Page 1

I N T H I S I S S U E / / J U LY 5 - 1 1 , 2 0 1 8

THE QUIET SCENERY

SIMPLICITY MEEKS RUSTIC ON THE MENU AT // CREEK FALLS THUNDERBIRD CLAIR TAPPAAN

OF

GRACE POTTER’S LODGE STARTING GUIDE TO POINT FOR SIERRA ADVENTURES // WASHOE GALIS DUNGAL //

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17

Josh Reed

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Volume 37 | Issue 17 TM

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 TheTahoeWeekly.com

SUBMISSIONS

35 21

Events & Entertainment Submit at TheTahoeWeekly.com Editorial Inquiries editor@tahoethisweek.com Entertainment Inquiries entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Photography production@tahoethisweek.com

Catherine Schoen

MAKING IT HAPPEN

IN THIS ISSUE Arts & Culture

10 Clair Tappaan Lodge

20 Washoe Galis Dungal

17 Meeks Creek Falls

21 The Arts

18 Sierra Stories

Out & About 06 Lake Tahoe Facts 08 Sightseeing 10 Events 12 Golf Courses 12 Family Fun Activities 13 Golf Column 19 Beaches & Parks 14 Family Fun

Fun & Games 22 Horoscope & Puzzles

Music Scene 34 Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 35 High Sierra Music Festival

Local Flavor

15 Beaches & Parks

27 Thunderbird’s Darren Weston

16 Wet ‘n’ Dirty

28 Tasty Tidbits

16 Hiking

29 Wine Column

19 Marinas & Boat Ramps

30 Chef’s Recipe

ON THE COVER Webber Falls, located north of Truckee on Highway 89, plunges 76 feet in several cascades into a deep gorge carved out of basaltic bedrock. The Tahoe Sierra is blessed with boundless waterfalls to explore, like Meeks Creek Falls featured in this issue of Tahoe Weekly. For details on other waterfall outings, click on Out & About at TheTahoeWeekly.com. For directions to Webber Falls, visit fs.usda.gov. Photography by Scott Thompson | ScottShotsPhoto.com, @ScottShotsPhoto

Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at

4

Sales Manager Anne Artoux anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Art Director Alyssa Ganong production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106

JULY 5-11, 2018

Features

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102

EXPLORE THE TAHOE SIERRA FROM THE PUBLISHER

Summer is in full swing, and we always encourage our readers to explore a new side to Tahoe like Meeks Creek Falls on the West Shore, the historic Clair Tappaan Lodge situated on Donner Summit, the Washoe Galis Dungal on display on the North and West Shores or this year’s High Sierra Music Festival located in the Lost Sierra. All of these adventures and much more await locals and visitors alike and beg your attention. Don’t worry there’s plenty of summer left if you don’t get to all of these adventures this week. But, of course, we’ll have a whole new set out in next week’s edition, so you should get started.

Only at TheTahoeWeekly.com Here’s what you may have missed if you’re not following The Tahoe Weekly on Facebook:

• Trails, sugar pine planting top Tahoe Fund projects • Barker Pass to open mid-July • Summer fun, programs at Taylor Creek • Forest Service eyes plan for Incline Lake • South Shore beaches closed for safety, habitat protection • Alcohol ban in effect at some Tahoe beaches • Fireworks ban in effect 

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & Instagram

Graphic Designer Justeen Ferguson graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment Editor Sean McAlindin entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Food Editor Priya Hutner priya@tahoethisweek.com Copy Editor Katrina Veit Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle, Cam Schilling, Brittany Negaard

TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/ TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

@TheTahoeWeekly


WINTER WILL COME AGAIN. Meanwhile, here’s what to look forward to • BREATHTAKING PANORAMIC VIEWS • TAHOE’S HIGHEST BASE ELEVATION (8260’) • EASY ACCESS W/ SLOPESIDE PARKING

Only 25 Minutes From Reno 80

TRUCKEE

RENO 267

431

INCLINE VILLAGE

89

TAHOE CITY

395

LAKE TAHOE

Season Opening Date Oct 26 2018 Book now at skirose.com

28

50

50

STATELINE

CARSON CITY


TheTahoeWeekly.com

LAKE TAHOE FACTS |

Read about how the lake was formed, Lake Tahoe’s discovery, lake clarity and more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Explore Tahoe.

GRAY ’S CROSSING

COYOTE MOON

TAHOE DONNER

Reno & Sparks

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Donner Lake Donner Summit

OLD GREENWOOD

Truckee

BOCA RESERVOIR

DONNER LAKE

STAMPEDE RESERVOIR

GRAEAGLE MEADOWS

ho Ta

N

GRIZZLY RANCH WHITEHAWK RANCH NAKOMA

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

TAHOE CITY

RESORT AT SQUAW CREEK

Tahoe City

Alpine Meadows

LAKE FOREST

Dollar Hill

TAHOE CITY MARINA

Sunnyside SUNNYSIDE

l

Ta h o e R i m

GOLF COURSES

ai Tr

NORTH TAHOE

NV

TAHOE VISTA REC AREA

HOMEWOOD

SAND HARBOR

Lake

Glenbrook o Ta h

OBEXER’S

e Ri m Tr a i l

Meeks Bay

Fed By: 63 streams and 2 hot springs

Cave Rock

Only Outlet: Truckee River (Tahoe City)

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F

Emerald Bay

Zephyr Cove South Lake Tahoe

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Average Snowfall: 409 inches

Stateline

Fannette Island

TAHOE KEYS

Cascade Lake

LAKESIDE

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Shoreline: 72 miles

BIJOU

CAMP RICHARDSON

Ta h oe

Natural rim: 6,223’

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

SKI RUN

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

EDGEWOOD TAHOE

CAVE ROCK

Watershed Area: 312 square miles

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

CA

MEEKS BAY

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Tahoma Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

Carson City

Homewood

CASINOS

Lake Clarity: 2017: 59.7 feet avg. depth. 1968: First recorded at 102.4 feet Average depth: 1,000 feet

Marlette Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

Eagle Rock

DEEPEST POINT

COON ST. BOAT LAUNCH

SIERRA BOAT CO.

INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

BOAT RAMPS

INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN

OLD BROCKWAY

FEATHER RIVER PARK

MARINAS

eR

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

WEST EAST SOUTH

Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California.

i m Tr a

il

SCHAFFER’S MILL

PLUMAS PINES

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

PROSSER RESERVOIR

PONDEROSA

FREEL PEAK

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

TAHOE PARADISE

Permanent Population: 66,000

LAKE TAHOE

Number of Visitors: 3 million annually

Kirkwood

Markleeville

Why is the lake blue? The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and the blue light is scattered back.

“LYFE is about being your most healthy, authentic self, living life to the fullest, and inspiring others” www.TahoeLyfe.com

6


“What’s really exciting about Mountainside is that it’s attracting a younger, more active, adventurous type of owner. The homes feature curated interiors that respect the environment but are also inspired and hip. Boulders will be a true departure from woodsy or lodgy traditions” Scott Corridan, www.scottcorridan.net

BOULDERS SHOW HOME photo: Outfitter, Levon Ayres

Set within the ski-in, ski-out community of Mountainside, the Boulders enclave offers three distinct approaches to mountain living, all offering the resort-style amenities of Mountainside. “Residents love to tell us how Mountainside helps them unplug, and truly connect.” says Ron Barnes, Senior Strategist of Mountainside Partners. “That it’s the ideal natural environment to relax and let their kids live a little more free range. For us, a connection to the land, and to each other, is what Boulders is all about.”

Getting back to nature is easier when you live within it.

OPEN HOUSE DAILY 2,9OO – 4,9OO sq ft Priced from under $2.5M Up to 1,6OO sq ft of outdoor living space

MountainsideNorthStar.com

877.495.7984

OW N E R S H I P I N C L U D E S full access to all Mountainside amenities including a 2-year membership to the Tahoe Mountain Club.

All information is subject to change. All imagery is representational. View may vary per home.


TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

North Lake Tahoe Demonstration Garden

East Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Eagle Rock

Summer | Free (775) 586-1610, ext. 25 | demogarden.org Demonstrations of lake-friendly landscaping using native and adaptive plants, water conservation, soil stabilization techniques, defensible space from wildfires & BMPs. Self-guided tours & clinics. TART

West Shore

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. Trail to top is on the south side. TART

Explore Tahoe

North Tahoe Arts Center

Tahoe Art League Gallery South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Emerald Bay

Tahoe City

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.) TART/BlueGo

Heavenly

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. Ticket required. BlueGo

Tahoe City Field Station

West Shore

Parking fee | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Sugar Pine Point State Park is home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (summer tours), see boathouses with historic boats and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

High Camp

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

PROSSER 21,332

8

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. (summer tours). TART

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Soda Springs

(530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

East Shore

Readings taken on Friday, June 29, 2018 ELEVATION :

6,228.91 |

IN 2017:

6,228.9

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

Olympic Valley

Tahoe Maritime Museum

Tahoe City

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Features guided tours, exhibits and hands-on activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Tahoe Science Center

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Truckee Railroad Museum

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

VISITORS’ CENTERS Kings Beach Kings Beach State Rec. Area (Thurs.-Mon., summer)

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd. (800) 468-2463

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd. (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50 (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City 100 North Lake Blvd. (530) 581-6900

Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Rd. (Depot) (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village 855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr. (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (summer tours). TART

3080 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Rd. (530) 587-3558

225

200,000 AF

175

125

150,000 AF

Measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS)

Tahoe City

KidZone Children’s Museum

Old Jail Museum

621

Truckee

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

Lake Tahoe Museum

FLOW AT FARAD

Tahoe City

Gatekeeper’s Museum

CAPACITY: 18,300 C

75

Watson Cabin

Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe

CAPACITY: 9,500 C 50

Truckee River |

Parking fee (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle (summer tours), see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House. TART/BlueGo

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

CAPACITY: C 226,500

CAPACITY: A 20,400

Emerald Bay

Donner Summit Historical Society

South Lake Tahoe

CAPACITY: 29,840

50

25

MARTIS 854

Vikingsholm Castle

Tallac Historic Site

0

INDEPENDENCE 17,362

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the Tower of Nations with its Olympic Flame and the symbolic Tower of the Valley at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

May-October | thunderbirdtahoe.org Thunderbird Lodge is the former Whittell estate. This magnificent lakefront home features the Lighthouse Room, Old Lodge, 600’ underground tunnel (with a former lion cage) and Boat House, home to the “Thunderbird,” a 1939 wooden boat. Ages 6+ only. No on-site parking. Tours by reservation only.

100,000 AF

DONNER 9,247

truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

STAMPEDE 220,443

Olympic Museum

Summer | (530) 583-3279 | terc.ucdavis.edu This 1920s-era building features a history of the field station, current UC Davis research projects, interactive exhibits and demonstration garden. Ages 8+. TART

Thunderbird Lodge

LAKE LEVELS Lake Tahoe Natural rim 6,223’ P

North Shore

Truckee

South Lake Tahoe

North Shore

BOCA 37,277

North Shore

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street and 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

South Lake Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

Tahoe City

(530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

South Lake Tahoe

Fannette Island

Incline Village

Catch glimpses of Lake Tahoe and lupine in bloom along the meandering bike trail in Tahoe City. | Katherine E. Hill

TROA.NET

PUBLIC TRANSIT: NORTH SHORE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH SHORE | bluego.org


July 5-11, 2018

Come shop with us at

The Resort at Squaw Creek

530.583.1874

400 SQUAW CREEK ROAD

OLYMPIC VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

Custom. Unique. Lake Tahoe jewelry

Right here on the main floor at the Boatworks Mall • Tahoe City SteveSchmiersJewelry.com • 530.583.5709

9


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

Clair Tappaan Lodge S TA RT I N G P O I N T F O R S I E R R A A D V E N T U R E S STORY BY TIM HAUSERMAN

T

he Sierra Club’s Clair Tappaan Lodge provides family-style rustic accommodations on old U.S. Highway 40 near the top of Donner Pass. Today, it is a gathering place for those seeking to escape to the recreational winter and summer playground that is the Sierra Nevada. Folks back in the 1930s had the same idea. The lodge was the brainchild of an enterprising group of skiers from the Bay Area who decided they needed an inexpensive place to stay in the Sierra. One of the original skiers involved in the effort was Milton Hildebrand, who recently celebrated his 100th birthday, and helped the build the lodge when he was 16. In 1935 he wrote: “After a great weekend of skiing, the skiers asked themselves where to spend the night on future trips. The obvious answer was a ski-lodge, owned and operated by the Sierra Club.”

Check off

#1 on our

Ultimate Tahoe Summer Bucket List at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

in an opening of a thick forest of firs.

BUILDERS OF THE FUTURE FUNDRAISER J U LY 6 - 8 | F E AT U R I N G M I LT O N H I L D E B R A N D

Today, Clair Tappaan Lodge sits high above Highway 40 in an opening of a thick forest of firs. In the winter it is buried deep in snow and in the spring, the melting snow fills the adjoining creek that plunges down toward Lake Van Norden. The sound of rushing water is joined by wind through the trees, and frequently, trains emerging or entering the tunnel under Mount Judah at the top of the Sierra crest. The lodge has a large dining area and kitchen, living room with rock fireplace and plenty of comfy couches, several recreational rooms and a variety of sleeping accommo10

TOP: Back entrance to Clair Tappaan Lodge. | Tim

Hauserman; ABOVE: Still from a 1934 video of the building of the Lodge. | Courtesy Sierra Club Clair Tappaan Lodge; LEFT: Library & living room inside the lodge. | Courtesy Clair Tappaan Lodge

dations. Sleep happens in dorm rooms and cubicles, which are rows of tiny rooms with two bunk beds. Restrooms are communal as are the eating arrangements with breakfast, lunch and dinner included and everyone pitching in to help with a quick chore every day. Those old wood floors creak in the middle of the night as folks make their way gingerly to the restroom, so ear plugs are recommended if you are a light sleeper.

THINGS TO DO Hiking | The Pacific Crest Trail crosses Highway 40 at Donner Pass, about 1 mile from the lodge. Hikers can head south on the 6-mile Mount Judah Loop Trail full of wildflowers into mid-July. Or meander north through the popular climbing walls of Donner Summit 4 miles to a tunnel under Interstate 80. Further exploration north of I-80 leads to Frog Lake Cliff, Castle Peak, Coon Canyon, Basin Peak, Paradise Lake and the Sierra Club’s Peter Grubb Hut. Trailheads to Lola Montez Lake and Loch Leven Lakes are within a 15-minute drive. Also worth exploring are the old railroad tunnels on Donner Summit. You can just

J U LY 5 - 1 2 , 2 0 1 8

WHAT DO YOU DO

WHEN YOU SEE A BEAR?

Learn how to handle wildlife encounters, whether it be while camping, hiking or in your own backyard on July 7 at Spooner Lake State Park at 7 p.m. Join the Nevada Department of Wildlife’s Urban Wildlife Coordinator for a lesson on what to do and how to react to wild animals; from raccoons and coyotes to bears and mountain lions.

Clair Tappaan Lodge sits high above Highway 40

Architect Walter Ratcliff was in this ski party; he had already designed another ski lodge in the area so he assumed the task of designing this one. Horace Breed, the leaseholder of the property, transferred it to the Sierra Club, which started collecting money from members. Different branches of the club donated items such as fireplaces and hoods, stoves and plumbing fixtures. A fellow with the perfect Western name, Lewis Clark, rounded up workers who built the lodge in time for the 1934-1935 winter season.

