Page 1

WINTER WONDER GRASS

Going beyond bluegrass

CREATING A SPACE FOR ARTISTS

COMMUNITY SOUP NIGHT warms the soul

INDIGO GIRLS

Confluence of art, activism

IN THIS ISSUE

ACCESSING PUBLIC LANDS


FROM

499

$

2 0 1 7– 1 8 TA H O E S U P E R PA S S

BUY NOW

SKI FREE

THIS SPRING

PRICES GO UP AFTER

APRIL 18 TA H O E S U P E R PA S S . C O M


TheTahoeWeekly.com

What’s Inside

Volume 36 | Issue 06 TM

| MARCH 23-APRIL 5

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Features

Editoral | editor@tahoethisweek.com Entertainment | entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

Out

Arts Scott Rokis

14

Nicole Dreon

culture

20 19 Creating a Space for Artists 20 The Arts

KEEPING PUBLIC LANDS ACCESSIBLE There are many things that draw people to the Tahoe Sierra – world-class ski resorts, unparalleled mountain biking and hiking trails, the breathtakingly blue waters of Lake Tahoe and the scores of mountain streams and lakes that dot the mountains, and the abundance of recreation opportunities that the mountains afford residents and visitors alike. But we each must do our part to protect this unique environment from the ravages of human interaction from litter and traffic, to preserving Tahoe’s famous clarity, and perhaps, most importantly, maintaining access to public lands. The region is home to thousands of acres of public lands – state parks, U.S. Forest Service lands, California Tahoe Conservancy, even the Army Corps of Engineers maintains public lands at Martis, among many others. Most of us will enjoy these public lands during our time in Tahoe from marveling at the dam in Tahoe City on state park land to exploring the back country whether skiing and snowshoeing to snowmobiling and mountain biking to hiking. Balancing the need to preserve the mountain environment for generations to come while maintaining access to popular back-country destinations has become a growing issue as water quality improvement projects have lessened or removed parking and trail access to Tahoe’s back country. Keeping public access issues in the forefront as local and state agencies do the essential task of protecting Tahoe’s natural environment is something in which Tahoe Weekly is committed. As part of that ongoing commitment, Kayla Anderson revisits the issue of back-country access that the Tahoe Weekly first reported on in the fall of 2015. Kayla looks at the accomplishments of local agencies working together and the problems that still plague back-country users, namely winter parking, for her feature “Accessing Public Lands” in this issue. 

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVES

Local

flavor

Courtesy Slow Foods

From the Publisher

Community Soup Night Tasty Tidbits Wine Column Chef’s Recipe

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill | publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102 Sales Manager Anne Artoux | anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Art Director | Production Alyssa Ganong | production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106 Graphic Designer Mael Passanesi | graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101

13 06 08 09 11 12 13 16 17 18 18

Entertainment Editor Priya Hutner | priya@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 104 Copy Editor Katrina Veit

Lake Tahoe Facts Sightseeing Events Snow Trails Downhill Skiing Deep ‘n’ Daring Family Fun For the Kids Cross-Country Skiing Announcements

Music SCENE

31 31 32 33 34

IN THE OFFICE Courtesy Sugar Bowl

about

Photography | production@tahoethisweek.com

Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle

DEADLINES & INFO April 6 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, March 28 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, March 30 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, March 30 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, March 30

Courtesy WinterWonderGrass

Skibikes Accessing Public Lands Tahoe Locals Sierra Stories

09 14 16 30

SUBMISSIONS

24 22 Puzzles 23 Horoscope 24 Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 24 WinterWonderGrass 27 Indigo Girls

TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

ON THE COVER

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

– John Muir

Greg Garrison ascends the southeast slope of Jakes’ Peak to explore the back country on Lake Tahoe’s West Shore. Outdoor enthusiasts have raised concerns with Tahoe officials about main-

FEATURES · POWDER ALERTS · COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS · KEEP UP-TO-DATE ON FACEBOOK

Subscribe to the free, digital editions of Tahoe Weekly & Tahoe Powder

taining the public’s access to recreation in the region’s back country, which Kayla Anderson explores in the Tahoe Weekly’s ongoing coverage of back-country access. Photography by Scott Rokis | ScottRokis.com, @RokisPhoto

TheTahoeWeekly.com | issuu.com | issuu app iTunes & GooglePlay | E-Newsletter Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at 4

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & post your photos on Instagram

@TheTahoeWeekly


March 23-April 5, 2017

early-bird pass Sale through April 30 Adult (ages 24-64)

$379 $279 Full

Midweek

Senior (ages 65-69)

$159 $139 Full

Midweek

includes spring access season extended to April 23 Kids 6 & Under / Adults 80+ are free!

View details & purchase online: DiamondPeak.com • (775) 832-1177 5


TheTahoeWeekly.com

N

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee Donner Lake

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Donner Summit BOREAL

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Reno & Sparks MT. ROSE

WEST EAST SOUTH

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SUGAR BOWL h Ta

AUBURN SKI CLUB

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Tahoe City

SQUAW CREEK

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside Tahoe Pines Eagle Rock

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

il

Ta h o e R i m

NV

Dollar Hill

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Carson City

Homewood HOMEWOOD

e Ri

Visit plugshare.com for details

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

CA

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Natural rim: 6,223’

Glenbrook o Ta h

ELECTRIC CHARGING STATIONS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

ALPINE MEADOWS

a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

SQUAW VALLEY

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

CASINOS

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

CLAIR TAPPAAN

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

ROYAL GORGE

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

il

DONNER SKI RANCH SODA SPRINGS

Cave Rock

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Watershed Area: 312 square miles Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F

Fannette Island

Shoreline: 72 miles

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Ta h oe

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually HOPE VALLEY

Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 73.1’ in 2015. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

6


March 23-April 5, 2017

S HADE S OF WH ITE EVE NT Save up to 15% on any California Closets system in white, ivory, or in our exclusive Italian-inspired Lago finishes.* Call today to arrange your complimentary in-home design consultation, or visit us online at CaliforniaClosets.com

R E NO

5580 Mill Street, Ste 900

775.827.8282 ©2017 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise independently owned and operated. USABath #71711

californiaclosets.com

*Valid 03/01/17 through 04/30/17 on new purchases only. Not to exceed 15% of purchase price. Not valid with other offers. Applies to partitions and shelves. Add’l terms and conditions may apply. Participating locations only.

