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FAST FOR

HUNGER There’s no camping like

THE LIQUE

Hip-Hop jazz for the soul

SNOW CAMPING Myths about

AVALANCHE DANGER

Tahoe

IN THIS ISSUE

SPRING 2017 EDITION


SKI FREE THIS SPRING 2017–18

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

What’s Inside

Volume 36 | Issue 07 TM

| APRIL 6-19

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Features

SUBMISSIONS Editoral | editor@tahoethisweek.com

Snow Camping Tahoe Local Avalanche Myths Tahoe Music & Festivals 28 Worship Services 32 Sierra Stories 08 12 15 17

Entertainment | entertainment@tahoethisweek.com Photography | production@tahoethisweek.com

IN THE OFFICE Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill | publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102

Out

Arts

culture

Image Nation

17

25 Exhibit Calendar 25 Watching Paint Dry 26 The Arts

AMAZING TAHOE SPRING SKIING The winter season just keeps on giving as the bounty of snowfall the Tahoe Sierra experienced during the 2016-17 season extends into spring. The snow crocus and daffodils are starting to appear as the snow melts at Lake level, but at Tahoe resorts at higher elevations there’s still plenty of time for spring skiing and snowboarding. Downhill and Nordic resorts have extended their seasons well into April, with Mt. Rose and Squaw Valley going until Memorial Day and 4th of July, respectively. Spring skiing also means more time to explore backcountry sports from snowmobiling to skiing. Writer Lisa Michelle recently did her own exploring, joining the Tahoe Rim Trail Association on its Snow Camping 101 outing and she shares her experiences in “There’s no camping like snow camping.”

Local

flavor

39 40 41 42

Project MANA Chef’s Recipe Wine Column Tasty Tidbits

Sightseeing Lake Tahoe Facts Events Snow Trails Family Fun For the Kids Snowmobiling Deep ‘n’ Daring Announcements

Music SCENE 33

Entertainment Editor Priya Hutner | priya@tahoethisweek.com

Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle

DEADLINES & INFO April 20 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 11 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, April 13 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, April 13 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, April 13 TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

ON THE COVER

30 Puzzles 31 Horoscope 33 Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 33 The Lique 37 The Head & The Heart

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVES

Graphic Designer Mael Passanesi | graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101

Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen

14

39

While exploring the back country, local forecasters urge adventurers to practice safe avalanche skills and to take heed, debunking some common myths in Kayla Anderson’s story “Myths about avalanche danger.” With the advent of spring also comes our seasonal Tahoe Music & Festivals guide, featuring our picks for festivals, performances, outings and indulgences not to be missed this spring from the Spring Meltdown metal festival in Stateline, to the Reno Sculpture Fest, to the inaugural Lake Tahoe Brewfest and much more. 

Courtesy Projecrt Mana

From the Publisher

Art Director | Production Alyssa Ganong | production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106

Copy Editor Katrina Veit

06 07 08 10 12 13 14 14 16

26

Courtesy Northstar California

about

Sales Manager Anne Artoux | anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110

– John Muir

Seamus Donohue enjoys a bluebird ski day at Mt. Rose Ski Area, which is among many Tahoe resorts that have extended their seasons due to this year’s epic snowfall. Mt. Rose will be open for skiing until May 29. | Photography by Billy Jesberg, SkiRose.com

FEATURES · POWDER ALERTS COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS

Subscribe to the free, digital editions of Tahoe Weekly & Tahoe Powder TheTahoeWeekly.com | issuu.com | issuu app iTunes & GooglePlay | E-Newsletter Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at 4

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April 6-19, 2017

early-bird pass Sale through April 30 Adult (ages 24-64)

$379 $279 Full

Midweek

Senior (ages 65-69)

$159 $139 Full

Midweek

includes spring access season extended to April 23 Kids 6 & Under / Adults 80+ are free!

View details & purchase online: DiamondPeak.com • (775) 832-1177 5


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SIGHTSEEING

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

East Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Donner Summit

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

West Shore

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

$10 parking | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Sugar Pine Point State Park is home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

High Camp

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

BASE DEPTH:

131”

Squaw Valley BASE DEPTH:

BASE DEPTH:

LAKE TAHOE 6

Natural rim 6,223’

210”

Emerald Bay

Parking fee | Tours in summer (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Wed.-Mon. | Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Tahoe City

North Shore

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and the 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

Tallac Historic Site

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

Taylor Creek Visitor Center

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

Truckee truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

Reports taken on Friday, March 28, 2017

Mt. Rose Ski Area BASE DEPTH:

213”

109”-246”

Kirkwood Mountain Resort

Vikingsholm Castle

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

REGIONAL SNOW LEVELS Heavenly

North Shore

Sweeping views of Lake Tahoe’s South and West Shores as seen from Mount Watson. | Katherine E. Hill

Sugar Bowl BASE DEPTH:

Tahoe City

Tours in summer (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in the summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

Tahoe Maritime Museum

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Truckee

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Tahoe Science Center

Truckee Railroad Museum

Western SkiSport Museum

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Incline Village

Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Olympic Winter Games

Donner Summit

Fri.-Sun. | Free (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing, exhibits include snowshoes from the 1850s, ski equipment from the 20th Century and a pair of 8-foot-long skis used by John “Snowshoe” Thompson, a legendary mail carrier. Located at Boreal off I-80. TART

Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building. TART

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

Kings Beach

South Lake Tahoe

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Historical Society Incline Village

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe City

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Kings Beach State Rec. Area, (Thurs.-Mon., summer) 969 Tahoe Blvd., (800) 468-2463

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd., (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50, (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City 100 North Lake Blvd., (530) 581-6900

Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Road (Depot), (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village Tahoe City

Daily | Free | tahoemuseum.org Features official 1960 Winter Olympic items such as skis, promotional literature, collection of official Olympic photographer Bill Briner. Learn the history of skiing in the Sierra. Inside Boatworks Mall. TART

855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr., (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd., (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Road, (530) 587-3558

116”-211” Elevation: 6,227.25 | Elevation in 2016: 6,222.86

TRANSIT: NORTH LAKE TAHOE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH LAKE TAHOE | bluego.org


April 6-19, 2017

N

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee Donner Lake

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Donner Summit BOREAL

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Reno & Sparks MT. ROSE

WEST EAST SOUTH

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SUGAR BOWL h Ta

AUBURN SKI CLUB

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Tahoe City

SQUAW CREEK

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside Tahoe Pines Eagle Rock

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

il

Ta h o e R i m

NV

Dollar Hill

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Carson City

Homewood HOMEWOOD

e Ri

Visit plugshare.com for details

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

CA

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Natural rim: 6,223’

Glenbrook o Ta h

ELECTRIC CHARGING STATIONS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

ALPINE MEADOWS

a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

SQUAW VALLEY

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

CASINOS

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

CLAIR TAPPAAN

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

ROYAL GORGE

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

il

DONNER SKI RANCH SODA SPRINGS

Cave Rock

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Watershed Area: 312 square miles Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F

Fannette Island

Shoreline: 72 miles

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Ta h oe

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually HOPE VALLEY

Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 73.1’ in 2015. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

7


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

THERE’S NO CAMPING LIKE

snow camping

amping in winter should not be a suffer fest. At least that’s what I hoped when I planned to join the Tahoe Rim Trail Association for its Snow Camp 101 program in March. Before setting out for camp above Tahoe Meadows, we spent a few hours learning the fundamentals of camping on snow. Preparation and prevention are key for an enjoyable adventure. Weather is a large part of prevention. Campers should be willing to reschedule or cancel trips based on the forecast. Since the weather in the Sierra isn’t entirely predictable, campers should be prepared for a variety of conditions.

the kitchen. We dug and carved into a snowdrift until we created a counter and bench about 20 feet in length. My tent went up with little effort. After staking it down, I built a small snow wall around the bottom to prevent cold air from circulating under me. I felt confident about the cold night ahead and visited the kitchen to cook my dehydrated meal.

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Camp for a cold, winter night.

AVOID SIMPLE MISTAKES Before we use a real restroom one last time, John Ferguson, a former Marine Corps Recon leader, reminds us of how simple mistakes cost people their lives. “Many people get lost just looking for a place to use the bathroom, especially at night,” says Ferguson. He shared the story of a woman who left the Appalachian Trail to use the

rewarded with a spectacular sight: a glaring full moon rising in the east as the sun set in the west. A panorama blossomed as we watched in awe. bathroom and got lost. She kept a journal for one month before she died. This is an extreme example, but proves how easily mistakes can be made especially if vision is impaired by snow or fog. He suggested leaving a small light attached to your tent at night or making reflectors from cord and reflective tape to mark the path back. I had never considered a FUD (female urination device) before now.

8

EVERY TUESDAY

Toddler Time Truckee

A few of us hiked to the top of the ridge and were

Layers work best. Cotton holds moisture and is not recommended. Polypropylene is a good choice, but wool is best. Wool is great at absorbing moisture and it dries relatively quickly, compared to other fibers. Our second guide, Jim Mrazek, inspected my sleeping system. I have a threeseason tent, a Therm-a-Rest mat, an air mattress, an 18-degree sleeping bag with a silk liner and the down booties I splurged on for extra warmth. I get Mrazek’s and Eick’s approval and am eager to go.

Hope Valley Outdoors offers Mindful XCountry Skiing on Mondays from 3 to 4 p.m. The practice of mindfulness meditation is proven to assist with stress management and overall health. It’s easy, accessible and goes beautifully with a quiet mountain trail. $20. | hopevalleycrosscountry.com

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530) 546-2012

Crack the code Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts an Hour of Code on Tuesdays at 4 p.m. This introduction to computer programming for Grades 3 and higher is designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. Children can choose from a variety of fun projects. | (775) 832-4130 Camp kitchen.

Hiking to snow camp near Chickadee Ridge.

Ski in the moment Markleeville

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

AVOID HYPOTHERMIA “Staying dry means staying warm, that includes not overheating and sweating,” says Gerry Eick, who has been guiding for the TRTA for eight years. Shivering is an early sign of mild hypothermia, so find a way to get warm. Physical activity like jumping jacks will warm you up or if you’re in your sleeping bag, raise your knees to your chest — but remember, don’t get sweaty. Eating will warm you up. A common misconception is that alcohol warms you, but it actually enhances hypothermia. Clothing is important in keeping warm.

APRIL 6-20, 2017

EVERY MONDAY

STORY & PHOTOS BY LISA MICHELLE

C

EVENTS CALENDAR

SETTING UP CAMP We hiked about a mile into camp, just below Chickadee Ridge. The afternoon sun had most of us peeling off layers within minutes. In camp, we immediately scouted our individual spots. I chose a small area bordered on three sides by lodgepole pines. Never camp near dead or dying trees, they can come down or limbs can break and fall on you. Next, we outlined a space double our tent size by stomping the snow with our snowshoes with backpacks on for added weight and better compaction. We let our sites settle and got to work building

After dinner, the sun dropped below the West Shore and lit the snow with a vibrant violet haze. Clouds of tangerine smeared the last blue light of day above Lake Tahoe. A few of us hiked to the top of the ridge and were rewarded with a spectacular sight: a glaring full moon rising in the east as the sun set in the west. A panorama blossomed as we watched in awe. The night was bright and cold: 15 degrees. In my sleeping bag, I had on my wool leggings and was wrapped in my puffy North Face jacket. Hand warmers were in my down booties thawing my toes. I wore a wool long-sleeve shirt covered with another down jacket. I had on my beanie and I was still cold. I lifted my knees to my chest 25 times and waited to warm up. I wasn’t shivering, just cold, uncomfortably cold. At 2 a.m. I made the trek to my pre-planned, pre-stomped bathroom area and fell waist deep into the tree well I was supposed to avoid. I was cold the entire night and looked forward to dawn. At breakfast, I learned that six of the seven participants had been cold during the night and that included two couples. We agreed it wasn’t a miserable cold, just uncomfortable enough to prevent sleep. For me, snow camping was worth the sacrifice. The lack of bears, bugs and crowds was also a perk. Spending the night in a snowy wilderness has a liberating charm and is worth the trial and error it takes to learn to camp comfortably. 

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Babes in Bookland Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in Heavenly is from 4 to 7. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass. Free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from featured winery. | (530) 523-8024

EVERY THURSDAY

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village, Nev. The Conversation Café is a drop-in conversation forum hosted by the Senior Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310

Story Time Tahoe City

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382

Toddler Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts story time every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m. with stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 6 months to 3 years. | (775) 832-4130


April 6-19, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

Courtesy Leif Whittaker

Preschool story time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years and older. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Wine voyages Olympic Valley

Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Café to learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Flights available from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. through April on Thursdays. | squawalpine.com

Help with computers Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First Thursdays of the month are “Beginners Basic Instruction,” second Thursdays are “Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about technology. | (530) 546-2021

EVERY FRIDAY

Ski with rangers South Lake Tahoe

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit offers Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort. The one-hour tours begin at the top of the gondola every Monday and Friday at 1 p.m. Participants must be intermediate-level skiers/boarders or above and provide their own lift ticket. No reservations: first-come first-served. Until April 7, weather permitting. | goto/ltbmu/skiranger

Ski in the moment Markleeville

Hope Valley Outdoors offers Mindful X-Country Skiing on Fridays from 3 to 4 p.m. The practice of mindfulness meditation is proven to assist with stress management and overall health. It’s easy, accessible and goes beautifully with a quiet mountain trail. $20. From 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the yurt is Women’s Backcountry Health. | hopevalleycrosscountry.com

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with G and PG movies. | (530) 582-9669

EVERY SATURDAY

Great end to the day Incline Village, Nev.

Diamond Peak’s Last Tracks wine/beer tasting events will be held every Saturday through April 15. Buy a late-day lift ticket, valid from 2 to 4 p.m., to take a final chair ride up to Snowflake Lodge for wine or craft beer tastings, paired with appetizers. Participants take a run down a freshly groomed trail. $44. 21+. | RSVP diamondpeak.com

EVERY SUNDAY

Hearty, good snowshoe Kirkwood

Kirkwood Cross Country & Snowshoe Center offers Soup and Shoe every Sunday at noon. An easygoing snowshoe is followed by soup at the Kirkwood Inn. | kirkwood.com

Only natural Markleeville

Hope Valley Outdoors offers naturalist hikes with Janara Nerone on Sundays from 3 to 4 p.m. She will discuss snowpack, local plants, wildlife, ecology or the history of the Hope Valley. $20. | hopevalleycrosscountry.com

APRIL 6 | THURSDAY All the cool CATTs Tahoe Vista

Contractors Association of Truckee Tahoe is hosting a mixer at Tahoe Tech Group from 5 to 7 p.m. Check out the new offices. Food, fun, raffle prizes and networking. | ca-tt.com

Winery Takeover Tahoe City

Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents an Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinner that include the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery. $30 to $35. | RSVP sunnysideresort.com

TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

TERC offers “Recovering the Endangered Mountain Yellow-legged Frog in the Sierra Nevada,” with Roland Knapp, Ph.D., of Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory UC Santa Barbara. A world with no frogs is a possibility in the Sierra Nevada; 90 percent of the Mountain Yellow-legged Frogs have been disappearing due to an amphibian pathogen and loss of habitat from fish introductions in our lakes. No-host bar at 5:30; presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP terc.ucdavis.edu

A community honored Olympic Valley

North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association Community Awards banquet is at Resort at Squaw Creek. “Make Your Mark: Celebrating Your Impact on North Lake Tahoe” will begin with cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. Businesses, organi-zations and individuals will be honored. | gotahoenorth.com

Entrepreneurs welcome South Lake Tahoe

“Are you growing your dream business?” The mentor-based Entrepreneurs Program meets the first Thursday of every month from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Aspen Room at Lake Tahoe Community College. Free to all. | Register tahoechamber.com

APRIL 7 | FRIDAY Havana meets Tahoe Stateline, Nev.

Tahoe Regional Planning Agency presents economist Rafael Betancourt talking on “Cuba: The Limits of Reform” from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the TRPA offices. He will be offering his unique insights on sustainable tourism. Free. | RSVP (775) 589-5251

Ahoy, lil’ matey Tahoe City

Tahoe Maritime Museum hosts preschool story time: Ships, Sails and Nautical Tales from 11 to 11:30 a.m. every other Friday of the month. The program is directed at ages 3 to 5 and will feature books that have maritime themes. | danielle@ tahoemaritime.org

Chowder Feed South Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe Windjammers Yacht Club hosts a Chowder Feed at 6 p.m. at the Yacht Club room in the Tahoe Keys Marina with a Social Hour, dinner at 7 p.m. and a general meeting. Open to members and anyone interested in learning about becoming a member. $15. | RSVP tahoewindjammers.com

‘MY OLD MAN

AND THE

M O U N TA I N ’ Alpenglow Sports partners with Mountaineers Books to host mountaineer Leif Whittaker at Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema on April 13. Whittaker brings a fresh perspective on his famous father, Lou Whittaker, a mountaineering legend who was the first American to summit Mount Everest in 1963. Leif’s “My Old Man and the Mountain” is the engaging and humorous story of what it was like to grow up the youngest son of Jim Whittaker and Dianne Roberts. He shares glimpses of his upbringing and how the pressure to climb started early on. Learn of his first adventures with family in the Olympic Mountains and on Mount Rainier, his close and competitive relationship with his brother, Joss, his battle with a serious back injury and his efforts to stand apart from his father’s legacy. The event starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 online or $12 at the door. | bit.ly/2mA0wFa

Charleston the night away Olympic Valley

The Gatsby Gala featuring the Truckee High Jazz Band is from 7 to 10 p.m. at Resort at Squaw Creek. Come in Roaring 20s attire. Live music, dancing, food, auction, raffle. $60. Fundraiser for Truckee High School music program. Tickets also at The Pour House. | eventbrite.com

APRIL 8 | SATURDAY Flies with those eggs? Truckee

Truckee EAA Chapter 1073 holds its pancake breakfast on the second Saturday of each month at the Truckee Tahoe Airport and offers free Young Eagles airplane rides for ages 8 through 17 on those mornings. Breakfast and flights start at 8 a.m. weather permitting. | yecoord1073@outlook.com

Free Ski Day Soda Springs

ASC Training Center is hosting a free ski day in honor of the late Mark Nadell. Everyone welcome. Donations accepted to the Captain Nordic Fund to benefit the Nordic team. | auburnskiclub.com

Local guided hike Olympic Valley

Local Carmen Carr will lead a hike to Pole Creek at 9 a.m. From Truckee, take SR 89 south toward Olympic Valley. The trailhead is across from the Big Chief Lodge. Along the way, there are stunning views of 8,424-foot Silver Peak. Bring snowshoes. | (530) 550-5192

New spin on egg hunt Incline Village, Nev. Underwater Egg Hunt at Incline Village Recreation Center from noon to 1:30 p.m. Some eggs float and other sink, but every child gets a prize. Big Bunny will be there. | (775) 832-1310

Dummies can fly Tahoe Donner

Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area hosts Closing Day and the Downhill Dummy Contest. Teams send unique dummies sliding down the hill and off a massive jump. This year’s theme is “Cartoon Characters.” Prizes awarded for best crash, best air and best design. | tahoedonner.com

Growing local South Lake Tahoe

Gary Romano, author of “July & Winter: Growing Food in the Sierra,” will be presenting his book at South Lake Tahoe Library at 2 p.m. He will detail his knowledge from decades of experience growing food in Beckwourth, one of the harshest climates in the Sierra Valley. The event is free and open to everyone. | (530) 573-3185

Slow food ahead Truckee

Slow Food Lake Tahoe offers a Bone Broth Skillshare workshop from 4 to 6 p.m. at Truckee Tahoe Community Foundation. Learn the tricks to making nutrient-dense and delicious slow-cooked bone broths and short-cooked vegetable stocks. $20 per person. | Register slowfoodlaketahoe.org

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

9


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Snow Trails

MORE EVENTS EXPLORE

TA H O E ’ S W I N T E R

T R A I LS

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com > Beginner’s guide to snowshoeing > Snowshoeing among the pines in Tahoe Donner > Lake Tahoe views from Chickadee Ridge > Trek to Coldstream Canyon > Touring Tahoe Meadows

APRIL 8 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

Kids’ Night Out Tahoe City

Drop off the little ones, ages 5 and older, at Rideout Community Center from 4 to 10 p.m. every second Saturday of the month. Kids can enjoy a dinner, crafts, movies and games. Preregistration is required. $15 per child. | (530) 583-3440

Support ski patrol Stateline, Nev.

The 18th annual Heavenly Ski Patrol Fundraiser Boardwalk Beach Party is at Hard Rock Casino from 6 to 10 p.m. There will be carnival games, raffles, a silent auction, Heavenly’s Avalanche Rescue Dogs, music by Hare of the Dawg, food, beer and wine. Beer tasting with purchase of glass stein for $25 or plastic stein for $15, includes entry fee and a raffle ticket for a Tahoe Local Season Pass. All ages welcome. | facebook.com/heavenlyavalancherescuedogs

APRIL 9 | SUNDAY

SKI TOURING & SNOWSHOEING

TAHOE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL

LEVEL: Easy to moderate A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road. This is a nice area for downhill practice while cross-country skiing. The terrain has gentle, rolling slopes. From Interstate 80, take Highway 89 south 3 miles, then turn right on Cabin Creek Road. The unmarked trailhead is 1 mile from the highway. Limited parking is available in a road cut, when plowed. There is moderate snowmobile use in the area.

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 582-7892

The park is mostly flat and open year-round. Skiers can enjoy the forests and boulder fields, glide down to the lake and meander through the park. There is an unmarked, 9.6-km, skier-packed trail starting near the Emigrant Trail Museum. For the more adventuresome, glide over the hills into Coldstream Canyon. TART

PETER GRUBB HUT/CASTLE PEAK LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous

A marked Nordic ski trail begins at the Castle Peak/Boreal interchange on Donner Summit off Interstate 80, west of Truckee. Take the Castle Peak exit and follow it for one-quarter mile to the intersection for the trailhead to the north that goes up Castle Valley and over Castle Pass. Follow unmarked trail to Peter Grubb Hut. For overnight stays at Peter Grubb Hut, call (530) 426-3632 for reservations.

