Page 1

AUGUST 8-14, 2019

NATURE IN BALANCE AT

D.L. BLISS STATE PARK

ROLLING GOOD TIME ON NEW

BEAVER TAIL TRAIL TRANSPARENT KAYAKS REVEAL TAHOE’S DEPTHS // FESTIVAL FAUX FUR // COLLECTIVE SOUL SHINES ON // THE TASTE OF ALOHA SPIRIT IN TAHOE // ANDERS OSBORNE //


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TheTahoeWeekly.com

FEATURES

Beaver Tail Trail

7

Clearly Tahoe

14

Sierra Stories

15

14

TM

35

Andy Skadff

AUGUST 8-14, 2019

Volume 38 | Issue 22

Brian Walker | Courtesy Clearly Tahoe

IN THIS ISSUE

6

Events

8

Golf Column

Editorial Inquiries editor@tahoethisweek.com Darren Manzari

5

Lake Tahoe Facts

11

FAMILY FUN

Balancing Rock

12

For the Kids

12

22

13

Hocus-Focus & Sudoku

15

ARTS & CULTURE

Velu Fur The Arts

16 17

MUSIC SCENE

Collective Soul

18

Entertainment Calendar & Live Music

18

Anders Osborne

22

LOCAL FLAVOR

Taste of Aloha Spirit

23

Tasty Tidbits

24

Wine Column

25

Chef’s Recipe

26

ON THE COVER The “Thunderbird” yacht plies the waters of Lake Tahoe. One of the most iconic wooden boats in the world is housed at Thunderbird Tahoe, the former home of the eccentric George Whittell Jr., which is now open to the public. Enjoy the celebration of wooden boats at the 47th annual Lake Tahoe Concours d’Elegance on Aug. 9 and 10 in Homewood. Find details on the event in this edition and at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Read more about “Thunderbird” and Whittell at TheTahoeWeekly.com; search for Thunderbird. Photography by Court Leve | CourtLeve.com, @CourtLeve

LIFEBLOOD OF THE TAHOE SIERRA FROM THE PUBLISHER

There’s no argument that at the center of life in the Tahoe Sierra is Lake Tahoe itself. Our economy, our lifestyle, our community, our environment and the water supply for Northern Nevada all rely on Big Blue. Whether your drinking water comes from the snowmelt that feeds into the lake and eventually flows to Reno and beyond, or you enjoy spending time in the lake and on its shores, we are all vested in the health of Lake Tahoe. And, the Lake runs throughout this edition weaving together the multifaceted need to protect her and to enjoy her crystalline waters. You’ll find a brief mention in this edition on the release of the annual State of the Lake report from the UC Davis Environmental Research Center, but I suggest you visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to read the full report on how eliminating the invasive Mysis shrimp may be a key to improving Tahoe’s clarity, and then visit tahoe.ucdavis.edu to learn even more. UC Davis does amazing work to protect Lake Tahoe and our environment. If Lake Tahoe didn’t have her brilliant blue waters, so many of us wouldn’t be drawn here. In this issue, we highlight some great ways to enjoy her from Kayla Anderson’s stargazing tour on Clearly Tahoe’s transparent kayaks to two of the best events in August – the annual Lake Tahoe Concours d’Elegance and the Ta-Hoe Nalu. And, Mark McLaughlin continues his fascinating look at “Tahoe’s Water Wars” in Part II of his series. If you missed Part I, visit TheTahoeWeekly.com and click on History under the Explore Tahoe menu. He’ll conclude with Part III in the Aug. 15 edition. Also in this edition, Tim Hauserman tries out the new Beaver Tail Trail in Kings Beach and Michelle Allen takes a family fun hike to D.L. Bliss’s Balancing Rock. 

Ultimate Tahoe Summer Bucket List Take the challenge and check off items on our Ultimate Tahoe Summer Bucket List. Share your photos #TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Out & About for the list.

In this edition:

Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at

4

Cover Photography production@tahoethisweek.com

MAKING IT HAPPEN

Account Executive Erik Schultz erik@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110

13

Crossword & CryptoQuip

Entertainment Inquiries entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102

FUN & GAMES

Horoscope

SUBMISSIONS Events & Entertainment Submit at TheTahoeWeekly.com Click on Events Calendar

OUT & ABOUT

Sightseeing

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 TheTahoeWeekly.com

#32

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & Instagram

Account Executive Felicity Monsees felicity@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 111 Art Director Alyssa Ganong production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106 Graphic Designer Justeen Ferguson graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment Editor Sean McAlindin entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Food Editor Priya Hutner priya@tahoethisweek.com Family Editor Michelle Allen michelle@tahoethisweek.com Copy Editor Katrina Veit Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle, Cam Schilling, Alex Silgalis TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/ TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

@TheTahoeWeekly


August 8-14, 2019

SIGHTSEEING

Enjoying a beautiful summer day playing on Big Blue’s West Shore off Rubicon Point. | Katherine E. Hill

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. South Tahoe

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov | Closed Feb. 1-June 15 Loocated in Emerald Bay. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15.) TART/South Tahoe

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views. Ticket required. South Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

Parking fee | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours In Sugar Pine Point State Park (summer tours), see boathouses, historic boats and more. TART

High Camp

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides, views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Museum and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

North Shore

northtahoebusiness.org Dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach in the heart of town. TART

North Lake Tahoe Demonstration Garden

Incline Village

Tahoe City

(530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

TheTahoeWeekly.com Find more places to explore. Click on the Explore Tahoe menu.

Tallac Historic Site

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists, workshops. South Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World.” South Tahoe

Taylor Creek Visitor Center

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. South Tahoe

Thunderbird Lodge

East Shore

May-October | thunderbirdtahoe.org The former Whittell estate. Home to “Thunderbird” boat. Ages 6+ only. Tours by reservation.

Truckee

CAPACITY: C 226,500

Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring photos, Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses used from 1875 until May 1964 (summer tours). TART

Truckee

CAPACITY: 29,840 PROSSER 28,636 (530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov Featuring9,418 exhibits, artifacts on the Donner CAPACITY: 9,500 C 50 DONNER Party (1846-47) and the Pioneer Monument. TART INDEPENDENCE 17,284 CCAPACITY: 18,300 A 20,400 MARTIS 865 CAPACITY: donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Visit the museum and take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40.ATTART | FLOW FARAD 618 Truckee River

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Celebrate the 1960 VIII Winter Olympic Games at Squaw Valley. At High Camp featuring historic memorabilia and photographs. TART

Measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS)

Tahoe Maritime Museum

TROA.NET

Tahoe City

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Features self-guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on maritime history. TART

Tahoe Science Center Truckee

6,228.55

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

Old Jail Museum

Donner Summit Historical Society Soda Springs

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

Incline Village

(530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org Interactive exhibits, science & art classes. Up to age 7. BabyZone & the Jungle Gym. TART

(775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of Calif., Davis, science education center features a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Lake Tahoe Museum

Truckee Railroad Museum

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry and settlers. South Tahoe

Truckee

truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Learn about the historic railroad. Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. TART

Truckee

truckeehistory.org | truckee.com Settled in 1863, a stagecoach stop for the Central Pacific RR. Walking tours at the Depot. TART

Vikingsholm Castle

Summer | Free (775) 586-1610, ext. 25 | demogarden.org Learn about native/adaptive plants, water conservation, soil stabilization, defensible space. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Summer | (530) 583-3279 | terc.ucdavis.edu History of the field station, UC Davis research projects, interactive exhibits, demo garden. TART

STAMPEDE 224,503

IN 2018:

225

South Lake Tahoe

North Shore

MUSEUMS

C PACITY CITY:: 40 0,870 ,8 BOCA 17,429 CAPA

6,228.95 |

200,000 AF

Explore Tahoe

Tahoe City Field Station

ELEVATION :

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

175

A volcanic plug on the West Shore. TART

Readings taken on Friday, August 2, 2019

125

West Shore

visittahoecity.com Shopping, dining, historical sites: Tahoe City Dam, Fanny Bridge, and Watson Cabin (1909) for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking. TART

LAKE LEVEL Lake Tahoe Natural rim 6,223’

100,000 AF

Eagle Rock

North Shore

75

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano.

Tahoe City

50

East Shore

25

Cave Rock

150,000 AF

ATTRACTIONS

Emerald Bay

Parking fee | (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle (summer), see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island). TART/South Tahoe

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org The oldest building in Tahoe City (1909), on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

TRANSIT North Tahoe & Truckee (TART) | laketahoetransit.com South Tahoe | tahoetransportation.org

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

LAKE TAHOE FACTS |

Read about how the lake was formed, Lake Tahoe’s discovery, lake clarity and more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Explore Tahoe.

GRAY ’S CROSSING

COYOTE MOON

TAHOE DONNER

Reno & Sparks

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Donner Lake Donner Summit

OLD GREENWOOD

Truckee

BOCA RESERVOIR

DONNER LAKE

STAMPEDE RESERVOIR

GRAEAGLE MEADOWS

ho Ta

N

GRIZZLY RANCH WHITEHAWK RANCH NAKOMA

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

TAHOE CITY

RESORT AT SQUAW CREEK

Tahoe City

Alpine Meadows

LAKE FOREST

Dollar Hill

TAHOE CITY MARINA

Sunnyside SUNNYSIDE

l

Ta h o e R i m

GOLF COURSES

ai Tr

HOMEWOOD

NV

TAHOE VISTA REC AREA

SAND HARBOR

Lake

Spooner Lake

Glenbrook o Ta h

e Ri m Tr a i l

Tahoma Meeks Bay

Cave Rock

Watershed Area: 312 square miles

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Emerald Bay

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F

TAHOE KEYS

Stateline LAKESIDE

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Shoreline: 72 miles

BIJOU

CAMP RICHARDSON

Ta h oe

Natural rim: 6,223’

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

Fannette Island

Cascade Lake

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

Number of Visitors: 3 million annually

Zephyr Cove South Lake Tahoe SKI RUN

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

EDGEWOOD TAHOE

CAVE ROCK

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

CA

MEEKS BAY

Only Outlet: Truckee River (Tahoe City)

Permanent Population: 66,000

Carson City

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

OBEXER’S

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

Lake Clarity: 2018: 70.9 feet avg. depth. 1968: First recorded at 102.4 feet Average depth: 1,000 feet

Marlette Lake

Homewood

CASINOS

Fed By: 63 streams and 2 hot springs

NORTH TAHOE

Tahoe

Eagle Rock

DEEPEST POINT

COON ST. BOAT LAUNCH

SIERRA BOAT CO.

INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

BOAT RAMPS

INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN

OLD BROCKWAY

FEATHER RIVER PARK

MARINAS

eR

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

WEST EAST SOUTH

Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California.

i m Tr a

il

SCHAFFER’S MILL

PLUMAS PINES

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

PROSSER RESERVOIR

PONDEROSA

FREEL PEAK

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

TAHOE PARADISE

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

LAKE TAHOE

TheTahoeWeekly.com Learn about the natural history of the Tahoe Sierra. Click on Nature & Environment under the Out & About menu.

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Out

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

ROLLING GOOD TIME ON NEW

Beaver Tail Trail

August 8-14, 2019

&ABOUT

to make it happen. Funding came from Truckee Tahoe Airport and Tahoe Fund. The plan is that this trail will be the start of a network of trail improvements planned for the area. In addition to helping finance the trail, Tahoe Fund purchased 20 bikes to be used by the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe. A group of kids were on those bikes at the trail’s unveiling. While we may look at it as an enjoyable ride, the Forest Service has found that flow-trail designs reduce the amount of erosion — in this case into Griff Creek, which flows into Lake Tahoe. The design allows the water to shed off the trail without creating rivers of dirt following the

STORY & PHOTOS BY TIM HAUSERMAN

A

mong fanfare and a ribbon cutting, the newly christened Beaver Tail Trail opened in Kings Beach on July 12. The new single-track flow trail emphasizes rolling, banked turns and switchbacks to make for a fun mountain bike ride, without much climbing. I took a quick run over the trail and with the exception of one steep drop that I decided to walk, a few places where I lost the trail and two out-of-control dogs nipping at my tires, it was an awesome ride. The trail begins off of Beaver Street in Kings Beach. It’s easily accessible to folks in Kings Beach at the top of the town’s downtown grid. I started riding from Steelhead Avenue and found a pretty good climb through the neighborhood before reaching the end of pavement on Beaver Street. The climb then continues uphill on dirt road for another half mile before the Beaver Tail heads off on the left — and most of your climbing is complete. Immediately Beaver Tail lives up to its billing as a flow trail. It’s an exhilarating single track with lots of sweeping, rolling turns and extra bumps thrown in for fun. While I don’t really like technical trails, for the most part this trail is very doable for anyone with decent bike handling skills. There was one short drop off a rock that surprised me, but I held on. Then I met a junction near a creek crossing. Both potential routes looked like nice single track, so I really had no idea which way to go until I pulled up a map of the route on my phone. This led me to cross the creek, which was rushing water about 6 inches deep. You could probably ride it, but I scampered across on a log instead. Once across, another unsigned junction appeared. I picked wrong first heading uphill, but then recovered and took a left turn and headed back down alongside the creek. This section close to the babbling creek

OUT & ABOUT

The new single-track flow trail emphasizes rolling, banked turns and switchbacks to make for a fun mountain bike ride.

