Page 1

In search of

DIRT TRAILS BREWS, BRATS & BALLET High art & simple pleasures

DWEEZIL ZAPPA

freaks out

THE MAGIC BEANS grow on Tahoe

IN THIS ISSUE

SPRING IN TAHOE


TheTahoeWeekly.com

What’s Inside

Volume 36 | Issue 08 TM

| A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 0

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Features

Events Calendar & Editoral | editor@tahoethisweek.com

Spring in Tahoe Tahoe Local In Search of Dirt Sierra Stories

Entertainment | entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

Out

about

Arts Joyce Chambers

Kelley Werner

culture

15

20 19 Exhibit Calendar 19 Through Lyme-colored glasses 20 The Arts

From the Publisher

SPRING’S DUAL SIDES Exploring Tahoe in late spring as the snow starts to melt, but is still too deep to reveal hiking and mountain biking trails, means being creative to enjoy two seasons of sports. Snowshoe to waterfalls and rock climbing, explore local museums, head into the back country, head into the woods for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, and enjoy the extended downhill ski season. Tahoe’s hiking trails will soon begin to reveal themselves, first on Lake Tahoe’s sun-drenched East Shore and in Truckee. Read some of our picks for the in-between season in “Spring in Tahoe.” Priya Hutner has been exploring a different side to Tahoe this spring – exploring and sampling the rise in Japanese whiskey and spirits at several Truckee restaurants. Her tasty trek will have you wanting to give the Priya Sour a try at the Redlight. Writer Tim Hauserman needed a break from the snow and ventured down to Nevada City “In Search of Dirt.” Tim shares his picks for hiking and mountain biking trails, including some that depart from downtown Nevada City in this issue. 

Local

flavor

Photography | production@tahoethisweek.com

IN THE OFFICE Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill | publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102 Tahoe Rim Trail Assoc.

08 14 15 18

SUBMISSIONS

Sightseeing Lake Tahoe Facts Events Snow Trails Deep ‘n’ Daring Family Fun For the Kids Announcements

Music SCENE 28

37 31 Tasty Tidbits 31 Japanese Spirits & Cocktails 33 Wine Column 34 Chef’s Recipe

Puzzles Horoscope Dweezil Zappa Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 27 Brews, Brats & Ballet 28 The Magic Beans 22 23 24 24

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVES

Art Director | Production Alyssa Ganong | production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106 Graphic Designer Mael Passanesi | graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment Editor Priya Hutner | priya@tahoethisweek.com

13 06 07 08 11 13 16 16 30

Sales Manager Anne Artoux | anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110

– John Muir

Copy Editor Katrina Veit Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle

DEADLINES & INFO May 11 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, May 4 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, May 4 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, May 4 TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

ON THE COVER

The sun sets over the East Shore of Lake Tahoe as seen from Secret Cove on March 30, 2017. “It was snowing off and on before this,” says photographer Scott Thompson. “I didn’t think I was going to get any color but the sky opened up at the last minute and it was awesome.” | ScottShotsPhoto.com @scottshotsphoto

FEATURES · POWDER ALERTS COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS

Subscribe to the free, digital editions of Tahoe Weekly & Tahoe Powder TheTahoeWeekly.com | issuu.com | issuu app iTunes & GooglePlay | E-Newsletter Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at 4

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & post your photos on Instagram

@TheTahoeWeekly


April 20-May 10, 2017

SEASON PASS SAVINGS! ON SALE NOW

GOLF

Passes and packs are on sale at early season prices. Save up to 10% by purchasing by April 30!

• Voted Best Golf Course in 2016 • A true mountain classic • First championship golf course in the Truckee Tahoe area • Highest elevation course in the region • Driving range, lessons, special events, and a full range of food and beverage

Early-buy perks include comp rounds of golf for friends! See all golf season pass and package rates at tahoedonner.com/golf

SKI

Purchase next year’s pass by April 30, save money, and get extra perks and benefits!

Tahoe Donner Downhill

• The best place for family fun and learning in the Tahoe region. • Successful learn-to-ski program • Programs for kids as young as 3 years old • Wide open bowls, excellent grooming • Small ski area, personal touch

Tahoe Donner Cross Country

Voted Best Nordic Ski Area in 2016 • World class trail system • Stunning views • Spectacular new facility

Early-buy perks include comp tickets! See all 2017-2018 season pass and package rates at tahoedonner.com/ski-season-passes

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT TAHOEDONNER.COM 530-587-9400 5


TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

Kings Beach

East Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Donner Summit

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

Tallac Historic Site

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo West Shore

Truckee truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

LAKE LEVELS

Readings taken on Friday, April 14, 2017

Natural rim 6,223’

RESERVOIR CAPACITY

Elevation 6,227.59’ | Elevation in 2016 6,223.10’

P CITY TY: 40,870 Boca 31,377 CAPA

Stampede 182,682

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

Olympic Valley

Lake Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

Taylor Creek Visitor Center

$10 parking | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Sugar Pine Point State Park is home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

High Camp

North Shore

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

South Lake Tahoe

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

South Lake Tahoe

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and the 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

Emerald Bay

Heavenly

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Tahoe City

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

North Tahoe Arts Center

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

South Lake Tahoe

Measured in Acre Feet (AF)

CAPACITY:

226,500

CAPACITY: A

9,500

6

Measured in Cubic Feet Per Second (CFS)

Tours in summer (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in the summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

Tahoe Maritime Museum

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Truckee

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Tahoe Science Center

Truckee Railroad Museum

Western SkiSport Museum

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Incline Village

Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Olympic Winter Games

Donner Summit

Fri.-Sun. | Free (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing, exhibits include snowshoes from the 1850s, ski equipment from the 20th Century and a pair of 8-foot-long skis used by John “Snowshoe” Thompson, a legendary mail carrier. Located at Boreal off I-80. TART

Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building. TART

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

Kings Beach

South Lake Tahoe

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Historical Society Incline Village

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe City

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Kings Beach State Rec. Area, (Thurs.-Mon., summer) 969 Tahoe Blvd., (800) 468-2463

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd., (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50, (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City 100 North Lake Blvd., (530) 581-6900

Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Road (Depot), (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village Tahoe City

855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr., (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd., (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Road, (530) 587-3558

225

200,000 AF

175

150,000 AF

125

75

50

25

Truckee River

100,000 AF

CI Independence 16,107 CAPACITY: 18,300 I 20,400 Martis 1,085 CAPACITY:

Tahoe City

Daily | Free | tahoemuseum.org Features official 1960 Winter Olympic items such as skis, promotional literature, collection of official Olympic photographer Bill Briner. Learn the history of skiing in the Sierra. Inside Boatworks Mall. TART

A Prosser 9,082 CAPACITY: 29,840

Donner 5,744

Emerald Bay

Parking fee | Tours in summer (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Vikingsholm Castle

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

Wed.-Mon. | Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

West Shore

Explore Tahoe

North Shore

Hues of purples, greens and golds paint the loop trail in Kings Canyon in Carson City, Nev. | Katherine E. Hill

Flow at Farad 4380 | troa.net troa net

TRANSIT: NORTH LAKE TAHOE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH LAKE TAHOE | bluego.org


April 20-May 10, 2017

N

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee Donner Lake

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Donner Summit BOREAL

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Reno & Sparks MT. ROSE

WEST EAST SOUTH

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SUGAR BOWL h Ta

AUBURN SKI CLUB

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Tahoe City

SQUAW CREEK

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside Tahoe Pines Eagle Rock

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

il

Ta h o e R i m

NV

Dollar Hill

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Carson City

Homewood HOMEWOOD

e Ri

Visit plugshare.com for details

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

CA

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Natural rim: 6,223’

Glenbrook o Ta h

ELECTRIC CHARGING STATIONS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

ALPINE MEADOWS

a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

SQUAW VALLEY

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

CASINOS

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

CLAIR TAPPAAN

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

ROYAL GORGE

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

il

DONNER SKI RANCH SODA SPRINGS

Cave Rock

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Watershed Area: 312 square miles Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F

Fannette Island

Shoreline: 72 miles

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Ta h oe

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually HOPE VALLEY

Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 73.1’ in 2015. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

7


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

EVENTS CALENDAR

Spring in Tahoe

A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7

S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AT H E R I N E E . H I L L

EVERY TUESDAY

T

Heavenly Mountain Resort

ahoe’s snowpack is likely to last until summer, and while many downhill resorts are closing soon, there’s still a lot to explore. Here are our picks for some of the best ways to enjoy spring in Tahoe. This year’s snowfall has exceeded more than 700 inches at most Tahoe ski resorts, extending the winter season well into spring. Many Tahoe resorts will be open until late April, while Mt. Rose is looking to continue turning lifts through Memorial Day. And, Squaw Valley says it will be open for skiing on the 4th of July.

Rock climbing locations are starting to emerge from the winter snowpack, but you’ll have to snowshoe or cross-country ski to reach them. Tahoe Weekly Art Director Alyssa Ganong has been doing just that and shares some spots for early season climbing: Indian Springs at Cisco Grove off Interstate 80. “Its south facing, gets warm, melts out pretty quickly. Easy approach, less than a mile with snowshoes.” Sugarloaf near Kyburz off Highway 50. “Mostly south facing, good winter/spring crag for low elevation about 4,100 feet.” River Rock off Highway 80 between Reno and Truckee. “Mostly west facing so great afternoon sun. Probably no snow.”

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every

Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Crack the code Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts an Hour of

Code on Tuesdays at 4 p.m. This introduction to computer programming for Grades 3 and higher is designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the

Lake and North Tahoe Regional Park in Tahoe Vista. Hope Valley is a magnificent place to explore with vast meadows and breathtaking views, and Mount Rose is sure to be a winter playground for the next few months. These same spots are also great places to take the kids sledding. Check out our list of local snow trails and sledding hills in this issue and at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

FAT TIRE BIKING Mountain bikers will have to wait longer this season to explore Tahoe trails, but if you have a fat tire bike, go for it. Local snow trails and snowmobile locations are packed down from heavy users throughout the season and make great spots for fat tire biking. Don’t bike on wet trails – it causes ruts and damages trails. A big no-no.

EARLY SEASON HIKING

SLEDDING, SNOWSHOEING & CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING The cross-country ski resorts may be closed, but there’s still plenty of snow trails to explore. Local and state parks are a great place to explore the snow trails from lakeside locales at Sugar Pine and Donner State Memorial Park to Spooner 8

Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530)

Toddler Time Truckee

EXPLORE THE BACK COUNTRY

SNOWSHOE TO ROCK CLIMBING

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool

Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on 546-2012

DOWNHILL SEASON EXTENDED

The ski lifts may stop turning, but the back-county season is likely to continue well into summer. Now is also a great time to grab a reservation at one of the Sierra Club’s Tahoe huts that you’ve been trying to get all season. The huts – Benson, Bradley, Grubb and Ludlow – are accessed by skiing or snowmobiling.

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

Trails in Truckee and the East Shore of Lake Tahoe have more sun exposure and less snowpack, and will be some of the first to open for hikers. My favorite early season hike is Skunk Harbor on the East Shore. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for details on other local hikes.

SNOWSHOE TO WATERFALLS The spring snowmelt will mean amazing waterfalls, but you’ll have to snowshoe to reach many of them. Check trail conditions

and parking before venturing out by calling the Forest Service (see Sightseeing in this issue for contact information). And, be sure to carry maps as most signs will likely still be buried in the snow. Eagle Falls in Emerald Bay. Venture to the upper falls just off the Emerald Bay parking lot or snowshoe down to the lower falls accessed via the Vikingsholm parking lot. Meeks Bay waterfall on the West Shore. This is a mostly flat trail to the waterfall. The only sign that designates the fork for the Pacific Crest Trail is likely buried so carry a topo map. Shirley Canyon in Olympic Valley is always a crowd-pleaser. You can reach Shirley Creek after a short trek with lots of small, cascading falls through the rocks. Glen Alpine Falls at Fallen Leaf Lake. The lower falls are pretty much at the trailhead, while the upper falls are only a 1-mile hike.

SIGHTSEEING

basics. Children can choose from a variety of fun projects. | (775) 832-4130 EVERY WEDNESDAY

Babes in Bookland Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every

Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in

Heavenly is from 4 to 7. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass. Free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from featured winery. | (530) 523-8024 EVERY THURSDAY

Now is a great time to explore local museums. Tahoe City is home to the Gatekeeper’s Museum, the Tahoe Maritime Museum and the Museum of Sierra Ski History, all chocked full of great local artifacts. Explore the science of Tahoe at the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village, Nev., and don’t forget the railroad museum housed in a caboose in Truckee. Check out the Sightseeing page in this issue and at TheTahoeWeekly.com for more great museums to explore.

Bring your binoculars Incline Village, Nev.

KIDS, KIDS, KIDS

conversation forum hosted by the Senior

Of course, you’ll want to get the kids out. A favorite spot is the KidZone Museum in Truckee. Sledding will be plentiful for a while on Donner Summit and Mount Rose. Or, explore local indoor climbing walls and indoor pools at the region’s public recreation centers. See our list of Family Activities in this issue or visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. 

Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community

Village Green Bird Walks from 7:30 to 9

a.m. with Tahoe Institute for Natural Science every Thursday from May 4 to June 8. Enjoy a leisurely stroll observing birds, identifying songs, calls and field marks. Open to birders of all experiences. Meet at Aspen Grove parking lot. | (775) 298-0067

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village, Nev. The Conversation Café is a drop-in

Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310


April 20-May 10, 2017

Story Time Tahoe City

“Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,”

Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530)

OUT & ABOUT

TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

Creating bridges Truckee

and fourth Thursdays are differing themes

Muir Institute of the Environment at UC

“Creation and Darwin’s Galapagos,” with

about technology. | (530) 546-2021

Davis will talk on “Global Climate Change:

science professor Derek Larson. Professor

How much can we rely on the natural world

Larson will review the specifics of evolu-

to fix our problem.” Learn about the current

tionary theory and explore examples of

state of these carbon sinks, their vulnerabili-

how evolution is researched today along

Ahoy, lil’ matey Tahoe City

ty to future changes and how global climate

with his discussion of his trip to the Gala-

policies are susceptible to the sustainability

pagos. He will outline controversy over

with stories, puppets, music and move-

school story time: Ships, Sails and Nautical

of natural carbon-dioxide uptake. No-host

the theory at Darwin’s time, ending with

ment for ages 6 months to 3 years.

Tales from 11 to 11:30 a.m. every Friday.

bar at 5:30; presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP

a discussion on how that divide continues

| (775) 832-4130

The program is directed at ages 3 to 5

terc.ucdavis.edu

to this day and how to bridge it in the

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler

third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone”

583-3382 EVERY FRIDAY

Toddler Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts story time

every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m.

Tahoe Maritime Museum hosts pre-

Dr. Ben Houlton, director of the John

future. Refreshments at 6:30 p.m.; pro-

and will feature books that have maritime

Preschool story time Truckee

themes. | danielle@tahoemaritime.org

Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

Sleep is a free community health talk

Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with

Performance at 5:30 p.m. Dr. Greg Tirdel

G and PG movies. | (530) 582-9669

and Nikki Dean discuss how sleep affects

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every

and older. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Wine voyages Olympic Valley

Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar &

From bah to zzzz Truckee

gram 7 to 8:15 p.m. Free. | Register

Stop Counting Sheep! Improve Your

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at

| (530) 587-3769

Flights available from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. through April 27. | squawalpine.com

Mother Earth is calling Olympic Valley Tahoe Truckee Earth Day 2017 is

at the Village at Squaw Valley. The festival, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., provides

Café to learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love.

sierracollege.edu

APRIL 22 | SATURDAY

at Tahoe Center for Health and Sports

health and offer strategies to improve it.

APRIL 20 | THURSDAY

Sierra College Insights presents

About the river Truckee

APRIL 21 | FRIDAY

a multitude of educational booths on the topics of watershed health, forest

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts

River Talk, a one-hour virtual tour of the projects throughout the watershed. It is

Share and write Incline Village, Nev.

health, pollution prevention, alternative

Lifescapes, a memoir-writing program

energy, waste management, local art,

Help with computers Kings Beach

a chance for guests to learn about the

for seniors, is from 2 to 4 p.m. at Incline Vil-

live music and dance and more.

council’s work and offer comments and

lage Library. First and third Fridays of each

| tahoetruckeeearthday.com

computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First

feedback. At 8 a.m. in the TRWC office.

month. All are welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Thursdays of the month are “Beginners

| RSVP (530) 550-8760

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing

Basic Instruction,” second Thursdays are

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

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9

2/16/17 3:49 PM


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Events

MORE Matt Palmer | Village at Squaw

APRIL 22

TA H O E T R U C K E E E A R T H D AY

Hole in snow Alpine Meadows

9-11 a.m. Morning March for Science

and khakis for the Alpine Meadows’ 34th

11 a.m-4 p.m. Discovery Zone

highly anticipated spring event is a unique

11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Climate Change films 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Serina Dawn Band 12-12:30 p.m. Children’s “Guide to Planet Earth” 12:45-3 p.m. Burrito Bingo 2-2:15 p.m. Asha Dancers 2:15-3 p.m. Envirolution Trashion Show 3-3:30 p.m. Community March for Science 3-6 p.m. Après with Patagonia Provisions 3:30-5 p.m. Sol Horizon

CELEBRATING EARTH DAY The Tahoe Truckee Earth Day Festival returns to The Village at Squaw Valley on Earth Day on April 22. One of the largest Earth Day celebrations in the region, the free community event takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and gives kids and adults the opportunity to learn about recycling, composting, alternative energy and sustainability through hands-on activities the whole family can enjoy. A diverse array of booths welcome hands-on participation, with a special focus on climate science education at this year’s event: get dirty in the compost zone, understand your carbon footprint, explore sea level rise

APRIL 22 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

and check out The Discovery Zone hosted by the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum. The event also boasts a Trashion show, climate change short films, dancing and live music from Serina Dawn Band and Sol Horizon. This year also includes the national March for Science, a nationwide movement to demonstrate a passion for science and call for support and safeguarding of the scientific community. A series of climate change short films will be screened on a 26-minute loop and are family friendly. TART will be providing free bus service to the event. | tahoetruckeeearthday.com

Ditch the ski jacket for a collared shirt

annual Snow Golf Tournament, the only top-to-bottom snow golf course. This way to spend a day on the slopes with the whole family. The nine-hole course starts at the top of Summit Express Chair and meanders its way down the mountain with the last holes bringing competitors back to the bottom of Alpine Bowl Chair. | squawalpine.com

Walk with scientists Olympic Valley

March for Science at Tahoe Truckee

Earth Day at Village at Squaw at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Those interested in marching should contact Heather Babcock Segale on the Facebook page. | http://facebook.com/ tahoemarchforscience

It’s only natural South Lake Tahoe

Kid’s Nature Journal Club is on the

second and fourth Saturday of each month from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at South Lake Tahoe Library. Learn how to capture adventures in a nature journal. Some materials provided; bring notebook and pen and dress for the weather. | (530) 573-3185

Bacon, Beer & Bluegrass Norden

Sugar Bowl hosts the Bacon, Beer &

Bluegrass festival featuring bacon-themed tapas, Brewers Cabinet beers, drinks, live bluegrass and more. | sugarbowl.com

How spicy is yours Twin Bridges

Sierra-at-Tahoe hosts a Salsa Showdown

at the Golden Bear Terrace. Participants can enter his or her salsas, traditional or fruity, to win a 2017-18 season pass. Competition is capped at the first 25 salsas entered. There will be a taco-eating contest, piñata, food specials and Spanish jams playing. | sierraattahoe.com

Soulfully elegant Stateline, Nev.