EVENTS CALENDAR

take a hike right out the back door of the lodge to wind through a deep forest above a bubbling creek. Mountain biking | Lola Montez Lake is a stop-off point along the challenging Hole in the Ground Trail that begins near Boreal Ski Area. The Donner Lake Rim Trail is also accessed on Donner Summit. It travels past Summit Lake into Johnson Canyon and then climbs up to the Drifter Hut at the top of the winter home of Tahoe Donner Cross Country. Road biking | Old Highway 40 is one of the area’s most iconic road rides. Starting at Donner Lake the 40-mile route to Cisco Grove and back is both beautiful and challenging; much of the road is lightly traveled. It includes a 3-mile climb up to Donner Pass from the lake with unbeatable views of Donner Lake, Mount Rose and a gentle descent along the Yuba River. Be aware of the deceivingly difficult, long climb back to Donner Pass from Cisco Grove. After all that summer exercise, some lake time might be in order. Donner Lake is only 5 miles away where swimming, kayaking and other boating activities abound. Find your own public pier and dive in.| clairtappaanlodge.com 

This family-friendly event is free, and park entrance fees will be waived for attendees. The program will be held outdoors. | RSVP (775) 749-5980

JULY 5 | THURSDAY Beach cleanup Tahoe beaches | Tahoe City

After Tahoe’s celebrated July Fourth festivities, locals beaches are full of trash, which can hurt wildlife and lake clarity. Join volunteers for the largest cleanup of the year to remove litter from Tahoe beaches. Bring a reusable gloves. 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Free | keeptahoeblue.org

Tahoe Star Tours Northstar’s Dark Skies Cosmoarium | Truckee

Northstar Dark Skies Cosmoarium offers star guide Tony Berendsen for an intimate look at the Sierra stars. View the cosmos through high-powered Celestron telescopes. 7-10 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Family Movies At Squaw The Village at Squaw Valley | Truckee

Families and friends can enjoy movies on the big screen in the Events Plaza each Thursday night until Aug. 30. Movies at 8:30 p.m., weather permitting. Blankets and warm clothes are recommended. 8:30-10:30 p.m. Free | (530) 584-6266, squawalpine.com


July 5-11, 2018

OUT & ABOUT

EVENTS Cool Car Cruizen Fridays Heavenly Village | South Lake Tahoe

Join the fun every Friday until Oct. 12. All cool vehicles welcome. 5-8 p.m. Free | goodsamsaferide.com

Tahoe Star Tours Northstar’s Dark Skies Cosmoarium | Truckee

Northstar Dark Skies Cosmoarium offers star guide Tony Berendsen for an intimate look at the Sierra stars. View the cosmos through high-powered Celestron telescopes. 7-10 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Members are involved in the tech industry or small business. Topics are technology, startups, local businesses and environment. 6-8 p.m. $5 | chamber.truckee.com

Kindred fundraiser Moody’s Bistro, Bar & Beats | Truckee

Enjoy a night of music by Sam Ravenna, a silent auction, an art project and a display of Transcendent Souls on display at Burning Man this year in this fundraiser for Kindred Art & Folk Institute. 6-10 p.m. | (530) 587-8688, kindredtruckee.org

JULY 10 | TUESDAY

Stargazing Guided Tour

Good Morning Truckee

Resort at Squaw Creek | Olympic Valley

Truckee-Tahoe Airport | Truckee

Come gaze into the vast beyond and learn about constellations, the history of reading stars, and perhaps a bit about your astrological sign. 9-10:30 p.m. $15-$25 | (866) 791-7417, destinationhotels.com

JULY 7 | SATURDAY 50th Annual Pancake Breakfast Meeks Bay Fire Department | Meeks Bay

Supports local Tahoe and Donner Lake Californa State Parks and the Meeks Bay Fire Protection District. First Responders eat free. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. $6-$10 | sierrastateparks.org

Discussing community issues each month. Open to everyone. 7:30-8:30 a.m. | (530) 587-8808, chamber.truckee.com

Summer lecture series Tahoe Maritime Museum | Tahoe City

Join the summer lecture series. Light refreshments served. 5 p.m. Free | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Family movie night Aspen Grove | Incline Village

Starlight Cinema Summer Movie begins at dusk. Price includes admission, popcorn and drink. 7 p.m. | yourtahoeplace.com

Tahoe Star Tours Northstar’s Dark Skies Cosmoarium | Truckee

Northstar Dark Skies Cosmoarium offers star guide Tony Berendsen for an intimate look at the Sierra stars. View the cosmos through high-powered Celestron telescopes. 7-10 p.m. | eventbrite.com

JULY 8 | SUNDAY 50th Annual Pancake Breakfast Meeks Bay Fire Department | Meeks Bay

Supports local Tahoe and Donner Lake Californa State Parks and the Meeks Bay Fire Protection District. First Responders eat free. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. $6-$10 | sierrastateparks.org

Tahoe City Waterfront Walking Tour Gatekeeper’s Museum | Tahoe City

This fun and informative tour focuses on Tahoe City and includes the Truckee River, dam, water rights, flow rates, water clarity, historic sailing vessels, boat racing, fish, Commons Beach and things to do. About three-quarters of a mile on flat trail. 10-11:30 a.m. Free | (530) 448-4143, mountaintowntours.wordpress.com

Builders of the Future Clair Tappaan Lodge | Norden

This year, we are honoring the people who built Clair Tappaan Lodge in 1934, and all the students today who benefit from environmental education at the Lodge. The Clair Tappaan Lodge Environmental Education Scholarship Fund helps bring those students to an outdoor environment where they learn and practice the Sierra Club mission. $210 | (530) 426-3632, clairtappaanlodge.com

JULY 9 | MONDAY Mountain Minds Monday Pizza on the Hill | Truckee

Tahoe Silicon Mountain is a monthly networking group for people that live, work or vacation in the Truckee/Tahoe/Reno area.

Courtesy Northstar California

JULY 6 | FRIDAY

JULY 11 | WEDNESDAY Giving Fund Benefit Dinner The Lodge Restaurant & Pub | Truckee

The Tahoe Donner Giving Fund will host its 4th Annual Dinner and Silent Auction. Proceeds fund fall grants supporting local nonprofits in the greater Truckee area and scholarships to community high school graduates. 6-9 p.m. | (530) 587-9425, tahoedonner.com

BEERFEST & BLUEGRASS F E S T I VA L

The 12th annual Beerfest & Bluegrass Festival returns to the Village at Northstar from July 6 to 8 with roots jams, family mountain fun and fresh brews. Pick up a souvenir tasting glass and enjoy crisp pours along with food stations boasting handcrafted, relaxed summer fare. The weekend features Run the Brewery, a family-friendly on-mountain brewery run on July 6. This 5K/10K race weaves through Northstar alpine trail system with a beer sampling. On July 7, enjoy the main event featuring a beer tasting from 3 to 7 p.m. with 40 regional and local craft breweries along with live music from Ike & Martin, Dirty Cello and Sean Watkins. A Brewmaster dinner on July 8 at Martis Valley Grille features Northstar California’s Executive Chef Steve Anderson artfully pairing five courses of seasonally inspired dishes with craft beers (also offered Aug. 12 and Sept. 2). | northstarcalifornia.com

530.913.9212 TahoeAdventureCompany.com Kayak & SUP Tours Mountain Bike Tours

Stargazing Guided Tour Resort at Squaw Creek | Olympic Valley

Hiking / Multisport

Come gaze into the vast beyond and learn about constellations, the history of reading stars, and perhaps a bit about your astrological sign. 9-10:30 p.m. $15-$25 | (866) 791-7417, destinationhotels.com

Family Adventures Teambuilding Group Events

Movies on the Beach Commons Beach | Tahoe City

Thunderbird Lodge Kayak Tour

Enjoy a free, family friendly movie every Wednesday until Aug. 22 at dusk. | visittahoecity.org

JULY 12 | THURSDAY Tahoe Star Tours Northstar’s Dark Skies Cosmoarium | Truckee

Northstar Dark Skies Cosmoarium offers star guide Tony Berendsen for an intimate look at the Sierra stars. View the cosmos through high-powered Celestron telescopes. 7-10 p.m. | eventbrite.com

$

5 OFF

Trailhead Mountain Bike Rentals at Tahoe XC in Tahoe City, 925 Country Club Dr.

Kayak & Paddleboard Rentals on the beach in Tahoe Vista, 7010 N. Lake Blvd.

RENTALS

Half day or longer *Mention this coupon at time of booking and bring ad.

Family Movies At Squaw The Village at Squaw Valley | Truckee

Families and friends can enjoy movies on the big screen in the Events Plaza each Thursday night until Aug. 30. Movies at 8:30 p.m., weather permitting. Blankets and warm clothes are recommended. 8:30-10:30 p.m. Free | (530) 584-6266, squawalpine.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events.

Tahoe Adventure Company Inspiring High Sierra Adventures 11


TheTahoeWeekly.com

Four Cruises a Day

DRIVING RANGE

|

PAR

On the Tahoe Gal

ADVERTISEMENT YARDS

NORTH TAHOE CRUISES

Golf Courses

HOLES

OUT & ABOUT

COYOTE MOON (530) 587-0886 | CoyoteMoonGolf.com

18

7,177

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GRAY’S CROSSING (530) 550-5804 | GolfinTahoe.com

18

7,466

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NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA (530) 562-3290 | NorthstarCalifornia.com

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6,820

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OLD GREENWOOD (530) 550-7024 | GolfinTahoe.com

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7,518

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INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP Tee time: (866) 925-4653 | Pro shop: (775) 832-1146 | GolfIncline.com

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7,106

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INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN Tee time: (866) 925-4653 | Pro shop: (775) 832-1150 | GolfIncline.com

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3,527

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TRUCKEE & NORTHSTAR

NORTH LAKE TAHOE & OLYMPIC VALLEY

LIVE MUSIC on Sunday night | MAGICIAN SHOW on Monday night Reservations: (530) 583-0141 | Book online at TahoeGal.com | Tahoe City, CA

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Family Fun

License #954258

PLUMBING SERVICE & REPAIR DRAIN CLEANING & ROOTER SERVICES Frozen pipe thawing specialist Quality, professional work at reasonable rates. Locally Owned & Operated | Honest & Reliable Not a Franchise Company Call our office

(530) 525-1807

Ask about our Free Whole House Plumbing Inspection | RooterConnection.com

ADVENTURE

PUBLIC POOLS

GEOCACHING

“Tahoe Gal”

High-tech treasure hunt on mountain using GPS to find 10 caches. Free with Aerial Tram ticket; GPS rentals available. Opens mid June. TART

Cruises to Emerald Bay, Happy Hour, dinner, sunset, full moon, Sunday dinner/live music, comedy dinner, and more. Next to Lighthouse Center, east end of Tahoe City. TART

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com

INCLINE VILLAGE

DISC GOLF

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com

25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends). Daily rates & memberships available.

18-hole course at Incline Park at 980 Incline Way. Free. Daily dawn-dusk. TART

OLYMPIC VALLEY

INCLINE VILLAGE

KIRKWOOD

(209) 258-7277 | kirkwood.com Experience disc golf at 7,800 feet with the notorious DiscWood disc golf course. The 18-hole course weaves through the trees and over mountainous terrain. Free. Scorecards and maps may be picked up at the General Store.

(530) 583-6985 | squawalpine.com 18-hole course at Squaw Valley’s High Camp. Disc rentals. TART

Getting it right since 2001

PAYING TOO MUCH FOR WINTER BOAT STORAGE?

TRUCKEE

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

swim training, hydraulic lift at Tahoe-Truckee High School. TART

ROCK CLIMBING WALLS

TAHOE VISTA

(530) 546-4212 | northtahoeparks.com 18-hole course at North Tahoe Regional Park, off National Avenue. Parking $5. Daily dawn-dusk. TART

TRUCKEE

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

TRUCKEE

ROLLER SKATING

18-hole course at Truckee River Regional Park, off Brockway Road. Dogs must be on leash. Free. Daily dawn-dusk. TART

OLYMPIC VALLEY

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com At High Camp at Squaw Valley. All ages. Aerial Tram ticket required. TART

ZEPHYR COVE

SKATE PARKS

The Zephyr Cove course is 18 holes covering 5,256 feet with holes of varying lengths. On Warrior Way. BlueGo

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

HORSEBACK RIDING

TRUCKEE

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee River Regional Park with several bowls with a spine and channel, a long rail and ledges. Knee and elbow pads and helmets required. Free. Daily dawn-10 p.m. TART

Bijou Community Park features a skateboard park on Al Tahoe Boulevard off Highway 50. BlueGo

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

(530) 587-9470 | tahoedonner.com Guided 1- and 2-hour trail rides for ages 7+. Pony rides.

12

(530) 542-6056 | citiofslt.com

A mostly flat and moderately wooded course is located at Bijou Community Park featuring 27 holes covering 8,324 feet. The course features mixed tees with varied fairways with slight elevation changes. On Al Tahoe Boulevard off Highway 50. BlueGo

18 holes at Sierra College Campus. Free. Daily dawn-dusk. TART

Call Steve at (775) 287-1089 for our full service, low rate guarantee.

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

(530) 550-2225

TahoeBoatManagement.com

Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. TART

25-yard indoor pool with 6 lanes, 1-meter spring diving board,

TRUCKEE

Allow TAHOE BOAT MANAGEMENT to quote and compete for your business

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com

25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. BlueGo

OLYMPIC VALLEY

STORAGE • SERVICE • SALES

(800) 218-2464 | tahoegal.com

NORTH TAHOE CRUISES “Tahoe Cruz”

(530) 583-6200 | tahoesail.com Scenic, 2-hour sailing cruises from Tahoe City Marine. Private charters. TART

INCLINE VILLAGE

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com

Intermediate/advanced area with two, 5-foot tall bowls with a spine, 3-foot box and 2.5 foot bowl for beginners. Street course on top, with 8-foot flat rail, 6-foot down rail, four stairs and a 10-foot downward ramp. Corner Hwy. 28 & Southwood. Daily dawn-dusk. TART

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be listed in Family Fun. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more family activities. Click on Kids under the Out & About menu.


July 5-11, 2018

OUT & ABOUT

COYOTE MOON STORY BY B R I T TA N Y N E G A A R D

Go lf C o ur se

Course Details 18 holes | par 72

Yardage 5,022 to 7,111

Slope Courtesy Coyote Moon Golf Course

125 to 140

Ratings 69.3 to 73.6

G

etting lost in the beauty and seclusion of nature is a why many visit the Tahoe region. Coyote Moon Golf Course is the perfect place to do just that. Early into the first nine it is easy to forget that you are just a few minutes’ drive away from downtown Truckee.

Every hole is different, but each fit into the existing terrain like a glove. My golf partner David “Dayday” Gosiewski and I teed off late afternoon with no one else in sight; it felt like we had the place to ourselves. The course was in good shape for being open only two weeks. The high elevation added to the serenity, as did the course design. The greens are not flat, but rather designed to fit in and around the natural surroundings. Opened in 2,000, the course sits on 250 acres and remains a home for local wildlife. The course is fair and challenging, and the wide greens allow shot play for various skill levels. I enjoyed seeing how the greens were designed to fit in with the established surroundings. Every hole is different, but each fit into the existing terrain like a glove. As we made our way

down the 12th hole, a friendly ranger, Craig, let us know we were approaching a coyote den. This is where the course gets its name. The 13th hole offers the best view of the coyote’s home; this is the course signature. The tee off is breathtaking. There’s even a warning sign to club down, as the championship tees are maybe 100 yards down slope. Hole 13 takes you right over Trout Creek and the rest of the back nine incorporates quite a few enjoyable water features. The established firs, pines and granite boulders throughout keep the course interesting, but not unplayable. Coyote Moon has a Bar & Grill offering breakfast, lunch, happy hour and pizza. Call in an order on the call box at Hole 8 and it will be waiting once you get off the back nine. If you have time, arrive early and take in the view, and take advantage of the full swing practice mats, putting and chipping greens. Practice balls are included with your round of golf, as is a cart and cooler. This course is the perfect Sierra golf experience. Twilight was a great time for us to play; the rates are discounted later in the day, as well. | (530) 587-0886, coyotemoongolf.com 

CoyoteMoonGolf.com

MAKE old Greenwood and gray’s crossing PART OF YOUR FOURTH OF JULY PLANS Play Old Greenwood or Gray’s Crossing and experience the finest golf and course conditions in the High Sierra. June 28 - July 11 take advantage of our $110/person rate Monday - Wednesday, or $125/person, Thursday - Sunday. The Courses Old Greenwood’s eighteen holes of mountain perfection are a ‘must-play’ for any serious golfer, while Gray’s Crossing features fast greens and tournament-like conditions every day.