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Check out the map for the new trail. Click on Summer: Mountain Biking under the Out & About menu.

was scenic and a blast with quick ups, downs and turns until — “Whoa, Nellie” — there was a big drop. Some great trail building created a smooth 10-foot drop that would certainly be rideable for a more skilled rider. Perhaps, once I’m more familiar with the trail, I will ride it. This time I decided to walk it. Hey, I need my brain to write, so I better keep it in my helmet. After that it was some more rolling and a few bumps added by the trail builders before the trail ends with an option of heading uphill on an older trail or heading downhill slightly before a dirt access road that goes to the end of Commonwealth Drive. The new trail is only about 1 mile,

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: The new Beaver Trail has opened above Kings Beach. | Tim Hauserman; The grand opening | Courtesy Tahoe Fund

but it’s an enjoyable ride that just about every rider should be able to ride successfully. It also connects to a host of other trails in the area. I would strongly recommend starting from Beaver Street as opposed to Commonwealth Drive; it is mostly downhill from Beaver Street and the trail is designed to flow downhill. The trail was constructed by the U.S. Forest Service, North Tahoe Public Utility District and Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association (TAMBA), which held more than a half dozen trail-building days

$5

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fall line into the creek. Flow trails are the design of choice these days. In the last few years, TAMBA built Ocelot and the Lakeview Ridge, flow trails which are now a popular part of the network of trails that fan out from Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area in Tahoe City. Also, The Corral Trail in South Lake Tahoe started the flow trail trend and is now perhaps the area’s most popular trail. The name Beaver Tail was chosen by popular vote. Three potential names were selected as the most popular and Beaver Tail was the resounding favorite in an online poll, garnering 560 votes in just a few days. If you are living or staying in Kings Beach and have a free hour to explore on your mountain bike, this trail is a great way to spend that hour. With more time you can explore other trails in the area or head on up to the top of Beaver Street for a second lap. | tahoefund.org 

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OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

EVENTS CALENDAR AUGUST 8-15, 2019

Tahoe City Waterfront Walking Tour Gatekeeper’s Museum | Tahoe City | Aug. 8

Courtesy TahoeTV.com

Courtesy Valhalla Tahoe

10-11:30 a.m. Free | (530) 426-2334, mountaintowntours.wordpress.com

Wooden Boats

in All Their Glory

This year’s 46th annual Concours d’Elegance will again be staged at the historic Obexer’s Boat Company in Homewood on Aug. 9 and 10. The two-day wooden boat show is open to the public. Concours judges will reward those who have restored their boats to the highest level of authenticity as they appeared when they were shipped from the factory. Included in the event are social events such as an opening night dinner and awards barbecue and more. At the show, the Concours Village will afford guests with show tickets, a commemorative Concours wine glass, samplings from a wide array of wines and access during the event. Space is limited. | laketahoeconcours.com

AUG. 8 6 p.m. | Opening Night Dinner | West Shore Café

AUG. 9 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | Concours d’Elegance Obexer’s Boat Company 6 p.m. | Awards Ceremony Barbecue Obexer’s

“Movie to

Keep Squaw True” streaming

AUG. 10 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | Concours d’Elegance Obexer’s 4 p.m. | Roar Off | Obexer’s

AUG. 11 Ladies Luncheon & Men’s Grill | Private Lakefront Homes

AUG. 12 9 a.m. | Woody Over-the-Bottom Race Obexer’s to Tahoe City Marina

Sierra Watch has released the film “The Movie to Keep Squaw True” on its Web site for free streaming. The movie tells the “story of how Tahoe locals are stopping developers from turning their favorite mountain into a Vegas-style amusement park,” according to a press release from Sierra Watch. The movie is available for free at sierrawatch.org/keep-squaw-true-movie.

A Roaring Good Time The 1920s come alive during the 35th annual Gatsby Festival at the Tallac Historic Site in South Lake Tahoe on Aug. 10 and 11. The free event will include guided tours of the historic Pope and Baldwin estates, a speakeasy, vintage automobiles, historical talks, a vintage market, silent auction, family games and activities and food and drink. Guests are encouraged to wear 1920s clothing. On Aug. 11, from 2 to 4 p.m., guests can participate in the Gatsby Afternoon Tea and Fashion Show fundraiser. This is a separate event; tickets are $65. Proceeds benefit Tahoe Heritage Foundation. | tahoeheritage.org

State of the Lake released

Lake Tahoe, with its iconic blue waters straddling the borders of Nevada and California, continues to face a litany of threats related to climate change. But a promising new project to remove tiny, invasive shrimp could be a big step toward climate-proofing its famed lake clarity. That’s according to the annual Tahoe: State of the Lake report, released by the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center on Aug. 1. The report presents data from 2018 regarding lake clarity, temperature, snowpack, invasive species, algae, nutrient loads and more, all in the context of the long-term record. Read the full report at TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on Out & About: Nature & Environment. | tahoe.ucdavis.edu

RENTALS | TOURS | LESSONS | SALES | DELIVERY

Rentals & Tours

Must mention ad at booking & present upon arrival.

SAND HARBOR STATE PARK

Rentals next to the boat ramp

Reservations 530.581.4336 8

|

TahoeCityKayak.com & SandHarborRentals.com

Eyes on the Lake training Tahoe Keys POA | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 8

Learn how to identify and report aquatic invasive plants found in Tahoe’s lakes and streams and help Keep Tahoe Blue. 12-2 p.m. Free | takecaretahoe.org

Help with computers Kings Beach Library | Aug. 8, 15

Ongoing computer help. Call or stop by for the class schedule. 3-4 p.m. Free | (530) 5462021, placer.ca.gov

Truckee Thursdays Downtown Truckee | Aug. 8, Aug. 15

Historic Downtown Truckee is turned into an exciting street fair featuring local and regional artisans, food trucks, a beer garden and live music. 5-8:30 p.m. Free | truckeethursdays.com

Hot Tahoe Cruizen Week Heavenly Village South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 8-11

A free week of watching cool cars, playing poker and awards to best cars. 5-8 p.m. Free | theshopsatheavenly.com

Tahoe Star Tours Northstar Cosmoarium | Truckee | Aug. 8, 10, 15 Led by amateur astronomer and poet Tony Berendsen, each tour includes a sciencebased talk about the cosmos and telescopic view of the constellations. 8-10:30 p.m. $25$45 | tahoestartours.com

Outdoor Summer Movie Series Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | Aug. 8, 15

A different movie shows every Thursday until Aug. 29. 8:30 p.m. Free | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

Tools for life’s challenges Tahoe Forest Center for Health | Truckee | Aug. 8 Explore transformative topics designed to inspire, educate and empower. Every 2nd and 4th Thursday. Free | (530) 587-3769, tfhd.com

Tahoe City Historic Walking Tour Meet outside Blue Agave Restaurant Tahoe City | Aug. 9

Rainbow Walk

Stateline | Aug. 8, 10, 13, 15

Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9, 11

Meet at the Echo Summit trailhead. Help build the newest section of the Pacific Crest and Tahoe Rim Trails. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | tahoerimtrail.org

Kings Beach | Aug. 8, 10, 15

Shop at 521 North Lake Blvd. Rentals on the water at Commons Beach

Meet at High Camp lobby. No reservations necessary. All hikes are weather and conditions permitting 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

Echo Summit Workday

Watson Lake Workday

TAHOE CITY

Squaw Valley | Olympic Valley | Aug. 8-15

10-11:30 a.m. Free | (530) 426-2334, mountaintowntours.wordpress.com

NEW HOBIE PEDAL KAYAKS IN STOCK

$5 OFF

North Face Guided Hikes

Meet at the entrance to the Fiberboard Freeway/FS 73. We’ll be addressing erosion issues. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | tahoerimtrail.org

Conversation Cafe Incline Rec Center | Aug. 8, 15

Meet others and share interesting views, have discussion on engaging topics. 10-11 a.m. $5 | yourtahoeplace.com

Join an on-site naturalist for a walk down the Rainbow Trail. You will learn all about the fascinating connections between Lake Tahoe and the meadow, marsh and stream located at the Taylor Creek Visitor Center. 10:30 a.m.12 p.m. | takecaretahoe.org

Hike with a Ranger Heavenly Mountain South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9-11

Approximately one hour and are moderate in terms of difficulty, closed-toed shoes and water are required for attendance, and a ticket to ride the gondola. 11 a.m. | (530) 543-2618


August 8-14, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

Extraordinary Entertainment In An Exceptional Setting Washoe Ways

Historical Walk: Jibboom Street

Tallac Historic Site South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9, 13

Old Jail Museum | Truckee | Aug. 10

Learn what summer life was like for Washoe families. 1-2 p.m. Free | tahoeheritage.org

This will show where the housing was and a history of the dance halls and other industries that thrived. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | chamber.truckee.com

Walking Tour Tallac Historic Site | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9, 13 This docent-guided walk allows visitors into the lives of the elite San Francisco families that made these homes their summer retreat. This 90-minute walk consists of some uneven terrain and paved trails. 2-3:30 p.m. | tahoeheritage.org

Virtual Reality Studio Incline Village Library | Aug. 9

Experience the canals of Venice, ride a roller coaster or walk with dinosaurs on the second and fourth Fridays. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free | (775) 832-4130, libraryaware.com

Family Movie Night

Smokey’s Trail Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 10

Shake his paw and learn more about wildfire prevention. 10:30 a.m. Free | tahoesouth.com

Sidewalk Saturdays Downtown Tahoe City | Aug. 10

Enjoy shopping, fun, music and more with specials at local businesses from noon to 5 p.m. 12-5 p.m. Free | (530) 583-3348, visittahoecity.org

Natural Discourse at Sagehen Sagehen Creek Field Station | Truckee | Aug. 10

Join the fun at Northwoods Clubhouse every Friday night with a free showing of a new or classic family movie. Free | (530) 587-9400, tahoedonner.com

The evening includes: an introductory talk about experimental forestry and fire research at Sagehen by Jeff Brown, catered dinner performance by Sasha Petrenko and art installations at the field station. 5-9 p.m. $50-$75 | facebook.com

Taylor Creek Evening Programs

Margie Powell Illustrated Hikes

Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9

Donner Summit Canyon | Truckee | Aug. 10, 11

Tahoe Donner | Truckee | Aug. 9

Sit under the stars and discover Taylor Creek’s Friday night programs at the Lake of the Sky Amphitheater. 8-9 p.m. Free | takecaretahoe.org

There will be history talks and sites with ads painted on the rocks 100 years ago and petroglyphs from 2,000 to 4,000 years ago. Hikes are the same on both days. | donnersummithistoricalsociety.org

Wildflowers, Birds, and Falls

Marlette Lake 50K and 10 Miler

Mount Rose Trailhead | Reno | Aug. 10

Spooner Lake State Park | Incline Village | Aug. 11

Wonderland of Wildflower Hikes

Glacier Way to Drifter Hut hike

Sorenson’s Resort | Meyers | Aug. 10

Glacier Way Trailhead | Truckee | Aug. 11

Hike from the Mount Rose Trailhead to Galena Falls in search of summer birds and spectacular scenery. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free | tinsweb.org

Join botanist/biologist Steven Cochrane in exploring the stunning wildflowers of Alpine County. Cost includes lunch. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $65-$95 | sorensensresort.com

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A Tony-Winning Rock ‘n’ Roll Tribute

Book by Colin Escott and Floyd Mutrux / Inspired by Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins

A romp through scenic and challenging trails. 6 a.m. $75-$105 | (530) 546-1019, tahoetrailrunning.com

Hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians will enjoy stunning views of Donner Lake, Mount Rose and the Pacific Crest. An easy 4-mile out and back hike with minimal elevation change. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | eventbrite.com

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Mountain Bike Race

Explore more events in the Tahoe Sierra or submit your event. Click on Event Calendar. FREE!

Ages 13 to 50 and older: Put your skills to the test this summer on the trails of the Northstar California Bike Park. Compete in a single race or enroll in the entire series. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | (800) 466-6784, facebook.com

An Uproarious Battle of the Sexes

By William Shakespeare

Through August 25

Sand Harbor at Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park Showcase Series (Aug. 12) - Mirage: Visions of Fleetwood Mac

LakeTahoeShakespeare.com | 800.74.SHOWS Generous Support Provided By:

Steve Schmier’s

Northstar California Resort | Truckee | Aug. 11

AARP Smart Driver Class Kahle Community Center | Stateline | Aug. 10

A refresher for drivers age 55 and older with an emphasis upon how age-related changes affect driving and will help seniors continue to be safe drivers. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Coffee with Supervisor Gustafson Tahoe House | Tahoe City | Aug. 12

Join her at Tahoe House for an informal opportunity to talk with her about important issues in your community. All are welcome. 9-10:30 a.m. | (530) 308-0783, placer.ca.gov

Johnson Canyon Docent Hike Donner Lake Interchange Trailhead Truckee | Aug. 10

A moderate 2.5-mile out-and-back hike with minimal elevation change at 6,400 feet. 9 a.m. Free | eventbrite.com

Mountain Minds Monday Pizza on the Hill | Truckee | Aug. 12

Tahoe Silicon Mountain is a monthly networking group for people that live, work or vacation in the Truckee/Tahoe/Reno area. 6-8 p.m. $5 | chamber.truckee.com

Aquatic Monitoring Field Collection Various | Truckee | Aug. 10

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts monitoring days. Come prepared to get in the water. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free | truckeeriverwc.org

Guided Hike Galena Creek Visitor Center | Reno | Aug. 10

Please bring appropriate clothing and plenty of water. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | (775) 849-4948

Good Morning Truckee Truckee-Tahoe Airport | Truckee | Aug. 13

Held the second Tuesday of every month at Truckee Tahoe Airport from 7:00-8:30am. Ticket price for general public is $12; Truckee Chamber members $10 and includes a hot breakfast and raffle ticket. 7-8:30 a.m. $12 | truckee.com

Custom Fine Jewelers “Here” Since 1977 In the marina at the Boatworks Mall SteveSchmiersJewelry.com • 530.583.5709

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

9


TheTahoeWeekly.com

FREE BOWLING

each person who bowls 2 games at regular price gets a 3rd game free with this coupon

