Page 1

SPRING ADVENTURES in Carson City

Tahoe

HUSKY RESCUE

AYURVEDIC spring cleaning IN THIS ISSUE

2017 EDITION

Building 路 Remodeling 路 Decorating Landscaping 路 Tiny Homes

Memorial Day Weekend Sat & Sun 路 May 27-28

TruckeeHomeShow.com

at Truckee High School


SKI FREE THIS SPRING 2017–18

TA H O E S U P E R PASS F RO M

$ 519

M AY 20, 2017

R A M P U P TO B E I J I N G M AY 27 & 28, 2017

M A D E I N TA H O E M AY 28, 2017

C U S H I N G C ROSS I N G W E E K E N DS STA RT I N G M AY 20 T H RU J U LY 2, 3 & 4, 2017

H OT T U B PA RT I E S J U N E 13 – S E PT 5, 2017

B LU E S DAYS

EV E RY T U E S DAY J U N E 17 & 18, 2017

P E A KS A N D PAWS J U N E 23 – 25, 2017

K I DS A DV E N T U R E GAMES J U LY 1 – 4, 2017

F R E E D O M F E ST

4T H O F J U LY W E E K E N D T H E M E D W E E K E N DS

WAC KY COST U M E S S Q UAWA L P I N E .CO M

1-800-403-0206 All events subject to change, check squawalpine.Com to confirm scheduled dates.


DEEP MAY SNOW ADULT

$

CHILD

60 30

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LIFT TICKETS Thursdays-Sundays

through Memorial Day 5/29

Buy a Season Pass and ski the rest of this season for FREE! Only 15 minutes away but a world apart!

SkiRose.com Only 15 minutes from Incline Village


TheTahoeWeekly.com

What’s Inside

Volume 36 | Issue 09 TM

| M AY 1 1 - 2 4

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Features Out

Local

Warm sunny days. Fresh powder in the mountains. Spring in Tahoe means two seasons of outdoor adventures await in the mountains. Ski the slopes in the morning from the downhill ski resorts still open – Mt. Rose and Squaw Valley – or take a pre-dawn trek into the back country for solo powder turns set against the rising dawn. Then, it’s back for a quick change to the next activity – paddleboarding or kayaking on a pristine lake, hiking and maybe even mountain biking on dry trails (Please, don’t mountain bike on wet trails, it damages the trails.), century road rides or a boat ride in the afternoon sun. It’s all part of a the allure of a life or a week spent in Tahoe. It’s also time for the annual spring rite of passage marking the start of the golf season and with it our annual 2017 Tahoe-Reno Golf Guide. As with everything else in the Tahoe region, a round of golf in the Tahoe Sierra offers golfers a unique experience. Breathtaking mountain views and views of Lake Tahoe await golfers in Tahoe and Truckee. Explore the Lost Sierra with high-mountain vistas or golf with views of both the Carson and Virginia ranges in Reno, Sparks and the Carson Valley. Our Tahoe-Reno Golf Guide will help you plan your golf outings for the summer. And, in each issue of Tahoe Weekly from May 25 through October our golf writers will profile a different course in the region. Look for it in each issue of Tahoe Weekly or at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Look for the Golf link under the Out & About tab. 

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVES

IN THE OFFICE

flavor

35 35 37 38

Tasty Tidbits Ayurvedic Cleansing Wine Column Chef’s Recipe

Sales Manager Anne Artoux | anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110

Graphic Designer Mael Passanesi | graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101

22 05 06 16 18 20 21 21 22 22

Entertainment Editor Priya Hutner | priya@tahoethisweek.com

Lake Tahoe Facts Sightseeing Events Marinas & Boat Ramps Announcements For the Kids Beaches & Parks Wet ‘n’ Dirty Fishing

Music SCENE 28

35

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill | publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102

Art Director | Production Alyssa Ganong | production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106

Susan Ball

culture

23 Exhibit Calendar 23 Connecting to Creativity 24 The Arts

TWO SEASONS OF OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

Photography | production@tahoethisweek.com

Tahoe RCD

about

24

From the Publisher

Entertainment | entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

Arts Phyllis Shafer

The Club at Arrowcreek | TheLegend

07

Events Calendar & Editoral | editor@tahoethisweek.com

Golf Guide Carson City Tahoe Locals Sierra Stories

07 16 18 34

SUBMISSIONS

26 Puzzles 27 Horoscope 28 Legends of the Celtic Harp 28 Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 31 Reno Phil Youth Orchestra 32 Easy Giant Album Review

Copy Editor Katrina Veit Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle

DEADLINES & INFO May 25 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 16 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, May 18 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, May 18 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, May 18 June 1 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 23 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, May 25 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, May 25 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, May 25 TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

ON THE COVER

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

FEATURES · POWDER ALERTS COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS

– John Muir

The historic Tahoe City Golf Course is celebrating its 100th season this summer. It’s time to book a tee time at the historic course or one of the dozens of courses in the Tahoe-Reno region. Check out the Tahoe Weekly’s annual Tahoe-Reno Golf Guide for more on area courses. | Courtesy Drone Productions, GolfTahoeCity.com

Subscribe to the free, digital editions of Tahoe Weekly & Tahoe Powder TheTahoeWeekly.com | issuu.com | issuu app iTunes & GooglePlay | E-Newsletter Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at 4

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & post your photos on Instagram

@TheTahoeWeekly


May 11-24, 2017 GRAY ’S CROSSING COYOTE MOON

TAHOE DONNER

Reno & Sparks

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Donner Lake Donner Summit

OLD GREENWOOD

Truckee

BOCA RESERVOIR

DONNER LAKE

STAMPEDE RESERVOIR

GRAEAGLE MEADOWS

h Ta

N

GRIZZLY RANCH WHITEHAWK RANCH

TAHOE CITY

Alpine Meadows

Dollar Hill

TAHOE CITY MARINA

Sunnyside

GOLF COURSES

SUNNYSIDE

il

Ta h o e R i m

a Tr

CASINOS

LAKE FOREST

NORTH TAHOE

NV

TAHOE VISTA REC AREA

Eagle Rock HOMEWOOD

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

Marlette Lake

SAND HARBOR

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

Tahoe Pines

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

DEEPEST POINT

COON ST. BOAT LAUNCH

SIERRA BOAT CO.

INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Tahoe City

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Incline Village

OLD BROCKWAY

RESORT AT SQUAW CREEK

BOAT RAMPS

INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN

Tahoe Vista

Olympic Valley

MARINAS

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

WEST EAST SOUTH

THE DRAGON AT NAKOMA GOLF RESORT

ra Rim T

il

SCHAFFER’S MILL

PLUMAS PINES

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

PROSSER RESERVOIR

PONDEROSA

Carson City

Natural rim: 6,223’

Glenbrook

Homewood o Ta h

OBEXER’S

e Ri

ELECTRIC CHARGING STATIONS

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

Visit plugshare.com for details

Meeks Bay MEEKS BAY

Cave Rock

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

Emerald Bay

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline

Fannette Island SKI RUN

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet

LAKESIDE BIJOU

Shoreline: 72 miles Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

CAMP RICHARDSON Ta h oe

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

TAHOE KEYS

Cascade Lake

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

EDGEWOOD TAHOE

CAVE ROCK

Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

CA

Watershed Area: 312 square miles

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

TAHOE PARADISE

Permanent Population: 66,000

LAKE TAHOE

Number of Visitors: 3 million annually Kirkwood

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

Markleeville

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 73.1’ in 2015. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

5


TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

The water released from Lake Tahoe into the Truckee River has been raging as the season’s snowpack melts. See Lake Levels on this page for more information. | Katherine E. Hill

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

North Lake Tahoe Demonstration Garden

East Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Donner Summit

Summer | Free (775) 586-1610, ext. 25 | demogarden.org Demonstrations of lake-friendly landscaping using native and adaptive plants, water conservation, soil stabilization techniques, defensible space from wildfires & BMPs. Self-guided tours & clinics. TART

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

North Tahoe Arts Center

Tahoe Art League Gallery South Lake Tahoe (530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Tahoe City

South Lake Tahoe

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

Heavenly

Tahoe City Field Station

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo

Tallac Historic Site

West Shore

Taylor Creek Visitor Center South Lake Tahoe

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

North Shore

East Shore

Elevation 6,227.74’ | Elevation in 2016 6,223.43’ Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

CAPACITY:

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Open summer only (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Truckee

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building in Incline Village. TART

Lake Tahoe Museum

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

9,500

Measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS)

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in the summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

Tahoe Maritime Museum

Tahoe City

Tahoe Science Center

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Truckee Railroad Museum

South Lake Tahoe

Flow at Farad 6080 | troa.net troa net

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

VISITORS’ CENTERS Kings Beach Kings Beach State Rec. Area, (Thurs.-Mon., summer)

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd., (800) 468-2463

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd., (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50, (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Road (Depot), (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village 855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd., (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Road, (530) 587-3558

225

200,000 AF

175

150,000 AF

125

100,000 AF

75

50

25

Truckee River

Daily | Free | tahoemuseum.org Features official 1960 Winter Olympic items such as skis, promotional literature, collection of official Olympic photographer Bill Briner. Learn the history of skiing in the Sierra. Inside Boatworks Mall. TART

35 College Dr., (530) 543-2600

Donner 6,718

I 20,400 Martis 1,105 CAPACITY:

Tahoe City

100 North Lake Blvd., (530) 581-6900

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Incline Village Historical Society

A Prosser 8,045 CAPACITY: 29,840 CAPACITY: A

Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Olympic Winter Games

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and hands-on activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

226,500

CI Independence 15,585 CAPACITY: 18,300

6

Emerald Bay

Parking fee | Tours summer only (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

P CITY TY: 40,870 Boca 30,514 CAPA

Stampede 183,077

Vikingsholm Castle

Thunderbird Lodge

Readings taken on Friday, May 5, 2017

Natural rim 6,223’

truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

LAKE LEVELS RESERVOIR CAPACITY

Truckee

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

May-October | thunderbirdtahoe.org Thunderbird Lodge is the former Whittell estate. This magnificent lakefront home features the Lighthouse Room, Old Lodge, 600’ underground tunnel (with a former lion cage) and Boat House, home to the “Thunderbird,” a 1939 wooden boat. Ages 6+ only. No on-site parking. Tours by reservation only.

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

Lake Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

$10 parking | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Sugar Pine Point State Park is home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

High Camp

North Shore

Summer | (530) 583-3279 | terc.ucdavis.edu This 1920s-era building features a history of the field station, current UC Davis research projects, interactive exhibits and demonstration garden. Ages 8+. TART

South Lake Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

North Shore

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

Tahoe City

Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

West Shore

Explore Tahoe

Incline Village

PUBLIC TRANSIT: NORTH SHORE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH SHORE | bluego.org


The Club at Arrowcreek | The Legend

2017 EDITION

Golf Guide

INSIDE Tahoe & Truckee Reno & Sparks Carson Valley The Lost Sierra

EXCLUSIVE C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com > Tips for golfing in the mountains > Tahoe’s most challenging holes

The Tahoe Weekly features a weekly golf section in each edition of the magazine from Memorial Day through October. Be sure to pick up your copy each week or

download the digital edition on any device through the free issuu app at iTunes or GooglePlay. Get Tahoe Weekly delivered to your inbox by free subscription at

TheTahoeWeekly.com

CONTRIBUTORS | CASEY GLAUBMAN, TJ LESTER, JENN SHERIDAN AND KATHERINE E. H ILL

7


2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE | TheTahoeWeekly.com

TAHOE CITY GOLF COURSE

Northstar California Golf Course

www.GolfTahoeCity.com Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

9 holes | par 33

2,691

105 to 118

65.5

TAHOE CITY GOLF COURSE is located in the heart of Tahoe City near Commons Beach and local shops. A fun and challenging 9-hole, par-33 course with one par 5, four par 4s and 3s will have players using every club in their bag as they walk or ride through towering pine trees enjoying views of Lake Tahoe. The clubhouse has a full bar

and restaurant, as well as a pro shop with rental clubs available. Enjoy a scenic patio, two bocce courts, practice greens and a barbecue area available for family reunions, receptions and barbecues after your private golf tournament. Book your tee time, tournament or private party today. Located behind Bank of America in Tahoe City.

251 N. Lake Blvd. | Tahoe City, CA 96145 Call and book your tee time at (530) 583-1516 or visit www.GolfTahoeCity.com.

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Truckee & Northstar T

ruckee offers the largest variety of golf courses in the area from spectacular high-mountain views at Coyote Moon and Tahoe Donner to expansive views of Martis Valley at Northstar. Featured as a top destination for golfers, the Old Greenwood Golf Course is a Jack Nicklaus Signature design, while its sister resort, The Golf Club at Gray’s Crossing offers tournament-like conditions. For a shorter round, visit Ponderosa Golf Course, a 9-hole community course.

Coyote Moon Golf Course | If you are looking for a true mountain golf experience, look no further than Coyote Moon Golf Course. Located minutes from downtown Truckee, the course sits on a 250-acre property with breathtaking views, towering pines and granite outcroppings. Each hole feels as if you are playing golf in the middle of the woods. The layout has numerous elevation changes, well-protected greens and strategically placed hazards throughout. | coyotemoongolf.com The Golf Club at Gray’s Crossing | Gray’s Crossing was designed by Jim Hardy and former PGA Tour professional Peter Jacobson. The course was opened in 2007 and features holes lined with lofty pines and native grasslands. The National Audubon Society recognized Gray’s Crossing as an Audubon International Gold Signature Sanctuary. | golfintahoe.com Northstar California Golf Course |

The golf course at Northstar has two distinct nines. The front nine wanders through wonderful Martis Valley and is referred to as the Meadow Nine. The back nine, called the Mountain Nine, climbs mountainous terrain and winds its way through majestic pines. The course was designed by Robert Muir Graves and is an enjoyable layout for all. | northstarcalifornia.com

COYOTE MOON GOLF COURSE www.CoyoteMoonGolf.com Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

18 holes | par 72

7,177

120 to 140

64.1 to 73.6

COYOTE MOON GOLF Course is one of the finest mountain golf experiences in the country. Residing in the beautiful Lake Tahoe area, Coyote Moon sits on 250 acres of secluded, rolling hills amidst towering pines, enormous granite outcroppings, wildflowers and the beautiful Trout Creek. The vistas, plus fresh mountain air, equals near perfection.

Coyote Moon Golf Course is a challenging, but fair test of Lake Tahoe golf. Most tee shots offer ample landing areas, as there are only a few forced carries. From the landing areas, most holes funnel to medium-sized, undulating greens that are well protected by trees, sand and water. The golf course was designed by Brad Bell, a former PGA Tour player, well known for creating highly praised courses.

10685 Northwoods Blvd. | Truckee, CA 96161 For tee times, call (530) 587-0886 or visit www.CoyoteMoonGolf.com.

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Old Greenwood Golf Course | One of the most upscale golf experiences in the Lake Tahoe region may be found at Old Greenwood Golf Course, built by the legendary Jack Nicklaus in 2004. The course has received a number of accolades including a Top 10 ranking for Best New Public Access Golf Course by Golf Digest and ranked the 4th Finest New Upscale Public Course in America by Golf Magazine. | golfintahoe.com Ponderosa Golf Course |

Ponderosa Golf Course is Truckee’s oldest golf course. It was developed by the Truckee townspeople and designed by Bob Baldock in 1961. Ponderosa is a 9-hole course that plays just more than 3,000 yards. It is a blend of six par 4s, two par 3s and one par 5. | ponderosegolfcoursetruckee.com

GRAY ’S CROSSING TAHOE DONNER

COYOTE MOON

OLD GREENWOOD

TRUCKEE

Donner Lake

BOCA PROSS

PONDEROSA

Truckee River

STAMPE

SCHAFFER’S MILL

NORTHSTAR

8

Kings Beach


GRAY ’S CROSSING TAHOE DONNER

COYOTE MOON

OLD GREENWOOD

May 11-24, 2017 | 2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE

Old Brockway Golf Course

INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN

INCLINE VILLAGE

Truckee River

OLYMPIC VALLEY LINKS AT SQUAW CREEK

OLD BROCKWAY

TAHOE VISTA CARNELIAN BAY

KINGS BEACH

CRYSTAL BAY

INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP

Marlette Lake TAHOE CITY

ALPINE MEADOWS

DOLLAR HILL TAHOE CITY

Sunnyside

North Lake Tahoe & Olympic Valley Tahoe Pines

Glenbrook

Homewood

o Ta h

e Ri

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

N

Meeks orth Lake Tahoe is Bay home to two historic courses: Tahoe City Golf Course MEEKS celebrating its 100th anniversary this season and Old Brockway. Some of BAY the region’s finest courses can be found at Incline’s Mountain and Championship Cave Rock courses with breathtaking Lake Tahoe views and The Links at Squaw Creek, which EDGEWOOD CAVE ROCK offers a challenging game in Olympic Valley. TAHOE

Schaffer’s Mill Golf and Lake Club |

Schaffer’s Mill, designed by John Harbottle and Johnny Miller, features enchanting views of Martis Valley, the Carson Range and the ski runs of Northstar. The first nine is located in a meadow and is fairly flat and the back nine climbs hilly terrain with many elevation changes. It is a par 71 that measures more than 7,000 yards from the black tees. | schaffersmill.com

Tahoe Donner Golf Course | Tahoe Donner Golf Course was the first 18-hole championship layout in Truckee. The front nine was designed by Roy Williams and further refined by renowned architect Billy Bell Jr., who completed the back nine in 1976. The course received a renovation by Cary Bickler in 2006 and was nominated by Golf Digest Magazine for Best Remolded Golf Course in America. The course features many elevation changes, granite rock formations, narrow fairways lined with soaring pines and views of the Truckee Valley. | tahoedonner.com

OLD GREENWOOD

Emerald Bay

Zephyr Cove South Lake Tahoe

Stateline

Fannette Island Incline Village Championship Course | The Championship Course in Incline Village SKI RUN

was built in the summer of 1964 and is the first championship layout in the Tahoe LAKESIDE Basin. TAHOE KEYS The Crystal Bay Development Company hired Robert Trent Jones Sr. to BIJOU carve a mountain layout that is a must play for any visitor. The highlight of this course is by far the dramatic CAMP RICHARDSON views of Lake Tahoe. The golf shop has twice been ranked among the top 100 golf shops FREEL in America by Golf TWorld. | golfincline.com PEAK aho e R i m Tr ail LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

Incline Village Mountain Course |

The 18-hole, par 58 Mountain Course plays a TAHOE PARADISE modest 3,527 yards from the white tees. Don’t let the lack of yardage fool you. Be preLAKE TAHOE pared to use every club in your bag and expect a variety of challenging lies. The course was built by renowned designer Robert Trent Jones Jr. and is a dedication to Harold B. Tiller, known as one of the co-founders of Incline Village. | golfincline.com

GRAY’S CROSSING

www.GolfinTahoe.com

www.GolfinTahoe.com

Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

18 holes | par 72

7,518

128 to 140

70.4 to 75.2

18 holes | par 72

7,466

126 to 149

69.7 to 75.2

NESTLED AMONG 600 acres of towering pines and surrounded by beautiful mountain vistas lies Old Greenwood. As a Jack Nicklaus Signature Designed course, Old Greenwood has received Jack’s highest level of personal attention, and it shows. Old Greenwood’s 18 holes of perfection are a “must-play” for any serious golfer. Home to California’s premier Golf Academy, which features the region’s top golf technology and offers lessons, clinics and golf schools taught by

one of America’s top 100 instructors, Old Greenwood has a wide range of offerings for golfers of every ability level. In addition to world-class golf, fourseason Club Memberships at Tahoe Mountain Club offer members a wide selection of benefits both on the course and off the course. With our equally acclaimed sister course, Gray’s Crossing, located just across the street, it’s the perfect location for your next resort golf vacation or corporate golf tournament.

EVERGREEN PINES line the fairways as the course weaves through a natural mountain surrounding with Mt. Rose as its backdrop. Gray’s Crossing meets golf enthusiasts’ demands to play a course with a traditional private club feel. Fast greens and tournament-like conditions await golfers every day. Demanding a combination of creative club choices and tactical strategies, this Jacobsen/Hardy course reveals the designers’ passion for fun, yet challenging play. When not on the greens, guests

may enjoy perusing the extensive array of merchandise in the Golf Shop or relax at PJ’s Restaurant. The indoor/ outdoor restaurant and bar boasts breathtaking, panoramic views of Mt. Rose, a spacious lawn and a patio for relaxing around the fire. Make it a family outing. Both Old Greenwood and Gray’s Crossing have two sets of junior tees, and offer complimentary golf for juniors after 5 p.m. New for 2017, Gray’s Crossing’s practice facility is open daily for your family’s enjoyment.