The rising moon over majestic mountains and scurrying coyotes among soaring pines are only a couple of nature’s wonders greeting Coyote Moon golfers year after year. This course, known for its preserved natural beauty and challenging, yet fair, greens, is a wonderful place to escape into the High Sierra while playing the game you love.

GOLF COURSE NCGA MEMBER RATES AVAILABLE

10685 NORTHWOODS BLVD. | TRUCKEE, CA 96161 | (530) 587-0886

to book your tee time call (530) 550-7044

Old Greenwood | GolfinTahoe.com | Gray’s Crossing 13


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Family Fun Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events. Make It! Take It!

Tahoe City Library | Tahoe City July 5-7, 10, 12

Get your maker hat on at the library with crafts for elementary age kids on a drop-in basis. Each week a new project will be revealed. Crafts can be done in the library or take it to go. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Pre-Schooler Story Time

Tahoe City Library | Tahoe City | July 5, 12 For ages 5 and younger. 10:30-11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382, placer.ca.gov

Toddler Story Time

Incline Village Library | Incline Village July 5, 12

TOY BOAT BUILDING Swing into Tahoe Maritime Museum this summer for toy boat building on Saturdays through Aug. 25 from 2 to 4 p.m. Work together to glue together the parts and then get creative with painting and decorating your boat. Drop in for ages 3 to 9 years. $5 suggested donation. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

With stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 18 months to 3 years. 11:1511:45 a.m. | (775) 832-4130

Preschool story time

Truckee Library | Truckee | July 5, 12

For ages 3 years and older. A half-hour stayand-play after the reading. 11:30 a.m. | (530) 582-7846, mynevadacounty.com

Teen Center

Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe Kings Beach | July 5-6, 9-12

MARKETPLACE

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be included in the Marketplace.

Ships, Sails & Nautical Tales

Tahoe Maritime Museum | Tahoe City | July 6

FACIAL & WAX STUDIO Since 2002

MICRODERMABRASION

BOTANICAL FACIALS & PEELS

EXPERT WAXING

Cara Mia Cimarrusti Esthetician/Owner

5 3 0 .4 1 2 . 0 4 4 6 425 N. LAKE TAHOE BLVD #17 · Tahoe City

ABOVE THE BLUE AGAVE

SIDESHOW BOB’S Window Cleaning Since 2000

Residential & Commercial (530) 581-2343 or (530) 412-2703 CA & NV Licensed & Insured

PRUNING ✽ TREE REMOVALS ✽ CRANE WORK

& BRACING ✽ STUMP GRINDING DISEASE & PEST IDENTIFICATION

CABLING

HAZARDOUS TREE EVALUATION ARBORISTS CONSULTING DEFENSIBLE SPACE

FREE ESTIMATES

Tree Risk Assessment Qualified Tyler Boutelle (owner-operator) Certified arborist Lic #we-8090a California Contractor’s #963194

alpinearboriststreecare.com 530.582.1286

FERTILIZING

Teen Center at Boys & Girls Club for 7th graders and older. Computers, TVs, video games, books, pool table and board games. Open gym Wednesday-Friday 6-7 p.m. 7 p.m. | (530) 546-4324, bgcnlt.org

Let us keep your home looking beautiful so you can focus on summer...

Yard Maintenance RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

530.448.3125 | RosebudTahoe.com

Advertise in Shop Local!

Color 2” $60 | 3” $90 All ads included in free digital edition.

they can kill your trees & destroy your home! CUT-RITE TREE & SPRAY

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CARPENTER ANT & BARK BEETLE CONTROL SPECIALIST Complete Pest Control Service — Inside & Out

Serving Truckee & Tahoe areas for over 40 years!

530-525-7704 | CutRiteTreeAndSpray.com

Preschool-age children enjoy maritimethemed stories and a model boat building craft. Ages 3 to 7. Registration required. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Family Fun Fridays

KidZone Museum | Truckee | July 6

Play-based class designed to inspire exploration and discovery through art. For ages 5 and younger. 11 a.m. | kidzonemuseum.org

Sky Tavern Grass Roots Bike Series Sky Tavern | Reno | July 6

Kings Beach Library | Kings Beach | July 7

Bring a white, 100 percent cotton item and transform it into a colorful tie dye.Dye, rubberbands and guidance provided. Register. 2-4 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Toy Boat Buildling

Tahoe Maritime Museum | Tahoe City | July 7 Work together to glue together the parts and then get creative with painting and decorating the boat. Ages 3 to 9. Drop in. 2-4 p.m. $5 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Young Adult Writers’ Meetup South Lake Tahoe Library South Lake Tahoe | July 7

Meet with fellow writers for discussion and writing. Laptops available. Snacks provided. 3-4 p.m.

Californian Dirt MTB Series

Sugar Bowl Resort | Norden | July 8

Register for the California Dirt MTB Series online. Registration is required for all racers as this is the last race of five races’ cumulative points for two series. 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. | ybonc.org

Kids playtime

Truckee Library | Truckee | July 9

Truckee Library hosts an unstructured playtime for children and parents. Toys are provided. 4:30-5:30 p.m. | (530) 582-7846, mynevadacounty.com

Tahoe Tiny Timbers Gym Time

IVGID Rec Center | Incline Village | July 10

Tahoe Tiny Timbers Gym Time is designed to give kids up to 5 years an opportunity to socialize and use his or her gross motor skills. 9:30-11 a.m. | (775) 832-1310, yourtahoeplace.com

Preschool Story Time

Kings Beach Library | Kings Beach | July 10

Toddler Time

Kids ages 4-9 are invited to an evening of fun at Northwoods Clubhouse while parents enjoy a night on the town. 5-9 p.m. | tahoedonner.com

For ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. 10:30 a.m. | (530) 582-7846

Northwoods Clubhouse | Truckee | July 6

Truckee Library | Truckee | July 10

Parents’ Night Out

ME2 Lab

Go out for a night on the town feeling confident that your children are safe and having the time of their lives. Children ages birth through 11 years old will enjoy games, crafts, recreation and a movie. Registration is required. 6-10 p.m. | (530) 583-1534, tahoeministries.com

University of Nevada, Reno engineering students present topics to school-age kids in fun, hands-on demonstrations. 4 p.m. | (775) 832-4130, washoecountylibrary.us

First Baptist Church | Tahoe City | July 6

Carpenter Valley family hike

14

Groovy Tie Dye

Kids Night Out

Kids in grades 6-12 can shoot hoops, play volleyball, climb the rock wall and play arcade or video games. 6:30-9 p.m. $5 | (775) 586-7271

Licensed & Insured

Ongoing for kids. 12-1 p.m. | (530) 5827846, mynevadacounty.com

Preschool Storytime is every Tuesday from 10:30-11am. Each week a different theme. Kids work on multi-sensory pre-literacy skills. Stop by for the fun and read books, sing songs, learn nursery rhymes, and do a fun and easy crafts. 10:30-11 a.m. Free | (530) 5462021, placer.ca.gov

Kahle Community Center | Stateline | July 6

Juan Estrada 530-546-8493 530-412-2220

Truckee Library | Truckee | July 7

Sky Tavern will be hosting a Grassroots Bike Series. It will be fun for the entire family. All age groups and levels welcome. Come on up for some good ol’ family fun. Project Discovery will be offering Zip-line rides. 4:30-9:30 p.m. | skytavern.com

Teen Scene

Tree Trimming & Removal • Brush Chipping Yard Clean-Up • Wood Splitting & Stacking Stump Grinder • Crane Work

Lego Club

Lower Carpenter Valley | Truckee | July 7

Enjoy a docent-led, 2+ mile round-trip hike on mostly flat terrain on somewhat rough roads.This will be a slower-paced hike with stops designed to allow play amongst the erractic boulders and along the creek side. 9 a.m. | eventbrite.com

Incline Village Library Incline Village | July 10

Story Time

Truckee Library | Truckee | July 11

For ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. 10:30 a.m. | (530) 582-7846, mynevadacounty.com

Story time

Zephyr Cove Library | Zephyr Cove | July 11

Enjoy stories, songs, activities and coloring. 11:30 a.m. | (775) 588-6411, catalog.douglas. lib.nv.us

Paws To Read

Incline Village Library | Incline Village | July 12 Children can practice reading to friendly therapy dogs and receive a free book. All ages welcome. 4-5 p.m. | (775) 832-4130


July 5-11, 2018

Beaches & Parks

OUT & ABOUT

DOGS OK

PLAYGROUND

FIRE PIT/GRILL

BEACH

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

BIKE TRAIL ACCESS

RESTROOMS

PICNIC TABLES

RENTALS | TOURS | LESSONS | SALES | DELIVERY

$5 OFF Rentals & Tours

EAST SHORE

CHIMNEY BEACH & SECRET COVE ROUNDHILL PINES BEACH

Hwy. 50

SAND HARBOR STATE PARK ZEPHYR COVE

Hwy. 28, 5.9 miles south of Incline Vlg.

Hwy. 28, 3 miles south of Incline Village

Hwy. 50

• •

Must mention ad at booking & present upon arrival.

TAHOE CITY

KINGS BEACH

COON STREET DOG BEACH

Hwy. 28, at the bottom of Coon Street

KINGS BEACH STATE RECREATION AREA

Hwy. 28, in Kings Beach

• •

MOON DUNES BEACH

Hwy. 28

NORTH TAHOE BEACH

Hwy. 28, across from Safeway

SECLINE BEACH

Hwy. 28, at the end of Secline Street

SPEEDBOAT BEACH

Hwy. 28, at Harbor Ave.

Shop at 521 North Lake Blvd. Rentals on the water at Commons Beach

SAND HARBOR STATE PARK

Rentals next to the boat ramp

Reservations 530.581.4336

|

TahoeCityKayak.com & SandHarborRentals.com

TAHOE VISTA

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK & DOG PARK

SANDY BEACH

Hwy. 28, at top of National Ave.

Hwy. 28, across from the Perennial Nursery

TAHOE VISTA RECREATION AREA

Hwy. 28, at National Ave.

CARNELIAN BAY

CARNELIAN WEST BEACH PATTON LANDING

Hwy. 28, next to Gar Woods

Hwy. 28, at Onyx Street

• •

TAHOE CITY

COMMONS BEACH HERITAGE PLAZA

Hwy. 28, Tahoe City behind old fire station

Hwy. 28, Downtown Tahoe City

LAKE FOREST BEACH POMIN PARK SKYLANDIA

Lake Forest Road, 1.5 miles east of Tahoe City

Lake Forest Road, east of Tahoe City

Lake Forest Road, east of Tahoe City

64-ACRES PARK & BELL’S LANDING

Hwy. 89, south of Tahoe City

TAHOE CITY DOG PARK

Grove Street

WILLIAM KENT BEACH

Hwy. 89, 2.5 miles south of Tahoe City

WILLIAM LAYTON PARK & GATEWAY PARK Hwy. 89, south of Tahoe City at Dam

Hwy. 89, 17 miles south of Tahoe City

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS PARK EMERALD BAY BEACH KILNER PARK

Hwy. 89, 18.5 miles south of Tahoe City

Hwy. 89, 3.5 miles south of Tahoe City

MARIE SLUCHAK PARK MEEKS BAY

Hwy. 89, 4 miles south of Tahoe City

Corner of Hwy. 89 & Pine St., Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Hwy. 89, 9.5 miles south of Tahoe City

Obexer’s Marina - 5300 West Lake Blvd. - Homewood, CA

FREE BOWLING

CAMP RICHARDSON EL DORADO BEACH KIVA BEACH

Hwy. 89 •

Hwy. 50 at Lakeview Commons

Hwy. 89 east of Taylor Creek

NEVADA BEACH POPE BEACH

Hwy. 89

Hwy. 50

Hwy. 89

REGAN BEACH

Hwy. 50

Automatic Scoring “Bumper Bowling,” Video Arcade, Billiards, Video Poker, Cocktails, ATM, Full Swing Golf Simulator 920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

bowlincline.com

SQUAW VALLEY PARK

At Hwy. 89 & Squaw Valley Road

Hwy. 267, 1 mile south of Truckee Airport

RIVER VIEW SPORTS PARK

12200 Joerger Drive

TRUCKEE RIVER REGIONAL PARK

Hwy. 267, .25 miles south of Truckee

• • •

DONNER LAKE

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK SHORELINE PARK WEST END BEACH

I-80 Donner Lake exit

Donner Pass Road, next to the State Park West of Donner Lake

• • •

BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

Coupon good for the entire party. Limit 1 free game per person per visit. Not valid with other offers. Not valid for league or tournament play.

Nevada Rack n Roll Expert Billiards Services

TRUCKEE

MARTIS CREEK

Smoke Free Every Day!

TRUCKEE RIVER CANYON •

Family Recreation Center VOTED BEST POOL ROOM ON THE NORTH SHORE!

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

BALDWIN BEACH

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete

(530) 525-7962 - ObexersBoat.com

each person who bowls 2 games at regular price gets a 3rd game free with this coupon

Hwy. 89, 10 miles south of Tahoe City

Water Ski · Wakeboard · Wakesurf

WEST SHORE

D.L. BLISS STATE PARK

Learn to

Jet Ski Rentals (2015 Sea-Doo GTS 130) & Boat Charters

Experience Lake Tahoe

- Pre-Owned Pool Tables For Sale -Moving/Installation - Recovering - Leveling - Repairs - Antique Restoration - Accessories

http://NevadaRacknRoll.com - Serving Nevada And California

(775)544-9810

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org

15


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Wet ‘n’ Dirty

Hiking

*Trails open depending on conditions.

Courtesy Eco Bike Adventures

Mileage is roundtrip, with levels based on family access. All trails are more heavily used on weekends.

LO ST S I E R R A

ADVENTURE EXPO

Eco Bike Adventures hosts the third annual Lost Sierra Adventure Expo from July 6 to 8 featuring a Pedal Assist Open, Throttle Assist Open, Kids Trail, 100m Drag Race, Long Jump Challenge and a Best in Show eBike Build, along with demos, food, beer and wine and live music at the Diamond S Ranch in Beckwourth. | ecobikeadv.com

TAHOE RIM TRAIL

EMERALD BAY & VIKINGSHOLM CASTLE

The Tahoe Rim Trail is a 164.8-mile loop trail that encircles Lake Tahoe. The trail is open to hikers and equestrians, and mountain bikers in some sections. It is generally moderate in difficulty, with a 10 percent average grade and elevations ranging from 6,300 to 10,333’. Visit tahoerimtrail.org for maps, guided hikes & descriptions.

GRANITE LAKE

LAKE TAHOE EAST SHORE

MARLETTE LAKE Moderate | 9 miles RT Walk along the dirt path through the picnic area and follow signs to Marlette Lake. Mostly sun exposed. Great wildflowers in early summer. Start at Spooner Lake State Park.

SECRET HARBOR & CHIMNEY BEACH Easy | 3 miles RT Follow the trail to Chimney Beach trail and follow the trail to the end and over a group of boulders to reach the sandy beaches of Secret Harbor (the wooden steps off the trail lead to the nude beach at Secret Cove). Off Hwy. 28.