Soroptimist International of Tahoe Sierra

is hosting the 28th annual Elegant Evening at Harrah’s Lake Tahoe from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. There will be food, wine and vodka tastings, raffles and a silent auction that allows online bidding before the event. The Soul Experience featuring Trey Stone will provide the dance music. $75. | 501auctions.com/elegantevening/tickets

SOUTH TAHOE EARTH DAY Earth Day celebrations on the South Shore return on April 29 to recognize, celebrate and promote the region’s unique beauty while educating the public about local environmental issues at Bijou Community Park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Learn about ways to counteract global climate change through recycling and composting, alternative energy, water conservation, sustain-

ability and reducing the ecological footprint. Enjoy local music and dance, swing through the Kid Zone to make recycle-themed arts and crafts, enjoy face painting and visit the educational booths and local vendors. Food and local crafts will be available for purchase. There will be a free bike valet. Check Web site for schedule. | southtahoeearthday.org

APRIL 25 | TUESDAY Geology at work South Lake Tahoe

Dave Schnake of Tahoe Rim Trail As-

sociation will give a talk, “Geology of the Tahoe Basin,” at El Dorado County Library at 6 p.m. His talk will take guests around the Tahoe Rim Trail highlighting the amazing variety of geology here, the enormous geologic forces that led to the formation of

10


April 20-May 10, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

Snow Trails Lake Tahoe and its geologic history.

EXPLORE

APRIL 28-29 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY

Free. | Register tahoerimtrail.org

Fallen Leaf’s role South Lake Tahoe

John Kleppe, Ph.D., will speak at the

T R A I LS

Inside, outside show South Lake Tahoe Golden Bear Events presents the

6th annual South Lake Tahoe Home

Lake Tahoe Historical Society’s Spring

& Garden Show. This year’s show will

General Membership Meeting at 7 p.m.

feature door prizes every 20 minutes,

in Camp Richardson’s Lodge on “Ancient

drawing prizes, food and tips on gar-

Mega-Droughts in the Lake Tahoe Basin

dening and how to re-purpose dozens

& Beyond.” Nonmembers $3; members

of items. At South Tahoe Middle School.

free. | (530) 541-5458

| goldenbearevents.com

APRIL 26 | WEDNESDAY

TA H O E ’ S W I N T E R

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com > Beginner’s guide to snowshoeing > Snowshoeing among the pines in Tahoe Donner > Lake Tahoe views from Chickadee Ridge

APRIL 29 | SATURDAY

> Trek to Coldstream Canyon

Membership 101 Truckee

Celebrate Mother Earth South Lake Tahoe

bership 101 is from 8 to 9 a.m. at the

Bijou Community Park from 10 a.m. to

California Welcome Center last Wednesday

3 p.m. with local music and dance, Kid

of the month. For new, current or poten-

Zone with recycle-themed arts and crafts,

tial members to learn about the benefits

face painting, educational booths and

of belonging. Coffee and pastries. | info@

local vendors. Food and local crafts

truckee.com

available for purchase. Free bike valet.

Truckee Chamber of Commerce Mem-

| southtahoeearthday.org

Stretch and read Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library presents Family

Yoga Story Time at 4 p.m. Get moving with

Friends of the El Dorado Country

Library present author and Sierra Nevada

partners and parents come together.

native, Gary Noy, with an illustrated lec-

| (775) 832-4130

ture on historical material from his newest book, “Gold Rush Stories: 49 Tales of

Gary Romano, author of “July & Winter:

Seekers, Scoundrels, Loss and Luck.” Features 49 unique, interesting and some-

Growing Food in the Sierra,” will discuss

times hard-to-believe, stories from the

gardening in the Sierra at Word After Word

California Gold Rush. 3 p.m. Free.

Bookshop at 6:30 p.m. | facebook.com/

| eldoradolibrary.org

wordafterwordbooks

MAY 2 | TUESDAY APRIL 27 | THURSDAY Work’s over South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Chamber’s After Five event is

Morning breakfast meeting Tahoe City Join the North Lake Tahoe Resort

Association for First Tuesday Morning

from 5 p.m. at Blue Angel Café & Chimayo

Breakfast Club from 7 to 8:30 a.m. $15.

Street Grill. | tahoechamber.org

| gotahoenorth.com

Support the bike park Truckee

MAY 3 | WEDNESDAY

Bar of America hosts a fundraiser for

Truckee Bike Park Project from 5 to 10 p.m. Tickets include dinner buffet, music by

Get inspired to hike Truckee

Tahoe Mountain Sports and Southern

Groove Foundry, raffle and auction. Adults

Yosemite Mountain Guides presents “Ex-

$35; $20 ages 12 and younger. | (530)

ploring the John Muir Trail” at 6 p.m. Free

587-3110

in-store event. Raffle benefiting Mountain Area Preservation. | (530) 536-5200

Popularity trail Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library presents The

Pacific Crest Trail: America’s Greatest Wil-

Contractors Association of Truckee Tahoe

is hosting a mixer at Epic AV Automation

the PCT is often called, “America’s Wilder-

from 5 to 7 p.m. Food, fun, raffle prizes

ness Trail” and why it’s known worldwide.

and networking. | ca-tt.com

| (775) 832-4130

Entrepreneurs welcome South Lake Tahoe “Are you growing your dream busi-

ness?” The mentor-based Entrepreneurs

Merry Fishmas Truckee

Program meets the first Thursday of every

Eve Fundraiser is at Blue Coyote Bar and

at Lake Tahoe Community College. Free

Grill from 7 to 9 p.m. Celebrate trout con-

to all. | Register tahoechamber.com

Trout Unlimited’s 12 annual Fishmas th

month from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Aspen Room

TAHOE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL

A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road. This is a nice area for downhill practice while cross-country skiing. The terrain has gentle, rolling slopes. From Interstate 80, take Highway 89 south 3 miles, then turn right on Cabin Creek Road. The unmarked trailhead is 1 mile from the highway. Limited parking is available in a road cut, when plowed. There is moderate snowmobile use in the area.

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 582-7892

The park is mostly flat and open year-round. Skiers can enjoy the forests and boulder fields, glide down to the lake and meander through the park. There is an unmarked, 9.6-km, skier-packed trail starting near the Emigrant Trail Museum. For the more adventuresome, glide over the hills into Coldstream Canyon. TART

PETER GRUBB HUT/CASTLE PEAK LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous

A marked Nordic ski trail begins at the Castle Peak/Boreal interchange on Donner Summit off Interstate 80, west of Truckee. Take the Castle Peak exit and follow it for one-quarter mile to the intersection for the trailhead to the north that goes up Castle Valley and over Castle Pass. Follow unmarked trail to Peter Grubb Hut. For overnight stays at Peter Grubb Hut, call (530) 426-3632 for reservations.

POLE CREEK TRAIL SYSTEM LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Unmarked trails follow roads along Pole Creek and Silver Creek Drainages. Trailhead 6 miles south of Truckee on Highway 89. Some parking on west side of highway. Trails follow U.S. Forest Service roads. Several loops.

SAGEHEN SUMMIT

LEVEL: Easy to moderate An unmarked route follows the road up to the creek bottom. Lateral roads offer many side trips. Trailhead at Sagehen Summit on the west side of Highway 89, 8 miles north of Truckee. Limited parking.

NORTH SHORE

All the cool CATTs Truckee

derness Experience at 6:30 p.m. Learn why

APRIL 28 | FRIDAY

SKI TOURING & SNOWSHOEING

LEVEL: Easy to moderate

Them thar hills South Lake Tahoe

this special story time where music, books,

Bring questions Truckee

> Touring Tahoe Meadows

South Lake Tahoe Earth Day is at

BROCKWAY SUMMIT LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Brockway Summit off Highway 267 offers an abundance of areas to ski. Between Northstar and Kings Beach, there are turnouts on both sides of the highway where Nordic skiers and snowshoers can follow logging and utility roads.

PAGE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to moderate

On Mount Rose high above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where skiers can stretch their legs. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends for skiers, snowshoers and snowmobilers, so try skiing during the week.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Skiers can glide along the road (not plowed in winter) or through the meadows. For a longer outing, head up the mountain to Barker Pass. This area also is open to snowmobilers.

MEEKS MEADOWS LEVEL: Easy

Meeks Meadows on the West Shore off Highway 89 offers a vast area to ski. The trailhead is across from the Meeks Bay Fire Station; look for the log cabin with red trim. Follow the U.S. Forest Service road or meander through the meadow and down to Meeks Creek.

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy to moderate | (530) 525-7982 The Ed Z’berg/Sugar Pine Point State Park is a spectacular spot to cross-country ski or snowshoe among the dense forests of the West Shore or along Lake Tahoe’s shores. The park offers more than 18 km of marked ski trails. Three groomed trails begin at the campground, 9 miles south of Tahoe City, with two skier-packed trails on the lake side of the park, accessed from the Day Use entrance. Winter camping available. The park also offers a number of guided tours throughout the season including full moon snowshoe tours, ski tours of the 1960 Olympic crosscountry trails, historic snowshoe tours and the family Junior Ranger program; call for dates. No dogs allowed on trails. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

TAYLOR CREEK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 573-2600 Developed for beginners, this well-marked series of trails allows skiers to explore the area. Terrain is mostly flat and is good for the entire family. Take Highway 89 south around Emerald Bay to the Fallen Leaf Lake Area. Turn on Cathedral Road and park in the Sno-Park. Marked trails start at the parking lot with three trails near Fallen Leaf Lake. On the Lake side of Highway 89, follow the road to the Visitor Center to access the Tallac Historic Trail. SnoPark Permit required.*

Ski or snowshoe along an old road that meanders through a forest and into a cluster of meadows. Take Highway 89 south from Tahoe City, then turn right on Pine Avenue and right on Tahoe Park Heights Road. At the crest of the hill, take the middle fork, which becomes Big Pine Road, then take a left on Silver Tip. The parking area is at the top of the road.

servation in the Truckee watershed. Pizza, beer and raffle. $30 per person. | jonbaiocchiflyfishingnews.blogspot.com

SEE OUR EVENTS CALENDAR FOR GUIDED SNOWSHOE TREKS.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

* Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

11


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

MORE EVENTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

MAY 5 | FRIDAY

FUNDRAISER

Facebook.com/TruckeeBikePark

Premiere Sponsor

Bar of America

Live Music · $5 Raffle & Live Auction

ADULT $35 | CHILD $20 (UNDER 13)

Tickets include Dinner Buffet · All ages welcome at Bar of America Thursday 5pm - 10pm

April 27, 2017

Pancake breakfast Truckee

Benefit pancake breakfast is offered on

Truckee Bike Park TruckeeBikePark.org

MAY 7 | SUNDAY

All proceeds will support the next build phase and maintenance of the bike park!

Share and write Incline Village, Nev.

the first Sunday of every month from 8 to

for seniors, is from 2 to 4 p.m. at Incline Vil-

to benefit Senior Meals on Wheels. $7,

lage Library. First and third Fridays of each

$3 children younger than 12.

Lifescapes, a memoir-writing program

11:30 a.m. at Truckee Senior Apartments

month. All are welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Cinco de Mayo Party Olympic Valley

Enjoy a Cinco de Mayo-themed week-

Tahoe casual Tahoe City

The Community Benefit Auction and Wine

Tasting hosted by Kiwanis Club North Lake

end at Squaw Valley with a party with

Tahoe is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sunnyside

Mariachi in the Village at Squaw and a après

Restaurant and Lodge. More than $50,000

Tequila Tasting Notes on the KT deck.

in goods and services will be offered along

| squawalpine.com

with premium wines and sumptuous appetizers. Dress is Tahoe casual with spring flair.

Cinco de Mayo Festival South Lake Tahoe

$35 in advance or $40 at the door. Tickets avail-

Tahoe Family Resource Center for the 14th

Nature’s Cabin Fever or online. | kiwanisnlt.org

Join the celebration with the South Lake

able from Kiwanis Club members, Mother

annual Cinco de Mayo party at Heavenly’s California Lodge from 5 to 10 p.m. with

MAY 9 | TUESDAY

a Mexican buffet, authentic live music,

The first in a series of wellness events at Granlibakken. A unique event that will inspire and heal the mind, body and soul. » Therapeutics » Energy Workers » Yoga Instructors » Guided Meditation » Metaphysical Teachings 530-583-4242 | Granlibakken.com/wellness-packages

folkloric dancers, kid’s activities, and more. Tickets at Family Resource Center. $20

Rise and shine Truckee

Good Morning Truckee is held from 7 to

advance, $25 at the door, $10 ages 6 to 12,

8:30 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport on

free 5 and younger. $5 entry after 8 p.m.

the second Tuesday of every month. Open

| (530) 542-0740

to everyone. $12, $10 chamber members; includes breakfast. Topic is Brew Beer, Dis-

MAY 6 | SATURDAY

till Spirits, Make Wine. | (530) 587-8808

Building a case South Lake Tahoe

Trusty pets Truckee

present Dr. Peter Mires on Mark Twain

a presentation series: Estate Planning to

and Architecture. Mires will share his

ensure your pets are cared for presented

research fellowship at the Elmira College

by Rich E. Molsby from 5 to 6 p.m. Seating

Center for Mark Twain Studies. By pair-

is limited. At the shelter on Stevens Lane.

ing passages from Twain’s work with

| RSVP erin@hstt.org

Friends of the El Dorado County Library

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe offers

examples of extant buildings, Mires illustrates Mark Twain’s opinions and

MAY 11 | THURSDAY

tastes of American architecture. 10 a.m. Free. | eldoradolibrary.org

It’s only a flower moon Incline Village, Nev.

Restoration efforts South Lake Tahoe

Cheese Socials for 55+ are moderate, 1-mile,

ing in the Emerald Fire along Cascade Road

offered in collaboration with the National For-

from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Help plant 1,000

est Service. Participants should wear warm

trees. Seedlings, gloves and hard hats pro-

clothing and bring a flashlight. Transportation,

vided. Bring bottled water and wear sturdy

wine, cheese and snacks provided. Flower

shoes. | sugarpinefoundation.org

Moon hike departs from Incline Recreation

Summer Moonlight Hikes with Wine and

Sugar Pine Foundation is hosting a plant-

paved-road hikes to the Crystal Bay lookout

Center at 5 p.m. | yourtahoeplace.com

Greek Festival Tahoe Vista

Mourelatos Lakeshore Resort is hosting

a Glendi Greek Festival at 6:30 p.m. featur-

Join The Friends of the Library for a mem-

ing authentic Greek dancers and music, tra-

bership party at the Truckee Library. Meet

ditional food and drink, singing and dancing

new board members, celebrate our Truckee

(instructions provided). Everyone invited.