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete

EVENTS Courtesy Ta-Hoe Nalu

OUT & ABOUT

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MARKETPLACE

Paddle the Days Away Ta-Hoe Nalu Lake Tahoe Paddle Festival is on Aug. 10 and 11 at Kings Beach State Recreation Area. Celebrate stand-up paddleboarding with two days of paddle clinics, yoga, races and fun on the beach. Activities for both kids and adults are offered throughout the weekend, such as two-hour guided paddle tours; no experience is necessary. There will be live music daily and raffles at the Kona Beer Garden from 2 to 5 p.m. and a local Retail Village open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. | tahoenalu.com

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be included in Marketplace. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

CUT-RITE TREE & SPRAY The tree pest expert in the area CARPENTER ANT & BARK BEETLE CONTROL SPECIALIST Complete Pest Control Service — Inside & Out

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Meet in the recreation lobby and bring lunch, water and sunscreen, wear appropriate clothing and shoes. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $10-$13 | yourtahoeplace.com

Trek Up Tallac

Full Moon Kayak Tour

Mt. Tallac Trailhead | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 14

Sugar Pine Point State Park | Tahoma | Aug. 14

Stanford Rock Trail Day

Foriver Bird Walk: Boca Reservoir

Stanford Rock Trail | Tahoe City | Aug. 14

Truckee | Aug. 15

Heritage Days

Audubon Nature Walk

Tallac Historic Site | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 14

Incline Village Golf Courses | Aug. 15

Led by Tahoe Institute for Natural Science naturalists, up the steep nine-mile roundtrip trail in search of views and all things natural. RSVP. 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free | tinsweb.org

Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association is working on trail maintenance on this trail. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free | facebook.com

Martis Wildlife Area Docent Day Truckee River Watershed Council | Aug. 14

Interested in the Martis Wildlife Area Restoration Project? We can answer any questions. 2-4 p.m. Free | truckeeriverwc.org

Free yoga & live music Wanderlust Yoga Studio | Olympic Valley | Aug. 14

Complimentary classes are taught by a different local teacher each week. All levels are welcome, yoga mats are available. 5-6:30 p.m. Free | (800) 403-0206, squawalpine.com

Lakeside Movie Series Commons Beach | Tahoe City | Aug. 14

Bring low-back chairs. Movies play at dusk. 6-11 p.m. Free | facebook.com

Juan Estrada 530-546-8493 530-412-2220 10

Licensed & Insured

Tahoe Vista Recreation Area | Aug. 14, 15

This easy-to-moderate two-hour tour is 1 to 3 miles. Includes all kayaking equipment, guides, instruction, natural history and astronomy discussions, hot drinks and snacks. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $65 | (530) 913-9212, tahoeadventurecompany.com

Incline Rec Center | Aug. 13

Explore what life would have been like visiting Lake Tahoe in the 1920s at our summer estates. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. | tahoesouth.com

Tree Trimming & Removal • Brush Chipping Yard Clean-Up • Defensible Space Wood Splitting & Stacking Stump Grinder • Crane Work

Full Moon Kayak

State park Interpreters will provide insight about the regions cultural and natural history under the light of a full moon. 7-9 p.m. $40 | takecaretahoe.org

No experience required. Bring binoculars. No dog. RSVP to dmonroe@truckeeriverwc. org. 7-9 a.m. | truckeeriverwc.org

Join TINS naturalist Sarah Hockensmith for a leisurely stroll to observe the numerous species of birds and plants that are found in Tahoe on a half-mile walk. Register bit.ly/ivgolfwalks. 8-9 a.m. Free | facebook.com

Business Plan Development Workshop Placer Cty Admin Center | Tahoe City | Aug. 15 We break it down and show you how to write a business plan whether it’s to get organized, support a loan application or serve as a roadmap to advance your business. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | (530) 546-1945, placer.ca.gov

Summer Moonlight Hikes Incline Rec Center | Incline Village | Aug. 15

A mile-long paved hike to Crystal Bay Lookout are sponsored in collaboration with the National Forest Service.Bring a flashlight. Trip includes transportation, wine, cheese and snacks. Meet at Recreation Center. 5 p.m. $16-$20 | yourtahoeplace.com

Tahoe Pitch Camp Sierra Business Council | Truckee | Aug. 14

A series of workshops with business experts who teach participants the art of the pitch. Select businesses will present at Tahoe Pitch Showcase on Sept. 9. 6-8 p.m. Free | chamber.truckee.com

Summer Movie Nights Sorenson’s Resort | Meyers | Aug. 15

Family-friendly. Take advantage of our $5 smores’ bar and get cozy for a family night at the movies. Bring a blanket, it can get chilly. 7:30-10 p.m. Free | sorensensresort.com


August 8-14, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

B I J O U M U N I C I PA L Go lf C o urse

STORY & PHOTOS B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

GOLF COURSE

Course Details

NCGA MEMBER RATES AVAILABLE

9 holes | par 32

Yardage 1,721 to 1,989

Slope Not rated

Not rated

Check off

Summer Bucket List #32 on our Ultimate Tahoeat TheTahoeWeekly.com Hole 1.

T

ucked a few hundred feet behind A Cup of Cherries in South Lake Tahoe is Bijou Municipal Golf Course, a quiet course that beckons novice golfers, families and wildlife including dragonflies, sandpipers, mallards, butterflies and bumblebees. This basic and friendly ninehole course is the least intimidating course I’ve ever played in Tahoe — taking into consideration its flat terrain, average 200yard holes and lack of challenging ponds, sand traps or other golf-ball eaters.

and just want to brush up your game on your lunch break, playing at Bijou will make you feel like a rock star. Even if you know how to golf and just want to brush up your game on your lunch break, playing at Bijou (which means “little jewel”) will make you feel like a rock star. It is quite possible to play birdie golf (or, in my case, bogey golf ) and walk the course in an hour. Celebrating its 99th anniversary this summer, Bijou was first owned by Virgil Gilcrease and then changed hands once or twice before being sold to the City of South Lake Tahoe in 1983 with the condition that it remain available as a golf course. Almost a century after it opened, the course maintains its original configuration and is open to everyone at a great price.

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TheTahoeWeekly.com Read the Tahoe Sierra Golf Guide & local golf profiles. Click on Golf under the Out & About menu.

Experience Lake Tahoe Learn to

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Jet Ski Rentals (2019 sea-doo gti 130) & Boat Charters

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Even if you know how to golf

Facing south, I teed off of the whites on Hole 1, par 4. It’s a straightforward fairway, but the rough on the left-hand side is a long patch of tall grass. In searching for my Nike ball, I found a lost one buried under 1 inch of clover. Hole 4 is a short 143 yards, but don’t worm burn it because a fast, low drive may have the potential to smack one of the two small boulders in the middle of the fairway and derail your shot. Hole 5 signals the turn, wrapping around and heading back toward the clubhouse. On Hole 6, I caught up with an older couple from Santa Cruz; they vacation regularly in South Lake Tahoe in the summers and like to play Bijou. That hole did have a golf-ball eater consisting of a big brush ravine that we all lost balls in; so, we meandered over to the red tees on the other side of the ravine to tee off again and try to save face. There’s also tall grass on the right of Hole 9 that has a tendency to steal golf balls, but if you aim yourself up correctly, it’s quite possible to get a hole-in-one. Everyone who works and plays at Bijou is friendly and casual, making it a great place to go and relax, putt around, observe some nature and break up a day. | (530) 542-6097, cityofslt.us 

CoyoteMoonGolf.com 10685 NORTHWOODS BLVD. | TRUCKEE, CA 96161 | (530) 587-0886

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FAMILY FUN

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Family FUN

Nature in Balance AT D . L . B L I S S S TAT E PA R K

FOR THE KIDS AUGUST 8-15, 2019

“Tahoe Nature Scout” released

S T O R Y B Y M I C H E L L E T. A L L E N | P H O T O S B Y K AT H E R I N E E . H I L L

Dollar Point resident Nancy Meness Hardesty has released “Tahoe Nature Scout Vol. 1” The book is a primer for kids to learn about the plants, animals and ecology of Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Basin.

A

long the West Shore of Lake Tahoe, the tall pine trees and rugged mountain terrain lie in stark contrast to the emerald and cobalt water of Lake Tahoe. These elements are in balance despite their juxtaposition. At the heart of this amazing scene is D.L. Bliss State Park. People come from around the world to climb, hike, camp, float, soak and decompress. D.L. Bliss State Park is named after Duane Leroy Bliss, a lumber and mining mogul from the late 1800s. His family owned large portions of land in the Lake Tahoe Basin and in 1929 they donated 744 acres in his honor to California State Parks. Since that time, the park has grown to 2,149 acres, preserving the land for public use and restoring a natural balance

This half-mile, easy hike features a fascinating geologic phenomenon: a 130-ton boulder precariously perched on a narrow rock base. to a once heavily forested area. The park has a historic campground, day-use beach access and some of the most notable hiking trails around Lake Tahoe. One of these great hikes is the Balancing Rock Nature Trail. This halfmile, easy hike features a fascinating geologic phenomenon: a 130-ton boulder precariously perched on a narrow rock base. People have been drawn to this feature since the late 1800s, decades before the park was established. They came then and they come now to take their picture with it. Being a kid who loves rocks, I knew my 6-year-old son Anikin would love to see this fragile rock landmark. We traveled 17 miles south of Tahoe City on State Route 89 to the park

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TheTahoeWeekly.com Explore the trail to the Rubicon Point Lighthouse or the Rubicon Trail to Emerald Bay. Click on Summer: Hiking under the Out & About menu. Find more family-friendly activities to enjoy. Click on Family Fun under the Out & About menu. entrance. We followed the long, winding road to the gate where we paid the ranger for the day-use pass. We continued to follow the road as it descended into the canyon. Along the road we noticed some other interesting rock formations, one even looked like a stack of 12

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The 130-ton Balancing Rock

precariously perched on a narrow rock base; A replica of a Washoe galis dungals at the start of the trail; Along the trail to Balancing Rock.

pancakes. These unique geologic wonders are evidence of volcanic activity and glacial floes that once covered this land. We passed the campground soon reaching the Balancing Rock Nature trailhead. The first thing we saw was a replica of a galis dungals, or traditional Washoe winter hut, made of large trees carefully bound together. We stepped inside and Anikin and I talked about how the Washoe would have lived in a galis dungals like this; we marveled at the craftmanship of the structure. From there we walked up a small hill and followed the easy, flat trail. Along the way, Anikin climbed around on large boulders, asking if any of the rocks were the rock we came to see. In less than a quarter of a mile, we reached the famed Balancing Rock. The rock seemed to defy gravity and appeared as if could fall over at any moment despite its massive weight. Erosion has worn down the rock and the rock it sits on; it’s only a matter of time before the rock tumbles into the valley below, but not anytime soon. We took our picture next

to the amazing structure but Anikin was not persuaded when we tried to get him to climb on the rock. I reassured him that it is safe, but he wasn’t convinced. He was content to continue climbing on more stable rocks as we completed the short loop back to the trailhead. Rubicon Point Lighthouse Trail is another noteworthy trail. This 1.5-mile roundtrip, family friendly hike has views of what was once the highest lighthouse in the United States. Built in 1916, the Rubicon Point Lighthouse was used for only a short time and was deactivated in 1921. Anikin has not yet been on this hike but has seen the lighthouse many times from our boat. This one is on the to-do list. If you have kids who are a little older than Anikin or are seasoned hikers with lots of energy, the Rubicon Trail is a great choice. It is known for its sweeping lakeviews and proximity to American Bald Eagle nesting grounds. This trail connects Emerald Bay State Park to D. L. Bliss State Park, about 6 miles roundtrip. There are moderate hills and is a little beyond Anikin’s current endurance level. D. L. Bliss State Park’s campground has tent, group and small RV spaces that are nestled in the shade of the trees and Rubicon Peak. Access to the beaches is farther down the road at Lester Beach and Calawee Cove Beach. The park is popular in the summer and the parking lot usually is full by mid-morning. Arrive early morning or late afternoon for the best parking and there is a parking fee. | parks.ca.gov  Michelle Allen is a nearly 20-year resident of Tahoe and mother to a rambunctious 6-year-old and understands the challenges of keeping kids entertained. She may be reached at michelle@tahoethisweek.com.

The book contains 36 activities kids can complete to earn a Tahoe Nature Scout badge and is designed for all ages. Artwork in the book is by T.J. Smith. A sticker badge is included in the book, and an embroidered badge can be ordered online. Volume 1 focuses on the North Shore. Volume 2 will be released in Summer 2020 and will focus on the South Shore. Books and badges may be ordered online. | nancyhardesty.com

Drop-in art workshops Tallac Historic Site | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 8, 15 10 a.m.-12 p.m. $10-$30 | tahoeheritage.org

Paws2Read Incline Village Library | Aug. 8

4-5 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

Toddler Story Time Incline Village Library | Aug. 8, Aug. 15 11:15-11:45 a.m. | (775) 832-4130

Engineering Challenge Kings Beach Library | Aug. 9

2-3 p.m. Free | eventbrite.com

Friday Fun Night Northstar California Resort | Truckee | Aug. 9

6 p.m. | (800) 466-6784, northstarcalifornia.com

Kitchen Kids Tallac Historic Site | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9, 14 1-2 p.m. | tahoeheritage.org

Mommy and Me Barton Health | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 9, 13 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | (530) 539-6620, bartonhealth.org

Teen Scene Kahle Community Center | Stateline | Aug. 9 6:30-9 p.m. $5 | (775) 586-7271

Kids Arts Saturdays Balancing Rock Nature Trail ½ mile roundtrip

Rubicon Point Lighthouse 1½ miles roundtrip

Rubicon Trail | 6 miles roundtrip

North Tahoe Arts | Tahoe City | Aug. 10

1-3 p.m. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Kids Nature Journal Club South Lake Tahoe Library | Aug. 10

11:30 a.m. Free | engagedpatrons.org


August 8-14, 2019

Horoscopes Puzzles

FUN & GAMES

* P U Z Z L E S C O N T I N U E D O N PA G E 1 5 .