NV159_SOW_TahoeWkly_9.2x6.4_0217.indd 1

2/16/17 3:49 PM

Save Up to

20%

On Rentals When Reserving at

Buy 2 Sale items, get an additional 20% OFF those items. *

*7101603301*

7101603301

Northern California’s BEST Outdoor Store for Over 40 Years! *Offer valid through April 16, 2017. One coupon per purchase, must present ad to receive discount. Excludes GoPro and apparel items. Sales may differ per category. Cannot be used with other coupons or offers.

Custom Boot Fitting. Overnight Shop Services. Excellent Gear and Apparel Selections.

501 N Lake Blvd, Tahoe City, CA 96145 • (530) 580-8240 • For store hours and locations visit anymountain.net

7


TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

East Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders - Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Donner Summit

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

West Shore

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

$10 parking (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

High Camp

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

BASE DEPTH:

131”

Squaw Valley BASE DEPTH:

BASE DEPTH:

LAKE TAHOE 8

Natural rim 6,223’

210”

Emerald Bay

Parking fee (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Wed.-Mon. | Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Tahoe City

North Shore

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and the 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

Tallac Historic Site

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

Taylor Creek Visitor Center

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

Truckee truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

Reports taken on Monday, March 20, 2017

Mt. Rose Ski Area BASE DEPTH:

212”

113”-233”

Kirkwood Mountain Resort

Vikingsholm Castle

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

REGIONAL SNOW LEVELS Heavenly

North Shore

The rewarding view of Lake Tahoe and the Sierra from the top of Granite Chief, Squaw Valley. | Alyssa Ganong

Sugar Bowl BASE DEPTH:

110”-196”

Elevation: 6,226.89 | Elevation in 2016: 6,222.69

Tahoe City

Opens late June (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in the summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

Tahoe Maritime Museum

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Truckee

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Tahoe Science Center

Truckee Railroad Museum

Western SkiSport Museum

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Incline Village

Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Olympic Winter Games

Donner Summit

Fri.-Sun. | Free (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing, exhibits include snowshoes from the 1850s, ski equipment from the 20th Century and a pair of 8-foot-long skis used by John “Snowshoe” Thompson, a legendary mail carrier. Located at Boreal off I-80. TART

Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building. TART

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

Kings Beach

South Lake Tahoe

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Historical Society Incline Village

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe City

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Kings Beach State Rec. Area, (Thurs.-Mon., summer) 969 Tahoe Blvd., (800) 468-2463

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd., (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50, (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City 100 North Lake Blvd., (530) 581-6900

Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Road (Depot), (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village Tahoe City

Daily | Free Features official 1960 Winter Olympic items such as skis, promotional literature, collection of official Olympic photographer Bill Briner. Learn the history of skiing in the Sierra. Inside Boatworks Mall. TART

855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr., (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd., (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Road, (530) 587-3558

TRANSIT: NORTH LAKE TAHOE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH LAKE TAHOE | bluego.org


Out

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

MARCH 23-APRIL 6, 2017

Ski in the moment Markleeville

Hope Valley Outdoors offers Mindful XCountry Skiing on Mondays from 3 to 4 p.m. The practice of mindfulness meditation is proven to assist with stress management and overall health. It’s easy, accessible and goes beautifully with a quiet mountain trail. $20. | hopevalleycrosscountry.com

EVERY TUESDAY

Dashing through the snow Incline Village, Nev. Snowshoe hikes and lunch for ages 55 and older are on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. until March 28. Trekkers of all abilities are welcome to join moderate level snowshoe hikes at various locations throughout Tahoe. Enjoy a lunch in the dining hall on the Sierra Nevada College campus. Includes guides, transportation and lunch. $18 without IVGID pass, $15 w/IVGID pass. | yourtahoeplace.com

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530) 546-2012

Toddler Time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Crack the code Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts an Hour of Code on Tuesdays at 4 p.m. This introduction to computer programming for Grades 3 and higher is designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. Children can choose from a variety of fun projects. | (775) 832-4130

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Babes in Bookland Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Read with the family Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts Family Story Time from 4 to 4:45 p.m. Features stories, finger plays, and wiggle action as part of the experience to encourage a love of books. | (775) 832-4130

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

&ABOUT

OPEN DOWNHILL POSSIBILITIES

EVERY MONDAY

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit offers Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort. The one-hour tours begin at the top of the gondola every Monday and Friday at 1 p.m. Participants must be intermediate-level skiers/boarders or above and provide their own lift ticket. No reservations: first-come first-served. Until April 7, weather permitting. | goto/ltbmu/skiranger

OUT & ABOUT

Skibikes

EVENTS CALENDAR

Ski with rangers South Lake Tahoe

March 23-April 5, 2017

STORY BY LISA MICHELLE

I

f gliding down a ski slope while in a seated position piques your interest or the prospect of biking during winter without peddling fat tires causes a craving, then consider skibiking. Imagine a bike with skis where the wheels should be. Skibikes offer a range of options for riders of all abilities. If you can ski, snowboard or ride a bike, you’re already ahead of the gentle learning curve. “Learning to skibike is so easy that people progress really fast and sometimes go a little crazy,” says Jeff Butcher, head of research and development at Koski Snowsports. Butcher has been skibiking Tahoe terrain since 1971 and is a representative for the American Ski Bike Association. This season, all Vail resorts are allowing skibikers access to their runs, but not the terrain parks. Sierra-at-Tahoe is extremely skibike friendly and is one of the only resorts in the Tahoe area to allow skibikes in the terrain park. Jeff Butcher at Sierra-at-Tahoe

“ Anything you can do on a bike or a pair of skis, you can do on a skibike. The possibilities are endless.” –Jeff Butcher “Anything you can do on a bike or a pair of skis, you can do on a skibike. The possibilities are endless,” says Butcher, who adds that most skibiking is done in the back country. Matt Hanson, the founder of Alpine Skibikes Inc., designs and manufactures snowbike conversion kits, allowing bikers to replace the wheels with skis. Hanson, who has been skibiking for 36 years, was the first to skibike what Tahoe locals call The Minden Mile. The side-country run begins at the top of Monument Peak at Heavenly Ski Resort and ends at the bottom of Kingsbury Grade in Minden, Nev. Hanson also claims to have been the first to descend Mount Tallac on a skibike in 2004. “It took three hours to snowshoe up with the frame strapped to my back, then about 20 minutes to ride down,” says Hanson. Ski biking has been a lifesaver to individuals who struggle with physical limitations. Knee and hip replacement patients, who were told they would never ski again, are back in the saddle and shredding the slopes. Skibiking offers amputees and wounded veterans the opportunity to experience the thrill of riding big mountains. Recently, Butcher was involved in the Hartford Ski Spectacular in Breckenridge, Colo. The event is one of the nation’s largest winter sports festivals for people with disabilities and has more than 800 registered participants annually. Butcher was partnered with a veteran who suffered from brain damage and posttraumatic stress disorder.

nose, was clocked at more than 125 mph. These days, the skibiking community in Lake Tahoe is a small but welcoming group. People approach Butcher almost every time he rides at Sierra-at-Tahoe. He is asked: Is that as fun as it looks or is that hard to learn? Butcher jumps off his bike and offers a ride to the curious person. Some folks take him up on his offer. “Not one person hasn’t liked it,” says Butcher.