Library community all while enjoying re-

$10. | mlrtahoe.com

freshments. Details TBA. | (530) 582-7846

MAY 6-7 | SATURDAY-SUNDAY

MAY 11-15 | THURSDAY-MONDAY

The name’s Bond, James Bond Tahoe City

Celebrate being female Portola

Family Laser Tag from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at

Hot Springs is an off-the-grid gathering by

Rideout Community Center. $25 first two

women for women. More than 35 teachers

family members, $5 each additional mem-

will offer their passion, wisdom and accep-

ber. Advance tickets only. | tcpud.org

tance in community. Come celebrate each

Tahoe City Parks & Recreation hosts

Sponsor

Come to the party Truckee

Indigo Star Earth Gathering at Sierra

other in all the ways that women shine. | indigostar.earth

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events. 12


OUT & ABOUT

April 20-May 10, 2017

Deep ‘n’ Daring

Courtesy Tahoe Rim Trail Association

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Deep ‘n’ Daring events. Open to the public Truckee For the first time in a century, Webber Lake will be open for public camping in 2017. Webber Lake, 17 miles north of Truckee, was acquired by the Truckee Donner Land Trust. For the past 65 years, Webber Lake was used as a private fishing camp, an arrangement that ended in 2016. When the snow melts, the Land Trust will open Webber Lake, with limited camping, until complete renovations for a large campground and day use areas are completed for a grand opening in 2018. Camping for RVs, trailers, tents, large groups and everything in between will be available. | tdlandtrust.org

Gearing up for biking Plumas County Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship has announced the races and events for 2017. The Quincy Epic is from April 29 to 30 at the Plumas Sierra County Fairgrounds, Yuba Expeditions with a Saturday parking lot party is May 27 to 29 in Downieville, The Lost & Found Bike Ride is tentatively scheduled for June 3 to 4 at Lake Davis, The Downieville Classic is from Aug. 3 to 6 and registration is open now, the Downieville Epic with the TNT Trail Day is from Aug. 19 to 20 at Packer Saddle and the Grinduro is from Oct. 7 to 8 in Quincy. Trail days include May 20, June 17 and July 15 in Quincy. There will be more in September and October on dates. | sierratrails.org

Virginia City Grand Prix Virginia City, Nev. Experience the legendary racing in historic Virginia City during this off-road motorcycle race on April 29 and 30. After the race, head to the Village Saloon to talk bikes and celebrate. | vcgp.com

Way to go, Lexie Truckee Auburn Ski Club Training Center announces that biathlete Lexie Madigan, 14, has been named to the U.S. Biathlon Youth/Junior Development Team by the U.S. Biathlon’s International Competition Committee. Madigan recently returned from the Liatoppen Biathlon races in Norway where she finished third in the girls 15-year age group out of a large field and posted several Top 10 finishes. In January, Madigan had some disappointing news when, after winning several qualifying events in Jericho, N.Y., she was named to the Youth (U19) Biathlon World Championship Team. The International Competition Committee then ruled that she was too young to compete internationally and gave her spot to an alternate. Being named to the USBA Development Team will certainly take the sting out of that setback. | auburnskiclub.com

Skiing on melted snow Olympic Valley The 27th Annual Cushing Crossing is on May 6 at Squaw Valley. The original pond-skimming event was started as a spring resort ritual. Every year a celebrity judging panel and amazing emcees gather for this spectacle filled with big spills and

laughable thrills. The event kicks off at 1 p.m., awards are at 3 p.m. at the KT Base Bar. | squawalpine.com

Amgen returns to Tahoe South Lake Tahoe Professional cycling will return to Lake Tahoe on May 11 to 12. The Amgen Breakaway from Heart Disease Women’s Race Empowered with SRAM will include the overall start and Stage 2 on consecutive days. The women’s competition will conclude with a third stage in Elk Grove on May 13 and the final in Sacramento on May 14. The women will start with one of the most beautiful race routes in the USA, circumnavigating the 72-mile shoreline of Lake Tahoe with the final climb that will lead riders to the finish at Heavenly Mountain Resort. A new Stage 2 route will be announced in early 2017 where riders will face summits more than 7,300-feet leading to what promises to be a climatic finish. The upcoming race marks the tenth consecutive year that a women’s competition is a major component of the Amgen Tour of California. | amgentourofcalifornia.com

Heavenly’s future South Lake Tahoe The U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit is seeking comments on proposed improvements to existing skiing and snowboarding terrain at Heavenly Mountain Resort. Improvements would include widening ski trails and removing trail obstacles. Should be sent by April 28. Ski trail widening to reduce bottlenecks and improve skier flow, would take place on approximately 12 trails, with grading required in two locations to match the widened area to the grade of the existing trail. Due to the widening, any existing snowmaking lines will be relocated to near the new edge of the trail. Removal of obstacles, such as boulders, stumps and logs, would take place on seven trails to improve natural snow surface coverage. Project work could begin as early as spring/summer 2018. | (530) 543-2840 or mattdickinson@fs.fed.us

WILDERNESS FIRST AID Tahoe Rim Trail Association offers Wilderness First Aid from April 22 to 23. Wilderness First Aid is the industry standard course for professional outdoor leaders and will provide participants with the tools to make critical medical and evacuation decisions in remote locations. This fast paced, hands-on training is designed to meet the needs of trip leaders, camp staff, outdoor enthusiasts and individuals working in remote locations. | RSVP (775) 298-4485 or tahoerimtrail.org

as they take on one of the country’s top-ranked whitewater courses. Professional men, women and juniors will compete for more than $10,000 in Freestyle, Boatercross and Slalom categories. | renoriverfestival.com

Take to the refuge Fallon, Nev. Spring Wings Bird Festival is from May 19 to 20 at Lahontan Valley Wetlands. Experts lead birding and wildlife tours in the Lahontan Valley Wetlands and Stillwater Wildlife Refuge with hands-on activities, raptors on display and speakers. | springwings.org

Beacon training

Reno, Nev. Experience the world’s largest and most famous monster truck tour from May 12 to 14 at the Livestock Events Center. Watch world-class drivers compete in front of capacity crowds in racing and freestyle. | monsterjam.com

Meyers A Beacon Basin for avalanche transceiver practice and training is now open at the Lake Valley Fire Protection District station in Meyers. Additionally, the district is offering free air-canister refills for backcountry airbags. Because the service is free, it will allow people to practice pulling the air bag before heading out on the mountain. | (530) 577-3737 or facebook. com/lakevalleyfire

Yeah, for warm weather

Surf’s up

Reno, Nev. The 14th annual Reno River Festival  kicks off the long-awaited return of summer on May 13 and 14. This festival brings an array of traditional and unique warm-weather activities to downtown Reno’s Wingfield Park. New in 2017, festival goers can sample wine while enjoying live music, experience a carnivallike atmosphere and join in with the entertainment. The record-breaking winter created exciting conditions on the Truckee River and the event will showcase more than  60 of the world’s top whitewater athletes 

Teton Gravity Research presents “Proximity,” a film that pairs surfing’s living legends with today’s most progressive young surfers. The film is directed by award-winning filmmaker Taylor Steele and produced by Teton Gravity Research in association with Garage Productions. “Proximity” will explore the delicate relationship between people, time and place, showcasing surfing icons from different generations in diverse locations around the world. The film brings together the most prodigious collection of surfing talent on the planet, four iconic legends and four of the most gifted young-guns,

Monster Jam

sending them to remote breaks across the globe. | tetongravity.com

Pump up da bike Truckee The Little Big, a bike festival for all, is on May 27 and 28 at the Truckee Bike Park. The event will feature a ladies’ bike skills clinic, a pro and amateur dual slalom race, cycle-cross races, kids’ pump track/ Strider jam and Jump Jam for men and women. All events will have registration on site except the skills clinic. | truckeebikepark.org

Battle Born Moto Festival Sparks, Nev. Expect the most extreme forms of offroad motorcycle racing in one weekend from June 3 to 4 at the Wild West Motorsports Park. Top pros from the West will demonstrate their talents in motor-climb racing, extreme enduro, trials and freestyle motocross. | elevatedaction.com

One day lake ride Lake Tahoe The 26th annual America’s Most Beautiful Bike Ride is an impressive 72mile journey that circumnavigates Lake Tahoe in one day on June 4. Hosted by Bike the West and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, it offers spectacular scenery along with the necessities: food/ water, restroom and first-aid stations for avid recreational bicyclists. Cycling action continues on the same route with the 15th Annual Tour de Tahoe – Bike Big Blue, a Ride to Cure Diabetes, as participants test their strength and physical endurance on Sept. 10.  | Register bikethewest.com

13


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA H O E L O C A L

Nina MacLeod

License #954258

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E PRINT

GO BEYOND TH

y. co m at Th eTah oe Wee kl

TAHOE MUSIC & FESTIVALS rs

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STORY BY LISA MICHELLE

H

er remarkable endurance and spirit at age 77 are what Nina MacLeod would simply call Norwegian. She’s had four major surgeries in five years, including a new hip and a battle with cancer. To say MacLeod is a survivor would be selling her short. Most winter days you will find her skiing at Heavenly, cross-country touring in Hope Valley or dancing where there is good music. Spring and summer are for mountain biking, hiking and fly-fishing, according to MacLeod, who has traveled the world to cast her line. MacLeod fell in love with fly-fishing in her hometown Oslo, the capital of Norway. She was 16 and her boyfriend, who was an avid fly-fisherman and fly-caster, introduced her to the sport. MacLeod practiced every day for hours to improve her skills, but it was when she began to enter international competitions that she became hooked.

Most winter days you will find her skiing at Heavenly, cross-country touring in

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Hope Valley or dancing

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where there is good music.

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In 1957, 17-year-old MacLeod competed in Kiel, Germany, at the International Casting Federation’s first competition. She left with two world records, one for distance and one for accuracy. Those sentimental fishing rods decorate the walls of her South Lake Tahoe home. MacLeod has called Lake Tahoe home for 37 years. Her journey to the Sierra Nevada began after an invite from Stein Eriksen, an Olympic gold medalist, the father of freestyle skiing and the first alpine skier to win triple gold medals at a World Championship. Eriksen worked for Sugarbush Resort in Vermont and wanted Norwegian instructors for the ski program. He recruited MacLeod, who was certified in downhill and cross-country in Norway and Switzerland. “Stein knew the rigorous requirements of being certified in Norway,” says MacLeod, who was placed on wooden skis as a toddler. After her first season in Vermont, MacLeod accepted a job modeling ski sweaters in New York for Beconta, one of the most prominent ski-wear manufacturers of the 1960s and 1970s. The following season she met and married her husband in Marin County. The couple often traveled from the Bay Area to their home in Tahoe with their two sons, who became avid skiers — one of whom qualified for the U.S. ski team. In 1980, the family made Tahoe a permanent home. When MacLeod became a single mother, she worked as a ski instructor at Heavenly. Also, the rivers and creeks throughout the Sierra offered her many opportunities to put her flyfishing certification to use as an instructor and guide. MacLeod earned her credentials through the Golden Gate Casting Club led by Mel Krieger, a world-renowned flyfisherman, instructor and author.

Nina MacLeod in traditional Norwegian attire at the Snowshoe Thompson Tour in Hope Valley.

Years later, when visiting Genoa, Nev., MacLeod happened on Snowshoe Thompson Day. The celebration was in honor of the famous Norwegian who delivered mail on skis in the dead of winter from Placerville to Genoa from 1856 to 1876. “Before I knew it, I was co-chairman of the Snowshoe Thompson Committee in Genoa,” says MacLeod. “In Norway, we honor Snowshoe Thompson with an annual 20km cross-country ski tour.” MacLeod, who participated in the celebration twice, felt she could do something similar in the Tahoe area. In 1998, she launched the Snowshoe Thompson Ski and Snowshoe Tour in Hope Valley, where she is a cross-country instructor. The tour includes snowshoeing, skiing, music, food, some traditional Norwegian attire and an historian who details the magnitude of what Thompson accomplished during blizzards for 20 years. “Besides the winter conditions think of the canyons and mountains he crossed,” says MacLeod. “If anyone thinks it was easy, just try it. I know of good skiers who tried it for four days. Their feet were covered in blisters and they couldn’t finish.” MacLeod was involved in raising funds for a Snowshoe Thompson statue that stands in the Mormon Station State Historic Park in Genoa. In 2003, Friends of Snowshoe Thompson was formed and MacLeod serves as the liaison between Genoa and Norway. The mission of the nonprofit organization is “to honor the memory of Snowshoe Thompson, including promotion of international cooperation between Norwegian and American communities.” MacLeod still appreciates her time on the snow and is passionate about fishing new places, which will include Arkansas and Alaska this summer. But, Friends of Snowshoe Thompson is her real baby. Unfortunately, this year’s annual Snowshoe Thompson’s Ski and Snowshoe Tour in Hope Valley was canceled due to severe weather. MacLeod is working hard planning next winter’s tour and hopes to include new members.  For more information or to volunteer, visit Friends of Snowshoe Thompson at snowshoethompson.org.

Do you know someone interesting in Tahoe? To nominate someone you’d like to see featured, e-mail editor@tahoethisweek.com.


April 20-May 10, 2017

FEATURE

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Explore local wineries in Nevada City and Grass Valley

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Independence Trail’s wooden flume. | The Yuba River as seen from the Independence Trail. | The Deer Creek Tribute Trail begins in downtown Nevada City. | Ferns and fauna along the Deer Creek Tribute Trail.

IN SEARCH OF DIRT STORY BY TIM HAUSERMAN | PHOTOS BY JOYCE CHAMBERS

NEVADA CITY HIKING, MOUNTAIN BIKING

T

his has been one heck of a winter. It seems like it rained or snowed just about every day since the year began. The snow just kept piling up foot on foot, as we battled ferociously with our worn-out shovels to keep it from totally burying us. Eventually, even those of us who love the snow and skiing began to plead, “Enough already!” We longed for a glimpse of green grass and the chance to let our feet feel brown dirt. Fortunately, just a bit more than an hour from Truckee, I found firm ground, the greenest of grasses and ferns ripe with enthusiasm. There were even a few wildflowers. Driving to Nevada City, I was getting concerned that the city itself would be awash in snow based on how deep the layers of white were all along State Route 20. But the last few miles of descent into downtown Nevada City offered green grass, blossoming trees and water aplenty. In town, rushing Deer Creek was not only full of water, but also carried pieces of fencing and other detritus that had floated downstream from recent flooding. In fact, one popular restaurant, Lefty’s, had to be removed from my list of potential dining choices, because it was closed due to the flooding (but has since reopened). I was happy to be doing my part to support the town’s economy given what it is has been through this winter. While getting feet on dirt was my top priority, just wandering around Nevada City’s downtown was a fun way to spend a few hours. There are a number of interesting shops, including several bookstores, The Earth Store and plenty of places to taste good food and, more importantly, chocolate. During my 36-hour visit, I took two awesome short hikes: one in town and the other a short drive away. There is also a wealth of mountain-biking opportunities that I’ve sampled in the past, but since they are at a bit higher elevation, some snow melting will need to happen before they will be open this spring.

THE HIKES Deer Creek Tribute & Deer Creek Environs trails This set of hiking trails leads from downtown Nevada City through a lovely forest, crosses Deer Creek and, after a few miles of fairly easy walking, loops back into downtown. The route takes you on single track along the bustling creek and along country roads past a number of charming residences, some tucked into quiet succulent hollows, others perched precariously above the water.

I found firm ground, the greenest of grasses and ferns ripe with enthusiasm. There were even a few wildflowers. Once you are on dirt, the trail wanders through a lush green landscape of ferns and trees, leading to a new suspension bridge spanning Deer Creek. On each side of the bridge you will find impressive rockwork. On the north side is a fascinating drainage pipe that has been designed to look like a huge hollow tree. Before beginning your hike, stop by the Nevada City Chamber of Commerce to pick up a map of the trail because the route can be confusing.

Independence Trail This is six miles from Nevada City, toward Downieville on State Route 49, just a half mile before reaching the mighty Yuba River. There is

both an East and a West trail leading out from the trailhead. The West Trail follows the route of an old gold-mining ditch. It is nearly level and is considered the first handicapped accessible hiking trail in the nation. In about a mile, you reach a waterfall and lush fern canyon below a long section of wooden flume. This makes a good turn around point or you can continue for another mile and a half before turning around.

THE RIDES Pioneer Trail The Pioneer Trail starts at the Harmony Ridge Market, a small deli and store on State Route 20 about five miles east of Nevada City. Single track follows State Route 20 uphill to the east. The first 5 miles is fun for every level of rider. There is smooth, gentle rolling, with plenty of twists and turns to keep it interesting. Once you cross the road, the route heads further away from the road and become more challenging because it gets steeper and more technically difficult. Many folks turn around at the crossing and return to the trailhead. Eventually in about another 7 miles, with quite a bit more climbing, the Pioneer Trail crosses State Route 20 again near the Omega Rest Stop, which has an excellent view of the mining tailings across the canyon to the north.

Scotts Flat Trail Scotts Flat also begins at the Harmony Ridge Market. It starts out winding along the flats near the highway before steadily descending to the road above Scotts Flat Reservoir. For those with good Explore the rocky crags riding skills, it is a twisting, turning, flowing ride at Fontanillis Lake and with hairpin turns on a smooth, narrow surface. Dicks Peak. It’s mostly downhill from the market, so you will either need to ride back up the trail, ride up the paved road back to State Route 20 or leave a car at both ends.  15


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com ADVERTISEMENT

Family Fun

ICE SKATING

Courtesy Tahoe Rim Trail Association

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Snow Play Area on Fairway Blvd., next to the Chateau, on the driving range. Bring own equipment.

MOUNT ROSE Near the Mount Rose summit, enjoy sledding in Tahoe Meadows off Highway 431. Bring equipment.

(530) 542-6262 | citiofslt.com Indoor facility open year-round. BlueGo

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com Ice skating & rentals. Club House. TART

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(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com At Truckee River Regional Park. Skate rentals, broomball leagues, ice dancing & hockey lessons. Skate rentals & season passes available. TART

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Tubing & mini snowmobiles. TART

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25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends).

ECHO LAKE

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(530) 542-6056 | citiofslt.com 25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. BlueGo

TAYLOR CREEK (530) 543-2600

Highway 89, north of Camp Richardson Road. Bring equipment.* BlueGo

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(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Indoor pools with competition pool and warm water pool, diving board, swim training, hydraulic lift and lessons. TART

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South side of I-80, Castle Peak exit beyond Boreal Inn frontage road. Bring equipment.*

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(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

SLEDDING & TUBING

TAHOE DONNER

(530) 587-9437 | tahoedonner.com At Trout Creek Recreation Center. No personal sleds. Family events all season.

YUBA PASS

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EAST SHORE

Highway 49 at Yuba Pass. Bring equipment.*

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State park open for general snow play. Bring equipment.