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Tickets will be available onsite. For members ages 4 to 7, they are $5 and $10 for ages 8 and older. Tickets for nonmembers ages 4 and older are $15. Ages 3 and younger enter free. | tahoedonner.com

Pancakes + Ponies Tahoe Donner | Truckee | Aug. 10

9-11 a.m. $15-$35 | tahoedonner.com

Toy Boat Building Tahoe Maritime Museum Tahoe City | Aug. 10

2 p.m. Free | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Jr. Forest Ranger Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 12

10 a.m. $5 | tahoesouth.com

This Leo New Moon is extra special for you. It marks a go-ahead that you may feel has been lacking or delayed, but no longer. This is like a string of green lights stretching ahead even in the midst of heavy traffic. Of course, you do have a role to play. The outer synchronicities will be there so what you need to do is show up fully and engage your creative passions.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

The focus of this lunar cycle will be behind the scenes and perhaps also emphasizing inner work for you. Of course, it could prove wildly productive and create a massive breakthrough. This is especially true if your focus is upon clearing subconscious blocks. There are a lot of programs available to access these so seek and you will find.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

The sparks of new friendships are highlighted by this New Moon cycle. The seed-sparks implied could even prove to include new love and romance interests. Yet, much of the emphasis is upon friendships. In the background, professional interests may be on your mind. If so, your focus should be on whom you know more than what.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

Wow, this New Moon is occurring in your solar career sector. This represents an opportunity to get the attention you feel you want, have earned and deserve. So, approach authority figures and anyone positioned to grant favors or provide leverage in support of your goals and aspirations. This could be an opportune time to organize a grand tour.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

This is a fire moon cycle and you are a fire sign. The message here is one of great inspiration. Projects or relationships started now could prove extremely successful. It is likely that you will feel over the moon alright and unstoppable. You could use the energy to simply have fun. There are indications of deeper end themes. If so, focus less on understanding and more on getting over it.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

Are you in the mood for transformation? Good for you if you are because that is the golden egg in this cycle. Transformation means something has changed, permanently. It could be your perspectives, or attitude, or approach and strategy. There is a lot of power packed into this cycle, yet it will be best harnessed by a resolve to make meaningful changes.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19)

This New Moon takes place in your relationships zone. Therefore, opportunities for new relationships are present or perhaps the focus will be upon improving existing relationships. Mars plays an interesting role in this equation and refers to the need to incorporate new perspectives. If you have resistance, conflicts could arise, so let that be the sign. Otherwise, how much fun can you have?

Family Skate Night

The Village at Northstar Truckee | Aug. 13

Preschool Story Time

Have you been waiting for your moment to bring certain ideas or projects down to earth that you feel have been floating in the back of your mind, or the ethers? If so, get excited, because this cycle will lead you to do just that. It is important that you avoid thinking and dreaming now and take action to initiate your creative manifestation project.

Kings Beach Library | Aug. 13

3-7 p.m. | chamber.truckee.com

10:30-11 a.m. Free | (530) 546-2021, placer.ca.gov

Teen Tuesdays Incline Village Library | Aug. 13

4-5 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, libraryaware.com

Baby Bookworms Truckee Library | Aug. 14

10:30 a.m. Free | (530) 582-7846, madelynhelling.evanced.info

Make and Take Incline Village Library | Aug. 14

4-4:45 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

RUFF, Read Up for Fun Truckee Library | Aug. 14

4-5 p.m. | (530) 582-7846, truckeefol.org

Kids Crafts in the Garden Tahoe Mariime Museum Tahoe City | Aug. 15

1:30 p.m. $25 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

Summer fun may have been delayed but now it is here and in full force and will be over the coming weeks. The emphasis is divided between family and romance in particular. This could prove to be a breakthrough period. Even apparently ended relationships could experience a resurrection. This also applies to picking-up on where unfinished projects were left off.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

You are creative at your core. If you have forgotten this or never realized it, this New Moon stands to be a big reminder. Sometimes by simply jumping in, all the inspiration and creative know-how you did not know you had or forgot about will come back. The main point is to have fun. So, avoid feeling like you ‘have to’ get it done and so on. Enjoy the process above all.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

Seeds of beauty will be planted with this New Moon. You will feel inspired both by and to create beautiful works. These can be as simple as beautiful moments or experiences or beautiful meals or you may dive into something more constructive and lasting. What is important now is that you try something new. It is all about now and next in your universe.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

Your focus will be extra sharp thanks to the energies of this New Moon. You may have already noticed this over the past few weeks. But it is extra strong now and will continue as such for the coming month even. Some of your focus will be directed towards actions that feel like investments. Creating for the future does require your full presence of mind.

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Mom’s hair is longer, 2. Girl’s dress has ruffles, 3. Indoor plant is missing, 4. Door handle is higher, 5. Dress polka dots are black, 6. Fewer stars around boy’s head.

Tahoe Donner presents Waterpalooza on Aug. 10 at the Driving Range. From 12 to 4 p.m., the family can enjoy water games and activities to stay cool in the heart of summer. There will be slip and slides, water-fight zones, flume zoom and field games such as cornhole and water balloon tosses. Drinks and barbecue options will be available for purchase.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

If you never let actor Vaughn or singer Gill get the best of you, I suppose you’re in-Vince-able.

Wet, Wild and Wacky

CryptoQuip

A. Stetz | Tahoe Donner

13


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIGHT UP THE NIGHT The view south along the Pacific Crest from Andesite Peak.

T R A N S PA R E N T K AYA K S R E V E A L T H E D E P T H S O F T A H O E S T O RY B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N P H O T O S B Y B R I A N WA L K E R | C O U RT E S Y C L E A R LY TA H O E

It’s 10 p.m. on a clear, calm

Tahoe night and a motley crew of Tahoe locals is standing on a dock in the Tahoe Keys on the South Shore watching Clearly Tahoe’s kayak crew line up a fleet of transparent floating vessels. The only way to see them is via the LED lights that line the bottom of the craft and the orange buoys attached to their ends. These new, late-night stargazing tours are different from the daytime or dusk tours; in this tour one can see fish, rocks and the invasive milfoil light up at night. Above, paddlers can see the Big Dipper and the sky’s other star celebrities.

LEFT TO RIGHT: Enjoy the crystalline waters of Lake Tahoe on the transparent kayaks of Clearly Tahoe; Setting out from the Tahoe Keys; A stargazing tour with Clearly Tahoe.

The group explored coves in the Tahoe Keys and paddled Equipped with a clear boat that keeps a cup holder, sponge, a wireless Bluetooth speaker, extra LED lights (for the life jackets), a blanket and a cooler stocked with boxed water and Tahoe Trail Bars, our group sets out in the calm waters of Tahoe Keys. We paddle out into a glassy cove where various-sized fish swim and sleep below. For four years, Clearly Tahoe has been offering standard tour experiences of various durations, and most recently late-night stargazing tours. Its fleet of transparent, human-powered vessels are French-style canoe/kayak hybrids designed for fishing in shallow water — slow and steady. Clearly Tahoe co-owner Kelsey Weist grew up in Pennsylvania whitewater rafting, biking, hiking, rock climbing; she moved to South Lake Tahoe in 2013 to start the business with friend Geoff Miller. They had been travelling around together for the past seven years and Weist got the idea to launch a clear kayak tour company in Puerto Rico, where she had connections, until Miller introduced her to Tahoe. “We were into scuba diving and Geoff wanted to go to Tahoe. I got new diving equipment designed for Puerto Rico waters, but then when we dived Tahoe, I saw this pyrite — fool’s gold— sparkling off the bottom of the lake. It glistened in the sand; it was just one of the best experiences,” she says. Weist saw things in the lake that people can’t see from the shore and she wanted to share that experience with others. But there was one problem: the water was too cold. So, they purchased translucent kayaks so that non-divers could comfortably see what was going on beneath the lake’s surface.

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out into the lake, enjoying the serene “The experience is my way of sharing the scubadive experience with non-divers,” she says. Clearly Tahoe also works with League to Save Lake Tahoe to document what’s they see during tours, from keeping logs about underwater plants and fish species to removing things that don’t belong such as lost sun umbrellas or even sunken boats. “One day I was out on a tour and saw this big white thing under the water. Later we went back out to see what it was and it was a sunken $85,000 Mastercraft wakeboard boat,” she says. Clearly Tahoe immediately called the Coast Guard and told them the VIN numbers and they were surprised that they could make out the numbers so well from their clear kayaks. “Everything changes and every day is something different,” she says. Weist reiterates that safety is their No. 1 concern and all guides are lifeguard-certified and prepared to handle an emergency scenario — although they haven’t had one. Weist points to the bright orange floaties on either end of the boats, noting that not only do they help identify a craft, but they also can act as pillows to allow paddlers to kick back, relax and soak in their surroundings. In our 1.5-hour nighttime experience, the group explored coves in the Tahoe Keys and paddled out into the lake, enjoying the serene environment and small ripples in the shimmering water under the light of a half moon. On the way back, Miller said that the new LED nighttime tours appeal more to the person who is looking for something a little different on vacation.

environment and small ripples in the shimmering water under the light of a half moon. “This is a good alternative for those that aren’t into the bar scene and want a unique Tahoe experience after the sun goes down,” he says. “There are not a lot of nighttime activities at the lake. Kids ages 5 and up can go on our dusk/glow tour and people ages 12 and older can go on the stargazing tour; these are suitable for elderly guests, too. Our guides do a good job of keeping it mellow and safe,” Weist adds. As we ended our LED tour, a fellow paddler described being on the water at night as a Zenlike experience. I don’t know about the rest of the group, but I went home and fell right to sleep. | clearlytahoe.com n


August 8-14, 2019

FEATURE

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

L ake Ta hoe Water Wars | P a r t I I felt that it was a government subsidy to their agricultural competitors in the west. Funded by the sale of publicly-owned Western land, the law called for the construction of dams for the development of water storage linked with distribution networks to foster agriculture, ranching and hydroelectric power in arid regions. U.S. Rep. Newlands drafted the initial legislation, but it also ran into resistance from Western politicians concerned about giving up state control of water to the federal government. Ultimately, the most contentious issues were resolved and the law passed.

Local control of the Lake Tahoe Dam and the Truckee River was lost in the early 20th Century when ardent

L

itigation over water rights in western Nevada began as early as 1864 on the Carson River and just a bit later the Truckee River when the first retaining dam was built at Lake Tahoe’s outlet. It was just the beginning of bi-state water wars between the Silver State and California, a volatile conflict that continued for well more than a century. Water rights will always be a hot topic in Nevada, the driest state in the Union, where cities, miners, farmers and ranchers compete for this limited natural resource. The fact that two-thirds of Lake Tahoe, as well as the lake’s only outlet, lies within California adds significant political juice to the hydrological battle. Nevada secured water rights to Lake Tahoe and the Truckee River in litigation against California under the western water-law doctrine of prior appropriation. Two fundamental principles of prior appropriation are: first in time, first in right and beneficial use. First in time means that rights are awarded to the person, business or entity that first uses the water based on the date and puts it to beneficial use, such as for irrigating farmland, mining purposes or hydroelectric power generation.

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Read Part I. Enjoy more of Mark McLaughlin’s Sierra Stories. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe menu. In 1870, California engineer A.W. Von Schmidt planned to transport Tahoe water from the Truckee River in a series of tunnels, flumes, pipes and canals to San Francisco. In response to the proposal, Joe Goodman, editor of the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, advised the Golden State developers to bring an escort of 20 militia regiments. “They will need them all,” Goodman warned, “for we will not submit to the proposed robbery.” Nevada fought the diversion and successfully acquired rights to water in the Tahoe-Truckee system through the prior appropriation doctrine. They proved in federal court that the Silver State had

Digging Truckee Canal, circa 1905. | Courtesy Churchill County Museum & Archive

diverted Truckee River water downstream for agricultural production prior to 1870. Under this law, it doesn’t matter how far upstream the user is, it’s the date of diversion for beneficial use that determines rights. Despite the legal setback, as well as opposition from California interests, Von Schmidt continued to resurrect his water scheme for years to no avail. In 1889, a consortium of investors led by Nevada congressman Francis G. Newlands, purchased the decrepit Towle Brothers mill site — and its water rights — at the Donner Lake outlet. The company immediately replaced an old dam there with a new one that raised Donner Lake 20 feet for Nevada water storage. Homes on the east end of the lake had to be moved back 20 yards from the rising water. Today Donner Lake is managed as a reservoir for Nevada with a small dam that creates about 9,500 acre-feet of storage during the spring and summer months. But in 1888, a logging company proposed a dam on Donner Lake nearly 100 feet high that would have easily doubled the size of the lake and impounded 22,205 acre-feet. That idea was unsuccessful, as well, but plans to exploit Lake Tahoe didn’t die. As recently as 1952, the Bureau of Reclamation proposed tapping Tahoe water with a tunnel through the Carson Range with storage held in Washoe Lake. Engineer Von Schmidt’s plan to sell Tahoe water to San Francisco via the “grandest aqueduct in the world” was just one of many attempts to develop regional water assets. The fight for control of Lake Tahoe and the Truckee River watershed heated up again in 1899 when Nevada senator William M. Stewart proposed designating a Lake Tahoe National Park, where development would be restricted within its basin and all surplus water dedicated to irrigation and hydroelectric power generation for Reno homes and businesses. Although the national park proposal failed to become reality, local control of the Lake Tahoe Dam and the Truckee River was lost in the early 20th Century when ardent conservationist President Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt signed the Federal Reclamation Act on June 17, 1902. It was a bitterly fought legislation, hotly contested by Eastern states who naturally

conservationist President Teddy Roosevelt signed the Federal Reclamation Act on June 17, 1902. Keenly aware of Senator Newland’s enthusiasm, as well as the potential improvement of Nevada’s struggling economy, President Roosevelt wanted to see quick action on the new federal irrigation bill. With Newlands’ encouragement, top officials from the U.S. Reclamation Service visited Reno and Carson City where they promised that federal funds would be forthcoming for the financially depressed state. All Nevada’s government had to do was enact a statute that would subordinate the State Water Engineer’s Office to the new federal reclamation agency. The full-court press worked and in early 1903 Nevada passed the requested water statute that gave the Feds the power to control Lake Tahoe and the Truckee and Carson river watersheds. When