Matt Hanson exploring on his skibike

“I got him on the bike and the smile never left his face the entire weekend,” say Butcher. The veteran now travels the U.S. skibiking. Internationally known as skibobs, skibikes, of one sort or another can be traced as far back as 1850. But the birth of modern skibiking is forever linked to Austrian Engelbert Brentner. In 1949, Brentner patented the Sit-Ski. The new Sit-Ski replaced wooden or metal runners with actual skis. Brentner also added foot skis, which provided stability. Suddenly, skibikers could go everywhere skiers went. Skibiking is well established in Europe. Members of the Federation Internationale de Skibob, compete in slalom, giant slalom and even skibob cross races. It seems speed is what attracts European riders. On April 17, 2003, in Les Arcs, France, the skibob world speed record was set by Romuald Bonvin of Switzerland. His skibob, equipped with a windshield and a bobsled-type

Austrian Engelbert Brentner invented the modern version of the Ski-Ski in 1949.

Currently, Tahoe area resorts do not offer skibike rentals or lessons. If you’re interested in trying a skibike, Butcher recommends contacting him through his Web site snowbiker.net or the American Skibike Association’s Web site at americanskibike. org. You can also purchase a do-it-yourself conversion kit and watch instructional videos. Facebook is an excellent place to connect with fellow skibikers. “I wish I could let everyone ride. I just love the sport and want to spread the word,” says Butcher. Most skibikers will go out of their way to be friendly and practice the customary code of etiquette. Odds are good they would be happy to help get you on a skibike.  9


.

OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Events

MORE

California Day Dream. | Mason Mashon

tions: first-come first-served. Until April 7, weather permitting. | goto/ltbmu/skiranger

Ski in the moment Markleeville

Hope Valley Outdoors offers Mindful XCountry Skiing on Fridays from 3 to 4 p.m. The practice of mindfulness meditation is proven to assist with stress management and overall health. It’s easy, accessible and goes beautifully with a quiet mountain trail. $20. From 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the yurt is Women’s Backcountry Health. | hopevalleycrosscountry.com

Sample and taste Olympic Valley

WILD & SCENIC

F I L M F E S T I VA L

The 12th Annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival South Lake Tahoe combines award-winning environmental and adventure films with the energy of local activism on March 24 at MontBleu. Featured films will include exciting outdoor adventures, environmental battles and inspirational stories of people making a difference. The Festival will feature a VIP backstage reception, a silent auction, giveaways, and beer and wine. It will also include an Activism Area where festivalgoers can learn more from Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership Members about the issues affecting the Sierra Nevada. It will be a zero waste event, with recycling and composting available at the venue. The Festival is showing two feature films: “Great Lakes, Bad Lines” and “Operation Moffat.” Advance tickets are $12 for Sierra Nevada Alliance members, $15 for non-members and $10 for students online and at Patagonia South Lake Tahoe. Tickets will be available at MontBleu the night of the show for $20. Doors open at 6 p.m., films start at 7 p.m. | Tickets sierranevadaalliance.org

Friday Night Tasting Notes at Plaza Bar at Squaw Valley from 3:30 to 5 p.m. until March 24. Taste craft beers or specialty spirits from popular breweries, wineries and distilleries. Stick around from 5 to 7 p.m. for drink specials and live music. | squawalpine.com

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with G and PG movies. | (530) 582-9669

EVERY SATURDAY

Crack of dawn Olympic Valley

Dawn Patrol gives skiers access to untouched corduroy or fresh powder on coveted intermediate/advanced terrain at Squaw Valley through March 25. Meet at Aerial Tram before 7:40 a.m. Ski from 8 to 9 a.m. before public. Space is limited. | RSVP (800) 403-0206.

Rangers lead the way Mount Rose, Nev.

The Carson Ranger District on the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest offers forest ranger-led snowshoe walks every Saturday through March 26 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., over 2 miles of moderately strenuous terrain in Tahoe Meadows. Meet at on the south side of the road near the white ranger truck. Participants bring snowshoes, sunglasses, sunscreen, a lunch and water. Preregistration is preferred. | (775) 722-3985 or oldertrails@ yahoo.com

Great end to the day Incline Village, Nev. EVERY WEDNESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in Heavenly is from 4 to 7. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass. Free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from featured winery. | (530) 523-8024

EVERY THURSDAY

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village, Nev.

The Conversation Café is a drop-in conversation forum hosted by the Senior Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310

Story Time Tahoe City

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382

Toddler Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts story time every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m. with stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 6 months to 3 years. | (775) 832-4130

10

Preschool story time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years and older. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Wine voyages Olympic Valley

Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Café to learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Flights available from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. through April on Thursdays. | squawalpine.com

Help with computers Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First Thursdays of the month are “Beginners Basic Instruction,” second Thursdays are “Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about technology. | (530) 546-2021

EVERY FRIDAY

Ski with rangers South Lake Tahoe

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit offers Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort. The one-hour tours begin at the top of the gondola every Monday and Friday at 1 p.m. Participants must be intermediate-level skiers/boarders or above and provide their own lift ticket. No reserva-

Diamond Peak’s Last Tracks wine/beer tasting events will be held every Saturday through April 15. Buy a late-day lift ticket, valid from 2 to 4 p.m., to take a final chair ride up to Snowflake Lodge for wine or craft beer tastings, paired with appetizers. Participants take a run down a freshly groomed trail. $44. 21+. | RSVP diamondpeak.com

Love a parade Northstar

The Ripperoo Parade around the ice rink at Northstar’s Village is every Saturday through April 4 at 4 p.m. Meet at the Kid’s Ski School entrance at 3:45 pm to participate. Noisemakers and toys will be provided. | northstarcalifornia.com

EVERY SUNDAY

MARCH 23 | THURSDAY Winery Take-Over Tahoe City

Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinner that includes the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from St. Supery Estate Vineyards and Winery. $30 to $35. | RSVP sunnysideresort.com

Rethink for change Truckee

Tahoe Center For Health and Sports Performance presents a free health talk: Empowered Choices — Change Your Life by Changing Your Thoughts with Nikki Dean from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Participants can learn to change their life by changing their thoughts; create clear, achievable goals and overcome self-sabotaging behaviors. Light refreshments. | Register (530) 587-3769