SKUNK HARBOR

Guided Wildflower Hikes

Stanford Rock workday

Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Olympic Valley | July 5-12

Standford Rock | Tahoe City | July 7

This summer enjoy daily guided hikes until Sept. 3 at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at High Camp. Dogs are welcome and there are no reservations necessary. 2:30 p.m. | (800) 4030206, squawalpine.com

TAMBA has an ambitious schedule of weekend trail days this year scattered around the lake.Volunteers are needed to help to make new connections or to make old trails more rideable. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | tamba.org

Wildlife Talk Sky Tavern Grass Roots Bike Series Sky Tavern | Reno | July 6

Sky Tavern will be hosting a Grassroots Bike Series. It will be fun for the entire family. All age groups and levels welcome. Come on up for some good ol’ family fun. Project Discovery will be offering Zip-line rides. 4:30-9:30 p.m. | skytavern.com

Spooner Lake State park | Glenbrook | July 7

Learn how to handle wildlife encounters, whether it be while camping, hiking or in your own backyard. Join the Nevada Department of Wildlife’s Urban Wildlife Coordinator for a lesson on what to do and how to react to wild animals; from raccoons and coyotes to bears and mountain lions. 7-8:30 p.m. Free | (775) 749-5980, parks.nv.gov

Wilderness First Aid for Dogs The Cedar House Sport Hotel | Truckee | July 6 Gain the confidence to make decisions and create positive outcomes for your dog in unpredictable situations. | (530) 582-5655, cedarhousesporthotel.com

Californian Dirt MTB Series Sugar Bowl Resort | Norden | July 8

Register for the California Dirt MTB Series online. Registration is required for all racers as this is the last race of five races’ cumulative points for two series. 7 a.m.-2:30 p.m. | ybonc.org

Black Wall workday Black Wall | Norden | July 7

Join the Access Fund and the Truckee Donner Land Trust to work on creating sustainable climbing access routes and staging areas. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. | eventbrite.com

Round Lake work day Round Lake | Meyers | July 7

Join Tahoe Rim Trail Association for a fun day out on the trail to rebuild and maintain the trail to Round Lake that suffered damage last fall. The group will leave from the Big Meadow trailhead and walk several miles with tools to reach all the work sites. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | tahoerimtrail.org

Carpenter Valley family hike Lower Carpenter Valley | Truckee | July 7

Enjoy a docent-led, 2+ mile round-trip hike on mostly flat terrain on somewhat rough roads.This will be a slower-paced hike with stops designed to allow play amongst the erractic boulders and along the creek side. 9 a.m. | eventbrite.com

Hike Donner Summit Canyon Donner Summit | Truckee | July 8

A trail up the canyon follows much of the old Dutch Flat/Donner Lake Wagon Road, which later served as the Lincoln Highway. Some of the historic features visible from the upper part of the trail include Native American petroglyphs, the China Wall and the world’s first automobile underpass (1913). 9 a.m.-2 p.m. | eventbrite.com

55+ Hiking Series Area Venues | Incline Village | July 10

Hikers age 55 and older can visit different Tahoe locales as part of IVGID Senior Programs. Meet in Incline Village Recreation Center lobby. Bring water, lunch and wear appropriate clothing and shoes. 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. | yourtahoeplace.com

Pacos Ladies Ride Pacos Bike Shop | Truckee | July 10

The Pacos Ladies Ride meets at the shop for a fun packed girl-powered mountain bike ride. There is nothing like joining a group of like-minded woman for an evening of exercise and crisp mountain air as the last few magical hours of daylight fade out. 5:30 p.m. | (530) 587-5561, pacosxc.com

Moderate | 2.8 miles RT This interesting hike ends at a beautiful cove lined with boulders and a luxurious sandy beach on the edge of Lake Tahoe with some of the warmest waters around the lake. Visitors can look inside the historic party house owned by George and Caroline Newhall in the 1920s along beach. Park north of gate; do not block gate off Hwy. 28.

SPOONER LAKE Easy | 1.8 miles RT Spooner Lake is a great, easy hike for any season with interpretive displays. At Spooner Lake State Park. NORTH SHORE

PICNIC ROCK Moderate | 3.6 miles RT Just off the Tahoe Rim Trail, the expansive view from the top provides a panorama of both Lake Tahoe and the Martis Valley. A single track winds up, offering a gradual climb with no technical challenges, until reaching Picnic Rock, an old volcanic rock. Off Hwy. 267.

STATELINE LOOKOUT Easy | .5 miles RT This short hike offers superb views of Lake Tahoe. A short, self-guided nature trail explains the history of the North Shore. Hwy. 28 in Crystal Bay.

Moderate | 2.5 miles+ RT | No dogs Steep descent to Vikingsholm Castle. Can continue to Eagle & Emerald Points around the bay for easy hikes. Connects to Rubicon Trail (see below). Park on either side of rocky overlook in Emerald Bay on Hwy. 89. ADA access (530) 525-9529.

Moderate | 2.2 miles RT A small alpine lake situated on the cusp of Desolation Wilderness, the hike is a popular entrance for hikers and equestrians to the back country and a spectacular trek towering over the pristine waters of Emerald Bay. Steady ascent of 850’ in less than 1 mile. Trailhead at Bayview Campground off Hwy. 89.

PAGE MEADOWS Easy-Moderate | 4-6 miles RT The hike to Page Meadows is a local favorite because of its easy access and beautiful scenery through forests to an expanse of several meadows. You can start the hike to Page Meadows from 64 Acres off Hwy. 89 along the Tahoe Rim Trail for a longer hike or from Ward Creek Boulevard off Hwy. 89.

RUBICON TRAIL & LIGHTHOUSE Easy-Moderate | .5-9 miles | No dogs Hike starts at Calawee Cove at D.L. Bliss State Park or Emerald Bay. Trail follows cliffs and coves along Lake Tahoe, nesting ospreys and eagles, short side trail to Rubicon Lighthouse, which is easy to access with small children.

BALANCING ROCK Easy | .5 miles A short, self-guided nature trail featuring Balancing Rock, an overlying rock of 130 tones balanced on a rock. At D.L. Bliss State Park.

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK Easy | 1.5 miles RT The nature trail loops through the forest past an array of wildflowers and through several sections of dense slash bleached nearly white from years of sun exposure. There are great spots to relax on the beach below Ehrman Mansion. ALPINE MEADOWS

FIVE LAKES Strenuous | 5 miles RT Five Lakes is a great hike inside Granite Chief Wilderness, with the first 1 mile+ a steady ascent with great views of Alpine Meadows. Trailhead 1.8 miles up Alpine Meadows Road from Hwy. 89 across from Deer Park Drive. Dogs prohibited May 15-July 15. OLYMPIC VALLEY

SHIRLEY CANYON & SHIRLEY LAKE

SOUTH SHORE

LOWER & UPPER ECHO LAKES Easy | 2.4-4.8 miles RT Lower and Upper Echo Lakes is a little-known paradise perched atop Echo Summit, 5 miles west of Meyers on Hwy. 50. The trailhead begins next to the dam. Once you reach Upper Echo Lake, 2.4 miles from the start, you’ll see a kiosk at a dock for a water taxi. You can take a taxi back or return the way you came, or continue into Desolation Wilderness. The ride is a relaxing 20-minute tour through the channels connecting the two lakes. Taxi, cash only. (530) 659-7207. WEST SHORE

CASCADE FALLS Moderate | 1.4 miles RT This boulder-strewn hike takes hikers to the waterfall descending from Desolation Wilderness into Cascade Lake. The falls are raging in the spring and are often a trickle by late summer. Near the end of the trail, walk up a large, flat boulder to the top of a hill where the trail can become confusing. Look for wooden posts marking the trail. Trailhead at Bayview Campground off Hwy. 89. Not recommended for small children or small dogs.

Easy-Strenuous | .5-5 miles RT This hike follows a creek as it passes by waterfalls and spectacular granite boulders along Shirley Creek. Park at the end of Squaw Peak Road. The first section that follows the creek is great for kids. As you climb, the trail may sometimes be hard to distinguish, so keep the creek on your right going up and on your left going down. Can continue a strenuous climb to High Camp and take the Aerial Tram to the valley (schedule at squawalpine.com).

SQUAW & EMIGRANT PEAKS Moderate | 3.4-4.4 miles RT Ride the Aerial Tram to High Camp, elev. 8,200’, and choose from a variety of trails (maps from Guest Services or squawalpine.com). Climb to the weathered buttresses atop Squaw Peak, visit the historic Watson Monument at Emigrant Peak or meander through the meadows covered with wildflowers, and enjoy the panoramic views afforded from Squaw’s spacious upper mountain. Tram ticket required. Hikes in the meadows good for small children. TRUCKEE

GLACIER MEADOW LOOP

Moderate | 1 mile RT Quick hike to the top of a volcanic outcropping offers panoramic views of the area off Hwy. 89 south of Tahoe City.

Easy | .5 miles RT Short, self-guided nature loop with signs that explain how glacial action carved and polished the surface landscape. Take Interstate 80 W from Truckee to the Castle Peak/Boreal Ridge Road exit.

EAGLE FALLS & LAKE

MARTIS CREEK WILDLIFE AREA

EAGLE ROCK

Easy-Moderate | .1-3 miles RT Great views of Lake Tahoe & Emerald Bay. Falls 5-minute walk from parking lot. Steady ascent to Eagle Lake not recommended for young children. West end of picnic area across from Emerald Bay, Hwy. 89.

Easy | 4 miles RT Loop through Martis Creek meadow for a walk along the creek. Off Hwy. 267.

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more hiking trails to enjoy.

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events. 16

Click on Summer under the Out & About menu.


July 5-11, 2018

FEATURE

THE QUIET SCENERY OF

MEEKS CREEK FALLS The view south along the Pacific Crest from Andesite Peak.

STORY BY TIM HAUSERMAN

Early summer is the perfect time to check out Tahoe’s waterfalls.

EXCLUSIVE C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Watch a video of the Meeks Creek Falls Check out more Tahoe waterfalls. Click on Summer under the Out & About menu.

The most famous are Eagle Falls and Cascade Falls at Emerald Bay, Horsetail Falls off of State Route 50 near Echo Summit and Galena Falls on the Tahoe Rim Trail near Mount Rose. But, it’s also nice to escape the crowds by visiting some of the lesserknown falls like Meeks Creek Falls. I took a trip there this spring and it was a spectacular mass of roaring whitewater and we had the place to ourselves. The trip to Meeks Creek Falls

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Meeks

Creek Falls. | Katherine E. Hill; The remains of a three-seat outhouse from Camp Wasiu. | Tim Hauserman; Enjoy resting on the many big boulders along Meeks Creek below the falls. | Katherine E. Hill

THE ROUTE FOLLOWS AN OLD DIRT ROAD THROUGH A MEADOW is a perfect 4-mile roundtrip. It’s easy walking, level most of the way with just a bit of gentle climbing. The hike begins at the Meeks Bay trailhead; it is also known as the Tahoe-Yosemite Trail, which leads to Genevieve and Crag lakes in the Desolation Wilderness, then over Phipps Pass to Emerald Bay. The route follows an old dirt road through a meadow. It’s level with wildflowers in the grassy areas and a scattered forest of pine and fir trees. A glimpse of Rubicon Peak can be seen to the southwest and regular views pop up of the high moraines of granite to the north and south. Recent fires and controlled burns have created patches of thick, equal-aged pines in the meadow areas. At 1.3 miles, opposite a springtime pond/summertime meadow, the trail to the lakes leads off to the right, becomes single track and climbs uphill. To reach the falls, leave the trail and go straight ahead on the old road. The road continues through a grove of large firs and, unfortunately, diseased pines, then narrows and begins climbing gently to a junction. Here a left turn takes you to a concrete foundation, which was the lodge for Camp Wasiu, a Girl Scout camp from the 1950s to the late 1960s. What remains now are the rusty remains of bed springs and old pipes, the foundation, the steps to what was once the front door and a three-seat outhouse near the falls.

WITH WILDFLOWERS IN THE GRASSY AREAS At one time, Camp Wasiu was a happening place, a rustic retreat at the edge of the wilderness. A news clipping promoting the camp in 1960 reads: “While much of the camp now lies buried under a blanket of snow, in just a few months hundreds of girls will be exploring recesses of the camp, swimming in the “girl” made dam, hiking into lake areas of Desolation Valley and participating in numerous group activities.” From the lodge foundation, the route to the falls continues straight west toward the mountains on a gentle descent. Now, roaring Meeks Creek and the approaching falls can be clearly heard. Just past the outhouse, devoid of walls, you can begin to meander through the woods toward the rocky pile at the bottom of the falls. The falls themselves are a swiftly moving rush of water tumbling through a pile of boulders. While the creek flows year-round, it is the early-season snowmelt that gives the falls its power, so get it while you can. There are a number of flat granite boulders to sit on and enjoy the rush of the falling water just a few feet away. In our most recent visit, we startled a pair of Sierra garter snakes, which like to sun themselves on the rocks next to the water. What I didn’t locate was the water bottle I lost here a few years ago. It dropped into the drink below the flat boulder I was sitting on and was so tucked into the murky water beneath the rock; it was impossible to see or retrieve.

A N D A S C AT T E R E D FOREST OF PINE AND FIR TREES. A GLIMPSE OF RUBICON PEAK CAN BE SEEN TO T H E S O U T H W E S T. Once you’ve had your fill of the falls, you can return to the trail or explore the creek farther downstream. Several options are available to add to your adventure. You could return to the trail and hike another 3.5 miles on a moderate ascent to Genevieve Lake. At that point, be sure to make the worthwhile effort to go another half mile to enjoy the more dramatically beautiful Crag Lake. Option B would be to return to your car, cross State Route 89 to find the super fine Meeks Bay Beach, one of Tahoe’s finest. 

17


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Ma y “Queenie” Dunn | Ta h o e G o l f P i o n e e r : P a r t I I

EXCLUSIVE C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Read Part I. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe menu.

The Tahoe City Golf Course turns 100 years old this summer. | Courtesy TCPUD.

waters around Big Blue, with a charming, short-line, passenger-train system that catered to the comforts of well-heeled visitors heading to Lake Tahoe from the United States and Europe. In 1905, a promotional pamphlet described the Tahoe Tavern as “a long rambling building shingled with pine bark, with 20-foot porches and supports of roughsawed native wood, all set in a primeval forest.” The top of the three-story building included many gables on a steeply pitched roof to shed winter snow. The interior featured beamed ceilings with elk horn chandeliers and simple rustic furniture. Rooms were furnished with “perfectly appointed baths, large closets, electric lights, steam heat and running water.”