12915 Fairway Drive | Truckee, CA 96161 For tee times at Old Greenwood, call (530) 550-7024. For tee times at Gray’s Crossing, call (530) 550-5804. For more information on both courses, visit www.GolfinTahoe.com.

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2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE | TheTahoeWeekly.com

The Links at Squaw Creek Golf Course |

Amidst the iconic Olympic Valley lies a links-style course designed by Robert Trent Jones Jr. Nearly every peak of Squaw Valley Resort can be seen from the course including KT-22, Squaw Peak and Emigrant Peak. Resort at Squaw Creek boasts the only fully organic championship course in the Lake Tahoe region, meaning that only certified organic fertilizers are used and no pesticides are applied. The course has been recognized by the Audubon International as a Certified Cooperative Sanctuary. | squawcreek.com

36Perfection

holes of

Old Brockway Golf Course | Old Brockway Golf Course holds some of the richest history found in Lake Tahoe. In 1924, developer Harry Comstock hired Scottish designer John Duncan Dunn to design the course. During the 1930s and 1940s, North Tahoe was a favorite vacation spot for celebrities and the elite. It was common to see Bob Hope, Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin and it was the home for the first Bing Crosby Golf Tournament in GRAY ’S CROSSING 1934. | oldbrockway.com

mountain

TAHOE DONNER

COYOTE MOON

OLD GREENWOOD

Truckee

Join us for our 2017 opening!

May 19

STAMPEDE RESERVOIR designed by May “Queenie” Dunn Hupfel in 1917. The original layout was links style consisting of six holes with sand greens. Guests of the famous Tahoe Tavern played golf here while vacationing in North Tahoe. Playing 2,691 yards from the blue tees, Tahoe City Golf SCHAFFER’S MILL Course offers a variety of shots and a mixture of challenging and easy holes, which makes ra Rim T this course enjoyable for o e low and high handicappers. | golftahoecity.com

DONNER LAKE

PLUMAS PINES GRAEAGLE

Gray’s Crossing

June 2

GRIZZLY RANCH

h Ta

NORTHSTAR

WHITEHAWK RANCH

RE INT AIR

il

Donner Summit Old Greenwood

PONDEROSA

Tahoe City Golf Course | This was another favorite of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Bob TRUCKEE RESERVOIR AIRPORT Hope and Sammy Davis Jr. duringBOCA the 1950s. The Tahoe City Golf Course is a municipal PROSSER RESERVOIR course that offers some of the most affordable rounds in the area. The course was first

INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN

South Lake Tahoe Incline Village

OLD BROCKWAY

THE DRAGON 2017 golf passes AT NAKOMA

Tahoe Vista

GOLF RESORT

INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP

Crystal

Whether you’re an early bird, weekend warrior, or just outh Lake Tahoe Kings is home to one ofBay the most famous courses in the area, the Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course, which is routinely rated among the Top looking to squeeze in a few holes after work, we’ve Beach Carnelian100 Bay golf courses in America. It also hosts the American DEEPESTCentury Celebrity Golf got a pass for you! Our two pass options give you the Olympic COON ST. Tournament, which brings top players and famous faces to the region each summer. POINT BOAT LAUNCH SIERRA ability to tailor your tee times to Valley your schedule. For For a moreBOAT casual game, golfers may head to the Bijou Municipal Golf Course. CO. The Tahoe Paradise Golf Course is hilly 18-hole courseSAND with tight, narrow fairways more information on our Season Pass offerings, visit NORTH TAHOE CITY HARBOR or play along the Truckee River at Lake Tahoe Golf Course. TAHOE us online or give us a call at (530) 550-7084. RESORT AT

S

SQUAW CREEK

Alpine To book a tee time, visit www.GolfinTahoe.com Meadows

Tahoe City

LAKE FOREST

Dollar Hill

Bijou Golf Course |

TAHOE VISTA REC AREA Bijou Municipal Golf Course opened in 1920 and offers fairways

TAHOE lined with lofty pines and majestic views of Freel Peak. This 9-hole executive layout CITY features five par 5s and four par 3s. The greens are small and flat and there are no water MARINA

hazards, making this course perfect for beginners. | cityofslt.us

Sunnyside Ta h o e R i m

a Tr

SUNNYSIDE Edgewood

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Tahoe Golf Course | South Lake Tahoe’s premier golf course is Edgewood Tahoe. It is the only course in the Tahoe Basin that sits along the shores of the lake, which makes it that much harder to concentrate on your game. Edgewood opened in 1968 and was designed by George Fazio. Golf Digest regularly rates it among the top 100 in the nation. | edgewoodtahoe.com

Tahoe Pines Eagle Rock

Glenbrook

HOMEWOOD

Lake Tahoe Golf Course | Homewood

Lake Tahoe Golf Course offers majestic views of Twin Peaks, Mount Tallac, Desolation Wilderness and the summit of Heavenly. The Truckee River OBEXER’S meanders its way through much of the course and mountain wildlife can be found throughout. This is an enjoyable layout for golfers of all abilities offering challenging shots for low Tahoma handicappers along with a set of family tees for beginners. | laketahoegc.com

Meeks Bay

Tahoe Paradise Golf Course |

Tahoe Paradise is a unique, 18-hole executive course that offers a challenge for all handicaps. The course offers many elevation changes and a variety of dogleg lefts and rights. Most rounds here are played in less than four hours, making this a great course to play if you are limited on time. | tahoeparadisegc.com

ZEPHYR COVE SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

EDGEWOOD TAHOE

STATELINE

Cascade Lake

BIJOU

Fallen Leaf Lake TAHOE PARADISE LAKE TAHOE

10

Carson City


May 11-24, 2017 | 2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE

HOLES

YARDS

PAR

Tahoe-Reno Golf

DRIVING RANGE

ADVERTISEMENT

18

7,177

72

18

7,466

72

18

6,781

72

18

7,518

72

9

3,022

35

18

7,010

71

18

7,002

72

9

3,418

36

INCLINE VILLAGE CHAMPIONSHIP

18

7,106

72

INCLINE VILLAGE MOUNTAIN

18

3,527

58

LINKS AT SQUAW CREEK

18

6,931

71

9

2,691

33

9

2,002

32

18

7,555

72

18

6,741

71

18

4,034

66

18

7,015

72

9

883

27

9

2,822

35

18

6,725

72

18

7,411

72

18

6,421

72

18

6,983

71

18

7,310

72

18

6,715

71

18

6,669

72

18

6,613

71

(775) 828-6640 | WashoeGolf.com

18

6,695

72

(775) 851-3301 | WolfRunGolfClub.com

18

7,100

72

9

1,391

27

THE RESORT AT RED HAWK | HILLS COURSE

18

7,106

71

THE RESORT AT RED HAWK | LAKES COURSE

18

7,140

72

WILDCREEK GOLF COURSE | CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE

18

7,047

72

WILDCREEK GOLF COURSE | EXECUTIVE COURSE

9

1,420

27

18

6,020

71

18

7,218

72

*Courses open unless otherwise noted.

TRUCKEE & NORTHSTAR

COYOTE MOON

(530) 587-0886 | CoyoteMoonGolf.com Opens in June

GRAY’S CROSSING

(530) 550-5804 | GolfinTahoe.com Opens June 2

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA OLD GREENWOOD PONDEROSA

(530) 562-3290 | NorthstarCalifornia.com Opens May 26

(530) 550-7024 | GolfinTahoe.com Opens May 19

(530) 587-3501 | PonderosaGolfCourseTruckee.com

SCHAFFER’S MILL

(530) 582-6964 | SchaffersMill.com Opens May 12

TAHOE DONNER GOLF

(530) 587-9443 | TahoeDonner.com Opens June 2

NORTH LAKE TAHOE & OLYMPIC VALLEY

BROCKWAY GOLF

(530) 546-9909 | OldBrockway.com

Tee time: (866) 925-4653 | Pro shop: (775) 832-1146 | GolfIncline.com Opens mid-May Tee time: (866) 925-4653 | Pro shop: (775) 832-1150 | GolfIncline.com Opens late May

TAHOE CITY GOLF

Pro shop: (530) 581-6637 | SquawCreek.com Opens July 1

(530) 583-1516 | GolfTahoeCity.com Opens May 15

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

BIJOU

(530) 542-6097 | CityofSLT.us

EDGEWOOD TAHOE LAKE TAHOE

Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course

(888) 881-8659 | Pro shop: (775) 588-3566 | EdgewoodTahoe.com

(530) 577-0788 | LakeTahoeGC.com

TAHOE PARADISE

(530) 577-2121 | TahoeParadiseGC.com

THE LOST SIERRA

THE DRAGON AT NAKOMA GOLF RESORT FEATHER RIVER INN GOLF COURSE FEATHER RIVER PARK RESORT GRAEAGLE MEADOWS

(530) 836-1253 | FeatherRiverInn.com

(530) 836-2328 | FeatherRiverParkResort.com

(530) 836-2323 | PlayGraeagle.com

GRIZZLY RANCH GOLF CLUB PLUMAS PINES

(530) 832-5067 | NakomaGolfResort.com

(530) 832-4200 | GrizzlyRanchGolfClub.com Opens May 12

(530) 836-1420 | PlumasPinesGolf.com

WHITEHAWK RANCH

(530) 836-0394 | (800) 332-4295 | GolfWhitehawk.com

RENO, NEV.

THE CLUB AT ARROWCREEK | THE LEGEND LAKERIDGE GOLF COURSE

(775) 825-2200 | LakeRidgeGolf.com

ROSEWOOD LAKES GOLF COURSE SIERRA SAGE GOLF COURSE WASHOE GOLF COURSE WOLF RUN GOLF CLUB

(775) 850-4471 | GolfArrowCreek.com

(775) 857-2892 | RosewoodLakes.com

(775) 972-1564 | SierraSageGolf.org

SPARKS, NEV.

THE LINKS AT KILEY RANCH

(775) 354-2100 | TheLinksatKileyRanch.com

(775) 626-4599 | RedHawkGolfandResort.com

(775) 626-4599 | RedHawkGolfandResort.com (775) 673-3100 | WildcreekGolf.net

(775) 673-3100 | WildcreekGolf.net

CARSON VALLEY, NEV.

CARSON VALLEY GOLF COURSE DAYTON VALLEY GOLF CLUB

(775) 265-3181 | CarsonValleyGolf.com

(775) 246-7888 | DuncanGolfReno.com

EAGLE VALLEY | EAST COURSE

(775) 887-2380 | EagleValleyGolf.com

18

6,618

72

EAGLE VALLEY | WEST COURSE

(775) 887-2380 | EagleValleyGolf.com

18

6,851

72

EMPIRE RANCH GOLF COURSE | COMSTOCK /RIVER

18

6,840

72

EMPIRE RANCH GOLF COURSE | SIERRA /RIVER

18

6,733

72

EMPIRE RANCH GOLF COURSE | SIERRA /COMSTOCK

18

6,573

72

GENOA LAKE GOLF CLUB | LAKES COURSE

(888) 795-2729 | GenoaLakes.com

18

7,359

72

GENOA LAKE GOLF CLUB | RANCH COURSE

(866) 795-2709 | GenoaLakes.com

18

7,290

72

18

6,426

71

18

6,914

72

(888) 227-1335 | EmpireRanchGolf.com

(888) 227-1335 | EmpireRanchGolf.com (888) 227-1335 | EmpireRanchGolf.com

SILVER OAK GOLF COURSE SUNRIDGE GOLF CLUB

(775) 841-7000 | SilverOakGolf.com

(775) 267-4448 | SunRidgeGC.com

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be listed in Golf. 11


2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Feather River Inn Golf Course | This stunning par-3 track stays true to its original design concept: a course that is enjoyable, well kept and rewarding in play. The course is uniquely set in the Eastern Sierra with views of breathtaking snow-capped mountains, towering pines and azure blue skies. | featherriverinn.com

Whitehawk Ranch Golf Course

Feather River Park Resort | Feather River Park Resort course offers stunning views of the Mohawk Valley along its tree-lined fairways. There are two welcoming 18-hole championship courses for players of all abilities. | featherriverparkresort.com Graeagle Meadows Golf Course |

The course first opened as nine holes in 1968 and the back nine was completed in 1970. It was designed by Ellis Van Groder and features panoramic views of the Mohawk Valley. Graeagle is an enjoyable layout for all ability levels. The greens are modestly sized and stress accurate approach shots. | playgraeagle.com

GRIZZLY RANCH

H

FEATHER RIVER INN & PARK

The Lost Sierra

BECKWOURTH

BLAIRSDEN PLUMAS PINES

GRAEAGLE

ead North on State Route 89 from Truckee to discover a lost world complete with hidden, world-class golf destinations. The Dragon at Nakoma Golf Resort offers breathtaking views of the High Sierra. Golf Digest has ranked the neighboring Whitehawk Ranch Golf Club as one of the Top 20 courses in California. Plumas Pines runs along the Feather River with pristine, tree-lined fairways while the superb greens at Graeagle Golf Course are serene and picturesque. Nestled between the Sierra Nevada and Cascade ranges, the Grizzly Ranch Golf Club is surrounded by more than 1 million acres of national and state forest.

NAKOMA

CLIO

GRAEAGLE MEADOWS

WHITEHAWK

WHITEHAWK RANCH

The Dragon at Nakoma Golf Resort |

With picture-postcard views from every tee, Nakoma’s 18-hole championship course, the Dragon, never disappoints. While you stop to savor the mountain vistas, don’t forget you are playing on a course that debuted as one of America’s Top 75 according to Golf World. It was designed by Robin Nelson, who also designed the famous Dunes at Mauna Lani on the Big Island of Hawaii. | nakomagolfresort.com

Keri Oberly

TO TRUCKEE

TAHOE DONNER GOLF COURSE www.TahoeDonner.com/Golf Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

18 holes | par 72

7,002

127 to 134

68.9 to 74.1

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Affordability with a view! Rated “excellent” by reviewers on TripAdvisor, Tahoe Donner Golf Course is located in the beautiful High Sierra just minutes away from downtown

Truckee. Play among towering pines, meandering creeks and granite rock formations on this challenging 18hole, par-72 championship golf course. It is perfect for friends, family and group outings.

A round of golf on average paces at four and a half hours and is the true definition of a mountain course where golfers enjoy the peace and quiet of natural surroundings, wildlife sightings, and greens so consistently pure they have been recognized as the “Best Greens in the Tahoe Region.”

$20, for beginner to advanced levels. Clinics vary by the day, so whether you are looking to improve your swing or work on your short game, there is something for every skillset. Private lessons are also available daily, and kids ages 8 to 14 can also enroll in Junior Golf School, offered at various times throughout the summer season. And, while you’re at the course, don’t forget to stop by The Lodge Restaurant and TAHOE DONNER Pub to check out our Golfers’ Happy TRUCKEE Hour and the outdoor dining options on our expansive deck.

SIGNATURE HOLE Known as “Buena Vista,” meaning “Good View” in Spanish, our par 4, 417-yard hole 18 is the perfect way to end your day. Featuring panoramic PLUMAS PINES views and a dramatic change in GRAEAGLE elevation, you’ll tee off with a fairway GRIZZLY RANCH wood, hybrid or long iron to lay-up WHITEHAWK short of Trout Creek. Although RANCH the green complex is the deepest THE DRAGON AT NAKOMA on the course, it is ringed by five GOLF RESORT cavernous bunkers and one lone pine. Occasionally, the hole will be played from the forward tee (291 yards), magically transformed into the most BEST VALUE IN TOWN spectacular “drivable” par 4 in the With most green fees unchanged in High Sierra. What a finish! nearly 4 years, Tahoe Donner offers exceptional value for a course of this caliber. Additionally, drop-in clinics are offered almost daily at a flat rate of just

12850 Northwoods Blvd. | Truckee, CA 96161 For tee times and more information, call (530) 587-9443, visit www.TahoeDonner.com/golf/course/ or e-mail golf@tahoedonner.com.

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TAHOE


May 11-24, 2017 | 2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE

Grizzly Ranch Golf Club |

Grizzly Ranch Golf Club opened in 2005 and was designed by Bob Cupp. The course is aptly named, playing to a grizzly 7,411 yards from the back tees, but there are four tee boxes to choose from, allowing you to pick the ideal length for an enjoyable round. Unlike many mountain golf courses, Grizzly Ranch does not have any extreme elevation changes or forced carries. It plays fair for all levels of golfers. | grizzlyranchgolfclub.com

Plumas Pines Golf Course |

Plumas Pines Golf Resort is a fantastic destination to get away from it all. Designed in 1980 by Homer Flint, the course zigzags its way along the middle fork of the Feather River and features some of the most pristine playing conditions in the area. The fairways are narrowly lined with towering pines and water comes into play on nearly every hole. Accuracy and course management are crucial. | plumaspinesgolf.com

Whitehawk Ranch Golf Course |

The course was designed by Dick Bailey in 1996 and offers a unique blend of holes that wander through meadows of native grasses and wildflowers along with holes that are cut through lofty aspens, cedars and firs. In 2007 and 2008, Whitehawk was rated as the No. 11 best public course in California by Golf Digest Magazine and also won the esteemed Golf Writers Association Environmental Award in 1997. | golfwhitehawk.com

L

Reno & Sparks

ower elevation and a milder climate allow the courses in the Reno and Sparks area to open earlier than those in Tahoe. If you are jonesing to swing a club in the early spring and late into the fall, take a short drive down the hill and start the golf season before the snow melts off some of the mountains courses. With more than a dozen courses to choose from, there’s something for every golfer in Reno and Sparks.

RENO The Club at Arrowcreek | The Legend | The Club at Arrowcreek, located in the foothills, boasts 36 holes of challenging, unique terrain. After your round, drown your sorrows or celebrate your victory at the Redfields Bar & Grill. If you’re looking for something a bit more elegant, relax in front of the fireplace in the Terrace Room where you can enjoy fine cuisine and dining in a comfortable atmosphere. | golfarrowcreek.com Lakeridge Golf Course | Designed by Robert Trent Jones Sr. in 1969, Lakeridge offers gorgeous views of both Reno and the surrounding mountains. In addition to beautiful scenery, the course offers numerous challenges, perhaps the best of which is the par-3 17th hole that features an always-fun island green. Just make sure you bring some extra balls for this tricky hole. | lakeridgegolf.com Rosewood Lakes Golf Course | Designed by Brad Benz and opened in 1991, the Rosewood Lakes Golf Course is an affordable, public course located close to Reno. This scenic course offers generous greens offset by water hazards and numerous bunkers. The combination makes Rosewood Lakes ideal for players of all skill levels and abilities. | rosewoodlakes.com Sierra Sage Golf Course | Weather permitting, the Sierra Sage Golf Course caters to year-round golfers of all stripes. The walker-friendly Sierra Sage Course sits beneath the slopes of Peavine Mountain and, in addition to 18 challenging holes, the course offers two full-practice holes, multiple putting greens and a full-grass driving range. If you want a different way to get around the course, golfers can try out the newest craze, GolfBoards. | sierrasagegolf.org Washoe Golf Course |

The Washoe Golf Course offers two 9-hole courses: the Executive Course and the Short Game Course. Washoe Golf Course is unique in that a single green fee gets you unlimited access to both courses for the day. Need to work on those short irons? Spin a few laps on the Short Game Course until you feel up to the challenge of the Executive. | washoegolf.org

Genoa Lakes Golf Club | Ranch Course

INCLINE VILLAGE

THE CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE

THE MOUNTAIN COURSE

Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

18 holes | par 72

7,106

127 to 146

68.7 to 73.9

18 holes | par 58

3,527

98 to 102

55.2 to 58.2

www.GolfIncline.com | Opens May 19

LOCATED AT 955 Fairway Blvd. in Incline Village, Designer Robert Trent Jones Sr. called the course “the ideal mountain layout” with “views you will never forget.” This challenging, par-72 course matches everything you look for in a mountain design – towering trees, timely doglegs and natural water features, all of which complement its picturesque setting. For tee times, visit www.GolfIncline.com.

Renovated in 2003-04 by Kyle Phillips, amenities include a 23,000 ft. clubhouse with a banquet facility, an award-winning Golf Shop, lessons by PGA and LPGA staff, a state-of-the-art driving range, and a top-of-the-line restaurant – The Grille. The Championship Course was listed on the “Best in State” list 2012-2015 by Golf Digest magazine and ranked #5 on GolfAdvisor’s 2016 “Top Courses in Nevada” list.

www.GolfIncline.com | Late-May/Early-June

LOCATED AT 690 Wilson Way in Incline Village, the Mountain Course invites golfers to enjoy the great outdoors at this public 18-hole par-58 course featuring an amazing mountain layout and beautiful views. This course is fun, affordable, and quick to play with special 9-hole and twilight rate options starting at just $18.

Bring the family out for fun events like Nine & Wine, Sunday Family Fun Days (with family-friendly 8” cups on the greens), and Thrill & Grill throughout the season. Learn to golf or improve your game with the Get Golf Ready 5-day clinics offered throughout the season.