What’s on the MAP Truckee

Mountain Area Preservation (MAP) Project Mixer is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Cedar House Sport Hotel. MAP will be updating the community on the Martis Valley West litigation and how to get involved in the grassroots efforts fighting the housing proposal for 760 homes adjacent to Brockway Summit. Cash bar, light appetizers and MAP giveaways. | mapf.org

MARCH 23-26 | THURSDAY-SUNDAY Meet the 49ers Olympic Valley

The 49ers Foundation will hold a charity event at the Resort at Squaw Creek with winter activities for the family, gourmet food and wine. Meet the players, coaches and cheerleaders. The 49ers Foundation seeks to keep Bay Area kids safe and on track in school. | RSVP 49ers.com

MARCH 24 | FRIDAY Unbirthday Celebration Incline Village, Nev. Enjoy a free day of skiing at Diamond Peak for those who birthdays are between April 17 and Dec. 14. | diamondpeak.com

Ahoy, lil’ matey Tahoe City

Tahoe Maritime Museum hosts preschool storytime: Ships, Sails and Nautical Tales from 11 to 11:30 a.m. every other Friday of the month. The program is directed at ages 3 to 5 and will feature books that have maritime themes. | danielle@tahoemaritime.org

Preserving history Tahoe City

Tahoe Maritime Museum offers a Winter Lecture Series at 5 p.m. Franc Casey and friends offer stories of inspiration and excitement about wooden boats. This is the second part of the series. Open and free to the public. | tahoemaritimemuseum.org

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Kirkwood Cross Country & Snowshoe Center offers Soup and Shoe every Sunday at noon. An easygoing snowshoe is followed by soup at the Kirkwood Inn. | kirkwood.com

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Yucatan Adventure Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97 per person. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Only natural Markleeville

Wild & Scenic Film Festival Stateline, Nev.

Hearty, good snowshoe Kirkwood

Hope Valley Outdoors offers naturalist hikes with Janara Nerone on Sundays from 3 to 4 p.m. She will discuss snowpack, local plants, wildlife, ecology or the history of the Hope Valley. $20. | hopevalleycrosscountry.com

The Sierra Nevada Alliance hosts a stop of the Wild & Scenic Film Festival featuring beautiful, engaging and eye-opening films around the theme “At the Edge” at 7 p.m. at MontBleu. The Festival combines award-winning environmental and adventure films with the energy of local activism. Advance tickets $50 VIP, $15 general admission, $12 members, $10 students. $20 at the door. | wildandscenicfilmfestival.org


March 23-April 5, 2017

MARCH 25 | SATURDAY Look what’s out there South Lake Tahoe

Waterfowl and Woodpecker Outing with Bird Tahoe is from 8 a.m. to noon. Don and Lynn Harriman will lead participants on a walk or cross-country ski/snowshoe through the forest beginning at the Fallen Leaf/Cathedral snow park and heading north toward Baldwin Beach, looking for whatever happens to cross the path. | Register tinsweb.org

Successful snowshoeing Soda Springs

REI Outdoor School offers Introduction to Snowshoeing, Level 1 at 10 a.m. at Donner Summit Sno-Park. Discover the freedom of snowshoeing on this field outing. Learn snowshoeing techniques, proper use of equipment and how to make every trip a success. $80, $70 members. | rei.com

Hopping with hops Incline Village, Nev.

BrewSKI, a local craft brew fest, is at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Twelve breweries will showcase their most glorious hops on an outside deck at the Winters Creek Lodge. The party will stop when the beer runs out. | skirose.com

MARCH 29 | WEDNESDAY

MARCH 25-APRIL 2 | SAT.-SUNDAY Ski for less Tahoe venues

Skiing For Schools is at participating resorts: Homewood, Tahoe Donner Downhill and Cross Country and Tahoe Cross Country. Lift tickets are offered at discount prices and all proceeds go to Excellence in Education to help local schools. | exined.org

MARCH 26 | SUNDAY All in the family Tahoe Donner

Tahoe Donner Family Challenge is a matched time race done as a family at Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area. Children get medals and winners get their names engraved on a trophy in the ski lodge. | tahoedonner.com

MARCH 28 | TUESDAY Intriguing history South Lake Tahoe

Friends of the El Dorado County Library present “The Genes of Jeans: A Riveting Tale” with genealogist Kathleen P. Clemence about the inventor of riveted work pants, Jacob William “JW” Davis. The fact that the world’s favorite item of clothing was invented and patented in Reno is unknown to most locals and denim fans worldwide. 6 p.m. Free. | eldoradolibrary.org

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com > Beginner’s guide to snowshoeing > Snowshoeing among the pines in Tahoe Donner > Lake Tahoe views from Chickadee Ridge > Trek to Coldstream Canyon

About the river Truckee

> Touring Tahoe Meadows

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts River Talk, a one-hour virtual tour of the projects throughout the watershed. It is a chance for guests to learn about the council’s work and offer comments and feedback. At 5:30 p.m. in the TRWC office. | RSVP (530) 550-8760

Soup’s on Truckee

Greg Palmer will recount the story of the Stevens Townsend Murphy Party of 1844 in a fun and interactive way at 5:30 p.m. at Donner Memorial State Park. Doors open at 5. $5 donation. Refreshments for sale. | sierrastateparks.org

T R A I LS

Heart to Heart is a free lecture series at Tahoe Forest Hospital at 9:30 a.m. Get the facts to reduce heart disease and diabetes risks. Today’s topic presented by Carolyn Willette, RN, is “Love Your Heart: Emotional Aspects of Heart Disease.” | Register (530) 582-3285

Alright to start crabbin’ Truckee

Conversations with history Donner Lake

TA H O E ’ S W I N T E R

Reducing risk factors Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Yucatan Adventure Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97 per person. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

The Rotary Club of Truckee’s 24th annual Chris Matthew Memorial Crab Feed is at Truckee Community Rec Center. Bar opens at 5 p.m., dinner is 6 to 7 p.m. and auction at 7 p.m. Proceeds benefit InnerRhythms Dance. Tickets $45 adult, $25 ages 15 and younger. Buy from a Rotarian. | (530) 550-4443

EXPLORE

Truckee Chamber of Commerce Membership 101 is from 8 to 9 a.m. at the California Welcome Center last Wednesday of the month. For new, current or potential members to learn about the benefits of belonging. Coffee and pastries. | info@truckee.com

Beacon Date Night is at Café Zenon from 6 to 9 p.m. Jason Lahy of Alpenglow Sports will cover single and multiple burials, as well as other avalanche scenario events. Those who do not have a beacon will be supplied with a loaner; otherwise bring your own to the Tahoe City Golf Course/Winter Sports Park for beacon practice. Dinner special $10. | Beacon Date Night on Facebook

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Snow Trails

Membership 101 Truckee

Shed some light Tahoe City

Tahoe Food Hub and Slow Food Lake Tahoe announce Community Soup Nights at Full Belly Deli. Enjoy soup and bread for $5 and salad for an extra $2 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. There will be live music and a raffle. See feature in Local Flavor in this issue. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

MARCH 31 | FRIDAY Business recognition Stateline, Nev.