WEST SHORE

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HOPE VALLEY AREA

CARSON PASS

Snowplay area off Hwy. 89, 3 miles south of Tahoe City. Bring equipment.*

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

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Machine-groomed snow play area; no tubes or toboggans allowed. All ages.

Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Bring equipment.*

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Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

Gentle slope on Highway 89 South, one-eighth mile south of the wye. Bring equipment. TART

(209) 295-4251

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YO U T H

BACKCOUNTRY CAMPS The Tahoe Rim Trail Association is hosting its 10th annual Youth Backcountry Camps in partnership with Tahoe Institute for Natural Science this summer. Youth participants are provided with gear, food and instruction. Kids learn basic backpacking and navigation skills, leave no trace ethics, natural history, local flora and fauna and trail stewardship. Camp for ages 14 to 17 is from June 25 to 28; camp for ages 12 to 14 is from July 9 to 12 and Aug. 13 to 16. The cost is $365 per person; scholarships are available. | Register (775) 298-4485 or tahoerimtrail.org

Highway 50 at Echo Lake Road. Bring equipment.*

On Lake Tahoe Blvd. Bring equipment. BlueGo

Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. Reopens spring 2017. TART

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Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Family Fun. ALL ACTIVITIES ARE WEATHER DEPENDENT. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222. BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org

16

For the Kids

Journaling nature

Learn to ace it

South Lake Tahoe On April 22 and May 13 at 10 a.m. join the Kids Nature Journal Club at South Lake Tahoe Library. Come learn skills for exploring the natural world and how to capture adventures in a nature journal. Some materials will be provided, but bring a notebook and pen. Make sure to dress for exploring. Free and open to all children age 10 and older. | (530) 573-3185

Incline Village, Nev. Incline Recreation Center offers Junior All Star/Quick Start Clinics for tennis players, ages 4 to 12. These three-week sessions meet twice a week. Drop-ins are permitted if space is available. Players are divided by age groups. Sessions start in May and run until September. | yourtahoeplace.com

Looking for talent

Incline Village, Nev. Incline Recreation Center offers Lifeguard Training Class for ages 15 and older on May 20 and 27 and June 3 from 1 to 7 p.m. The American Red Cross-sanctioned course encompasses: Lifeguarding, CPR for the professional rescuer, first aid and AED Certifications. The American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Class is for ages 16 years and older. Learn to be a water safety instructor and teach swim lessons. This class breaks down each stroke and trains you to teach swimming by incorporating creative teaching methods, covering basic water safety techniques. The class is offered on May 21 and June 4 and 11 from 1 to 7 p.m. The deadline to register for both classes is May 19. | yourtahoeplace.com

Reno, Nev. Sierra School of Performing Arts is looking for actors, dancers and singers, Grade 4 to adult, for a summer production of “The Sound of Music.” Prepare a short monologue and at least 16 bars of an up-tempo song from the show or other Broadway musical on April 23 from 1 to 5 p.m. Bring sheet music if you prefer piano accompaniment. Everyone auditioning must attend the dance audition. | sierraschoolofperformingarts.org

Art to take home Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts will host Kids Art Saturdays, seven free art workshops for ages 2 to 12. Each workshop allows children to create an art project that is meant to be taken home. Artists volunteer their time to give children a chance to discover the fun of creating. Parents must remain with the children; the times are noon to 2 p.m. A Gift for Mom is on May 6 and A Gift for Dad is on June 10. Paint the Pumpkin is on Sept. 30 at the Tahoe City Oktoberfest. Make an Ornament is on Dec. 2. | northtahoearts.com

Safety first

Young leaders needed Incline Village, Nev. The IVGID Recreation Department is looking for enthusiastic, dedicated, hard-working teens entering Grades 6 to 10 for the Leaders in Training Education program. Students will be trained and work for a minimum of one week at summer camp. They will be in


April 20-May 10, 2017

charge of designing and leading activities and more. Applications are due May 19. | yourtahoeplace.com

Scholarship opportunities Tahoe Vista Flow Arts Studio’s Youth Program provides performance art training in aerial fabric, dance and yoga, with an emphasis on health and wellness. Performance training is tough and rigorous, but participants gain self-confidence, aerial art and performance training and a tight tense of community. Each year, Tahoe Flow Arts Studio issues scholarship funds to students, ages 8 and 17, who can prove monetary need. No aerial arts experience is necessary to apply. Applications are due May 1. | tahoeflowartsstudio@gmail.com or tahoeflowartsstudio.com

Play holiday days Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Parks and Recreation offers Spring Epic Enrichment Camps led by Miss Joan. The camps include stories, songs, science, games, art, crafts, creative snacks and more. Monday Madness is for ages 3 to 5 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Mondays from May 22 to June 12. Terrific Tuesday is for Pre-K to age 5 from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tuesdays from May 9 to June 6. Thrilling Thursdays is for age 5 through Grade 3 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. from May 11 to June 8. | (775) 832-1310 or yourtahoeplace.com

Academic scholarships for teens Liberty Utilities offers academic scholarships for eligible high-school and college students within its service territory. The eight schools in the fifth annual scholarship program are South Tahoe High School, Loyalton High School, Douglas High School, Coleville High School, North Tahoe High School, Truckee High School, Portola High School and Lake Tahoe Community College. Interested students should contact their school’s financial aid office or counselor. | libertyutilities.com

Youth Art Contest California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife is starting a “Don’t Let it Loose!” campaign and is asking children in Grades 2 to 12 to send illustrations depicting invasive species, how their release affects natural resources or what to do with unwanted pets/plants instead of releasing them. The youth artwork will be used in a poster and video campaign. All types of media will be welcome: drawings, paintings, animations, comic strips, videos, etc. All entries must include an entry form and be received by May 15. | wildlife. ca.gov

Welcome guppies Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Recreation Center offers swim lessons for a variety of ages and abilities. Programs are designed to follow the American Red Cross Learn-to-Swim guidelines and all instructors are Water Safety Instructor certified. Session VI is from May 15 to June 8. | Register (775) 832-1310

MICKEY’S

BIG MACK CHARTERS

Nature camps for kids Tahoe Institute for Natural Science announces its summer camps. They have expanded the number of camps and the ages who can attend. There will be Truckee and North Shore day camps in partnership with KidZone and Northstar. South Lake Tahoe day camps will be added and youth back country camps in partnership with Tahoe Rim Trail Association will be offered to junior- and high-school students. Scholarships are available. | tinsweb.org

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Free gym time Truckee Toddler Gymtime is for walking children to age 3 and their parents/caregivers. They can enjoy socialization and active play with play equipment, including pushing and riding toys, balls, hoops, slides and tunnel mazes. This drop-in class in the big gym at the TTUSD District Office is parent-facilitated and free of charge. It will be on Thursdays from 9:30 to 11 a.m. following the school district schedule. | truckeefrc.org

(large cabin w/ restroom)

(up to 13 people)

Little ones like to congregate Incline Village, Nev. Tahoe Tiny Timbers Gym Time at Incline Village Recreation Center is for ages newborn to 5 on Tuesdays and Fridays from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. This is an opportunity for youngsters to socialize and use gross motor skills in a stimulating environment. Caregivers/parents must be present. | yourtahoeplace.com

OUT & ABOUT

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center VOTED BEST POOL ROOM ON THE NORTH SHORE! Automatic Scoring “Bumper Bowling,” Video Arcade, Billiards, Video Poker, Cocktails, ATM, Full Swing Golf Simulator 920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

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Truckee Truckee Donner Recreation and Park District offers several ongoing classes for babies and parents. Mommy & Me Curiosities is on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 9 to 10:30 a.m. for ages 1 to 3. Baby & Me Discoveries is on Wednesdays from 11 to noon for ages 1 to 3. Baby Bears Yoga is on Tuesdays from 11 to noon for ages 2 to 5. The instructor for all is Renee Grennan and classes are held at the Community Art Center. Music Together Family Class is on Tuesdays from 10 to 10:45 a.m. or Saturdays from 11 to 11:45 a.m. for age birth to 5. Parents must stay with students. Brooke Chabot is the instructor. | Register tdrpd.org

Free preschool program Truckee The Family Room program at the Truckee Elementary School is from Mondays to Fridays from 10 a.m. to noon. Space is limited in this free program. The Family Room is a bilingual program dedicated to encouraging the development of literacy and school readiness in families with children ages 3 and younger. Activities include a mix of reading, music and crafts, while parents create supportive peer networks. The Family Room includes a free lending library of English and Spanish children’s books. | (530) 587-2513 or truckeefrc.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities. 17


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Re no’s e ffort inspired Squaw Valley O l y m pi c s well ahead when Cushing realized that hosting the Olympics could save his failing enterprise. Squaw Valley Ski Corp. was running low on investment capital and the resort was struggling financially. Floods, fires and avalanches in the early 1950s had negatively affected the company’s bottom line. An Olympic event would pump nearly $20 million in infrastructure development into Cushing’s ski area. If he could pull it off, it would be a miracle.

Alex Cushing and California snatched the opportunity from Reno, Nev., which was already aggressively pitching to host the upcoming Winter Games.

T

he Reno Tahoe Winter Games Coalition is working hard to land the 2026 Winter Games for the Tahoe Sierra region. They’re not alone in their efforts. In addition to other countries hoping for a chance to host the XXV Games, several U.S. cities are also bidding including Denver, Colo., Anchorage, Alaska, and Lake Placid, N.Y. The International Olympic Committee will make its decision sometime in 2019, which will leave about six years to prepare for one of the world’s greatest sporting extravaganzas. It won’t be the first time the region has attempted to host the Winter Olympics. In 1928, Tahoe City was one of three California locations that wanted the 1932 Winter Games. It was a competition between North Tahoe, Yosemite National Park and a small ski area in the Southern Sierra. The California Chamber of Commerce chose Yosemite to represent the state due to its scenic mountain beauty, which was bound to impress an International Olympic Committee dominated by Europeans, as well as its history of organized cross-country ski racing. There was no Olympic downhill skiing at the time, only ski jumping and cross-country skiing. In addition, the recently completed $1 million Ahwahnee Hotel in Yosemite Valley could provide luxurious accommodations for visitors with enough money to travel during a crushing financial depression that was hobbling the American economy. Ultimately, the Games were awarded to Lake Placid. It was the first time the United States hosted a Winter Olympics. Nearly 30 years later, Squaw Valley was the site of the 1960 Games; the Olympic rings on the signs at the entrance to the valley attest to that. People familiar with Tahoe’s winter sports history know the intriguing story of how Alex Cushing, CEO of Squaw Valley Ski Corp., miraculously snagged the Olympics from the grasp of Innsbruck, Austria, in a classic tale of the 18

underdog snatching victory. Cushing was hungry for free publicity in the winter of 1955 when he declared his interest in hosting the 1960 Games. To his surprise, the idea quickly gained traction among leading California politicians and businessmen and it became a rallying cry. Cushing himself was swept into a lastminute bidding process. He later admitted as much, saying, “I had no more interest in getting the Games than the man in the moon. It was just a way of getting some newspaper space.” At the time, Squaw Valley Ski Resort had only one chairlift and was a relatively unknown ski resort. Ironically, Cushing and California snatched the opportunity from Reno, Nev., which was already aggressively pitching to host the upcoming Winter Games. It was a newspaper article about the strong effort of the Silver State’s political leadership, business community and residents to get the Winter Olympics that caught Cushing’s attention. In terms of the groundwork done to market its location, Nevada was

Nevada, however, was ready to fight for this rare chance to show off its Tahoe Alps, a region of nearby mountains that included scenic alpine terrain in and around Slide Mountain and Mount Rose, including present-day Diamond Peak and Rifle Peak, all overlooking Lake Tahoe. In a letter to the International Olympic Committee in December 1954, the mayor of Reno promised: “the enthusiastic support and cooperation of every citizen in our community.” Nevada’s senators sent their own missives. Sen. Alan Bible assured the committee that his state had outstanding facilities and that he personally would travel to New York City to provide “firsthand information of any kind.” The president of the Reno Chamber of Commerce stated that the bid for the eighth Olympic Winter Games “has the whole-hearted support and backing of the 1,000 firms that comprise the chamber’s membership. Reno is a town composed of sports lovers and winter enthusiasts. We believe the winter games at Reno will be the most successful in terms of facilities and hospitality in many years.” When the Olympic Committee held its U.S. meeting in New York, Nevada officials offered to provide an airplane free of charge to fly members to Reno. In early 1955, Nevada released a promotional publication showcasing reasons why the Reno area was a perfect location for the Games. Its airport could handle aviation traffic from any major population center or port anywhere in the United

TA H O E

States. The flight from Boston was more than 12 hours, but everyone knew those times would be shortened by the coming jet age. Reno was also served by two major railroads and located at the intersection of three major highways. The Winter Games were to be held in two concentrated areas of western Nevada, both within 25 miles of each other. The bobsled, ski jump, cross-country and downhill ski disciplines were focused in the Tahoe Alps, primarily near Slide Mountain. All ice events, such as figure skating, hockey and speed skating, were to be held at new facilities on the University of Nevada, Reno campus. The school’s current sports stadium would be enlarged and a new civic auditorium built. A site south of Reno was tentatively planned for an isolated Olympic Village. Optimistic planners calculated that there should be enough lodging built on Lake Tahoe’s North Shore sufficient to house 75,000 spectators.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

> Learn about the Reno Tahoe bid for the 2026 Olympics

> New Olympic ski museum in the works

Meanwhile, Cushing wasn’t resting on his laurels. Despite his statement that he wasn’t looking to hook the Olympic rings for Squaw Valley, Cushing quickly secured the endorsements of a California state senator and the governor who strongly backed the effort. There were only six weeks until the bidding deadline and Cushing wasted no time. He and two associates traveled thousands of miles to personally meet with 42 of the 62 voting delegates. That effort, along with a “hastily prepared brochure and charming dissertation,” made the difference and Cushing pulled off a miracle, squeaking by Innsbruck to host the 1960 Winter Olympics. Those Games launched Squaw Valley and Lake Tahoe into the international spotlight as world-class vacation destinations.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com, or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

Nostalgia

TRUCKEE BURIED BY 1880 SPRING STORM After surviving the extreme winter of 1879-80, by late March Truckee residents were ready for some warm sun and fishing season. As luck would have it, instead of blue skies it snowed the first three weeks of April, dumping a record 298 inches on Donner Pass. By April 15, chaos reigned in the mountains and railroad traffic crawled when it wasn’t stopped by avalanches or crushed sheds. By the third week, Truckee was buried under 16 feet of snow and the ice measured 10 feet thick on Donner Lake. The record storm broke on April 24, leaving a snowpack more than 30 feet deep.

Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s newest book “Snowbound: Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” available in local stores or at thestormking.com. Courtesy Mark McLaughlin collection


CALENDAR ONGOING EXHIBITS

Mahsan Ghazianzad & Grant Miller Metro Gallery | Until April 21

Arts

Dotty Molt McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until April 27

Barbie Crawford McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until April 27

Youth Art Month Lake Mansion | Until April 28

Kathryn Grider LXS Gallery | Until April 28 Carroll-Sue Jones LTCC Library | Until April 28

Winter Art Exhibit Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe | Until April 30

Shahri Masters Incline Village Library | Until April 30

Ellen Nunes Cobalt Artist Studio | Until May “Bird Mafia” Atelier Truckee | May 1-June 30 Emily Reid Never Ender Gallery | Until May 2 Katy Ann Fox Sierra Arts Gallery | May 3-29 Carson Valley Art Association Copeland Gallery | Until May 4

Scarce Project Riverside Studios | Until May 5 Valeriy Kagounkin Sparks Museum & Cultural Center | Until May 13

“Tree Lines” UNR Church Fine Arts | Until May 18

Jane Cassidy SNC Tahoe Gallery | Until May 19

A Place in the Country Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 21

THE ARTS

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

SNC Student Show Holman Arts & Media Center | April 27-May 19

April 20-May 10, 2017

Through Lyme-colored glasses S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

O

n meeting Anastiscia Chantler-Lang you would have no idea that she has been to hell and back as a survivor of chronic Lyme disease. A lot of people don’t know what chronic Lyme disease is or what a devastating impact it can have on you if it goes untreated for six weeks after you contract it. In Chantler-Lang’s case, even after she lost her job, her house and money fighting Lyme disease, she refused to give up. It is due to her struggle that she is now living in Lake Tahoe, painting and continuing to deal with her disease, now in remission. Lang is using her artwork to help her heal and advocate for Lyme disease survivors. “Had you met me in 2014 when I arrived here from Canada, I would have looked completely different. I was half the size I am now,” says the slender artist. While fighting Lyme disease, ChantlerLang underwent daily colonics, had severe constant pain in her bladder and a compromised liver. She couldn’t form a

Anastiscia Chantler-Lang’s artwork

Peter Stichbury Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28

St. Mary’s Art Center Spring Exhibition | Until May 28

Spinifex: Aboriginal Paintings Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28

“My Body Your Body” Sierra Arts Gallery | June 1-22

“High Desert Alchemy”

“Art creates an alternate reality for me. I get lost in it. It’s an outlet for what we’re going through and it gives me a bit of relief from being in that little world [of Lyme disease].”