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13


2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Wolf Run Golf Club | The home course of the University of Nevada, Reno men’s and women’s golf teams, Wolf Run Golf Club located in Southern Reno is a fun, challenging gem of a course. If you’re new to the area, the Wolf Run is a great introduction to the area and to desert golfing in general. Tricky, undulating terrain provides challenges for beginners and experienced players alike. Should the worst happen, not to worry. The clubhouse offers full-service club repair to make sure your grandpa’s clubs can help get you through another season. | wolfrungolfclub.com

SPARKS

WHITEHAWK RANCH GOLF CLUB www.GolfWhitehawk.com Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

18 holes | par 71

6,983

105 to 142

62.9 to 71.7

fornia poppies and blue lupine. Seven streams — meandering through tall pines, cedars, firs and quaking aspens — create ponds and waterfalls that contribute to the challenge and beauty of the Dick Bailey-designed course.

THE EAGLE & HAWK! Play Whitehawk Ranch Golf Club and Graeagle Meadows Golf Course for $199. Whitehawk Ranch residents, passholders and countless visitors share a ubiquitous observation – “Once you cross the entry off Highway 89 onto the property, it’s like you have entered a different world.”

From the championship tees, the par-71 course plays 6,983 yards, and with four sets of tees for each hole. Golfers of all levels can expect an exhilarating round of golf. Whitehawk offers a true golf challenge in a traditional fashion amid the peace and serenity of its beautiful setting.

Carved from the natural terrain of the Mohawk Valley, immaculate fairways are framed with native grasses, Cali-

The Links at Kiley Ranch | The Links at Kiley Ranch is the perfect place to squeeze in a quick 9. This executive-style, par-3 course is open to the public year-round. It features a gorgeous practice putting green made of 100 percent bent grass, challenging water features and professional instruction. It hosts a Glow Ball Tourney during the summer. | thelinksatkileyranch.com Redhawk Golf and Resort | The Hills Course |

As the signature course of threetime U.S. Open champion Hale Irwin, the Hills Course at Redhawk combines small greens, deep bunkers and significant elevation changes for an experience that is as challenging as it is enjoyable. The Hills Course sits on what was once a working ranch and elements of this history shine through during each round. | redhawkgolfandresort.com

Redhawk Golf and Resort | The Lake Course |

If gorgeous desert landscapes, challenging features and beautifully sculpted greens are your thing, check out the Robert Trent Jones Jr. designed Lake Course at Redhawk Golf and Resort. This 7,400-yard course is located minutes from Sparks, though the scenery and amenities will have you feeling as if you’ve stepped into a faraway world. | redhawkgolfandresort.com

Wildcreek Golf Course | Championship Course |

If you’re looking for a challenging round of golf, the Wildcreek Golf Course is your go-to around Sparks. When a course has been chosen to host the PGA Seniors Tournament not once, not twice, but three times, you know you’re in for a unique, challenging afternoon. | wildcreekgolf.net

Wildcreek Golf Course | Executive Course | Perhaps you don’t have all day to play or perhaps you just want to work on your short game in preparation for the next family get-together. Either way, the 9-hole, all par-3 Executive Course at the Wildcreek Golf Course is the perfect choice. | wildcreekgolf.net

768 Whitehawk Dr. | Clio, CA 96106 For tee times, call (530) 836-0394 or visit www.GolfWhitehawk.com.

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Meadows and surrounding Graeagle. Five mountain peaks surrounding the Golf Course and the Feather winds through its heart, creating GRAY ’SRiver CROSSING astonishing views at every turn! Tree OLD GREENWOOD tops instead of roof tops, numerous Graeagle Meadows, ranked 5th in water features and elevated tees make California by Golf Advisor, is only this the ultimate golf experience. This an hour away from Reno & Tahoe, championship golf course is the first to making this course a must for your open and last to close; catering to all skill summer golf adventures. Harvey West levels and is the most walkable, family and sons, who donated the famous friendly course in the area. Emerald Bay Vikingsholm to State Parks, developed and built Graeagle OLD BROCKWAY

6934 Hwy. 89 | Graeagle, CA 96103 For tee times visit www.PlayGraeagle.com.

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Carson Valley

he Carson Valley serves up unique courses with spectacular views from the Comstock to the Carson River in the shadow of the Carson Range, which might offer snow-capped vistas throughout the season.

Carson Valley Golf Course |

If you’re looking for a golf experience that’s a little bit out of the ordinary, look no further than the Carson Valley Golf Course. Thanks to the close proximity to the Carson River and the large cottonwood trees lining the course, hot summer days become a pleasant golf experience. If traditional golf isn’t your thing, the Carson Valley Golf Course also offers FootGolf in the afternoon. | carsonvalleygolf.com 580 SILVER OAK GOLF COURSE

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May 11-24, 2017 | 2017 TAHOE-RENO GOLF GUIDE

Dayton Valley Golf Club |

The majestic Dayton Valley Golf Club, designed by Arnold Palmer, is recognized as one of the top courses in Northern Nevada. This could help explain why it has been a PGA Tour Qualifier location since 1995, making it the longest, consecutive-running location in the country. With a whopping 40 acres of water features, Dayton Valley Golf Club might be as challenging as it is beautiful. It’s easy to see why this course is listed as one of Golf Digest’s “Places to Play.” | duncangolfreno.com/dayton-valley/

Eagle Valley | East Course | This is the more user-friendly of the two Eagle Valley courses. The East Course boasts a great setup for walking or riding. FootGolf is offered in the afternoons. | eaglevalleygolf.com Eagle Valley | West Course |

The Eagle Valley West Course is a desert links-style course that’s sure to challenge even the most seasoned golfers. | eaglevalleygolf.com

Empire Ranch Golf Course | Comstock-River Course | The Comstock-River course at the Empire Ranch Golf Course is steeped in local history as a former stop for weary emigrants traveling west. The course features well-manicured fairways and greens, challenging bunkers and beautiful vistas no matter what hole you’re playing. | empireranchgolf.com Empire Ranch Golf Course | Sierra-River Course |

Step out onto the Sierra-River course at the Empire Ranch Golf Course and get ready to feel as if you’re stepping into a piece of bygone history. This gorgeous course also features a grass driving range, a chipping area and two practice putting greens so you can make sure your game is up to par (pun definitely intended) before you even step foot on the first tee box. The 9-hole Sierra-River course is also staffed by PGA professionals more than happy to help you take your game to the next level. | empireranchgolf.com

Empire Ranch Golf Course | Sierra-Comstock Course |

The historic Sierra-Comstock Course has everything you could ask for in nine holes of golf: stunning views, a close proximity to Carson City and challenging features. | empireranchgolf.com

Genoa Lakes Golf Club | Lakes Course | As the home of the U.S. Open Qualifier, the Lakes Course at the Genoa Lakes Golf Club provides a challenge to even the most seasoned golfer. This links-style course was designed by PGA champion Peter Jacobsen and John Harbottle III. It features rolling fairways, lush wetlands and fantastic views of the Carson Range. | genoalakes.com Genoa Lakes Golf Club | Ranch Course | With wide open spaces and spectacular mountain views, the Ranch Course at Genoa Lakes Golf Club is perfect for those who enjoy a more power-driven game of golf. With more than 100 bunkers and a waterfall challenge though, don’t make the mistake that the Ranch Course is simply a “grip it and rip it” course. You’ll need all your wits about you as you tackle this challenging course. | genoalakes.com

OLD BROCKWAY GOLF COURSE www.OldBrockway.com Course Details

Yardage

Slope

Ratings

9 holes | par 36

3,418

113 to 132

66.9 to 71.6

HISTORIC OLD BROCKWAY Golf Course has been family owned and operated for more than 30 years. Old Brockway offers more than 3,400 yards of quality, serene golfing with two par 5s, two par 3s and five par 4s. Enjoy walking through the towering Jeffery pines with lake views on each and every hole. The Golf Channel rated Historic Old Brockway as one of the top 9-hole courses in the country. It is our welcoming staff, dedicated

crew and beautiful setting that all make Old Brockway a “Lake Tahoe Golfing Tradition.” Old Brockway Golf Course was built by Harry Comstock and designed by renowned Scottish architect John Duncan Dunn, one of the premiere golf course architects of his era. Historic Old Brockway features small, turtle-back greens, minimum green to tee walking distances, and tight-knit fairways. It’s known as the best golfing value at the lake.

7900 North Lake Blvd. | Kings Beach, CA 96143 For tee times, call (530) 546-9909 or visit www.OldBrockway.com.

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Silver Oak Golf Course |

Silver Oak Golf Course is the perfect getaway for an afternoon or longer. Eighteen holes of rolling, pristine grass offer a challenge to all, while maintaining a fun atmosphere for those newer to the game. Try out the newest craze, FootGolf, where competitors use their feet to kick a soccer ball into a 21-inch hole. | silveroakgolf.com

Sunridge Golf Club |

Sunridge Golf Club offers five sets of tees to accommodate golfers of all skill levels. In addition to 18 gorgeous holes, Sunridge maintains chipping areas and practice greens, as well as a 300-yard driving range so you can enhance every aspect of your game. If you’re looking to take your game to the next level, the friendly professional staff will be more than happy to work with you during a private lesson or three. | sunridgegc.com

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PONDEROSA GOLF COURSE www.PonderosaGolfCourseTruckee.com Course Details

Yardage

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9 holes

3,022

119 to 120

66.6 to 69.9

PONDEROSA GOLF COURSE offers a family friendly, but surprisingly challenging, 9-hole course, developed by the townspeople of Truckee in 1961. The course, nestled in the heart of Truckee, celebrates the natural Sierra landscape and is characterized by its amalgamation of pine trees. The course rolls smoothly with straight fairways and a short par 4 until the third hole, a tough uphill par 3 with unexpected gradation

changes and a sloping green. Still, the 9th hole is considered the most difficult, with trees woven as obstacles along the long fairway. Purchased for private operation in 1968, the course was made public by purchase from the Truckee-Tahoe Airport District in 2008, and is manicured to ideal conditions by the Truckee-Donner Recreation & Park District. Ponderosa also features practice greens, driving nets, a pro shop and snack bar.

For tee times, call (530) 587-3501 or visit www.PonderosaGolfCourseTruckee.com. Advertisement

15


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

Carson City adventures WAT E R FA L L S & H O T S P R I N G S S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AT H E R I N E E . H I L L

S

EVERY TUESDAY

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530) 546-2012

Toddler Time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Crack the code Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts an Hour of Code on Tuesdays at 4 p.m. This introduction to computer programming for Grades 3 and higher is designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. Children can choose from a variety of fun projects. | (775) 832-4130

the other side of the falls. The views are breath-taking of Carson City, the Carson Range to either side of us, open meadows, and the brilliant purples, golds and greens of spring. The trail descends down a dirt road that has many spots washed out from the heavy floods over the past winter. The loop trail is 1.8 miles and is moderate; most of the toddlers finished the loop trail about 20 minutes after us. You may also connect to other, longer trail systems from the trailhead. After a great lunch at Thai Basil in downtown and a few errands, we headed to historic Carson Hot Springs for a relaxing and long soak in a private hot springs room and several laps in the hot springs-fed pool.

dogs and my sister where Anikin could also ride his bike. The park offers a number of easy trails of varying lengths that are suitable for anyone. We encountered walkers of all ages and many small children and dogs enjoying another beautiful day. We headed to one of the trails to the Carson River, where we marveled at how swiftly the river was moving and were careful to keep the dogs only on the banks.

Babes in Bookland Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in Heavenly is from 4 to 7 p.m. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass. Free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from featured winery. | (530) 523-8024

Bring your binoculars Incline Village, Nev.

Carson City adventures, Part II Snowstorms continued to bring fresh powder after my first trip and while I enjoyed a little more cross-country skiing, I was ready to call an end to my winter season and we made a return trip to Carson City several weeks later. This time, we brought my 4-year-old nephew, Anikin. I decided on the Riverview Park along the Carson River for a nice walk with the

EVERY WEDNESDAY

EVERY THURSDAY

Village Green Bird Walks from 7:30 to 9 a.m. with Tahoe Institute for Natural Science every Thursday until June 8. Enjoy a leisurely stroll observing birds, identifying songs, calls and field marks. Open to birders of all experiences. Meet at Aspen Grove parking lot. | (775) 298-0067

We settled in for a spell on a downed tree next to the river while Anikin built sand castles and the dogs relaxed. We then headed back to the car for a return trip to Carson Hot Springs. We relaxed in the hot springs, swam in the pool and even spent time under The Hammer – a hot springs spout elevated more than 20 feet over the pool that really does hammer you when it hits you. Great for tired, achy muscles. The hot springs is family friendly and is a great spot to unwind and relax. And, you’ll want to try out the brews next door at Shoe Tree Brewing, which opened in March.  The Carson City Visitors Bureau has information and directions to local hiking and mountain biking trails at visitcarsoncity.com, including Kings Canyon Waterfall and Riverside Park. For more information on Carson Hot Springs, visit carsonhotsprings.com.

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M AY 1 1 - 2 5 , 2 0 1 7

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

ometimes a girl just needs some time in the dirt. After a winter of seemingly endless snow days and many days out enjoying the winter wonders of fresh powder, I was ready to give my skis a break and dig out the hiking boots, heading down to Carson City for a respite from the snow. I took a day off from work with my sister, Michelle Allen, my dog, Sierra, and Allen’s dog, Cooper, for a hike to King Canyon Waterfall, only 5 minutes from downtown Carson City.

The spring day was bright and warm as we embarked from the trailhead at the end of Kingsview Way. We started with the .03-mile trail to the cool, raging waters of the waterfall. A group of about a dozen toddlers and young children and 4 to 5 moms were frolicking in the cool pool at the bottom of the falls. We then double backed down a short section of trail to pick up the Upper Falls trail that climbed up the canyon. We passed various groups of the kids along the trail, enjoying views of Carson City and the Virginia Range as we made our way up the switchbacks. The trail climbs up and into the fire-scared canyon before crossing Kings Canyon Creek and looping back to

EVENTS CALENDAR

Farmers Market Tahoe City

The Tahoe City Farmers Market operates every Thursday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Commons Beach from May 18 to Oct. 12. | tahoecityfarmersmarket.com

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village, Nev.

The Conversation Café is a drop-in conversation forum hosted by the Senior Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310

Story Time Tahoe City

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382


May 11-24, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

Events

MORE Courtesy TINS

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events. Toddler Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts story time every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m. with stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 6 months to 3 years. | (775) 832-4130

Preschool story time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years and older. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Help with computers Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First Thursdays of the month are “Beginners Basic Instruction,” second Thursdays are “Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about technology. | (530) 546-2021

EVERY FRIDAY

Ahoy, lil’ matey Tahoe City

Tahoe Maritime Museum hosts preschool story time: Ships, Sails and Nautical Tales from 11 to 11:30 a.m. every Friday. The program is directed at ages 3 to 5 and will feature books that have maritime themes. | danielle@tahoemaritime.org

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with G and PG movies. | (530) 582-9669

MAY 11 | THURSDAY Meet and mix Truckee

Truckee Chamber mixer is hosted by Mountain High BNI from 5 to 7 p.m. at 12000 Pioneer Trail. | truckee.com

It’s only a flower moon Incline Village, Nev.

Summer Moonlight Hikes with Wine and Cheese Socials for 55+ are moderate, 1-mile, paved-road hikes to the Crystal Bay lookout offered in collaboration with the National Forest Service. Participants should wear warm clothing and bring a flashlight. Transportation, wine, cheese and snacks provided. Flower Moon hike departs from Incline Recreation Center at 5 p.m. | yourtahoeplace.com

Winemaker dinner South Lake Tahoe

Blue Angel Café and Boeger Winery present The Winemakers Dinner at 6 p.m. The four-course wine dinner costs $78 per person. | RSVP (530) 544-6544

Come to the party Truckee

Join The Friends of the Library for a membership party at the Truckee Library. Meet new board members, celebrate our Truckee Library community all while enjoying refreshments. | (530) 582-7846

Be a biologist Truckee

Truckee River Watershed Council offers an Adopt-a-Stream leader training from 6 to 8 p.m. at the watershed office. Be trained and equipped to conduct five field samples in the summer and two lab analyses in the winter. No experience needed. Ages 16+. | (530) 550-8760, ext. 1

MAY 11-15 | THURSDAY-MONDAY Celebrate being female Portola

Indigo Star Earth Gathering at Sierra Hot Springs is an off-the-grid gathering by women for women. More than 35 teachers will offer their passion, wisdom and acceptance in community. Come celebrate each other in all the ways that women shine. | indigostar.earth

MAY 13 | SATURDAY Flies with those eggs? Truckee

Truckee EAA Chapter 1073 holds its pancake breakfast on the second Saturday of each month at the Truckee Tahoe Airport and offers free Young Eagles airplane rides for ages 8 through 17 on those mornings. Breakfast and flights start at 8 a.m. weather permitting. | yecoord1073@outlook.com

It’s only natural South Lake Tahoe

Kid’s Nature Journal Club is on the second and fourth Saturday each month from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at South Lake Tahoe Library. Learn how to capture adventures in a nature journal. Some materials provided; bring a notebook and pen and dress for the weather. | (530) 573-3185

Restoring the forest South Lake Tahoe

Sugar Pine Foundation needs volunteers to help plant seedlings in the Emerald Fire area from 10 a.m. to noon. Park at the Emerald Bay Road pullout across from Cascade Road. | sugarpinefoundation.org

Choo-choo Truckee

Truckee Donner Railroad Society offers kiddie train rides at Regional Park’s Train Track Circles Playground. From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free. Donations accepted. | truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com

Kids’ Night Out Tahoe City

Drop off the little ones, ages 5 and older, at Rideout Community Center from 4 to 10 p.m. every second Saturday of the month. Kids can enjoy a dinner, crafts, movies and games. Preregistration is required. $15 per child. | (530) 583-3440

The ultimate party Truckee

Sierra State Parks Foundation presents “Saving the Donner Party” by Dr. Richard F. Kaufman at Donner Memorial State Park Visitor Center at 5 p.m. Kaufman will tell the story of how the storm of the century trapped 81 innocent men, women and children in the Sierra Nevada and how they were saved. Complimentary cheese and crackers; beverages for purchase. Free. A $5 donation suggested. No RSVP. | (530) 583-9911

MAY 15 | MONDAY TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

Learn about high-altitude gardening from Lake Tahoe Master Gardeners and TERC at the Tahoe City Field Station from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tonight features asparagus. | (775) 881-7566

E X P L O R E TA H O E ’ S

NATURAL DIVERSITY

Join Sarah Hockensmith of the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science as she introduces the diverse landscapes of the Tahoe region from lake level to the tops of the mountains as part of Tahoe Nature Chase at Alpenglow Sports on May 25 at 6:30 p.m. for a slideshow and lecture presentation. The presentation will cover how different flower, tree, bird and mammal species adapt as elevation increases and what unique creatures can be found in specific elevations in the area. The option to join the season-long Tahoe Nature Chase will also be offered. The Tahoe Nature Chase celebrates many aspects of Tahoe’s natural history. Participants will explore the Lake Tahoe region in search of designated nature-observation challenges that are assigned for each month throughout the 2017 calendar year. This is a free community event with a suggested donation of $5 for TINS. | tinsweb.org

MAY 16 | TUESDAY Business know-how offered Truckee

Knowledge Bites presents “Getting Things Done in the Cloud” from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. This session will give participants tools and strategies to organize, execute and communicate better. Software product architect John Lorence will lead the workshop. RSVP | (530) 587-8808

MAY 17 | WEDNESDAY DIY vegetables Truckee

Master Gardeners with Slow Food Lake Tahoe present a high-altitude food-growing workshop at 5:30 p.m. at the Truckee Demonstration Garden: Grow Your Own Asparagus. Participants receive free starter plants. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

MAY 18 | THURSDAY About the river Truckee

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts River Talk, a one-hour virtual tour of the projects throughout the watershed. It is a chance for guests to learn about the council’s work and offer comments and feedback. At 8 a.m. in the TRWC office. | RSVP (530) 550-8760

Grant winners honored South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Women’s Community Fund’s second annual Grants Gala is from 6 to 9 p.m. at Tahoe Beach Retreat. The 2017 grant winners will be announced and the 2016 grantees will return to share how they spent the TWCF’s giving funds. Tickets $35. | tahoewomenscommunityfund.org

TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

What is autism? What causes autism and can it be cured? Come gain an overview of how the description of autism has changed since it was first described in 1943, the various causes of autism, the attempts at treatment and the success of early intervention treatments. No-host bar at 5:30; presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP terc.ucdavis.edu

MAY 19 | FRIDAY Birding and brunch Hope Valley

Sorenson’s Resort presents Spring Birding and Brunch from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Many species are returning from wintering grounds, giving bird enthusiasts a chance to see them flitting about their summertime digs. Local birder Jim Woods shares his knowledge of birds and local wildlife. | RSVP (800) 423-9949

Share and write Incline Village, Nev.