Tahoe Chamber hosts the 2017 Business Expo at Harvey’s Lake Tahoe. Booth and sponsor registration for chamber members open. Annual tradeshow has silent auction. | tahoechamber.org

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers “Sakura” Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97 per person. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

The life of poetry Incline Village, Nev.

Sierra Nevada College celebrates its third anniversary of The Poetry Center at 7 p.m. in Prim Library. The reception will include poetry readings. | sierranevada.edu

APRIL 1 | SATURDAY Ski ‘til sunset Tahoe Donner

Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area hosts the Spring Evening Ski Party at Eagle Rock with music and an outdoor bar. Skiing will be extended to 5:45 p.m. Attendees will enter a drawing for a 2017-18 season pass. | tahoedonner.com

OUT & ABOUT

SKI TOURING & SNOWSHOEING

TAHOE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL

LEVEL: Easy to moderate A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road. This is a nice area for downhill practice while cross-country skiing. The terrain has gentle, rolling slopes. From Interstate 80, take Highway 89 south 3 miles, then turn right on Cabin Creek Road. The unmarked trailhead is 1 mile from the highway. Limited parking is available in a road cut, when plowed. There is moderate snowmobile use in the area.

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 582-7892

The park is mostly flat and open year-round. Skiers can enjoy the forests and boulder fields, glide down to the lake and meander through the park. There is an unmarked, 9.6-km, skier-packed trail starting near the Emigrant Trail Museum. For the more adventuresome, glide over the hills into Coldstream Canyon. TART

PETER GRUBB HUT/CASTLE PEAK LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous

A marked Nordic ski trail begins at the Castle Peak/Boreal interchange on Donner Summit off Interstate 80, west of Truckee. Take the Castle Peak exit and follow it for one-quarter mile to the intersection for the trailhead to the north that goes up Castle Valley and over Castle Pass. Follow unmarked trail to Peter Grubb Hut. For overnight stays at Peter Grubb Hut, call (530) 426-3632 for reservations.

POLE CREEK TRAIL SYSTEM LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Unmarked trails follow roads along Pole Creek and Silver Creek Drainages. Trailhead 6 miles south of Truckee on Highway 89. Some parking on west side of highway. Trails follow U.S. Forest Service roads. Several loops.

SAGEHEN SUMMIT

LEVEL: Easy to moderate An unmarked route follows the road up to the creek bottom. Lateral roads offer many side trips. Trailhead at Sagehen Summit on the west side of Highway 89, 8 miles north of Truckee. Limited parking.

NORTH SHORE

BROCKWAY SUMMIT LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Brockway Summit off Highway 267 offers an abundance of areas to ski. Between Northstar and Kings Beach, there are turnouts on both sides of the highway where Nordic skiers and snowshoers can follow logging and utility roads.

PAGE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to moderate

On Mount Rose high above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where skiers can stretch their legs. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends for skiers, snowshoers and snowmobilers, so try skiing during the week.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Skiers can glide along the road (not plowed in winter) or through the meadows. For a longer outing, head up the mountain to Barker Pass. This area also is open to snowmobilers.

MEEKS MEADOWS LEVEL: Easy

Meeks Meadows on the West Shore off Highway 89 offers a vast area to ski. The trailhead is across from the Meeks Bay Fire Station; look for the log cabin with red trim. Follow the U.S. Forest Service road or meander through the meadow and down to Meeks Creek.

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy to moderate | (530) 525-7982 The Ed Z’berg/Sugar Pine Point State Park is a spectacular spot to cross-country ski or snowshoe among the dense forests of the West Shore or along Lake Tahoe’s shores. The park offers more than 18 km of marked ski trails. Three groomed trails begin at the campground, 9 miles south of Tahoe City, with two skier-packed trails on the lake side of the park, accessed from the Day Use entrance. Winter camping available. The park also offers a number of guided tours throughout the season including full moon snowshoe tours, ski tours of the 1960 Olympic crosscountry trails, historic snowshoe tours and the family Junior Ranger program; call for dates. No dogs allowed on trails. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

TAYLOR CREEK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 573-2600 Developed for beginners, this well-marked series of trails allows skiers to explore the area. Terrain is mostly flat and is good for the entire family. Take Highway 89 south around Emerald Bay to the Fallen Leaf Lake Area. Turn on Cathedral Road and park in the Sno-Park. Marked trails start at the parking lot with three trails near Fallen Leaf Lake. On the Lake side of Highway 89, follow the road to the Visitor Center to access the Tallac Historic Trail. SnoPark Permit required.*

Ski or snowshoe along an old road that meanders through a forest and into a cluster of meadows. Take Highway 89 south from Tahoe City, then turn right on Pine Avenue and right on Tahoe Park Heights Road. At the crest of the hill, take the middle fork, which becomes Big Pine Road, then take a left on Silver Tip. The parking area is at the top of the road.

SEE OUR EVENTS CALENDAR FOR GUIDED SNOWSHOE TREKS.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

* Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

11


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Downhill Skiing & Snowboarding

MORE EVENTS

ALPINE MEADOWS (530) 581-8374 | squawalpine.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tickets also good at Squaw Valley.

BOREAL MOUNTAIN RESORT (530) 426-3666 | rideboreal.com 9 a.m.-9 p.m. All tickets good until 9 p.m.

DIAMOND PEAK (775) 832-1177 | diamondpeak.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Last Tracks Feb.-April.

Base 6,835’ Vertical 1,802’

2,400

Base 7,200’ Vertical 500’

380

Base 6,700’ Vertical 1,840’

655

TERRAIN

MILITARY DISCOUNTS

SKIABLE ACRES

NIGHT SKIING

ELEVATION

TERRAIN PARKS

*Ski areas open depending on conditions.