Roosevelt visited Carson City that year, he said that the state’s irrigation interests required a large forest reserve around Lake Tahoe to protect the vital watershed from logging, ranching and overgrazing. But the abundance of privately-owned land in the Tahoe Basin and California’s economic concerns about harming those industries stymied efforts in this regard. Under the auspices of the TruckeeCarson Project, modern dams and reservoirs on the Truckee system were planned for Donner Lake, as well as Independence and Webber lakes. Built primarily for flood protection, Boca, Prosser and Stampede reservoirs would come later. On the Carson River, Long Valley and Hope Valley were targeted. The elaborate undertaking was dubbed Newlands Reclamation Project, which would provide Truckee and Carson River water to four western Nevada counties: Washoe, Churchill, Storey and Lyon. The main linchpin to this complex water transport system was a new canal to siphon water from the Truckee River via the Derby Dam — built 20 miles downstream of Reno — and transfer it to the Carson River, about 32 miles south. Completed in 1905, the Truckee Canal was constructed using primitive wooden plows pulled by horse and mule. This berm and trench conveyance still transports high-quality drinking and irrigation water from the Truckee River to the distant lower Carson River Basin. Incredibly, one of the principal products provided by this hijacked water is dehydrated milk — all of which is sold to China. Read Part III in the next edition or at TheTahoeWeekly.com; click on History under the Explore Tahoe menu  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe tab.

More Puzzles

* P U Z Z L E S C O N T I N U E D F R O M PA G E 1 3 .

See answers on page 13.

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THE ARTS

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Arts

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

Velu Fur

Local Author

Pens True Tales

E C O - F R I E N D LY F A U X F U R G U R U S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R | P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y V E L U F U R

C

olorful, fuzzy, fun and reversible, Velu Furs are uplifting Tahoe fashion. These conversation starters are all the rage and with many colors and styles to choose from, each fur stands out and creates a truly personal statement. Maybe you’re in the mood to feel like a wild, sexy creature from Africa or dress in a season of the year from another universe. Velu is French for furry. The faux furs come in a plethora of colors: tans, greens and oranges offer hints of fall; golds, browns and blacks create a more natural vibe while a playful electric blue fur cries cotton candy. These fake furs are fabulous festival or club wear. Karen Dustman’s new book, “Forgotten Tales of Carson Valley and nearby settlements,” contains 33 tales of that she collected from her weekly history e-newsletter of adventurous rambles in the Sierra and fascinating facts about California and Nevada historic sites.

“ It’s a fun product and it’s versatile. It shows your unique personality and it’s a stylish piece of clothing with a stylish twist.”

Jordan Laub founder of Velu Fur created and designed the ultimate vegan line of eco-friendly fur jackets. The fluffy, multicolored vegan creations are made from recycled plastic liners and use Microflex technology. They are reversible and machine washable; they come with stash pockets. Some have earplugs on the drawstrings and removable sleeves that turn into boot warmers. The jackets are packaged and delivered in a clear festival-approved light-up backpack. The backpack has three modes and flashes when the music hits 85 decibels, signaling the user to put in the earplugs to prevent hearing damage. Laub, who says that design is his passion, initially created the jackets for music festivals; although, the furs are great for skiing and snowboarding and for winter warmth at night out on the town.

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Explore the vibrant arts scene in the Tahoe Sierra. Click on Arts & Culture. His father took Laub to his first Burning Man when he was a teenager. It was his sister Alex who made him his first faux-fur coat for the event. Not only was he blown away by his experience at Burning Man, but it eventually inspired him to create and design a line of faux-fur jackets. This born and bred native of South Lake Tahoe is 25 years old and currently attend16

Included are true tales of the building of early Kingsbury Grade and how one teacher saved her students from a fire. Learn which Gardnerville building was the pride of the East Fork School District back in the 1870s and which was the ugliest jail building west of the Mississippi. Learn how the community responded when Snowshoe Thompson’s headstone was nearly stolen.

–Jordan Lamb

ing law school; he plans to take the bar exam next July. “I come from a long line of lawyers. I dreamed of starting a law firm with my father,” he said. (Unfortunately, his father passed away from brain cancer during Laub’s first year of law school.) “I watched how hard he worked and how brutal it was for him. I thought hell, let’s just have some fun.” Laub started Velu Fur in 2017. Initially, each jacket was made by hand. He teamed up with Rich Kunkel of the Sweatsedo Company, who showed him the ropes. Laub learned about wholesale manufacturing and product and clothing manufacturing under Kunkel’s tutelage. According to Laub, his friend Steven Haggerty helps him out, as well: “Steven runs the back end of the business. He handles all the fulfillment and Web site. Hard to have Velu without Steve.” “The first year we sold 1,000 jackets. We attended the Las Vegas [Electric Daisy Carnival] in May and sold out of our inventory in three days. It blew me away,” he said. “There were 10 people deep and 10 people wide in the booth and I just yelled

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: The Mac Daddy Jacket; The Crop Hoodie.

does everyone here want a jacket?” The company offers numerous designs and styles. The Crop Hoodie is a bolerocut, waist-length, cropped fur and the Mac Daddy Jacket is a hip-length jacket with removable sleeves. The Mac Daddy comes in three different styles: the Chupacabra has a colorful tiedye lining, the Outcaste has a Renaissancethemed lining and the Wingman has a graffiti lining. Laub is having a creative good time with his line. “I see it as a replacement for real fur. No animals are harmed. It’s a fun product and it’s versatile. It shows your unique personality and it’s a stylish piece of clothing with a stylish twist,” he said, adding that the jackets serve as a talking piece and conversation starter. Velu Furs are wearable works of art that make a fashion statement; they can be dressed up or down and for any occasion. The jackets range in price from $100 to $200 depending on the style. | Facebook Velu Fur 

Dustman will be speaking at the Lion’s Club in Gardnerville at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 21 at Jethro’s. Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for more speaking events. “Forgotten Tales of Carson Valley” is available at Carson Valley Museum & Cultural Center, Dangberg Home Ranch Historic Park and on Amazon. | karendustman.com

Anastiscia Chantler-Lang exhibit Incline Village Library | Aug. 8-30 (775) 832-4130, facebook.com

Andy Skaff art exhibit Wolfdale’s | Tahoe City | Aug. 8-Dec. 30 wolfdales.com

Black And White Exhibit North Tahoe Arts Tahoe City | Aug. 8-Sept. 8

11 a.m.-5 p.m. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com


August 8-14, 2019

Arts

THE

Incline Village Fine Art Festival Preston Field Incline Village | Aug. 9-11

10 a.m.-5 p.m. | cwbevents.com

Natural Discourse at Sagehen

WOLFDALE’S HOSTS

Sagehen Creek Field Station Truckee | Aug. 10 5-9 p.m. | facebook.com

THE ART OF

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

ANDY SKAFF Wolfdale’s Cuisine Unique in Tahoe City is again featuring oil paintings by Andy Skaff through January 2020. Skaff’s work ranges from classic, impressionist paintings to abstract distillations of familiar subjects. His paintings have been exhibited at the Napa Valley Museum, the Oil Painters of America Western Regional exhibit in Santa Barbara, Sunset Magazine Western Idea House in Truckee and are part of the permanent collection of Martis Camp Lodge, Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Forest Cancer Center and the Larkspur Hotel Group. His paintings were featured in continuing exhibits at Gump’s in San Francisco for more than a decade. Locally, Skaff is represented by Alpine Home and Pablo’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Tahoe City. | wolfdales.com

THE ARTS

Explore more events in the Tahoe Sierra or submit your event. Click on Event Calendar. Knitting Group Atelier | Truckee | Aug. 13

4-6 p.m. | (530) 386-2700, ateliertruckee.com

The Quiet Side II Andy Skaff | Wolfdale’s

Open Studio Local Author Event: Todd Borg

Arts & Crafts Show

Word After Word Books | Truckee | Aug. 8

Round Hill Square Zephyr Cove | Aug. 9-11

5-8:30 p.m. | (530) 536-5099, wordafterwordbooks.com

Senior Center South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 13

10 a.m.-1 p.m. | (530) 544-2313

10 a.m. | artisttoyoufestivals.com

Adult Coloring “Outboards: In-Style”

Fiber Art Friday

Tahoe Maritime Museum Tahoe City | Aug. 8-Jan. 23

South Lake Tahoe Library | Aug. 9

10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Pine Needle Basket Weaving Workshop North Tahoe Arts | Tahoe City | Aug. 8

1 p.m. | engagedpatrons.org

Homewood Handcrafted Designs under the Pines Homewood Mountain Resort | Aug. 9-11

10 a.m.-5 p.m. | (530) 525-2992, eventbrite.com

Truckee Library | Aug. 14

11 a.m.-12 p.m. | (530) 582-7846, madelynhelling.evanced.info

Tahoe Art League Meeting Senior Center South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 14

6-8 p.m. | (530) 544-2313, business.tahoechamber.org

12-4 p.m. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Public readings & discussions Sierra Nevada College | Incline Village | Aug. 8

CWB Events presents...

8 p.m. | (775) 831-1314, sierranevada.edu

Public Tour Call to Artists North Tahoe Arts Tahoe City | Aug. 8-23

(530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

“The Dirt Around Tahoe” book signing Senior Center | South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 8 7:30 p.m. | kathrynreed.com

“Going Places: Sailing By Stars” Tahoe Maritime Museum Tahoe City | Aug. 8-Jan. 23

10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | (530) 583-9283, tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Truckee Roundhouse | Aug. 8, 15

2-2:45 p.m. | chamber.truckee.com

Tahoe Rim Trail Photo Contest Tahoe Rim Trail Assoc | Stateline | Aug. 8-Sept. 1 tahoerimtrail.org

TAL Artists Exhibit Tahoe Art League Gallery South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 8-Oct. 31 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | talart.org

Transcontinental Art Show Truckee Community Rec Center | Aug. 8-Oct. 31 chamber.truckee.com

DAILY TRAIN RIDES May through October

7 train departure times between 10am – 4pm

Incline Village Fine Art Festival

August 9-11 ~ Friday, Saturday & Sunday ~ 10 am-5 pm

Preston Field ~ 700 Tahoe Blvd ~Incline Village Free Parking & Admission

No Reservations Required

Virginia City, Nevada Visit: VirginiaTruckee.com Steam & Diesel Locomotives © Virginia & Truckee Railroad. All rights reserved.

CWB Events LLC ~cwbevents.com~916.936.9393 17


MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

Collective Soul SHINES ON

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

AUGUST 8-15, 2019 T A H O E

SUMMER EDITION

STORY BY SEAN McALINDIN

| JUNE 6-OCT.

Calendar at Visit the Event .com for TheTahoeWeekly on, up-to-date informati more summer events

Aug. 11 | 8 p.m. | MontBleu Resort Casino | Stateline, Nev

and to submit your event.

10, 2019

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

INSIDE LIVE MUSIC LIVIN’ IN THE WILD, WILD WEST

TheTahoeWeekly.com

ARTS & CULTURE FESTIVALS & FAMILY FUN CULINARY DELIGHTS START YOUR ENGINES PERFORMING ARTS INS THE MOUNTA ARE CALLING R FREE SUMME CONCERTS

F

ew bands continue to influence the genre of modern rock as powerfully and extensively as Collective Soul. The Georgiabred band of brothers rocketed into public consciousness when a breakout hit off their homemade demo, “Hints Allegations and Things Left Unsaid,” helped to define the barefaced and barefooted music of the 1990s. “Once Georgia State University’s WRAS radio station started playing “Shine,” everything really gained traction and took off,” says rhythm guitarist Dean Roland. “In our mind, we were hoping we could get a record contract.” The band soon signed with Atlantic Records; four records and seven U.S. modern rock No. 1’s later, they had altered the course of the genre indefinitely — if only because many bands that came afterwards sounded so much like them. “There’s fresh perspective and appreciation to be our age and this far into our career and still be able to do it,” says Roland. “We take a lot pride and are very grateful for that.”

18

E W EEK

LY

TheTahoeWeekly.com issuu app iTunes & Google Play facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly @TheTahoeWeekly

Lee Clower

Wanderlust Read more about page 26. Squaw Valley on | Courtesy Wanderlust

SOUTHERN UPBRINGINGS Roland grew up the youngest of three sons of a Southern Baptist preacher who had majored in music at Shorter University near Atlanta. “He had a beautiful tenor voice,” says Roland of his late father. “Some of my earliest memories are of my mom playing piano, dad singing. Music was there from the beginning.” The genesis of the band was enigmatic older brother Ed, who studied at Berklee College of Music before coming home to the small town of Stockbridge. “His musical influences would trickle down to me,” he says. “Whatever he listened to, I thought was cool.” Along with neighborhood friend Will Turpin on bass, Dean and Ed (who now goes by E), recently reached the 25-year mark with their homegrown rock project. “[My brother] was always very driven, no question about that; to have success in the music industry you have to be,” says Roland. “He burned hard.” After “Shine” caught the attention of college rock, radio stations around the country and dominated the golden age of MTV, the boys embarked on a nationwide tour while recording an eponymous followup featuring singles “December,” “Where the River Flows” and “The World I Know.” “We always viewed it as we wanted a career out of this thing,” says Roland. “We didn’t want to be a flash in the pan. We wanted to stick around.” If you don’t remember the names of these songs, trust me, you’d recognize their unforgettable hooks in a second. The sudden success took the 20-year-old on the trip of a lifetime.