Lifescapes, a memoir-writing program for seniors, is from 2 to 4 p.m. at Incline Village Library. First and third Fridays of each month. All are welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Benefits for huskies Truckee

Best Pies is hosting a fundraiser for Tahoe Husky Rescue. Speakeasy Night is an evening of casino-style gaming, music and libations. Tickets on sale at Best Pies; 1920s attire is encouraged. | tahoehuskyrescue.org

CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

17


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA H O E L O C A L S

Brad Taylor & Letisha Cole

Marinas & Boat Ramps

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Kaleea, Koa, Pele and Alpine with owners Brad Taylor and Letisha Cole.

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OBEXER’S Homewood | (530) 525-7962

T

ahoe Husky Rescue founders Brad Taylor and Letisha Cole exude a calming, assuring aura that makes them instantly likeable to humans and animals. I learned this after meeting them recently at the Tahoe Mountain Brewing Company in Truckee. Taylor has been living in the Lake Tahoe area for more than 10 years. He came out West to enjoy skiing and the outdoors. He fell in love with a co-worker’s Husky puppy that he played with in the office. In 2001, he adopted his own Husky from a breeder in Carson City, Nev., and named her Malia. Two years later, he went back to the breeder to get her a sister he named Kiana. Although he loves his two dogs, he says that he is not a fan of breeders anymore. He’s learned that there are too many abandoned animals that need good homes. A few years later, Taylor was at a veterinary’s office when a couple from the Bay Area came in to drop off their Husky – permanently. Since the dog had nowhere to go but to an animal shelter, Taylor took the dog in and named it Koda. He matched Koda with a couple from Tahoe Donner two weeks later. It was lucky for Koda that Taylor took an interest in her. He learned that often when owners surrender their Huskies in the Reno-Tahoe area, shelters are either too full to take them in or the dogs end up getting euthanized if they display aggressive behavior. Taylor and Cole started the Tahoe Husky Rescue to save these at-risk Huskies and now receive calls from California and Nevada shelters looking for someone to foster a dog. They get about an equal number of calls from people looking to adopt Huskies as they do from people or entities looking to surrender them. “After realizing how many dogs get euthanized, I wanted to try to take those rescue-only dogs out of the shelters,” he says. In 2015, the couple solidified the nonprofit Tahoe Husky Rescue into a 501(c)3 to save as many Huskies as possible. Most their rescue pups come from Reno animal shelters. When Taylor fosters them, he says they never know how long it will take before the dogs are placed in a permanent home. Tahoe Husky Rescue operates entirely from donations and money out of their pockets. Most of the money goes toward vet bills. Every dog that Tahoe Husky Rescue takes in is spayed/neutered and a small adoption fee helps cover expenses. “There are so many Huskies in shelters,” Cole says. “It’s insane how much money people will pay for a puppy when you can

18

get a rescue dog for $200.” Tahoe Husky Rescue has taken in some memorable dogs. Austin was one of their first dogs. “He never had human contact and was very shy. He went to four homes and was a total escape artist. Two minutes after we adopted him out, the people called us and said he jumped out the car window. Later he darted out the door when a pizza delivery guy came. Austin finally was adopted by an older lady who has kept him ever since,” says Cole. Kiva was found running wild in the Sun Valley/Reno area. “When we arrived, she opened someone’s front door and was found in the house playing with a dog and Brad got her on a leash,” says Cole. A woman from Grass Valley saw her at a Squaw Valley Peaks and Paws event and adopted her. Taylor says that the most rewarding

Tahoe Husky Rescue operates entirely from donations and money out of their own pockets.

TAHOE CITY MARINA Marina & Rentals: (530) 583-1039 Service: (530) 581-2516

BOAT INSPECTIONS

MANDATORY INSPECTIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR LAKE TAHOE, ECHO LAKES, FALLEN LEAF LAKE & DONNER LAKE. LAKE TAHOE

(888) 824-6267 | tahoeboatinspections.com | Fees $30-$121; 7-day pass available. | Daily 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

NORTH SHORE ALPINE MEADOWS: Hwy. 89 at Alpine Meadows Road. Open TRUCKEE TRUCKEE-TAHOE AIRPORT: Hwy. 267 off Airport Rd., Truckee. Opens May 17 EAST SHORE SPOONER SUMMIT: Junction of Hwys. 28 & 50. No vessels more than 30’. Open SOUTH SHORE MEYERS: At the junction of Hwys. 89 & 50. Open TRUCKEE AREA

(530) 582-2361 | truckeeboatinspections.com Mandatory inspections will be required for all vessels for Donner Lake at inspection stations above. $10-$40. Annual pass available. (530) 582-7724. Mandatory self inspections are in place at Prosser, Boca, Jackson Meadows & Stampede reservoirs.

PUBLIC RAMPS LAKE TAHOE

LAKE FOREST

6 a.m.-7 p.m. daily. $15-$20. Pass available. Restrooms. One-way exit only after closing. Sealed boats only.

TAHOE VISTA REC. AREA (530) 546-4212

Opens late May. Picnic area, beach, restrooms.

COON ST. BOAT LAUNCH (530) 546-4212

Opens in May. Restrooms.

Hwy. 28, Bottom of National Ave.

Hwy. 28, Bottom of Coon St. in Kings Beach

SAND HARBOR

(775) 831-0494

Hwy. 28, 2 miles south of Incline Village

CAVE ROCK aspect of starting the Tahoe Husky Rescue is saving lives and giving dogs a second chance. Cole says that they love meeting new owners and getting the random text messages and photos of healthy, happy adopted dogs. On the first Friday of every month, Truckee’s Tahoe Brewing Company taproom hosts a Hops for Huskies event from 3 to 8 p.m. The proceeds benefit the Tahoe Husky Rescue. On May 19, Best Pies in Truckee will also be hosting a fundraiser for Tahoe Husky Rescue, which will be in the form of a Speakeasy Night, an evening of casinostyle gaming, live music and libations. Tickets are on sale at Best Pies and 1920s attire is highly encouraged. (Editor’s note: Author Kayla Anderson will be one of the blackjack dealers.) | tahoehuskyrescue.org 

(530) 583-3796

1.5 miles east of Tahoe City, off Hwy. 28

(775) 831-0494

Hwy. 50, East Shore

EL DORADO BEACH

(530) 542-2981

Hwy. 50 at Lakeview Ave., South Lake Tahoe

6 a.m.-8 p.m. daily until Sept. 30. 6 a.m.-2 p.m. Fri.-Sun. Oct. 1-April 30. Picnic area, beach, Visitors’ Center, food, restrooms. Sealed boats only. 6 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Picnic area, restrooms. Sealed boats only.

Opens in May. Picnic area, restrooms.

AREA LAKES

DONNER LAKE

(530) 582-7720

I-80, Donner Lake exit

PROSSER RSVR.

(530) 587-3558

Hwy. 89, 2 miles north of Truckee

BOCA/STAMPEDE RSVR.

(530) 587-3558 I-80, Hirschdale exit

$10 California boats, $15 out-of-state boats. $3 parking. Season pass $70 California, $120 out-of-state. Restrooms.

10 mph speed limit strictly enforced. No fees for parking or launching.

45 mph speed limit. No launching fee. $10 parking. Subject to closure during low water levels.

PUBLIC PIERS Public piers are free, but have limited space; often limited to loading and unloading. DONNER LAKE

DONNER LAKE

I-80, Donner Lake exit

37 public piers on north shore from the boat ramp east. Fenced piers are private.

LAKE TAHOE

GAR WOODS

Carnelian Bay

KINGS BEACH

Bottom of Coon St.

SKYLANDIA PARK

Lake Forest

Access to restaurant, small beaches. Restrooms. Busy pier adjacent to town, public beach, picnic sites. Restrooms. Small beach, picnic facilities. Restrooms.

Do you know someone interesting in Tahoe?

KASPIAN PICNIC AREA West Shore

Between Tahoe City and Homewood. Picnic area, beach. Restrooms.

GROVE STREET

Open 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Located east of Commons Beach. Restrooms at Commons Beach.

To nominate someone you’d like to see fea-

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 110, to be listed in Marinas.

tured, e-mail editor@tahoethisweek.com.

Center of Tahoe City

SUGAR PINE POINT

Tahoma

Hiking, Ehrman Mansion tours, nature trail. Restrooms.


May 11-24, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

MORE EVENTS MAY 19 | FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17

Think mountain biking South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Area Mountain Bike Association Spring Party is from 6 to 9 p.m. at California Base, Heavenly Ski Resort. Free party, open to all ages. Information on upcoming projects, bike film, raffle and membership opportunities. Full spread pasta dinner. | Facebook.com/ TAMBATahoe

MAY 19-21 | FRIDAY-SUNDAY For the soul Tahoe City

The first annual Restorative Arts and Yoga Festival will feature two days of workshops and classes led by local Tahoe practitionners, yoga instructors and professionals at Granlibakken Tahoe. This one-of-a-kind event is designed for those just starting their yoga practice and experienced yogis alike. $240. | granlibakken.com

MAY 20 | SATURDAY Take a picture Tahoe venues

The 17th annual Snapshot Day is from 9 a.m. to noon in South and North Lake Tahoe, Truckee and Middle Truckee River. Help capture the water quality of the Tahoe and Truckee River watersheds. No experience necessary. All ages welcome. | truckeesnapshotday.org

Dig that community vibe Truckee

Truckee Demonstration Garden is hosting a dig-in for community volunteers to help with getting the garden ready for planting, refurbishing damaged beds, weeding, etc. No experience necessary. Dig-in dates are the third Saturday of every month from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. | truckeegarden@gmail.com

Shoes to try on, out Tahoe City

Free Hoka One One Demo Day is at Alpenglow Sports from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Try out Hoka trail shoes, whether you are a runner or a hiker. The Hoka representative will be on hand to fit you and answer any questions. | alpenglowsports.com

Gardening tips South Lake Tahoe

Friends of the Library offers a UC Cooperative Extension Master Gardener of Lake Tahoe Asparagus Workshop at 10 a.m. This hardy perennial vegetable can become part of an edible landscape and a mainstay in your garden. Free. | eldoradolibrary.org

Spring Festival Truckee

Kindred Art and Folk Institute hosts a Spring Festival to celebrate art, nature and music from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Truckee Community Arts Center to raise money for at-risk youth scholarships, public art and art education programs. Enjoy family activities, fire dancing, an interactive urban art wall, artisan market, bounce house, snow tube costume contest and more. $15 per family, $10 per person. | kindredtruckee.org

Crystal dark skies Hope Valley

Galaxy Slideshow and Stargazing at Sorenson’s Resort is presented by astronomers Adrienne Cool and Ron Marzke. Check out the celestial show using telescopes and binoculars (or bring your own.) Slideshow at 8 p.m. and stargazing at 9 p.m. No experience required; kids welcome. Donation of $10 suggested, includes cookies and cocoa. Benefits Alpine County schools. | sorensonsresort.com

MAY 20-21 | SATURDAY-SUNDAY Growing in Tahoe South Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe Community College Connect offers a community class on growing organic food in Tahoe. “What Plants Grow Well in Tahoe” is from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The first day is a lecture and the second is a hands-on workshop. | (530) 541-4660, ext. 717

MAY 21 | SUNDAY Party down, Spring Tahoe City

Spring Fiesta is at Rideout Community Center from 4 to 8 p.m. Come for the tacos, but stay for the music, games, piñatas and more. Rotary Club of Tahoe City will be selling beer and margaritas. $7 presale, $10 at the door. | tcpud.org

The first in a series of wellness events at Granlibakken. A unique event that will inspire and heal the mind, body and soul. » Therapeutics » Energy Workers » Yoga Instructors » Guided Meditation » Metaphysical Teachings 530-583-4242 | Granlibakken.com/wellness-packages

MICKEY’S

Promote local writers Truckee

BIG MACK CHARTERS

Seniors strut their stuff Truckee

• YEAR-ROUND SPORTFISHING • ALL GEAR PROVIDED • 43’ SPORTFISHER

Literary Arts & Wines is a monthly reading series every third Sunday at 5 p.m. to promote the work of emerging regional writers at Art Truckee. | literaryartsandwine.com

Truckee High School Senior Fashion Show is from 5 to 8 p.m. at Truckee Community Rec Center. The fundraiser includes a dinner buffet, silent auction, raffle, drinks, music and the latest apparel from Truckee shops. Proceeds benefit Project Safe & Sober Grad Night. Tickets at high school or Truckee Community Rec Center. | truckeehighboosters@yahoo.com

MAY 22 | MONDAY TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

$90* $850 FULL BOAT

*Discount for Cash

(large cabin w/ restroom)

(530) 546-4444 or (800) 877-1462

(up to 13 people)

S����� B��� C�., C�������� B��, N���� L��� T����

MickeysBigMack.com

Learn about high-altitude gardening from Lake Tahoe Master Gardeners and TERC at the Tahoe City Field Station from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tonight features tomatoes. | (775) 881-7566

MAY 23 | TUESDAY Guided wine tasting Kings Beach

Wine Tahoe offers free guided wine tasting and wine education at North Tahoe Event Center from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Featuring wines from Napa, Sonoma and Burgundy. Wines available for purchase. Limit 18 people. | RSVP (925) 683-15230 or winetahoe.com

MAY 24 | WEDNESDAY DIY vegetables Truckee

Master Gardeners with Slow Food Lake Tahoe present a high-altitude food-growing workshop at 5:30 p.m. at the Truckee Demonstration Garden: Grow Your Own Tomatoes. Participants receive free starter plants. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

MAY 25 | THURSDAY From the water to the sky Tahoe City

Tahoe Institute for Natural Science presents Tahoe’s Natural Diversity: Lakes Edge to Summit with Sarah Hockensmith. Learn about the diverse landscapes of the Tahoe region from lake level to the tops of the mountains with a slideshow and presentation at Alpenglow Sports at 6:30 p.m. Free, suggested $5 donation for TINS. | (530) 583-6917

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events.

O

19


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

FREE BOWLING

each person who bowls 2 games at regular price gets a 3rd game free with this coupon

Announcements Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete Courtesy Granlibakken

GOOD

Family Recreation Center VOTED BEST POOL ROOM ON THE NORTH SHORE!

FOR THE

Automatic Scoring “Bumper Bowling,” Video Arcade, Billiards, Video Poker, Cocktails, ATM, Full Swing Golf Simulator

SOUL The first annual Restorative Arts and Yoga Festival will feature two days of workshops and classes led by local Tahoe practitioners, yoga instructors and professionals at Granlibakken Tahoe from May 19 to 21. This one-of-a-kind event is designed for those just starting their yoga practice and experienced yogis alike. The cost is $240. | granlibakken.com

920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

Smoke Free Every Day!

bowlincline.com

Coupon good for the entire party. Limit 1 free game per person per visit. Not valid with other offers. Not valid for league or tournament play.

License #954258

PLUMBING SERVICE & REPAIR DRAIN CLEANING & ROOTER SERVICES Frozen pipe thawing specialist Quality, professional work at reasonable rates. Locally Owned & Operated | Honest & Reliable Not a Franchise Company Call our office

(530) 525-1807

Ask about our Free Whole House Plumbing Inspection | RooterConnection.com

NORTH TAHOE CRUISES On the Tahoe Gal

New ways to weed

Safety is certifiable

Placer County Health & Human Services is hosting the Northern California Cannabis Summit on May 12 in Olympic Valley. With recreational cannabis now legal in California, health experts are stepping up efforts to help keep cannabis out of the hands of youth. A number of key experts from around the region will be there, including policymakers, to present on cutting-edge research and trends and best practices around youth cannabis use and prevention. | placer.co.gov

Truckee Donner Recreation & Park District offers safety lessons at the Truckee Community Pool. Lifeguard Training Blended Learning for ages 15 and older who want to become a lifeguard. Participants must be able to prove swimming ability and enroll in an online portion of the class. The session runs from May 31 to June 28 on Wednesdays and Fridays. Participants must register before May 15. A Lifeguard Review class is on June 14 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for those who have a current certification in lifeguarding or newly expired one. These certifications need to be updated every two years. | tdrpd.org

Weeding through the changes Due to the passage of Proposition 64 in the November 2016 state election, the use of nonmedical, aka recreational, marijuana has been legalized. The Town of Truckee Town Council is holding a workshop to discuss the town’s approach to marijuana regulations at Town Hall from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 11. | cannabis@townoftruckee.com

Don’t fight the power Tahoe Chamber offers a Level Up Power Planning Workshop on May 17 from 2 to 5 p.m. at Tahoe Chamber conference room in Stateline, Nev. Tahoe Chamber and business consultant Anne Marie Smith will show participants how to learn to establish a strategic planning process to make better decisions faster. Attendees will leave with a copy of Smith’s book, “60 Minute Strategic Plan.” | tahoechamber.org

SEASON OPENS MAY 12

On

Mother’s Day

ALL MOMS RIDE FREE! Located at the Lighthouse Center, behind Safeway in Tahoe City Reservations: (530) 583-0141 | Book online at TahoeGal.com | Tahoe City, CA 20

The perks of membership Truckee Chamber of Commerce invites prospective, new and existing chamber members to the monthly Membership 101 gathering on May 24 from 8 to 9 a.m. in the train depot. While having coffee and light snacks, guests can visit with other members, staff and a board member and have a chance to talk about how the chamber can best support business and the business community. Afterwards chamber members create a free business page on the Truckee. com Web site. | megan@truckee.com

Business know-how offered Knowledge Bites presents two spring workshops. “Getting Things Done in the Cloud” is on May 18 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. This session will give participants tools and strategies to organize, execute and communicate better. Software product architect John Lorence will lead the workshop. “Demystifying Access to Capital for Your Business” is on June 15 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. Participants will learn the good, the bad and the ugly ways that entrepreneurs can raise money to start a business. Kristin York of the Sierra Small Business Development Center will lead the workshop. | (530) 587-8808

For your own good For Goodness Sake presents two workshops. Sanskrit Chanting and Philosophy with Kacey Davy is on May 19 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Connect with Sanskrit’s timeless sounds through the chanting of classic ancient texts: “The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali” and the “Bhagavad Gita.” The Power of Words with DeeDee Boies is on May 20 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Participants will discover the energy and magic of words and how to choose and use them with greater mindfulness as powerful tools in daily life. A $20 donation is suggested. | goodnesssake.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Announcements.


DOGS OK

PLAYGROUND

FIRE PIT/GRILL

BEACH

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

RESTROOMS

Beaches & Parks BIKE TRAIL ACCESS

For the Kids

PICNIC TABLES

OUT & ABOUT

May 11-24, 2017

EAST SHORE

CHIMNEY BEACH & SECRET COVE ROUNDHILL PINES BEACH

Hwy. 50

SAND HARBOR STATE PARK ZEPHYR COVE

Hwy. 28, 5.9 miles south of Incline Vlg.

Hwy. 28, 3 miles south of Incline Village

Hwy. 50

• •

KINGS BEACH

COON STREET DOG BEACH

Hwy. 28, at the bottom of Coon Street

KINGS BEACH STATE RECREATION AREA

MOON DUNES BEACH

Hwy. 28

NORTH TAHOE BEACH

Hwy. 28, across from Safeway

SECLINE BEACH

Hwy. 28, at the end of Secline Street

SPEEDBOAT BEACH

MUSIC IS

Hwy. 28, in Kings Beach

Hwy. 28, at Harbor Ave.

• •

TAHOE VISTA

FUNdamental

Beginning Ukulele with Ben Martin, founder of Tahoe Truckee School of Music, is on Tuesdays from 3 to 4 p.m. and Beginning Guitar is from 4 to 5 p.m. The session is from May 23 to June 13. The fundamentals of music will be covered. Drop-ins are allowed. | info@tahoemusic.net

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK & DOG PARK

SANDY BEACH

Hwy. 28, at top of National Ave.

Hwy. 28, across from the Perennial Nursery

TAHOE VISTA RECREATION AREA

Hwy. 28, at National Ave.