POLE CREEK TRAIL SYSTEM LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Unmarked trails follow roads along Pole Creek and Silver Creek Drainages. Trailhead 6 miles south of Truckee on Highway 89. Some parking on west side of highway. Trails follow U.S. Forest Service roads. Several loops.

SAGEHEN SUMMIT

LEVEL: Easy to moderate An unmarked route follows the road up to the creek bottom. Lateral roads offer many side trips. Trailhead at Sagehen Summit on the west side of Highway 89, 8 miles north of Truckee. Limited parking.

NORTH SHORE

BROCKWAY SUMMIT LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Brockway Summit off Highway 267 offers an abundance of areas to ski. Between Northstar and Kings Beach, there are turnouts on both sides of the highway where Nordic skiers and snowshoers can follow logging and utility roads.

PAGE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to moderate

On Mount Rose high above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where skiers can stretch their legs. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends for skiers, snowshoers and snowmobilers, so try skiing during the week.

Rally for the rally Incline Village, Nev.

Art & Wine Tasting at Incline Spirits & Cigars is from 4 to 6 p.m. Artist Anastiscia Lang is holding a benefit for those with Lyme Disease to go to the Washington D.C. rally in front of the White House on May 6. $5 suggested donation. | artrageous.info

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

APRIL 10 | MONDAY

LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Skiers can glide along the road (not plowed in winter) or through the meadows. For a longer outing, head up the mountain to Barker Pass. This area also is open to snowmobilers.

MEEKS MEADOWS LEVEL: Easy

Meeks Meadows on the West Shore off Highway 89 offers a vast area to ski. The trailhead is across from the Meeks Bay Fire Station; look for the log cabin with red trim. Follow the U.S. Forest Service road or meander through the meadow and down to Meeks Creek.

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy to moderate | (530) 525-7982 The Ed Z’berg/Sugar Pine Point State Park is a spectacular spot to cross-country ski or snowshoe among the dense forests of the West Shore or along Lake Tahoe’s shores. The park offers more than 18 km of marked ski trails. Three groomed trails begin at the campground, 9 miles south of Tahoe City, with two skier-packed trails on the lake side of the park, accessed from the Day Use entrance. Winter camping available. The park also offers a number of guided tours throughout the season including full moon snowshoe tours, ski tours of the 1960 Olympic crosscountry trails, historic snowshoe tours and the family Junior Ranger program; call for dates. No dogs allowed on trails. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

TAYLOR CREEK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 573-2600 Developed for beginners, this well-marked series of trails allows skiers to explore the area. Terrain is mostly flat and is good for the entire family. Take Highway 89 south around Emerald Bay to the Fallen Leaf Lake Area. Turn on Cathedral Road and park in the Sno-Park. Marked trails start at the parking lot with three trails near Fallen Leaf Lake. On the Lake side of Highway 89, follow the road to the Visitor Center to access the Tallac Historic Trail. SnoPark Permit required.*

Ski or snowshoe along an old road that meanders through a forest and into a cluster of meadows. Take Highway 89 south from Tahoe City, then turn right on Pine Avenue and right on Tahoe Park Heights Road. At the crest of the hill, take the middle fork, which becomes Big Pine Road, then take a left on Silver Tip. The parking area is at the top of the road.

Moonlit trek Tahoe Vista

Tahoe Adventure Company offers a Full Pink Moon trek on snowshoes. From 6 to 9 p.m. No experience necessary. Fee includes equipment, guides, hot drinks, trail snacks and permits. | tahoeadventurecompany.com

Business of eco Tahoe Donner

Tahoe Silicon Mountain presents Rachel Arst McCullough on “Growing Truckee-Tahoe’s Entrepreneurial Ecosystem.” Just back from the Mountain Ventures Summit in Telluride, Colo. McCullough, co-founder of Tahoe Silicon Mountain and owner of McCullough Web Services, will be sharing takeaways from the conference on creating and building healthy and sustainable entrepreneurship ecosystems in mountain towns. At Pizza on the Hill from 6 to 8 p.m. $5. | tahoesiliconmountin.com

APRIL 11 | TUESDAY Rise and shine Truckee

Good Morning Truckee is held from 7 to 8:30 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport on the second Tuesday of every month. Will hear from experts from Martis Valley, Donner Summit, Lake Tahoe on how community plans were developed and how they guide the future from an economic, environmental and social standpoint. Open to everyone. $12, $10 chamber members; includes breakfast. | (530) 587-8808

Taking care of pets Truckee

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe offers a presentation series: Pet Emergencies presented by Gina Kang, DVM, from 5 to 6 p.m. She will cover first aid basics and how to recognize pet emergencies. Seating is limited. At the shelter on Stevens Lane. | RSVP erin@hstt.org

Tahoe talks Incline Village, Nev.

SEE OUR EVENTS CALENDAR FOR GUIDED SNOWSHOE TREKS. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

10

Incline Village Library presents Gary Romano, owner of Sierra Valley Farms, who will share knowledge from experience growing food in the Sierra Nevada as detailed in his book “July & Winter: Growing Food in the Sierra.” 6:30 p.m. | (775) 832-4130

Spring ling Stateline, Nev.

Boys & Girls Club of Lake Tahoe presents Spirit of Spring at Edgewood Tahoe. Self-serve wine and spirit tasting provided by Southern Wines & Spirits. Advance tickets $40, day of $50. | Tickets bgclt.org

APRIL 12 | WEDNESDAY From 1 to 100 Incline Village, Nev.

Sierra Nevada College presents Nora Betyousef Lacey for the U.S. Bank Speaker Series at 11:45 a.m. After 25 years in the biotechnology sector, Betyousef Lacey became an entrepreneur in 1994 when she founded Cell Marque Corporation, a biotechnology company specializing in cancer-detection products. As president and CEO, she led Cell Marque from an initial $5,000 investment with one employee to a 100-employee company. | sierranevada.edu

Help from the young Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts Senior to Senior from 2 to 3:30 p.m. A group of tech-savvy seniors from Incline High School will be available to help older persons with computer-related questions. Bring laptop, tablet, phone, e-reader or other device and learn something new. | (775) 832-4130

Chamber mixer Incline Village, Nev.

Stillwater Spa at the Hyatt Regency hosts a chamber mixer with North Lake Tahoe Chamber from 5 to 7 p.m. | gotahoenorth.com

APRIL 13 | THURSDAY Dogs love books Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library offers Paws To Read from 4 to 5 p.m. Children can practice reading to friendly therapy dogs and receive a free book. All ages welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Ta, ta, ta tasting Truckee

Third Thursday Tasting at The Pour House is from 5 to 7 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

What it was like Tahoe City

Alpenglow Sports partners with Mountaineers Books at Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema to present Leif Whittaker’s “My Old Man and the Mountain,” an engaging story of what it was like to grow up the youngest son of Jim Whittaker, first American to reach the top of Mount Everest in 1963. $10 online, $12 at the door. 7 p.m. | brownpapertickets.com/ event/2873357

Hail the conquering heroes Kings Beach

Sierra Nevada College announces the 2017 Janet Pahl and Warren Kocmond Ski and Snowboard Banquet from 6 to 9 p.m. at North Tahoe Event Center. Join SNC Tahoe’s ski and snowboard student-athletes for their end-of-the-season celebration and the induction of the 2017 members into the 4th annual Athletics Hall of Fame. $50. | sierranevada.org

APRIL 14 | FRIDAY Preserving history Tahoe City

Tahoe Maritime Museum offers a Winter Lecture Series at 5 p.m. Peter Goin, author, photographer and professor, will discuss: “One Hundred Years of Shoreline: Rephotography and Lake Tahoe.” Open and free to the public. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org


April 6-19, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

TAHOE INCLINE SPORTS Formerly Tahoe Bike & Ski

About the river Truckee

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts River Talk, a one-hour virtual tour of the projects throughout the watershed. It is a chance for guests to learn about the council’s work and offer comments and feedback. At Moonshine Ink offices. | RSVP (530) 550-8760

Family viewing in 3D Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts 3D Movie Night at 6:30 p.m. “Moana” will be shown. Bring pillows and blankets. Popcorn and 3D glasses will be provided. | (775) 832-4130

Effects of war Tahoe City

Myths & Mountains and Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema presents “White Sun,” a film by Deepak Rauniyar, at 7 p.m. The film illustrates the bitterness of the 13-year civil war in Nepal and its aftermath. Proceeds will benefit library community centers in Nepal. $15. | mythsandmountains.com

APRIL 14-15 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY Meet the author Incline Village, Nev.

Sierra Nevada College Writers in The Woods features Peter Makuck, a poet, short-story writer and critic. In 2010, his book “Long Lens: New and Selected Poems,” was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He will give a reading of his work on Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. and teach a workshop on Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. Reading is free and open to the public; the workshop is $50. | Register sierranevada.edu

APRIL 15 | SATURDAY There’s one over there Tahoe City

Easter Egg Hunt sponsored by Tahoe City Parks & Recreation is at Commons Beach starting at 10 a.m. Pictures with the Easter Bunny and family friendly games. No registration. Free. | tcpud.org

White balls of flier Tahoe City

Inaugural Snowball Drive Championship at the Tahoe City Golf Course starts at 11 a.m. after the egg hunt. Pack it down, let it fly. Free. | tcpud.org

Spring Egg Hunt Truckee

Bring the kids to the Spring Egg Hunt at Truckee River Regional Park at 11:30 a.m. Arrive at 11 a.m. to take photos with the Easter Bunny. Children will be divided into age groups. Children should bring baskets. | (530) 582-7720

It’s simply extravagant hunt Incline Village, Nev. Spring Eggstravaganza Community Egg Hunt is at 11 a.m. sharp at Incline Village Recreation Center. Get picture taken with Big Bunny. For ages 11 to infants. | (775) 832-1310

APRIL 16 | SUNDAY

$24 Basic/Sport Ski Package $30 Performance Ski Package $36 Demo Ski Package $15 Kid's Shape Skis* $20 Youth Basic Ski Package (11-14 years old) $14 XC (Touring) Rental or Snowshoe Rental $26 Snowboard & Boots Strap-in bindings $20 Kid's Snowboard & Boots* Strap-in bindings $6 kids $7 adults Helmets with rental

Poetry and prose Truckee

Literary Arts & Wine is a monthly reading series held every third Sunday at Art Truckee at 5 p.m. All are welcome. | literaryartsandwine.com

APRIL 17 | MONDAY Not your bag Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library presents Save the Environment on PLARnit Project at a Time at 5:30 p.m. Learn about the plastics problem and how one can help. Hands-on project is repurposing a plastic bag. Gifts included. All ages. | (775) 832-4130

APRIL 18 | TUESDAY

$3 off Skis & Poles or Board Only

t

5th Day FREE! or

4th Day ½ OFF reg. price (on 4 day rentals only!)

Good for entire party. Coupon not valid w/ other offers. Expires May 31, 2017

Package is: Skis, Boots & Poles Ski Pants, Gloves, Boots, Sleds & Goggles Available All ski rentals are shape skis

*10 years & under/130cm or smaller

(775) 413-5144

930 Tahoe Blvd #702, Incline Village, NV

TahoeBikeSki.com

Located in Raley’s Center behind Rookies

Guided wine tasting Kings Beach

MICKEY’S

Wine Tahoe offers free guided wine tasting and wine education at North Tahoe Event Center from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Featuring wines from Napa, Sonoma and Burgundy. Wines available for purchase. Limit 18 people. | RSVP (925) 683-15230 or winetahoe.com

BIG MACK CHARTERS

Name that bug Truckee

• YEAR-ROUND SPORTFISHING • ALL GEAR PROVIDED • 43’ SPORTFISHER

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts Aquatic Monitoring Lab Night for those interested in water quality. In this evening of lab work support, participants will identify aquatic insects in water samples collected over the summer. From 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Space is limited. | RSVP (530) 550-8760, ext 1

$90* $850 FULL BOAT

*Discount for Cash

(large cabin w/ restroom)

(530) 546-4444 or (800) 877-1462

(up to 13 people)

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APRIL 19 | WEDNESDAY Got a fix? Truckee

MickeysBigMack.com

A Fixit Clinic will be held at Truckee Roundhouse to celebrate Earth Day from 5 to 8 p.m. This is for anyone who wants to learn how to fix their broken things — clothing, appliances, jewelry, wooden furniture, electronics — with a Fixit Coach. All ages welcome. Free. | truckeeroundhouse.com

License #954258

APRIL 20 | THURSDAY About the river Truckee

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts River Talk, a one-hour virtual tour of the projects throughout the watershed. It is a chance for guests to learn about the council’s work and offer comments and feedback. At 8 a.m. in the TRWC office. | RSVP (530) 550-8760

TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

Dr. Ben Houlton, director of the John Muir Institute of the Environment at UC Davis will talk on “Global Climate Change: How much can we rely on the natural world to fix our problem.” Learn about the current state of these carbon sinks, their vulnerability to future changes and how global climate policies are susceptible to the sustainability of natural carbon-dioxide uptake. No-host bar at 5:30; presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP terc.ucdavis.edu

PLUMBING SERVICE & REPAIR DRAIN CLEANING & ROOTER SERVICES Frozen pipe thawing specialist Quality, professional work at reasonable rates. Locally Owned & Operated | Honest & Reliable Not a Franchise Company Call our office

FREE BOWLING

each person who bowls 2 games at regular price gets a 3rd game free with this coupon

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center VOTED BEST POOL ROOM ON THE NORTH SHORE!

Enough eggs for everyone South Lake Tahoe

Automatic Scoring “Bumper Bowling,” Video Arcade, Billiards, Video Poker, Cocktails, ATM, Full Swing Golf Simulator

Lake Valley Fire Protection District presents an Easter Egg Hunt at Tahoe Paradise Park at 10 a.m. 10,000 eggs this year. Pictures with the Easter Bunny. Ride with friends; parking is limited. Free. | (530) 577 3737

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events.

(530) 525-1807

Ask about our Free Whole House Plumbing Inspection | RooterConnection.com

920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

bowlincline.com

Smoke Free Every Day!

Coupon good for the entire party. Limit 1 free game per person per visit. Not valid with other offers. Not valid for league or tournament play.

11


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA H O E L O C A L

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Family Fun

Bonnie Zellers S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

W

hile studying nursing at University of Nevada, Reno, Bonnie Zellers happened to take a rock-climbing class as one of her electives, which led to her inadvertently being one of the first women pioneers of Lake Tahoe snowboarding. She lives in Tahoe Donner with her rescue dog, Charlie, and husband, Jim Zellers, also a former Tahoe-based professional snowboarder. She still works as a resident nurse at Tahoe Forest Hospital and enjoys all of the activities that the lake has to offer. She met her husband at the rockclimbing class; both shared a love of adventure and mountaineering. Looking to try something new, Jim gave her a skateboard-like deck fastened to a sled with bungee straps attached to the top of it. The couple along with friend Tom Burt went out in the Mount Rose back country and tried to ride it in the snow. “It was like a first generation, super basic board,” says Bonnie.

“ Tahoe is an amazing area. Every time I go somewhere and come back it’s like, why did I ever leave this place?” –Bonnie Zellers Since this was before most ski resorts allowed snowboarding, the three would hike to spots until they started riding at Donner Ski Ranch, the only regional ski resort that accepted the new sport at the time. Every once in a while, they would also go out to Iron Mountain off of U.S. Route 50. Tom and Jim started competing in snowboarding; Bonnie traveled around with them and started entering contests, as well. “There was such a limited number of resorts that allowed snowboarding that everyone knew everyone,” she says. She competed in downhill, slalom and Giant Slalom along with other women pioneers such as Amy Roberts, Nancy Elrod, Heather Mills and Tina Basich. “There were five or six of us at the most who did competitions; it was a very tightknit group,” she says. Donner Ski Ranch hosted fun events and then Homewood started allowing the single-plankers, but Bonnie decided to test her snowboarding abilities in other ways. “I competed for about three years, but then got more interested in big-mountain

Do you know someone interesting in Tahoe? To nominate someone you’d like to see featured, e-mail editor@tahoethisweek.com.

12

ICE SKATING

NORTH LAKE TAHOE

SQUAW VALLEY

INCLINE VILLAGE

(530) 403-0206 | squaw.com

expeditions and first descents,” she says. Her first big trip to Alaska was with photographer Chris Noble, Jim and Tom in 1987, which led to more trips like that. “We all rock climbed together and spent a lot of time in Yosemite and in the mountains. What appealed to us were the cols, descents and tall peaks,” says Bonnie, whose first sponsors were Avalanche Snowboards, Ocean Pacific, The North Face and Rossignol. “I would especially like to acknowledge and thank Bev Sanders, owner of Avalanche Snowboards with her husband, Chris. They took a gamble on me and gave me my first sponsorship. They went from building snowboards in their garage in South Shore to being one of the first successful snowboard companies. Bev was a very influential woman for snowboarding and helped to shape the sport. She and Chris were also great fun to travel with,” says Bonnie. In order to maintain her sponsorships she needed a certain amount of exposure, so Bonnie pitched big-mountain trip ideas to magazines in order to explore mountains around the world. She went to Chamonix in France; Greece; New Zealand and Nepal to name a few, but Alaska was one of her favorites. “I spent quite a bit of time in Alaska. I went again in 1992 and judged an extreme snowboarding competition. In Alaska, we had a free-for-all, rowdy, fun crew,” she says. “It has a special place in my heart.” Along with Alaska, the Eastern Sierra is on her list of favorite places. “Between California, Nevada, Utah and the Western states, I’ve probably been close to 100 mountains on expeditions,” she says. “I like checking out new terrain. Even though it’s not very exotic or unique, it’s just a special place to me because of its accessibility and mountain lines. But, Alaska is pretty awesome, too.” She was born in Hawaii and her family traveled a lot when she was young because her father was in the Navy. However, when she attended UNR, she found that the Reno-Tahoe area had everything that appealed to her and couldn’t leave after graduating. “Tahoe is an amazing area. Every time I go somewhere and come back it’s like, why did I ever leave this place? We’re very into mountain biking, split boarding and rock climbing and it’s all within 30 minutes of where we live,” she says. “It’s perfect for what we like to do and we don’t have to drive far to get to these places. It’s so beautiful here and with all of the different mountain ranges we can always find a great place that’s not too overcrowded.” 

Olympic Ice Pavilion at High Camp. Hockey or figure skating rentals. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Snow Play Area on Fairway Blvd., next to the Chateau, on the driving range. Bring own equipment.

MOUNT ROSE Near the Mount Rose summit, enjoy sledding in Tahoe Meadows off Highway 431. Bring equipment.

(530) 542-6262 | citiofslt.com Indoor facility open year-round. BlueGo

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com Ice skating & rentals. Club House. TART

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

(530) 546-0605 | northtahoeparks.com End of National Avenue off Hwy 28. Rentals available. TART

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

CLOSED FOR THE SEASON

(530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

TRUCKEE

Sledding & cross-country trails. Rentals available. Club House. TART

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com At Truckee River Regional Park. Skate rentals, broomball leagues, ice dancing & hockey lessons. Skate rentals & season passes available. TART

CLOSED FOR THE SEASON

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SQUAW VALLEY

(530) 452-4511 | squaw.com Tubing & mini snowmobiles. TART

PUBLIC POOLS

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

INCLINE VILLAGE

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com

ECHO LAKE

25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends).

(530) 644-2324 Highway 50 at Echo Lake Road. Bring equipment.*

OLYMPIC VALLEY

On Lake Tahoe Blvd. Bring equipment. BlueGo

(800) 403-0206 | squaw.com Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. Reopens spring 2017. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

SAWMILL POND TAYLOR CREEK (530) 543-2600

Highway 89, north of Camp Richardson Road. Bring equipment.* BlueGo

STATELINE

(530) 542-6056 | citiofslt.com 25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. BlueGo

KAHLE PARK

TRUCKEE

Off Highway 207. Bring equipment. BlueGo

(775) 586-7271 | douglascountynv.gov

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Indoor pools with competition pool and warm water pool, diving board, swim training, hydraulic lift and lessons. TART

TRUCKEE & BEYOND

DONNER SUMMIT (530) 587-3558

ROCK CLIMBING WALLS

South side of I-80, Castle Peak exit beyond Boreal Inn frontage road. Bring equipment.*

TRUCKEE

TAHOE DONNER

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

(530) 587-9437 | tahoedonner.com At Trout Creek Recreation Center. No personal sleds. Family events all season.

YUBA PASS

SLEDDING & TUBING

(530) 994-3401 Highway 49 at Yuba Pass. Bring equipment.*

EAST SHORE

SPOONER LAKE

WEST SHORE

(775) 831-0494

State park open for general snow play. Bring equipment.

BLACKWOOD CANYON (530) 543-2600

Snowplay area off Hwy. 89, 3 miles south of Tahoe City. Bring equipment.*

HOPE VALLEY AREA

CARSON PASS (209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

GRANLIBAKKEN

(530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com

HOPE VALLEY

Machine-groomed snow play area; no tubes or toboggans allowed. All ages.

Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Bring equipment.*

TAHOE CITY

MEISS MEADOW

Gentle slope on Highway 89 South, one-eighth mile south of the wye. Bring equipment. TART

(775) 882-2766

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Family Fun. ALL ACTIVITIES ARE WEATHER DEPENDENT. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222. BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org


April 6-19, 2017

For the Kids

Courtesy IVGID

IT’S AN

EGGSTRAVAGANZA

Bring the kids to the Spring Egg Hunt at Truckee River Regional Park on April 15 at 11:30 a.m. Arrive at 11 a.m. to take photos with the Easter Bunny. Children will be divided into age groups. Children should bring baskets. | (530) 582-7720 On the North Shore, it’s a Spring Extravaganza at Commons Beach in Tahoe City on April 15 for all ages at 10 a.m. with an Easter egg hunt and pictures with the Easter Bunny. Free. | tcpud.org The Incline Village Recreation Center is the site for this year’s Spring Eggstravaganza Community Egg Hunt on April 15 for ages 11 and younger. Take pictures with the Easter Bunny. The hunt begins at 11 a.m. Free. | yourtahoeplace.com On the South Shore, the annual Easter Egg Hunt is April 16 at Tahoe Paradise Park. Enjoy fire trucks from Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District and an Egg Hunt. Bring a camera to pose with the Easter Bunny. Limited parking. | (530) 577-3737

Play holiday days Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Parks and Recreation offers Spring Epic Enrichment Camps led by Miss Joan. The camps include stories, songs, science, games, art, crafts, creative snacks and more. Monday Madness is for ages 3 to 5 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Mondays from April 17 to May 8 and from May 22 to June 12. Terrific Tuesday is for Pre-K to age 5 from 1 to 3 p.m. on Tuesdays from May 9 to June 6. Thrilling Thursdays is for age 5 through Grade 3 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. from April 6 to May 4 and from May 11 to June 8. EPIC Base Camp at Lake Tahoe School for Grades K to 5 from April 10 to 13. | (775) 832-1310 or yourtahoeplace.com

School’s out for holiday Truckee Truckee Donner Recreation and Park District offers holiday camps when school is out for Grades K to 5 at the Community Recreation Center. Spring Fling Camp is from April 10 to 14. | (530) 582-7720 or tdrpd.org

Crack the code Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Library offers Coding Camp from April 10 to 14 from 3 to 5 p.m. This introduction to computer science for kids is designed to demystify code and

show that anybody can learn the basics. Registration is required. There are 10 seats available, but more can come if some bring their own devices. This camp is best for Grade 3 and up. | Register (775) 832-4130

OUT & ABOUT

ADVENTURE 365 Truckee’s New Outlet Sporting Goods Store

WINTER BLOWOUT SALE Brand name gear at extremely discounted prices!

Skis · Snowboards · Jackets Pants · Gloves · Beanies · Bags Goggles · Socks · Helmets First Layers · Snow Boots Facebook.com/Adventure365Truckee (530) 414-4519 · 11025 Pioneer Trail #104, Truckee Near Full Belly Deli

CUSTOMER SERVICE IS OUR PASSION

Art to take home Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts will host Kids Art Saturdays, seven free art workshops for ages 2 to 12. Each workshop allows children to create an art project that is meant to be taken home. Artists volunteer their time to give children a chance to discover the fun of creating. Parents must remain with the children; the times are noon to 2 p.m. Paint the Easter Egg is on April 15, following the Commons Beach egg hunt. A Gift for Mom is on May 6 and A Gift for Dad is on June 10. Paint the Pumpkin is on Sept. 30 at the Tahoe City Oktoberfest. Make an Ornament is on Dec. 2. | northtahoearts.com

Celestial inspiration The 7th annual 2017 Astro-Poetry Contest is calling for poem submissions. All poems must be astronomy related and not longer than 20 lines. There is only one submission per student allowed. Students may submit a poem by email with their name, address, phone number, school and teacher’s name. The deadline to submit is on April 15. Students in Grades K through 12 in the Tahoe or Reno area can enter. | poems@tahoestartours.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities.

www.mountainhardwareandsports.com 11320 Donner Pass Road, Truckee · (530) 587-4844 13


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Deep ‘n’ Daring

Snowmobiling

Courtesy Northstar California

SPRINGY RAIL JAM ADVERTISEMENT

GUIDED TOURS EAGLE RIDGE SNOWMOBILE TOURS | Truckee / Sierraville (530) 546-8667 | SledTahoe.com CLOSED FOR THE SEASON

LAKE TAHOE SNOWMOBILE TOURS | Brockway Summit / Truckee (530) 546-4280 | LakeTahoeSnowmobiling.com

TRAIL AREAS MOUNT ROSE

TAHOE MEADOWS

Intermediate to advance On Mount Rose above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where snowmobilers can enjoy the back country. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends, so visit during the week. Snowmobiling is allowed on the north side of Highway 431 only from the staging area to service road 051. Follow this road northwest to the 1,000-acre riding area.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON Intermediate to advanced

The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Snowmobilers should follow the road about 2.5 miles, then take a left across the bridge and continue up Barker Pass Road to large open areas, some steep bowls and many roads.*

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL Intermediate

A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road off Highway 89 south of Truckee. Turn onto Cabin Creek and look for the unmarked trailhead 1 mile from the highway. Enjoy gentle, rolling slopes. Parking is limited.

MARTIS PEAK

PROSSER LAKE/TRUCKEE AREA Easy to advanced

Take Highway 89 north of Truckee. Various launching sites are along the road at Prosser Lake, Hobart Mills, etc. A large Sno-Park is about 14 miles north of Interstate 80 at Little Truckee Summit. Groomed roads lead to hundreds of miles of back country. Access to Basset’s Station on Highway 49 for lunch and gas (30 miles), Mount Lola at 10,300 ft., Webber Lake trail system, ridges at Independence Lake and more. From Prosser, go east or west of Highway 89 to open areas.*

CISCO GROVE

RATTLESNAKE Easy to advanced

Steep canyon and side slopes at lower end of trail with 7 miles of groomed access. Upper elevations feature ridges and bowls. Route follows Rattlesnake Road to Magonigal Summit. Trailhead at Cisco Grove exit north off Interstate 80.*

HOPE VALLEY

HOPE VALLEY

Easy to moderate Located at the junction of Highways 88 and 89 south of South Lake Tahoe. Sno-park on the south side of Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Much of Hope Valley is open to snowmobiling, but some areas are not; stay in designated areas. Ungroomed routes to Willow Creek (8.5 miles) and Tamarack Lake (1 mile) and groomed routes to Blue Lakes (11.5 miles) and Forestdale (3.5 miles). Stage from Hope Valley Sno-Park.*

LOST SIERRA

YUBA PASS

Easy to advanced The route north from Yuba Pass off Highway 49 is popular for snowmobilers, and shares the trail system with Nordic skiers for the first mile before branching off. Snowmobilers can head north on the trail and travel through Gold Lake Highway. Then, head south to Bassett’s or north to Gold Lake. This route offers a variety of terrain and beautiful views of the Sierra Buttes and the Lakes Basin. More than 100 miles of trails. Take Highway 89 north of Truckee, and then take Highway 49 to Yuba Pass. Trailhead parking is 6 miles east of Bassett’s Station.*

Intermediate to advanced Best access and limited parking about one-quarter mile north of Brockway Summit below the top of Highway 267 on the Truckee side. No groomed trails, but many old lumber roads exist. Take a good map, as it’s easy to become turned around.

LITTLE TRUCKEE SUMMIT Easy to advanced

There are several marked routes with about 110 miles of groomed trails. Marked snowmobile trails follow roads to Webber Lake and Yuba Pass, Rim and Ridge Loops, Bald Ridge Loop and Treasure Mountain, Pass Creek Loop, Independence Lake Loop, Meadow Lake Loop and Jackson Meadow. Most trails are groomed. Trailhead at Jackson Meadow Road, about 14 miles north of Truckee on Highway 89.

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Snowmobiling. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

14

The annual Northstar California spring rail jam is back on April 15 with an all new feature lineup designed by renowned terrain park expert, Mike Schipani. The event is free to enter and participants can sign up on a first-come, first-served basis in men’s and women’s categories, within three divisions: age 16 and older, ages 11 to 15 and ages 10 and younger. Fans can watch the mid-mountain competition from the Lodge at Big Springs deck. A live DJ will jam spring grooves. | northstarcalifornia.com

Gates & Wake Area venues The Gates & Wake Pro Challenge returns on April 7 and 8. The two-day challenge features a slalom water ski at Bell Acqua Lake in Rio Linda on April 7, followed by a giant slalom race on April 8 at Homewood Mountain Resort. Entry is $150 and includes both events, a ski lift ticket and lunch at Homewood. | RSVP (916) 6383382 or bob@superboatrepair.com

Gather ye teammates Truckee Truckee River Winery is taking teams for its Spring Bocce League. There will be three league nights — Sunday, Monday and Tuesday — with games starting at 5:30 or 7:15 p.m. Each league night will have a maximum of 12 teams. Signups are being taken now. A minimum of four people on each team is needed before a team can register. Each team can have a maximum of 10 players. Teams will be charged $20 per player, due by the first game. Registration forms are on the Web site and are due by April 17. The first league will start on April 23. | truckeeriverwinery.com

Skim on skis South Lake Tahoe The second week of Heavenly’s 2017 Spring Loaded will culminate with Pond Skimming on April 8 and from noon to 1 p.m. Costumed skiers and riders will attempt to skim across a pond as they are judged on success, style and the crowd’s reactions. | skiheavenly.com

Don’t look back

Olympic Valley Squaw Valley USA hosts the Billy Dutton Uphill on April 9. Participants start at the base of KT-22 and go up the Mountain Run to High Camp. Ski it, skin it, run it, snowshoe or hike, whatever works. This is a unique race with 2,000 feet

of climbing during the 3.2-mile course. It’s a fun challenge for recreational athletes, runners, snowshoers, cross-country and back-country skiers. The race is on even if there’s no snow. Proceeds benefit Far West Nordic junior programs. | squawalpine.com

Hole in snow Alpine Meadows Ditch the ski jacket for a collared shirt and khakis on April 8 for the Alpine Meadows’ 34th annual Snow Golf Tournament, the only top-to-bottom snow golf course. This highly anticipated spring event is a unique way to spend a day on the slopes with the whole family. The ninehole course starts at the top of Summit Express Chair and meanders its way down the mountain with the last holes bringing competitors back to the bottom of Alpine Bowl Chair. | squawalpine.com

The tour stops here Reno, Nev. The Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour stops in Reno on April 6 at Silver Legacy Grand Exposition Hall at 7 p.m. Nevada Land Trust brings the spirit of outdoor adventure to Reno. A local film, “The Perfect Flight” will be featured with Shawn Hayes, the falconer, attending the event. Tickets available at Silver Legacy or REI. | nevadalandtrust.org

Beacon training Meyers A Beacon Basin for avalanche transceiver practice and training is now open at the Lake Valley Fire Protection District station in Meyers. Additionally, the district is offering free air-canister refills for back-country airbags. Because the service is free, it will allow people to practice pulling the air bag before heading out on the mountain. | (530) 577-3737 or facebook.com/lakevalleyfire

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Deep ‘n’ Daring events.


April 6-19, 2017

FEATURE

In mid-December a shelf of snow dropped off under the Blazing Zephyr chair at Mt. Rose

Myths

ABOUT

AVALANCHE DANGER

A

fter one of the biggest snow seasons in recent history, the Lake Tahoe Basin is blanketed in white giving powder hounds and back-country enthusiasts plenty of terrain in which to play. Before heading into the back country, local avalanche forecasters stress the importance of being prepared, taking precautions, doing research and knowing the truth about common avalanche myths. Being prepared with the right equipment is essential. Always carry a compass or compass app, shovel, beacon and probe in off-piste land and always go with a friend. If you get buried in an avalanche, only your friend can dig you out, which is why everyone in the group should carry avalanche gear. “If 1 in 5 people go out in the back country with a beacon, who’s the lucky one? If an avalanche is triggered and everyone gets caught in it, you have very little time to dig everyone out,” says Sierra Avalanche Center (SAC) executive director Don Triplat. “A big thing in our travel techniques is determining what is avalanche terrain and what is not,” says SAC forecaster Andy Anderson. “We think we know what the slope angle is, but we don’t actually measure it.” Measure it. “Look at the avalanche forecast before you go out, but pull out a compass and double-check yourself,” says Anderson. “The percentage of people going out with a compass is probably low because they already go out with their smartphone, but the problem is they don’t use it.”

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

> Avalanche training will save your life > Science of snow: Forecasting avalanche conditions

> Local avalanche education resources

Although a lot of avalanches happen at slopes steeper than 30 degrees, a wet slab avalanche can happen on lower-angled terrain, as well. Which direction the slope is facing can also provide some insights into what type of avalanche can be released. Anderson says that on a mixed precipitation day, northwest- and southeast-facing slopes are a

S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

problem. However, on a sunny and warm day with an east wind blowing, he says adventurers should be wary of all south-facing slopes. Check the SAC Web site before going out. The staff forecasters say that no matter how good the snow looks, moderate avalanche danger exists on all elevations, especially on wind-loaded slopes. According to Anderson, people make mistakes because they are uneducated about potential avalanche danger and they believe myths that have perpetuated within the community: Myth 1 | Loud sounds cause avalanches. The weight of the snow or compressed force causes a slide.

“Avalanches travel at speeds of 50 to 80 mph. It feels like someone is pulling a rug out from under you and that’s hard to escape.” –Andy Anderson Myth 2 | When buried in an avalanche, dig a little air pocket and spit to determine which way is up. Then dig up. “You won’t be able to move at all when buried because the snow sets up like concrete,” says Triplat. “That’s true,” Anderson adds. “Once completely buried, only your partner can dig you out. Around 75 percent of people die from asphyxiation, 25 percent from trauma, which is probably higher in Lake Tahoe due to all of the obstacles in an avalanche path, and around 2 percent die from hypothermia.” Myth 3 | There is no avalanche danger 24 hours after a snowstorm. This is simply not true. The snow does not stabilize in one day after a snowstorm.

“More than half of the calls about avalanches come in after 24 hours since a storm has passed,” says Anderson. Myth 4 | Avalanches can come out of nowhere. They are predictable and usually people set them off. Myth 5 | When an avalanche is triggered, you can ski out of the way to avoid getting caught up in it. “Avalanches travel at speeds of 50 to 80 mph,” says Anderson. “It feels like someone is pulling a rug out from under you and that’s hard to escape.” The chances of skiing out of the way when an avalanche is coming toward you are slim to none. Myth 6 | Only slopes with a deep snowpack can set off avalanches. Avalanches can be triggered on a foot or less of snow if the conditions allow. “As long as you have a slab layer and a weak layer, it doesn’t matter how deep it is,” says Anderson. Myth 7 | If you see ski or snow tracks in an area, that area is stable. Just because you see evidence that people were there, it doesn’t mean the snow is stable. It means that whoever made those tracks was lucky. You should constantly do research and be prepared. Myth 8 | Avalanches don’t happen on forested slopes. Skiing through the trees doesn’t provide immunity from avalanches. If anything, it creates more obstacles to hit if you get swept up in one. Even if you aren’t venturing into the back country, it’s always good to be prepared and aware of one’s surroundings in heavy snowstorms. Keep the cell phone charged, carry a shovel and check SAC’s Web site for current conditions. The Lake Valley Fire Protection District in Meyers also offers free beacon training and free air canister refills for back-country airbags. Call (530) 577-3737 for more information. 

15


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Announcements

Courtesy Tahoe Donner Downhill

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Announcements. April 15 is looming large The Tax Aide Program of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) offers free tax preparation assistance for locals at the Family Resource Center of Truckee and the North Tahoe Family Resource Center in Kings Beach. Persons or families of any income level or age are welcome whose returns are not too complicated. Appointments in Truckee will be from 9:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. on Saturdays: April 8 and 15. Call (530) 587-2513 for an appointment. In Kings Beach, make an appointment on Fridays: April 7 and 14. Call (530) 546-0952 for an appointment. | aarp.org/ taxaide

SLIDE, DUMMY Tahoe Donner’s Downhill Dummy Contest is on April 9. Teams send unique dummies slide down the hill and off a massive jump. This year’s theme is cartoon characters. Prizes are awarded for best crash, best air and best design. Prizes will be awarded for best design, best air and best crash. | tahoedonner.com

Free immigration legal aid One Justice’s Justice Bus Project and South Lake Tahoe Family Resource Center are holding a free legal immigration assistance clinic on April 8 from 1 to 5 p.m. at Lake Tahoe Community College. This clinic is for individuals with green cards who want to naturalize or individuals with questions about their status, looking to see what their immigrations options are. Volunteer law students and attorneys will meet one-on-one with clients. Call for an appointment. | (530) 542-0740

Free vaccine, microchip clinic Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe, Wylie Animal Rescue, Placer County and the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe will be hosting a free vaccine and microchip clinic for dogs and cats belonging to residents of Eastern Placer County on April 8. The clinic will take place at The Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe in Kings Beach from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Attendees must bring proof of residency. Pets will be seen on a first-come, first-served basis. Dogs must be on leash and cats inside a carrier. | (530) 5822463 or kara@hstt.org

Can you fix it? A Fixit Clinic will be held at Truckee Roundhouse to celebrate Earth Day on April 19 from 5 to 8 p.m. This event is for anyone who wants to learn how to fix their broken things — clothing, appliances, jewelry, wooden furniture, electronics — and reduce the amount of stuff that gets thrown away. Fixit Coaches will be on hand to assist people with their broken items. Truckee Roundhouse and Town of Truckee are looking for volunteers to be Fixit Coaches. | emertens@ townoftruckee.com

Weeding through the changes

16

Due to the passage of Proposition 64 in the November 2016 state election, the use of nonmedical, aka recreational, marijuana

has been legalized. The Town of Truckee Town Council is holding workshops to discuss the town’s approach to marijuana regulations at Town Hall from 6 to 8 p.m. on April 13 and May 11. | cannabis@ townoftruckee.com

Share your know-how Truckee Chamber of Commerce and Sierra Business Development Center are looking for chamber member businesses that specialize in the field of digital marketing — social, SEO, email, blogging, search, brand, Web development — and can participate in an expert panel workshop plus breakout/table sessions on April 20 at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. | jcarr@sierrabusiness.org

Excellent ticket rates Skiers and snowboarders can prepurchase reduced-rate lift tickets valid at many North Lake Tahoe ski resorts through the Excellence in Education Skiing for Schools program. Tickets are available for Tahoe Donner Downhill, Homewood and Tahoe Cross Country. Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows tickets are on sale. Tickets may be pre-purchased at exined.org or at Tahoe Dave’s ski shops. Tahoe Cross Country trail passes are available at Alpenglow in Tahoe City. Proceeds from the Skiing for Schools program goes to the Tahoe Truckee Unified School District. | (530) 550-7984 or exined.org

Buy a ticket, make a donation Vail and Northstar, through their Epic Promise grant, have donated all-day, $111 lift tickets to support Tahoe SAFE Alliance’s mission: to end the incidence and trauma of domestic violence, sexual violence and child abuse in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee. These tickets for the 2016-17 ski season at Northstar, Heavenly and Kirkwood, among other resorts. | tahoesafealliance.org

Help buy beacons The Meyers Community Foundation is seeking donations to raise $1,000 to pay for the Beacon Basin program and is asking the community to get involved. The Beacon Basin program offers avalanche transceiver practice and training at the Lake Valley Fire Protection District station in Meyers along with free air-canister refills for back-country airbags. The Meyers Community Foundation and Sierra Avalanche Center have donated most funds for the Beacon Basin equipment. Those interested in donating to the program may visit meyerscommunityfoundation.org. | (530) 577-3737 or lakevalleyfire.org

Mother Earth is calling Tahoe Truckee Earth Day 2017 is on April 22 at the Village at Squaw Valley. The festival, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., provides a multitude of educational booths on the topics of watershed health, forest health, pollution prevention, alternative energy, waste management, local art and more. Festival promoters are seeking sponsors, booth participants and volunteers. | tahoetruckeeearthday.com

Watch where you park Winter parking restrictions around the greater North Lake Tahoe area are in effect until May 1. Parking along roadway shoulders during this time is prohibited. When parking in downtown areas, visitors are encouraged to use designated public parking lots. County officials also advise renters with vacation homes to alert their tenants of seasonal parking restrictions. Illegally parked vehicles may be ticketed and fined or towed, if necessary. | placer.ca.gov

Honoring fallen firefighter The Tahoe Fund is seeking donations to fund $9,000 for memorial signs designating a portion of Highway 50 from Mount Ralston Road to Echo Summit as the Firefighter Michael “Mikey” Hallenbeck Memorial Highway. Hallenbeck, a 21-year-old ski lift operator and wildland firefighter on the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, died while fighting the Sierra Fire in August 2015. | tahoefund.org


Tahoe

SPRING EDITION | APRIL 6-JUNE 20

GENOA COWBOY FESTIVAL Read more on page 24.

I

n most places around the country, the flowers are already in bloom. In Tahoe, an epic winter and record snowfall offers a bounty of spring skiing and other resort winter offerings — there is still much fun to be had. Music, art, entertainment and food events abound as the snow slowly melts. Let’s celebrate. S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

HOE W EEK

No. 1

TA

LY

The source for events, music & entertainment TheTahoeWeekly.c om issuu app iTunes & Google Play facebook.com/Th eTahoeWeekly @TheTahoeWeekl y

17


NTBA

MUSIC ON THE BEACH | JUNE 17-SEPT. 1

MUSIC & FESTIVALS | TheTahoeWeekly.com

ON STAGE

Reno Ukulele Festival

Truckee Thursdays

April 6-9 | Nugget Casino Resort | Sparks, Nev.