HO

No. 1

TA

source The for events, music & entertainment

“ We always viewed it as we wanted a career out of this thing. We didn’t want to be a flash in the pan. We wanted to stick around.” –Dean Roland “We were playing clubs in Atlanta,” he says. “We didn’t have a big following. Mostly it was our friends and girlfriends at the time who would come to our shows. When it took off, thousands of people were coming to see us. It kind of spins you sideways a little bit, but you take it in stride.” Collective Soul holds the rare distinction of being one of the only bands to play both Woodstock ‘94 and ‘99. “For us, we were in the middle of it,” says Roland. “You see it all happening. My take on the time was everything was glowing.” With Sublime, Bush, Live, Gin Blossoms, The Smashing Pumpkins, Soul Asylum, Weezer and Third Eye Blind all wrapping up major summer tours this year, it’s safe to say a 90s revival is alive and well. “I see it,” says Roland “Every moment in time has a 20-year thing where it comes back around and a younger generation catches onto it. There are a lot of really great songs from that era.”

25 YEARS YOUNG After years of non-stop touring and recording, along with a couple of divorces, the Roland brothers took one short break before delivering five more albums on indie labels since 2004. Their latest release, “Blood,” is a raw, distorted flash of the power chords and haunting licks that have been their trademark since the beginning. “The idea of blood is we are all from the same family,” says Roland. “It’s the idea of having a band of brothers. All of us come from that same place.” The humble, soft-spoken guitarist became the father of baby girl in January. “I think it’s just heightened everything,” he says. “There’s an appreciation factor for where you are in life. Now this little person depends on you.” As far as Collective Soul’s legacy, he says: “I hope it’s a positive one. And that people have appreciation and respect for the authenticity of it.” | montbleuresort.com 

Check out the Tahoe Music, Events & Festivals guide for all the summer fun. Click on Music Scene.

AUGUST 8 | THURSDAY Open Orchestra Rehearsal Classical Tahoe Concert Pavilion at Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Live at Lakeview Lakeview Commons, South Lake Tahoe, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Truckee Thursdays Downtown, Truckee, 5-8:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Itamar Zorman Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Reno, 6-9 p.m. David Lewis Boomtown Casino, Verdi, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Live Music Cottonwood Hilltop Restaurant, Truckee, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Eric Anderson & Whitney Myer The Hytch at Sierra Water Gardens, Reno, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Little River Band Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 7 p.m. Jamie N Commons Great Basin Brewing Company, Sparks, 7-10 p.m. Line Dancing Lake Tahoe AleWorkx, South Lake Tahoe, 7 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Dennis Blair Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Great American Variety Show Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Metalachi Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 8 p.m. Karaoke Davidson’s Distillery, Reno, 8 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Masters of Illusion Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. The Righteous Brothers Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 8-10:30 p.m. Hot August Nights Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8:15 p.m.-12 a.m. Dueling Pianos Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8:30-10:30 p.m. The Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Me Time, The Filthy Lowdown, Working Class Skumbags Shea’s Tavern, Reno, 9 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe Hot August Nights Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno


August 1-7, 2019

MUSIC SCENE

C A L E N D A R | AUGUST 8-15, 2019 The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno Sierra Nevada European Car Festival Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Hot August Nights 2019 Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Classical Tahoe Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village

AUGUST 9 | FRIDAY Johnny O. Band The Beacon, South Lake Tahoe, 1-5 p.m. Kris Diehl The Idle Hour, South Lake Tahoe, 2 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Jazz and Beyond: Opening Day Garden Party Bliss Mansion, Carson City, 4-6 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 4-7 p.m. Music in the Park Tahoe Paradise Park, South Lake Tahoe, 5-8 p.m. Vintage Trailer Revival Show Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, Reno, 5-8 p.m. Jack Di Carlo Gold Hill Hotel, Gold Hill, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 6-9 p.m. David John Ruby’s Amphitheater, Virginia City, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Barbecue Concert MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 6:30-11 p.m. Cherie and Take This Governor’s Mansion, Carson City, 6:30-8 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Classical Tahoe Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 7 p.m. Whitney Myer Great Basin Brewing Company, Sparks, 7-10 p.m. “Firebird Suite” Classical Tahoe Concert Pavilion at Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 7-9:30 p.m. “The Wizard of Oz” Red Hawk Golf and Resort Event Center, Sparks, 7-9 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Dennis Blair Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Great American Variety Show Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. George! The Concert Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 7:30 p.m. “Guys & Dolls” Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Reno, 7:30-10 p.m. Green Book Downieville, 7:30 p.m. Live Music Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats, Truckee, 8-11:55 p.m. Masters of Illusion Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Ryan Brinnand, Eli McCoy, Savybalboa, ZP Ratik Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Live DJ Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. Hot August Nights Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8:15 p.m.-12 a.m. Steve Marzan Pioneer Underground, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Dueling Pianos Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8:30-10:30 p.m.

Jake’s Garage MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 8:30-11:30 p.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 9 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. GrooveSession + Lumbercat Funk n’ Groovy Dead Ringer Analog Bar, Reno, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. The Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Live Music Jimmy B’s Bar & Grill, Reno, 9-11 p.m. Public Eye Bar of America, Truckee, 9-10 p.m. Keyser Soze Alibi Ale Works - Truckee Public House, Truckee, 9 p.m.-12 a.m. Live Music Bar of America, Truckee, 9:30-11:55 p.m. Dennis Blair Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9:30 p.m. ONOFF/Engine Fire/Acid Box Shea’s Tavern, Reno, 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. DJ in Center Bar Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 10 p.m. DJs Dance Party Lex Nightclub, Reno, 10 p.m. Loveknuckle b2b Desiderata Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 10 p.m. Justin Jay’s Fantastic Voyage The BlueBird Nightclub, Reno, 10 p.m. DJ Montague St. James Infirmary, Reno, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe Hot August Nights Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno Sierra Nevada European Car Festival Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Hot August Nights 2019 Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Jazz & Beyond Carson City, Reno

AUGUST 10 | SATURDAY Sound Waves Pool Party w/DJs Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Vintage Trailer Revival Show Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, Reno, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Randy Ide and Jakki Ford Duo Greenhouse Garden Center, Carson City, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sierra Event Groups Bottles & BOWL The Rack, Reno, 12:10 p.m. Live music Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 1-4 p.m. Kris Diehl The Idle Hour, South Lake Tahoe, 2 p.m. Brews, Jazz and Funk Fest Village at Squaw, Olympic Valley, 2 p.m. Niall McGuinness & New World Jazz Project Comma Coffee, Carson City, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock - Hotel Lobby, Stateline, 3-6 p.m. Live DJ Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 3-6 p.m. Live Music Village at Northstar, Truckee, 3-6 p.m. Painted Mandolin Trio Dry Creek Ranch, Truckee, 3:30 p.m. Kay Dance The Generator, Sparks, 4-6 p.m. Summer Vibes Sierra Well, Reno, 4-10 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

19


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

LAKE STREET DIVE

Aug. 14 | 8 p.m. MontBleu Resort Casino | Stateline, Nev. BROOKLYN BANGERS Lake Street Dive are led by Rachael Price’s stunning vocals and the virtuoso musicianship of a four-piece jazz band. | montbleuresort.com

SHAMARR ALLEN & THE UNDERDAWGS

JAZZ

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

AUG. 10 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

NEW ORLEANS FUNK

Aug. 8 | 4:30 p.m. Lakeview Commons | South Lake Tahoe NINTH WARD TRUMPETER sans boundaries Shamarr Allen has influences in hip hop, jazz, funk, rock, blues and country from his upbringing in the Big Easy. He’ll be preforming with his band the Underdawgs. Local reggae group The Tahoe Tribe opens at the series sponsored by Tahoe Weekly. | liveatlakeview.com

POOR MAN’S WHISKEY

COUNTRY

Aug 10. | 8 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. ENJOY A SEATED showed with Paw Paw, W.Va., legends Asleep at the Wheel. After party with psychedelic Sonoma County outlaws Electric Tumbleweed. | crystalbaycasino.com

SAM CHASE & THE THE

Emily Sevin

UNTRADITIONAL

NEWGRASS

Aug. 11 | 4 p.m. Commons Beach | Tahoe City NORTHERN CALIFORNIA bluegrass bards Poor Man’s Whiskey return to Commons Beach with an incomparable fusion of old-time, Southern rock and old-school jam for the series sponsored by Tahoe Weekly. | concertsatcommonsbeach.com

20

FOLK ROCK

Aug. 14 | 6 p.m. Truckee River Regional Park | Truckee WARRIORS FOR TROUBLED times, San Francisco’s The Sam Chase & The Untraditional blend rock ‘n’ roll and folk with the sensibility of old-school punks. | tdrpd.org

Man and Machine Nightingale Concert Hall, Reno, 4 p.m. Millennium Bugs Foreman-Roberts House Museum, Carson City, 5-7 p.m. New Vintage Baroque The Lost Marbles Ranch, Beckwourth, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live music Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 6-9 p.m. Live Music Old 40 Bar & Grill, Norden, 6-9 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Live Music Sands Regency Casino, Reno, 7-11 p.m. Classical Tahoe Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 7 p.m. Itamar Zorman Classical Tahoe Concert Pavilion at Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 7-9:30 p.m. Dead Winter Carpenters Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7-10 p.m. Beatles Flashback Great Basin Brewing Co, Sparks, 7-10 p.m. Guys & Dolls Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Reno, 7:30-10 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Dennis Blair Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Great American Variety Show Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Mark Mackay Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 7:30 p.m. “Rad” Yuba Theater, Downieville, 7:30 p.m. “Twelfth Night,” -A Ballet Noir Carson Community Center, Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Country “Ladies Night” The Saint, Reno, 8 p.m. Jackson Browne Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harveys, Stateline, 8 p.m. Asleep At the Wheel Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Leon Bridges Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. Masters of Illusion Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m.

Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay, 8 p.m. Live DJ Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 8 p.m. “MADDSkillz” Showcase Whiskey Dicks, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m. Andi Kilgore MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 8-11 p.m. When Doves Cry: a Night of Prince Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 8 p.m. Hot August Nights Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8:15 p.m.-12 a.m. Dueling Pianos Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8:30-10:30 p.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 9 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. The Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Public Eye Bar of America, Truckee, 9-10 p.m. Karaoke Jimmy B’s Bar & Grill, Reno, 9 p.m. Dennis Blair Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9:30 p.m. DJ in Center Bar Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 10 p.m. DJs Dance Party Lex Nightclub, Reno, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe Hot August Nights Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno Sierra Nevada European Car Festival Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Hot August Nights 2019 Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Jazz & Beyond Carson City, Reno

AUGUST 11 | SUNDAY Live Music Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Great Gatsby Living History Festival Tallac Historic Site, South Lake Tahoe, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tyler Stafford Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 2-5 p.m. Brews, Jazz and Funk Fest Village at Squaw, Olympic Valley, 2 p.m. Live Music Jake’s On The Lake, Tahoe City, 2-4 p.m. Live DJ Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 3-6 p.m. Live Music Village at Northstar, Truckee, 3-6 p.m. Concerts at Commons Beach Commons Beach, Tahoe City, 4-7 p.m. Live Music Hard Rock Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 4-7 p.m. Retro Radio Dolls & Urban Renewal Project Capital Amphitheater, Carson City, 4:30-8 p.m. Genoa Concerts on the Green Genoa Park, Genoa, 5 p.m. Music in the Park Alpine County Library, Markleeville, 5-8 p.m. Sounds of the City Alturas Bar, Reno, 5-7 p.m. Classical Tahoe Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 7 p.m. Jazzmeia Horn & Ensemble Classical Tahoe Pavilion at Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 7-9:30 p.m.


MUSIC SCENE

August 1-7, 2019

C A L E N D A R | AUGUST 8-15, 2019 The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Dennis Blair Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. SadGirl The Holland Project, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Masters of Illusion Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Trivia Night Shea’s Tavern, Reno, 8 p.m. Hot August Nights Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8:15 p.m.-12 a.m. Panda Fat Cat Bar & Grill, Tahoe City, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

EXCLUSIVE CONTENT AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Explore more events in the Tahoe Sierra or submit your event. Click on Event Calendar. FREE! The Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Live Jam Jimmy B’s Bar & Grill, Reno, 9 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe Hot August Nights Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno Sierra Nevada European Car Festival Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Hot August Nights 2019 Sands Regency Casino Hotel, Reno Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Jazz & Beyond Carson City, Reno

Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Jazz & Beyond Carson City, Reno

2019

Once Upon A Time in Hollywood Aug. 9-22

AUGUST 14 | WEDNESDAY

Brittany Runs a Marathon Aug. TBD

Finding Neverland InnerRhythms, Truckee, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Wheeled Food Wednesdays Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 5:30-8 p.m.

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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PRESENTS

RUNNING ON EMPTY? Got to be somebody’s baby? Stop pretending and doctor your eyes with rock legend Jackson Browne. Don’t forget to stay for the load out. | caesars.com/harveys-tahoe

Tru c k e e D ow n T ow n so ci aT ion M e r c h a n T s as es nt s

AUGUST 12 | MONDAY Finding Neverland InnerRhythms, Truckee, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. High School jazz students w/Jazzmeia Horn Classical Tahoe Concert Pavilion at Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 1-2 p.m. West Coast Swing Dance Carson Lanes Family Fun Center, Carson City, 5:30-10 p.m. Mirage: Visions of Fleetwood Mac Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Masters of Illusion Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Motown on Monday The Loving Cup, Reno, 9 p.m.-3 a.m.