CARNELIAN BAY

CARNELIAN WEST BEACH PATTON LANDING

Hwy. 28, next to Gar Woods

Hwy. 28, at Onyx Street

• •

TAHOE CITY

COMMONS BEACH

Hwy. 28, Tahoe City behind old fire station

The art of watching kids

Safety is first

HERITAGE PLAZA

Babysitting 411 is offered for ages 12 to 14 at Lake Tahoe Community College on May 19 and 20. In this workshop, participants will learn how to create a babysitting business, what to expect from children and child safety and emergency preparedness, including a CPR/First Aid certification for adults to infants. Lunch, materials and a babysitting bag are included. | (530) 5414660, ext. 717

Incline Recreation Center offers Lifeguard Training Class for ages 15 and older on May 20 and 27 and June 3 from 1 to 7 p.m. The American Red Cross-sanctioned course encompasses: Lifeguarding, CPR for the professional rescuer, first aid and AED Certifications. The American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Class is for ages 16 years and older. Learn to be a water safety instructor and teach swim lessons. This class breaks down each stroke and trains you to teach swimming by incorporating creative teaching methods, covering basic water safety techniques. The class is offered on May 21 and June 4 and 11 from 1 to 7 p.m. The deadline to register for both classes is May 19. | yourtahoeplace.com

LAKE FOREST BEACH

Young leaders needed

MEEKS BAY

Journaling nature On May 13 at 10 a.m. join the Kids Nature Journal Club at South Lake Tahoe Library. Come learn skills for exploring the natural world and how to capture adventures in a nature journal. Some materials will be provided, but bring a notebook and pen. Make sure to dress for exploring. Free and open to all children age 10 and older. | (530) 573-3185

Youth Art Contest California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife is starting a “Don’t Let it Loose!” campaign and is asking children in Grades 2 to 12 to send illustrations depicting invasive species, how their release affects natural resources or what to do with unwanted pets/plants instead of releasing them. The youth artwork will be used in a poster and video campaign. All types of media will be welcome: drawings, paintings, animations, comic strips, videos, etc. All entries must include an entry form and be received by May 15. | wildlife.ca.gov

Welcome guppies Incline Village Recreation Center offers swim lessons for a variety of ages and abilities. Programs are designed to follow the American Red Cross Learn-to-Swim guidelines and all instructors are Water Safety Instructor certified. Session VI is from May 15 to June 8. | Register (775) 832-1310

The IVGID Recreation Department is looking for enthusiastic, dedicated, hardworking teens entering Grades 6 to 10 for the Leaders in Training Education program. Students will be trained and work for a minimum of one week at summer camp. They will be in charge of designing and leading activities and more. Applications are due on May 19. | yourtahoeplace.com

Play holiday days Incline Village Parks and Recreation offers Spring EPIC Enrichment Camps led by Miss Joan. The camps include stories, songs, science, games, art, crafts, creative snacks and more. Monday Madness is for ages 3 to 5 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Mondays from May 22 to June 12. Terrific Tuesday is for Pre-K to age 5 from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tuesdays until June 6. Thrilling Thursdays is for age 5 through Grade 3 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. from May 11 to June 8. | (775) 832-1310 or yourtahoeplace.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities.

POMIN PARK SKYLANDIA

Hwy. 28, Downtown Tahoe City Lake Forest Road, 1.5 miles east of Tahoe City

Lake Forest Road, east of Tahoe City

Lake Forest Road, east of Tahoe City

64-ACRES PARK & BELL’S LANDING

Hwy. 89, south of Tahoe City

TAHOE CITY DOG PARK

Grove Street

WILLIAM KENT BEACH

Hwy. 89, 2.5 miles south of Tahoe City

WILLIAM LAYTON PARK & GATEWAY PARK Hwy. 89, south of Tahoe City at Dam

WEST SHORE

D.L. BLISS STATE PARK

Hwy. 89, 17 miles south of Tahoe City

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS PARK EMERALD BAY BEACH KILNER PARK

Hwy. 89, 4 miles south of Tahoe City

Hwy. 89, 18.5 miles south of Tahoe City

Hwy. 89, 3.5 miles south of Tahoe City

MARIE SLUCHAK PARK

Corner of Hwy. 89 & Pine St., Tahoma

• •

Hwy. 89, 10 miles south of Tahoe City

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Hwy. 89, 9.5 miles south of Tahoe City

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

BALDWIN BEACH

CAMP RICHARDSON EL DORADO BEACH KIVA BEACH

Hwy. 89 •

Hwy. 50 at Lakeview Commons

Hwy. 89 east of Taylor Creek

NEVADA BEACH POPE BEACH

Hwy. 89

Hwy. 50

Hwy. 89

REGAN BEACH

Hwy. 50

TRUCKEE RIVER CANYON

SQUAW VALLEY PARK

At Hwy. 89 & Squaw Valley Road

TRUCKEE

MARTIS CREEK

Hwy. 267, 1 mile south of Truckee Airport

RIVER VIEW SPORTS PARK

12200 Joerger Drive

TRUCKEE RIVER REGIONAL PARK

Hwy. 267, .25 miles south of Truckee

DONNER LAKE

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK SHORELINE PARK WEST END BEACH

I-80 Donner Lake exit

Donner Pass Road, next to the State Park West of Donner Lake

• • •

BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org

21


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Wet ‘n’ Dirty

Courtesy Tahoe RCD

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Wet ‘n’ Dirty events. Amgen returns to Tahoe

BOAT INSPECTION

S TAT I O N S O P E N

Roadside stations for inspections and decontaminations of motorized boats and watercraft are officially open for the 2017 boating season. The following locations are now open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., seven days a week: Meyers at the junction of U.S. Route 50 and Highway 89, Spooner Summit at the junction of U.S. Route 50 and Highway 28 in Nevada and Alpine Meadows on Highway 89. The Truckee-Tahoe location on Highway 267 will open on May 17. All motorized watercraft require inspection for aquatic invasive species before launching into Lake Tahoe, Fallen Leaf Lake and Echo Lake. Annual watercraft inspection fees remain unchanged from last year. See Marinas & Boat Ramps in this issue. | tahoeboatinspections.com

Fishing Licenses are required in California and Nevada for 16 years and older. Temporary licenses are available. California (916) 928-5822 or dfg.ca.gov; Nevada (866) 703-4605 or ndow.org. Licenses are available at most hardware stores. California Department of Fish and Game holds Free Fishing Days on July 1 and Sept. 2, with Nevada’s Free Fishing Day on June 10. LAKE TAHOE Fishing is closed in Lake Tahoe within 300 feet of its tributaries and upstream to the first lake from Oct. 1 to June 30. Lake Tahoe is open year-round from 1 hour before sunrise to 2 hours after sunset. No fishing is allowed within 300 feet of the mouth of any stream. Most Sierra lakes are open all year. No fish may be used for bait or possessed for use as bait in Lake Tahoe, Fallen Leaf Lake or Donner Lake, unless taken from that lake. Live bait in these lakes is limited to: Lahontan redside shiner, Tui chub, Tahoe sucker, Lahontan mountain sucker, Piute sculpin and Lahontan speckled dace. Chumming is illegal. There is a two-fish limit on Mackinaws, and a limit of five fish on Lake Tahoe. Fishing for Rainbows from the shore is best May through July. If you’re on the North Shore, the Kings Beach and Lake Forest areas are planted throughout the summer. Cave Rock on the East Shore of the lake is a good location for Rainbow and Brown. TAHOE REGION

SPOONER LAKE Spooner Lake is managed as a trophy fishery at Spooner Lake State Park on the East Shore. It is open all year for catch and keep, with a limit of five trout. Rowboats, inflatable rafts and float tubes may be used, but no motorized boats.

UPPER TRUCKEE RIVER The Upper Truckee is fed from the waters of Meiss Country south of Highway 89 in South Lake Tahoe. Fishing is good in the deep pools during the early part of fishing season. TRUCKEE REGION

BOCA RESERVOIR Boca is good for early and late shore fishing and is popular for trolling for Rainbow, Brown and Brook.

DONNER LAKE Brown and Rainbow can be expected when shore fishing with good spots at the boat ramp or the west end of the beach. Mackinaws can be found in the shallows during the early season.

MARTIS CREEK RESERVOIR Rainbow, Brown and Lahontan cutthroat trout. Catch and release only using artificial lures with barbless hooks and no bait. No motorized boats.

PROSSER CREEK RESERVOIR

ECHO LAKES Just a short drive off of Highway 50 in South Lake Tahoe, try both boat and shore fishing here. Shore fishing is usually good from the dam. Please respect the rights of private property and homeowners around the lake.

FALLEN LEAF LAKE The best fishing is from a boat, but occasionally fish can be taken from the shore with a good cast. The lake is a short walk from Fallen Leaf Lake Road or Fallen Leaf Campground. Fishing within 250 feet of the dam is illegal.

SAWMILL POND A stocked pond for children 15 years of age and younger. Adults are allowed to help children fish, but not allowed to fish themselves. The pond is located 1 mile south of South Lake Tahoe along Lake Tahoe Boulevard.

Among the best trout fishing in California, especially for Rainbow and Brown.

STAMPEDE RESERVOIR Holds a large number of trophy class Rainbow and Brown trout. Shore fishing nets Browns and Rainbow, with Kokanee when trolling. TRUCKEE RIVER At Lake Tahoe’s only outlet in Tahoe City, fishing is closed year-round from the dam in Tahoe City to 1,000 feet downstream. Certain other sections of the Truckee are closed year-round. Check fishing regulations. Fish the deep pools during the early part of the season. Best bets are to fish the section of the river between Tahoe City and River Ranch (Hwy. 89 and Alpine Meadows Road).

For more information, contact U.S. Forest Service | fs.usda.gov

22

South Lake Tahoe Professional cycling will return to Lake Tahoe on May 11 to 12. The Amgen Breakaway from Heart Disease Women’s Race Empowered with SRAM will include the overall start and Stage 2 on consecutive days. The women’s competition will conclude with a third stage in Elk Grove on May 13 and the final in Sacramento on May 14. The women will start with one of the most beautiful race routes in the USA, circumnavigating the 72-mile shoreline of Lake Tahoe with the final climb that will lead riders to the finish at Heavenly Mountain Resort. A new Stage 2 route will be announced in early 2017 where riders will face summits more than 7,300feet leading to what promises to be a climatic finish. The upcoming race marks the tenth consecutive year that a women’s competition is a major component of the Amgen Tour of California. | amgentourofcalifornia.com

Ramp Road at Stampede will be open during the project. | usbr.gov/mp/sod/ projects/stampede 

Trotting out the trout Tahoe venues California Department of Fish and Wildlife will start releasing pilot peak Lahontan cutthroat trout into Truckee area waters. Recently, the department received a shipment of cutthroat trout eggs from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s hatchery complex in Gardnerville. This is the second shipment of eggs in the last two years and is part of a joint effort between the agencies. The pilot peak Lahontan cutthroat trout is a lake form of cutthroat trout. This particular strain is native to the Truckee River basin and is known for their aggressive feeding behavior and large size. Lakes to be stocked include Echo, Fallen Leaf, Donner, Boca, Prosser, Stampede and Webber.

Hooray for spring runoff

Reno, Nev. Experience the world’s largest and most famous monster truck tour from May 12 to 14 at the Livestock Events Center. Watch world-class drivers compete in front of capacity crowds in racing and freestyle. | monsterjam.com

Beckwourth The Lunker Point boat ramp on the west shore of Frenchman Lake in eastern Plumas National Forest is now open. The facility had been closed for the past three years due to drought-related, low water levels. Water levels are expected to remain high for the rest of the boating season. | fs.usda.gov/main/plumas/home

Yeah, for warm weather

No dogs on Upper Truckee Marsh

Reno, Nev. The 14th annual Reno River Festival  kicks off the long-awaited return of summer on May 13 and 14. This festival brings an array of traditional and unique warmweather activities to downtown Reno’s Wingfield Park. New in 2017, festival goers can sample wine while enjoying live music, experience a carnival-like atmosphere and join in with the entertainment. The record-breaking winter created exciting conditions on the Truckee River and the event will showcase more than 60 of the world’s top whitewater athletes as they take on one of the country’s topranked whitewater courses. Professional men, women and juniors will compete for more than $10,000 in Freestyle, Boatercross and Slalom categories. | renoriverfestival.com

South Lake Tahoe The California Tahoe Conservancy announces its annual seasonal dog closure at the Upper Truckee Marsh through July 31. The purpose of the closure is to keep dogs out of critical breeding habitat for special, threatened and endangered species, such as the Willow Flycatcher and Yellow Warbler. Beginning Aug. 1, dogs will again be permitted access to the Upper Truckee Marsh, if they are on leash. The Conservancy-owned Cove East property, west of the river, remains open year-round for leashed dog access. | tahoe.ca.gov

Monster Jam

Take to the refuge Fallon, Nev. Spring Wings Bird Festival is from May 19 to 20 at Lahontan Valley Wetlands. Experts lead birding and wildlife tours in the Lahontan Valley Wetlands and Stillwater Wildlife Refuge with hands-on activities, raptors on display and speakers. | springwings.org

Stampede road closures Truckee The Bureau of Reclamation is working on Stampede Dam. The work necessitates a road closure from the Stampede Meadows Road and Dog Valley Road intersection to the Emigrant Group Campground entrance on Dog Valley Road. Public access to Stampede Reservoir will be along Hobart Mills and Dog Valley Road. This road closure is expected to last through October 2018, when the project is planned to be complete. Additionally, the Emigrant Group Campground will be closed for the 2017 season and re-opened for the 2018 season. Logger Campground and the Boat

Pump up da bike Truckee The Little Big, a bike festival for all, is on May 27 and 28 at the Truckee Bike Park. The event will feature a ladies’ bike skills clinic, a pro and amateur dual slalom race, cycle-cross races, kids’ pump track/ Strider jam and Jump Jam for men and women. All events will have registration on site except the skills clinic. | truckeebikepark.org

Gearing up for biking Plumas County Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has announced the races and events for 2017. Yuba Expeditions with a Saturday parking lot party is from May 27 to 29 in Downieville, The Lost & Found Bike Ride is tentatively scheduled for June 3 to 4 at Lake Davis, The Downieville Classic is from Aug. 3 to 6 and registration is open now, the Downieville Epic with the TNT Trail Day is from Aug. 19 to 20 at Packer Saddle and the Grinduro is from Oct. 7 to 8 in Quincy. Trail days include May 20, June 17 and July 15 in Quincy. There will be more in September and October on dates. | sierratrails.org


CALENDAR ONGOING EXHIBITS

Valeriy Kagounkin Sparks Museum & Cultural Center | Until May 13

May 11-24, 2017

Arts

THE ARTS

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

“Tree Lines” UNR Church Fine Arts | Until May 18

Sara Smith

Jane Cassidy SNC Tahoe Gallery | Until May 19 Myranda Blair LXS Gallery | Until May 19 A Place in the Country

C O N N E C T I N G T O C R E AT I V I T Y

Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 21

Katy Ann Fox Sierra Arts Gallery | Until May 26

S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

Peter Stichbury Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28

Spring Exhibition St. Mary’s Art Center | Until May 28

Spinifex: Aboriginal Paintings Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28

Leah Alfano & Sky Emerson North Tahoe Visitor Center | Until May 31

Sara Smith Riverside Art Studios | Until May 31 “My Body Your Body” Sierra Arts Gallery | June 1-22

“High Desert Alchemy” OXS Gallery | Until June 2 “Denali Patterns” LTCC Library | Until June 9 Helmut Klementi South Lake Tahoe Library | Until June 10

Jennifer Wildermuth Reyes McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until June 16

Will Barber McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until June 16

Robert Rollins Metro Gallery | Until June 16 Great Basin Native Artists Carson City Visitors Bureau | Until June 19

Kathy Aoki LTCC Library | Until June 23 “Image Nation” Truckee Recreation Center | Until June 30

“Bird Mafia” Atelier Truckee | Until June 30 “High School Pic[ks] 2” The Brick | Until June 30 “Strange Cousins from the West” Sierra Arts Gallery | July 1-30

“Maynard Dixon: The Paltenghi Collections” Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

Miradas Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

A

rtist Sara Smith was heading to Walker Lake to enjoy a weekend of ceramic making with a Raku Kiln. “Ceramics are pretty predictable, but with a Raku Kiln the results are unpredictable. The smoke and wood adhere to the outside of the piece. What’s created is beautiful,” Smith says.

more often than not they can get back to whatever age they were when they decided they were not an artist. Maybe they were shut down. If you ask a room full of kids who is an artist every one raises their hands,” she says. “I believe art has the power to open us up to things we might not see and back to connecting and

Dick Marconi Arte Italia | Until July 30 Four-Artist Exhibit Sierra Arts Gallery | Aug. 3-25 “On the Water”

“I believe art has the power to open us up to things

Tahoe Maritime Museum | Until summer

we might not see and back to connecting and

Rachel Stiff Sierra Arts Gallery | Sept. 7-29

thinking more creatively.”

1 ST & 3 RD WEDNESDAY

Gathering of Artists North Tahoe Arts Center THURSDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art (except 1st Thursday) 2 ND FRIDAY

Senior art classes & tours Nevada Museum of Art SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art 2 ND SATURDAY

Free admission Nevada Museum of Art Kids’ Art day Nevada Museum of Art Art Walk Reno

Smith has created a life in which she lives and breathes art. She also shares her passion with others. Blue Wolf Studios in Kings Beach recently hosted Smith and her “Collaborative Live Artist Takeover Party.” “Basically the show was an opportunity for people to create an art piece together,” says Smith.. Smith handed out paintbrushes, palette knives and sponge rollers for participants to get on their art groove. She wove a large canvas from strips of canvas for the event. “I invited people to play on the canvas. I like to get people involved. Every one of us is creative, but somewhere long ago, some of us decided we are not artists,” Smith says. She encourages people to become less intimidated in the realm of art. “If I can help open the door wide enough for people to walk through it,

thinking more creatively.” Smith works with a number of different mediums. She paints and draws and creates large mural installations. She also plays with different types of materials and tries not to get stuck in one area of her work. “I am inspired by nature. I am inspired by this beautiful place. There is inspiration right outside my window. I’ve been painting a lot of bears,” she says. According to Smith, her art explores the parallels between relationships: “I am a mom and see familial relations, as well as mother and child relationships in the animal world. I look at how we nurture our children and what are we doing to raise our young and give them the tools to live in the world.” Smith’s most recent mural project was a collaborative piece with Mountain Forge. The large installation was unveiled at the

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Sara Smith poses

with her artwork; “Mother and Child I”; Mael Passanesi and Katie Kyler participate in community painting night.