June 8-Aug. 18 | Truckee

The ninth annual Reno Ukulele Festival is on the horizon. One of the largest events of its kind in the country, it celebrates the growing popularity of the diminutive instrument and includes evening concerts, workshops, instruction and vendors. | nuggetcasinoresort.com

Truckee Downtown Merchants Association Part presents Truckee Thursdays, part street fair and part block party in historic downtown. Hobnob with locals, meet visitors and join in the fun — live music, activity booths, local vendors and food trucks — every Thursday night from 5 to 8:30 p.m. All ages are invited to participate in the festivities. | truckeethursdays. com

“The Passion” April 8, 9, 11, 14 | Area venues Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus showcase the 12th annual presentation of J. S. Bach’s masterpiece, “The Passion according to St. Matthew.” The program will feature selections from Part 2 of the “Passion” and will be performed in English. | toccatatahoe.com

Spring Meltdown Festival April 20-22 | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino | Stateline, Nev. The 10th Spring Meltdown METAL Festival is bigger and badder than ever. It originated in South Shore. More than 50 heavy metal bands rock out Lake Tahoe; an extra third day was added this year. | hardrockcasinolaketahoe.com

Spring Music Series Until April 23 | Alpine Meadows

June 10-18 | Area venues Mozart in the Mountains features Anyssa Neumann performing Piano Concerto No. 21 and Josue Casillas performing Concertone and Symphony No. 39. Jeff Lundhorst is the concertmaster. | toccatatahoe.com

Bluesdays Tuesdays June 13-Sept. 5 | Village at Squaw Valley | Olympic Valley Enjoy this free outdoor concert series of acclaimed artists howlin’ the blues starting at 6 p.m. | squawalpine.com

Concerts at Commons June 18-Sept. 3 | Commons Beach | Tahoe City

Talented musicians take center stage on the deck at Alpine Meadows for a spring filled with great skiing and exceptional live music every Saturday and Sunday. | squawalpine.com

Local, regional and national artists take the stage every Sunday afternoon at Commons Beach in Tahoe City. From 4 to 7 p.m., enjoy food and drinks from local vendors or pack a picnic to watch the sun set on the shimmering waters of Lake Tahoe. | concertatcommonsbeach.com

Reno Jazz Festival

Music on the Beach

April 27-29 | University of Nevada, Reno

June 30-Sept. 1 | Kings Beach State Recreation Area | Kings Beach

The Reno Jazz Festival offers three days of concerts, clinics and competitions on the UNR campus to celebrate 55 years of jazz. Since its first year in 1962, the festival has endeavored to bring to Reno both talented students and renowned professional artists. | unr.edu/rjf

Enjoy the sunset on the shore of Lake Tahoe with live music, local food vendors and a range of frequently rotating beers from Alibi Ale Works, a local craft brewery. Free performances from Tahoe’s favorite bands will ensure dancing in the sand every Friday night from 6 to 8:30 p.m. | northtahoebusiness.org

Rhythm & Rawhide May 17 | Reno Ballroom | Reno, Nev. This fundraiser for the Reno Philharmonic and the Reno Rodeo Foundation offers a night of good, old-fashioned country-western entertainment. Musical director Laura Jackson will lead the Reno Phil with featured vocalists Rachel Potter and Patrick Thomas. Enjoy favorite classics such as “Crazy,” “Jambalaya” and “The Devil Went Down to Georgia.” | renorodeofoundation.org

18

Mozart in the Mountains


THE

RENO RIVER FESTIVAL | MAY 13-14

Courtesy Reno River Festival

April 6-19, 2017 | MUSIC & FESTIVALS

MOUNTAINS ARE CALLING AMGEN Tour of California May 11-12 | North & South Lake Tahoe This grueling Tour de France-style cycling road race challenges the world’s top professional cycling teams to compete along a demanding course that traverses hundreds of miles of California’s iconic highways, byways and coastlines each spring. The teams chosen to participate have included Olympic medalists, Tour de France contenders and World Champions. Don’t miss the excitement as the Women’s Stage 1 and 2 competitors race around Lake Tahoe. | amgentourofcalifornia.com

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slalom water ski Bell Acqua Lake #3 Rio Linda, CA

Reno River Festival May 13-14 | Truckee River Whitewater Park | Reno, Nev. Enjoy sunning on the riverbanks, watching pro kayakers duke it out, listening to music, perusing merchandise tents, sampling food and beverage gardens and learning to kayak in the beginner channel. The festival features some of the best freestyle kayakers. | renoriverfestival.com

Spring Wings Bird Festival May 19-20 | Lahontan Valley Wetlands | Fallon, Nev. Experts lead birding and wildlife tours in the Lahontan Valley Wetlands and Stillwater Wildlife Refuge with hands-on activities, raptors on display and speakers. | springwings.org

Opening Day at the Lake May 26-29 | Area venues Tahoe is ready for summer during Memorial Day Weekend. Time to open up summer cabins, put boats in the water and get a jump on traditional summer activities. Enjoy restaurant deck openings and parties. | visittahoecity.org

april 15 sat

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Thunderbird Paddling Festival June 10 | Sand Harbor State Park | Incline Village, Nev.

Homewood Mountain Resort 5145 W Lake Blvd, Homewood, CA

All forms of standup paddleboarding on Lake Tahoe will be featured at this festival. Race in the Thunderbird 8 Miler or 4 Miler. There will be Grom races for the kids. SUP enthusiasts can also test new gear, check out the vendor expo and take clinics. | laketahoepaddling.com

$150 inocwluSdkei sS:lalom

Tough Mudder

Water & Sn at Homewood h c n Lu · t e k ic Lift T

June 10-11 | Northstar California | Truckee Do you have what it takes to take on this rugged, cross-country course? Endure world-class obstacles, more than 20, for 8 to 10 miles in this team event or just watch the fun. | toughmudder.com

Adventure Sports Week June 16-25 | Area venues Enjoy 10 days of human-powered sports, music, film and fun. The event hosts eight competitive events during the day along with entertainment at night. Trail running, triathlon, mountain biking, paddleboarding and other competitive events will be offered. There will also be demos, clinics and activities for every adventure enthusiast in the family. | adventuresportsweektahoe.com

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MUSIC & FESTIVALS | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Grant Kaye

MAKER SHOW 2017 | JUNE 11

ARTS &

Tahoe Truckee Earth Day 2017

Made in Tahoe Festival

April 22 | Village at Squaw Valley | Olympic Valley

May 27-28 | Village at Squaw Valley | Olympic Valley

This festival is a volunteer run, nonprofit event to recognize, celebrate and promote the region’s unique beauty. Enjoy live entertainment while learning how to preserve and protect our natural resources. | tahoetruckeeearthday.com

Made in Tahoe Festival celebrates all things Tahoe. The Village at Squaw Valley will host a wide array of offerings that are made in or inspired by the Lake Tahoe Basin and Truckee by local artisans, businesses, culinarians, organizations and entertainers. | squawalpine.com

Reno Earth Day April 23 | Idlewild Park | Reno, Nev. This year’s theme is: The Natural World, Clean and Green Technologies and Many Cultures. From 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., stroll the 20 acres of the park looking at more than 350 exhibits and activities for all ages, that includes four stages of entertainment, specialty foods, local breweries, workshops, rallies, games and prizes. | facebook.com/renoearthday

South Tahoe Earth Day April 29 | Bijou Community Park | South Lake Tahoe Earth Day recognizes, celebrates and promotes the region’s unique beauty while educating the public about local environmental issues. Learn about ways to counteract global climate change through recycling and composting, alternative energy, water conservation, sustainability and reducing the ecological footprint. Enjoy local music and dance. | southtahoeearthday.org

Cinco de Mayo April 29-30 | Grand Sierra Resort | Reno, Nev. This annual celebration of Latino heritage is two days of live entertainment, popular Latin bands and musicians, amateur boxing, Mexican dancing horse performances and a children’s playground. Enjoy Mexican food and other dishes from top local restaurants, arts, crafts, games and more. | cincodemayoreno.com

Indigo Star Earth Gathering May 11-15 | Sierra Hot Springs | Portola This event is an off-the-grid gathering by women for women. More than 35 teachers will offer their passion, wisdom and acceptance in community. Come celebrate each other in all the ways that women shine. | indigostar.earth

Reno Sculpture Fest May 12-14 | ReTrac Plaza | Reno, Nev. The Reno Sculpture Fest returns with new larger-than-life installations, live music, kids activities and late-night after parties in 12 city blocks, as well as an arts and yoga festival. | renosculpturefest.com

Restorative Arts and Yoga Festival May 19-21 | Granlibakken Tahoe | Tahoe City The inaugural Restorative Arts and Yoga Festival will feature two days of workshops and classes led by local Tahoe practitioners, yoga instructors and professionals. | granlibakken.com 20

CULTURE Sands EuroFest June 2-4 | Sands Regency | Reno, Nev. This weekend celebration will feature European food and beer, entertainment, dancing and craft booths at the 19th annual event. | sandsregency.com

Nevada State Fair June 8-11 | Mills Park | Carson City, Nev. Enjoy four days of fun, entertainment, carnival rides and pig racing. There will be a car show, history reenactments and exhibits from participating counties of the great state of Nevada. | nevadastatefair.org

Maker Show 2017 June 11 | Truckee Tahoe Lumber Co. | Truckee Truckee Roundhouse hosts the third annual Maker Show featuring local makers and artists and food and beverages from local restaurants. | truckeeroundhouse.org

Tahoe City Solstice Festival June 15-18 | Tahoe City Celebrate the start of summer with the 12th annual Solstice Festival featuring the farmers’ market, Solstice Stroll Classic Car Show, live music at different venues, Tahoe City Wine Walk, the Solstice Sip ‘n’ Shop and kickoff to the summer concerts at Commons Beach. The great outdoors takes center stage with events, guided tours, clinics and more at the Alpenglow Mountain Festival and during Adventure Sports Week. | visittahoecity.org

2017 Stewart Father’s Day PowWow June 16-18 | Stewart Facility | Carson City, Nev. Celebrate Father’s Day weekend with the entire family and experience Native American heritage, history and pride. The former Stewart Indian School will come alive with more than 200 dancers, 25 arts and crafts vendors and Indian tacos and other fare. | stewartindianschool.com

8th annual Peaks & Paws June 17-18 | Village at Squaw | Olympic Valley This two-day festival features dog-themed entertainment, fun activities for the family, adoptable dogs, wine and beer tasting and great bluegrass music. There will be dog-centric entertainment, including the ultimate flying dog show, fly ball demonstrations and dog-friendly hikes and fetching contests. | squawalpine.com


“Tooth of Crime” April 7-22 | Brüka Theatre | Reno, Nev. This dystopian rock fantasy written by Sam Shepard is set in a bleak and blinding desert world of apocalyptic devastation. Violence and rock music combine to fuel battles where language is the weapon of choice. | brukatheater.com

“Bridge to Terabithia” April 21-23 | Community Arts Center | Truckee The story is of a deep friendship between two misfit kids and their creation of an imaginary kingdom in the woods. | truckeecommunitytheater.com

Brew, Brats & Ballet April 22, 23 & 30 | Area venues The Sierra Nevada Ballet presents Brews, Brats & Ballet, a variety of short, original choreographic works by area artists. | sierranevadaballet.org

“Spring 10-Minute Play Festival”

“BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA” | APRIL 21-23

An evening of dance spanning classical ballet, a mid-century modern classic and two contemporary premieres. Guests Calvin Thomas and Daiane Lopes da Silva will be featured. | tahoearthauscinema.com

Danielle Hankinson

April 7-9 | Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema | Tahoe City

THEATER

An Evening with Lake Tahoe Dance Collective

& DANCE

April 6-19, 2017 | MUSIC & FESTIVALS

“Stupid F***ing Bird” May 18-June 17 | Brüka Theatre | Reno, Nev.

Comedies, farce, avant-garde contemporary pieces, thought-provoking dramas, all packed into tiny productions. | truckeecommunitytheater.com

An aspiring director rampages against the art created by his mother’s generation. A nubile actress wrestles with an aging Hollywood star for the affections of a renowned novelist — and everyone discovers how disappointing love, art and growing up can be. | bruka.org

“Murder in Green Meadows”

“Young Frankenstein”

May 12-28 | Reno Little Theater | Reno, Nev.

June 8-11 | Community Arts Center | Truckee

Thomas, a successful architect, and wife, Joan, have just moved into their dream house in the quiet suburban town. A friendship develops with their neighbors Carolyn and Jeff, as does an affair between Joan and Jeff. Thomas makes two demands of his wife: She must stop seeing Jeff and she must kill him. | renolittletheater.org

It’s bawdy. It’s naughty. It’s Mel Brooks. Based on the 1974 film by Brooks and Gene Wilder, this parody of the horror film genre features Frederick Frankenstein, his faithful fiancé, a hunchbacked sidekick, leggy lab assistant, mysterious housekeeper and the monster himself, who does a mean tap dance to “Putting on the Ritz.” | truckeecommunitytheater.com

May 6 | Community Arts Center | Truckee

LAKE TAHOE DANCE COLLECTIVE

ANNUAL REPERTORY SHOWCASE

APRIL 7TH, 7PM APRIL 8TH, 2PM & 7PM APRIL 9TH, 2PM

TAHOE ART HAUS CINEMA

TICKETS & INFO

LAKETAHOEDANCECOLLECTIVE.ORG 21


DELIGHTS

DELECTABLE

CHILI ON THE COMSTOCK | MAY 20-21

MUSIC & FESTIVALS | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Reno Wine Walk April 18, May 20, June 17 | The Riverwalk District | Reno, Nev.

Food Truck Friday May 19-Sept. 29 | Idlewild Park | Reno, Nev. Reno Street Food came about in 2012 with just five food trucks. Reno Street Food can proudly say it has 30 deliciously packed food trucks, pop-up restaurants and food trailers every Friday from 5 to 9 p.m. There are local bands and artists featured each week. | Reno Street Food on Facebook

Strange Brew Festival May 20 | The Brewer’s Cabinet | Reno, Nev. Strange Brew Festival is a celebration of uniquely crafted brews from local breweries. More than 20 local breweries will offer brews exclusively made for this event — brews that will challenge taste buds and sensibilities. There will be music and great barbecue from 3 to 7 p.m. | strangebrewfestival.com

Chili on the Comstock May 20-21 | Virginia City, Nev.

Take a stroll along the Truckee River while sipping on wine. Every third Saturday of the month at participating Riverwalk District merchants. | renoriver.org

The 34th annual Chili on the Comstock returns to the historic town. Taking place along C Street, the main drive, the event promises all the favorite flavors and brings the return of the Fireball Saloon Crawl, Fun with the Runs 5K, music and family-friendly activities. | visitvirginiacitynv.com

Steampunk Tavern Stroll

Reno Craft Beer Week

April 22 | Area venues | Reno, Nev.

June 2-10 | Area venues | Reno, Nev.

Steampunk Tavern Stroll is a themed bar crawl that brings together both a possible future and a re-imagined past from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. It merges the Victorian era with a Buck Rogers sensibility. | crawlreno.com

Craft Beer Week highlights the region’s craft beer culture while expanding the reach of craft beer through collaboration, education, cooperation and responsible libation. Enjoy sampling the region’s best beers, learning from local brewers and discovering an evolving craft. Home brewers are invited to compete in the Biggest Little Homebrew competition. | renocraftbeerweek.com

Farmers’ Markets May 18-October | Area venues Nothing says summer like a trip to the local farmer’s market. Enjoy the sunshine, fresh local produce, great food and people who help make this community special. Tahoe City farmers’ market and Truckee Regional Park’s market open in mid-May. Other regional markets from South Lake Tahoe to Carson City, Nev., to Beckwourth open in June. | foothillsfarmersmarket.com

Epic SciFi & Fantasy Crawl June 3 | Area venues | Reno, Nev. Celebrate favorite SciFi classics, video games, books and movies with costumes, drinks and friends. The evening begins with a light saber battle in the heart of downtown. | crawlreno.com

Lake Tahoe Brewfest June 10 | Coldwater Brewery & Grill | South Lake Tahoe The inaugural Lake Tahoe Brewfest features craft brew tastings from breweries Lake Tahoe breweries and some from the surrounding areas, a home brewers’ competition, music, arts and crafts, food and more. | tahoesouth.com

Taste of the Comstock June 10 | Area venues | Virginia City, Nev. Sample savory bites of Virginia City’s finest fare, experience the way it was on the Comstock and encounter the life of the upper echelon in the VIP whiskey lounge all at Taste of the Comstock. In its heyday, when silver was pouring from the hills, Virginia City was well known as a town of riches, elegance and fine dining. | visitvirginiacitynv.com

Truckee Brew Fest June 10 | Truckee Regional Park | Truckee The 12th annual Truckee Brew Fest features more than 40 specialty brews from Northern California and Nevada breweries, music by Lost Whiskey Engine and Coburn Station, dancing, barbecue items and silent auction. | truckeebrewfest.com

The Great Eldorado BBQ, Brews and Blues Festival June 16-17 | Eldorado Resort Casino | Reno, Nev. This annual event is equal parts barbecue block party, microbrew tasting event and music festival with free, nonstop rock and blues throughout the weekend. Last year, more than 60 microbreweries participated including Brew Brothers, Saint Archer Brewing Company, Pyramid, Magic Hat and Blue Moon. | eldoradoreno.com

Tahoe City Wine Walk June 17 | Tahoe City One of Tahoe City’s signature annual events, the Wine Walk gives participants the opportunity to sip, shop and explore. Stroll the scenic lakefront sidewalks, tasting wines and noshing on tasty bites from nearly 30 wineries, local restaurants and caterers. | tahoecitywinewalk.com

22


April 6-19, 2017 | MUSIC & FESTIVALS

Courtesy Virginia City

STREET VIBRATIONS SPRING RALLY | JUNE 2-4

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Virginia City Grand Prix April 29-30 | Virginia City, Nev. Experience the legendary racing in historic Virginia City during this off-road motorcycle race. After the race, head to the Village Saloon to talk bikes and celebrate. | vcgp.com

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May 12-14 | Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center | Reno, Nev. Experience the world’s largest and most famous monster truck tour. Watch world-class drivers compete in front of capacity crowds in racing and freestyle. | monsterjam.com

Hot August Nights Spring Fever Revival May 19-20 | Area venues | Reno, Nev. Twist and shout back to the 1960s and 1970s for a weekend of classic cars and rock ‘n’ roll music in downtown Reno, which will hum with powerful engines and dreamy sighs as classic cars from bygone eras line the streets. Marvel at the Show ‘n’ Shines and enjoy free entertainment provided by the Silver Legacy Resort Casino. The event also features food and beverages and memorabilia booths. | hotaugustnights.net

Street Vibrations Spring Rally June 2-4 | Reno & Virginia City, Nev. Enjoy a weekend of motorcycle fun with live entertainment on six stages, bike games, poker runs, vendors and more. | roadshowsreno.com

Battle Born Moto Festival June 3-4 | Wild West Motorsports Parks | Sparks, Nev. Expect the most extreme forms of off-road motorcycle racing in one weekend. Top pros from the West will demonstrate their talents in motor-climb racing, extreme enduro, trials and freestyle motocross. | elevatedaction.com

Octane Fest June 9-11 | Rattlesnake Raceway | Fallon, Nev. This festival hosts a week of high-powered motorsports with dirt-track racing, fuel-drag racing and a jamboree with monster trucks and freestyle motocross. | octanefest.com

US Open of Watercross June 17-18 | Sparks Marina | Sparks, Nev. This event is the NASCAR of watercross and draws top competitors worldwide. This premier racing circuit showcases professional and amateur athletes in the highly explosive and exciting sport of personal watercraft racing. | prowatercross.com 23


MUSIC & FESTIVALS | TheTahoeWeekly.com

RENO CATTLE DRIVE | JUNE 10-15

LIVIN’ IN

THE WILD, WILD WEST

Reno Xtreme Barrel Race

April 25-30 | Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center | Reno, Nev.

The Biggest Little Barrel Race in the World hosts contestants from more than 10 states. This barrel race series is unique in that competitors include men and women, amateurs and professionals and all age groups. The fastpaced competition with top athletes and beautiful horses is free to the watching public. | burnsevents.com

Genoa Cowboy Festival April 28-30 | Genoa, Nev. A blend of beautiful setting, entertainment, heritage and Western culture, the Genoa Cowboy Festival is a place to celebrate cowboy music and poetry, Old West history and the Western lifestyle. Genoa is the site of the first ranch in Nevada and still has working cattle ranches near the center of town. | genoacowboyfestival.org

Comstock Arabian Horse Association Spring Fiesta May 5-7 | Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center | Reno, Nev. Arabian horses have always held a mystique and are often regarded as noble. Beautiful, elegant and versatile, they are the most recognized horse breed in the world. Enjoy the spirited competition that feature Arabians, Half Arabians and Anglo Arabians. | comstockarabianassociation.com

Let it Ride, Reno! June 2-4 | Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center | Reno, Nev. Dedicated to preserving the sports of team penning and ranch sorting on the West Coast, these championships offer the best and most fair events held at premier venues with great cattle, awesome awards and an excellent experience for any level of rider. | legacychampionships.wordpress.com

24

Reno Cattle Drive June 10-15 | Area venues For 26 years, the Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive has given would-be cowboys and cowgirls the chance to participate in an authentic, old-style cattle drive as they travel 100 miles through Nevada desert to deliver more than 300 steer to the rodeo grounds in downtown Reno. | renorodeo.com

Reno Rodeo June 15-24 | Rodeo Grounds | Reno, Nev. The Reno Rodeo is 10 days of the best PRCA-sanctioned rodeo competitions in the country with more than 750 professional athletes, two worldclass team-roping events, Xtreme bull riding, team roping, steer wrestling, barrel racing and bronco riding. The event features an extreme Mustang Makeover, Double R Marketplace for shopping, food, carnival and the wieldy popular Mutton Bustin’. | renorodeo.com

Bob Feist Invitational Team Roping June 19 | Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center | Reno, Nev. This 40th annual masters’ roping event features the world’s top 100 teams, representing 23 states and Canada that compete for the coveted BFI Championship in one of the most respected events among team ropers. | bfiweek.com


Arts

CREATIVE AWARENESS

ONGOING EXHIBITS

Jane Cassidy SNC Tahoe Gallery | April 6-May 19

Scarce Project

Watching paint dry

Riverside Studios | April 7-May 5

Norma Cili El Dorado County Library | Until April 8 Cobalt Artist Studio | April 8-May

D O D I F F E R E N T C L I M AT E S A F F E C T PA I N T I N G ?