Aug. 10 | 8 p.m. Harvey’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev.

AUGUST 13 | TUESDAY Finding Neverland InnerRhythms, Truckee, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Phreemium Comma Coffee, Carson City, 5-7 p.m. Live Music PJ’s at Gray’s Crossing, Truckee, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bluesdays Tuesdays Village at Squaw, Olympic Valley, 6-8:30 p.m. Bingo Tuesday’s with T~n~Keys MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Live Music Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Erra, Currents Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Rocky Dale Davis Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Dirty Cello Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Rosebud’s Dance Band Bob McFadden Plaza (Third Street Stage), Carson City, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Tuesday Night Blues Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno

JACKSON BROWNE

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MUSIC SCENE

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Anders Osborne

C A L E N D A R | AUGUST 8-15, 2019 AUG. 14 | WEDNESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21

M U S I C , M E D I TAT I O N AND LIVING SOBER

Darren Manzari

STORY BY SEAN McALINDIN

Wesley Orsolic Band Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Unplugged Truckee Philosophy, Truckee, 6-9 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. Live Music CB’s Bistro, Carnelian Bay, 6-9 p.m. Live music Graeagle Mill Works, Graeagle, 6-9 p.m. Summer Quad Concert University of Nevada Reno, Reno, 6 p.m. Lazy 5 Summer Music Series Lazy 5 Regional Park, Sparks, 6:30 p.m.

“There’s something to the isolation and regular stillness of meditation. It’s a way of life, to stay in the present moment.” –Anders Osborne BLUES

A

s we get older, life doesn’t necessarily get easier. But if we’re lucky, we do learn a thing or two along the way. Anders Osborne’s latest album released in April, “Buddha and the Blues,” delves musically into a 1970s Topanga Canyon vibe while considering the aspects of a divided mind and the daily resolve to be happy, healthy and helpful toward others. “I’m having a dialogue with myself in the songs,” he says. “It’s the exploration of my own experience of reaching midlife and diving into those emotions. I have friends going through sickness and addiction and I’m trying to be positive and grateful as much as I can.” While the introspective Swedish artist who lives in New Orleans has been practicing meditation on and off for the past three decades, he’s revved it up in the past few years as way to support his recovery from the netherworld of drug and alcohol addiction. “There’s something to the isolation and regular stillness of meditation,” he says. “It’s a way of life, to stay in the present moment.” Just like the album concept, Osborne found divergent means for composing the material for the record. “I think there are two ways I write, in the moment, stream of consciousness and a more premeditated method where I set out to approach a certain aspect of my life or something, I think could maybe be useful to someone else. The word ‘blues’ is about choosing to embrace the sadness and melancholy. You can choose the blissfulness of life or you can choose despair,” he says. Since Osborne got on the wagon 10 years ago, fans have formed a sober group at shows called the Lucky Ones to support him and each other through life’s mercurial journey. The benefits of this positive lifestyle change have reverberated through his music and performance as he works to be in the moment with himself and his audience. “I still struggle with being anxious and nervous before the shows, but now it’s

22

incorporated into the experience,” he says. “If my stomach is upset and I feel fatigued and tired, then that’s what it is. If you keep taking the edge off the experience, you aren’t really having the experience.” In particular, Osborne has found the writing process to be easier since he’s gotten clean and sober. “It’s 10 times better, maybe 50 times better,” he says. “There is so much more creativity in sobriety than when I was loaded. I talked a lot about creativity when I was high or drunk. And there are times on marijuana, acid or mushrooms when you feel pretty connected to the universe and it’s all pretty great, but it’s hard to sustain it for more than a few years.” The lucidity of abstinence has also freed Osborne to develop a sharper sense of purpose both in the studio and on stage. “It becomes a much clearer connection with the intent and making sure of what you’re trying to do,” he says. “I still use the stream-of-consciousness approach, but I am more alert to what other people feel. You can tell when they’re bored. It’s like, ‘Oh sh**, I better stop noodling on my guitar.’ When I was loaded, I’d just keep going on and on.” As he turns 53 this year, Osborne has realized he’s not the brash, invincible young man he used be, but something much more. “I think the culture of New Orleans music stands out in that aspect,” he says. “If someone is having a financial struggle, if somebody is a mess, we pitch in. There’s very little division between up-and-coming beginners and well-established old mentors like George Porter, Art Neville and [the late] Dr. John. Everyone is a part of each other’s life. Everyone has a chance to interact and learn from each other and pass on that musical tradition.” Osborne headlines Brews, Jazz and Funk Fest on Aug. 10 at 6 p.m. on the Main Stage. This two-day festival features an array of tasty beers and music. All proceeds benefit the Humane Society of TruckeeTahoe. | squawalpine.com 

Brews, Jazz and Funk Festival AUG. 10 2-3:30 p.m. | Sal’s Greenhouse 3:30-4:30 p.m. | Rigmarole 4-5:30 p.m. | Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds 5-6 p.m. | Rigmarole 6-8 p.m. | Anders Osborne AUG. 11 2-3:30 p.m. | Jellybread 3:30-4:30 p.m. | Reno Jazz Syndicate 4-5:30 p.m. | The Humidors 5-6 p.m. | Reno Jazz Syndicate 6-8 p.m. | Five Alarm Funk

Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. The Sam Chase & The Untraditional Truckee Regional Park, Truckee, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday Night Showcase Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Young The Giant/Fitz & The Tantrums Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 7 p.m. Hawthorne Heights Cargo at Whitney Peak Hotel, Reno, 7-11:30 p.m. Lake Street Dive MontBleu Resort, Stateline, 7 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Rocky Dale Davis Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Sherre Carnes and Chuck Hughes Living the Good Life, Carson City, 7:30-10:30 p.m. “Monessan Falls” Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, Reno, 7:30 p.m.

Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Prince Daddy & the Hyena, Kississippi, Retirement Party The Holland Project, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Open Mic Jimmy B’s Bar & Grill, Reno, 8 p.m. Country Line Dancing/Karaoke Virginia Street Brewhouse, Reno, 9 p.m. The Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Jazz & Beyond Carson City, Reno

AUGUST 15 | THURSDAY Finding Neverland InnerRhythms, Truckee, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Live at Lakeview Lakeview Commons, South Lake Tahoe, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Curt Mitchell and Friends Comma Coffee, Carson City, 4:30-6 p.m. Truckee Thursdays Downtown, Truckee, 5-8:30 p.m. Luke Stevenson Lone Eagle Grille, Incline Village, 6-10 p.m. New Wave Crave Boomtown Casino, Verdi, 6-10 p.m. Live Music Glen Eagles Restaurant & Lounge, Carson City, 6:30-9 p.m. Live Music Cottonwood Hilltop Restaurant, Truckee, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Bellamy Brothers Boomtown Casino, Verdi, 7 p.m. All About the Bass Nevada State Museum, Carson City, 7-9 p.m. Dirty Cello Great Basin Brewing Co, Sparks, 7-10 p.m. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Rocky Dale Davis Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 7:30 p.m. The Great American Variety Show Harrah’s, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Tim Snider Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30-9:30 p.m. “Monessan Falls” Good Luck Macbeth Theatre Company, Reno, 7:30 p.m. Karaoke Davidson’s Distillery, Reno, 8 p.m. Live Music McP’s Irish Pub, South Lake Tahoe, 8 p.m.-12 a.m. Masters of Illusion Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Dueling Pianos Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8:30-10:30 p.m. The Improv Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 9 p.m. Bellamy Brothers Boomtown Casino, Verdi, 9 p.m. Thunder from Down Under Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m. Karaoke Rojo’s Tavern, South Lake Tahoe The Illusionists Experience Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe Jazz & Beyond Carson City, Reno JoJo Siwa Reno Events Center, Reno


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

August 8-14, 2019

LOCAL FLAVOR

flavor

The taste of Aloha spirit I N TA H O E S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

H

awaii. Wild. Warm. Tropical. Snorkeling in the crystal-clear waters off the shores of the Big Island, swimming with dolphins and mantas in Kealakekua Bay, and generally slowing down and enjoying island time is one of the simple pleasures in life. I’m partial to the Kona side of the Big Island; I’ve enjoyed much of what the island has to offer including Hawaiian cuisine. While poi isn’t my favorite, I love taro.

HAWAIIAN LOCO MOCO Courtesy Priya Hutner · Serves 4 For gravy 1 C mushroom, sliced 1 small onion, diced 1 T olive oil 2 C beef stock or bone broth 1 t Worcestershire sauce 1 t soy sauce Salt & pepper to taste 1 T cornstarch ¼ C water

If you are looking for a classic contemporary Hawaiian dish go no further than the Loco Moco. Picking fresh mango, papayas and figs off the trees for breakfast or preparing a delicious salsa for fish tacos is one of the many rituals I love while chilling on island time. Dragon fruit with fresh-squeezed lime, lilikoi, custard apple, lychees or its cousin the rambutan are tropical fruits that are refreshing, delicious and nutritious and scream summer. Many of these fruits can be found in our local supermarkets, although I’ve yet to find the elusive custard apple — due to the fact it’s best to eat one almost immediately after it’s picked. Hawaiian cuisine can be found in a number of places throughout Tahoe. The Poké craze is still trending and served on many menus around the lake. The latest place to crop up is Poké on the Lake inside Sticks Market at Donner Lake. It’s the perfect delicious lunch to grab and go to enjoy on a dock. We might not find Spam sushi in Tahoe — Hawaiians are the second largest consumers of Spam in the world — but Jax at the Tracks in downtown Truckee offers a Hawaiian twist on its breakfast menu: a Spam and egg sandwich on a Hawaiian roll. It also serves a Hawaii burger. In Tahoe City, Jake’s on the Lake prides itself on its Aloha vibes with a number of Hawaiian dishes including Hawaiian Hamachi Crudo, Poké roll and Kahlua Pork Belly. South Lake Tahoe has a number of restaurants that are serving up some Hawaiian culture. Chicken in a Barrel BBQ, the Tahoe franchise of the Hawaiian chain, serves traditional Hawaiian barbecue. Don Harvard runs the family business. The meats are prepared with a dry rub and smoked in large barrels on the premises. The menu includes a signature Hawaiian grass-fed cheeseburger topped with teriyaki sauce and grilled pineapple, as well as a Hawaiian coleslaw side. Harvard

Burger patties 1 small onion, diced small 1 T olive oil 1 lb. ground beef ⅓ C panko 1 egg 1 t Worcestershire sauce 1 t salt 1 t pepper

For assembly experienced this traditional Hawaiian roadside barbecue on a trip to Hawaii. It inspired him to purchase the first franchise on the mainland. Another local restaurant serving up Hawaiian cuisine is Kalani’s Restaurant in Heavenly Village. The Hawaiian fusion menu and island atmosphere nestled in the mountains brings the Aloha spirit to the alpine setting. Poké Rok and Freshies Restaurant & Bar also offer a number of Hawaiian dishes. If you’ve not tried Hawaiian shaved ice it’s the perfect treat to beat the summer heat. Check out Tahoe Pops at The Ice Shack at Ski Run Marina. Hawaiian food is a melting pot of flavors and cultures. Taro is a main staple in the diet as is fresh fish. Over the course of Hawaii’s history, different cultures arrived on the islands bringing fruits, vegetables and animals. When the Polynesians arrived, they brought sweet potatoes, yams, coconuts, kukui nuts and breadfruit. Asian influences in Hawaii come from China, Japan and the Philippines. Many dishes that are considered traditional Hawaiian food didn’t originate in Hawaii such as chicken long rice and Lomi-Lomi salmon but now are deeply ingrained in the culture. Lau Lau is made with pork wrapped in layers of taro leaves and cooked in an underground hot-rock oven for hours until it turns soft. The dish has a smoky flavor and the meat is tender and juicy. If you are looking for a classic con-

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Chicken in a Barrel BBQ; Fresh papaya and lime juice; Smoking barrels at Chicken in a Barrel.

temporary Hawaiian dish go no further than the Loco Moco. This meal consists of steamed rice topped with a juicy hamburger patty and gravy, topped with a fried egg. Luaus are ubiquitous in Hawaii. Interested in creating your own Hawaiian luau in the mountains for your next summer party or barbecue? Make sure to include Kalua pig, Lau Lau, long chicken, fresh mahi mahi and ahi and don’t forget the poi. Desserts such as haupia, a coconut pudding; mochi, a Japanese rice cake; coconut cake and guava cake are also served. So grab your Hawaiian shirt or grass skirt, put on some music by Iz Kamakawiwoʻole or Jake Shimabukuro and enjoy the flavors and cuisine of Hawaii in Tahoe. Mahalo.  Priya Hutner is a writer, personal chef and workshop facilitator. She is the owner of the Seasoned Sage, which prepares organic artisan meals for dinner parties and events. She also offers in-home cooking classes, parties and local pop up dinners. As a breath meditation teacher and long-time yogi, she facilitates workshops and classes that focus on gaining a deeper awareness of self. Read more at TheTahoe-Weekly.com; click on Local Flavor. Send story ideas to priya@tahoethisweek.com. | (772) 913-0008, pria78@gmail.com, seasonedsage.com

2 C Japanese rice, cooked 4 eggs 3 scallions, sliced for garnish

Prepare gravy Heat ½ tablespoon olive oil in a pan and sauté onions until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 5 minutes. Add stock or broth, Worcestershire and soy sauce. Simmer for five minutes. Mix cornstarch and water; add to gravy slowly stirring until gravy thickens. Prepare patties Mix ground beef, onion, panko, egg, Wor-cestershire sauce, salt and pepper together. Form into patties and grill or sauté until desired doneness. Assemble Fry eggs over easy. First add rice to bottom of plate. Place patty over rice, ladle gravy over steak and top with over-easy fried egg. Garnish with scallions.