–Anastiscia Chantler-Lang

OXS Gallery | Until June 2

“Denali Patterns” LTCC Library | Until June 9 Helmut Klementi South Lake Tahoe Library | Until June 10

Great Basin Native Artists Carson City Visitors Bureau | Until June 19

“Image Nation” Truckee Recreation Center | Until June 30

“High School Pic[ks] 2” The Brick | Until June 30

“Strange Cousins from the West” Sierra Arts Gallery | July 1-30

“Maynard Dixon: The Paltenghi Collections” Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

Miradas Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16 Four-Artist Exhibit Sierra Arts Gallery | Aug. 3-25

“On the Water” Tahoe Maritime Museum | Until summer

Rachel Stiff Sierra Arts Gallery | Sept. 7-29 1 ST & 3 RD WEDNESDAY

Gathering of Artists North Tahoe Arts Center THURSDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art (except 1st Thursday) 2 ND FRIDAY

Senior art classes & tours Nevada Museum of Art SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art 2 ND SATURDAY

Free admission Nevada Museum of Art Kids’ Art day Nevada Museum of Art Art Walk Reno

sentence and her nervous system was shot — to name a few of her issues. At times her body had to be packed in ice because the convulsing would be so intense. Back in 2008, Chantler-Lang was a bit by a tick while hiking in upstate New York and soon developed a bull’s-eye rash. A violent flu followed two weeks later coupled with hallucinations, anxiety and vomiting. Two weeks after the flu had cleared, Chantler-Lang went to the doctor for a tetanus shot. “And, then all hell broke loose,” she says. She spent all of her money going to dozens of doctors in every kind of specialty to try to diagnose the problem. She lost her house, her savings and her then-fiancé. She was broke, living out of her car and suffering. Chantler-Lang went back to Canada to be with her mother and through mutual connections found out about Sierra Integrative Medical Center in Reno, Nev. She flew down to meet with the doctors and ended up smashing IV poles with a man in the hallway named Greg, who was fighting Hepatitis C. They fell in love and Greg stayed with her for the five months of treatment. At the end of her treatment, Greg took her swimming at Donner Lake. “It was amazing to see a piece of what other people live like. The world that I came from in Rochester [New York] was so

Anastiscia Chantler-Lang in her studio

superficial,” says Anastiscia. “I was violently ill for so long, broken on every level, I couldn’t fathom meeting someone. Lyme disease shot me down so hard; it’s so brutal what you have to go through in treatment. Greg was just there.” “I saw that she knew everyone in the clinic and poured her heart out to help them

even though she was so sick herself. I was blown away by that,” says Greg. “At 50 years old, I had no kids, had never married and my motto became that song you sing at karaoke with the line, ‘When I fall in love, it will be forever.’ We just proceeded in blind faith, blind love.” Anastiscia has always been interested in art and local history. She started drawing Native Americans, landscapes, horses and swirling colorful, detailed patterns with subliminal Lake Tahoe characters. She uses various types of oil pastels and colored pencils, but stays away from oil and acrylic paints because the odors affect her Lyme. “Art creates an alternate reality for me. I get lost in it. It’s an outlet for what we’re going through and it gives me a bit of relief from being in that little world [of Lyme disease]. When someone likes a painting, I feel true joy,” she says. Now she is painting for a purpose, using her art to spread awareness of chronic Lyme disease, raising money to help with survivors’ expenses and advocating for better healthcare insurance. She hosted an art and wine tasting in Incline Village on April 9 to raise money for two projects close to her heart: Hand in Hand for Lyme Disease Inc. and the Mayday Project rally in Washington, D.C., on May 6. “[Lyme disease] is becoming much more prevalent and can happen to anyone,” she says. “This is the first time that the CDC [Centers for Disease Control] has recognized that this is the fastest growing disease and we need to push for more affordable diagnostics.” Anastiscia’s artwork is for sale through artrageous.info, Java Hut and the Stevenson Gallery in Kings Beach, and the Incline Village/Crystal Bay Visitors Bureau. 

19


THE ARTS

Arts

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE

Cobalt like the lake Incline Village, Nev. Cobalt Artist Studio presents Ellen Nunes fine art, which will be on display through May. Called, “Creation Series: A Collaboration with Nature,” the body of work encompasses years of deliberate, playful experimentation born on a bone-chilling winter night in 2006. Workshops at the studio include Painting Poppies in Watercolor on May 6. | cobaltartiststudio.com

COLLECTION OF

ARTISTS’

WORKS

Celebrating youth art Reno, Nev. Arts for All Nevada presents a Youth Art Month exhibit at Lake Mansion until April 28. The exhibit will be filled with colorful and imaginative children’s artwork as part of the annual nationally celebrated Youth Art Month. | (775) 826-6100

North Tahoe Arts will feature the works of members in the exhibit through April 30 at the North Tahoe Art Center. This year’s show is a collection of work from 17 artists working in a range of mediums. | northtahoearts.com

High standards exhibited Minden, Nev. Carson Valley Art Association announces the opening of an art show at the Copeland Gallery. The 50 local artists are interested in various mediums. Objectives include developing a high standard of art, presenting to the public free of charge the best work of its members in various exhibits and supporting young artists in the area by offering educational scholarships. The show runs through May 4. | (775) 782-8207

Etsy Craft Entrepreneurship Truckee Sierra Business Council announces the spring Etsy Craft Entrepreneurship program begins on May 3 at the Truckee Roundhouse. Etsy Craft Entrepreneurship is an innovative program that provides micro-business training to eligible adults with existing creative skills, to help supplement his or her income and sell product to new markets. Classes are taught by Krista Tranquilla, with support from Sierra Business Council’s Small Business Development Center. Participation is $25, but space is limited. Applications must be submitted by May 1. | sierrabusiness.org

Plein Air painters sought Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts presents The North Lake Tahoe Plein Air Open from Sept. 5 to 10, and applications are now being accepted until May 1. Artists of all levels from all over the country will gather in North Lake Tahoe to paint the breathtaking scenery of North Lake Tahoe in the open air. The week’s events include Farmer’s Market Quick Draw Competition on Sept. 7 and two morning paint-outs and painting demonstrations. The Public Exhibit will be at Northstar California Resort during the Autumn Food &Wine Festival. Main competition prizes will be awarded at the opening of the festival on Sept. 9 at 11:30 a.m. This exhibit is free and open to the public. Viewers can vote for the “People’s Choice” award. | northtahoearts.com

Love what you paint Carson City, Nev. Spring Creek artist Kathryn Grider doesn’t have to venture far to find inspiration for her paintings. She needs only to open her door. Living near the base of the Ruby Mountains, Grider is surrounded by nature’s beauty and it shows in her exhibit, “Painting What I Love,” which is on display at the LXS Gallery on the first floor of the Nevada Legislature Building through April 28. “My goal as an artist is to paint from life’s experiences – not to reproduce photographic images, but to reflect my personal impressions of the scene before me, imparting emotion and a sense of place to the painting,” she said. | travelnevada.com 20

Gathering of Artists

Summer Fields Kelley Werner | North Tahoe Arts Center

Make it to the Show Truckee Truckee Roundhouse Maker Show on June 11 needs makers. The Maker Show is in celebration of commercial and noncommercial makers. This year 25 commercial makers will be chosen; there will be no cap on the number of non-commercial makers chosen. | truckeeroundhouse.org

Bright whimsy Reno, Nev. The Never Ender Gallery and Boutique presents Emily Reid, an arts educator and mother living and working in Reno. Her brightly colored, whimsical animal portraits will enchant and mesmerize. The exhibition runs through May 2. | neverenderreno.com

species in crisis, created Scarce to encourage responsible protection of the endangered and to remember the beauty of the extinct. Armstrong paints extinct animals in black and white because they are forever gone. To the endangered she adds a touch of color because there is hope. | riversideartstudios.com

Masters at work Incline Village, Nev. Shahri Masters artwork will be on display at Incline Village Library through April. She was inspired by her daughter toward creativity for healing and recently began painting. Her work has been well received and she has sold several pieces. She currently has three commissions in progress. Masters is also the author of three books. | (775) 832-4130

Tahoe City Gathering of Artists is every first and third Wednesday of the month at North Tahoe Arts Center. Artists are welcome to drop in and share studio space from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. | northtahoearts.com

Art that affords spirit Incline Village, Nev. The Incline Village Visitors Information Center has brought together four artists who work in four different mediums for a new show titled “Whimsical Spirit.” The exhibit runs through April 30. Troi Follansbee is a native Californian artist who creates mosaic sculptures using many types of materials, called tesserae. Follansbee will display a new series entitled, “Get Busted,” which features a spontaneous style. Ellen Beauregard uses mixed medium within her large paintings from tar, epoxy and metals. She uses color, texture and luster to balance the composition of each piece.

Two for the library South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League two exhibits at Lake Tahoe Community Library. “Denali Patterns,” by Les and Jill Allert runs until June 9. These images were captured as the couple flew over Mount Denali in a turbo prop airplane. They depict the relationship of dark and light, rock and ice and images only found around the highest mountain on the North American continent. Artist Carroll-Sue Jones’ work is on display until April 28. Her realistic portraits of mountain sheep, bison, elk, fox and birds are presented on backgrounds of slatted maple burl, redwood and slate. | talart.org

Art raises awareness Truckee Riverside Studio in Truckee announces that the Scarce Project by Ali Armstrong will be on display until May 5. Armstrong, an artist who raises awareness about animal

Rainy Season Sunset Kathryn Grider | LLXS Gallery


April 20-May 10, 2017

Anastiscia Chantler-Lang is a selftaught artist from Toronto, who relocated to Tahoe in 2015 after traveling extensively and working in fashion and handbag design. She uses pastels and colored pencils to convey her feelings and experiences while living in the Sierra region. Bill Stevenson is a Truckee photographer for whom the art of taking pictures is practically genetic. Both Stevenson’s great-great grandfather and great-grandfather photographed living on the edge of the American frontier from their home in Leavenworth, Kan. | (800) 468-2463

Exhibition features Northern California artists Northstar The Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe, has joined with SLATE Art Consulting to feature a new winter exhibition of the works of 31 Northern California artists throughout the hotel’s lobby and public areas through April. Artists featured include Jonah Burlingame, Maria Burtis, Elaine Coombs, Pauletta Chanco, Micah Crandell-Bear, Joanne Fox, Holly Van Hart, Carol Lefkowitz, David Nyquist, Thea Schrack, Amy Lee Solomon, Jeff Snell, Rob Synder, David Wellner and Diane Williams. Works from the collection are clearly labeled and additional information about the artists is also provided. There are notes to help with a selfguided tour, a walk-through map and price sheet of the SLATE winter collection at the concierge desk. Private tours of the rotating art collection, led by one of the exhibition’s curators, can also be arranged for groups of eight or more, through SLATE Art Consulting. | ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe

choice and is rarely arbitrary. Many boat owners choose names that reflect a part of their life or family. Many are expressions of the owner’s personality and sense of humor. Other boat names pay homage to the tradition of the boat as a gendered object. Not only will “What’s in a Name” explore all these fascinating elements, it will also highlight the many superstitions and myths which surround this deeply personal choice. Visitors can also expect to delve into the complex nautical history behind the female persona of ships and boats. The museum invites boat owners to share the story behind his or her boat, as well as loan any transoms, nameplates or photographs that will help illustrate this fascinating element of boating culture. The museum will accept submissions through April. | barbara@tahoemaritime.org

and purpose. Lensing will be open to engaging conversation on female empowerment, intentional living and how to integrate mindfulness and into life. The $20 fee includes a coloring book. | northttahoearts.com

Lots of art for $5 Reno, Nev. Art Walk Reno starts at 5 p.m. the first Thursday of every month throughout the year. Guests can see the works of local and regional artists on display in venues within the Arts District, between Liberty Street and Second Street and Virginia Street and Arlington Avenue. The walk begins at West Street Market in downtown Reno. Tickets are $5. | artspotreno.com

Big art for all to see Reno, Nev. Artist submissions for Circus Circus Reno’s 24-Hour Mural Marathon is now open. The event, which will be held from July 15 to 16, will challenge selected competitors to paint an original mural in a panel 19 feet 7 inches wide by 14 feet high on the Virginia Street side of the hotel casino. The murals will remain on the walls for one year and competitors will compete for prize money. Each artist will also receive a $750 stipend to pay for paint and materials. The competition will begin at 10 a.m. on July 15 and end at 10 a.m. on July 16. The winners will be selected by a panel of judges. Artist submissions are open to all artists. Interested artists may submit no more than two original concepts. Entries must be submitted by 12 a.m. on April 21. | circusreno.com

Boat names focus of exhibit Tahoe City “What’s in a name?” Juliet famously pondered. Well, if you are a boat, the answer is: quite a lot. Tahoe Maritime Museum announces that the museum will feature an exhibition that explores the stories behind the names of familiar Tahoe places and beloved Tahoe boats in May. Despite Shakespeare’s conceptualization of names as meaningless constructs, choosing a name for a boat is a personal

What’s new to see at SNC Incline Village, Nev. Sierra Nevada College presents “Long Since the Sun Has Set,” by artist Jane Cassidy in Tahoe Gallery until May 19. Cassidy is a multidisciplinary artist and educator from Galway, Ireland. Primarily trained in music composition and animation, her main interests lie in audio-visual immersive environments, visual music, live VJing and multi-channel work. She is currently assistant professor of digital media at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. There will be an artist’s talk on April 20 from 5 to 7 p.m. The annual student show will be from April 27 to May 19 at the Holman Arts & Media Center. A reception will be on May 2 from 5 to 6 p.m. | sierranevada.edu

Summer playground celebrated Tahoe City Tahoe Maritime Museum features the exhibit is “On the Water: Sport and Leisure at the Lake” at its new location in Tahoe City. Lake Tahoe’s crystal waters have attracted people for generations, but it wasn’t until the 1850s that the region had its first year-round settlers when logging camps formed around the basin. Knowing logging was a fleeting industry, the camp owners quickly turned to tourism. By 1900, Tahoe’s summer resorts were catering to visitors from the nearby Nevada cities, and the larger Californian cities to the West. Tahoe was truly a summer playground, with recreation at the resorts focused around boating and other water activities. The exhibit will be on display throughout the year. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Butterflies come home

On exhibit at Sierra Arts Reno, Nev. Sierra Arts Gallery features the works for Glynn Cartledge on display until April 28, with an artist’s reception on April 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. The Gallery features the work of Katy Ann Fox from May 3 to 29, with a reception on May 18 from 6 to 8 p.m. | sierraarts.org

THE ARTS

The Critically Endangered Northern White Rhino Ali Armstrong | Riverside Studios

Two photographic displays

Opposites attract

Reno, Nev. McKinley Arts and Culture Center presents, “Every Image Has a Story: Dotty Molt,” until April 27. Dotty Molt transplanted to the Sierra Nevada region 10 years ago from Florida. Her work is largely focused on an exploratory journey she underwent starting early last year, traveling across the country in her car and solely focusing on her art. The set of photographs being shown are representative of this journey. “Nature in Black and White” by Barbie Crawford will be on display until April 27. Crawford is a professional photographer residing in the Lake Tahoe area. She creates detailed macro-photography portraits of the natural world around her she takes on solitary hiking trips in back country Tahoe. | reno.gov

Reno, Nev. The Metro Gallery in Reno City Hall presents “Paint & Metal: Mahsan Ghazianzad and Grant Miller” until April 21. The two seemingly opposite abstract pieces are tied together coherently with the expressive and authentic use of color, mediums and concepts. Using its abstract imagery, the works deal with ideas of truth and exploration of emotions. Ghazianzad’s work carries intimate meaning, capturing the essence of her experiences through her paintings, including personal history and philosophies. Miller designed and built furniture and then became interested in welding and metalworking. | reno.gov

All things art Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts offers Guided Mindfulness Adult Coloring for Women with Tina Lensing is on May 4 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at NTA’s Corison Loft. The workshop will begin with a Mindfulness exercise and discussion on the importance of living with intention

Early bird savings offered Reno, Nev. Nevada Museum of Art will present the Art + Environment Conference on Oct. 19 to 21. Early bird registration is now open. Guests will traverse time and space across the unsettled terrains, shifting frontiers and limitless horizons of the Greater West, the last part of the planet to be explored and settled. Those who purchase tickets before May 12 will get a $100 discount. | nevadaart.org

Truckee Truckee Donner Recreation and Park District offers the Charles Fayette McGlashan Butterfly Collection at the Community Recreation Center. It had been housed in the Nevada City courthouse for 61 years. C.F. McGlashan and his daughter, Ximena, sometimes referred to as the “Butterfly Princess,” assembled more than 20,000 butterfly specimens. | tdrpd.org

Therapeutic exhibit Truckee Image Nation, a new art installation featuring Nevada County veterans, is on display at the Truckee Community Recreation Center until June 30. Image Nation is an initiative of the Nevada County Arts Council in partnership with Welcome Home Vets, funded in part by the California Arts Council and local contributions. The photographs, self-portraits and pictures of veterans’ hands are the result of a therapeutic workshop with veteran and master photographer Michael Llewellyn. Image Nation helps veterans express themselves and connect with each other and society, a key element in treating post-traumatic stress disorder. Llewellyn, a veteran himself, has been working in photography since 1988. “I have personal experience with the debilitating social isolation caused by episodes of trauma,” Llewellyn said in a press release. “The practice of photography offered me insight into understanding creative self expression, which contributed to the success of my career.” | tdprd.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com

for a complete list of Arts. 21


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. ASTRONOMY: What is the common name of the constellation Monoceros? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What is the westernmost territory of Canada? 3. MYTHOLOGY: Who was the Roman equivalent of the Greek hero Odysseus? 4. ARCHITECTURE: What are the blades of a windmill called? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What natural attraction would you be viewing if you were on a boat called “Maid of the Mist”? 6. MUSIC: What rock band’s debut album was titled “Kill ‘Em All”? 7. TELEVISION: What are the names of Marge’s sisters in “The Simpsons”? 8. HISTORY: What company owned the ill-fated Titanic? 9. GOVERNMENT: Which amendment to the U.S. Constitution forbids cruel and unusual punishment? 10. LITERATURE: What kind of creature is Bagheera In the “The Jungle Book”?