SHUTTLE BUS

THE RESORTS

CHILD CARE

APRIL 1 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

Novice 25% Intermediate 40%

Advanced 35%

Novice 30% Intermediate 55%

6

2

Advanced 15%

Novice 18% Intermediate 46%

Advanced 36%

Après ski party Homewood

Homewood Mountain Resort Passholder Party is at 89 Bar & Grill from 4 to 8 p.m. Includes free beer and wine for the first hour, music by Ike & Martin, shot skis, costumes and raffle prizes and games. $10, free passholders. | RSVP skihomewood.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers “Sakura” Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97 per person. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

APRIL 2 | SUNDAY

9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tubing hill.

GRANLIBAKKEN (530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com Fri.-Sun. & holidays only. Snow play area, open daily. Warming hut open daily.

HEAVENLY (775) 586-7000 #1 | skiheavenly.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays; 8:30 a.m. weekends. Sledding, tubing, cross-country and snow bikes available.

HOMEWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT (530) 525-2900 | skihomewood.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Snowcat skiing.

KIRKWOOD (877) 547-5966 | kirkwood.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cross-country ski, tube, dog sled, Snowcat tours.

MT. ROSE SKI TAHOE (775) 849-0704 | (800) 754-7673 | skirose.com 9 a.m -4 p.m.

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA (530) 562-1330 | northstarcalifornia.com 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Tubing lanes and lift.

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE (530) 659-7475 | sierraattahoe.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 8:30 a.m. weekends & peak times. Tubing, snowshoe trails.

SODA SPRINGS (530) 426-3901 | skisodasprings.com 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thurs.-Mon. & holidays Snow tubing 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. daily.

SQUAW VALLEY (530) 583-6955 | squawalpine.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dawn Patrol 7:40 a.m. select dates. Tickets also good at Alpine Meadows.

SUGAR BOWL (530) 426-1111 | sugarbowl.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Connects to Royal Gorge Cross Country.

TAHOE DONNER DOWNHILL (530) 587-9444 #2 | tahoedonner.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

12

505

Base 6,200’ Vertical 300’

10

Base 6,540’ CA 7,200’ NV Vertical 3,500’ Base 6,230’ Vertical 2,510’

Base 7,800’ Vertical 2,000’

Base 8,260’ Vertical 1,800’

Base 6,330’ Vertical 2,280’

Novice 25% •

Advanced 25%

Novice 25% Intermediate 40%

Intermediate 45%

3

Advanced 35%

Novice 15% 2,010

Benefit pancake breakfast is offered on the first Sunday of every month from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Truckee Senior Apartments to benefit Senior Meals on Wheels. $7, $3 children younger than 12.

Banff Mountain Film Festival Stateline, Nev.

Novice 20% 4,800

Pancake breakfast Truckee

APRIL 3 | MONDAY

Advanced 35%

Intermediate 40% Advanced 30%

5

3

Expert 15%

Journey to exotic locations, paddle the wildest waters and climb the highest peaks at the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour at MontBleu. The Festival highlights adventure sports such as climbing, kayaking, alpine skiing and mountain expeditions, and also visit remote cultures and some of the world’s last wild places. The show starts at 7 p.m., doors open at 6. $16 advance, $20 at the door, free kids 10 and younger. | montbleuresort.com

Novice 12% 2,300

Intermediate 30% Advanced 38%

Expert 20%

Novice 20% 1,200+

Intermediate 30%

Advanced 40% Expert 10%

3

Edible Book Festival Incline Village, Nev.

The Edible Book Festival is a creative culinary celebration of the book. Using food as the supplies, participants create fare based on a book either literally or tongue-in-cheek. Open to kids and adults. Tasting opening to all at 5:30 p.m. To enter a dish, e-mail sharvey@ washoecounty.us. | (775) 832-4130

APRIL 4 | TUESDAY Novice 11% 3,170

Intermediate 56%

7

Advanced 33%

Base 6,640’ Vertical 2,212’

2,000

Base 6,700’ Vertical 550’

200

Base 6,200’ Vertical 2,850’

Intermediate 50%

Reno

(530) 426-3635 | donnerskiranch.com

Base 7,031’ Vertical 750’

Morning breakfast meeting Tahoe City

Join the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association for First Tuesday Morning Breakfast Club from 7 to 8:30 a.m. $15. | gotahoenorth.com

Novice 25% Intermediate 50%

6

Advanced 25%

Novice 30% Intermediate 40%

1

Advanced 30%

Novice 25% 3,600

Intermediate 45%

4

Advanced 30%

Base 6,883’ Vertical 1,500’

1,650

Base 6,750’ Vertical 600’

120

Advanced 38%

Family Science Expo South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences hosts the 12th annual Science Expo from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. for children of all ages and their families. This year’s theme is Earth and Space Science featuring dozens of hands-on interactive science experiments, activities and demonstrations emphasizing geology, climate and weather, and astronomy. Free admission. | tahoe.ucdavis.edu

Name that bug Truckee

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts Aquatic Monitoring Lab Night for those interested in water quality. In this evening of lab work support, participants will identify aquatic insects in water samples collected over the summer. From 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Space is limited. | RSVP (530) 550-8760, ext 1

APRIL 6 | THURSDAY All the cool CATTs Tahoe Vista

Contractors Association of Truckee Tahoe is hosting a mixer at Tahoe Tech Group from 5 to 7 p.m. Check out the new offices. Food, fun, raffle prizes and networking. | ca-tt.com

Winery Take-Over Tahoe City

Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents an Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinner that include the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery. $30 to $35. | RSVP sunnysideresort.com

TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

TERC offers “Recovering the Endangered Mountain Yellow-legged Frog in the Sierra Nevada,” with Roland Knapp, Ph.D., of Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory UC Santa Barbara. A world with no frogs is a possibility in the Sierra Nevada; 90 percent of the Mountain Yellow-legged Frogs have been disappearing due to an amphibian pathogen and loss of habitat from fish introductions in our lakes. No-host bar at 5:30; presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP terc.ucdavis.edu

A community honored Olympic Valley

North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association Community Awards banquet is at Resort at Squaw Creek. “Make Your Mark: Celebrating Your Impact on North Lake Tahoe” will begin with cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. Businesses, organizations and individuals will be honored. | gotahoenorth.com

Entrepreneurs welcome South Lake Tahoe

“Are you growing your dream business?” The mentor-based Entrepreneurs Program meets the first Thursday of every month from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Aspen Room at Lake Tahoe Community College. Free to all. | Register tahoechamber.com

Heart to Heart is a free lecture series at Tahoe Forest Hospital at 9:30 a.m. Get the facts to reduce heart disease, pulmonary disease and diabetes risks. Today’s topic presented by Betsy Taylor, RD, is “Supermarket Smarts.” | Register (530) 582-3285

3

Novice 40% Intermediate 60%

Journey to exotic locations, paddle the wildest waters and climb the highest peaks at the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour at MontBleu. The Festival highlights adventure sports such as climbing, kayaking, alpine skiing and mountain expeditions, and also visit remote cultures and some of the world’s last wild places. The show starts at 7 p.m., doors open at 6. $16 advance, $20 at the door, free kids 10 and younger. | montbleuresort.com

Incline Village Library host an Easter Story time with stories, a craft, egg hunt and pictures with the Easter Bunny from 4 to 4:45 p.m. | (775) 832-4130

Reducing risk factors Truckee

Novice 17% Intermediate 45%

Banff Mountain Film Festival Stateline, Nev.