After studying the landscape, she began designing a six-hole course that worked in tune with the undulating topography of the meadows.

t’s been 100 years since the opening of the Tahoe City Golf Course, making it one of the oldest, continuously operating public courses in California. The ninehole, par 33 course has a fascinating and colorful history that starts with Queenie Dunn, America’s first professional woman golfer and designer of the Tahoe Tavern Links, precursor to the current course. In the following decades, legendary entertainers such as Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and other celebrities would spend summer afternoons on the Tahoe City course. May “Queenie” Dunn-Webb was already a rock star in the world of golf when she was hired in 1917 by Charles Bliss, managing owner of the luxurious Tahoe Tavern hotel just south of Tahoe City. Americans were going crazy for golf in the first decades of the 20th Century and Bliss wanted to add the sport to his guest amenities of boating, swimming, horse-back riding, hiking and fishing. English-born, May Isabella Gourlay Dunn came from the Gourlay-Dunn lineage of families from Scotland and England. These two families had dominated the sport of golf for three generations, teaching professionally, designing courses, writing instructional articles and books, and improving club and ball construction. In 1910, 30-year-old May married her second husband, William “Willie” Webb, a club and ball maker. It was Willie Webb who affectionately called May “Queenie,” a nickname that stayed with her for life. Queenie filed for divorce four years later and immigrated to the United States in 1915 where she became this country’s first female golf professional. In 1916, after a short stint teaching and writing about golf on the East Coast, Queenie Dunn-Webb and her younger sister Norah moved to Nevada where the former helped establish the Reno Golf Club and 18

then designed and supervised the construction of a 9-hole course for it. The course opened for business in the spring of 1917 making Queenie the first female architect of golf links in the world. That June she got a call from Bliss at the Tahoe Tavern with a job proposal. The next day, Queenie boarded a westbound train to Truckee where she switched to the Bliss-owned, narrow-gauge Lake Tahoe Railway that connected the transcontinental line with Tahoe City. Tahoe Tavern first opened in the spring of 1902 as part of timber baron and railroad operator Duane L. Bliss’ grand scheme to elevate Tahoe Basin tourism through better transportation and upscale accommodations. D.L. Bliss was the patriarch who began a family dynasty that had major impacts on the economic growth of Lake Tahoe. Bliss integrated a sleek, stylish steamship, “S.S. Tahoe,” that plied the

Special thanks to golf historian Rick Lund for generously sharing his research. Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. You may reach him at mark@thestormking.com.

Rex, the Blizzard King Rex, the lead dog on this sled team pulling a plane at Dutch Flat, is the most famous dog you never heard of. Rex was a superhero Samoyed canine known for more than 30 mountain rescues over his lifetime, including an impressive effort to reach a snowbound passenger train west of Donner Pass in January 1952. Courtesy Jim Cheskawich

I

Diners were served the best foods available, including perfectly prepared Tahoe lake trout. For those conducting business or wishing to contact the outside world, long-distance telephone and Western Union Telegraph services were available. During the busy summer season, the Bliss resort could host up to 450 guests with hotel rates starting at $3 per day. D.L. Bliss died in 1907, but he left his hotel and transportation empire to his family. In 1917, the Tahoe Tavern was being managed by Charles Bliss who determined that golf links would add greatly to the hotel’s summer amenities. After listening to Charles’ proposal to build a course, Queenie set out at once to inspect the hay fields near the outlet of Lake Tahoe where the new Tahoe Tavern Links were to be located. After studying the landscape, she began designing a six-hole course that worked in tune with the undulating topography of the meadows. The half-dozen links ran 1,405 yards, varying from 115 to 330 yards between holes. Tahoe Tavern Links would be expanded to nine holes by

1921, but Bliss wanted the course playable by summer 1918 so an abbreviated version was constructed. On July 6, 1918, the course was officially dedicated and opened with a well-attended tournament with 25 players from all over the West Coast. Before irrigation was installed at the Tavern Links in 1931, the tees and greens were made from sand while the fairways were natural turf, which was common at the time. Jeffrey and sugar pines towered above the links, giving the course a wilderness vibe. When the course was expanded, one of the new tee shots boasted a breathtaking view of Lake Tahoe. Queenie remained the course pro and manager for Tahoe Tavern Links for several years. During the winter months, she taught golf in Southern California at various Linnard Hotels in the Pasadena area. Linnard Hotels would eventually buy Tahoe Tavern resort in 1925. D.M. Linnard, head of the company, gained approval from the Interstate Commerce Commission, along with an agreement with Southern Pacific Railroad, to upgrade the Lake Tahoe Railway to standard-gauge track, thus opening the line for reliable winter transportation to Tahoe Tavern and Lake Tahoe. But Queenie’s days as America’s most famous golf professional were numbered. In 1920 she met a wealthy businessman who was in Nevada for a divorce. Adolph G. Hupfel had arrived in Reno in 1919 to initiate divorce proceedings against his wife, who was connected to the St. Louisbased Busch beer brewing dynasty. The divorce was acrimonious and highly publicized, but it eventually ended in 1921. A highly skilled golfer, Hupfel spent his free time playing the Reno and Tahoe courses where he met Queenie. The couple fell in love and married in 1923. They moved to New York City and Queenie gave up her professional status to play for fun and later engaged in the art of landscape painting. Tahoe City’s Bechdolt family would buy the course in 1950 and run it for 62 years, but that’s a story for another day. 

Rex was flown in from San Francisco to lead the team that transported a doctor from Truckee to the stranded train. His exceptional endurance and unerring skill earned Rex the moniker “Blizzard King.” Rex later set a new world record when he pulled a sleigh weighing 1,870 pounds.


OUT & ABOUT

July 5-11, 2018

Marinas & Boat Ramps

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TAHOE CITY MARINA Marina & Rentals: (530) 583-1039 Service: (530) 581-2516

BOAT INSPECTIONS

MANDATORY INSPECTIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR LAKE TAHOE, ECHO LAKES, FALLEN LEAF LAKE & DONNER LAKE AND AREA RESERVOIRS. LAKE TAHOE

(888) 824-6267 | tahoeboatinspections.com | Fees $35-$121; 7-day pass available. | Daily 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. NORTH SHORE ALPINE MEADOWS: Hwy. 89 at Alpine Meadows Road. TRUCKEE TRUCKEE-TAHOE AIRPORT: Hwy. 267 off Airport Rd., Truckee. EAST SHORE SPOONER SUMMIT: Junction of Hwys. 28 & 50. No vessels more than 30’. SOUTH SHORE MEYERS: At the junction of Hwys. 89 & 50.

530-587-5777

gowhitewater.com YOGA ON THE BEACH in Tahoe City All Summer Long Best Yoga Class in Tahoe! Amazing Teachers! Wireless Headsets!

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TRUCKEE AREA

(530) 582-2361 | truckeeboatinspections.com Mandatory inspections are required for all vessels for Donner Lake at inspection stations above. $12-$160. Annual pass available. (530) 582-7724. Mandatory self inspections are in place at Prosser, Boca, Jackson Meadows & Stampede reservoirs.

CALIFORNIA BOATER CARD AS OF JAN. 1, 2018, CALIFORNIA REQUIRES BOAT OPERATORS TO PASS A MANDATORY BOAT SAFETY EDUCATION COURSE. This law will be phased in over eight years, by age. | californiaboatercard.com

PUBLIC RAMPS LAKE TAHOE

LAKE FOREST

(530) 583-3796

1.5 miles east of Tahoe City, off Hwy. 28

5 a.m.-7 p.m. Until Sept. 30. $15-$20. Pass available. Restrooms. One-way exit only after closing. Sealed boats only.

TAHOE VISTA REC. AREA (530) 546-4212

7 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. May 18-Labor Day. Picnic area, beach, restrooms.

COON ST. BOAT LAUNCH (530) 523-3203

6 a.m.-4 p.m. daily until Sept. 30. Restrooms.

Hwy. 28, Bottom of National Ave.

Hwy. 28, Bottom of Coon St. in Kings Beach

SAND HARBOR

(775) 831-0494

Hwy. 28, 2 miles south of Incline Village

CAVE ROCK

(775) 831-0494

Hwy. 50, East Shore

EL DORADO BEACH

(530) 542-2981

Hwy. 50 at Lakeview Ave., South Lake Tahoe

6 a.m.-8 p.m. until Sept. 30. Picnic area, beach, Visitors’ Center, food, restrooms. Sealed boats only.

6 a.m.-8 p.m. daily until Sept. 30. Picnic area, restrooms. Sealed boats only.

BOAT RENTALS & FUEL DOCK Boat Rentals 8am-6pm Fuel Dock 7:30am-9pm WEATHER PERMITTING

8 a.m.-6 p.m. daily until Sept. 30. Picnic area, restrooms.

AREA LAKES

DONNER LAKE

(530) 582-7720

I-80, Donner Lake exit

PROSSER RSVR.

(530) 587-3558

Hwy. 89, 2 miles north of Truckee

BOCA/STAMPEDE RSVR.

(530) 587-3558 I-80, Hirschdale exit

$12-$20. $96-$160 passes. $5 parking only. Mandatory inspections. Restrooms.

10 mph speed limit strictly enforced. No fees for parking or launching. Mandatory inspections. 45 mph speed limit. No launching fee. $10 parking. Subject to closure during low water levels. Mandatory inspections.

PUBLIC PIERS Public piers are free, but have limited space; often limited to loading and unloading. DONNER LAKE

DONNER LAKE

I-80, Donner Lake exit

37 public piers on north shore from the boat ramp east. Fenced piers are private.

LAKE TAHOE

GAR WOODS

Carnelian Bay

KINGS BEACH

Bottom of Coon St.

Small beach, picnic facilities. Restrooms.

KASPIAN PICNIC AREA West Shore

Between Tahoe City and Homewood. Picnic area, beach. Restrooms.

GROVE STREET

Open 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Located east of Commons Beach. Restrooms at Commons Beach.

Center of Tahoe City

SUGAR PINE POINT

Tahoma

Hiking, Ehrman Mansion tours, nature trail. Restrooms.

TA H O E C I T Y

MARINA

TA H O E C I T Y, C A Truckee Wye

Grove St.

Lake Forest

Busy pier adjacent to town, public beach, picnic sites. Restrooms.

Homewood

Jackpine

SKYLANDIA PARK

Access to restaurant, small beaches. Restrooms.

Incline Village

TA H O E C I T Y

TA H O E C I T Y

MARINA L A K E TA H O E • C A L I F O R N I A

MARINA

L A K E TA H O E • C A L I F O R N I A

(530) 583-1039 · TahoeCityMarina.com

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be listed in Marinas. 19


THE ARTS

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Arts

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

Washoe Galis Dungal STORY BY TIM HAUSERMAN

G

ali Dungals, or traditional Washoe winter huts, have been recreated at several Tahoe locations. The conical structures are supported by a frame of poles lashed together, then topped by layers of cedar bark sit at the entrance to the Tahoe Vistana Inn in Tahoe Vista, at the Incline Village/Crystal Bay Visitors Center and at D.L. Bliss State Park on the West Shore.

Maritime

museum hosts exhibits

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: A galis dungal in front of Tahoe Vistana Inn in Tahoe Vista. | Tim Hauserman; Construction of a galis dungal at the Incline Village/ Crystal Bay Visitors Center. | Courtesy Jacquie Chandler; A peak inside the galis dungal at D.L. Bliss State Park | Alyssa Ganong

“ We know how to live on the land, but we forgot. This process will help us to remember and recover our natural relationship with the earth.” –Jacquie Chandler “The purpose is to show what we can learn about a civilization that lived here for 10,000 years and yet there is no trace they were here,” says Jacquie Chandler from Sustain Tahoe, who spearheaded the project in Incline Village and Tahoe Vista. The one at D.L. Bliss is along the Balancing Rock Nature Trail. The galis dungals look similar in appearance to the tipis of other Native American tribes of the plains. A major difference, however, was that plains tribes used lighter-weight, portable materials such as animal hides because they were designed to be moved frequently. Galis dungals, on the other hand, were simple, strong and durable and used materials readily available in Tahoe. Once constructed they were not moved, but eventually over many years they would decay and return to the earth. The Washoe made galis dungals of strong, small trees for the poles and long sections of cedar bark that had been 20

seasoned for a year for the exterior. They did not cut down trees but used those that had already fallen. The structures had a fire pit in the middle with a vent at the top to allow smoke to escape. The door was a covering of deer or bear skin — although the Washoe didn’t hunt bear; they only skinned dead ones if found. They hunted deer, rabbits and birds. The Washoe would spend the cold Sierra nights sleeping next to the fire inside the huts. The galis dungals served as their Tahoe homes and were larger than the ones recently recreated. Chandler hopes that more of the galis dungals can be built, especially near hiking trails. “They can serve as an anchor point for a new adventure; for people to learn how to walk with a Washoe heart,” said Chandler. She is in the process of writing guidebooks that people can use when visiting the huts to learn about Washoe culture and develop a reverence for nature. She is also promoting the huts as a way to begin a forest- or nature-bathing experience. “Nature bathing is an immersive experience in nature, taking a mindful stroll

through a natural habitat, a chance to open up your senses and become in harmony in the natural surroundings,” Chandler says. Aside from introducing people to nature, Sustain Tahoe members believe that the erection of galis dungals are a perfect opportunity to learn how the Washoe relationship to the land was so different from ours. “We want to help visitors become stewards before they leave,” said Chandler. “We know how to live on the land, but we forgot. This process will help us to remember and recover our natural rela-tionship with the earth,” said Chandler. Sustain Tahoe’s other focus is on helping to create adventures that do no harm. They want people to get out of their cars and take the bus or ride a bike to hike in the woods. “We want people to understand the habitat and have an immersive educational experience so that your heart will fall in love with the Lake and you will protect it. The main thing we are trying to do is to host good, recreational activities without destroying things,” said Chandler. “The Washoe have a desire for greater presence of Washoe culture and heritage, which is based on stewardship of the land, wildlife and water,” says Washoe Tribe vice chair Mahlon Machado. Chandler is reaching out to landowners and other organizations that would like to host a galis dungal. She believes that these Washoe homes could serve as a starting point for a transformation that brings tourists and locals back to an era when the earth was treated with respect. | sustaintahoe.org 

The Tahoe Maritime Museum is hosting two unique exhibits at the museum in Tahoe City through April 2019: “The T-Files: The Search for Tessie” and “Dealers of Dreams.” The focus of “The T-Files” is to present the stories of monsters that have a significant history, passed down from indigenous peoples, medieval travelers or reputable explorers. Along the way, the museum invites visitors to join in the search for Lake Tahoe’s own monster, Tahoe Tessie. And discover the one place that Tessie is truly known to exist through a variety of artistic interpretations courtesy of the Benko Art Gallery. “Dealers of Dreams” explores the special relationship between boats, buyers and Tahoe, and the people that brought them together. These businessmen, entrepreneurs, designers and dealers made many a family’s dream of owning a boat on Tahoe a reality. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org


July 5-11, 2018

Arts

THE

Gallery Exhibit: Waving In The Wind The Potentialist Workshop | Reno July 5-July 8

Local veterans take visual art using Combat Paper embossed with the US Flag. They share their stories of freedom, war and military service in the gallery show called Waving in the Wind at Potentialist Workshop.Support local veterans and the arts; visit Waving in the Wind! | (775) 686-8201, potentialistworkshop.com

LOVE IS A

Hans Meyer-Kassel: Artist of Nevada

NATIONAL TREASURE

Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | July 5-Sep. 2

This exhibition includes more than 50 drawings, pastels and oil paintings drawn from private and institutional collections. Particular emphasis is placed on Meyer-Kassel’s romance with Nevada. 10 a.m. $1-$10 | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

The 2018 Tahoe Pride Art Show, “Love is

History of Transportation: A Mural Study by Helen Lundeberg

a National Treasure,” shines light on the diversity of the community featuring works

Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | July 5-Oct. 26

from Tahoe artists Scott Forrest, Red Stickman, Catherine Schoen, and art students

“Pride and Joy” Catherine Schoen | Benko Art Gallery

from South Tahoe High School at Benko Art Gallery in South Lake Tahoe. The exhibit is

Bloom constrasts in environments

Celebrating Israel’s 70th Anniversary

on display until July 8. | maketahoe.com

Nevada Museum of Art | Reno July 5-Dec. 30

Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | July 5-Oct. 14

Andy Skaff exhibit Wolfdale’s | Tahoe City | July 5-Dec. 31

Andy Skaff’s love of the West provides the inspiration for his light-filled, vibrant landscapes and cityscapes. His work ranges from classic, impressionist paintings to abstract distillations of familiar subjects. | askaff.com

Art of the Greater West Nevada Museum of Art | Reno July 5-Oct. 26

The artworks encourage conversations surrounding indigenous cultural practices such as mark-making and mapping; visual representations of settlement and expansion; and depictions of changes to the landscape brought about by colliding cultures. 10 a.m. $1-$10 | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Artist in Residence Kit Night Valhalla Tahoe | South Lake Tahoe July 5-July 26