Truckee Donner Community Swimming Pool in September. She is currently working with the teens of the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe to create a mural in the lobby of the building. “I am grateful to support the project,” she says, adding that the mural should be ready to unveil by the end of the school year. Smith hosted another live art event with local artist Sara Zimmerman at Tahoe University. “It was an intuitive process. We pulled together a 5-by-8 canvas and created a view of Squaw Valley,” said Smith. High Fives Foundation auctioned the piece at its Silver Tie Gala on May 5. Throughout May, Smith will be the featured artist at Riverside Studios for an exhibit featuring several mother-andchild-themed works in celebration of Mother’s Day (see Arts in this issue for details). She is also spearheading the “Community Tree” project, a community collaborative project at the third annual Truckee Maker Show on June 11. Community members will create individual leaves that will be sewn onto a large, painted grove of aspens that represent the TahoeTruckee community. And, on June 25, Smith will be teaching a fabric collage and surface design workshop at Atelier in Truckee. | saralsmith.com 

23


THE ARTS

Arts

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE

following their forced expulsion from the desert due to the Australian government’s atomic testing program in the 1950s. | nevadaart.org

Passion for outdoors

FRESH AIR, FRIENDS, PAINTING Tahoe Art League hosts a summer’s worth of Plein Air Painting starting with a presentation by plein air painter and educator Phyllis Schafer at 7 p.m. on May 11 in the board room of Lake Tahoe Community College. The painting schedule starts on May 14 at Rabe Meadow. Painters meet from 9 a.m. to noon on Sundays at different locations until the end of August. Participants should bring a bag lunch for an informal noontime critique. Anyone may participate. A full schedule is on the Web site. | talart.org

Take a moment

Phyllis Schafer | Tahoe Art League

The power of natives Watch out for mama bear Truckee Riverside Art Studio presents Sara Smith for the month of May. Smith’s work is influenced by science, nature, the study of human and animal social systems, individual and collective behavior and meditation. In this collection of work, she focuses on the mother and bear cub to open a doorway to the connections that we share as fellow inhabitants of this world. Mama protects her cub; love is universal. | riversideartstudios.com

Nothing lost Carson City, Nev. The Las Vegas artist, Myranda Blair, whose work is now featured at the LXS Gallery inside the Nevada Legislature, is an avid rock climber, animal lover, farmer and a natural space advocate. Her artwork reflects her passions; she uses natural materials, recycled glass and antiques. Bair is the fifth of six Nevada artists whose work has been featured as part of the Nevada Arts Council’s Legislative eXhibition Series during the biennial session of the legislature. Her work will be in place through May 19. | travelnevada.com

What’s new to see at SNC Incline Village, Nev. Sierra Nevada College presents “Long Since the Sun Has Set,” by artist Jane Cassidy in Tahoe Gallery until May 19 at the Holman Arts & Media Center. Cassidy is a multidisciplinary artist and educator from Galway, Ireland. Primarily trained in music composition and animation, her main interests lie in audiovisual immersive environments, visual music, live VJing and multi-channel work. She is currently assistant professor of digital media at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. | sierranevada.edu 24

Tahoe City North Tahoe Visitor Center Artists of the Month for May are Sky Emerson and Leah Alfano of Summit Side Photo & Video. Emerson’s passion for the outdoors led him to a versatile career as a photographer and videographer. When not being charged by bears or hiking through the back country he can be found photographing families, sport-ing events and commercial clients. Alfano has always been fascinated with photography and the majestic beauty around her. While earning a degree in business, she found her niche and combined her professional skills with her love of photography. Emerson and Alfano collaborated to form Summit Side Photo & Video in 2010 and were married in 2015. | gotahoenorth.com

Sparks, Nev. Sparks Museum & Cultural Center presents the work of Valeriy Kagounkin until May 13. Kagounkin was born in the Chuvash Republic of Russia. He works predominantly in the medium of paint. In 2014, he became a permanent member of the Russian Academy of Arts, established in 1775. Kagounkin’s paintings concentrate on his people, the indigenous natives of Russia and Siberia and their North American counterpart, the Native American and others who built the American West. “With my paintings, I want to show the modern viewer the power these people had in shaping the country we live in today,” he says. “I want to make incredible paintings that will touch the American heart and inspire the modern viewer.” | (775) 355-1144

Chemistry of the desert Carson City, Nev. Gail Rappa and Elaine Parks are Nevada artists who transform raw and found materials in mysterious and impressive ways and their work is the centerpiece of a new exhibit at the Nevada Art Council’s OXS Gallery. The exhibit, “High Desert Alchemy” will be in place until June 2. An artist talk and reception is on May 23 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. It is free and open to the public. Rappa and Parks, who both live in Tuscarora in Elko County, explore time, transformation, and death in their artwork. | (775) 687-6680

Grounded art Carson City, Nev. Gil Martin: “From the Ground Up” is at the CCAI Courthouse Gallery until May 24. For more than 20 years, Martin has made his own paint from natural earth pigments that he digs up from various sources in the western United States. He uses a starch paste made from corn meal as a binder and adds water to create a

more or less viscous paint. His latest body of work has unmistakable references to Western landscapes that come about by working horizontal bands of color against one another until the painting unifies. | arts-initiative.org

What’s on tap at NMOA Reno, Nev. A Place in the Country: Aboriginal Australian Paintings is at the Earl and Wanda Casazza Gallery until May 21. This exhibition presents a concise selection of paintings by Aboriginal Australian female artists, drawn from the collection of Martha Hesse Dolan and Robert E. Dolan. The Nevada-based couple began researching Aboriginal Australian art and acquiring work by female artists, as well as collaborative work or group projects. Each artist shares a commitment and responsibility to country. They paint the natural features of their country in a nonrepresentational style that enables the artists to keep secret and sacred elements hidden from uninitiated viewers. Peter Stichbury’s “Anatomy of a Phenomenon” will be on display until May 28 at Gallery North. New Zealand artist Stichbury is fascinated by society’s ongoing obsession with UFO phenomena. He paints historical UFO sightings, as well as portraits of the people who purportedly saw them. His subjects are caught in an alternate reality — forever changed by their sighting experience, but also influenced by the myths, disinformation and conspiracy theories. Spinifex: Aboriginal Paintings from the Robert Kaplan and Margaret Levi Collection will be on display until May 28 in the Ina Mae and Raymond Rude Gallery. This exhibition features Aboriginal paintings made by the Spinifex people of the Great Victoria Desert in Western Australia. The Spinifex Arts Project was established in 1996 as a way for the Spinifex people to record and document land ownership

Reno, Nev. Sierra Arts Gallery presents Katy Ann Fox until May 26. Fox is able to illustrate the stunning scenery and imagery within the American West. Her series “Still Movement” illustrates the places that have caused her to take a moment and appreciate the world around her. An artist’s reception will be on May 18 from 6 to 8 p.m. | sierraarts.org

Cobalt like the lake Incline Village, Nev. Cobalt Artist Studio presents Ellen Nunes fine art, which will be on display through May. Called, “Creation Series: A Collaboration with Nature,” the body of work encompasses years of deliberate, playful experimentation born on a bone-chilling winter night in 2006. | cobaltartiststudio.com

Gathering of Artists Tahoe City Gathering of Artists is every first and third Wednesday of the month at North Tahoe Arts Center. Artists are welcome to drop in and share studio space from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. | northtahoearts.com

Boat names focus of exhibit Tahoe City “What’s in a name?” Juliet famously pondered. Well, if you are a boat, the answer is: quite a lot. Tahoe Maritime Museum announces that the museum will feature an exhibition that explores the stories behind the names of familiar Tahoe places and beloved Tahoe boats in May. Despite Shakespeare’s conceptualization of names as meaningless constructs, choosing a name for a boat is a personal choice and is rarely arbitrary. Many boat owners choose names that reflect a part of their life or family. Many are expressions of the owner’s personality and sense of humor. Other boat names pay homage to the tradition of the boat as a gendered object. Not only will “What’s in a Name” explore all these fascinating elements; it will also highlight the many superstitions and myths which surround this deeply personal choice. Visitors can also expect to delve into the complex nautical history behind the female persona of ships and boats. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org


May 11-24, 2017

Therapeutic exhibit

Butterflies come home

Truckee Image Nation, a new art installation featuring Nevada County veterans, is on display at the Truckee Community Recreation Center until June 30. Image Nation is an initiative of the Nevada County Arts Council in partnership with Welcome Home Vets, funded in part by the California Arts Council and local contributions. The photographs, selfportraits and pictures of veterans’ hands are the result of a therapeutic workshop with veteran and master photographer Michael Llewellyn. Image Nation helps veterans express themselves and connect with each other and society, a key element in treating post-traumatic stress disorder. Llewellyn, a veteran himself, has been working in photography since 1988. “I have personal experience with the

Truckee Truckee Donner Recreation and Park District offers the Charles Fayette McGlashan Butterfly Collection at the Community Recreation Center. It had been housed in the Nevada City courthouse for 61 years. C.F. McGlashan and his daughter, Ximena, sometimes referred to as the “Butterfly Princess,” assembled more than 20,000 butterfly specimens. | tdrpd.org

Burning for volunteers Reno, Nev. Peter Hazel Art Studio was awarded a large honorarium to build “Bloom” a 40foot tall sculpture of steel and glass. The sculpture will be interactive and visitors will be able to climb inside the piece and hang out in the viewing platform 30 feet in the air. This sculpture will be heading to Burning Man 2017 in late August

THE ARTS

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debilitating social isolation caused by episodes of trauma,” Llewellyn said in a press release. “The practice of photography offered me insight into understanding creative self expression, which contributed to the success of my career.” | tdprd.org

and is currently in production at ArTech in Reno. Volunteers are needed to help to make fused glass discs and ceramic jellyfish medallions. No experience is necessary. | (775) 384-6820 or peter@ peterhazel.com

Lots of art for $5

Print fans welcome

Reno, Nev. Art Walk Reno starts at 5 p.m. the first Thursday of every month throughout the year. Guests can see the works of local and regional artists on display in venues within the Arts District, between Liberty Street and Second Street and Virginia Street and Arlington Avenue. The walk begins at West Street Market in downtown Reno. Tickets are $5. | artspotreno.com

Meyers Bona Fide Books offers Open Print Studio on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those who want to work on linocuts or wood block prints and those who have taken a letterpress class at Tahoe Letterpress are welcome. Assistance and some supplies are on site. | bonafidebooks.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com

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25


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. LITERATURE: What was the name of the city where Anne Frank and her family hid from Nazis in “The Diary of Anne Frank”? 2. MEASUREMENTS: How many feet are there in a fathom? 3. ADVERTISEMENTS: What product could no longer be advertised on U.S. TV after Jan. 1, 1971? 4. GEOLOGY: What is the tectonic boundary between the North American and Pacific plates? 5. MEDICAL: What do the initials stand for in the BRAT diet for children with upset stomachs? 6. TELEVISION: What was the detective character’s main prop on the drama “Kojak”? 7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: How many siblings does a septuplet have? 8. FOOD & DRINK: What is “beurre noir”? 9. MOVIES: What movie’s last line was, “We’ll go on forever, Pa, ‘cause we’re the people”? 10. MUSIC: Who composed “Music for the Royal Fireworks”?

Strange but true

by Samantha Weaver

Those who study such things say that cannabis has been used to ease childbirth pains in a variety of cultures, ranging from the Middle East to Northern Africa to East Asia -- and the evidence dates as far back as 2000 B.C. Junior Whirl: 1. Airdromes, 2. Armories, 3. Marries, 4. Sierra, 5. Raise, 6. Sari, 7. Sir. Hocus Focus differences: 1. Fence board is missing, 2. Stripe is missing, 3. Sleeve is shorter, 4. Cloud is smaller, 5. Cap is missing, 6. Arm is moved.

When a tailor’s work is normally only mediocre, I reckon you could say that it’s sew-sew.

CryptoQuip

1. Amsterdam, 2. Six, 3. Cigarettes, 4. San Andreas fault, 5. Bananas, rice, applesauce and toast, 6. Lollipop, 7. Six siblings. Seven offspring are called septuplets, 8. Butter that is cooked until it is dark brown, 9. “The Grapes of Wrath,” 10. George Frideric Handel

TRIVIA TEST

26

Thought for the Day: “It’s surprising how much memory is built around things unnoticed at the time.” – Barbara Kingsolver


May 11-24, 2017

Horoscopes

PUZZLES FOR KIDS

FIRE

EARTH

FUN & GAMES AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

A busy time both in front and behind the scenes is likely now. You are in an ambitious mood. Proceeding with full confidence remains somewhat challenging. Circumstances and certain players destined to make you have to be strategic and patient are indicated. Trust and confidence are keywords.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

A steady process of giving and take with others continues. You may feel as though you must give more that feels fair. This theme will continue for a while yet. Directing a sharp focus to matters is an asset for all concerned, yet it may also be hard to take. Your attitude is critical and resolve is bold, challenging others to keep up.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

Are you seeking adventure, escape or a combination of both? Exploring new territory is likely and this includes meeting new people. A proactive and spontaneous mood prevails. You are happy to be the one to make the first move, especially if you are in unfamiliar places. Otherwise, you may stand back and explore virtually and/or imaginatively.

The clouds are clearing, finally. Yet despite the inspiration to play, the need to work may be stronger. Either way, you will take a sporting approach. A spirit of victory will keep your spirits high. A competitive edge is also present and it could cause animosity and spoil the fun, so be aware and temper your attitude accordingly.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19) Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22) A soul-searching journey continues but now it is also time to express new facets of your individuality. It all amounts to deciphering who you feel you truly are and what constitutes your true purpose, a path with heart. This may come amidst the needs of the moment. Focus on identifying this deeper need as you manage outer responsibilities.

A creative and playful mood is keeping you busy, especially close to home. You want to take new initiatives and at least uplift the atmosphere by way of spring cleaning. Yet introducing a new style and feel altogether is also likely. Your energy levels are running high now so this is the time. If you delay now, the project could drag on for months even.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23) Navigating through tricky waters has kept you busy the past several weeks. Things should be getting clearer now. The urge to break into new territory remains strong and this could apply psychologically as well as physically. Your focus will get progressively stronger yet this week and you will be busy.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

Thinking new thoughts and entertaining the possibilities is keeping you busy of late. This process of thinking out of the box may prove refreshing yet a little intimidating as well. Big moves and even renovations are indicated. Seeing a bigger picture remains important to support taking what may well amount to a big leap of faith.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)

A philosophical mood prevails. You are seeking answers. The process may be leaving you feeling less social. What you want new is new knowledge, answers and the confidence of know how. Many new realizations and even profound insights are igniting in your mind. Record them somehow; you will be glad you did later.

A mix of ambition and curiosity are leading you to consider alternate approaches. A process of deep negotiations with significant others has been underway for many months even. But now it is time to take more deliberate action. This will require a strategic plan and fortunately, you are in a good headspace to do just that. Cooperate for best results.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22) Rich and powerful exchanges with others have been keeping you busy such as deciphering who has what you want and need and who needs what you have. Pushing through opposition and indecision is featured as you move towards the higher ground. It is natural to want the advantage and you do.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20) All the main lights are green now and the forward flow is apparent. Now it is time to get busy. Attending to several fronts requires time management. What to do first and where to start are questions. It all has to get done so anything applies as long as it is featured in your plans. Avoid idle distractions and rock and roll.

Tails in Tahoe Lucky

Holly

Oreo

Dutch

Lucky is a man about town. He’s learning to walk on a leash and loving every minute of it. He is just 2 years old, and enjoys a low key lifestyle complete with belly rubs and snack treats.

Holly is a friendly, playful and affectionate young lady. She will be the first one to greet you when you come home. She enjoys playing with wand toys or chasing that pesky red dot!

Oreo is an affectionate kitty who loves cuddles. He will sit on a lap for hours! He’s gentle and mellow and good with dogs.

Dutch is a very sweet and affectionate dog who came to us after his family moved away and couldn’t take him along. Dutch loves people but needs some time to get to know new dogs.

Pet Network (775) 832-4404 bschilpp@petnetwork.org www.petnetwork.org

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org

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Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org 27


MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

Legends of the Celtic Harp

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

M AY 1 1 - 2 5 , 2 0 1 7

W E AV I N G S T O R Y & S O N G

MAY 11 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

May 13 | 7 p.m. | $15 advance | $20 at door | Brewery Arts Center | Carson City, Nev.

Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Kelly Bentson Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. The Eric Johnson Trio Moodys 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Cash’d Out Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Nick Youssef & Sandy Danto The Improv 9 p.m. Special Events Indigo Star The Ridge Portola

Susan Ball

RENO & BEYOND

FOLK

E

nter the enchanting dream world of Celtic harp through the world-renowned musicianship and master storytelling of Lisa Lynne, Aryeh Frankfurter and Patrick Ball. “The name of the show is Legends of the Celtic Harp,” says Lynne. “It’s a humorous thing because it’s not that we are the legends. It’s that we play and tell the actual legends of how the Celtic harp traveled through history. We chronicle the fables of how music was used from way back in the medieval era through modern times. There’s mystery and humor in a collection of stories and songs all related to the harp. But it’s not just about the harp, it’s about humanity.” As professional musicians, storytellers and historians, these traveling entertainers bring a rare opportunity to see classical Celtic instruments performed in a theatrical setting. “All three of us play the Celtic harp,” Lynne says. “Aryeh and I play a standard harp with nylon strings and Patrick plays a much more rare harp with wire strings. This harp is representative of what was going on in early 14th and 15th century Ireland. With a glassy, jangly, bell-like tone, similar to the way a harpsichord compares to a piano, it’s got more of the jangly, haunting sound to it.” Other atypical instruments the ensemble will play during the performance include two cousins of the mandolin, called the bouzouki and the cittern. The bouzouki looks like a round guitar but is actually a large mandolin tuned one octave lower. The cittern has 10 strings in an open tuning and is popular in Welsh traditional music. The most unusual instrument of all is called the Swedish nyckelharpa. “Aryeh has an affinity for it and has 28

“The level of rhythmic skill required in playing heavy metal lifts up the folk music to really exciting levels.” –Lisa Lynne definitely shifted his energy into that over the past few years,” says Lynne. “It’s part violin, part hurdy-gurdy with a really beautiful and unique sound.” Ball is a well-known storyteller with a degree in Irish history. He performs compelling solo entertainment around the world. He joins with Lynne and Frankfurter for special performances whenever possible. “Patrick is a theater actor who is very serious and so, so funny,” says Lynne. “He performs history by way of stand-up comedy while Aryeh and I provide the underscore. It’s really very compelling.” In her youth, Lynne was a heavy-metal bass player in a southern California hair band called Riipshaa and Frankfurter performed progressive rock on electric violin. They discovered the harp separately, but met, collaborated and eventually married through their mutual love of ancient music. “I learned harp from hanging out with the gypsies at the Renaissance fairs and medieval dances at a time when I was just sort of coming into adulthood,” Lynne says. “I was so impressionable and this was such exciting music that took me back in time. So I picked up the harp, took a year off, saved money and learned it. There is a certain magic to the instrument that carried me along naturally from there.” Although the ensemble has by now mastered a variety of traditional instruments,

their performance is still heavily influenced by the classic rock bands they grew up listening to, such as Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd, legends who composed beautiful acoustic music in their own right. “We came from a side angle, so by the time we reached folk music it invited different arrangements that are unique, fresh and appealing to every demographic,” says Lynne. “The level of rhythmic skill required in playing heavy metal lifts up the folk music to really exciting levels. Being a bass player affects my playing of the harp when I lay into the low end to accentuate that big bottom. It’s all you need to make music that gets right into people and allows them to open up and take in it.” Those who attend are surely in for some exceptional and memorable entertainment with a fine dose of history and theater to go with it. “People are going to experience something very different from what they are expecting,” says Lynne. “They’re going to go on a journey that includes history, humor and uplifting tales of how music has been a part of our culture for centuries. A variety of beautiful music will leave people feeling very satisfied that they’ve experienced many emotions and felt the common links of music throughout mankind.”  To purchase tickets, visit breweryarts.org.

Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Just Us Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Silver Ships Peppermill 7 p.m. Atomika Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Fastlane Circus Circus 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Ashley Red Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m.

MAY 12 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 11 a.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Eric Matlock Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Funk Assassination Bar of America 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. The Sauce Moodys 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Jake Houston & the Royal Flush Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m.


May 11-24, 2017

MUSIC SCENE

C A L E N D A R | M AY 1 1 - 2 5 , 2 0 1 7 MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Nick Youssef & Sandy Danto The Improv 9 p.m. Special Events Indigo Star The Ridge Portola RENO & BEYOND Atomika Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Turtle’s Last Dance TJ’s Corral 5 p.m. The Starlighters Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Tom Miller Sassafras 6 p.m. Carolyn Dolan Living the Good Life 6 p.m. The Black Lillies Piper’s Opera House 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. As It Is w/Roam, Greyscale, Sleep Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Trippin King Snake Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Silver Ships Peppermill 8 p.m. Melissa Dru Harrah’s 8 p.m. Dead Letter Disciple Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Just Us Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Big Wild, Soohan and Joyzu Cargo 8 p.m. Apple Z Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Fastlane Circus Circus 9 p.m. Stephen Lord Boomtown 9 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 10 p.m. Ashley Red Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ R Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Polo Lounge 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Latin Dance Social Peppermill 7 p.m. “Nice Work if Your Can Get It” Western NV Musical Theatre Co. 7:30 p.m. “15 Reasons Not to Be a Play” Galena High School 7:30 p.m. Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. K-Von Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Reno Sculpture Fest ReTrac Plaza Monster Jam Livestock Events Center Reno

MAY 13 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Mescalito Sundeck Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Funk Assassination Bar of America 8 p.m. Mat Marucci Trio Moodys 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Cash Only Band Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. The Higgs Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 7 p.m. Totally 80s Dance Party Crystal Bay Club 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Nick Swardson MontBleu 8 p.m.

Nick Youssef & Sandy Danto The Improv 9 p.m. Special Events Indigo Star The Ridge Portola RENO & BEYOND Atomika Atlantis 4 p.m. Reno Youth Orchestra Pioneer Center 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Starlighters Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Legends of the Celtic Harp Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Air Supply Nugget Ballroom 8 p.m. Calling Ophelia Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Trippin King Snake Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Melissa Dru Harrah’s 8 p.m. Silver Ships Peppermill 8 p.m. Easton Corbin Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Just Us Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Monophonics, Vokab Kompany and Mojo Green Cargo 8 p.m. Fastlane Circus Circus 9 p.m. Apple Z Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Stephen Lord Boomtown 9 p.m. Ayla Simone Lex GSR 10 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 10 p.m. Ashley Red Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ R. Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Spryte Peppermill 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 2 & 7:30 p.m. “Nice Work if Your Can Get It” Western NV Musical Theatre Co. 2 & 7:30 p.m. K-Von Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “15 Reasons Not to Be a Play” Galena High School 7:30 p.m. Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Special Events Monster Jam Livestock Events Center Reno Reno River Festival Whitewater Park

MAY 14 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. All Good Funk Alliance Sundeck Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 2 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. Nick Youssef & Sandy Danto The Improv 9 p.m. Special Events Indigo Star The Ridge Portola RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

Shawn Adeli

TODRICK

HALL

“STRAIGHT OUTTA OZ” May 15 | 8 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev.