APRIL 5 | WEDNESDAY

Truckee

DONNER SKI RANCH

Easter Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

3

Advanced 0%

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events.


March 23-April 5, 2017

Deep ‘n’ Daring

OUT & ABOUT

Courtesy of Sugar Bowl

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Deep ‘n’ Daring events. Shed some light

Gathering vertical feet

Tahoe City Beacon Date Night is at Café Zenon on March 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. This free beacon training and special dinner is for those who want to refresh skills or those new to back-country travel. Jason Layh of Alpenglow Sports will cover single and multiple burials, as well as other avalanche scenario events. Those who do not have a beacon will be supplied with a loaner; otherwise bring your own to the Tahoe City Golf Course/Winter Sports Park for beacon practice. | Beacon Date Night on Facebook

Incline Village, Nev. The Silver State Vertical Drop is an annual ski competition and community fundraising event put on by the Silver State Hotshots, a Carson City-based wildfire suppression crew. Justin Cutler, the current captain of the Silver State Hotshots, began the event in 2008. Individuals or teams of three to five compete to safely ski as much vertical feet as possible in a four-hour period. This year’s Vertical Drop will be held at Diamond Peak Ski Resort on March 25. There will be free food and free beer for all Vertical Drop VIP competitors; tickets are limited. All proceeds from the Silver State Vertical Drop go to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, nonprofit organization that provides support firefighters and their families in times of crisis. | diamondpeak.com

Ski, girl, ski Coalition Snow, formed by a team of Tahoe women, launched a Kickstarter Campaign to fund its first YOUth line of skis and snowboards. This Kickstarter Campaign will help fund production of YOUth line of skis and snowboards and build the foundation for a community that spreads confidence and inclusivity to future generations of skiers and riders. Supporters will also have access to exclusive perks. | coalitionsnow.com

Round ‘n’ round KT22 Olympic Valley The most successful retro, skiing fundraiser benefiting athletes with lifealtering injuries is back on March 26: The Mothership Classic. Arcade Belts Co., will host the third annual classic on Squaw Valley’s infamous chairlift, KT22, aka The Mothership. Participants spend the day lapping KT22 as many times as possible with friends, all wearing retro gear, onepiece snowsuits, old goggles, old skis/ boards and other throwback gear. | highfivesfoundation.org

Even a dummy could Incline Village, Nev. Diamond Peak’s 17th annual Dummy Downhill is on April 1 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Participants build a dummy on skis or a snowboard that they launch off a big jump on Show-Off while spectators cheer them on from the Base Lodge Deck. Dummies must be at the base lodge by 10 a.m. to be judged on creativity. Dummies cannot be live and must weigh less than 75 pounds. The jumping will be followed by an awards ceremony on the Base Lodge Deck with live music. Pre-register online by March 31. | diamondpeak.com

WO R K T HO S E

THIGHS

Adrenaline fix Reno, Nev. AMSOIL Arenacross is coming to the Reno-Sparks Livestock Events Center from March 24 to 25. AMSOIL Arenacross is an extreme racing environment where athletes will compete on man-made dirt battlegrounds for many nights of high-speed, high-flying, fierce racing competition. | arenacross.com

Tom Sims Retro Worlds returns Soda Springs The Tom Sims Retro Worlds returns to Boreal from March 24 to 26. Remember how snowboarding started? Stunt ditches and hard boots, slalom racing, onsies, zinc oxide, headbands and razorblade sunglasses. Boreal is bringing it back. Enjoy three days of fun and rubbing elbows with legends and heroes of snowboarding’s history from the Great Race and The Beach Party Hand Shaped Old School Pipe Session. | rideboreal.com

More time to train Tahoe Donner Tahoe Donner’s Skogsloppet CrossCountry Ski Race has been rescheduled for March 25. No racing experience is required for this traditional 15km course that is a fun loop on beginner and intermediate terrain. There will also be a shorter 5km race for juniors and novices and a 2km race for kids. Money raised by the race supports Truckee’s middle school and high school Nordic ski teams. | tahoedonner.com

The Quad Crusher is an endurance race staged across Sugar Bowl’s four iconic peaks — Mount Judah, Mount Lincoln, Mount Disney and Crow’s Nest Peak — on March 25 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Quad Crusher is an uphill event that will test stamina, grit and determination while highlighting Sugar Bowl’s beauty and terrain variety. Two divisions and distinct courses will make this event fun for both seasoned athletes and passionate citizen uphillers. The event will conclude with an awards celebration, food, drinks and raffle with proceeds benefitting the Sierra Avalanche Center. | sugarbowl.com

Be a super star Tahoe Donner Tahoe Donner Family Challenge is a matched time race done as a family on March 26. The best oldest skier and best youngest skier in the family set the pace. Children get medals and winners get their names engraved on a trophy in the ski lodge. Downhill Dummy Contest is on April 9. Teams send unique dummies slide down the hill and off a massive jump. This year’s theme is “cartoon characters.” Prizes are awarded for best crash, best air and best design. | tahoedonner.com

Tour the Euer Valley Tahoe Donner The Tour D’Euer starts at 10 a.m. on March 26. This 25-year tradition offers participants the opportunity to tour Euer Valley and collect raffle tickets as they ski;

the more they ski, the more tickets they receive. Tickets are $25 and $20 for ages 19 and younger. | tahoedonner.com

Ability Challenge for Achieve Tahoe Olympic Valley The annual Ability Challenge Fundraiser for Achieve Tahoe will be on April 1 at Squaw Valley. In addition to a fun interactive day of on-hill activities and a festive after party, this year’s event will feature a special 50th anniversary component. Anyone who raises at least $200 can join the fun and will receive one lift ticket, a goodie bag, a lunch voucher and an invite to an après-ski party and free raffle. | abilitychallenge.net