Glynn Cartledge Sierra Arts Gallery | Until April 20

Mahsan Ghazianzad & Grant Miller Metro Gallery | Until April 21

SNC Student Show Holman Arts & Media Center | April 27-May 19

Dotty Molt McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until April 27

Barbie Crawford McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until April 27

Youth Art Month Lake Mansion | Until April 28

Winter Art Exhibit Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe | Until April 30

Shahri Masters Incline Village Library | Until April 30

Katy Ann Fox Sierra Arts Gallery | May 3-29

Carson Valley Art Association Copeland Gallery | Until May 4

A Place in the Country Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 21

Peter Stichbury Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28

Spinifex: Aboriginal Paintings Nevada Museum of Art | until May 28

“My Body Your Body” Sierra Arts Gallery | June 1-22

S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

I

like art and I like to travel. While noticing art in my travels around the world, I’m always amazed at how the environment and culture inspires one’s pieces. Lake Tahoe draws many artists and in knowing some artists who paint here, it has made me wonder: How fast does paint dry in Lake Tahoe compared to other places? It is a cool, sunny winter day in Lake Tahoe and local artist Monika Piper Johnson is inside Incline Village’s Cobalt Artist Studio workshop. A clean, wooden table is in the middle of studio with paints and art pieces off to the side. A heater is in place with a ceiling fan turned on, helping to circulate the air. Johnson has been painting abstracts, landscapes and still life for more than 17 years in North Lake Tahoe. Using oil paints as her preferred medium, she likes to capture scenes on-location. Johnson has experience painting in Virginia City, Mammoth, Montana, Wyoming and Alaska, where she says her work has a similar drying time to Lake Tahoe. However, she has also painted in Carmel, Mendocino, France, Bermuda and Russia where the process is different.

“High Desert Alchemy” OXS Gallery | Until June 2 Carson City Visitors Bureau | Until June 19

“Image Nation” Truckee Recreation Center | Until June 30

“Strange Cousins from the West” Sierra Arts Gallery | July 1-30

“Maynard Dixon: The Paltenghi Collections” Miradas

Monika Piper Johnson shows how the layers of oil paint dries in one of her art pieces.

Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

Four-Artist Exhibit Sierra Arts Gallery | Aug. 3-25

“On the Water” Tahoe Maritime Museum | Until summer

Rachel Stiff Sierra Arts Gallery | Sept. 7-29 1 ST & 3 RD WEDNESDAY

Gathering of Artists North Tahoe Arts Center THURSDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art (except 1st Thursday) 2 ND FRIDAY

Senior art classes & tours Nevada Museum of Art SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art 2 ND SATURDAY

Free admission Nevada Museum of Art Kids’ Art day Nevada Museum of Art Art Walk Reno

alkyd medium in with her paint to further protect an artwork. I poke at one of her paintings called “Thunderbird Lodge Gazebo” that she finished a month ago. It is dry to the touch, but thick and kind of buoyant. “I learned how to manipulate temperatures to get the right texture,” she says.

USING RECLAIMED WOOD

Great Basin Native Artists

Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

THE ARTS

& CULTURE

CALENDAR

Ellen Nunes

April 6-19, 2017

“In all of these places, the paints take much longer to dry; the longest being Bermuda and then France,” says Johnson. “Heat helps them dry, but humidity makes the oil paints take twice as long. Think about how long it takes for your hair to dry when you get out of the shower or how damp your clothes feel when they come out of the wash. Humidity affects paint like that, too.” What type of material an artist paints on, the size of it and the medium used affects the drying time, as well. Johnson finds that some colors, thicknesses and brands of oil paint take longer to dry. “Sap green is the slowest,” she says. The amount of pigments a paint color has may affect the drying time, but the bigger a painting is, the longer it takes to dry, as well. Johnson says that painting on location also takes longer because the light is constantly changing. Johnson admits that when she’s finished painting on location and wants it to dry faster, she’ll put it on the car dashboard over the defroster. She’ll also mix a fast dry

I meet with Kings Beach artist Mary Beth Hamilton. Painting on reclaimed cedar wood pier planks she gets from a neighbor, Hamilton approaches her artwork from a different angle and hadn’t considered the timeline of a painting until now. “Painting is such a timeless thing for me, I don’t think about how fast paint dries because of the creative flow.” She says that she has a different sensibility regarding her process; sometimes she wants a work of art to hurry up and dry so she can paint over it and other times she waits a couple of days to readjust her mental state before adding another layer. Hamilton studied art at Sonoma State University and has worked with different mediums in the last 20 years. She has experimented with ceramic sculptures, oil pastels, silk painting and even wood carving, but now her preferred process is taking different colors of house paint to reclaimed pier wood. “I found my voice painting on wood and this pace is perfect for growing and creating,” says Hamilton. She also finds that painting on old Lake Tahoe wood piers provides a new challenge. “I like working with materials that I have less control over.” But in getting back to how the old dried out wooden planks react with her preferred medium, she says that the “thirsty old wood just drinks up the paint,” so she goes through a lot of it. She likes using house paint because it’s cheaper than buying tubes of acrylic and it’s easier to use for bigger pieces. “Sometimes I’ll just put one layer on

Mary Beth Hamilton in her studio with planks of pier wood and artwork.

and it’s done, but then other pieces take 47 layers,” she says. “Art takes a lifetime of learning and experimenting. The learning curve has been steep with how paint dries and how the wood reacts with it,” she says.

Mary Beth Hamilton’s custom-made art cart.

PROTECTING PAINT FROM THE COLD It’s no secret that a cold, dry painting environment can provide some challenges when trying to keep paints intact. Unless you can keep a studio heated, paint may freeze and have to be thrown out. To keep her paint from drying out, Johnson will spread it out on a plate, cover it with saran wrap, and stick it in the freezer. That way it stays cold and isn’t exposed to air. To keep her paint from freezing, Hamilton bought a rolling cart from Harbor Freight, wrapped it in foil and foam insulation and then inserted little lights and a thermostat in it. “I didn’t consider paint freezing when we first built this shed, but I lost a lot in that first winter,” she says. 

25


THE ARTS

Arts

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE

ART RAISES

AWARENESS Riverside Studio in Truckee announces that the Scarce Project by Ali Armstrong will be on display from April 7 to May 5. Armstrong, an artist who raises awareness about animal species in crisis, created Scarce to encourage responsible protection of the endangered and to remember the beauty of the extinct. Armstrong paints extinct animals in black and white because they are forever gone. To the endangered she adds a touch of color because there is hope. Riverside Studios will host an opening night reception on April 7 from 5 to 8 p.m. The event includes live music, refreshments and snacks. | riversideartstudios.com

Masters at work Incline Village, Nev. Shahri Masters artwork will be on display at Incline Village Library through the month of April. She was inspired by her daughter toward creativity for healing and recently began painting. Her work has been well received and she has sold several pieces. She currently has three commissions in progress. Masters is also the author of three books. | (775) 832-4130

Cobalt like the lake Incline Village, Nev. Cobalt Artist Studio presents Ellen Nunes fine art, which will be on display starting on April 8. Called, “Creation Series: A Collaboration with Nature,” the body of work encompasses years of deliberate, playful experimentation born on a bone-chilling winter night in 2006. There will be an artist’s reception on April 8 from 4 to 6 p.m. It is open to the public. Workshops at the studio include Painting Poppies in Watercolor on May 6. | cobaltartiststudio.com

Celebrating youth art Reno, Nev. Arts for All Nevada presents a Youth Art Month exhibit at Lake Mansion until April 28. The exhibit will be filled with colorful and imaginative children’s artwork as part of the annual nationally celebrated Youth Art Month. | (775) 826-6100

High standards exhibited Minden, Nev. Carson Valley Art Association announces the opening of an art show at the Copeland Gallery. The 50 local artists are interested in various mediums. Objectives include developing a high standard of art, presenting to the public free of charge the best work of its members in various exhibits and supporting young artists in the area by offering educational scholarships. The show runs through May 4. | (775) 782-8207 26

“Ethiopian Wolf” Ali Armstrong | Riverside Studios

Print fans welcome

Call for exhibits

Drop in for fun

Meyers Bona Fide Books offers Open Print Studio on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those who want to work on linocuts or wood block prints and those who have taken a letterpress class at Tahoe Letterpress are welcome. Assistance and some supplies are on site. | bonafidebooks.com

Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts will feature the works of members in the exhibit through April 30 at the North Tahoe Art Center. | northtahoearts.com Tahoe City Gathering of Artists is every first and third Wednesday of the month at North Tahoe Arts Center. Artists are welcome to drop in and share studio space from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. | northtahoearts.com

South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League offers Tuesday Just for Fun workshops from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. with silk painters and watercolorists. Socialize and learn from each other the techniques of applying dyes on silk and watercolor paints on paper. There will be some demonstrations and information on materials and techniques. The free workshops will be at the South Lake Tahoe Senior Center. All ages and artistic abilities welcome. | RSVP (530) 542-6094 or addiesilkart@aol.com

Lots of art for $5

Both sides of the border

Reno, Nev. Art Walk Reno starts at 5 p.m. the first Thursday of every month throughout the year. Guests can see the works of local and regional artists on display in venues within the Arts District, between Liberty Street and Second Street and Virginia Street and Arlington Avenue. The walk begins at West Street Market in downtown Reno. Tickets are $5. | artspotreno.com

Reno, Nev. The Nevada Museum of Art welcomes “Miradas: Ancient Roots in Modern and Contemporary Mexican Art, Works from the Bank of America Collection,” which celebrates and reveals a variety of cultural aspects that emerged in the years after the Mexican Revolution to the present day. The exhibit will remain on view through July 16. “Miradas” consists of more than 100 paintings, prints and photographs created over the past 80 years by artists who have been attracted to and inspired by Mexico’s ancient civilizations and modern artistic

Out and about South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League announces exhibits being shown around South Lake Tahoe. A Cup of Cherries Café hosts a display of wintry photographs and paintings by TAL artists Donna Reid, Lois Loveless, Cherie Pinsky, Michael Schaer, Barb Gustafson and Rick Espinor through mid-April. The newest “Art Around Town” exhibit is at Bank of the West, featuring wildlife portraits by Barb Gustafson, Carroll Sue Jones, Nancy Lynch, Nina Major and Ellen Nunes through mid-April. | talart.org

Therapeutic exhibit Truckee Image Nation, a new art installation featuring Nevada County veterans, is on display at the Truckee Community Recreation Center until June 30. Image Nation is an initiative of the Nevada County Arts Council in partnership with Welcome Home Vets, funded in part by the California Arts Council and local contributions. The photographs, self-portraits and pictures of veterans’ hands are the result of a therapeutic workshop with veteran and master photographer Michael Llewellyn. Image Nation helps veterans express themselves and connect with each other and society, a key element in treating post-traumatic stress disorder. Llewellyn, a veteran himself, has been working in photography since 1988. “I have personal experience with the debilitating social isolation caused by episodes of trauma,” Llewellyn said in a press release. “The practice of photography offered me insight into understanding creative self expression, which contributed to the success of my career.” | tdprd.org

Gathering of Artists

Image Nation | Truckee Recreation Center


April 6-19, 2017

theories. Highlights include works by some of the best-known Mexican artists, including Diego Rivera, Rufino Tamayo and Gabriel Orozco, as well as Mexican-American artists such as Judithe Hernández, Roberto Juarez and Robert Graham. The exhibit will include several educational and entertaining offerings through July with details online. | nevadaart.org

Art that affords spirit Incline Village, Nev. The Incline Village Visitors Information Center has brought together four artists who work in four different mediums for a new show titled “Whimsical Spirit.” The exhibit runs through April 30. Troi Follansbee is a native Californian artist who creates mosaic sculptures using many types of materials, called tesserae. Follansbee will display a new series entitled, “Get Busted,” which features a spontaneous style. Ellen Beauregard uses mixed medium within her large paintings from tar, epoxy and metals. She uses color, texture and luster to balance the composition ttof each piece. Anastiscia Chantler-Lang is a self-taught artist from Toronto, who relocated to Tahoe in 2015 after traveling extensively and working in fashion and handbag design. She uses pastels and colored pencils to convey her feelings and experiences while living in the Sierra region. Bill Stevenson is a Truckee photographer for whom the art of taking pictures is practically genetic. Both Stevenson’s great-great grandfather and greatgrandfather photographed living on the edge of the American frontier from their home in Leavenworth, Kan. | (800) 468-2463

Exhibition features Northern California artists Northstar The Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe, has joined with SLATE Art Consulting to feature a new winter exhibition of the works of 31 Northern California artists throughout the hotel’s lobby and public areas through April. Artists featured include Jonah Burlingame, Maria Burtis, Elaine Coombs, Pauletta Chanco, Micah Crandell-Bear, Joanne Fox, Holly Van Hart, Carol Lefkowitz, David Nyquist, Thea Schrack, Amy Lee Solomon, Jeff Snell, Rob Synder, David Wellner and Diane Williams. Works from the collection are clearly labeled and additional information about the artists is also provided. There are notes to help with a self-guided tour, a walk-through map and price sheet of the SLATE winter collection at the concierge desk. Private tours of the rotating art collection, led by one of the exhibition’s curators, can also be arranged for groups of eight or more, through SLATE Art Consulting. | ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe

What’s new to see at SNC Incline Village, Nev. Sierra Nevada College presents “Long Since the Sun Has Set,” by artist Jane Cassidy in Tahoe Gallery from April 6 to May 19. Cassidy is a multidisciplinary artist and educator from Galway, Ireland. Primarily trained in music composition and animation, her main interests lie in audio-visual immersive environments, visual music, live VJing and multi-channel work. She is currently assistant professor of digital media at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. There will be an artist’s talk on April 20 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Miranda Mcfarland’s BFA exhibit will be from April 6 to 14 at Holman Arts & Media Center. According to the artist, “People gonna be good. Practice your awesome.” An artist reception will be on April 13 from 5 to 7 p.m. The annual student show will be from April 27 to May 19 at the Holman Arts & Media Center. A reception will be on May 2 from 5 to 6 p.m. | sierranevada.edu

On exhibit at Sierra Arts Reno, Nev. Sierra Arts Gallery features the works for Glynn Cartledge on display until April 28, with an artist’s reception on April 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. The Gallery features the work of Katy Ann Fox from May 3 to 29, with a reception on May 18 from 6 to 8 p.m. | sierraarts.org

seum announces that the museum will feature an exhibition that explores the stories behind the names of familiar Tahoe places and beloved Tahoe boats in May. Despite Shakespeare’s conceptualization of names as meaningless constructs, choosing a name for a boat is a personal choice and is rarely arbitrary. Many boat owners choose names that reflect a part of their life or family. Many are expressions of the owner’s personality and sense of humor. Other boat names pay homage to the tradition of the boat as a gendered object. Not only will “What’s in a Name” explore all these fascinating elements, it will also highlight the many superstitions and myths which surround this deeply personal

THE ARTS

All things art Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts offers workshops for a fee and art talks free of charge. Guided Mindfulness Adult Coloring for Women with Tina Lensing is on May 4 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at NTA’s Corison Loft. The workshop will begin with a Mindfulness exercise and discussion on the importance of living with intention and purpose. Lensing will be open to engaging conversation on female empowerment, intentional living and how to integrate mindfulness and into life. The $20 fee includes a coloring book. Fused Glass Pendants with Catherine Strand and Toni Rockwell is on June 30

Art challenges at Earth Day Reno, Nev. Mercury Momentum presents numerous challenges and contests open to the public that promote education, inquiry and expression this season. From science and writing, to art and fashion, there is something for everyone, such as poster art showcase, edible art challenge, upcycled trashion show, poetry reads, photography contests and more. These contests will showcase the creations and winners will be given awards in front of thousands at the annual Earth Day event at Idlewild Park on April 23. | renoearthday.org

Big art for all to see Reno, Nev. Artist submissions for Circus Circus Reno’s 24-Hour Mural Marathon is now open. The event, which will be held from July 15 to 16, will challenge selected competitors to paint an original mural in a panel 19 feet 7 inches wide by 14 feet high on the Virginia Street side of the hotel casino. The murals will remain on the walls for one year and competitors will compete for prize money. Each artist will also receive a $750 stipend to pay for paint and materials. The competition will begin at 10 a.m. on July 15 and end at 10 a.m. on July 16. The winners will be selected by a panel of judges. Artist submissions are open to all artists. Interested artists may submit no more than two original concepts. Entries must be submitted by 12 a.m. on April 21. | circusreno.com

Opposites attract Reno, Nev. The Metro Gallery in Reno City Hall presents “Paint & Metal: Mahsan Ghazianzad and Grant Miller” until April 21. The two seemingly opposite abstract pieces are tied together coherently with the expressive and authentic use of color, mediums and concepts. Using its abstract imagery, the works deal with ideas of truth and exploration of emotions. Ghazianzad’s work carries intimate meaning, capturing the essence of her experiences through her paintings, including personal history and philosophies. Miller designed and built furniture and then became interested in welding and metalworking. | reno.gov

Boat names focus of exhibit Tahoe City “What’s in a name?” Juliet famously pondered. Well, if you are a boat, the answer is: quite a lot. Tahoe Maritime Mu-

“African Elephant” Barb Gustafson | Bank of the West South Lake Tahoe choice. Visitors can also expect to delve into the complex nautical history behind the female persona of ships and boats. The museum invites boat owners to share the story behind his or her boat, as well as loan any transoms, nameplates or photographs that will help illustrate this fascinating element of boating culture. The museum will accept submissions through April. | barbara@tahoemaritime.org

Two photographic displays Reno, Nev. McKinley Arts and Culture Center presents, “Every Image Has a Story: Dotty Molt,” until April 27. Dotty Molt transplanted to the Sierra Nevada region 10 years ago from Florida. Her work is largely focused on an exploratory journey she underwent starting early last year, traveling across the country in her car and solely focusing on her art. The set of photographs being shown are representative of this journey. “Nature in Black and White” by Barbie Crawford will be on display until April 27. Crawford is a professional photographer residing in the Lake Tahoe area. She creates detailed macro-photography portraits of the natural world around her she takes on solitary hiking trips in back country Tahoe. | reno.gov

from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Corison Loft. Participants learn to make fusedglass pendants. NTA fused-glass artists Strand and Rockwell will teach basic glass properties and how to cut, shape and place layers of glass to make various pendants. All glass and tools are provided, as well as something to hang the pendants on. All pendants will be fired after class and can be picked up at North Tahoe Arts after July 7. The fee for the class is $45. Participants must be age 18 or older. Getting Your Art Career on Track with Eva Nichols is on June 1 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the NTA Artisan Shop. Nichols will show participants how to take the first steps to identify artistic goals, break them down into manageable steps and make them fit into real life. Elemental Magic: Combining Art and Feng Shui with Catherine Strand is on Aug. 25 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Artisan Shop. This talk is those interested in the magic of balance using the Five Elements and Feng Shui. Strand will explain this approach using ART and optimizing its placement. | northttahoearts.com

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for a complete list of Arts. 27


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

E A S T E R

WORSHIP SERVICES BAPTIST First Baptist Church of Tahoe City, 390 Fairway Drive, Tahoe City. Sunday service at 9 a.m. followed by fellowship. Kids’ Club & nursery offered during service. Good Friday Stations of the Cross at Corpus Christi Catholic Church, Tahoe City at 7 p.m. Easter sunrise service at Commons Beach, Tahoe City at 6 a.m. Service is outdoors, dress casually and warmly. Pastor Scott Capshaw. | (530) 583-7458, tahoeministries.com First Baptist Church of South Lake Tahoe, 1053 Wildwood Ave., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday services at 11 a.m. Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday Bible study at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Ladies’ Bible study at 6:15 p.m. Pastor Alan & Sharon Morse. | (530) 5442743, firstbaptistchurchslt.com Fellowship Community Church, 11605 Deerfield Road, Truckee. Sunday service at 10:30 a.m. (breakfast at 9:30 a.m.) Sunday school and nursery for 5th graders & younger during service. Together Thursday Fellowship at 6 p.m. | (530) 582-4045, fctruckee.com

CATHOLIC Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church, 10930 Alder Drive, Truckee. Saturday vigil at 5 p.m. in English and 6:30 p.m. in Spanish. Sunday Mass at 9 a.m. in English. Monday, Tuesday & Friday Mass at 8 a.m. Holy Hour with Benediction Friday at 8:30 a.m. Confessions Saturday from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Holy Thursday (bilingual) at 5:30 p.m. Good Friday Stations of the Cross at 12:30 p.m., Seven Last Words Reflection at 1:30 p.m., Liturgy (bilingual) at 3 p.m. Easter Vigil Saturday (bilingual) at 8:15 p.m. Easter Sunday Mass in English at 9 a.m. Mass in Spanish at 11 a.m. Rev. Vince Juan. | (530) 587-3595, assumptiontruckee.com Corpus Christi Catholic Church, 905 W. Lake Blvd., Tahoe City. Saturday vigil at 5 p.m. Sunday Mass at 8 & 10 a.m. all year. From July to Labor Day at Marie Sluchak Community Park, Tahoma. Daily Mass Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday at 8:30 a.m. Confessions Saturday at 4:30 p.m. or by appointment. Holy Thursday at 7 p.m. Good Friday Passion Service at 3 p.m. Good Friday Ecumenical Stations of the Cross at 7 p.m. Easter Holy Saturday at 8 p.m. Easter Sunday at 8 & 10 a.m. Father Benedict DeLeon, Pastor. | (530) 583-4409, corpuschristitahoe.org Our Lady of Tahoe Catholic Church, 1 Elks Point Rd., Zephyr Cove. Saturday vigil at 5 p.m. Sunday Mass at 8 & 10 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Wednesdays-Fridays Mass at 5:30 p.m. Saturday Confession from 4-4:30 p.m. & by appointment. Saturday Vigil Mass at 5 p.m. Easter Sunday Mass of the Lord’s Resurrection at 8, 10, 12:15 a.m. Father Oliver Curran. | (775) 588-2080, ourladyoftahoe.org Our Lady of the Lake (Mission Church of Assumption of the BVM), 8263 Steelhead Ave., Kings Beach. Sunday Mass in English at 4 p.m., Sunday Mass in Spanish at 6 p.m. Sunday Confession 3:30 & 5:30 p.m. Thursday bilingual Mass at 8 a.m. Holy Thursday (bilingual) at 7:30 p.m. Good Friday (bilingual) Liturgy and Stations of the Cross at 3 p.m. Easter Sunday Mass in English at 4 p.m. Mass in Spanish at 6 p.m. | (530) 5873595, assumptiontruckee.com 28