Strange but true

by Samantha Weaver

According to Guinness World Records, the world’s largest snowflake measured 15 inches across. If you’re like 83 percent of American pet owners, you believe that your pet is better at cuddling than your significant other. Junior Whirl: 1. Ash, 2. Spruce, 3. Hemlock, 4. Plum (plumb), 5. Pine, 6. Chestnut, 7. Laurel, 8. Peach, 9. Beech (beach), 10. Cypress, 11. Bay, 12. Palm, 13. Olive, 14. Dates, 15. Elder. Hocus Focus differences: 1. Tie is different, 2. Newspaper is smaller, 3. Switch is missing, 4. Picture is smaller, 5. Doll is missing, 6. Drawer handle is missing.

The cross mama grape would sometimes chastise her spoiled baby by shouting “Stop your wining!”

CryptoQuip

1. The Unicorn, 2. Yukon, 3. Ulysses, 4. Sails, 5. Niagara Falls, N .Y., 6. Metallica, 7. Patty and Selma, 8. The White Star Line, 9. Eighth, 10. Panther

TRIVIA TEST

22

It was 20th-century German poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht who made the following sage observation: “Art is not a mirror held up to reality but a hammer with which to shape it.”


April 20-May 10, 2017

Horoscopes

PUZZLES FOR KIDS

FIRE

EARTH

FUN & GAMES AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

As eager as you are to advance, you may be feeling the need to slow down. Smell the flowers and the coffee. Slowing down will allow you to concentrate more fully. You have entered another cycle of experimentation. The time is right to sample but perhaps not to buy or commit, at least not in regards to the long-term.

Some important shifts on relationship fronts are underway. These are causing you to make some important adjustments, to get out of your own way somehow. Blind spots and habits are the norms. But occasionally, circumstances in the destiny flow require they be reconsidered. Despite sincere efforts, you will probably like the results.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21) The Sun in Aries and Venus re-entering Aries says: go within to decipher your priorities this week, Taurus. Mars in your sign indicates pioneering initiatives and when the Sun follows suit next week, you will be like a bull out of the gates. This is especially true if you know what you want and have created a plan.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21) Circumstances are pushing you to work a little harder these days. These efforts include making key changes in your own usual approach. Take nothing for granted now, especially how you usually do things. Others may be playing the role of instigator. ‘Don’t shoot the messenger.’ Receive the message and learn the lesson.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21) Getting in touch more fully with who you are as an individual, continues. This may well include travel interests. At deeper levels, there is a push to break through fears and insecurities. Mercury retrograde in Taurus has perhaps stirred things up in the subconscious, but not quite enough to be conscious. Now you know why.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21) An exciting, playful and sporty cycle continues. You may feel stronger than you have for a while. At best, you feel inspired to push harder and do more. You are probably wise to pace yourself and set realistic goals. In order to succeed at going big right now, aim for a systematic strategy that includes measurable results.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22) Some fresh starts in your professional sphere have guided you into new territory somehow. This has likely required extra effort to access your confidence. Altogether, something of a soul-searching journey that began back in February, at least, continues. Taking things slowly remains the ideal pace.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23) Your visionary mind has been ignited. You have begun to see a wider scope of possibility. At worst, you feel a little overwhelmed and intimidated. This feeling could even increase while Mercury is retrograde. There remain a couple of weeks to go. Allow this awareness to ease your mind. It is all about entering new territory.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22) Sometimes clearing the way literally involves removing things. At other times, the process includes replacing the old with the new. This can occur psychologically as well as physically, like now perhaps. The time is right to do some inner work. This can be as basic as gaining new knowledge and fresh perspectives.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19) A lot of energy is stirring close to home. You have probably begun or are feeling inspired to take on some pretty big projects. If this includes spring cleaning and creating a more beautiful home environment, then you are probably right on track. Aim to create an atmosphere that supports both deepened self-awareness and inner peace.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) You are learning to see the world as with fresh eyes. This trend will increase over the coming weeks. Already a process of digging deeper than you have for a while is underway. This includes gathering new tools and learning new skills. Generally, this is a follow-through period and a time of returns from initiatives taken a few years ago.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) With both Mercury and Venus retrograde, the momentum of late has been less than obvious and predictable. It may help to be aware that you are not alone. Positively, you have been making steady progress behind the scenes despite delays. Expect this trend to continue throughout the month.

Tails in Tahoe Lucky

Holly

Oreo

Dutch

Lucky is a man about town. He’s learning to walk on a leash and loving every minute of it. He is just 2 years old, and enjoys a low key lifestyle complete with belly rubs and snack treats.

Holly is a friendly, playful and affectionate young lady. She will be the first one to greet you when you come home. She enjoys playing with wand toys or chasing that pesky red dot!

Oreo is an affectionate kitty who loves cuddles. He will sit on a lap for hours! He’s gentle and mellow and good with dogs.

Dutch is a very sweet and affectionate dog who came to us after his family moved away and couldn’t take him along. Dutch loves people but needs some time to get to know new dogs.

Pet Network (775) 832-4404 bschilpp@petnetwork.org www.petnetwork.org

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org

WARF (775) 783-8737 karen.joseph@att.net www.tahoewarf.com

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org 23


MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Dweezil Zappa freaks out

CALENDAR

A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7

APRIL 20 | THURSDAY

STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

April 28 | 7:30 p.m. | $43.11+ | Harrah’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Meltdown Festival Hard Rock Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Tahoe Truckee School of Music Recital Tahoe Art Haus 5:30 p.m. Sean McAlindin Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Jenni Charles & Jesse Moody’s 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. 4/20 w/Black Star Safari, Dingo Weasel Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. G Jones Tahoe Biltmore 9:30 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Northwoods Clubhouse 6:30 p.m. Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Rocky LaPorte & Ron Morey The Improv 9 p.m.

A

RENO & BEYOND Jeff Dean

midst a beguiling family feud to rival the likes in the movie “Grey Gardens,” Dweezil Zappa is set to bring his unique form of freak protest rock to the banks of Lake Tahoe. Following two letters of warning from his younger brother, Ahmet, who represents the Zappa Family Trust (ZFT), Dweezil decided to call this year’s outing, “50 Years of Frank: Dweezil Zappa Plays Whatever the F@%K He Wants: The Cease and Desist Tour.” Posthumously, mother Gail cut her children from control of the trust after giving 30 percent shares each to younger siblings Ahmet and Diva and 20 percent shares each to Dweezil and his older sister, Moon Unit. As the lesser shareholders, Dweezil and Moon Unit are granted no access to trust funds and receive payment as beneficiaries only when the trust is making a profit, which has so far not been the case. “It’s stuff that’s all really, as far as I can tell, created to be a nuisance,” Dweezil says of the legal actions. “But they are using the money of the family trust to do all this, spending it like it’s going out of style.” Although the Trust’s cease and desist letters do not prevent Dweezil from playing his father’s music, they do bar him from selling anything associated with the name Frank Zappa and the trust has also filed for an exclusive trademark on the last name Zappa itself.

Dweezil says he doesn’t know why his two younger siblings are choosing to create a rift at the expense of his father’s legacy, but hopes the family will find a way to cooperate. Dweezil insists his mission is to carry on his father’s legacy for the benefit of both fans and kin.

“ It has different energy compared to some of the more complex music my dad wrote. There is nice balance to the material and feel of the show.” –Dweezil Zappa “If they were to be granted the rights in the way they’ve filed for them, they have the opportunity to block me from using my own last name,” says Dweezil. “But legally, they have no way of stopping me from playing the music.” This tour is focused on celebrating the 50th anniversary of Frank Zappa and The Mothers of Invention’s avant-garde, satirical, psychedelic debut album, “Freak Out!,” which after Bob Dylan’s “Blonde on Blonde” was the second double-LP ever to be released. “It’s been a fun tour because of the music we are playing,” says Dweezil. “It has different energy compared to some of the more complex music my dad wrote. There is nice balance to the material and feel of the show.”

24

“We’re gonna do what we can, but it’s so ridiculous because it’s ultimately just about playing music and allowing people to escape their normal everyday life for a couple hours, to give them the chance to experience the music live and be exposed to a larger amount of what Frank really stood for,” he says. According to Dweezil, most people don’t understand the full scope and magnitude of his father’s art, which includes a catalog of more than 80 albums in genres ranging from rock and punk to opera and classical. “This is a guy that could sit with a blank piece of paper on a flight from New York to Los Angeles, write an orchestral score and then hand it to some musicians when he got to New York where people could leap onto the page,” he says. “He had the ability to write for any instrument that way.”

As a self-taught musician, Frank never shied away from expressing himself and following his own muse to realms both beautiful and bizarre. “He just liked the way it [musical notation] looked so he went to the library and learned it himself,” says Dweezil. “His music has no boundaries. In that sense, he was capable in every way. I guess you could call him an auteur. He was firing on every element.” This year’s tour moniker echoes the anti-commercial satire his father mastered throughout his 30-year career with albums titles such as “We’re Only in It for the Money” and “Sheik Yerbouti.” In a word, Dweezil believes his father’s legacy is all about integrity, something he learned early on that motivates him to continue his quest. In fact, when asked to state a religion on Dweezil’s birth certificate, Frank wrote “musician.” “I think he was the kind of person who had strong beliefs in obviously the artistic sense, but politically and socially he was very much into simple communication and speaking the truth,” Dweezil says. “He did not hold back. He did not mince words. He would stand for whatever he believed. He made music that was wildly unpopular in many cases. Even in his fan base that loves his music there are records that people don’t like at all. There is a diversity in all of that, but the point is Frank made music he liked. If other people liked it, that was a bonus.”  For tickets, visit harrahstahoe.com.

Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Jason King Band Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Spring Fling Youth Strings CC Community Center 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rye Brothers Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame Peppermill 7 p.m. Soundwave Circus Circus 8 p.m. Palmore Remix Atlantis 8 p.m. Sadistik, Nacho Picasso, Rafael Vigilantes Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Michelle Moonshine & Scratchdog Stringband Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Drinking with Clowns 3rd Street Bar 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Erik Meyers Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

APRIL 21 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Meltdown Festival Hard Rock Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 11 a.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Live music Plaza Bar 5 p.m.


April 20-May 10, 2017

C A L E N D A R | A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 Andrew Ohren Nakoma Resort 5 p.m. Michael and David Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Guitar Town Bar of America 8 p.m. Erin & the Project Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Andre Nickatina Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Scott Pemberton Band The Trocadero 9 p.m. micah j & DJJD Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. DJ Chris English & DJ Josbeatz Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open mic Art Truckee 7 p.m. Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Bridge to Terabithia” Truckee Community Theater 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Rocky LaPorte & Ron Morey The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Palmore Remix Atlantis 4 p.m. 111e Starlighters Boomtown 4 p.m.

MUSIC NOTES High Sierra band contest The 27th Annual High Sierra Music Festival has announced its 2017 Band Contest. For the first time, High Sierra Music Festival is giving an opportunity for emerging artists to enter to win a chance to play on the Vaudeville stage at this year’s festival on July 2. The festival returns from June 29 to July 2 at PlumasSierra Fairgrounds in Quincy. Contest rules and regulations are available online, and bands and solo artists have until May 1 to enter. | highsierramusic.com/ bandcontest

Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Carolyn Dolan & Peter Supersano Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. First Take Rocks Fandango 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Granger Smith w/Earl Dibbles Jr. Cargo 8 p.m. Rye Brothers Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame Peppermill 8 p.m. The Wiz Kid Silver Legacy 8 p.m. KISS Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Soundwave Circus Circus 8 p.m. Voodoo Cats & Seedless 10DenC Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Mike Furlong Silver Legacy 8 p.m. On the Border-Eagles Tribute Atlantis 8 p.m. Rebekah Chase Band Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Misophonia, JkkF Jub Jub’s 8:30 p.m. Take 2 Harrah’s 9 p.m. Chuck Gann Boomtown 9 p.m. Will Clarke 1 Up 10 p.m. Neil Jackson Lex GSR 10 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ R Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Burning” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Latin Dance Social Peppermill 7 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. David Lee Carson Comedy Club 8 p.m. Erik Meyers Pioneer Underground 9 p.m.

APRIL 22 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Spring Meltdown Festival Hard Rock Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Serina Dawn Band The Village 11:30 a.m.

Midtown Social Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Jacked Up Lake Tahoe Diamond Peak 1 p.m. Sol Horizon Village Squaw 3:30 p.m. “The Passion” St. Rose of Lima Church 3:30 p.m. Live bluegrass Village Lodge Sugar Bowl 4 p.m. Truckee Tahoe Community Chorus Resort at Squaw Creek 7 p.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Guitar Town Bar of America 8 p.m. Battle of the Bands Hard Rock 8 p.m. Steve & Tom Bar of America 8 p.m. Erin & the Project Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Reed Mathis & Electric Beethoven Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Katchafire w/Inna Vision & Mystic Roots Band MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Totally Rad 80’s Dance Party Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Scratchdog Stringband Divided Sky 9 p.m. Metal Echo Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Down North Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Mark Stylz & DJ SN1 Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Bridge to Terabithia” Truckee Community Theater 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Rocky LaPorte & Ron Morey The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Palmore Remix Atlantis 4 p.m. 111e Starlighters Boomtown 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame Peppermill 8 p.m. The Wiz Kid Silver Legacy 8 p.m. RenoFest Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Mike Furlong Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Rye Brothers Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Rebekah Chase Band Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Todd Snider Sparks Nugget 8 p.m. Earles of Newton’s Juke Joint Dance Club The Saint 8 p.m. Soundwave Circus Circus 8 p.m. Take 2 Harrah’s 9 p.m. Paul Covarelli Boomtown 9 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

Check out the Harvey’s Outdoor Concert Series lineup

The Who join outdoor concert series Harveys Lake Tahoe and Another Planet Entertainment have announced the addition of The Who to the 2017 Lake Tahoe Summer Concert Series at Harveys Outdoor Arena. Rock ‘n’ Roll icons The Who will bring their electrifying show to Harveys on Aug. 16 for an evening of legendary hit songs. | harveystahoe.com

Movement workshop for actors Holly Natwora will lead a Viewpoints Movement Workshop based on the work created by Anne Bogart. “Viewpoints” is a technique of composition that provides a vocabulary for thinking about and acting upon movement and gesture and creates staging for the actor and director. This workshop is open for ages 15 and older, all levels of performers on April 23 at Brüka Theatre in Reno, Nev., as part of Brüka’s Artist in The House Series. | RSVP (775) 323-3221 or brownpapertickets.com

MUSIC SCENE

ANDRE NICKATINA

April 21 | 9 p.m. Whiskey Dick’s Saloon | South Lake Tahoe ANDRE NICKATINA headlines the second annual Four-Twenty Smokeout. San Francisco rapper Andre Nickatina will be joined by Sewer Crew, B3 the Shark and Rhythmatix. | facebook.com/ whiskeydickstahoe

MIDTOWN SOCIAL

April 22 | 1 p.m. Alpine Meadows Sun Deck Alpine Meadows MIDTOWN SOCIAL’S freshly squeezed blend of California soul, funk and rock is downright irresistible. A nine-piece tourde-force, Midtown Social is coming to Tahoe on the heels of its first full-length release. | squawalpine.com

NOW PLAYING

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

Lake Tahoe in Depth Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Guided tours & 3-D movies

Distance Between Dreams

Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

April 20 » 7:30pm

(or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

with pro surfer Ian Walsh

Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2 May TBD

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

25


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE

BROTHERS

APRIL 25 | TUESDAY

COMATOSE

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Lucas Arizu Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m.

April 26 | 8 p.m. Trocadero Room | Reno, Nev. INFUSED WITH a sense of relaxed, experienced confidence, The Brothers Comatose offer a Southwestern-tinged, rowdy sound that might just make this your new favorite record before you turn it over to Side B. This rocking string band lights up the stage. | facebook.com/ trocaderoreno

THE

RENO & BEYOND

QUEBE

Jessie McCall

SISTERS APRIL 22 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

April 28 | 7 p.m. Mormon Station State Park | Genoa, Nev. TEXAS TRIPLE-THREAT, fiddle champions, the Quebe Sisters, blow away audiences with their multi-part harmony. The trio’s performances are authentic allAmericana, all the time. They are respectful of the artists that inspired them the most. | genoacowboyfestival.org

WYNONNA JUDD AND THE

BIG NOISE

Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Spider Peppermill 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Peeti V Lex GSR 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Erik Meyers Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Burning” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Brews, Brats & Ballet Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Special Events Steampunk Tavern Stroll Reno

APRIL 23 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

April 29 | 7 p.m. TJ’s Corral | Carson City, Nev. WYNONNA JUDD and the Big Noise, led by her husband/drummer/producer Cactus Moser, released a debut, fulllength album to critical acclaim. The band describes its new sound as “vintage, yet modern” and a “return to the well.” It’s a gutsy work encompassing country, Americana, blues, soul and rock. | carsonvalleyinn.com 26

Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Peter Joseph Burtt & The Kingtide Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Paul David & the Drivers Diamond Peak 2 p.m. Truckee Tahoe Community Chorus Resort at Squaw Creek 2 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Bridge to Terabithia” Truckee Community Theater 2 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. Rocky LaPorte & Ron Morey The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m.

Classix Six Pioneer Center 4 p.m. Carson City Symphony CC Community Center 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. George Pickard Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. RenoFesto Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Ryan Chrys & the Rough Cuts, w/Everyday Outlaw The Saint 8 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Brews, Brats & Ballet Reno Little Theater 2 p.m. John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Reno Earth Day Idlewild Park  

APRIL 24 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. George Pickard Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Missio w/Cemetery Sun Jub Jub’s 7:30 p.m. Kick Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m.