Kit Night’s impressionist still lifes and plein aire work is influenced by Jazz. She loves listening to the old guys tell their stories and talk about their struggles. Color inspires Kit. She gets endorphins from it, creating radiant light with color. 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. | (530) 541-4975, valhallatahoe.showare.com

THE ARTS

Bloom is an internet-based Earthwork that transforms data into an experience of playfulness and unpredictability. A seismograph measures the Hayward Fault’s movements and the data sets are captured and run through a computer program designed by the artists. 10 a.m. $1-$10 | (775) 3293333, nevadaart.org

This year the State of Israel celebrates 70 years since its founding by the United Nations following World War II. To mark this occasion, the Nevada Museum of Art presents exhibitions by Israeli artists Michal Rovner and Tal Shochat. These contemporary artists create work grounded in the history of photography. | nevadaart.org

Enrique Chagoya: Reimagining the New World

“Cabins” exhibit North Tahoe Arts Center | Tahoe City July 5-July 27

North Tahoe Arts’ newest exhibit, “Cabins” provides a platform for exploring the simplicity of design by featuring innovative 2D and 3D inspiration for the inhabited, abandoned, reclaimed, sustainable and modern off-the-grid escape. | (530) 581-2787, northtahoearts.com

Nevada Museum of Art | Reno | July 5-July 8

Enrique Chagoya’s works incorporate diverse symbolic elements from pre-Columbian mythology, Western religious iconography and American popular culture. Chagoya often appropriates the visual tropes of Western modernism in his works, just as the masters of modern art cannibalized so-called primitive forms without properly contextualizing them. $1-$10 | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Call to artists North Tahoe Art Center | Tahoe City July 5-July 6

North Tahoe Arts is accepting prospectus for “Coexisting” on display from Aug. 2 to Sept. 7. Now, more than ever, it is the time to coexist with Mother Earth.“Coexisting” documents and addresses environmental issues and offers a solution to inform, challenge and take action. | northtahoearts.com

“From Dust To Water” Nevada Arts Council | Carson City July 5-July 13

In Matthew Couper’s exhibition, “From Dust to Water,” the Las Vegas-based artist uses the language of symbols – skeletons and cacti, blenders and playing cards – to combine pictorial elements in witty and incisive visual narratives. Social commentary is the emphasis in the Couper’s works. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. | nvculture.org

American artist Helen Lundeberg’s “History of Transportation” traces a progression of labor from the Native American era to the dawn of the airline industry in the 1940s. On view through Jan. 6, 2019. 10 a.m. $1-$10 | (775) 329-3333, nevadaart.org

Fiber Art Group South Lake Tahoe Library | South Lake Tahoe July 6-Nov. 2

Open to those who enjoy knitting, crocheting, embroidery, hand sewing and other fiber arts. Participants will learn new tricks and are encouraged to share projects, ideas and stories. Bring projects or start new one. All skill levels welcome. 2-3 p.m. | (530) 573-3185

Artist Reception Valhalla Tahoe | South Lake Tahoe | July 10

Join a reception for artist Kit Night, Valhalla Tahoe’s Artist in Residence, with light refreshments, meet Night, view her work and hear about her process. 4:30-6:30 p.m. | (530) 5414975, valhallatahoe.showare.com

Knitting Group Atelier | Truckee | July 10-Aug. 28

The group is open to all knitters, crocheters, loom artists. whatever your thread, you are welcome. This is a not a class, it’s a group intended for individuals who enjoy the company of other yarn artists. Bring a project or start a new one. 4-6 p.m. Free | (530) 386-2700, chamber.truckee.com

Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events.

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR

MARK MCL AUGHLIN’S NEWEST BOOK

2018 Summer Art & Craft Show on Tahoe’s South Shore Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region. O rd e r b o o k s d i re c t a t

TheStormKing.com or pick up a copy at: • Geared for Games • Gratitude Gifts • Alpenglow Sports • Mind Play • Word After Word Bookshop

Group presentations · In-home talks (530) 546-5612 · TheStormKing.com

Fine Art | Pottery | Jewelry | Handcrafted Gifts

WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION: MONDAYS TAHOE CITY

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3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Ctr. 330 Fairway Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House 265 Bear St.

TUESDAYS TRUCKEE

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3:30pm to 4pm Sierra Senior Center 10040 Estates Dr.

3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church 341 Village Blvd.

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July 5-8 & 26-29 South Lake Tahoe Middle School July 13-15 & 20-22 Roundhill Square www.artisttoyoufestivals.com | 209.338.7868

21


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Horoscopes

FIRE

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Puzzles

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

Mars retrograde in Aquarius is synchronizing with events to produce a fair amount of tension in you. Finding the balance between what you want and need and what others think you want and need is likely. At worst, you feel alone with it and possibly secretly jealous of others who seem to be having all the fun. If so, focus on all that gives you a good reason to feel grateful.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

There are things you want to have and do and it may feel like more than ever. Yet, it may be that things are not flowing very quickly at all. This would produce a double whammy. Your patience levels will, therefore, need to be topped up, regularly over the next couple of months or so. Direct your focus to the bigger picture and the longer term.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

Mars retrograde is occurring in your solar 7th. This can manifest as challenging interpersonal dynamics. Trust in others and the flow, in general, may be an issue. The resolution lies in focusing to create more harmony in both your closest personal relationships and your social and professional ones too. Balance requires positive pro-action in both your relationships and in your career.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19)

Mars retrograde in your sign suggests that the main challenge now is to move forward with confidence. Circumstances may not entirely be supporting you to do this. One step and day at a time moving into the unknown is extra important. This can be achieved by making each step slow and sure, as though walking in the dark. Like yourself and others will like you too.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

Creating a better flow in your life is extra emphasized with Mars retrograding through the Water Bearer sign. The goal is to strike a better balance between what you are putting out and the return. You are ready and willing to do what it takes in this regard. The main issue is to overcome perfectionism. Since it is unachievable, instead aim for excellence.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

Despite all the power moves and advancements you have been experiencing over the past several months, Mars retrograde may be manifesting as feelings of blocked energy. This will have the effect of causing you to turn within and/or to step back to review your life and the choices you have made. Trust this flow and do so faithfully and patiently.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

In the forefront, you are in a playful and creative mood. Much of your focus is on home and family. As the picture widens, you are dreaming about what is possible. Thoughts about money and how to best invest are featured. You are at a high point and you are likely feeling strong. Yet, you may also feel tired and are more than ever trying to work smarter than harder.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

A fairly powerful internal struggle is indicated by Mars retrograde in Aquarius for you. This may have something to do with one or both parents directly or how you were socialized by them. That line between doing what is accepted and what feels authentically may be an issue. As usual, identification is the first step towards resolution.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

Mars retrograde indicates a time of decision in your life. At worst, you may feel stuck or held back. Upon closer observation, you may discover that your own attitude and habits are at least major contributors. Either way, you are experiencing a growing determination to break through barriers, internal or external, real or created by your own habitual perspectives.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

An overhaul of how you communicate, perhaps especially in and or about your closest personal relationships is indicated. You want to be heard, clearly. If you feel ignored or rejected, you may retaliate. In the short term, you are happy to play and venture, but this need may not go away until it is addressed, as in it could linger all summer.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

One way or another, you want to break free and experience a fuller measure of your sense of individuality. Part of the solution is to decipher and define what that is. Keeping it simple, exploring new territory by way of travel may prove very liberating and healing. Or perhaps the journey is more intellectual, by way of knowledge. Mercury and Venus in Leo say: play with the possibilities.

CryptoQuip

Digging deep to forgive yourself and others for what did and did not occur is linked to Mars retrograde this summer. On the flip side, this can be described as having faith and accepting what is. Regret and resentment are poisons that you must not ingest. There are two mantras to consider. The first is: Thank you, I forgive you, I release you. The second is: Now and next…

I recently read a motto that a lighting store had been using: “The customer is always bright.”

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Horse is missing, 2. Watering can is missing, 3. Bathing suit is different, 4. Shovel is missing, 5. Bird is missing, 6. Hat is moved.

22


LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

GRACE POTTER’S GUIDE TO

E N T E RTA I N M E N T J U LY 5 - 1 2 , 2 0 1 8

JULY 5 | THURSDAY Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Live at Lakeview Lakeview Commons, South Lake Tahoe, 4:30-8:30 p.m. First Thursday: First Take with Rick Metz Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, 5-7 p.m. DJ Trivia MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 7 p.m. Line Dancing with DJ Trey Hellfire Saloon, Reno, 7-9 p.m. Magic Fusion starring Titou The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Broadway in Blue: A Broadway Musical Revue Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30 p.m. Headliner Series: Anat Cohen Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Bartley Ranch Regional Park, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Thirsty Thursday W/DJ Bobby G! Polo Lounge, Reno, 8 p.m. Acoustic Wonderland Sessions Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, Sparks, 8 p.m. Comedy Night Lex Nightclub, Reno, 8-9:30 p.m. Karaoke The Pointe, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Karaoke 5 Star Saloon, Reno, 9 p.m. Magic Fusion starring Titou The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. LEX Unplugged Lex Nightclub, Reno, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Student Body Thursdays The Brew Brothers, Reno, 10 p.m.

JULY 6 | FRIDAY Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Comedy Happy Hour Lex Nightclub, Reno, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Guitarist Jack Di Carlo Gold Hill Hotel, Gold Hill, 5:30-8 p.m. Heavenly Village Concert Series Shops at Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 5:30 p.m. Uncle Kracker Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 6-9 p.m. At the Illusionist’s Table Liberty Food and Wine Exchange, Reno, 6:30-9 p.m. Ladies Night - Free Line Dancing Lessons NoVí, Reno, 7-9 p.m. BAC Blowhards Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7-9 p.m. Latin Dance Social Peppermill Casino, Reno, 7 p.m. TOCCATA Summer Music Series Bartley Ranch Regional Park, Reno, 7 p.m. A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Reno Little Theater, Reno, 7:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

High Sierra Music Festival STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

JULY 5-8 | QUINCY

“I

remember wearing a denim jumpsuit one year,” says Grace Potter about her early years at High Sierra Music Festival. “It wasn’t practical because it was so hot, but it looked awesome, which is the only reason one should ever choose to wear a jumpsuit at High Sierra.” Having recently made a powerful music video with NASA about female pioneers called, “Look What We’ve Become,” Potter thinks she might’ve found a way to bring this bold fashion statement of yore back to the famously warm music gathering in Quincy. “The insulated air-conditioned jumpsuits are going to be all the rage in 2020, but we’ll get into it some other time,” she jokes. Potter has performed at High Sierra twice, in both 2005 and 2006. The first time was as an up-and-coming artist out of Burlington, Vt., who played in the beer tent stage. By the following year, she and her old band, The Nocturnals, had graduated to the main stage and did not disappoint. “I have a beautiful history with High Sierra,” says Potter. “Even though I’ve only played it twice before, it feels like I’ve lived up there the whole time. It’s such a community and atmosphere entrenched in the mountains where there is a sense of feeling at home. I had some really formative rock ‘n’ roll experiences there where it felt like the night went on and on.” On one fond occasion in particular she jammed with My Morning Jacket until the early hours of the morning, listening to the George Harrison album, “All Things Must Pass” for what seemed like a neverending moment in time. “We had been friends with them over the years of touring,” says the fiery vocalist. “They were warm and welcoming guys with a lovely energy. We shared life experiences and musical tastes. But by the time we got to High Sierra, it was our first time to really dig in and have fun. We had a random conversation that spiraled down into whiskey drinking and waxing poetic about music. It’s a really cool memory that I’ll never forget.” Potter reminisced about walking through the campsite with random concertgoers who felt like long-lost family members. “It was always completely natural,” she says. “Wandering into the campsite sends a good message that you’re down to hang. My festival upbringing is hanging out on Shakedown Street and meeting folks and that’s never gone away.” (Shakedown Street is a lively row of vendors outside of Grateful Dead, Phish or other hippie tribe concerts where fans sell and trade foods, merchandise and other goods.)

Josh Reed

CALENDAR

MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE July 5-11, 2018

“ It’s such a community and atmosphere entrenched in the mountains where there is a sense of feeling at home.” Potter grew up an adventurous New England teenager, who wasn’t afraid to take risks and be herself in the mid-1990s musical community. “The most memorable time was probably the Ben & Jerry’s fest in Vermont,” she says. “Every year, Sugarbush [Resort] would host a summer festival in my backyard. Everybody came through. I remember one year it was Hootie and the Blowfish and The Spin Doctors with Susan Tedeschi. I was just seeing all these people doing it and that was their job. I thought to myself, ‘Now that’s the coolest job you can ever do.’ ” Now an established musician in her own right, Potter still enjoys the inimitable energy of the festival scene, in particular the friendly rivalries that tend to generate between bands. “Honestly, it isn’t as free love and happygo-lucky as you might think,” she says. “When you see a band blow you away right

–Grace Potter

before you hit the stage, you know you are going to put your best show forward. What I love best is going on my stage and pushing the envelope ever more. I think it invites an atmosphere of healthy competition and creates a collective momentum where everyone wants to the ones to hold up the circus tent. You get 45 minutes on stage and you get off, but we all have a common goal making everyone feel great.” As far a veteran festival advice, Potter says to wear your water to keep hydrated, don’t forget lip balm and always remember to enjoy the music. “Now everyone knows there are sitters and there are standers,” she says. “I feel strongly that everybody would enjoy the fest however they want to as long as they do it safely. If you are sitting and the people in front of you get up to dance, you can’t complain or bum out. The best solution to that is to get up and start dancing yourself.” | highsierramusic.com. 

23


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

C A L E N D A R | J U LY 5 -1 2 , 2 0 1 8

Extraordinary Entertainment In An Exceptional Setting

JULY 6 | FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

The Play About a Dick Good Luck Macbeth, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Broadway in Blue: A Broadway Musical Revue Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30 p.m Steel Rockin’ Karaoke Ponderosa Saloon, Virginia City, 8 p.m. Write Me a Murder Theatre Palisades, Pacific, 8 p.m.

Shakespeare’s Towering Tragedy

DJ Roni V Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 10 p.m. Dance party 5 Star Saloon, Reno, 10 p.m. Soul Funk Disco The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 10 p.m. Keyser Soze Crystal Bay Casino, Crystal Bay, 10 p.m. DJ Show Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay

If you like classic reggae, ska and soul, come dance with Reno’s Keyser Soze at the Crystal Bay Casino on July 6.

By William Shakespeare

Off Broadway’s Groovy Retro-Hit Revue

Created by Larry Gallagher

July 6 - August 26

Sand Harbor at Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park (Showcase Series: July 16 - Sept. 8, 2018)

LakeTahoeShakespeare.com | 800.74.SHOWS Generous Support Provided By:

Tru c k e e D ow n T ow n so ci aT ion M e r c h a n T s as es nt s p re

F R ET TELE

SHURV ICEE SEIT W EBSIET V IS R MOR FO FO IN

5-8:30PM

Historic Downtown Truckee

ARTISAN VENDORS

LIVE MUSIC

FOOD COURT

Jun. 14 – Aug. 23

BEER GARDEN

KIDS ACTIVITIES

July 5th · Jake Nielsen’s Triple Threat

Solid Gold Soul Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Dave Stamey Piper’s Opera House, Virginia City, 8-10:30 p.m. Big Business The Saint, Reno, 8-11 p.m. Karaoke The Pointe, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Comedic Magician Justin Rivera Reno Tahoe Comedy, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, Sparks, 9 p.m. Guest DJs St James Infirmary, Reno, 9 p.m. Magic After Dark: Robert Hall The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m.