Queen of the Snows, 1550 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley. Sunday Mass at noon from Easter Sunday to July. Outstation Sunday Mass at 9 a.m. at Marie Sluchak Community Park, Tahoma from July to Labor Day. Easter Sunday at 12 p.m. Father Benedict DeLeon. | (530) 583-4409, corpuschristi-tahoe.org St. Francis of Assisi, 701 Mount Rose Highway/State Route 431, Incline Village. Saturday Mass at 5 p.m. Sunday Mass at 9 & 11 a.m., & 5 p.m. in Spanish. TuesdayFriday Mass at 9 a.m. Saturday Sacrament of Reconciliation from 4-4:30 p.m. & on request. Thursday Mass of the Last Supper at 6 p.m. Good Friday service at 3 p.m., Stations of the Cross at 6 p.m. Holy Saturday Vigil at 5 p.m. Easter Sunrise Service at 7 a.m.; English Mass at 9 & 11 a.m., followed by egg hunts; Spanish Mass at 5 p.m., followed by egg hunt. Rev. William Nadeau. | (775) 8310490, sftahoe.org St. Theresa Catholic Church, 1041 Lyons Ave., South Lake Tahoe. Saturday vigil at 5:30 p.m. Sunday Mass at 8 & 10 a.m., 12 & 7 p.m. in Spanish. Monday-Friday Mass at 8 a.m., Wednesday & Friday Mass at 12 p.m. Saturday Confession at 4 p.m. Holy Thursday Mass at 7 p.m. Good Friday English Liturgy at 12:15 p.m., Stations of the Cross at 1:30 p.m., “People of the Passion” at 6 p.m., Spanish Liturgy at 7:30 p.m. Saturday Easter Vigil at 8:15 p.m. (No 4 p.m. confessions and no 5:30 p.m. Mass). Easter Mass at 8 & 10 a.m., noon and 7 p.m. Father Mauricio Hurtado. | (530) 544-3533, tahoecatholic.com

CHRISTIAN Calvary Chapel of South Lake Tahoe, 807 Emerald Bay Rd., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday services at 9 & 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Children’s Sunday School & Youth Church at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday Ladies’ Bible Study at 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. with childcare. Thursday Awana Kids Club at 6 p.m., Youth Group at 7:30 p.m. Palm Sunday 9 & 10:30 a.m. Good Friday Communion at 12 p.m. Easter Sunday Sunrise Service at 6 a.m. at Regan Memorial City Beach, Easter services 9 & 10:30 a.m. Service Pastor Jerry Foster. | (530) 5447320, calvarytahoe.com Calvary Chapel of Truckee, 11725 Donner Pass Road, Truckee High School cafeteria. Sunday service 10 a.m. with Sunday school & childcare. Wednesday Bible study, Calvary Kids Club & Youth Groups meet at 7 p.m. at Fellowship Community Church, 11605 Deerfield Drive. Pastor Brian Larson. | (530) 587-1711, cctruckee.com Church on the Lake, 7000 Latone Ave., Tahoe Vista, at North Tahoe Hebrew Congregation building. Sunday at 10 a.m. Pastors Ken Kasterko & Jimetta Mayne. | (530) 580-8292, tahoechurchonthelake.org Iglesia Cristiana Vida Nueva, 918 Northwood Blvd., Incline Village. Celebremos la Pascua-Servicio Domingo al mediodia (12). Pastores John y Ruby Cole. | (775) 831-5030, inclinevidanueva.org Lake Tahoe Church of Christ, 3609 Vanda Lee Way (in the Seventh-day Adventists building), South Lake Tahoe. Sunday class at 10 a.m., services at 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible class at 7 p.m. Guest speakers. | (530) 208-9509, southtahoechurchofchrist.com

Lake Tahoe Christian Fellowship, 3580 Blackwood Road, South Lake Tahoe. Sunday pre-service prayer at 9:15 a.m., service at 10 a.m. Children’s ministries at 10:40 a.m. Wednesday Women’s Bible study at 10 a.m. Friday Men’s Bible Study at 6:15 p.m. Saturday Iglesia Vida Nueva service at 7 p.m. Pastors Terry and Cheryl Edwards. | (530) 544-4357, laketahoecf.com New Life Foursquare Church, 918 Northwood Blvd., Incline Village. Sunday service at 10 a.m. Nursery & New Life Kids meet at same time. Easter Service at 10 a.m. with New Life Kids and Nursery. Pastors Tim and Jen Allen. | (775) 831-5030, newlifeincline.org Sierra Bible Church, 11460 Brockway Road, Truckee. Sunday service at 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wednesday Junior High & Senior High Youth at 5:30 & 7:15 p.m., respectively. Good Friday service at 6 p.m. Easter services 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. No 6 p.m. service. Pastor Wayne Hoag. | (530) 5876025, sbctruckee.com Sierra Community Church, 1165 Sierra Blvd., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday services 9 & 10:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Nursery care for ages younger than 3. Sunday school age 3 & older. Monday Bible study at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday Men’s Bible study at 6:30 p.m. Good Friday service at 7:15 p.m. Easter services on April 15 at 6:30 p.m. and April 16 at 9 & 10:45 a.m. Pastor Dan Wilvers. | (530) 544-7055, sierracommunitychurch.org Squaw Valley Chapel, United Church of Christ, 444 Squaw Peak Road (behind Tram), Olympic Valley. Historic chapel built for 1960 Winter Olympics. Sunday services at 10 a.m. Easter Sunday, free tram rides starting at 7 a.m. to those attending the 8 a.m. High Camp service, complimentary continental breakfast, special blessing of the Squaw Alpine Ski Patrol and commemoration of Joe Zuiches. Easter Service at 10 a.m. at the chapel. Open to all. Guest pastor Rev. Daniel Ross-Jones. | (408) 781-6447, squawvalleychapel.org South Shore Christian Assembly, 886 Glorene Ave., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday service 10 a.m. Children’s church at 10 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Pastor Bob & Marie Sapp. | (530) 541-0757, hislake.com/ssca.htm WORSHIP SERVICE LISTINGS ARE

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THETAHOEWEEKLY.COM Tahoe Community Church, 145 Daggert Way, Stateline. Adult Sunday school at 9 a.m. Sunday services at 10:30 a.m. Nursery care for newborn to age 5. Children’s worship at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Men’s Bible study at 7 a.m. & Thursday at 6 p.m. Thursday Women’s Bible study at 9 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Pastor Paul Tracy. | (775) 588-5860, tahoecommunitychurch.org Tahoe Faith Fellowship, at Tahoe City Community Center, Fairway Drive. Sunday service at 10 a.m. Home fellowship & other services during the week. Pastors Bill & Betty Ransom. | (530) 583-3977, tahoefaithfellowship.org Tahoe Forest Church, 10315 Hirschdale Road, Truckee. Saturday at 6 p.m. Sunday service 9 & 10:45 a.m. Tuesday High School group at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Middle School group at 7 p.m. Good Friday at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday at 10 a.m. Pastor Mike Sampson. | (530) 5877725, tahoeforestchurch.org

Truckee Christian Center, 11556 Brockway Road, Truckee. Sunday school & worship at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m. Pastors Jerry & Lynda Burks. | (530) 5874638, truckeechristiancenter.org Truckee North Tahoe Church of Christ, 11662 Hope Court, Truckee, at Truckee Seventh Day Adventist Church. Sunday Bible study at 10 a.m. Sunday worship at 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. | (530) 587-4551

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Christian Science Society, 11350 Donner Pass Road, next to Ace Mountain Hardware, Truckee. Sunday service & Sunday School at 10 a.m. Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Childcare provided at all services. Reading room open after services. | (530) 587-6352, christiansciencetruckee.com First Church of Christ, Scientist, 2081 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday service & Sunday school at 10 a.m. Wednesday meeting at 7 p.m. Childcare provided for all services. Reading Room open Saturdays from 12 to 4 p.m. and Mondays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and after church on request. | (530) 541-7892, christiansciencechurchslt.org, talksthatinspire.org

EPISCOPAL St. John’s In the Wilderness, 1776 U.S. Route 50, Glenbrook. Sunday service at 10 a.m. Maundy Thursday service and Eucharist at 7 p.m. Good Friday shared services at St. Patrick’s in Incline Village at 12 p.m. Holy Saturday Easter Vigil shared at St. Patrick’s at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday service with Flowering of the Cross at 10 a.m., followed by egg hunt. Rev. Victoria Warren. | (775) 5862535, stjohnsnv.org St. Nicholas, 855 W. Lake Blvd., Tahoe City. Sunday service at 9:30 a.m. (services are pet friendly; well-behaved pets only) with coffee hour after. Worship in historic Chapel of the Transfiguration June to August. Palm Sunday Holy Eucharist at 9:30 a.m. Easter Holy Eucharist at 9:30 a.m. | (530) 583-4713, stnicksepiscopal.org St. Patrick’s, 341 Village Blvd., Incline Village. Sunday services at 8 & 10 a.m., forum at 9 a.m.; Godly Play for preschoolers and grade-school kids at 10 a.m. Tuesday A Course of Miracles at 5 p.m., Healing service, a 12-step Eucharist at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Interfaith Prayer & Quieting at 5:30 p.m. Thursday Lectio Divina at 12:15 p.m. Maundy Thursday at 7 p.m. Good Friday Veneration of the Cross at 12 p.m., St. Matthew Passion at 7 p.m. Holy Saturday Easter Vigil at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday w/Holy Eucharist at 8 and 10 a.m. Rev. John Seville, interim priest & Rev, Dr. David J. Mussatti. | (775) 831-1418, tahoeepiscopal.org

JEHOVAH WITNESSES Kingdom Hall, 1325 Herbert Ave., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday service meeting at 10 a.m. Tuesday Bible study, school and service meeting at 7 p.m. | (530) 544-4770 Kingdom Hall, 3005 West Lake Blvd., Tahoe City. Sunday Spanish Bible discourse & Watch Tower at 10 a.m., English Bible discourse & Watch Tower at 1 p.m. Tuesday Bible study & service meeting at 7 p.m. in English. Wednesday Spanish Bible study & service meeting at 7 p.m. | (530) 581-0122 Kingdom Hall, 10155 Smith St., Truckee. Sunday service meeting at 10 a.m. Tuesday Bible study, school & service meeting at 7 p.m. | (530) 214-8033


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April 6-19, 2017

JEWISH North Tahoe Hebrew Congregation, 7000 Latone Ave. (off National Ave.), Tahoe Vista. Friday Shabbat service at 7 p.m. High Holidays schedule & activities on Web site. Guests welcome. | (530) 5460895, tahoetemple.org Temple Bat Yam, 3260 Pioneer Trail, South Lake Tahoe. Rabbi Evon J. Yakar. Thursday Torah at the Lake at 12 p.m. Friday Shabbat services at 6 p.m. Phone for schedule. | (530) 542-1211

LATTER-DAY SAINTS Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Highway 267 at Kingswood Way, Kings Beach. Sunday service at 10 a.m. Bishop Kenneth Craig. | (530) 546-3065 Church of Jesus Christ Latter-day Saints, 3460 Spruce Ave., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday service at 10 a.m. Bishop Ellis. | (530) 544-4477

LUTHERAN Christ the King, 3125 N. Lake Blvd., Dollar Hill, Tahoe City. Sunday worship & Sunday School at 9 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 4:30 p.m. Pastor Chip Larson. | (530) 583-1222, ctktahoe.net Hope Lutheran Church of the Sierra, 930 Julie Lane, South Lake Tahoe. Sunday service w/Communion 10 a.m. Nursery care & Children’s Time provided during service. Tuesday & Saturday Hispanic services at 7 p.m. Saturday Bible study at 9 a.m. Maundy Thursday at 7 p.m. Good Friday service at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday service at 10 a.m. Rev. Diana Turner. | (530) 541-1975, hopelutheransierra.org Truckee Lutheran Presbyterian Church, 11662 Hope Court, near the intersection of Brockway Road & Highway 267, Truckee. Sunday worship services at 10 a.m. Passion Sunday, April 9 at 10 a.m. Maundy Thursday, April 13, at 7 p.m. at Church of the Mountains. Good Friday, April 14, 7 p.m. Easter Sunday April 16, 10 a.m. Rev. Jeanie Shaw, interim pastor, and Rev. Joanie Tankersley, associate pastor. | (530) 5824243, tlpc.org

METHODIST Church of the Mountains, Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors, 10079 Church St., Truckee. Sunday service at 9 a.m. Sunday school & infant care offered. Easter Sunday at 9 a.m. w/Children’s Church and egg hunt. Pastor Donna Farrell & Church Administrator Cathie Foley. | (530) 5874407, churchofthemountains.com Kings Beach United Methodist, 8425 Dolly Varden at Bear, Kings Beach. Tuesday Bible study & free community meal at 6 p.m. No Sunday services. | (530) 546-2290

NONDENOMINATIONAL Cornerstone Community Church, 300 Country Club Drive, Incline Village. Sunday services at 9:30 a.m. with Children & Youth services. Pastor Ron Falstad. | (775) 831-6626, cornerstonecommunity.net Fallen Leaf Lake Church operated by St. Francis of the Mountains in the summer, 280 Fallen Leaf Road, South Lake Tahoe. JuneSeptember Sunday services at 8 & 10 a.m. All denominations welcome. Call to confirm. | (530) 544-6635

Tahoe Resort Ministries, weekly Sunday services at 2 p.m. at local ski resorts through Easter Sunday. Services are 15-20 minutes. Services at Squaw Valley, top of Big Blue Express. Alpine Meadows, top of Roundhouse. Northstar, top of Vista Express. Homewood Mountain Resort, top of Madden. Diamond Peak, top of Lakeview Quad. Mt. Rose, top of Lakeview. Sierra-at-Tahoe, top of Easy Rider Express. Good Friday service at Corpus Christi Catholic Church, Tahoe City at 7 p.m. w/ Stations of the Cross. Easter sunrise service at Commons Beach, Tahoe City at 6 a.m. Service is outdoors, dress casual and warmly. Debbie Wohler. | (530) 448-9359, tahoeministries.com

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be included in Shop Local.

Muddy Driveway? Drainage Problems? Call for a free evaluation and free plan*

BMPs & Erosion Control | Drainage Solutions | Defensible Space Landscaping & Irrigation | Civil Engineering

Unity at the Lake, 1195 Rufus Allen Blvd., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday meditation 9 a.m. Sunday celebration at 10 a.m. Ministers Stew & Hillary Bittman. | (530) 544-2266, unityatthelake.org

PRESBYTERIAN Lake Tahoe Community Presbyterian Church, 2733 Lake Tahoe Blvd., South Lake Tahoe. Sunday services at 8 & 10 a.m. Adult Sunday school at 9 a.m. Children’s Sunday school at 10 a.m. Childcare for newborn to age 3 during 10 a.m. service. Friday Men’s Bible study at 7:30 a.m. Easter Sunday Sunrise Service at 6:30 a.m. at Zephyr Point Presbyterian Conference Center. Light breakfast after service; bring dish to share. Easter Sunday Service at church at 10 a.m. w/Children’s Sunday school at 10 a.m. Rev. Bob Kelley. | (530) 544-3757, tahoepres.org Truckee Lutheran Presbyterian Church, 11662 Hope Court, near the intersection of Brockway Road & Highway 267, Truckee. Sunday worship services at 10 a.m. Passion Sunday at 10 a.m., Maundy Thursday at 7 p.m. at Church of the Mountains. Good Friday at 7 p.m. Easter Sunday at 10 a.m. Rev. Jeanie Shaw, interim pastor and Rev. Joanie Tankersley, associate pastor. | (530) 582-4243, tlpc.org and facebook.com/ truckeechurch The Village Church, Mt. Rose Highway, 736 McCourry Blvd., Incline Village. Sunday services at 8 (traditional) & 10 a.m. (blended), Youth Sunday school at 10:15 a.m. Tuesday Men’s Bible Study at 4 p.m. Wednesdays Men’s Study at 6:30 a.m., Prayer Group at 10 a.m., Adult Bible Study at 6 p.m. Pastors Jeffrey Ogden and Tony Conragan. | (775) 831-0784, thevillagechurchnv.org

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE Center for Spiritual Living Tahoe-Truckee, 700 N. Lake Blvd., at Tahoe City Marina. Sunday Celebration & Youth Church at 10 a.m. w/childcare. Meditation centering service at 9:25 a.m. Easter Celebration Service at 10 a.m. with Live Wire Choir. Childcare provided. Rev. Liz Luoma. | (530) 581-5117, tahoecsl.org

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Heavenly Valley Seventh-day Adventist Church, 3609 Vanda Lee Way, South Lake Tahoe. Sunday school at 10 a.m. Sunday worship at 11:15 a.m. | (530) 544-3525, tahoeadventist.org Truckee Seventh-day Adventist Church, 11662 Hope Court off Brockway, Truckee. Saturday Bible study at 10 a.m., service at 11:05 a.m. followed by lunch. | (530) 5875067, truckee22.adventistchurchconnect.org Updates for listings may be sent to editor@tahoethisweek.com.

*Resctrictions apply CA Lic. C27 847514 | Civil 65010 | NV Lic C10 73040 | Civil 20413

p 530.308.2920 | BMPTahoe.com

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR MARK MCLAUGHLIN’S

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FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. MEASUREMENTS: How much Champagne does a Jeroboam-size container hold? 2. MEDICAL: What is the common name for the condition called onychophagia? 3. LANGUAGE: What does the Greek prefix “pyro” mean? 4. TELEVISION: How many crew members were on the USS Enterprise in the original “Star Trek” series? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What country has an airport called Ninoy Aquino International? 6. STATE CAPITALS: Which U.S. state capital is named after an explorer who popularized the use of tobacco in England? 7. FAMOUS SAYINGS: What is the end of the following idiom? “Take it with a grain of ...”? 8. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a male turkey called? 9. CHEMISTRY: What is another name for a mineral known as “fool’s gold”? 10. GEOGRAPHY: What is the largest peninsula in the world?

Strange but true

by Samantha Weaver

It was vice president Adlai Stevenson who made the following sage observation: “All progress has resulted from people who took unpopular positions.” According to pollsters, during the year 2016, both head lice and cockroaches were more popular than the U.S. Congress.

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Wastebasket is missing, 2. Picture is missing, 3. Apple is missing, 4. Arm is moved, 5. Collar is missing, 6. Bug jar is empty.

Imagine a classic game played on a super-wide board. I reckon that would be chubby checkers.

CryptoQuip

1. Three liters or four bottles, 2. Nail biting, 3. Fire, 4. 430, 5. Philippines, 6. Raleigh, N.C. (Sir Walter Raleigh), 7. Salt, 8. A tom, 9. Iron pyrite, 10. Arabian

TRIVIA TEST

30

You may not realize it, but if you’ve ever spent a winter in the northern climes, you’ve probably made a sitzmark (or at least seen one). That’s the mark made when someone falls backward into the snow–like a snow angel.


April 6-19, 2017

Horoscopes

PUZZLES FOR KIDS

FIRE

EARTH

FUN & GAMES AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

With Mercury now in Taurus you can expect your focus to become steadier. Yet with Venus still retrograde, you may still feel uncertain about what you want regarding current interests. Furthermore, as Venus re-enters Pisces this vagueness may increase. Positively, you will feel more peaceful.

Some significant starts on relationship fronts are underway. Some of these are destined to activate new relationships altogether and/or fresh initiatives. However, some could well prove fleeting despite the initial excitement. It is all part of the dance of destiny so trust the flow.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21) Taurus (Apr 20-May 21) A busy time behind the scenes continues. Yet, experiences destined to reveal who are some of your truest and trusted friends are likely. With your ambitions to explore new territory steadily increasing, the combined energies could manifest as new friendships and love interests.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

A series of dynamic if complex circumstances are underway. Patience is a keyword and how you respond to people and situations now could prove pivotal, for better or worse. Slow down and avoid righteous and expectant reactions. Observe what is happening and accept it as clues about how you need to adapt.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

The time has come to enter new territory. Yet ironically, it may also manifest as a journey down memory lane. Good thing there are two of you so you can enjoy both directions. Weaving the experiences of both into a new synthesis will prove inspiring and may even manifest as inventiveness and opportunity.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

A playful cycle continues as does your need to engage with increased determination. A wide array of interactions with people includes at least as many ideas and perspectives to consider. Positively, you are in a position to receive as much as to give and the result could be recognized as a wealth of exchanges.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

A wave of new initiatives and experiences implies a breakthrough period. You may not feel sure of your willingness to commit yet. That may take another 2-3 weeks. Accept it as a trial period. There may be other stages of initiation and development as well. Take your time to decide.

A process of pushing through barriers continues. There are two ways you can go, the literal or the magical. The literal implies removing or obstacles, walls and even people from your life. The magical way refers to clearing old beliefs, attitudes, interpretations and self-concepts and watching the outer reflections change.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23) You are beginning to see your place in the world as with new eyes. Already, your ambitions are strong. Yet, you remain in the waiting room, so to speak. It may take a few weeks before you officially make a new start. The returns from the new ventures implied could prove significant. If interested, focus.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22) You have entered an accelerated period of change. It may manifest as basically as a shift of focus in alignment with the new season. However, the change could prove deeper than that. Your focus is strong and your drive equally so. This could prove to be a promising opportunity to make measurable progress.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) Thoughts are always the first stage of creation. These then grow into dreams, visions, plans, goals and intentions in the second phase. Action to actualize these comes next and follow through can be called stage four. Thus, creation includes looking back to stage one, frequent review of stage two and consistent focus on stage three. Chip chop.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) A new and exciting momentum is building. That Solar Eclipse in your sign in late February is destined to activate or synchronize with significant events in your life. Again, some will be outer events while others will stem from your own initiatives, and probably both. Answer the call.