John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Corky Bennett Rail City 4:30 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Chris Toomey Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Ignite Reno #17 The Saint 6:30 p.m. First Take Sparks Lounge 7 p.m. King Lil G Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Classix Six Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. Kick Atlantis 8 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Mitch Fatel & Jason Stuart The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Special Events Reno Xtreme Barrel Race Livestock Events Center

APRIL 26 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Charles Fleischer The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Chris Toomey Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Jazz Jam Living the Good Life 7:30 p.m. Kick Atlantis 8 p.m. The Brothers Comatose Trocadero 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Alex Culbreth Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Live Blues Wednesdays The Saint 9 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Mitch Fatel The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Reno Xtreme Barrel Race Livestock Events Center


April 20-May 10, 2017

C A L E N D A R | A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 APRIL 27 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Groove Foundry Bar of America 5 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Jenni Charles & Jesse Dunn Moody’s 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. The Alkaholiks w/DJ True Justice + Vocab Slick Hard Rock 9 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Charles Fleischer The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Reno Jazz Festival UNR Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Rustler’s Heat Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Kyle Rea Peppermill 7 p.m. Kehlani Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Tacocat Holland Project 7 p.m. Kick Atlantis 8 p.m. Platinum Circus Circus 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Alex Culbreth + Bluegrass Lex St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Mitch Fatel & Jason Stuart The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Chris Franjola Pioneer Underground 8 p.m. Special Events Reno Xtreme Barrel Race Livestock Events Center

APRIL 28 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 11 a.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Don “Fingers” Kahn Nakoma Resort 5:30 p.m. The Quebe Sisters Genoa 7 p.m. Kevin Danzig Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Dweezil Zappa Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Bias and Dunn Bar of America 8 p.m. The Miguel Jimenez Quartet Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Woolymammoth and Toadface The BlueBird 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Ideateam Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Sykwidit & DJ Josbeatz Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m.

Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Charles Fleischer The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Reno Jazz Festival UNR Kick Atlantis 4 p.m. Dale Poune Boomtown 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Nashville Nights Showcase Valley Ballroom 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Rustler’s Heat Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Ella Fitzgerald’s 100th Birthday Piper’s Opera House 8 p.m.

MUSIC SCENE

Brews, Brats & Ballet HIGH ART AND SIMPLE PLEASURES STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

April 22 | 7:30 p.m. & April 23 | 2 p.m. | Reno Little Theater | Reno, Nev. April 30 | 4 p.m. | Brewery Arts Center | Carson City, Nev.

“ Because there are no words, there are no limitations and no boundaries. There is only the intimate act of interpretation between the audience and the artist from one soul to another.” –Rosine Bena Platinum Circus Circus 8 p.m. Kyle Rea Peppermill 8 p.m. Just Us Silver Legacy 8 p.m. On the Wild Side Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Anthony Hamilton Grand Sierra 9 p.m. Spring Break 3 Cargo 9 p.m. Andersen Ackerson Duo Harrah’s 9 p.m. Stephen Lord Boomtown 9 p.m. Double Vision 3rd Street Bar 9 p.m. Panic City Lex GSR 10 p.m. Cook Book Atlantis 10 p.m. Adjudicator’s Jam Session Circus Circus 10 p.m. Dack Janiels St. James Infirmary 10 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ R Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Latin Dance Social Peppermill 7 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Mitch Fatel & Jason Stuart The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Illusionists Pioneer Center 8 p.m. Dan Gabriel Carson Comedy Club 8 p.m. Chris Franjola Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Reno Xtreme Barrel Race Livestock Events Center Genoa Cowboy Festival Genoa

CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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re you intimidated by the sophisticated, sometimes supercilious world of classical art? Are you more at home watching a minor-league baseball game, but you’ve got a hot date you’d like to impress? Or maybe you enjoy being ironic. Either way, you may want to brisé your way over to the Brewery Arts Center in Carson City for a brew, a brat and, you guessed it, ballet. The annual event hosted by Sierra Nevada Ballet will feature a variety of short, original choreographic works by area artists in an unpretentious and welcoming atmosphere. “It is based on Sacramento Ballet’s Beer and Ballet, but we have taken it a step further in that we have each choreographer speak about the creative process and accentuate the relaxed, casual atmosphere with brats and brews,” says Ballet founder and artistic director Rosine Bena. “The program is eclectic with pieces for every taste. We have different styles of music and dance — classical, modern, contemporary and Alex Kaskie’s modern hip-hop, which combines modern, ballet and hip-hop.” The program begins with two new works by San Francisco Bay Area composer Milton Williams, featuring choreography by Bena. “ ‘Sufferance’ is about a government protest that gets out of hand and becomes a riot,” Bena says. “Seeing something like that in person can be frightening, so I made the violent part happen in slow motion. I think this piece is appropriate for this time in the United States and the piece has a powerful message without being offensive. ‘Bewitchinglude’ is a solo for SNB principal Laura Lunde inspired by a beautiful photo that was taken of her dancing with a piece of fabric.” Next are two works created by Reno Philharmonic cellist and composer Joseph Tatum and Carson City choreographer Alex Kaskie, followed by a new piece by Englishborn company member Oliver Adams. “Alex and Joe are doing a 20-minute collaborative work for ARTOWN’s Down Under program,” says Bena. “ ‘Love’ is just one short composition from that piece. ‘Elements’ is a fabulous athletic piece by Oliver for five dancers. It is very exciting, very aerobically athletic and moves like the wind.” Reno natives Jen August and Daniel Miller then join forces for two new, short modern works, “November Rain” and the duet “Verses.”

“Jen has done a beautiful abstract modern group work about the feelings that memories evoke, as well as a duet for herself and Daniel about relationships,” says Bena. The performance is rounded out with an original piece by the founding director of the University of Nevada, Reno dance program and the Ballet’s education outreach director, Barbara Land. “Barbara has created a beautiful spiritual piece called ‘Kyrie,’ which has no religious significance, but invokes a feeling of universal beauty and spirituality,” says Bena. Finally, Bena will present a short excerpt of her new version of “Sleeping Beauty,” which will premiere in July. The entire performance is a little more than an hour and includes an intermission. There is a short Q and A after the performance with the choreographers and composers. Brews, Brats and Ballet provides local composers and choreographers an opportunity to show their new works, one that can often be difficult for them to find. “SNB started a young choreographer program in the early 2000s to inspire new choreographic works,” says Bena. “Many choreographers are inspired to do new works, but often lack the opportunity to create. They often lack the funding, venues or highly trained dancers to create their work. This program offers choreographers of any age the opportunity to create brand new works and gives the audience the opportunity to share a bit in the creative process by hearing some personal reflections about each work directly from the choreographer.” Bena believes that in our modern society art forms such as ballet are relevant as never before. “Ballet is a universal language,” says Bena. “Everyone is able to understand beautiful movement. Because there are no words, there are no limitations and no boundaries. There is only the intimate act of interpretation between the audience and the artist from one soul to another. In today’s extra fast-paced world of high tech, we have a real need to connect spiritually and find ways to enrich our soul. Ballet touches the spirit and the soul in a way that other experiences do not.”  For more information or tickets, visit sierranevadaballet.org.

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MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

The Magic Beans G R O W O N TA H O E

C A L E N D A R | A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 JULY 30 | THURSDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27

APRIL 29 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

April 29 | 10 p.m. | Free | Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev.

Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Lumination Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Kelly and Jeff Art Truckee 7 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Battle of the Bands Hard Rock 8 p.m. Bias and Dunn Bar of America 8 p.m. The Miguel Jimenez Quartet Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Everyday Outlaw Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Rebel Soul Hard Rock 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Rebel Soul Hard Rock 9 p.m. Pato Banton & The Now Generation MontBleu 9 p.m. The Magic Beans Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Exodus & DJ SN1 Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m.

Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Dynamix Peppermill 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Illusionists Pioneer Center 2 & 8 p.m. Chris Franjola Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. Steve Hytner Boomtown 7 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Mitch Fatel & Jason Stuart The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Special Events Virginia City Grand Prix Cinco de Mayo Festival Grand Sierra Reno Xtreme Barrel Race Livestock Events Center Genoa Cowboy Festival

APRIL 30 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

“ Our music is multigenre, but all based around danceable kind

S

elf-confessed jam band The Magic Beans will be making a visit to Crystal Bay, Nev., to share their version of Colorado dance music. “I know some people think it’s a dirty word, but I’d say we are a jam band,” says guitarist Scott Hachey. “Our music is multi-genre, but all based around danceable kind of stuff. We’ll get funky and stretch it out. We encourage people to get up and move.” Hachey insists that while The Magic Beans are known to jam it out, they are also focused on songwriting. “I know a lot of people can get caught in all the jamming and getting after it,” says

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Listen to “Five Points” to get a taste of what to expect at the CBC

Hachey. “Our approach to songwriting is to write good songs that are unique. I try not to emulate other people too much. I feel like lots of bands will do what other bands before them have done. I try to write from the heart and write what’s natural to me, not over think it and just kind of write what’s natural and what comes in our heads. More than other jam bands, we like to play songs, songs that have message behind them with lyrics that you can take something from.” The band is releasing a new selfproduced EP this month that features livetronica, R & B, funk, classic jam-band songs. It’s called “Common Mind.” “We cut it really fast,” says Hachey. “We’ve been touring pretty hard so it feels good for us to get into the studio and release another album.” The Magic Beans met in Boulder, Colo., and have steadily grown their fan base over the past seven years. “When we started out, we just played around Colorado,” says Hachey. “We were just younger dudes gigging around town and stuff, having fun. When we graduated

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[from college] we decided to do the music thing and it’s been pretty successful locally. Now we are trying to branch out and catch fire in some other places. For the past three years, we’ve been touring nationally. We’re kind of new to the Tahoe area so we are so looking forward to meeting more people out there.” Hachey is grateful to be a part of a burgeoning Colorado Front Range music scene that has helped propel The Magic Beans onto the national stage. “Colorado, being halfway between L.A. and New York, is a kind of cultural island of sorts because there is really nothing close to it,” says Hachey. “There’s a really vibrant music scene there and it’s really supportive. It’s not as cutthroat or competitive as other markets. You’re out playing shows every night with the guys and they are kind of like your co-workers. So we’ve been able to network and spread the music. We travel around and play the mountain towns and do well at [midsize theatres] like the Fox and Bluebird Theater. We’re hoping to make that jump to a Red Rocks opening slot next year.” The Magic Beans will visit Tahoe in the middle of a six-week East Coast/West Coast tour. When I spoke with Hachey, he was looking forward to an upcoming visit to historic Nectars in Burlington, Vt., a spot forever engraved in jam-band legend for being the birthplace of Phish. Although it’s nothing more than a dingy bar and restaurant on Main Street, Nectars is a rite of passage for jam bands across the land. “I was kind of star struck the first time we went there,” says Hachey. “It’s got a lot of history and I definitely follow all that lore. It’s very cool to be able to go and bring it to capacity. It’s a journey to make a career, so it’s cool to know that you could be on the right track playing those places.” The Magic Beans will also be playing a show on April 28 at the Crazy Horse Saloon in Nevada City. 

of stuff. We’ll get funky and stretch it out. We encourage people to get up and move.” –Scott Hachey Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Joel McHale MontBleu 8 p.m. Charles Fleischer The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Reno Jazz Festival UNR Pops Plays Piper’s Piper’s Opera House 3 p.m. Kick Atlantis 4 p.m. Dale Poune Boomtown 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. VAMP Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Wynonna and the Big Noise TJ’s Corral 7 p.m. Suspect Terrane Brewery Art Center 7 p.m. Rustler’s Heat Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. On the Wild Side Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Cheap Trick Nugget Ballroom 8 p.m. Steppin’ Stonz Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Just Us Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Platinum Circus Circus 8 p.m. Moon Hooch Trocadero 8 p.m. Kyle Rea Peppermill 8 p.m. David Crosby Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Stephen Lord Boomtown 9 p.m. Psy Fi The BlueBird 9 p.m. Andersen Ackerson Duo Harrah’s 9 p.m. Zona Nortena 3rd Street Bar 9 p.m. Mojo Green The Saint 9 p.m. Cook Book Atlantis 10 p.m. UZ and Oski 1 Up 10 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m.

Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. Charles Fleischer The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Brews, Brats & Ballet Brewery Arts Center 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Baldo Bobadilla Peppermill 6 p.m. Patrick Major Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. Dierks Bentley Reno Events Center 7:30 p.m. Cook Book Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Illusionists Pioneer Center 1 & 7 p.m. Mitch Fatel & Jason Stuart The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Virginia City Grand Prix Cinco de Mayo Festival Grand Sierra Reno Xtreme Barrel Race Livestock Events Center Genoa Cowboy Festival

MAY 1 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 5:30 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Patrick Major Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Baldo Bobadilla Peppermill 6 p.m.


April 20-May 10, 2017

MUSIC SCENE

C A L E N D A R | A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Cathy Ladman & Carrie Snow The Improv 9 p.m.

MAY 2 | TUESDAY RENO & BEYOND TAHOE & TRUCKEE Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Corky Bennett Rail City 4:30 p.m. Baldo Bobadilla Peppermill 6 p.m. Jaime Rollins Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Steve McGrew Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 3 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Cathy Ladman & Carrie Snow The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Baldo Bobadilla Peppermill 6 p.m. Jaime Rollins Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Live Blues Wednesdays The Saint 9 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Steve McGrew Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 4 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. David Beck Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m.

Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Decoy Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Eyes Set to Kill Jub Jub’s 7:30 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance All Ages Improv Pioneer Underground 7 p.m. Steve McGrew Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m.

MAY 5 | FRIDAY

Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Latin Dance Social Peppermill 7 p.m. Improv Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. “Nice Work if Your Can Get It” Western NV Musical Theatre Co. 7:30 p.m. Steve McGrew Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Alex Elkin Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Comstock Arabian Horse Assoc. Spring Fiesta Livestock Events Center

MAY 6 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Acoustic Nights Bar of America 5 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Battle of the Bands Hard Rock 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Sierra Hull w/Royal Jelly Jive Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Jake Nielsen’s Triple Threat Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Spring 10-Minute Play Festival Truckee Community Theater 7 p.m. “South Pacific” Truckee High School 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Cathy Ladman & Carrie Snow The Improv 9 p.m.

RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Decoy Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance All Ages Improv Pioneer Underground 2 p.m. Alex Elkin Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Nice Work if Your Can Get It” Western NV Musical Theatre Co. 7:30 p.m. Steve McGrew Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Howie Mandel Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Coppelia Pioneer Center 8 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Special Events Reno River Festival Comstock Arabian Horse Assoc. Spring Fiesta Livestock Events Center

MAY 7 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 11 a.m. Guitar Town Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Oleander Hard Rock 8 p.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Acoustic Nights Bar of America 5 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Jelly Bread Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Cathy Ladman & Carrie Snow The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. First Take Great Western Marketplace 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Decoy Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ R Styles Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m.

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MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Announcements

Courtesy Tahoe Institute for Natural Science

C A L E N D A R | A P R I L 2 0 - M AY 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 MAY 7 | SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “South Pacific” Truckee High School 2 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. Cathy Ladman & Carrie Snow The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

BRING YOUR BINOCULARS Village Green Bird Walks with Tahoe Institute for Natural Science will be held every Thursday from May 4 to June 8 from 7:30 to 9 a.m. in Incline Village, Nev. Enjoy a leisurely stroll observing birds, identifying songs, calls and field marks. Open to birders of all experiences. Meet at Aspen Grove parking lot. | (775) 298-0067 or tinsweb.org

Moving forward

Get walking

Mountain Housing Council of Tahoe Truckee announces a Community Housing Event on April 29 from 8 to 11 a.m. at Truckee High School. The event will bring community stakeholders together to celebrate efforts in co-creating the community infrastructure necessary to serve regional housing issues. | bit.ly/housingupdates

Tahoe Forest Health System’s Wellness Neighborhood presents the Community Walking Challenge starting May 1. This free, month-long, fitness challenge is to take 10,000 steps a day every day. All ages can participate. There are prizes and weekly raffle drawings for participants who get at least 10,000 steps per day. | Register tfhd. com/walking

The parks are coming The U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit will begin opening recreational facilities, weather and snow conditions permitting. Before recreation sites can be opened to the public, crews and staff have to clean up the sites, remove safety hazards and wait for the danger of a freeze to pass before turning on water systems. There is no parking, trash removal or restroom facilities available until the openings. | fs.usda.gov/goto/ltbmu/recareas

Learn defense Tahoe SAFE Alliance offers free selfdefense classes in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The classes for ages 11 and older are from Charles Gracie Team Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. They will be held at 10975 Pioneer Trail #2, on April 21 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. and on April 22 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Donations to Tahoe SAFE Alliance will be accepted. | RSVP tahoesafealliance.org

Members’ perks Truckee Chamber of Commerce invites prospective members, new members and existing members to the monthly Membership 101 gathering on April 26 from 8 to 9 a.m. in the train depot. Hear about the chamber’s initiatives, learn about member benefits, exchange ideas and talk about how the chamber can support the business community. Stay afterwards to learn how chamber members can create a free business page at truckee.com. | (530) 587-8808

Customer Service seminar Join Laura Moriarty of Tahoe Training Partners for a customer service workshop on May 4 from 8 to 10 a.m. to get ready for a busy summer at the Tahoe City Public Utility District board room. Plus, get a sneak peak of a new customer service video series specific to North Lake Tahoe businesses.  The seminar is free for members of the Tahoe City Downtown Association, North Tahoe Business Association or the North Lake Tahoe Chamber and $20 cash only for nonmembers. | visittahoecity.org, northtahoebusiness.org or gotahoenorth.com

Silver ties a must High Fives Foundation’s Silver Tie Gala is on May 5 at Dolan Lexus in Reno, Nev. The event will celebrate the accomplishments of the foundation and name the annual Community Fives Awards recipients. There will be cocktails, appetizers, dinner from Mark Estee, dessert, music, documentaries and an awards presentation. Tickets are $250. | highfivesfoundation.org

Weeding through the changes Due to the passage of Proposition 64 in the November 2016 state election, the use of nonmedical, aka recreational, marijuana has been legalized. The Town of Truckee Town Council is holding a workshop to discuss the town’s approach to marijuana regulations at Town Hall from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 11. | cannabis@townoftruckee.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Announcements. 30

Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Bill Wharton Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Coppelia Pioneer Center 2 p.m. “Nice Work if Your Can Get It” Western NV Musical Theatre Co. 2 p.m. Steve McGrew Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Comstock Arabian Horse Assoc. Spring Fiesta Livestock Events Center

MAY 8 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bill Wharton Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

MAY 9 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. All Them Witches w/Idle Bloom Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Corky Bennett Rail City 4:30 p.m. Denver Saunders Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Mile High Jazz Comma Coffee 7:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m.

Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 10 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 3 p.m. Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Nick Youssef & Sandy Danto The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Denver Saunders Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

MAY 11 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Cash’d Out Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Nick Youssef & Sandy Danto The Improv 9 p.m. Special Events Indigo Star The Ridge Portola RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Just Us Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Gerry Bednob Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m.


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

TA S T Y TIDBITS

Time for growing Reno, Nev. River School Farm announces the 2017 Homesteading Workshops held at Verdant Connections Urban Farm once a month: composting is on April 22, backyard animal husbandry is on May 13, herbal remedies is on June 10, backyard beekeeping is on July 22, high tunneling on Aug. 19 and preserving your harvest on Sept. 9. The two-hour morning workshops are for 15 people. The fee is $30 per workshop. | verdantconnections.com

DIY gardening Truckee Truckee Roundhouse in collaboration with Slow Food Lake Tahoe offers How to Build A Critter-Proof Garden Bed on April 29 from 8 a.m. to noon. During this interactive workshop, participants will be led through basic safety precautions and carpentry skills, then have an opportunity to build and take home a raised bed. Participants should expect to work hard and get messy. All parts will be assembled on site, with final assembly at home. No experience is necessary. Participants are also invited to attend an Organic Gardening 101 Workshop the following day free of charge. Participants must select the $75 class fee, which lid or bed they wish to build. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

Down-home produce Area venues Nothing says summer like a trip to the local farmer’s market. Enjoy the sunshine, fresh local produce, great food and people who help make this community special. Tahoe City farmers’ market opens May 19 and Truckee Regional Park’s market open in mid-May. Other regional markets from South Lake Tahoe to Carson City, Nev., to Beckwourth open in June.

Back the truck up Reno, Nev. Reno Street Food presents Food Truck Fridays from May 19 to Sept. 29 at Idlewild Park from 5 to 9 p.m. every Friday. There will be 30 deliciously packed food trucks, pop-up restaurants and food trailers along with local bands and artists featured each week. | Reno Street Food on Facebook

LOCAL FLAVOR

flavor

Japanese spirits and cocktails

Crawl, don’t walk Reno, Nev. Reno, the crawl capital of the world, announces its upcoming events. On April 22, the Steampunk Stroll will take place from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. The fee is $10 for a premium mug and map. There will be a costume contest and entertainment. Upcoming crawls include: Epic Crawl/ Lightsaber Battle on June 3, Pirate Crawl on Aug. 19, Zombie Crawl/Thriller Dance on Oct. 21 and Pajama Crawl on Nov. 18. | Register crawlreno.com

April 20-May 10, 2017

S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

J

apanese whiskey has taken the U.S. by storm. Some are light and smooth while others lean toward a rich scotch experience and most are daringly delicious. Drink too much and you’ll be dancing in no time. Bartender Dave Monachello at Cottonwood Restaurant turned me onto my Japanese whiskey obsession. He poured me a glass of Hibiki Harmony with a cube on the side; one sip and I fell in love. I drank it neat. Hibiki Harmony is light and easy to drink. Monachello also had a Yamazaki 12 Year Old single malt, which was more like scotch than the Hibiki and had a peatier flavor. Both were delicious. Ryan Dierks, co-owner of the Truckee Tavern, offers a number of Japanese whiskeys. He poured me a glass of Akashi that rivaled Hibiki. He served it with his signature hand-cut ice cube. If you find me at Truckee Tavern, this is what I’ll be sipping.

less sweet than its sake cousin, which is fermented. Shōchū tends to be a bit more earthy and nutty and is slightly akin to vodka in flavor. It originated in the Kyūshū region of Japan but is produced in locations throughout the country. It is made from rice, barley, sweet potato, brown sugar or soba; some distillers use chestnuts, sesame seeds or potatoes or blend more than one ingredient to produce shōchū. One of my favorite Japanese cocktails is the Grapefruit Shōchū Sour, which I was introduced to while in Japan. The simple recipe is grapefruit juice, soda water and shōchū.

Grapefruit Sh¯och¯u Sour

He poured me a glass of Hibiki Harmony with a cube on the side; one sip and I fell in love. “Akashi is an entry-level-priced blended whiskey. This is the candy cigarette of Japanese whiskey. Nikka, Hakushu, Yamazaki and Hibiki are truly incredible and rival any scotch,” says Dierks. “Masataka Taketsuru is kind of the godfather of Japanese single malt. He learned from masters in Scotland and brought it back to Japan. He was focused not only on distilling and aging but water source, grain quality, elevations, climate. If I understand the story correctly, he bought an entire watershed surrounding one distillery to ensure that no contamination of his pristine water source could happen. Every detail is observed and constantly improved upon in small ways to produce the most subtly nuanced whiskies I’ve ever had.” Bottles of imported Japanese whiskeys don’t come cheap. The price tag for a bottle of Hibiki Harmony is about $70, Yamazaki 18 Year Old will run around $275 and Hakushu 18 Year Old is about $250 a bottle. Zanders Spirits in Truckee carries a variety of high-end Japanese whiskeys and owner Tina Zanders-Aldridge is knowledgeable. “Hibiki Harmony is a blend because they couldn’t keep up with the age statement and demand,” she says.

According to Zanders-Aldridge, the demand is big because of social media and because of the quality. “It’s good. Japan shares the same profile as Scotland being on the ocean. The Suntory Distillery has been around for a long time and Yamazaki has been perfecting their craft.” If you lean to a sweeter libation, Japanese cocktails are plentiful. Drunken Monkey Sushi in Truckee offers a selection of Japanese whiskey and sake, including a number of infused sake drinks. Redlight Truckee offers an entire menu of sake and shōchū cocktails. Shōchū is distilled and

Abby Polus, co-owner of Redlight, designed a version of the Shōchū Sour for my birthday. It’s sour and sweet, grapefruity and delightfully refreshing. She added egg whites for a fun froth. Shōchū can be upwards of 24 percent alcohol content and they can sneak up on you. In addition, other cocktails at Redlight include a Japanese Ginger Mule, a Lavender Lemonade Shōchū Cocktail and a Redlight Russian made with local Dark Horse coffee, vanilla bean infusion and shōchū. Redlight now offers a Priya Sour on its menu; ask for it and give it a try. Tell the folks behind the bar you read about it in The Tahoe Weekly.  Priya Hutner is a writer, health and wellness consultant, and natural foods chef. Her business, The Seasoned Sage, focuses on wellness, conscious eating and healthy living. She offers healthy organic meals for her clients. She may be reached at pria78@ gmail.com or visit theseasonedsage.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to read more.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

31


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MORE Fine Italian Food & Spirits

TA S T Y

Tidbits

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HOW SPICY IS YOURS Sierra-at-Tahoe hosts a Salsa Showdown on April 22 at the Golden Bear Terrace. Participants can enter their salsas, traditional or fruity, win a 2017-18 season pass. Competition is capped at the first 25 salsas entered. While judges are looking for the No. 1 salsa, there will be a taco-eating contest, piñata, food specials and Spanish jams playing. Fill out a form on the Web site to enter. | sierraattahoe.com

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pianetarestauranttruckee.com 32

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Tahoe casual Tahoe City The Community Benefit Auction and Wine Tasting hosted by Kiwanis Club North Lake Tahoe is on May 7 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge. More than $50,000 in goods and services will be offered along with premium wines and sumptuous appetizers. Proceeds benefit local youth and social service programs. Dress is Tahoe casual with spring flair. Ticket prices this year are $35 per person in advance or $40 per person at the door. Tickets are available from any Kiwanis Club member, Mother Nature’s Cabin Fever or kiwanisnlt.org.

Best of the best Northstar Tahoe Forest Health System Foundation presents the 18th annual Best of Tahoe Chefs: Evening in White on May 21 at 4:30 p.m. at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe. The fundraiser will benefit Patient & Family Programs at the Gene Upshaw Memorial Tahoe Forest Cancer Center. Mobile bidding on the silent auction items from cell phones will be open on May 19 at noon. | bestoftahoechefs.org

Take a stroll along the river Reno, Nev. Downtown Reno Wine Walk along the Truckee River in the Riverwalk District is on May 20 and June 17 from 2 to 5 p.m. Every third Saturday of the month visit any of the participating Riverwalk District merchants to get a map of Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, for a $20 wine-tasting fee and valid photo ID, receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet to sample wine at any participating merchant. Strollers and pets are not advised because of large crowds. | renoriver.org

Chili in the hills Virginia City, Nev. The 34th annual Chili on the Comstock returns to the historic town May 20 to 21 along C Street in Virginia City. The event promises all the favorite chili flavors and brings the return of the Fireball Saloon Crawl, Fun with the Runs 5K, music and family friendly activities. | visitvirginiacitynv.com

Gardening tips for free South Lake Tahoe Friends of the Library offer two UC Cooperative Extension Master Gardener of Lake Tahoe workshops this May. Participants receive instruction on cultivation techniques and history/background of the plants. Everyone will leave with free plants. These are family-friendly workshops with hands-on opportunities. On May 20, the Asparagus Workshop is at 10 a.m. This hardy perennial vegetable can become part of an edible landscape and a mainstay in the garden. On May 30, Tomatoes Workshop is at 6 p.m. Learn the techniques required to grow these plants in our cool summers. Topics include proper varietal selection, location in the garden or container, planting options and methods for protecting the young plants. Free and open and all. | eldoradolibrary.org

Beer geeks allowed Reno, Nev. The Strange Brew Festival is on May 20 from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Brewer’s Cabinet. This is a celebration of uniquely crafted brews from local breweries. Expect the unexpected. Most of the offerings from more than 20 local breweries will only be available at this festival — uncommon beer, in many cases, specially crafted for this event. These brews will challenge taste buds and sensibilities. There will be live music and food from Liberty Food & Wine. | strangebrewfestival.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits.


April 20-May 10, 2017

LOCAL FLAVOR

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530-546-7529 | www.souledomain.com

I

bet the first word that comes to mind when you think of Australian wines is big: big fruit, big alcohol and big critters on the label. I bet the next word is small, as in less than $10 prices.

The Hunter Valley region of New South Wales has a unique maritime climate and soils for grape growing that create some of the most incredible Semillon wines you can imagine. For decades this was a popular and successful formula made possible by cheap land, plenty of water and cutting-edge wine technologies. The land and water factors are obvious advantages but the technology aspect was as important. You see the vast majority of Australian juice didn’t come from quality terroirs, but rather from fertile farm regions akin to California’s Central Valley. The Down Under yields were tremendous and growing costs were low. The fruit, however, was quite pedestrian. The Aussies recognized this and brought winemaking technologies to bear that made for tasty wine. So what happened? Contrary to popular opinion it was not the world’s changing taste in wines from plentiful wines to those with more refinement. As a matter of fact, the largest and fastest growing category in wine sales today is that of rich, high-alcohol wines, such as the beloved large-production wines with edgy names — think Apothic and the like. What killed the Aussies were droughts and wildfires that depleted water sources and the rising costs of producing wine. Also, the Australian government had subsidized the wine industry to help it gain a foothold in the world, which led to the cheap pricing that created a market perception that Aussie wines had to be cheap. Wow, that was depressing just to write. Indeed the fall was hard and heavy because many producers went belly up and others had to sell their wine below cost just to stay alive — some still do. So what are they going to do about it?

Aussie Vineyard managers. | Courtesy Australia Tourism

Job 1 is resetting the actual and perceived quality and price of their wines and wineries are identifying specific regions and the grape varieties that excel there. There is a lot more wine to explore from the Land Down Under. I bet it will surprise you to learn that top Australian wines such as Penfolds Grange and Henshke Hill of Grace sell for about twice what firstgrowth Bordeaux fetches these days. At much more approachable price points — think quite a bit less than top California offerings — there are many exciting wines to be discovered. As we would find with almost any exceptional wines, they come from dedicated people who identified the right terroirs with the right grapes and top winemaking. Cool climate regions such as Victoria and Tasmania bring Pinot Noirs and Chardonnays, as both still and sparkling wines, which stand with anything you will find in the $30 to $50 range. Western Australia has wineries with coast-hugging vineyards that create Cabernet Sauvignons and Chardonnays that are world class. Try either from Leeuwin Estate, especially their Art Series bottlings. For some things out of the box, the Hunter Valley region of New South Wales has a unique maritime climate and soils for grape growing that create some of the most incredible Semillon wines you can imagine. I will tell you they take at least seven to eight years to develop, but most producers don’t release them until then. South Australia is most known for being home to the hot Barossa Valley, known for its Shiraz. It’s also the site of the Clare and Eden valleys, both quite cool with well-draining mineral soils that make for powerful and delicious Rieslings. The best way to find these gems is to visit a dedicated wine shop and get some ideas from your trusted local wine purveyor. 

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Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier and his consulting business WineProwest.com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 544-3435 or lou@ wineprowest.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns.

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here was a set menu in my house while I was growing up. Thursday was always chicken night. I loved chicken night, but I did, however, learn to ask for the dark meat. It wasn’t that I didn’t like the white meat, but if you didn’t get it from the thick end of the breast, it would take an extra glass of milk to wash it down because it was more than just a little dry. When Mom cooked the chicken, she would take it out of the bag and put it right into the oven without doing anything to it. As we got older and our taste buds got a little more refined, she would sprinkle a little salt on it. Once in a while she would even baste it once during the cooking time. It was still pretty dry and the dark meat was still the best. These days, I still eat a lot of chicken. Most of the time, I get a family package of thighs or full legs. I’ll portion the chicken out and freeze it. Sometimes, I will cook a whole chicken if I am having guests for dinner or if I want leftovers’ for sandwiches. Whether you are cooking a whole chicken or parts, there are a few easy things you can do to keep the chicken moist and add a lot of flavor.

If you brown the bird on top of the stove first, then I find there is enough fat in the skin so that you do not need the extra oil. I find browning it on top of the stove will sear it a little quicker and keep the meat a tiny bit moister. Once the pan on the stove is hot, put the chicken in skin side or breast side down. Let the skin get a nice golden brown and then roll the bird a little until the entire outside is golden. Flip the bird right side up and place it in the oven for about 45 minutes or so depending on the size of the chicken. To test if it is done, push a small sharp knife through the thickest part of the thigh all the way to the bone. If the juice comes out clear then the chicken is ready. But if there is any red in the juice, then it still needs a little more time.

WHOLE CHICKEN When cooking a whole chicken, first you will want to season it. Rub the inside cavity of the body with a good amount of garlic, sage, rosemary, basil, salt and pepper. You can be fairly generous with the amounts because you are putting the spices on mostly bones and you want the flavor to permeate the meat. Once the cavity is seasoned, tie the legs so that they are pulled back and close to the body of the bird. The legs will cover the thin part of the breast, which will keep that section of meat from over cooking and drying out. Once tied, rub the outside of the body with sage, rosemary, basil, salt and pepper. Now that the bird is seasoned and tied, it is ready to cook. Turn the oven on to 350 degrees and put the pan on a burner on the stove to get hot. Some people like to spread a little oil or butter over the outside to help it crisp up and brown. If you are going to throw the chicken into the oven, that is a good idea.

THIGHS AND LEGS If you are just cooking thighs or legs, and want to add a little flavor, try this simple tip. Peel the skin back away from the meat but not all the way. Season the meat with the herbs, salt and pepper and replace the skin. Sprinkle a little more seasoning over the skin and over the bottom of the meat. Get your pan hot on top of the stove. Place the chicken skin

side down in the pan to brown the skin and then once the skin is golden, flip the meat over and place right away into the oven to finish. If you would like to make a simple sauce for the chicken, take the chicken out of the pan to rest before slicing and add a little sherry to deglaze the pan

If you would like to make a simple sauce for the chicken, take the chicken out of the pan to rest before slicing and add a little sherry to deglaze the pan on the stove top. on the stove top. Use a wooden spoon to be sure to free up all the chicken and herb parts that have stuck to the pan. When the sherry is almost evaporated, add a little water and let that cook down. All you need is a little of this juice drizzled over your chicken to add a lot more flavor. Enjoy the meal.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly. com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

ROASTED CHICKEN

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 1 whole chicken 2 cloves garlic 1T sage ½ T rosemary ½ T basil 1 T salt 1 T pepper 1 lemon 1 oz. sherry 3 oz. water 12 inches butchers twine Combine the finely chopped garlic with three-quarters of the herbs and rub the inside of the chicken well. Put a few knife wholes in the lemon and place inside the cavity. Loop the twine around the front of the chicken and then up around the legs to pull the legs back close to the body of the bird and tie it off. Brown the skin on top of the oven and finish in the oven at 350 degree for 45 minutes or until the juice comes out clear when the thickest part of the thigh is pierced with a small sharp knife. For thighs, pull the skin back but not off completely from the meat. Season the meat with the sage, rosemary, basil, salt and pepper. Replace the skin and season the top of the skin with just a little more of the seasonings. Place the chicken skin side down in a hot pan on the stove-top to brown the skin. Flip the chicken over and put it into the oven to finish.

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Photo by Matt Bansak

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