RENO & BEYOND

TEXAS NATIVE Todrick Hall is a multitalented artist: singer, songwriter, dancer, actor, choreographer, playwright, costume designer, Broadway performer and star of his own self-titled MTV show. “Straight Outta Oz” is inspired by L. Frank Baum’s, “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.” | harrahslaketahoe.com

Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Rhythm & Rawhide Reno Ballroom 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Jonathon Barton Boomtown 6 p.m. Roem Baur Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. The Hellenbacks Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Karaoke Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Quinn Dahle Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

KONGOS MAY 14 | SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

May 18 | 8 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. THE KONGOS ARE South Africanborn, Phoenix-based brothers: Johnny on accordion, Jesse on drums and vocals, Dylan on bass, guitar and vocals, and Danny on guitar and vocals. They are one of rock music’s most infectious and invigorating new voices. | crystalbaycasino.com

“SOUTH PACIFIC”

John Palmore Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. Blue October Cargo 8 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Ashley Red Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 2 p.m. “Nice Work if Your Can Get It” Western NV Musical Theatre Co. 2 p.m. “15 Reasons Not to Be a Play” Galena High School 2 p.m. Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Monster Jam Livestock Events Center Reno Reno River Festival Whitewater Park

MAY 15 | MONDAY

Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. John Palmore Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

MAY 16 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

TAHOE & TRUCKEE

May 12, 13, 19 & 20 Truckee High School Theater | Truckee TRUCKEE HIGH SCHOOL presents Rogers’ and Hammerstein’s, “South Pacific,” one of the most famous Broadway musicals of all time. “South Pacific” has won 10 Tony Awards and features iconic songs such as, “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair” and “Some Enchanted Evening.” The spring musical will feature a live orchestra. | (530) 448-4629 30

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Tom Rhodes w/Chase Du Rousseau The Improv 9 p.m.

presents

ALTERNATIVE ROCK

MAY 17 | WEDNESDAY

Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Todrick Hall Harrah’s 8 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Todrick Hall Presents “Straight Outta Oz” Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Special Events Indigo Star The Ridge Portola RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m.

John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Corky Bennett Rail City 4:30 p.m. Roem Baur Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Jonathon Barton Boomtown 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Quinn Dahle Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 18 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Bias & Dunn Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. The Chuck Hughes Trio Moodys 8 p.m. KONGOS w/Mother Mother Crystal Bay Club 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Northwoods Clubhouse 6:30 p.m. Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Tom Rhodes w/Chase Du Rousseau The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6 p.m. Jason King Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Johnzo West & the Wayward Souls Peppermill 7 p.m. Roem Baur Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 8 p.m. Underground Coverage Tour Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Hero’s of Rock & Roll Circus Circus 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. The Hellenbacks Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m.


May 11-24, 2017

Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Quinn Dahle Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m.

MAY 19 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 11 a.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. GuGu Drum Group North Tahoe School Theater 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. David and the Drivers Bar of America 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Sparkler Moodys 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Grateful Bluegrass Boys Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Live DJ High Camp 12 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open mic Art Truckee 7 p.m. Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Tom Rhodes w/Chase Du Rousseau The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. George Pickard Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Tom Miller Sassafras 9 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Mozzy Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Shiba San w/Justin Jay Cargo 8 p.m. John Dawson Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Johnzo West & the Wayward Souls Peppermill 8 p.m. Reckless Envy Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Dos Tacos & Pandora Acoustic Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Dangermuffin and Boondoggle The Saint 8 p.m. Fresh Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Thom Yeoman Boomtown 9 p.m. Hero’s of Rock & Roll Circus Circus 9 p.m. Carnage Lex GSR 10 p.m. Arizona Jones Atlantis 10 p.m. The Hellenbacks Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ R Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Polo Lounge 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Latin Dance Social Peppermill 7 p.m. “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Quinn Dahle Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Stupid F***ing Bird” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. “Cinderella” Pioneer Center 8 p.m. Special Events Hot August Nights Spring Fever Revival Reno Food Truck Friday Idlewild Park 5 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

MUSIC SCENE

Classical education

RENO PHILHARMONIC YOUTH ORCHESTRA STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

May 13 | 4 p.m. | $5 youth | $10 adult | Pioneer Center | Reno, Nev.

S

ome of the most talented young musicians from northern Nevada and northeastern California will be performing at the 2017 Reno Philharmonic Youth Orchestra Spring Showcase at the Pioneer Center in downtown Reno, Nev. The concert will feature works from Shostakovich, Puccini, Grieg, Mozart and Korsakov, in addition to a medley of songs from “Pirates of the Caribbean” and “Harry Potter.” As part of its education outreach program, the Reno Philharmonic supports three youth orchestras. Reno native Dustin Budish conducts the Concert Orchestra, which is the middle ensemble between the introductory Strings Symphonia and the more professional Symphony Orchestra. As the transitional ensemble’s leader, Budish works hard to engrain professionalism and teamwork into his group of 120 mostly middle-school students. “It’s about training them in a really professional way on how to behave in a rehearsal, how to prepare their parts and do some basic musical orchestral things and helping to prepare them for the more advanced orchestra,” says Budish. “Middleschool kids can be rambunctious so getting everybody together to focus can be a challenge. But we are serious about keeping that atmosphere of professionalism.” Budish quickly learned that the best way to get this particular age group to collaborate and learn was to have fun. “At the beginning I was particular about how to achieve our goals,” he says. “I think I’m more concerned now about having fun. I think the minute that it’s not fun is

Celebrate Mother’s Day throughout the resort with a Mother’s Day Champagne Brunch, Spa specials and additional events.

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH CLASSICAL

get to that point our imaginations are going and we are pushing the limit as far as how soft or loud we can play.” Budish believes that youth orchestral programs are essential to the vitality of any healthy community. “I was a product of the Washoe County School District music program,” he says. “I love music, but if it wasn’t for fifth-grade violin class or sixth-grade orchestra, if it wasn’t for Mrs. Hoffman and having these programs in school, I don’t think I would have ever chosen this path. I know there are lot of communities in our county that don’t have music is schools, but there are ways to many interdisciplinary connections between music and just about everything else students do. The essence of teamwork that comes from playing in an orchestra is an invaluable tool going forward.” After a performance last year at New

Sunday, May 14, 2017 Seatings from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Manzanita Celebrate mom and loved ones in Manzanita with a holiday-inspired brunch menu. The brunch menu will feature a chilled seafood display, a carving station, salads, cheese and charcuterie, along with breakfast favorites and desserts. Unlimited Champagne and a Bloody Mary Bar are included. Adults: $79. Children: $19 ages 6-12. Price excludes tax and gratuity. Advance reservations are recommended by calling 530-562-3050.

“They didn’t really think of Reno as a place for classical music, but performances like these are changing that.” when we lose momentum as an ensemble. I want to get us sounding as best we can while having a good time. I think we have gained a lot of progress musically, emotionally, mentally as a group when we started having more fun and that change has really been great for all of us.” One of the ways Budish creates this enthusiastic atmosphere is to allow the musicians to choose their own music. “I let the kids select the repertoire,” he says. “They can suggest whatever they like from video-game composers to classical music. From their suggestions, I make a list and we vote on the pieces we perform. The kids really love the music and it comes across in their playing.” As the group progresses throughout the year, it begins to come together and work on the more subtle aspects of musicianship. “Dynamics is the hardest one to get them to do,” says Budish. “It’s difficult to get all the details in the music right, but dynamics is what we are always trying to bring out. Our brains and bodies can only focus on so many details at once, so the musicians have to be reminded constantly. Sometimes I think for us it’s all about making ridiculous comparisons, when we

–Dustin Budish York City’s prestigious Carnegie Hall, Reno Philharmonic Youth Orchestra has been slowly but surely putting itself on the national map. “I don’t think a lot of people were thinking of Reno as having that type of talent pool before we went to Carnegie Hall,” says Budish. “But I’d heard them say that tuning-wise we are nearly as good as a professional orchestra. They didn’t really think of Reno as a place for classical music, but performances like these are changing that.” Those who attend the concert can expect to be thoroughly impressed and entertained by the amazing local youth musicians and their dedicated conductors. “If you think of your standard symphony orchestra, the conductor says a few words and you listen, but that’s not how our concerts go,” says Budish. “We have dynamic conductors who really communicate an atmosphere of fun and family. People are always amazed by how great the musicians sound for their age. Anyone coming to the concert will feel that passion and be blown away by how inspired our music making is.” 

THE RITZ-CARLTON SPA, LAKE TAHOE Indulge at The Ritz-Carlton Spa, Lake Tahoe with our Mother’s Day themed treatments including Mother-to-Be Retreat, Mom’s Essential Retreat or Mom’s Ultimate Retreat along with retail and product discounts. Please mention the “Mother’s Day Special” when making reservations to receive special pricing. For additional information or to reserve your treatment please call 530-562-3030.

530-562-3000 ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe

To purchase tickets, visit pioneercenter.com.

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

Easy Giant FLIES “TO THE MOON” STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Listen to Easy Giant’s new single, “The Deep” Read Sean’s review of their 2015 debut “Holy Wave”

MUSIC NOTES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Linkin Park, Eric Church headed to Tahoe Harveys Lake Tahoe and Another Planet Entertainment have announced the addition of two more amazing performers for the 2017 Lake Tahoe Summer Concert Series at Harveys Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena. Linkin Park, with special guest Machine Gun Kelly, will perform on Sept. 1, while Country superstar Eric Church will play two shows at Harveys on Sept. 2 and 3. Tickets go on sale in mid-May. | harveystahoe.com

EXCLUSIVE C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Check out the Outdoor Concert Series

PSYCHEDELIC SURF ROCK

B

y the time you read this, Chris Emmington will be overseas writing music. The one-time staple of funky, hardrocking, local cover bands has traded in the Tahoe dive-bar limelight for an actual music career in, of all places, Norway. “[Oslo’s] a cool vibe,” says Emmington of Norway’s capital city. “[Norwegians] are really romantic about their mountains and just got voted happiest people on Earth.” Emmington was granted a one-year, special-skill work permit as a music composer after landing a gig with Norwegian production company Eleven D Studio. “I’m a bit of a freelancer,” he says, “But it’s kind of cool when you have a project with some pressure on it. I did this mayonnaise commercial with some acoustic jams and another one for the Norwegian

So far, music from the new album has been used in the Peace Park special on ABC, an Alaska Snowboard Guides video, a Red Bull mountain biking edit, an Absinthe snowboarding film and in a Patagonia documentary about traveling and snowboarding in Turkey. Athletes from the latter endeavor returned with a Middle Eastern lute, called the saz, which Emmington learned to play for two tracks called “Another Sun” and “Sazo,” both of which feature hypnotic conga beats over swirling bass and guitar. It reminds me of Belle and Sebastian’s more psychedelic diversions strummed by a tripped-out cousin of the Beach Boys.

The album revives the psychedelic surfer vibe of his much-lauded 2015 debut “Holy Wave,” by combining early 1960s classic rock with a lo-fi garage sound. recycling movement and climate change. I realized I enjoy the act of combining music and video where you can really create the moment and set a vibe.” The motivation for writing on deadlines has also inspired Emmington to produce more original music for his ongoing solo recording project, Easy Giant; he is selfreleasing his second LP “To the Moon” this month. The album revives the psychedelic surfer vibe of his much-lauded 2015 debut “Holy Wave,” by combining early 1960s classic rock with a lo-fi garage sound. The result is a compilation of catchy melodies within an instantly listenable sound that transports the audience along on a satellite of ambient bliss. Emmington wrote, played and recorded the album himself in snowboarding legend Danny Davis’ Prosser Heights garage last summer on a single SM57 microphone. He and Davis connected a few years back on their mutual love of music and outdoors, became roommates and have since collaborated on a variety of creative projects. “Danny wanted me to write some music for his Peace Park event,” says Emmington. “So I wrote him a few songs and the ideas started piling up. I started doing a song a day.”

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The strength of Emmington’s composition is rooted in his focus on riffs. Each tune contains a marked theme around which he layers evocative vocals, somehow loose yet pocketed drumming and a blend of classic guitar harmonies. Classic rock á la King Crimson fades into an ambient space where a laid-back Life Aquatic vibe joins old school trap beat driven by pure Casio keyboard. The majority of “To the Moon” was recorded on a 1962 Kingston Flying Wedge made in Japan and featured on the album cover. “I love vintage Japanese guitars and this is my favorite one I’ve ever had,” he says. Emmington plays and sings with a soulfulness attained through years of studying classic rock, R & B and contemporary indie. It’s great to see him finally making good on his promise of success. “I think that it’s always been about trying to do music as a job, not as a struggle,” he says. “But [in Tahoe] it’s this crazy thing of playing in four or five bands while teaching music lessons, so I’m excited to be in a bigger city and making music for projects that have some important messages. The goal for the next year is to pump out more music than I ever have before. It just feels right.” | easygiantmusic.com 

MAY 20 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Battle of the Bands: Finals Hard Rock 8 p.m. David and the Drivers Bar of America 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Heritage Band & Riotmaker Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Dead Winter Carpenters w/Sam Ravenna Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. DJ Parties Live DJ High Camp 12 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Tom Rhodes w/Chase Du Rousseau The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

Tribute bands highlight July Fourth Tahoe Donner will kick off the July Fourth weekend by hosting its annual Summer Concert on the Green live music series featuring two nights of performances by top tribute bands – experience performances by Joel the Band (Billy Joel tribute) and The Rising (Bruce Springsteen tribute) on July 1, with Steely Dan tribute band, Aja Vu, and the high-energy dance cover band Wonder Bread 5 on July 2. Tickets are on sale and expected to sell out. | brownpapertickets.com

Lost Sierra Hoedown returns Enjoy a family friendly campout with music, adventure and outdoor education at the Johnsville Historic Ski Bowl from Sept. 21 to 24 at the Lost Sierra Hoedown. Headliners for this year’s festival feature Willie Watson, The Brothers Comatose, Dead Winter Carpenters and Willy Tea Taylor. Tickets are on sale. | lostsierrahoedown.com

Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. George Pickard Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Johnzo West & the Wayward Souls Peppermill 8 p.m. John Dawson Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Pallbearer, Gatecreeper, Venomous Maximus Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Reckless Envy Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Thom Yeoman Boomtown 9 p.m. Hero’s of Rock & Roll Circus Circus 9 p.m. Fresh Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Jelly Bread The Saint 9 p.m. Peeti V Lex GSR 10 p.m. Arizona Jones Atlantis 10 p.m. The Hellenbacks Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ R Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Hedspin Peppermill 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Cinderella” Pioneer Center 2 & 8 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Quinn Dahle Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. “Stupid F***ing Bird” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Special Events Hot August Nights Spring Fever Revival Reno Reno Wine Walk Riverwalk District Strange Brew Festival The Brewer’s Cabinet 3 p.m. Chili on the Comstock Virginia City

MAY 21 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Live DJ High Camp 12 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m.


Randy Gentry

May 11-24, 2017

Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. Tom Rhodes w/Chase Du Rousseau The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Rock River Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Arizona Jones Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. The Hellenbacks Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Cinderella” Pioneer Center 1 & 7 p.m. “Stupid F***ing Bird” Brüka Theatre 2 p.m. “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 2 p.m. Quinn Dahle Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Chili on the Comstock Virginia City

MAY 22 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Rock River Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Armed for Apocalypse, Pressure Drop Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

MAY 23 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Mike Furlong Boomtown 6 p.m. Hans Eberbach Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m.

MUSIC SCENE

BLACK

THE

LILLIES May 12 | 6 p.m. Piper’s Opera House | Virginia City, Nev.

THE BLACK LILLIES are roots rockers, armed with songs that blur the boundaries of roots-folk, soul, red-dirt country, blues and jazz. Their most recent album, “Hard to Please,” celebrates the band’s sweet harmonies and charismatic indie spirit supported by bandleader Cruz Contreras’ smart songwriting and tight musicianship. | pipersoperahouse.net ROOTS ROCK

DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Mark Pitta Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 24 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Ian Edwards w/Jesus Trejo The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. The Look Boomtown 6 p.m. Hans Eberbach Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Jake Ryan Studio on 4th 8 p.m.

Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Karaoke Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Mark Pitta Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 25 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Erica “Sunshine” Lee Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Eli Young Brand MontBleu 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. The Paul Covarelli Band Moodys 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m.

Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Ian Edwards w/Jesus Trejo The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6 p.m. The Look Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. The Inciters Peppermill 7 p.m. Arizona Jones Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Murder in Green Meadows” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Mark Pitta Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Stupid F***ing Bird” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m.

NOW PLAYING

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

Lake Tahoe in Depth See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

Project MANA

(Making Adequate Nutrition Accessible)

Emergency Hunger Relief Organization serving the North Shore and Truckee since 1991

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region.

Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS AND TIMES:

Guided tours & 3-D movies (or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

(775) 298-4161 MONDAYS TAHOE CITY | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Center, 330 Fairway Drive TUESDAYS TRUCKEE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community Arts Center, 10046 Church Street WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House, 265 Bear Street THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church ProjectMana.org 341 Village Blvd.

Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2 Through May 25

» 1 p.m. (weekends only) » 4:30 p.m. » 7:45 p.m.

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

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FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Ten Miles in One Day | A R a i l r o a d i n g M a r v e l By August, the seasoned crews were averaging several miles of track a day, but they still had hundreds to go. An intense rivalry built up between the Central Pacific and Union Pacific crews. When UP crews bragged that they had set a track-laying record with 4½ miles in one

The race between Central Pacific and Union Pacific was a profligate waste of money, but it also ranks as one of the greatest feats in American railway history.

S

hortly before the American Civil War, Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman visited northern California. He pronounced that building a railroad over the rugged Sierra Nevada and Great Basin was unfeasible and would require the work of “giants.” Hard-working crews of Chinese and Irish laborers would eventually prove otherwise, but snaking a train track through the mountains had been long considered an impossible feat — and a monumental financial gamble. California merchants Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, Leland Stanford and Charles Crocker collectively staked their own personal fortunes to finance the Central Pacific Railroad Company to build the Sacramento-to-Utah section of the nation’s first transcontinental railroad. In January 1869, after five years of construction, the so-called Big Four had spent a fortune on only 131 miles of track and their company was teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. Despite an army of more than 13,000 men working round the clock, crossing the Sierra had proven nearly impossible due to climate, topography and geology. Deep winter snow, steep canyons and obdurate granite combined to slow the effort to breach the mountain range. Central Pacific accountants figured that grading the roadbed, laying the ties and rails, rolling stock and support infrastructure had already cost the railroad company about $32 million, an average of $245,600 per mile. Central Pacific wasn’t only facing the challenges of laying track over the Sierra Nevada; it was in a desperate contest with Union Pacific Railroad to cover as much ground as possible in the least amount of time. The UP track originated in Omaha, Neb., and headed west toward the Great Salt Lake. When winter storms on Donner Pass brought work to a halt, Central Pacific transferred 5,000 men into the Truckee River Canyon where they slammed down track as fast as they could. The race between Central Pacific and Union Pacific 34

was a profligate waste of money, but it also ranks as one of the greatest feats in American railway history. No Hollywood movie director could set a better stage for the epic challenge of human endurance and complex organization. By spring of 1869, the hard-working laborers were east of Truckee and picking up speed. Charles Crocker, general superintendent of the railroad, had vowed that his crews would build a mile of track for every working day. When the crews reached Nevada, Crocker eliminated nearly all alcohol drinking among the Irish and physically intimated and threatened the Chinese when he caught them smoking opium. The whole operation ran like a welloiled machine. Graders and bridge builders worked miles in advance of the track crews laying iron rail while telegraph crews installed poles and strung wire. Every 2 miles of new track consumed 500 tons of rails, ties and track hardware. All the metal was shipped from foundries on the East Coast.

day, CP crews exceeded it with 6 miles. UP crews then boosted the record to 8 miles, but it had taken the men from 3 a.m. until midnight to do it. The race for riches had turned into a contest of pride. Crocker was certain that his Chinese crews could outperform the Union Pacific laborers in speed and endurance. As construction neared completion at Promontory Point, Utah, Crocker decided to set a track-laying record that no one could beat. On April 28, 1869, about 1,200 men were assembled to work in teams, unloading supply trains, lifting and aligning the rails and spiking them to the ties. (The ties had been dropped along the path the rails would follow.) Supply crews had loaded five separate trains, each consisting of 16 flatcars with enough bolts, spikes, fitting plates and iron rails to build 2 miles of track. A shrieking whistle started the challenge at 7 a.m. and within eight minutes the first trainload of 16 cars was unloaded. The spikes, bolts and plates were carried in buckets to where they were needed. Eight muscular Irishmen armed with heavy tongs lifted the rails onto a portable track gauge, which guaranteed they were always exactly 4 feet, 8½ inches apart. The track-laying team worked in pairs, each man grabbing one end of a rail and pulling it off the little flatcars. Each rail, 30 feet long and 560 pounds, was set into place within 30 seconds.