Tails in Tahoe Lucky

Holly

Oreo

Dutch

Lucky is a man about town. He’s learning to walk on a leash and loving every minute of it. He is just 2 years old, and enjoys a low key lifestyle complete with belly rubs and snack treats.

Holly is a friendly, playful and affectionate young lady. She will be the first one to greet you when you come home. She enjoys playing with wand toys or chasing that pesky red dot!

Oreo is an affectionate kitty who loves cuddles. He will sit on a lap for hours! He’s gentle and mellow and good with dogs.

Dutch is a very sweet and affectionate dog who came to us after his family moved away and couldn’t take him along. Dutch loves people but needs some time to get to know new dogs.

Pet Network (775) 832-4404 bschilpp@petnetwork.org www.petnetwork.org

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org

WARF (775) 783-8737 karen.joseph@att.net www.tahoewarf.com

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org 31


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

1 862 | C a l i f o r n i a ’s M o s t D e v a s t a t i n g W i n t e r and San Joaquin valleys were transformed into a broad inland sea stretching from the foothills of the Sierra to the Coast Range, somewhat similar in extent and shape to Lake Michigan.” The Alta California newspaper described the flooded area as “extending from Tehama, 80 miles north of Marysville, to a point in the San Joaquin at least 50 miles south of Stockton, forming a lake 20 miles wide by some 250 miles long.” Sacramento remained swamped by floodwater for six months.

The current seasonal snowfall total of about 42 feet at the Central Sierra Snow Lab means we still have a long way to go to reach Top 10 status at Donner Pass, let

T

here’s been a lot of talk about weather records being broken this winter, but it was only January’s epic snowfall totals that have made it into the record books so far. In January 2017, the Central Sierra Snow Lab (CSSL) near Donner Pass and many Tahoe Sierra resorts set new monthly snowfall tallies ranging from 20 to 25 feet.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Read Mark McLaughlin’s account of the 1906-07 winter – the Sierra’s Snowiest

But the current seasonal snowfall total of about 42 feet at the CSSL means we still have a long way to go to reach Top 10 status at Donner Pass, let alone exceed the 68 feet that fell in 1938. We are, however, closing in on the wettest year in the precipitation category, currently holding at third place behind 1982 and 1995, the first- and second-ranked water years since 1871. Remember, precipitation is rain and the water content of snow combined. The signature weather pattern of this winter has been a seemingly relentless series of atmospheric rivers that transported huge volumes of water vapor from the Pacific Ocean into the West Coast. At CSSL, resident scientist Randall Osterhuber has measured about 100 inches of precipitation so far — the annual average is 55 inches — but warmer temperatures due to the subtropical origin of many of the storms has limited snowfall totals at elevations below 7,000 feet. There have been plenty of weatherrelated issues across the West this winter, but even if this year manages to exceed the all-time precipitation record of 112 inches measured in 1982, it won’t compare to 1861-62, the most devastating winter in California history. The predominant weather characteristic in 1862 was also an onslaught of powerful atmospheric rivers, but significantly more intense. The megaflood that they caused took thousands of lives and destroyed 25 percent of the state’s economy. The devastation forced California into bankruptcy. In November 1861, steady rain fell day 32

Sacramento under water, circa 1862. | Courtesy California Historical Society

alone exceed the 68 feet that fell in 1938.

after day and Sacramento Valley ranchers started reporting cattle losses due to flooded grazing lands and cold temperatures. In early December, a series of powerful storms overwhelmed the state from north to south with snow, ice and rain. Soon newspapers throughout the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys were posting headlines about people drowning and hundreds of cattle being swept away. One editor stated: “For the past two weeks King Storm has prevailed in the North State. Nearly all bridges north of Red Bluff are washed out and no mail has been received from Yreka in over a week. Loomis Ward of Tehama lost 700 cattle by December 9. When the levee at Sacramento broke, the water was 10 feet deep in places. One hundred Chinamen were drowned on the Yuba River.” The months of December and January were remarkable for exceptional rainfall that generated widespread inundation in the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys. Communication was lost when telegraph poles and wires disappeared under water 30 feet deep. Witnesses reported that by the third week of January, “The Sacramento

Geology professor William Brewer, who was working on a geological survey of California at the time, reported that the great Central Valley was “a district of 5,000 or 6,000 square miles” where nearly every house and farm was obliterated. He stated that the delta region had become an inland sea: “The water ice cold and muddy — that the winds created high waves which beat the farmhouses into pieces.” Household furniture such as chairs, sofas, tables and beds floated among the carcasses of drowned animals. Brewer estimated that 200,000 cattle died. Rainfall amounts in California reached biblical proportions. Between Nov. 11, 1861, and Jan. 14, 1862, 6 feet of rain fell near Sonora in Tuolumne County. By February another 30 inches of rain added to the total, followed by still more storms that battered the Golden State. By the end of January 1862, rainfall in Sacramento was approaching 40 inches, nearly double what the city averages in a year. Residents of Los Angeles endured 28 consecutive days of rain in a season that

TA H O E

totaled 66 inches, more than 400 percent of normal. San Francisco was slammed with nearly 30 inches in 30 days — a rainfall event so severe that climatologists have determined that its statistical likelihood of return at once every 37,000 years. William S. Jewett took a steamer from San Francisco to Sacramento during the flood and gave an eyewitness account: “The dreadful flood completely drowned Sacramento, the capital of our State. I found the town lying about from three to fifteen feet under water — some of the wooden houses had sailed off down the river and others floated into the middle of the streets in all manner of positions.” Whole communities were swept away and the loss of people and livestock was staggering. Edwin Waite described conditions in the Sacramento Valley: “In some places we saw sheep on scaffolds but a few inches above the surface of the water, where they have been for weeks, fed occasionally by means of boats. The loss is not so much in the destruction of property as confidence. The people of the lowlands have lost all confidence in the large valleys as places for permanent homes.” California’s legislature convening in Sacramento also lost its confidence and escaped to San Francisco. Newly elected Governor Leland Stanford was forced to travel to his own inauguration ceremony by rowboat. The onshore flow of moist Pacific air translated into heavy precipitation with fluctuating snow levels in the mountains. Nearly 42 inches of precipitation were recorded at Grass Valley in November and December alone. Some locations picked up 11 inches of rain in just 24 hours. Nevada City in the lower foothills reported 115 inches of precipitation by March. Many locations in the Sierra foothills endured between 8 to 10 feet of rain that season. Sedimentary evidence indicates that floods of this magnitude occur on average every two centuries in California. It’s been 155 years since the last mega-flood and, just like with earthquakes, the clock is ticking.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com, or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

Nostalgia

RESCUE AT ALPINE MEADOWS In April 1982, the nation was riveted by news headlines following the avalanche drama playing out at the Alpine Meadows ski area. Employee Anna Conrad was saved after rescuers searched for five days, and the TruckeeTahoe community was uplifted by the news of a miracle. Bridget, a 9-year-old German shepherd, alerted to Anna’s position and became the first search and rescue dog in North America to locate a human avalanche victim.

Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s newest book “Snowbound: Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” available in local stores or at TheStormKing.com. Courtesy Robert Frohlich


LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

The Lique

CALENDAR

APRIL 6-20, 2017

HIP-HOP JAZZ FOR THE SOUL

APRIL 6 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Live music Tamarack Heavenly 3:30 p.m. Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. SNC Concert Choir St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church IV 7 p.m. Paul Covarelli Cottonwood 7 p.m. STS9 Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 8 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Kivi Rogers & Ken Garr The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Hans Eberbach Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Kerry Pastine & The Crime Scene Peppermill 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. The Kegels, Boss’Daughter, Bucket Flash Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Nathan Owens Motown & Soul Circus Circus 8 p.m. The Vegas Road Show Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Major Powers & The Lo-Fi Symphony The Saint 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. “The Word Begins” The Potentialist Theatre 7:30 p.m. Special Events Banff Mountain Film Festival Silver Legacy 7 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE April 6-19, 2017

S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

April 15 | 9 p.m. | $10-$15 | Moe’s BBQ | Tahoe City

R

asar, the frontman for The Lique (pronounced “leak”) is tall — with his jet-black Afro, chiseled features and commanding physique, he stands out in a room. I bumped into him at Moody’s in downtown Truckee a few months ago. During the band’s break, he thanked me for stopping by and gave me a copy of their CD. His kind, gentle and charismatic nature struck me. The quintet, dressed in their signature suits, is billed as a hip-hop jazz band, but like many artists they stretch genre boundaries. Rasar, originally from Sacramento, was a regular in the music scene there. He played in a number of bands before moving to Las Vegas three years ago. “I met my homegirl Butterscotch [singer, beatboxer and musician] and took a leap and moved out there. She’s the reason I’ve been able to get around the world,” says Rasar. Initially he worked as an usher; within in a month, he was offered a job as an emcee at a club on the Las Vegas strip. “I had no script. I ran around the club, danced and sang,” he said. From there he found himself doing the open-mic scene and the underground music scene. “The Lique was born out of this amazing opportunity; it was a gateway that connected me to the band,” he says. In 2015, he met guitarist Sean Carbone who wanted to start a hip-hop jazz band. Their first show was a month later. The band’s name was born while the group was on tour in Switzerland. After performing a gig, the band went to a late-night jazz club. One of the musicians was in the middle of an intense solo when a tall blonde woman seated in the front let out a howl during his

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Watch videos for “Batman” & “The Velveteen Rabbit”

The Lique is on an upward trajectory with their unique sound that fuses jazz and hip-hop. Their performances are alive, upbeat and thought provoking. show. Rasar was intrigued. “I walked up to her after the show and asked her what she was laughing about. She kept trying to explain but I didn’t understand her French accent. I had no clue what she was talking about. She kept saying, ‘The leek, the leek, don’t you know the leek?’” He soon learned that jazz performers play a short phrase or lick generally recognized by jazz aficionados. Rasar went back to his hotel and told the story to his mates. The group decided to name their band The Lique.

According to Rasar, their lyrics are: “Serious, fun, ridiculous and awesome in their own way — a play on things, mocking music that is dumbed down and simplified, about how we stifle ourselves to fit in.” The song “Batman” has a simple chorus yet offers lyrical depth about the masks we wear. “Democracy Manifest” is the Lique’s debut album. The songs shed light on world issues and take satirical pokes at the madness and maddening things occurring around us. “I learned that satire doesn’t always have

to be funny. There are many layers to the album, which was titled after a seeing a viral video [on YouTube] of an Australian diner dasher. These are volatile times and for better or worse this is what it’s come to.” Rasar, who played basketball in high school, acknowledges it helped: “I’ve learned a lot about leadership and teamwork,” he says “Somebody’s gotta lead. To be a real leader, you need to learn how to delegate and trust the process. I’ve also learned a lot about music and what’s possible and setting new goals. We are a band of brothers and we love music.” The Lique is on an upward trajectory with their unique sound that fuses jazz and hip-hop. Their performances are alive, upbeat and thought provoking. The band is having the time of its life, working on new material. They are set to release a new single entitled, “I Am,” this summer. They perform with Joy & Madness at Moe’s BBQ in Tahoe City on April 15. | Facebook Moe’s BBQ Tahoe City 

33


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

BOOM

BOX April 8 | 8 p.m. Montbleu Resort Casino & Spa Stateline, Nev.

THE DJ, SONGWRITER, producer and multi-instrumentalist Zion Rock Godchaux describes the BoomBox sound as “dirty disco blues.” The band will offer up a signature sound of back-beat, psychedelia and funky house. | montbleuresort.com

STS9 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

APRIL 7 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

April 6-7 | 8 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev. SOUND TRIBE SECTOR 9, aka STS9, is coming to Lake Tahoe for its Get Loud Tour. The adventurous electronic rock band recently released the album, “The Universe Inside.” | harrahslaketahoe.com

DESERT ROSE CHAMBER ENSEMBLE

Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Live music Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Don “Fingers” Kahn Nakoma Resort 5 p.m. Gaelynn Lea Bar One 7 p.m. Daniel Kushnir Cottonwood 7 p.m. STS9 Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Big Blu Soul Revue Bar of America 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Risky Biscuits Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Lake Tahoe Dance Collective Tahoe Art Haus 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Kivi Rogers & Ken Garr The Improv 9 p.m.

Ukulele All-Stars Sparks Nugget 8 p.m. Superbad Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Jackie Landrum Harrah’s 9 p.m. George Walker, Normal Bean & Merry Pranksters Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Candyland 1 Up 10 p.m. Hindsight Atlantis 10 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Evening of Improv Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Kelly Hilbert & Drew Shafer Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. “The Word Begins” The Potentialist Theatre 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. The Clairvoyants Silver Legacy 8 p.m.

RENO & BEYOND

April 15 | 8 p.m. Art Truckee | Truckee THE DESERT ROSE Ensemble began as a collective vision to offer a highquality, diverse repertoire and energetic performances. The ensemble includes a number of musicians from the Reno Philharmonic for an intimate concert. | Facebook Art Truckee

34

The Vegas Road Show Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. John Dawson Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. The Head and the Heart Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Nathan Owens Motown & Soul Circus Circus 8 p.m. Kerry Pastine & The Crime Scene Peppermill 8 p.m.

APRIL 8 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Sambada KT Squaw Valley 1 p.m. Joy & Madness Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Blues Monsters Northstar Village 2 p.m. Drinking with Clowns Kirkwood 2 p.m. Redneck Fusion Festival Sugar Bowl SNC Concert Choir St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church IV 7 p.m.

Herman’s Hermits Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. BoomBox MontBleu 8 p.m. Big Blu Soul Revue Bar of America 9 p.m. Zion Roots Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Soul Scratch Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Big Blue View Bar 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Lake Tahoe Dance Collective Tahoe Art Haus 2 & 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Kivi Rogers & Ken Garr The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND The Vegas Road Show Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Richard Johnson Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Victor & Penny w/Bob Malone Sparks Nugget 8 p.m. Superbad Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Kerry Pastine & The Crime Scene Peppermill 8 p.m. Nathan Owens Motown & Soul Circus Circus 8 p.m. John Dawson Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Jackie Landrum Harrah’s 9 p.m. Yuri’s Night 11 The BlueBird 9 p.m. The Sextones The Saint 9 p.m. Gardenss Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Justin Martin 1 Up 10 p.m. Hindsight Atlantis 10 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m.


April 6-19, 2017

C A L E N D A R | APRIL 6-20, 2017 DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Scene Peppermill 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m.

APRIL 9 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Sambada Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Big Blu Soul Revue Northstar Village 3 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. The London Souls w/People’s Blues of Richmond Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Kivi Rogers & Ken Garr The Improv 9 p.m. Special Events Lake Tahoe Dance Collective Tahoe Art Haus 2 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Ed Corey Trio Reno Little Theater 10:30 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. TOCCATA “The Passion” St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m.

Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Cliff and Dave Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. The Socks Peppermill 6 p.m. Brain Candy Live! Pioneer Center 7 p.m. Hindsight Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 2 p.m. Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 10 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Live music Tamarack Heavenly 3:30 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Cliff and Dave Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. The Socks Peppermill 6 p.m. American Made Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

APRIL 11 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Live music Tamarack Heavenly 3:30 p.m.

HAPPY HOUR Daily 3-7pm SALADS • SANDWICHES • BEER/WINE

Daily Soup, Lunch & Pasta Specials Daily Specials - Italian Wednesdays Mexican Thursdays, Fishy Fridays Arcade Games • Wi-Fi • HDTV Sports NFL Sunday Ticket on HDTVs with Specials!

Live music every Wednesday evening 6–9pm

$1 OFF! ANY MEDIUM PIZZA $2 OFF! ANY LARGE PIZZA or pay regular price and get a MINI Cheese Pizza FREE!

Not good with any other offers. Good through 04/19/17 view full menu & daily specials at cbspizza.com

TO GO Orders Welcome Open 11am-10pm Daily 5075 N. Lake Blvd., Carnelian Bay • Next to 7-11

BIG BLU SOUL REVUE

RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Socks Peppermill 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. American Made Band Atlantis 8 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Kevin Farley & Jeff Richards The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 12 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Live music Tamarack Heavenly 3:30 p.m. Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

Not just Pizza!

546-4738

TOCCATA “The Passion” St. Theresa Catholic Church SLT 7 p.m. Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Dolan, DJ Abilities, Cas One vs. Figure Hard Rock 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m.

MUSIC SCENE

April 7 & 8 | Bar of America | 9 p.m. April 9 | Northstar | 3 p.m. BIG BLU SOUL REVUE, renowned for hard-hitting blues, performs three shows in Truckee, two at night in historic downtown and one in the afternoon in The Village at Northstar. Get down for some bootyshaking action. | bigblusoulrevue.com

LAKE TAHOE DANCE

COLLECTIVE

REPERTORY SHOWCASE April 7 | 7 p.m. & April 8 | 2 & 7 p.m. April 9 | 2 p.m. Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema | Tahoe City THIS EVENING CELEBRATES diversity of style, including both contemporary work and the legacy from pioneers who paved the way for today’s talented choreographers. Guests Calvin Thomas and Daiane Lopes da Silva will be featured. | laketahoedancecollective.org

NOW PLAYING

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

Lake Tahoe in Depth See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Guided tours & 3-D movies Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

(or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

Beauty and the Beast April 6 » 6:30pm

Lake Tahoe Dance Collective Repertory Showcase

April 7 » 7pm | April 8 » 2pm & 7pm April 9 » 2pm

Alpenglow Sports: Leif Whittaker April 13 » 7pm White Sun April 14 » 7pm $15 Fundraiser for READ Global

Rambo Productions: 4th Annual Intergalactic Funk Formal w/ Deekline April 15 » 9:30pm $15 Advance / $20 Door

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

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C A L E N D A R | APRIL 6-20, 2017 APRIL 12 | WEDNESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

RENO & BEYOND L-Cubed UNR Randall Rotunda 12 p.m. Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Socks Peppermill 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. American Made Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Live Blues Wednesdays The Saint 9 p.m. Lucas Biespiel Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m.

DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Kevin Farley & Jeff Richards The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 13 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

MUSICNOTES

Concerts on Commons Beach lineup The lineup for the free Concerts on Commons Beach summer music series has been announced, with the series opening on June 18 featuring Groove Foundry along with Matty Reardon & Friends. The series features free concerts every Sunday along the shores of Lake Tahoe in Tahoe City from June 18 to Sept. 3. | concertsatcommonsbeach.com

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Check out the full summer lineup

Shakespeare music series tickets on sale The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival has announced its lineup for the Showcase Series, featuring stellar musical and dance performances every Monday during the festival.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Check out the full summer lineup

The series kicks off with the ever-popular Reno Philharmonic performing “Bravo on the Beach: Reno Phil Rocks Tahoe!” on July 17. The series will also feature performances by Sierra Nevada Ballet, the Reno Jazz Orchestra, a Chautauqua performance on Alexander Hamilton and more through Sept. 9. This year’s Shakespeare Festival features performances of “Love’s Labour’s Lost” and “Hound of the Baskervilles” on alternating nights Tuesday to Sunday from July 8 to Aug. 27. Tickets are on sale. | laketahoeshakespeare.com 36

Live music Tamarack Heavenly 3:30 p.m. Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Jacob Westfall Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Mic Smith w/Strange Weather The Loft 9 p.m. Anders Osborne w/Scott Pemberton Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m.

Neighbors Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Groove Foundry Bar of America 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Space Jesus Tahoe Biltmore 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Haymarket Square Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open mic Art Truckee 7 p.m. Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND American Made Band Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m.

DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Mustard Lex GSR 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Kevin Farley & Jeff Richards The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Illusionist Shimshi Sparks Nugget 8 p.m.

RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Justin Lee Band Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Caleb Hawley Peppermill 7 p.m. Halie O’Ryan Circus Circus 8 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. American Made Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. The Dangerfield Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Kevin Farley & Jeff Richards The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Toursome Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

APRIL 14 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Groove Foundry Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music Plaza Bar 5 p.m. TOCCATA “The Passion” St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church 7 p.m.

Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Too Short Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Halie O’Ryan Circus Circus 8 p.m. Justin Lee Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Thunder Cover Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Caleb Hawley Peppermill 8 p.m. Rodney Crowell Piper’s Opera House 8 p.m. A Perfect Circle Reno Events Center 8 p.m. Whiskey Heroes & Liam Kyle Cahill The Saint 8 p.m. Erin & the Project Harrah’s 9 p.m. Wilkinson’s Quartet Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m.

APRIL 15 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Space Cowboys KT Squaw Valley 1 p.m. The Blues Monsters Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Live music Kirkwood 2 p.m. déjà vu Northstar Village 2 p.m. Hawaiian Beach music Village Lodge Sugar Bowl Desert Rose Chamber Ensemble Art Truckee 8 p.m. Steve and Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Groove Foundry Bar of America 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Dean-O-Holics Hard Rock 9 p.m.


April 6-19, 2017

Joy & Madness w/The Lique Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Riotmaker & Lizano Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Mr. Rooney & Lambchop Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. DJ Parties Village at Northstar 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND American Made Band Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Lil Debbie, Demrick & 1 Ton Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Bryan Bowers Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m.

DJ Yo Yolie Peppermill 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Kevin Farley & Jeff Richards The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Illusionist Shimshi Sparks Nugget 8 p.m.

an album release show on April 8 at The Saint in Reno, Nev.

CONNECT FOR MORE STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

April 7 | 8 p.m. | $36 | Grand Sierra | Reno, Nev.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Ideateam Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Laura Ingle Northstar Village 2 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m.

Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Empire of the Sun Grand Sierra 7:30 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Zoot Suit Revue Nugget Ballroom 11 a.m. & 12 & 1 & 2 p.m. Illusionist Shimshi Sparks Nugget 6 p.m. Kevin Farley & Jeff Richards The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 17 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Super Diamond Nugget Ballroom 8 p.m. Thunder Cover Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Caleb Hawley Peppermill 8 p.m. Shinedown Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Halie O’Ryan Circus Circus 8 p.m. Justin Lee Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Three Divas III Reno Ballroom 8 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Erin & the Project Harrah’s 9 p.m. Weapons of Mass Creation The Saint 9 p.m. American Made Band Escalade 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m.