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Eclectic old world Ambiance Home made Pastas Wide-ranging Wine list

Carson Mall Wine Walk Carson Mall | Carson City | Aug. 10

Come sip and shop at the Carson Mall. Receive a wine glass which is yours to keep. 2-6 p.m. | visitcarsoncity.com

DINNER AND BAR NIGHTLY FROM 5-9 PM

Brews, Jazz and Funk Fest

Reservations Recommended

Village at Squaw | Olympic Valley | Aug. 10, 11

Sip, Nosh & Stroll

Happy Hour

Sun-Thurs | 5-6 pm

at

Downtown Truckee | (530) 587-4694

PianetaRestaurantTruckee.com

Fine Italian Food & Spirits

Famous for our Mexicans!

Locals Love Lanza’s! (530) 546-2434 BAR - 4:30 p.m. DINNER - 5 p.m.

7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

(530) 587-3557 10186 Donner Pass Rd - Truckee

LanzasTahoe.com

DYNO-MITE

BIG BANG THANKS!

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Thunderfaire

Thunderfaire, Lakeside Food & Wine Fair will take place on the grounds of historic Thunderbird Lodge from 4 to 8 p.m. on Aug. 11. Beautiful gardens and an unparalleled sunset are the backdrop for an evening of delicious food and wine. Celebrated chefs and vintners come together to delight the palate as guests roam throughout the grottoes and secret spaces of Capt. George Whittell’s Thunderbird Lodge estate. Raffles, prizes, a silent auction and entertainment will make the themed festival reminiscent of Old-World elegance. | thunderbirdtahoe.org

Tahoe City Farmers Market Commons Beach | Tahoe City | Aug. 8, 15

Every Thursday until Oct. 12. Enjoy fresh local produce, delicious food, live music and the local Tahoe City community. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Free | tahoecityfarmersmarket.com

Incline Village Farmers Market Farmers Market | Incline Village | Aug. 8, 15

Thursdays from 3 to 6 p.m. through Aug. 29 at a new location on 845 Alder Avenue. 3-6 p.m. Free | nevadagrown.com

Wine Tasting *

to our sponsors and donors ... Placer County North Lake Tahoe Resort Association TTCF/Melanie Jackson North Tahoe Fire Tahoe City Public Utility District Tahoe City Marina Pacific Built B.J.’s Barge Service John Krauss, LLC North Tahoe Cruises Deborah Godfrey and Family Sandra Otellini Tahoe City Rotary Swigard’s Hardware Sunnyside Restaurant & Lodge Tahoe Sierra Recreation, Inc. Groove Foundry Alpine Power Equipment The Blue Agave The Store Copies & More North Tahoe Business Association Stephen Hamill

Randall & Cynthia Pond Tahoe Fit PEC Tahoe Properties Oriental Trading Tahoe Forest Health System Plumas Bank Kiwanis Club of North Lake Tahoe Dam Cafe Olympic Bike Shop Todd Gordon Mather Architect Za’s Lakefront SnowFest! Bridgetender Tavern Mr. D DJ Services Hacienda del Lago Chambers Landing Fat Cat Bar & Grill TCDA 4th of July Committee Tahoe Dave’s Skis and Boards TCDA Board of Directors Granlibakken Thai Kitchen ID3 Interior Design Richard & Kelsey Ferris Next year is Tahoe City's Steven Merrill 75th Anniversary Thomas Reviglio 4th of July fireworks Hauserman Rental Group sho w. This diamond Joanne Taylor anniversary show is sur John Stannard e to sparkle! Tahoe Marina Lakefront Homeowners Association Fidelity National Title *Contributions of $250 or more Rogers Family Office

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The Pour House | Truckee | Aug. 8, 15

Enjoy a wine tasting during every Truckee Thursday this summer. 5-8:30 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

Truckee Thursdays Downtown | Truckee | Aug. 8, 15

Historic Downtown Truckee is turned into an exciting street fair featuring local and regional artisans, food trucks, a beer garden and live music. Take the free shuttles; schedule online. Tahoe Weekly is a sponsor. 5-8:30 p.m. Free | truckeethursdays.com

Romano’s Certified Farmers Market Sierra Valley Farms | Beckwourth | Aug. 9

Here at Sierra Valley Farms purchase meats, fish, organic fruits and vegetables, artisan cheeses and condiments; also there are wine tastings. 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free | facebook.com

Cowgirls and Cocktails

Thank you to all our donors, supporters, and volunteers! The Tahoe City Fireworks show is possible only through your support. The show is 100% funded through your donations and sponsorship.

Tahoe Donner | Truckee | Aug. 9

Cowgirls and cowboys are invited. Enjoy a meandering trail ride through meadows and forests, then relax and socialize while nibbling appetizers and sipping a frosty beer or glass of wine. 5-7 p.m. $69-$85 | tahoedonner.com

Chamber | CVB | Resor t Association

Meet the Winery: Kermit Lynch

VisitTahoeCity.org I (530) 583-3348 I info@visittahoecity.com

VisitTahoeCity.org I (530) 583-3348 I info@visittahoecity.com

Live. Live.Work. Work.Play. Play.Visit. Visit. 24

Uncorked Truckee | Truckee | Aug. 9

Meet the Winery Summer Event is with Kermit Lynch. Enjoy a sample of the fine Italian and French wines the retailer is known for. 6-8 p.m. | facebook.com

Breweries from throughout the western states showcase their best brews while fantastic bands bring the funk, making this fun-filled event one of the most popular in the Tahoe region. You can bring your canine companions. Proceeds benefit HSTT. 2 p.m. $10

August Luau Beach Retreat & Lodge South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 10

A Lake Tahoe Tradition of great food and entertainment with island-inspired drinks, an authentic buffet featuring Kalua Pork and Hula dancers. 6-9 p.m. $32-$65 | eventbrite.com

Truckee Community Farmers Market 12047 Donner Pass Road | Truckee | Aug. 11

Until Sept. 29 with local produce and live music. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | chamber.truckee.com

Planting workshops Villager Nursery | Truckee | Aug. 11

Join one of the local gardening classes. Eric Larusson will lead these instructive workshops on colors for your garden, how to be water wise and more. 10:30-11:30 a.m. | villagernursery.com

Brewmaster Dinner Series Martis Valley Grille | Truckee | Aug. 11

Northstar’s executive chef offers a curated evening featuring five seasonally inspired dishes paired with locally sourced craft beers. 6-8:30 p.m. $75 | eventbrite.com

Harvest Mondays Truckee Demonstration Garden | Aug. 12

Slow Food Lake Tahoe needs volunteers. No experience is required to volunteer. All produce grown this season will be donated to Project MANA in Truckee. 8 a.m. Free | facebook.com

Tank Garage wine tasting Basecamp | Tahoe City | Aug. 12

Join Calistoga-based Tank Garage Winery for complimentary wine tastings. Meet the winemaker, sample Tank Garage Winery’s new wine blends, roast s’mores and play lawn games. 5-7 p.m. Free | facebook.com

South Lake Tahoe Farmers Market American Legion Hall South Lake Tahoe | Aug. 13

Every Tuesday until Oct. 8 at the American Legion Hall parking lot. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Free | eldoradofarmersmarket.com

Workday Wednesdays Truckee Regional Park | Aug. 14

Truckee Demonstration Garden needs help with planting, weeding, fertilizing, repairing and learning all we can about high altitude growing. No experience is required to volunteer; learn as you go. 7 a.m. Free | facebook.com

Stateline Farmers market Kahle Park | Stateline | Aug. 14

Every Wednesday through Sept. 11 at Kahle Community Park. 4-7 p.m. Free | laketahoemarkets.com

Thirsty Third Thursday Wine Walk Downtown | Gardnerville | Aug. 15

Until Sept. 19. Each month is themed. 4:30-7:30 p.m. | visitcarsonvalley.org


August 8-14, 2019

Sunday through Thursday not valid w

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GROWER-PRODUCER STORY & PHOTOS BY LOU PHILLIPS

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hose who read this column regularly know that for the most part I rarely hype the latest and greatest of the wine world. It is not that I am a curmudgeon; it is just that those trends are rarely great. The most recent example is the — hopefully — on-its-last-legs “natural wine craze,” which has proven to be a way for really bad and usually quite inexperienced winemakers to sell their really bad wine. But, if not for them, what would the tightpants-Fedora-wearing hipsters have to swill — I mean, enjoy? That is why I have sat back and observed the grower-producer Champagnes, or GPCs, for several years until I was assured of both the quality and value of these wines. Well, hip hip hooray; this is a movement worth moving on especially while the warm weather is still in full song.

Champagne Egrot et Filles | Courtesy K& L Wines

In line with my mission to make you all wine insiders, we will start with the Champagne region’s dirty big secret — and sorry to burst your bubble. Sacré bleu, horrible pun? Those pricey bottles of non-vintage Champagne are not smalllot artisan wines; they are produced by the boatload. To be fair, I have to admit, despite the voluminous volumes, those sparklers are pretty darn good; but are purposely the same as they ever were because the big houses strive for consistency above all else.

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A champagne cellar.

That is where GPCs come into play. These are the underdogs who previously sold their grapes to the Champagne giants, who turned them into beaucoup bucks — and purposely tasty, generic sparklers.

Those pricey bottles of nonvintage Champagne are not

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small-lot artisan wines; they are produced by the boatload.

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(530) 546.2191 GPCs on the other hand are from small specific sites and not only reflect those sights but also their vintage. Even when they are non-vintage classified, they often have back-label designations of the year in which most of the grapes were harvested. As a result, they are wines of distinction: distinct terroir, distinct vintage and distinct winemaking. As a bonus, they tend to skew to the mid-level of Champagne prices. What can one expect when branching out into the grower-producer Champagne world? Well, like the big-box brands you will get fresh, crisp, lithe-bodied bubblies. However, instead of a consistency, you will adventure into varied flavor profiles that can range from fruit forward to minerally to downright earthy. This may beg the questions: “But, Mr. Vino Guy, how do I get me some GPCs? And, if they are so unique, how do I find one in my preferred style?” Glad you asked. Solution No. 1 is as always to visit your friendly neighborhood wine purveyor because he or she will tend to be inordinately proud of and knowledgeable about GPCs. No. 2 is Google it; producer’s Web sites of these artisan winemakers typically tell you just what to expect. 

Nightly 5-6 p.m.

Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier in Tahoe and his consulting business wineprowest. com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 5443435 or wineguru123@gmail.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns. Click on Wine Column under the Local Flavor tab.

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hen I was a kid, my mom would have fancy parties for her and my dad’s friends. They were was always a huge deal — well, at least for my mom. The most I and my brothers and sisters could hope for was that it would be on a Saturday, which was cleaning day for us; we weren’t allowed to go out to play until the entire house was cleaned. Oh yes, there were ways to get around cleaning day, but I don’t want

The whole house smelled so good and when we asked what this dish was or what was going with the dessert,

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to corrupt younger generations with how to get out of house work, I’ll leave that part to your imagination. By now, you have probably figured out that if the party fell on a Friday, that meant cleaning day came twice that week — and no kid should be subjected to that. The thing is, the cleaning wasn’t the part that bugged us the most. All day, we would be cleaning every square inch of the house while our mom was in the kitchen making all kinds of appetizers and various things for the main course. There also would be some kind of fancy dessert she’d come up with. The whole house smelled so good and when we asked what this dish was or what was going with the dessert, she would go into great detail leaving our tongues hanging

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FREE CONCERT Soul Project NOLA

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out in anticipation. I don’t really know why we would we ask, because we knew our fate and it didn’t include any of the delicacies being prepared. The best we could hope for would be that there would be something left over. Sad to say, but by the third grade, I knew even that would be far from reality.

As soon as the first guest turned onto our street, the nine of us kids were sent scurrying upstairs, our bellies full of — are you ready for this — Spaghetti O’s. I mean, come on, we could have at least had real spaghetti. The one dish my mom was really famous for making was her stuffed Cornish game hens. The hens would be stuffed with a wild rice and everyone always loved them. Personally, I wouldn’t know, at least not for many more years until I was much older. I did have a stuffed Cornish game hen on the menu while I was doing private dinners. The hen is boned and stuffed with a sweet pepper and basil couscous and served with a pear brandy sauce. I have to say, it would make my mom proud had she gotten to try it. I thought I would give you the recipe for a marinade that is great on the grill. Don’t worry, it also is great cooked in the oven, too. Since I want to grill the hen, I would bone it out. If you choose not to bone it, then cook it on indirect heat or on the grill not directly over the charcoal; use the lid. It will be a little trickier to caramelize the marinade without burning the skin. Boned or not, give this marinade a try and get out and get some grilling in.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Chef’s Recipe under the Local Flavor tab.

CORNISH HEN MARINADE

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith

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TUESDAYS TRUCKEE

THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE

3:30pm to 4pm Sierra Senior Center 10040 Estates Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church 341 Village Blvd.

(775) 298-4161

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ProjectMana.org

½ C soy sauce 1 C orange juice 1½ C white wine 4 T lemon juice 4 T brown sugar 6 T oil 1 T hot sauce, like Tabasco 1 large garlic clove, chopped 1 C fennel tops, chopped 1 T ginger, chopped Salt & pepper to taste (soy sauce is salty, so you won’t need much salt)

Mix all ingredients and marinade the hens for three to eight hours before cooking.


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Profile for Tahoe Weekly

August 8-14, 2019  

The “Thunderbird” yacht plies the waters of Lake Tahoe. One of the most iconic wooden boats in the world is housed at Thunderbird Tahoe, the...

August 8-14, 2019  

The “Thunderbird” yacht plies the waters of Lake Tahoe. One of the most iconic wooden boats in the world is housed at Thunderbird Tahoe, the...