TA H O E

Other workmen attached plates to the rail joints, hammered spikes and tightened bolts. There were 2 miles between the advance teams and the last men applying the finishing touches, a line of hyperactivity moving ahead at 1 mile per hour. By lunchtime, the men had built 6 miles of railroad and were ready to go for 10. The first hour after lunch, however, was spent bending rails because the remainder of the stretch was a steady climb and full of curves. The animated scene raged until 7 p.m. when a whistle blew to stop work. An army officer witnessing the event for Union Pacific said, “Mr. Crocker, I never saw such organization as that. It was just like an army marching over the ground and leaving the track built behind them.” The Central Pacific crews had set a new record of 10 miles and 56 feet in one 12-hour shift, using 25,800 ties, 3,520 rails, 28,160 spikes and 14,080 bolts. Each of the eight Irish tracklayers lifted 125 tons of iron in the course of that day’s work. In order to prove the job safe and sound, a locomotive was run over the new track at 40 mph. Union Pacific had less than 10 miles left to complete when Central Pacific pulled its amazing feat. Crocker had left them no room to beat him. One UP official was so incensed that he begged permission to tear up several miles of track so that his men could prove they were better. He was turned down and one of the most amazing achievements in American railroad history went into the record books.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com, or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

Nostalgia

SUMMER SNOWPACK Until April 2017, the winter of 1982-83 held the Northern Sierra record for the most precipitation measured, going back to 1922. Winter 2017 has now smashed all water records up and down the range, but especially in the all-important northern watersheds. Similar to what is happening this extraordinary season, in 1983, deep snow lasted well into the summer months in the high country of the Tahoe Sierra. Adventurous backcountry skiers were still poaching turns on the residual snowpack well past Labor Day weekend.

Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s newest book “Snowbound: Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” available in local stores or at thestormking.com. Courtesy Mark McLaughlin collection


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

TA S T Y TIDBITS

DIY vegetables Truckee Master Gardeners with Slow Food Lake Tahoe present high-altitude foodgrowing workshops at 5:30 p.m. at the Truckee Demonstration Garden. Grow Your Own Asparagus is on May 17 and Grow Your Own Tomatoes is on May 24. Participants receive free starter plants. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

Eating in the great outdoors Truckee Tahoe Mountain Sports hosts Taste the Adventure, a camp cooking demonstration on May 18 from 6 to 8 p.m. Michelle Shea, founder of Adventure Dining Guide, will show how to make healthy snacks and back-country meals with fresh foods from Tahoe Food Hub. There will be a food tasting from Alpineair & Patagonia Provisions, a camp stove comparison and a raffle to benefit Tahoe Food Hub. | tahoemountainsports.com

flavor

S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

I

t’s spring, but in Tahoe we are just winding down our epic winter of more than 700 inches of snow — many of us will be skiing into the summer. When it comes to thinking about a spring cleanse, our seasonal cycles don’t necessarily line up with the spring equinox. Here in the mountains, especially this year, a May cleanse is the perfect time to give our bodies a break from the foods that carry us through the winter season but aren’t always the best for our overall health. Also, environmental toxins build up over time. An Ayurvedic cleanse helps our bodies adjust to seasonal changes. Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest holistic healing systems. The ancient Indian science purports to be more than 5,000 years old and is based on the premise of balancing one’s individual constitution. The word Ayurveda translates as, “the sacred knowledge of life.”

A simple cleanse might include kitcherie, a stew made of mung beans, basmati rice and vegetables.

A May cleanse is the perfect time to give our bodies a break from the foods that carry us through the winter season but aren’t always the best for our overall health.

Back the truck up Reno, Nev. Reno Street Food presents Food Truck Fridays from May 19 to Sept. 29 at Idlewild Park from 5 to 9 p.m. every Friday. There will be 30 deliciously packed food trucks, pop-up restaurants and food trailers along with local bands and artists featured each week. | Reno Street Food on Facebook

Growing in Tahoe Lake Tahoe Community College Connect offers two community classes on growing organic food in Tahoe. “What Plants Grow Well in Tahoe” is from May 20 to 21. “Introduction to Permaculture and Companion Planting” is from June 3 to 4. The times of the classes are 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The first day is a lecture and the second is a hands-on workshop. | RSVP (530) 541-4660, ext. 717

Dig that community vibe Truckee Truckee Demonstration Garden is hosting monthly dig-ins for community volunteers to help with getting the garden ready for planting, refurbishing damaged beds, weeding — anything that needs to be done. No experience is necessary. Digin dates are the third Saturday of every month from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: May 20, June 17, July 15, Aug. 19 and Sept. 16. | truckeegarden@gmail.com CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

LOCAL FLAVOR

Ayurvedic spring cleaning

Time for growing Reno, Nev. River School Farm announces the 2017 Homesteading Workshops held at Verdant Connections Urban Farm once a month: backyard animal husbandry is on May 13, herbal remedies is on June 10, backyard beekeeping is on July 22, high tunneling on Aug. 19 and preserving your harvest on Sept. 9. The two-hour morning workshops are for 15 people. The fee is $30 per workshop. | verdantconnections.com

May 11-24, 2017

Sprinkle cinnamon and cardamom on cooked spring fruits

There are three doshas, or functional energies, in Ayurvedic medicine: pitta, vata and kapha. Each dosha is governed by different elements — air, water, fire earth, ether — and the three gunas, or characteristics: rajas, tamas and sattva. A balanced dosha helps to foster a healthy and centered life physically, mentally and spiritually. People with pitta doshas are generally fiery types, vata doshas tend to be more airy or windy, and kapha doshas tend to be earthy and slower moving. Most people are governed by more than one dosha. Balance is the key. In Ayurveda, it is important to align diet and lifestyle choices with one’s dosha. To figure out your dosha, you can take an online test (see end of article). Imbalances are relatively easy to recognize. Fatigue, skin problems, digestive issues and insomnia are just a few red flags that suggest a a dietary shift. Fiery pittas tend to be Type A personalities that would benefit from cooling foods and less aggressive exercise programs. A cooling yoga practice, such as moon salutation or yin yoga, might be helpful.

Vatas can be ungrounded and often have digestive issues; they might benefit from eating more cooked foods and vegetables and less uncooked. A more grounded yoga practice, such as restorative or slow vinyasa, would be beneficial. Kaphas tend to be dense and slow moving and easily gain weight when imbalanced; they need fast-moving vinyasa and hot yoga. Kapha doshas do best to eat fewer calories and spicy foods and avoid dairy. When flowers are blooming, there’s a tendency toward congestion. A break from dairy for a period of time could be beneficial. A simple cleanse might include kitcherie, a stew made of mung beans, basmati rice and vegetables. Some of the benefits of a kitcherie cleanse include better digestion, toxin and congestion elimination and increased energy. Choose a period of time to cleanse. Consider a three- or seven-day period. Squeeze lemon juice in warm water

If you drink coffee, slowly wean yourself off first. This can take up to a week for those who rely on java to get their day going. Start by mixing decaf into your usual fullstrength cup until your morning cup of coffee is all decaf; then stop drinking coffee altogether. Eliminate all processed foods, dairy, meat, sugar, alcohol and caffeine from the diet. Begin each morning with a cup of warm lemon water. For breakfast, eat kitcherie and vegetables or cooked spring fruits with cinnamon and cardamom. Make lunch the biggest meal: kitcherie, steamed vegetables and/or a green salad. If you have digestive issues, forget the salad and have cooked veggies. For dinner, eat light. Have a small bowl of kitcherie or vegetable soup or basmati rice and/or vegetables. Drink lots of warm water throughout the day and before meals.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Try Priya Hutner’s recipe for kitcherie

Finding someone who is familiar with Ayurveda to guide you through a cleanse can be helpful or take an Ayurvedic workshop in a group setting. This is fun and offers a support system to help you through the cleansing process. Determine your dosha by taking a quiz online. Try banyanbotanicals.com/ info/prakriti-quiz or ayurveda.com/pdf/ constitution.pdfs.  Priya Hutner is a writer, health and wellness consultant, and natural foods chef. Her business, The Seasoned Sage, focuses on wellness, conscious eating and healthy living. She offers healthy organic meals for her clients. She may be reached at pria78@gmail.com or visit theseasonedsage.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to read more.

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Tidbits

FARMERS’ MARKETS OPEN

El Toro Bravo Famous for our Mexican dinners (530) 587-3557

10186 Donner Pass Rd - Truckee

(530) 546-3315

Regional farmers’ markets are opening for the summer with Tahoe City leading the pack, opening the first market of the season on the shores of Lake Tahoe.

Mael Passanesi

LOCAL FLAVOR

The Tahoe City Farmers Market operates every Thursday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Commons Beach from May 18 to Oct. 12. | tahoecityfarmersmarket.com

Incline Village Farmers’ Market returns on Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m. from June 1 through August at Lake Tahoe School. | laketahoemarkets.com

Ski Run Farmers Market is every Friday from 3 to 8 p.m. on Ski Run Boulevard in South Lake Tahoe from June 2 through August. | skirunfarmersmarket.com

Truckee Farmers Market opens in late May with a market every Tuesday through early October from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Truckee Regional Park.

Romano’s Farmers’ Market is on Fridays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Sierra Valley Farms in Beckworth from June 2 to Sept. 9. | sierravalleyfarms.com

Truckee Community Farmers Market is every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. from June 4 to Sept. 24 at the Tri-Counties Bank Plaza. | truckeefarmersmarket.org

South Lake Tahoe Farmers Market is every Tuesday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. from June 6 to Oct. 10 at the American Legion Hall parking lot. | eldoradofarmersmarket.com

JasonsBeachSideGrille.com

8338 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, CA CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

Best of the best

CREATIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN AN ELEGANT LOG CABIN

SPRING SPECIAL 2-FOR-1 ENTRÉES 2-course minimum per person. Excludes Saturdays. Buy one entrée, get second of lesser value FREE with this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Please tip on full amount before discount. Exp. 5/25/17 Voted Best Place to Take a Date for 17 years EST. 1985

Charlie Soule Chef/Owner

THE SOULE DOMAIN Open for dinner nightly at 6pm - Please make reservations

Steve Soule Head Waiter

Stateline Dr. next to Tahoe Biltmore, Crystal Bay, North Lake Tahoe

530-546-7529 | www.souledomain.com

“Paesano Speciale” - $25 Glass of wine Choice of soup or salad Choice of fresh pasta dish Sunday-Thursday. Expires on 5/31/17 No coupon necessary. Excludes other discounts & promotions.

HAPPY HOUR

Sunday-Thursday 5-6 p.m. In Downtown Truckee - (530) 587-4694

PianetaRestaurantTruckee.com 36

Northstar Tahoe Forest Health System Foundation presents the 18th annual Best of Tahoe Chefs: Evening in White on May 21 at 4:30 p.m. at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe. The fundraiser will benefit Patient & Family Programs at the Gene Upshaw Memorial Tahoe Forest Cancer Center. Mobile bidding on the silent auction items from cell phones will be open on May 19 at noon. Tickets are $200 per person and are on sale now. | bestoftahoechefs.org

Gardening tips for free South Lake Tahoe Friends of the Library offer two UC Cooperative Extension Master Gardener of Lake Tahoe workshops this May. Participants receive instruction on cultivation techniques and history/background of the plants. Everyone will leave with free plants. These are family-friendly workshops with hands-on opportunities. On May 20, the Asparagus Workshop is at 10 a.m. This hardy perennial vegetable can become part of an edible landscape and a mainstay in the garden. On May 30, Tomatoes Workshop is at 6 p.m. Learn the techniques required to grow these plants in our cool summers. Topics include proper varietal selection, location in the garden or container, planting options and methods for protecting the young plants. Free and open and all. | eldoradolibrary.org

Chili in the hills Virginia City, Nev. The 34th annual Chili on the Comstock returns to the historic town on May 20 to 21 along C Street in Virginia City. The event promises all the favorite chili flavors and brings the return of the Fireball Saloon Crawl, Fun with the Runs 5K, music and family friendly activities. | visitvirginiacitynv.com

Beer geeks allowed Reno, Nev. The Strange Brew Festival is on May 20 from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Brewer’s Cabinet. This is a celebration of uniquely crafted brews from local breweries. Expect the unexpected. Most of the offerings from more than 20 local breweries will only be available at this festival — uncommon beer, in many cases, specially crafted for this event. These brews will challenge taste buds and sensibilities. There will be live music and food from Liberty Food & Wine. | strangebrewfestival.com

Take a stroll along the river Reno, Nev. Downtown Reno Wine Walk along the Truckee River in the Riverwalk District is on May 20 and June 17 from 2 to 5 p.m. Every third Saturday of the month visit any of the participating Riverwalk District merchants to get a map of Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, for a $20 wine-tasting fee and valid photo ID, receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet to sample wine at any participating merchant. Strollers and pets are not advised because of large crowds. | renoriver.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits.


LOCAL FLAVOR

May 11-24, 2017

C A L I F O R N I A’ S M O U N TA I N BY LOU PHILLIPS

We also provide

wine consulting

M asterpi eces

Fine Italian Food & Spirits

for collectors and businesses.

Learn from the best

We’ll buy your collections or help you acquire wines.

SOMMELIER TRAINING with Louis Phillips Level 3 Sommelier

Locals Love Lanza’s!

LEVEL 1 · June 20

Sunnyside Resort · 9:30am to 3:30pm Includes: e-Book, Wine Tasting, Test and Certification

More info, registration & pay: WineProWest.com WineGuru123@gmail.com -

S

ome of the most memorable wines I’ve had in the course of my wine journey have come from mountain vineyards — opaque, structured behemoths that even after decades of life still erupt from the glass with sensations that linger deliciously well after the last sip, intellectual wines with complexity that allow for enjoyment on many levels. One of the keystone characteristics of mountain wines is not just the ability to improve with age, but the need to age so the tannins are tamed and integrate with all of the other flavors.

With its coastal mountains formed from tectonic uplifts and ancient volcanic activities, California has as much or more true mountain vineyard acreage as anywhere in the world and as such is the perfect study in the whys of great mountain wines. California’s most famous mountain-wine treasure is Napa where ranges rise steeply and majestically on both sides: the Mayacamas Mountains to the west and the Vaca Range to the east. The star regions here are Spring Mountain Vineyards, Howell Mountain Vineyards, Mt. Veeder Winery, Atlas Peak AVA and Diamond Mountain Wine Country. The vineyards were etched from steep terrain covered with eons of shrubs and rocks and almost devoid of natural water sources. The low-fertility soils are shallow and drain easily yielding crop loads a fraction of vineyards on the valley floor. So let’s take a look at what makes wines made from mountain terrain different and often exceptional. The best place to start is in the skin because that is where the gifts of mountain life are bestowed on the fruit. A grape’s skin is much like our own in that its main function is protection from extreme heat, cold, sun exposure, fierce winds or drought. Mountain vineyards throw all of that and more at the vines forcing the grapes to create substances such as antho-

Courtesy Pride Mountain Vineyard

cyanins, of which tannins are the most well known, to protect and serve the grapes. Tannins bring great structure to wine and also provide color and flavor. In the hands of a talented wine team these compounds develop correctly in the fruit and are treated correctly during winemaking and aging to enhance their positive characteristics in the wine. The wines are dense and tannic in their youth and demand years of patience to show their stuff. But what stuff it is because with age they blossom with complex layers of dark fruits, minerals, earth and tannins that rarely become soft but integrate and provide structure like no other. So the next time you crack a bottle from Pride Mountain Vineyards, CADE Estate Winery, Dunn Vineyards, Cain Winery or the like, take a moment to appreciate the hard work of the people and the vines that created the masterpiece you are enjoying. Cheers to them. 

(775) 544-3435

(530) 546-2434 Bar - 4:30 p.m. Dinner - 5 p.m. 7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

LanzasTahoe.com

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Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier and his consulting business WineProwest.com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 544-3435 or lou@ wineprowest.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns.

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Local’s Lakefront Menu 3-Course $27.00 Sunday - Thursday

Located in the Village Center 760 Mays Blvd., Unit #8, Incline Village 530.270.WINE

Christy H ill.com

GlassesWineBar.com 37


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

COCONUT SHRIMP B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

W

Kings Beach Lunch Specials Daily Early Bird Special 4-6pm

Dinner Special 4-10pm

$3.50 Margaritas $3.50 Dos Equis $2.50 Draft Bud

25% Off Mexican Combo Dinners

Full

Bar

Open 11:30am-10:00pm (530) 546-4539 8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach in Kings Beach

“Come taste the difference”

OPEN DAILY 9 AM TO 9 PM ORDER AHEAD FOR FASTER SERVICE BY CALLING

(530) 546-0310

530.583.3324 2905 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City

BacchisTahoe.com

8515 BROOK AVE KINGS BEACH CA 96143 ACROSS FROM THE BEACH AND BEHIND PLUMAS BANK.

LAMEXICANAKB.COM

American Bistro & Wine Bar

Open Daily at 11:00 a.m. for Lunch & Dinner Breakfast Saturday & Sunday from 8 a.m.

21 for

Everyday Dinners

2-course min. per person. Please present coupon when ordering. Not valid w/other promotions. Expires 05/25/17

Happy Hour Everyday 4-6:30 pm Tuesday all night

SpindleshanksTahoe.com

400 Brassie Ave, Suite B - Kings Beach - (530) 546-2191

hen thinking of appetizers, there are so many possibilities. They can be any one of a number of finger foods or simply a smaller portion of a dinner entrée. One of my favorite foods to use for appetizers is shrimp. There are many ways to prepare shrimp from scampi-filled pastry shells to the more traditional shrimp cocktail. Another way of preparing shrimp is a popular choice for either dinner or as appetizers. This preparation involves shrimp being cooked with a coconut crust, aptly called coconut shrimp. By simply changing the number or size of the shrimp, as well as the serving accompaniments, shrimp can either be served for dinner or for appetizers. One suggestion for dinner would be to serve the shrimp with a rice that is made by adding toasted slivered almonds and small pineapple chunks. A light sweet and sour sauce would also go well with this dish, but be sure not to use too much sauce or you might mask many of the flavors of the coconut shrimp and rice.

The trickiest part of the cooking process is trying to maintain a steady oil temperature. Preparing the shrimp is simple. You have to find a way to get the coconut to stick to the shrimp and then it has to survive on the shrimp while cooking. One method of coating foods with some type of crust or breadcrumbs is to give the item a light coating of flour and then dip it in a well-beaten egg before dredging it. This method will work with the coconut, but there is a way to get a much lighter batter on the shrimp. Simply take an egg white and beat it until it is broken down. Add some cornstarch to make the mixture into a slurry-like consistency. This slurry can now be seasoned with salt and pepper and any additional herbs and spices you want to use to add flavor. The mix should be thick enough to stick to the shrimp with a light coat. Next, dredge the shrimp in the coconut and you are ready to fry them. Make sure the oil is hot before starting the coating process. The oil should be at 350 degrees and the shrimp should make the oil appear to boil as soon as contact is made. The trickiest part of the cooking process is trying to maintain a steady oil temperature. If the oil is too cold, the

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Try Chef Smitty’s recipe for Shrimp Cocktail

shrimp will absorb the oil into the batter and you could loose a lot of the coconut, as well as end up with a greasier product. If the oil gets too hot, the coconut will burn before the shrimp is fully cooked. What I will do to make the process less stressful is to cook the shrimp in the oil long enough to give the coconut a nice golden brown texture on both sides. Then I will place it on a paper towel to get rid of any excess oil and finally finish them in another pan in the oven for 3 to 5 minutes. As an appetizer, coconut shrimp will normally be served with a dipping sauce. There are many sauce choices from teriyaki to sweet and sour, as well as sweet and spicy. Here is a sauce that can easily be tailored to please a number of taste buds. Heat a little orange marmalade with a little water. Add some sweet and sour sauce and spice it up with a little chili paste. Be careful with the chili paste because it can get pretty hot very quickly. This is a simple sauce to make and by changing the ratios of the ingredients you can vary the taste to please everyone. The ingredients can be mixed in a bowl and will work fine, but heating them will create more of a dipping texture as apposed to a jelly-like texture. No matter what your sauce, coconut shrimp will make a great treat.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

COCONUT SHRIMP & DIPPING SAUCE From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith

8 shrimp size 16/20 or six shrimp size 12/15 1 egg white, beaten 2 to 3 T cornstarch 1 to 2 C coconut Salt and pepper ½- to1-inch deep oil in heavy pan

DIPPING SAUCE

4 T orange marmalade 2 T sweet and sour sauce 1 t chili paste 1 T water

Mix the cornstarch into the beaten egg white to make a slurry that will lightly stick to the shrimp. Season this with salt and pepper. Dip the shrimp into the slurry and then dredge in the coconut. Fry until golden brown on both sides. Pat on paper towel to remove excess oil. Finish cooking in the oven for 3 to 5 minutes. FOR THE SAUCE: Heat the marmalade on medium heat with water until the jam breaks down into a sticky liquid. Add the sweet and sour sauce. Slowly add the chili paste a small amount at a time. Vary the ratios of the ingredients for different tastes.

38


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8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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May 11-24, 2017  

The historic Tahoe City Golf Course is celebrating its 100 season this summer. It’s time to book a tee time at the historic course or one of...

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