The Head and the Heart

APRIL 16 | SUNDAY

RENO & BEYOND

The Sextones host

MUSIC SCENE

Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

A

fter a six-month hiatus in 2015 spurred by band leader Josiah Johnson’s addiction recovery, The Heart and the Heart are touring once more with a new album called “Signs of Light.” “When we first started, we would be doing these tours and we’d just camp out,” reminisces bass guitarist Chris Zasche. “No use getting hotels when you can sleep under the stars. The first couple years our singers would do a lot of busking around and a lot of the song ideas would come from campfire hangs.”

“Writing new music is the beacon of light at the end of the tunnel.” –Chris Zasche Now the band is heading toward a summer of major festivals including dates at Coachella, Bonnaroo and Red Rocks before returning to Europe. “I think we earned [the break],” says Zasche. “It was a much needed time for us to regroup and discover ourselves as humans. Now was are back together and seeing ourselves as part of the whole. The excitement and giddiness of getting to play music was there after taking that much time off. Writing this record was really fun because we had taken a step back and we all realized we really missed it.” “Signs of Light” was recorded in Nashville at the studio of Jay Joyce, who has also produced albums by Carrie Underwood, Keith Urban, Zac Brown and Cage the Elephant, amongst others. The recording preserves to perfection The Head and the Heart’s high-energy, melody-driven folk-pop. “It’s actually kind of hard [to capture that live sound],” says Zasche. “You’re in a studio. You’re in a formal setting. Your head’s down. You focus too much on proficiency. You focus too much on performance and forget about the fact that there are five or six other people in the room with you. We’d be looking back at a take thinking we nailed it and Jay would be like, ‘You guys are playing like metronomes.’ He was really good about

that. He is someone like that could sense that and it instantly hit a chord.” During the hiatus, Zasche spent six months touring the Canadian Rockies in his van while other members volunteered in Haiti, learned to fly planes, mastered Kung Fu, composed songs with Mavis Staples and got sober. The band eventually reunited in Stinson Beach to boogie board, write songs and record demos for the new album, which features songwriter/guitarist Jonathan Russell’s simple, subtle yet catchy melodies. “Jon has a separate sense just for melody,” says Zasche. “Even during this last tour we were on, I remember hearing him on the back of the bus working through new ideas. Everything he puts together is clever. He doesn’t settle for a simple ‘la la la’. He works as hard on melody as lyrical content which I think is rare.” Moving ahead, the band is focused on continuing to write new music and following the inspiration that initially convinced them to quit their day jobs and reach for their dreams. “Writing new music is the beacon of light at the end of the tunnel,” admits Zasche. “Touring is incredibly rewarding, but in any art from the creation process is the most thrilling part. What an incredible position to be in, to be comfortable and confident enough to write whatever we want.” And as always, the heart comes before the head. “When the band was just starting out [in Seattle], we were all trying to have jobs and somewhat normal lives,” says Zasche. “Then the band formed, which was this incredibly fulfilling experience and at some point we all had to take that leap together, which meant quitting our jobs and jumping in the deep end. I think that’s the approach we still have. “You can take the risks and that’s always going to be a struggle with any creative art form. It’s sort of battling away the safer way that people always seem to create. When you lose the safety net, that’s when pure art can come out; when there is no going back. I always think of that when we are writing music, you know like ‘I’ve heard this before and should I be pushing myself further.’ That was origin of the band and I believe it still applies.”  For tickets, visit grandsierraresort.com.

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

C A L E N D A R | APRIL 6-20, 2017 APRIL 17 | MONDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line dancing Nakoma Resort 5:30 p.m.

DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 19 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

APRIL 18 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Ab-Soul Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m.

Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m.

APRIL 20 | THURSDAY

Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Rocky LaPorte & Ron Morey The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Live Blues Wednesdays The Saint 9 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Meltdown Festival Hard Rock Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. G Jones Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. 4/20 w/Black Star Safari, Dingo Weasel Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Northwoods Clubhouse 6:30 p.m. Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Rocky LaPorte & Ron Morey The Improv 9 p.m.

RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Spring Fling Youth Strings CC Community Center 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Dusty Miles & The Cryin’ Shame Peppermill 7 p.m. Soundwave Circus Circus 8 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Michelle Moonshine & Scratchdog Stringband Studio on 4th 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. John Melendez The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Tooth of Crime” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Erik Meyers Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

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38


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

DINING GUIDE Jason’s | American

La Mexicana | Authentic Mexican

Taqueria La Mexicana opened in 1997 and brought the tried and tested family recipes from their taqueria in Norwalk that made them successful. Tahoe locals instantly began to notice the fresh ingredients and authentic dishes and La Mexicana quickly became a locals’ favorite for fast, affordable and delicious Mexican food prepared fresh daily. La Mexicana also features an authentic Mexican bakery (fresh bread baked daily), carniceria and a full grocery store to meet your needs while visiting Lake Tahoe. Come taste the difference or order online through Eat 24. 8515 Brook Ave. Kings Beach | lamexicanakb.com | Daily 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. | (530) 546-0310

Las Panchitas | Mexican

Serving fine Mexican food since 1975 and at Lake Tahoe since 1982, delicious Chinga-Lingas head the appetizer list. Authentic Chili Relleños are made from fresh-roasted chiles stuffed with jack cheese, and Fiesta Tostadas are created from a flour tortilla with beans, ground beef, chile colorado, chile verde, lettuce, sour cream, guacamole and cheese. The Chicken, Shrimp and Sirloin Fajitas are enough for two. 8345 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach | Full bar with delicious margaritas | Dinners from $10.95 | (530) 546-4539

RENO

Daughters Café | Hungarian

D

o you know that here in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee there are 3,000 residents living with food insecurity? Food insecurity is when you have no idea where your next meal is coming from. In a community with an abundance of wealth, everyone can help feed those in the community who are hungry. Project MANA has worked for the last 25 years to support people in need. This month, the nonprofit organization is setting out to raise $50,000 for hunger relief and everyone can help. Project MANA’s “Fight Hunger Fast” campaign seeks to feed the community. “This is a new peer-to-peer fundraising campaign, which asks people to raise money for us,” says development director Julie M. Malkin-Manning. It’s easy. Commit to fast for 24 hours anytime in April, sign up on Project MANA’s Web site and reach out to friends, family

In a community with an abundance of wealth, everyone can help feed those in the community who are hungry.

TRUCKEE

El Toro Bravo | Mexican

Pianeta | Italian Cucina

One of the Tahoe area’s best, Pianeta transports the palate with sophisticated, yet rustic Italian food in a warm, cozy atmosphere. The Antipasti features Bruschetta Olivata, Filet Mignon Carpaccio, Housemade Grilled Sausages & Crab Cakes. Pianeta makes most pasta in house with dishes like Veal Meatballs with Pesto & Linguini Pasta, Chicken & Prosciutto Cannelloni with Porcini Cream Sauce & Ravioli della Casa. 10096 Donner Pass Road, along Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Open for dinner nightly | Full bar and wine list | Happy Hour at the Bar Mon.-Fri. from 5 to 6:30 p.m. | (530) 587-4694

To be included in the Dining Guide, call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100.

flavor

S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R | P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y P R O J E C T M A N A

Located in a Victorian House on the corner of First and Bell Streets in the Downtown Truckee River District of Reno, Daughters Café offers unique homemade seasonal selections for breakfast and lunch. Choices include Hungarian Chicken Paprikas, Smoked Grits, Homemade Limoncello, fresh daily soup, eggs, omelets, sausage, salad and potatoes. They serve Magpie Coffee and all food is made to order and impeccably fresh. Family owned and operated by mom Barb, and daughters Skye and Bianca. This restaurant will hug you with warmth as if you have come home. Menu changes seasonally and is posted daily on the web. The Beignets alone are worth a visit during your holidays. 97 Bell Street, Reno, Nev. 89503 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. TuesdaySunday (Brunch) | (775) 324-3447 | daughterscafe.com

This is outstanding Mexican cuisine with recipes that have made El Toro Bravo a favorite in Truckee for 25 years. Located in a quaint, old-time, Truckee house, with a friendly ambience to go with your meal. Happy Hour Monday to Friday from 4 to 6 p.m. Topping the menu are tender Steak and Chicken Fajitas, Chimichangas, Tacoladas, Chili Relleños, Snapper Santa Cruz, Grilled Prawns and the unusual Oysters 444. Patio dining, weather permitting. 10816 Donner Pass Road, on the west end of Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Service from 11:30 a.m. | Full bar | (530) 587-3557

LOCAL FLAVOR

Fast for hunger

KINGS BEACH

Jason’s Beachside Grill, a locals’ favorite for more than 30 years offers casual dining in a rustic atmosphere. Savor American classics like Slow Roasted Prime Rib, Teriyaki Chicken, Pasta, Blackened Salmon and Jason’s famous Baby Back Ribs, along with nightly specials. Jason’s boasts the largest salad bar on the North Shore and gourmet halfpound burgers and sandwiches. There’s a kids’ menu, and a large selection of spirits, wine and microbrews. 8338 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, next to the North Tahoe Event Center | Daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. | (530) 546-3315

April 6-19, 2017

and colleagues to sponsor you and support your fasting efforts. The money raised will provide 160,000 meals. “During our last fiscal year, we distributed to the community 233,450 pounds of food. That’s $401,500 worth of food that fed the community more than 27,350 times,” she says. Malkin-Manning pointed out that spring is traditionally a time to cleanse. It’s also Lent when many undertake a fast or give up something for a period of time, which according to Malkin-Manning, seemed like the perfect time to initiate a campaign of this nature. There are a number of benefits of fasting including better sleep, clearer skin, improved mental and emotional clarity, and renewed energy. A fast gives the systems of the body a rest from all of the things we eat and drink. Participants can fast with juice, broth — bone broth is excellent — and fruit for the day. If you are unable to fast, then you can help by sponsoring someone else to fast.

“Raising awareness is as important as raising money. Sexy raises money, but there’s nothing sexy about not knowing where your next meal comes from,” she says. “Each $1 donated provides 1.33 meals and a $20 contribution amounts to 27 meals.” Project MANA spearheads a number of programs to feed the hungry. Their weekly meal distribution is held from 3 to 3:30 p.m. in the following locations: Mondays in Tahoe City at Fairway Community Center, Tuesdays in Truckee at the Community Arts Center, Wednesdays in Kings Beach at the Community House, and Thursdays in Incline Village at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church. “Our volunteers worked hard this winter shoveling the snow to make space for the tents to serve everyone,” she says. Food And Companionship Exchange (FACE), another program Project MANA offers, is a home food-delivery program that delivers to people who have physical

or mental limitations. The organization also offers Emergency and Cooking Compromised Food Bags filled with nonperishables for people who need extra food because they need to leave their home or have no access to a refrigerator or stove. Project MANA also hosts Let’s Talk Turkey, an annual event that provides a full Thanksgiving Day dinner to people in the community. “For $50, someone can sponsor a Thanksgiving meal. We work with local service agencies, schools and churches to target the needs of people in the community,” she says. The organization recently lost its distribution space and had to relocate the distribution warehouse to Truckee.

“We’ve always served Truckee, but never lived in Truckee. It cost a lot of money, new equipment and has increased our overhead,” she says. Those interested in fasting or those interested in sponsoring a fast, can visit the Web site. There are a number of community members who have signed up; maybe you know one. I plan to sign up to fast for such a worthy cause. | projectmana.org  Priya Hutner is a writer, health and wellness consultant, and natural foods chef. Her business, The Seasoned Sage, focuses on wellness, conscious eating and healthy living. She offers healthy organic meals for her clients. She may be reached at pria78@gmail.com or visit theseasonedsage.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to read more.

39


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Antipasti, Homemade Pastas & Rustic Regional Entrées

EGGS BENEDICT B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

with Hollandaise Sauce

Dinner served nightly in an ingenious Italian atmosphere HAPPY HOUR

Sunday-Thursday 5-6 p.m. In Downtown Truckee - (530) 587-4694

pianetarestauranttruckee.com

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Fine Italian Food & Spirits

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Locals Love Lanza’s! (530) 546-2434 Bar - 4:30 p.m. Dinner - 5 p.m. 7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

LanzasTahoe.com

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W

hen talking special breakfast, nothing hits home like Eggs Benedict. It is the filet mignon of the breakfast menu. Eggs Benedict is easy to make. Toast an English muffin, heat a piece of Canadian bacon and put it on the muffin. Poach an egg and top with hollandaise sauce. If you put a few drops of vinegar in the poaching water, the eggs will hold their form better. However, it is the hollandaise sauce that scares most people, but this sauce is not difficult to make. The key is to be patient when you are cooking the egg yolks for the sauce. Do not turn up the heat too high or you will end up with scrambled yolks. Keep whipping the yolks over low heat or cook them over a pot of boiling water. Whip them as they cook until they are thick. You also need patience while adding the melted butter because if you add the butter too fast the sauce will break or separate. Keep in mind that each egg yolk can take up to 4 ounces of butter. When the sauce is thick enough or starts to break, do not add any more butter. This recipe won’t always require exactly 4 ounces of butter.

I use Tabasco sauce instead of the traditional cayenne, which is in many recipes. Hollandaise sauce also is great on veggies and fish. For dinner, you can make hollandaise sauce for the asparagus. Don’t be afraid. Try this sauce and enjoy. 

It is the hollandaise sauce that scares most people, but this sauce is not difficult to make. Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

American Bistro & Wine Bar

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SpindleshanksTahoe.com

400 Brassie Ave, Suite B - Kings Beach - (530) 546-2191 40

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 2 egg yolks 2 t water 8 oz. butter, melted 1 lemon 2-3 drops Worcestershire sauce 2-3 drops Tabasco Salt and pepper to taste Place the water and yolks in a bowl and whip constantly while cooking over low to medium heat until the consistency is thick enough to leave ridges. Remove from the heat and slowly whip in the melted butter until the sauce thickens. If it starts getting shiny or starts to separate, stop adding butter and whip in a few drops of lemon, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco, salt and pepper to taste. Add all the seasonings a little at a time to taste.


April 6-19, 2017

LOCAL FLAVOR

WINES FOR SPRING BY LOU PHILLIPS

S

pring is all about nature’s renewal. What better time to commit to some things new and wonderful in the wine world. For those of us passionate or just plain happy and interested about wine, let’s use this spring to try wines we haven’t had before. For suggestions, I’ll feature some that are delicious, unique and fresh enough to stimulate springtime senses. One can’t go wrong leading off with bubbles. Remembering our pledge to try wines we haven’t yet experienced, I am going to suggest some unique fizzes. The first is from the unlikeliest of locations and the unlikeliest of grapes. How about Sparkling Shiraz from South Australia?

On the white, try side barrel-aged Sauvignon Blanc Semillon blends that are a specialty of Bordeaux or barrelfermented California Classic Sauvignon Blancs such as those from Merry Edwards Winery of Sebastopol or Mondavi Napa Fume Blanc. When done right, these whites are a study in floral/melon/citrus flavors with a richness, complexity and age ability from the barrel influence. As a bonus, you’ll find these world-class Sauvignon Blancs for far less than top quality Chardonnays.

Vegan Sauté • Sustainable Fresh Fish • Filet Mignon • Organic Chicken Local Seasonal Produce • Unique Winter Additions Voted Best Place to Take a Date for 17 years EST. 1985

Charlie Soule Chef/Owner

THE SOULE DOMAIN Open for dinner nightly at 6pm - Please make reservations

Steve Soule Head Waiter

Stateline Dr. next to Tahoe Biltmore, Crystal Bay, North Lake Tahoe

530-546-7529 | www.souledomain.com

How about Sparkling Shiraz

$ 6 glass of

from South Australia?

wine

After decades of making this celebratory wine, the Aussies

add cheese

know what they are doing. After decades of making this celebratory wine, the Aussies know what they are doing. The grapes are picked at low ripeness levels, highlighting the fresh berry and bright spice characteristics of this grape. Look for “Traditional Method” on the label and you’ll get quality sparklers. Next up and originating from EmiliaRomagna in Italy comes Lambrusco. This cherry-hued and flavored juice is made in the frothy frizzante style to be matched with assertive fare such as the spaghetti with Pecorino Romano and meats indigenous to this region.

CREATIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN AN ELEGANT LOG CABIN

plate for $12

Happy Hour Monday-Friday 3-6 p.m. LOCATED IN:

Old Town Truckee Cobblestone Tahoe City The Village at Squaw Valley

Back to Italy and the Veneto region for Soave Classico. Look for Classico on the label to ensure that top-notch Garganega grapes are the main ingredient. Try anything from the Inama Winery and your mouth will experience a happy dance. For red wines, spring is the perfect time to pursue fresh Cabernet Francs, such as those from the seminal 2015 vintage in France’s Loire Valley. Look for the place names Chinon or Bourgueil on the label for wines full of flavors of violet and fresh damson plum. Spain’s El Bierzo region is home to crisp and spicy wines full of red fruit flavors and a tinge of mineral crafted from the Mencia grape. A go-to example is the Petalos bottling from top producer J. Palacios. Hailing from Piedmont in Italy, Dolcettos are vibrant cherry-skin-inflected wines with bright tannins that make them great as pizza wines or for sipping on a spring day. Whether it’s these or other new-to-you wines, look at spring renewal as a chance to branch out and expand your wine world. Our local wine shop gurus are also great sources for suggestions. Cheers. 

uncorked wine bar & retail wine shop

TelosWine.com

Nightly 5-6 p.m.

Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier and his consulting business WineProwest.com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 544-3435 or lou@ wineprowest.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns.

ChristyHill.com 41


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA S T Y Kings Beach Lunch Specials Daily Early Bird Special 4-6pm

Dinner Special 4-10pm

$3.50 Margaritas $3.50 Dos Equis $2.50 Draft Bud

25% Off Mexican Combo Dinners

Tidbits

Full

Bar

Open 11:30am-10:00pm (530) 546-4539 8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach in Kings Beach

EASTER BRUNCH BUFFET O

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SUNDAY, APRIL 16 | 9AM-1PM $ 35 ADULTS | $20 KIDS UNDER 12 FEATURING

Salads | Fresh Baked Pastries | Assorted Cheese | Pancake Station House Smoked Salmon | Carving Station: Prime Rib & Turkey Hot Entrees including eggs Benedict, crab melt, three cheese ravioli and more

L E A R N TO M A K E

BONE BROTH

Slow Food Lake Tahoe offers a Bone Broth Skillshare workshop on April 8 from 4 to 6 p.m. at Truckee Tahoe Community Foundation on Donner Pass Road. Learn the tricks to making nutrient-dense and delicious slow-cooked bone broths and short-cooked vegetable stocks from a local nutritional practitioner. The cost is $20 per person. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

Don’t miss the Easter egg hunt for kids at 11am

New bar in town RESERVATIONS

RECOMMENDED

1850 West Lake Blvd | 530.583.7200 | sunnysideresort.com

Reno, Nev. Downtown Reno will soon see a new bar run by two familiar faces — the owners of Crawl Reno are opening their own space. Ed and Heidi Adkins, who organize many of Reno’s massive bar crawls hope to have their new bar open at 219 West 2nd Street by the end of the summer. They settled on calling the space Headquarters because it will serve as an anchor for current and future events. | headquartersreno.com

High Country gardening

(530) 546-3315

JasonsBeachSideGrille.com

8338 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, CA

530.583.3324 2905 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City

BacchisTahoe.com

Incline Village, Nev. Gary Romano, owner of Sierra Valley Farms, will share his knowledge from decades of experience growing food in the Sierra Nevada as detailed in his latest book “July & Winter: Growing Food in the Sierra,” at the Incline Village Library on April 11 at 6:30 p.m. | (775) 832-4130

A great way to end the day Incline Village, Nev. Diamond Peak’s Last Tracks Wine/ Beer Tasting events will be held every Saturday afternoon through April 15. Take advantage of a late-day lift ticket, valid from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by a final chair ride up to Snowflake Lodge to experience breathtaking views, wine or craft beer tastings paired with appetizers. When the event is over, participants can take a run down a freshly groomed trail. Tickets are $44 and include a ski lift ticket. | RSVP diamondpeak.com

Pop in for a Pop Up Truckee Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Pop Up Dinner Series several times per month. Designed and formatted like a spirited dinner party, a Stella Pop Up event is an exploration into creative cooking.

42

Guests are encouraged to walk around the kitchen, joining conversations that are free flowing and educational. There is one tasting menu for each gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. The cost is $97 per person. The dinners include Series 1 Pop Up on April 8, Series 2 Pop Up on April 15, Series 3 Pop Up on April 22 and Series IV on April 29. | cedarhousesporthotel.com

Take a stroll along the river Reno, Nev. Downtown Reno Wine Walk along the Truckee River in the Riverwalk District is on April 18 from 2 to 5 p.m. Every third Saturday of the month visit any of the participating Riverwalk District merchants to get a map of Wine Walk merchants. Go to the participating merchant of your choice, and, for a $20 wine-tasting fee and valid photo ID, receive a wine glass and an ID bracelet to sample wine at any participating merchant. Strollers and pets are not advised because of large crowds. | renoriver.org

Tahoe casual Tahoe City The Community Benefit Auction and Wine Tasting hosted by Kiwanis Club North Lake Tahoe is on May 7 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge. More than $50,000 in goods and services will be offered along with premium wines and sumptuous appetizers. Proceeds benefit local youth and social service programs. Dress is Tahoe casual with spring flair. Ticket prices this year are $35 per person in advance or $40 per person at the door. Tickets are available from any Kiwanis Club member, Mother Nature’s Cabin Fever or kiwanisnlt.org.

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits.


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April 6-19, 2017  

Seamus Donohue enjoys a bluebird ski day at Mt. Rose Ski Area, which is among many Tahoe resorts that have extended their seasons due to thi...

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