Summer Concert on the Green Tahoe Donner Golf Course, Truckee

JULY 7 | SATURDAY Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Let Freedom Rock VFW Post 9211, Bunker Lane, Reno, 12-8:30 p.m. TOCCATA Summer Music Series St. Theresa Catholic Church, South Lake Tahoe, 3:30 p.m. Alt-Rock Reload Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 5 p.m. Heavenly Village Concert Series Shops at Heavenly Village, South Lake Tahoe, 5:30 p.m.

Presented by Remax Mountain Living Partner Org Contractors Association of Truckee Tahoe

July 12th · Franks and Deans Presented by La Galleria & Care Flight Partner Org Revert Foundation

Complimentary Daily Tasting of more than 50 premium olive oils, balsamic vinegars, honey and more!

July 19 · The Sextones th

Presented by Sierra Nevada College Partner Org Tahoe SAFE Alliance

Open Daily 10:30am-6pm

Thank You to Our Event Sponsors!

And Our Media Sponsors!

t hoe.com ta o om

Open Late for Truckee Thursdays Downtown Truckee 10091 Donner Pass Road

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July 5-11, 2018

POP FICTION,

POP FICTION

BIG JANGLE1

July 6 | 6 p.m. Tahoe Donner Driving Range | Truckee

BEST SHOT &

MUSTACHE HARBOR MUSTACHE HARBOR

At the Illusionist’s Table Liberty Food and Wine Exchange, Reno, 5:30-8 p.m. David Nail Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 6-9 p.m. The Reno Fashion Show 2018 Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Ian Moore & Athena McIntyre Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 7 p.m.

MUSIC SCENE

1970s/1980s ROCK

VooDoo Dogz Washoe Camp Saloon, New Washoe City, 7-10 p.m. The Play About a Dick Good Luck Macbeth, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Broadway in Blue: A Broadway Musical Revue Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30 p.m. Write Me a Murder Theatre Palisades, Pacific, 8 p.m. Reno Retro Canteen Wingfield Park, Reno, 8 p.m.

Anthony Jeselnik Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 8 p.m. Karaoke The Pointe, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Comedic Magician Justin Rivera Reno Tahoe Comedy, Reno, 8:30 p.m. All Jacked Up Saturdays NoVí, Reno, 9-11 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, Sparks, 9 p.m. Saturday Dance Party St James Infirmary, Reno, 9 p.m. Seduction Saturdays Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Reno, 9 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. Saturday Night Karaoke Farah & Sons, Sparks, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Deep House Lounge The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 10 p.m. Dance party 5 Star Saloon, Reno, 10 p.m. Nelly at LEX Nightclub Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 10 p.m. DJ Show Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Stateline, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore Lodge & Casino, Crystal Bay Levitt AMP Summer Music Series Brewery Arts Center, Carson City Ages of the Moon Restless Artists Theatre Company, Sparks Summer Concert on the Green Tahoe Donner Golf Course, Truckee

JULY 8 | SUNDAY Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Sunday Music Brunch Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday Gospel Brunch The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 12-3:30 p.m. The Play About a Dick Good Luck Macbeth, Reno, 2-3:30 p.m. Write Me a Murder Theatre Palisades, Pacific, 2 p.m. Concerts at Commons Commons Beach, Tahoe City, 4 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 4:30-5:45 p.m. Genoa Town Park Concert Genoa, 5 p.m. Classical Tahoe Summer Gala Sierra Nevada College, Incline Village, 5 p.m. At the Illusionist’s Table Liberty Food and Wine Exchange, Reno, 5:30-8 p.m. Chris Costa Polo Lounge, Reno, 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Broadway in Blue: A Broadway Musical Revue Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30 p.m. Kyle Rea Orchestra Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Reno, 7:30-10:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

July 7 | 6 p.m. Tahoe Donner Driving Range | Truckee AT THE OPENING of the eighth annual Summer Concert on the Green on July 6, one of California’s best dance bands, Pop Fiction, plays with Tom Petty tribute Big Jangle. On Saturday, you’ll get a dose of Pat Benatar from Best Shot served with a healthy helping of yacht rocker by Mustache Harbor. | tahoedonner.com

PETER JOSEPH BURTT & THE KING TIDE

AFRICAN RHYTHMS

July 8 | 4 p.m. Commons Beach | Tahoe City LOCAL PHENOM Peter Joseph Burtt brings his original songwriting and African kora to the beach with support from his virtuoso bass player Sam Ravenna and the one and only Kai & the Monsters. Come to see your friends and feel the local love. | concertsatcommonsbeach.com

25


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

EVERCLEAR

Tahoe Improv Players 25th Anniversary Shows Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 7:30 p.m. Buddy Emmer and guest Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Dancing by the River Reno, 8-9:30 p.m. Comedy Night The Jungle, Reno, 9 p.m.

July 7 | 5 p.m. Hard Rock Casino | Stateline, Nev. EVERCLEAR RETURNS to headline the Alt-Rock Reload of the Hard Rock’s Amplified Summer Music Series, which makes sense considering the band has written and recorded some truly iconic 1990s alt-rock hits. But don’t expect them to dial it in, there’s plenty of new stuff, too. They will be performing with Fuel, Marcy Playground, Local H and Oleander. | hardrockcasinolaketahoe.com

IAN MOORE & ATHENA MCINTYRE

JULY 11 | WEDNESDAY

ALTERNATIVE ROCK

SEAN

JULY 8 | SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

WATKINS

David Luning Brasserie Saint James, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Canyon White 3-peat Victory Tour Hangar Bar, Reno, 8 p.m. Open Mic Comedy The Library, Reno, 8 p.m. Solid Gold Soul Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Ages of the Moon Restless Artists Theatre Company, Sparks

IAN MOORE

Roman Cho

JULY 9 | MONDAY

Daniel Work

BLUEGRASS/FOLK

SINGER/SONGWRITER

July 7 | 7 p.m. Brewery Arts Center | Carson City, Nev. RENEGADE TROUBADOUR Ian Moore teams up with ethereal vocalist Athena McIntyre for a night of sweet melodies, gritty guitar riffs and vibrant collaborative energy. It’s a night out of the Levitt AMP Summer Music Series, which runs until Aug. 25. | breweryarts.org

July 7 | 3 p.m. Village at Northstar | Truckee SEAN WATKINS CUT his musical teeth with his fiddling sister Sara and National Public Radio’s new “A Prairie Home Companion” host Chris Thile as a teenage guitarist for the Grammy-winning contemporary folk trio Nickel Creek. He has since released five albums on his own after the group split up to start successful solo careers. He’ll be supported by San Francisco’s Dirty Cello and local favorites Ike & Martin at Northstar’s Beerfest & Bluegrass Festival. | northstarcalifornia.com

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

Discover Ballet Folklorico Reno, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Children’s Acting Arts for All Nevada, Reno, 2-3:30 p.m. Song Group Tahoe Truckee School of Music, Truckee, 5:30-6:45 p.m. West Coast Swing Social Dance Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 5:30-7:30 p.m. At the Illusionist’s Table Liberty Food and Wine Exchange, Reno, 6:30-9 p.m. Magic Fusion starring Titou The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 7-8:15 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. The Hot Club of San Francisco Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Solid Gold Soul Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Open Mic Whiskey Dicks, South Lake Tahoe, 9 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 10 p.m.

JULY 10 | TUESDAY

9am 1pm

to

Incredibles 2 July 5th-12th 4:30 and 7:15 pm daily 1:45 pm matinees on weekends

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom July TBD Mission: Impossible - Fallout July TBD Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

26

Brought to you by

12047 donner pass rd. truckee truckeefarmersmarket.org

Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Summer Concert Series PJ’s at Gray’s Crossing, Truckee, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bluesdays Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows, Olympic Valley, 6-8:30 p.m. Canyon Jam/Open Mic Living the Good Life Nightclub-Bistro-Lounge, Carson City, 6:30 p.m. At the Illusionist’s Table Liberty Food and Wine Exchange, Reno, 6:30-9 p.m. Traditional Irish Session Ceol Irish Pub, Reno, 7 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m.

Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Brit Floyd Eclipse World Tour 2018 Grand Sierra Resort, Reno, 5 p.m. The Nickel Slots Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, 5 p.m. Concert Under the Stars Brewery Arts Center, Carson City, 5:30-10 p.m. Old Time Jam Mountain Music Parlor, Reno, 6 p.m. Live Music CB’s Pizza, Carnelian Bay, 6-9 p.m. Jody Sweet Cottonwood Restaurant & Bar, Truckee, 6 p.m. At the Illusionist’s Table Liberty Food and Wine Exchange, Reno, 6:30-9 p.m. Music in the Park Truckee River Regional Park, Truckee, 6:30 p.m. Open Mic Red Dog Saloon, Virginia City, 7 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Ranky Tanky Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Wednesday Night Jam Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, Sparks, 8 p.m. Karaoke 5 Star Saloon, Reno, 9 p.m. Ballet Classes Truckee Community Recreation Center, Truckee

JULY 12 | THURSDAY Cirque Paris Eldorado Resort Casino, Reno, 12 a.m. Live at Lakeview Lakeview Commons, South Lake Tahoe, 4:30-8:30 p.m. DJ Trivia MidTown Wine Bar, Reno, 7 p.m. The Play About a Dick Good Luck Macbeth, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival Sand Harbor State Park, Incline Village, 7:30 p.m. Blind Boys of Alabama with Paul Thorn Robert Z. Hawkins Amphitheater, Reno, 7:30-9 p.m. Thirsty Thursday W/DJ Bobby G! Polo Lounge, Reno, 8 p.m. Solid Gold Soul Harrah’s Lake Tahoe, Stateline, 8 p.m. Acoustic Wonderland Sessions Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, Sparks, 8 p.m. Comedy Night Lex Nightclub, Reno, 8-9:30 p.m. Karaoke The Pointe, Reno, 8:30 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft, South Lake Tahoe, 9-10:15 p.m. Karaoke 5 Star Saloon, Reno, 9 p.m. LEX Unplugged Lex Nightclub, Reno, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Student Body Thursdays The Brew Brothers, Reno, 10 p.m. Broadway in Blue: A Broadway Musical Revue Valhalla Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe.


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

July 5-11, 2018

LOCAL FLAVOR

flavor

RUSTIC SIMPLICITY

on the menu at Thunderbird S T O R Y B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

S

itting in a stone gazebo perched over the emerald waters of Lake Tahoe, we sit and talk and watch kayakers and the Sierra clouds float on a warm summer day. Executive chef Darren Weston at Thunderbird Lodge acknowledges how lucky he is to live and work here. Weston originally moved to Tahoe in 2,000 and worked for the U.S. Forest Service as a wildlife biologist surveying the land. He fell in love with a fellow biologist, who eventually became an oral surgeon. They married and both relocated to the Bay Area so that she could pursue her career in dentistry. Weston, meanwhile, went to culinary school. Then the couple moved to New York City, this time so Weston could pursue his passion. He worked with famous restauranteur Mario Bitale and also cooked at Lupa, a New York City restaurant specializing in Roman trattoria fare. The NYC food scene was exciting, but Weston and his wife yearned to come back to Tahoe. Four years ago, the opportunity came up when his wife took a job opportunity on the South Shore. With a decade of high-end culinary experience under his belt, Weston began catering for private affairs. A Thunderbird Lodge member suggested that the Whittell Estate hire him to cater its events. After a threehour interview in the same gazebo where we were sitting, Weston got the job as Thunderbird’s new executive chef.

and am unbelievably excited for this opportunity to come back. I can hike, mountain bike — I’m just happy. This is a really fun place; sometimes I gotta pinch myself. And there’s always something going on here,” he says.

LEFT TO RIGHT: Weston’s box of goods he picked

up from the South Lake farmers market aboard the “Thunderbird” yacht. | Shireen Piramoon, Thunderbird Lodge; Darren Weston picking fresh herbs he uses in his dishes at the Thunderbird. | Kayla Anderson; One of Darren Weston’s creations. | Courtesy Thunderbird Lake Tahoe

“ I try to keep it local. I love going to the farmers’ market and pulling from our own herb garden.”

Although he is classically French trained, Weston has always worked in Italian restaurants and enjoys cooking locally sourced food of whatever is in season. Every Tuesday, he takes the “Thunderbird” yacht over to the South Lake Tahoe farmers’ market to get food for that week’s meals.

“I try to keep it local. I love going to the farmers’ market and pulling from our own herb garden. The top chefs are always at them picking out their own ingredients. You have to be there to see what’s in season,” Weston says. “I do two days of shopping for a one-day event.” “He won’t let us shop for him. He’s very hands-on, making sure everything is fantastic,” says Thunderbird Lodge’s Shireen Piramoon. Weston also began integrating the estate’s own herbs, such as the tangy purple flower grown as part of the chive shoots, into his rustic, simplistic dishes. “His food is ridiculous, that’s why I don’t fit into my clothes anymore,” Piramoon says.

–Darren Weston

During the summer, Weston cooks meals for four to five events per week for private dinners, member events and corporate retreats. “In New York, I would serve 500 people in a day. Here I’ll do a private dinner for four people,” Weston says. “Every piece of food at the Thunderbird, my knife has cut or I cooked it myself. Where we’re sitting right now I’ve done an eight-course dinner for two people. It’s just as fun to cook the food as it is to eat it. This is the best table in Tahoe.” To be able to elevate the Whittell Estate with fine food is a dream come true for Weston. “I can’t fake the passion. I love Tahoe

Weston’s passion for Tahoe and cooking shines through and he is looking forward to other ways in which to highlight the Thunderbird Lodge experience. “We could bring in a pop-up format and turn Thunderbird into a restaurant for a night with a full menu and two seating times. I also want to do more with our natural environment, like host picnics at Skunk Harbor. With the bike path being built all the way to Thunderbird, we could even do catered bike tours. I’d love to do a chef-led kayak tour or snowshoe tours in the winter where we surprise our guests with hot toddies up on the hill,” he says. “I’d love to get paid to mountain bike. I’m happy to fill my pack with amazing food,” he says, naming off some of the fine cheeses and wines he would serve his guests. “This is an amazing place to work. It’s the best place on planet Earth to do dishes.” | thunderbirdtahoe.org. 

SUMMER EVENTS Tuesday-Saturday | until mid Oct.

DAILY ESTATE TOURS Tuesdays & Fridays July 10-Oct. 19

WINE & CHEESE TOURS Aug. 12

THUNDERFAIRE FOOD & WINE FAIR Sept. 9 | WINEMAKER’S DINNER Oct. 7 | AUTUMN HARVEST

DINNER 27


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA S T Y T I D B I T S Visit the Event Calendar at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of events. Truckee Community Farmers Market Tricounties Bank Plaza Truckee | July 8

AleworX

opens at Stateline Lake Tahoe AleworX has opened its second location featuring self-serve beer and wine, wood-fired pizza, a patio and a full bar. It’s located at at 31 Hwy 50 Suite, #105, Stateline, Nev. | laketahoealeworx.com

FLAPJACKS FUNDRAISER Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Meeks Bay Pancake Breakfast with a hearty breakfast spread, all while supporting local Lake Tahoe and Donner Lake Californa State Parks and the Meeks Bay Fire Protection District on July 7 and 8 from 8 a.m. to noon. Tickets are $10 adults, $6 children ages 5 and younger. First Responders eat free. Skip the lines and buy tickets in advance. | sierrastateparks.org

Tahoe City Farmers Market

Wine Tasting

Commons Beach | Tahoe City July 5, 12

The Pour House | Truckee | July 5, 12

Thursday mornings through Oct. 11. Enjoy fresh local produce, delicious food and incredible lake views. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Free | (530) 583-3348, tahoecityfarmersmarket.com

Cowgirls and Cocktails Tahoe Donner Equestrian Center Truckee | July 5

Cowgirls and cowboys are invited to gather for an early evening trail ride followed by a social hour with beer, wine and appetizers. 5-7 p.m. | tahoedonner.com

Admission is complimentary if you purchase one full-priced cocktail from the bar before the tasting. Participants must be age 21 and older to attend. Complimentary appetizers are included. 5:30 p.m. | calientetahoe.com

Cutthroat Saloon Markleeville’s Cutthroat Saloon is getting a new life with new owner Fawna Demond, who has periodically worked at the bar. The restaurant is open daily featuring live music on Saturdays. The Cutthroat will be serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, and Demond plans to bring back some popular menu items. | cutthroatsaloon.com

Hops for Huskies

Food Truck Fridays

Tahoe Mountain Brewing Co. Taproom Truckee | July 6

Idlewild Park | Reno | July 6

Stop by and enjoy the local brews and $1 from every beer purchased benefits Tahoe Husky Rescue. 3-8 p.m. | tahoehuskyrescue.org

The market will feature more than 35 vendors. There is something for everyone. Ski Run market offers Organic farm fresh produce, local eats, a bounce house for kids, live music and locally made arts and crafts. 3-8 p.m. | skirunfarmersmarket.com

Art of Mixology The Ritz | Truckee | July 8

This entertaining, educational experience will feature freshly cut herbs, classic ingredients such as bitters and infused liquors to create three unique cocktails paired with appetizers. 4-5 p.m. $60 | (415) 394-6500, chamber.truckee.com

Winemaker’s Dinner Thunderbird Lodge Incline Village | July 8

Thunderbird’s Chef Darren Weston will create a multi-course meal paired with some of the world’s finest spirits. This will be a seated event served in the Lighthouse Room with spectacular views of the lake. VIP tickets include pre-dinner cruise on “Thunderbird” yacht. 5 p.m. $495 | (775) 828-3536, thunderbirdtahoe.org

Truckee Tuesday Farmers Market Truckee River Regional Park Truckee | July 10

Come to the Farmers’ Market each Tuesday for fresh produce, prepared foods, crepes, baked goods, fish and meat, olive oil and artisan goods. 8 a.m. | chamber.truckee.com

Reno Street Food came about in 2012 with just five trucks. There are now, in its seventh year, 30 deliciously packed food trucks, pop-up restaurants and food trailers every Friday. Local bands and artists are featured each week. 5-9 p.m. | facebook.com

Ski Run Farmers Market Ski Run | South Lake Tahoe | July 6

Tequila tastings Caliente | Kings Beach | July 5

Enjoy a wine tasting during every Truckee Thursday this summer. | thepourhousetruckee.com

New owner for

Truckee Community Farmers’ Market Sundays until Sept. 30. The Truckee Community Farmers Market, is a California Certified Farmers Market, is committed to showcasing locally grown and artisan-quality foods. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free | (530) 414-9181, slowfoodlaketahoe.org

Biggest, Little City Wing Fest Silver Legacy Resort Casino | Reno July 6-7

The Silver Legacy serves more than 20,000 pounds of chicken wings during this annual event. Free live entertainment on outdoor stages, shopping and local celebrity wing judging top off the delicious holiday weekend. (775) 325-7401, silverlegacy.com

4th Annual Giving Fund Benefit Dinner and Silent Auction The Lodge Restaurant & Pub Truckee | July 11

The Tahoe Donner Giving Fund will host its 4th Annual Dinner and Silent Auction. Proceeds fund fall grants supporting local nonprofits in the greater Truckee area and scholarships to community high school graduates. 6-9 p.m. $ | (530) 587-9425, tahoedonner.com

500+ CRAFT BEERS

CIDERS // WINES // COCKTAILS

Happy Hour MON-FRI 3-6pm

Come in for some Fish ‘n’ Chips or a Lobster Reuben! BUZZFEED.COM

brewforia.com 28

Under the Village Ski Loft

800 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village

(775) 298-7660

Morgan’s in Midtown Reno features a fish market and outdoor patio seating

Truckee, CA - 10089 W. River St. - (530) 582-5000 Reno, NV - 1401 S. Virginia St. - (775) 683-9300 Daily from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. MorgansLobsterShack.com


July 5-11, 2018

LOCAL FLAVOR

NEW CALIFORNIA STORY & PHOTOS BY LOU PHILLIPS

Qual i ty Stars BREAKFAST

|

LUNCH

|

DINNER

Open Daily at 8:00 am Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner | Bocce

HAPPY HOUR 4:30-6 pm daily Tuesday All Night! Martini Mondays $7

spindleshankstahoe.com

F

rom a wine-grape-growing standpoint, California is blessed with having a variety of climates, soils and water sources from which to cultivate exceptional fruit for almost any type of wine varietal. And, the state’s artisans and producers make some of the best Cabernets, Chardonnays and Pinots in the world. However, there have been wine skeletons in the closets and until recently, Sauvignon Blanc and Rosé have had the most. With both wines, the problem started with the bottom line because wine consumers the world over have been unwilling to buy

400 Brassie Ave, Suite B · Kings Beach

Russian River Valley vineyards

(530) 546.2191

In Russian River Valley, Davis Bynum creates its Virginia’s Block-Jane’s Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc from a prime vineyard. The juice spends time in barrel, skips malolactic fermentation to retain acidity and is bottled unfiltered. This all adds up to complex delicious juice that also ages gracefully.

Fine Italian Food & Spirits

The juice spends time in barrel,

Voted Best Place to Take a Date for 17 years EST. 1985

skips malolactic fermentation to retain acidity and is bottled unfiltered. This all adds up to complex delicious juice that also ages gracefully.

THE SOULE DOMAIN

Locals Love Lanza’s!

CREATIVE AMERICAN DINING

(530) 546-2434

Reservations (530)546-7529

BAR - 4:30 p.m. DINNER - 5 p.m.

Stateline Dr. next to Tahoe Biltmore Crystal Bay, NV - North Lake Tahoe

Open nightly at 6 p.m.

7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

SouleDomain.com

LanzasTahoe.com

Davis Bynum’s exceptional Sauvignon Blanc

at price points that would allow producers to allocate the resources necessary to make great versions. These low prices were encouraged by the boatloads of cheap Spanish Rosé that started in the 1960s. Sauvignon Blanc has underperformed compared to foreign competition. The producers are not without blame; they have cut every corner imaginable such as growing the fruit for these wines on the cheapest and least appropriate land, over cropping and employing the quickest, cheapest winemaking. It is a case of which came first, the chicken or the egg. So what has changed? Well, for starters the world discovered the dry Rosés of Provence and the revolutionary Sauvignon Blancs from New Zealand and France. Sauvignon Blanc also benefitted from the meteoric rise in the price of quality Chardonnay, which left a nice niche where producers could now allocate top vineyard, viticulture and winemaking resources into their Sauvignon Blancs and remain profitable. Both categories are still relative bargains; quality versions start at $10 and star versions can be had for around $25. Here are some top performers: Rodney Strong Vineyards dedicated one of its estate vineyards in Northern Sonoma, Charlotte’s Home, for the fruit that makes its balanced tropical-fruit-forward summer sipper of a Sauvignon Blanc.

Rosés from California have been a mishmash of grapes and winemaking styles, but the quality movement has been focused on Pinot Noir and Rhone-grape blends. Another winner from Rodney Strong is its 2017 Rosé of Pinot Noir made from 100 percent Pinot Noir that is a potpourri of dry strawberry and rose petals — it needs to be on your summer wine list. By the

Eclectic old world Ambiance Home made Pastas Wide-ranging Wine list DINNER AND BAR NIGHTLY FROM 5-9 PM Reservations Recommended

Happy Hour

Sun-Thurs | 5-6 pm

Downtown Truckee | (530) 587-4694

PianetaRestaurantTruckee.com

Rodney Strong showing

way, this beauty just received a 92-point score from Wine Enthusiast. Delivering a little more structure, spice and oomph is David Ramey’s Sidebar Rosé, Russian River Valley, which is 100 percent Syrah. This is a Rosé that will pair perfectly with grilled meats or vegetables. As always ask your wine-shop gurus for their top picks, as well.  Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier in Tahoe and his consulting business wineprowest. com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 5443435 or wineguru123@gmail.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns. Click on Wine Column under the Local Flavor tab.

Helping Collectors Sell, Buy and Manage Their Collections Assisting Businesses Build Effective Wine Programs Making Your Wine Events Really Special Expertise and Ethics Public and Private Wine Classes

Sommelier Services

We Can Train Your Staff, Maximize Your Wine Program and Help With Your Fundraiser

WineProWest.com Louis Phillips

Level 3 Sommelier 30+ Years Experience

WineGuru123@gmail.com - (775)

544-3435

Open for Dinner Thursday - Sunday

530.583.3324 2905 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City

BacchisTahoe.com

29


LOCAL FLAVOR

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P O TAT O S A L A D B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

Kings Beach Lunch Specials Daily Early Bird Special 4-6pm

Dinner Special 4-10pm

$3.50 Margaritas $3.50 Dos Equis $2.50 Draft Bud

25% Off Mexican Combo Dinners

Full

Potato salad is one

Bar

of the easiest dishes to experiment on with

Open 11:30am-10:00pm (530) 546-4539

different flavors.

8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach in Kings Beach

Riverside Dining, Patio Bar & Grill Daily

FREE Concert Series

Diggin Dirt July 18th

RiverRanchLodge.com · 530-583-4264 call for reservations On the corner of Highway 89 and Alpine Meadows Rd.

SAND BAR

is open!!

Famous for our BEACHSIDE GRILLE

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JasonsBeachsideGrille.com

8338 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, CA

YOU ONLY NEED ONE

Mexicans! (530) 587-3557 10186 Donner Pass Rd - Truckee

CALENDER

& IT’S AT

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EASY | COMPREHENSIVE | FREE! Featuring: Entertainment | Events Outdoors & Recreation Festivals | Food & Wine Arts & Culture | Family Fun

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J

uly is when all the summertime activities start picking up and that includes picnics and cookouts. One of the most common staples you will see at any cookout is potato salad. You can probably ask 10 people how they make their potato salad and get pretty close to 10 different recipes. Potato salad is one of the easiest dishes to experiment on with different flavors. I am constantly saying to change the ingredients to fit your own taste buds and this dish is a great example of how to do that. Most of the recipes for potato salad will include mayonnaise, yogurt and sour cream, either by themselves or in some combination. But if you are in the mood for something different, use a simple oil and vinegar. Vinegar also is a common ingredient in most potato salads. It will bring out more of the other flavors while adding a tiny bite. The oil and vinegar can also incorporate different flavors to go with different ingredients. For a sweeter salad, use balsamic vinegar; while, for a more traditional one, I like to use either cider or rice vinegar. Use peanut oil, olive oil, vegetable oil or even sesame oil; the oil can add a lot of flavor, so think again of what flavors you want to bring out. As for the rest of the ingredients, things such as mustard, pickles, eggs, celery, onion, garlic and bacon are common additions. There also are many herbs that go great in a potato salad. Herbs such as parsley, thyme, rosemary, dill and my favorite, sweet basil, can all be used to complement your salad. There are so many other herbs and spices out there and a lot of them also will blend well. Spices such as curry,

nutmeg and star anise when used in the right proportion can really bring a great new flavor to your recipe. Just by adding or changing the herbs and spices, you can turn your own potato salad into a new dish. One summer at the Nantucket Yacht Club, the members wanted potato salad on the lunch menu all summer but asked if I could vary the recipe from time to time. I had a blast trying different concoctions. I made a new salad every couple of days and it kept it interesting for myself and the customers. I should have written at least some of them down but, again, it is the experimenting that makes it fun. I do remember one of the salads contained walnut oil, walnuts and freshly ground star anise. The kitchen staff looked on in horror until they tasted the end result. It came out awesome. It is just a matter of getting the right amounts of the various ingredients. Start with your base and add things slowly to make the dressing. Then add the dressing to the cooked potatoes a little at a time so you don’t make it a mush salad. I will use red potatoes 99 percent of the time for the simple reasons: I like that potato the best and it is easy to work with. However, it is a personal preference. This summer, experiment with your potato salad recipe and enjoy.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Chef’s Recipe under the Local Flavor tab.

POTATO SALAD

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith (Use 2 average-sized potatoes for 3 people. This recipe serves 18.) 12 potatoes, cut in chunks of approximately the same size ¼ C mayonnaise ½ C sour cream 2 T cider or rice vinegar 2 T Dijon mustard 1 t Worcestershire sauce 3-4 celery sticks, diced 1/2 red onion, diced 1 jalapeño, fine diced 1 green onion, diced 2 T basil, chopped 1 t nutmeg Cook the potatoes in lightly salted water until just cooked through. Mix all the wet ingredients in a bowl to taste. Toss all the dry ingredients together and then add three-quarters of wet ingredients, mix well and then add the rest until you get the desired consistency. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Try varying this by adding or subtracting other ingredients such as the eggs and/or bacon and other spices such as nutmeg or curry. To try adding spices, add just a little spice to a small amount of mixed wet ingredients and taste before adding to the full batch.


/ /

Summer Plans? / / / /

Visit the museum. Find Tahoe Tessie. Take a speed boat ride.

MUSEUM & GARDENS

Summer Hours: Thursday - Tuesday 10:00am - 4:30pm 401 West Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA 96145 530.583.9283 / www.tahoemaritime.org

Nightly 5-6 p.m.

ChristyHill.com 115 Grove St., Tahoe City CA 530-583-8551


TART offers daily connections to area resorts, dining, shopping and outdoor recreation!

I-80

H

Depot

P

Truckee Airport

267

Hourly Hwy. 267 Crystal Bay, Kings Beach, Northstar, Truckee Hwy. 89 Tahoe City, Squaw Valley, Truckee

TAHOE VISTA

SQUAW VALLEY

Grove St.

Tahoe City Transit Center

P

28

CRYSTAL BAY

TAHOE CITY

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Sand Harbor

SUNNYSIDE

LAKE TAHOE

89 Homewood Mountain Resort

HOMEWOOD TAHOMA Sugar Pine Point

P FREE Paved Parking Night Bike Service Trail

TART

MEEKS BAY

TRUCKEE LOCAL ROUTE Monday–Saturday service Connects with regional routes and Dial-A-Ride services throughout Truckee.

Northwoods Blvd.

DONNER SUMMIT

TRUCKEE THURSDAYS SHUTTLE–2018

I-80

Donner Pass Road

Sticks Market

Donner Lake

T R UC KE E

Gateway Center Donner Memorial State Park

Deerfield Dr. Crossroads Center

Depot 89

Henness Flats

I-80

Commercial Row

H

I-80

89

Regional Park

Old Brockway Rd.

Town Hall + Truckee 267 Airport (on call service)

ErskinePhotography

Free Shuttle June 14 – August 23, 4:30pm–9:45pm. Prosser, Glenshire, Sierra Meadows, Donner Lake, Tahoe Donner, Northstar, Squaw Valley to/from downtown Truckee.

Diamond Peak

Hyatt

CARNELIAN BAY

P

P

INCLINE VILLAGE

Minnow

North Tahoe Event Cntr.

28 89

Every 30 minutes Incline Village, Crystal Bay, Kings Beach, Tahoe City Free Summer Night Service until 2am North Shore, Squaw Valley, Northstar, Crystal Bay, West Shore. Offering larger buses for more passengers.

P

National /28 P

Alpine Meadows

431

KINGS BEACH

NORTHSTAR 89

TART REGIONAL ROUTES

RENO

I-80

TRUCKEE

Donner Pass Road

TART is a public transit system.

TahoeTruckeeTransit.com

Profile for Tahoe Weekly

July 5 to July 11, 2018  

Webber Falls, located north of Truckee on Highway 89, plunges 76 feet in several cascades into a deep gorge carved out of basaltic bedrock....

July 5 to July 11, 2018  

Webber Falls, located north of Truckee on Highway 89, plunges 76 feet in several cascades into a deep gorge carved out of basaltic bedrock....