13


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

ACCESSING PUBLIC LANDS PARKING, ACCESS CONTINUE TO PLAGUE BACK-COUNTRY USERS S T O R Y B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N · P H O T O S B Y S C O T T R O K I S

he 2016-17 season has been one of the largest snow seasons Lake Tahoe has experienced in years as Tahoe ski resorts have reported anywhere from 39 to 46 feet of natural snow since the season started, with some reporting record snowfall. As skiers and snowboarders have been seeking his or her own slice of powder and to escape from the daily grind, locals and visitors alike have been finding solace in the back country. However, access to those trails has been denuded in recent years, the unintended victim of water quality improvement projects in the Tahoe Basin. When the Tahoe Weekly first reported on this issue in fall 2015 for our feature story “You Can’t Park Here: Back-country skiers lament loss of West Shore parking,” access had already started to diminish. A group of back-country enthusiasts banded together and approached local government agencies as a unified front under the Tahoe Backcountry Alliance to try to restore parking. “People drive 4 to 5 hours up to the mountains to be in the mountains,” says Jason Layh, and people need a place to park. Layh works at Alpenglow Sports in Tahoe City and is one of the founders of the Alliance noting that dozens of people come into Alpenglow Sports a day looking for snowshoes, back-country ski setups, downhill-oriented gear and safety equipment. The goal of the water quality project was to improve and preserve Lake Tahoe’s clarity by improving stormwater drainage throughout the Basin, thereby controlling the amount of sediment from mountain runoff that flows into

14

the Lake, which can lead to a decline in lake clarity. Curbs and gutters have been installed on nearly all of Tahoe’s major roadways encirc-ling the Lake, with the project now near completion. The improvements also included removing many dirt turnouts along the highways to control sediment runoff and paving some dirt turnouts that greatly reduced parking availability. Roadway turnouts are intended for emergency parking only, say local and state agencies, however, back-country users say those turnouts were essential public access points for popular summer and winter trails like Jake’s Peak and the Rubicon on the West Shore and Mount Tallac on the South Shore.

MAINTAINING PUBLIC ACCESS No one disputes that protecting Big Blue’s famous waters is important, but many back-country users say that maintaining the public’s access to public lands needs to be an essential component to planning future projects in the Tahoe Basin. “This isn’t just about back-country skiers, it’s an issue about access to public lands in the winter,” Layh says. “If it

gets to the point where we can’t get out and enjoy it then it will be devastating. The public needs to keep their eyes open, otherwise it will get taken away. This affects mountain bikers, climbers, hikers, anyone who likes to enjoy the outdoors in the whole Lake Tahoe watershed.” When the Alliance organized in 2105, Layh says it was successful in advocating to keep access along the West Shore for places like Jake’s Peak from D.L. Bliss State Park. They also pushed for D.L. Bliss to be plowed to enjoy promontories such as Rubicon Point. The project dates to 2008 when government agencies including the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA), Caltrans and the U.S. Forest Service began working together on the project to improve Lake Tahoe’s water clarity. The project went through the normal environmental review process, including holding public meetings. However, what no one took into consideration was how the project would affect recreational access to trailheads, especially during the winter months when on-street parking is prohibited for snow removal. Back-country users quickly

noticed diminished access to trailheads such as Jake’s Peak, Bliss Peak and Desolation Wilderness as turnouts were eliminated. Soon after the Tahoe Weekly first reported on the issue, El Dorado County and the Forest Service’s Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU) held a series of meetings to continue the discussion about access issues. LTBMU’s Heather Noel said that the public meetings held in March and April 2016 had mixed attendance, but that the agency received more than 200 comments in response to letters. “The meetings were beneficial to get everyone on the same page on where the access issues are,” said TRPA public information officer Tom Lotshaw. He added that TRPA officials also prompted the Alliance to become a formal group and express the main issues as a unified front. “It is a constant challenge to get the right people to see (these projects) however you present it, but the good that came out of it is now we have an established relationship with that group of back-country skiers,” says Lotshaw.


March 23-April 5, 2017

FEATURE

“This isn’t just about back-country skiers, it’s an issue about access to public lands in the winter. If it gets to the point where we can’t get out and enjoy it then it will be devastating. The public needs to keep their eyes open, otherwise it will get taken away. This affects mountain bikers, climbers, hikers, anyone who likes to enjoy the outdoors in the whole Lake Tahoe watershed.”

–Jason Layh

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

David Reichel | Tahoe Backcountry Alliance

Tahoe back-country skiers share their first-person experiences with parking & towed vehicles

PARKING A CHALLENGE The TRPA also went on several field trips with the Alliance to take a closer look at the access areas, which resulted in an arrangement to keep the parking lot at D.L. Bliss State Park plowed in the winter along with other access points along Highway 89 on the West Shore. “In addition, we recently met with Tahoe Backcountry Alliance to understand current parking and access issues they’re seeing and provide a status update on projects we’re working on to increase parking capacity for users along the corridor,” says Noel. The Alliance for its part has been working hard to stay abreast of all the issues and advocate for public lands access as they continue to see an increase of people trying to access the Tahoe back country. Progress is being made to address public access within the Tahoe Basin as the number of winter back-country users has been steadily increasing. In 2014, Snowsports Industries America released a study stating that more than 6 million skiers and snowboarders have started exploring the back country and more than $54

million was spent in alpine touring skis, boots and accessories (like climbing skins). From snowshoers and sledders to people strapping skins onto their skis and climbing the tallest peaks, it seems like more and more people are venturing out into the woods to find peace, quiet and, hopefully, fresh snow. The parking area at D.L. Bliss State Park has been periodically closed due to the immense powder from 2017 storms, but Caltrans has been plowing turnouts along the West Shore. “We’ve been inundated with snow and all of us at the TBA are thrilled that winter public access has been so good,” Layh says. However, there have been some conflicts as the large snow events have led to even more parking issues, with some back-country users reporting vehicles being towed from turnouts while skiing.

A VOICE IN PUBLIC POLICY Although the group of back-country enthusiasts formed only when the Highway 89 water improvement project came on their radar, Layh believes that the timing was good to be involved in some of the other plans around Lake

Tahoe that are up for revision. “These opportunities come up only every 10 to 20 years, so the timing is fantastic to have the TBA give input on what is necessary and needed. We’re playing catch up, but thankfully all of the agencies have been really receptive,” Layh says, adding that the Alliance is involved in the forthcoming Winter Travel Management Plan from the Forest Service. However, the Alliance is concerned that there is a larger public access issue lingering – that without active lobbying, parking to access favorite trailheads may disappear and it encourages the public to become involved in maintaining access. Moving forward, Layh says that one of the main priorities of the Alliance is to try to gather data of how many people are using Tahoe’s back country. “We are continuing to work with the TRPA, LTBMU, El Dorado and Placer counties to advocate for winter recreation access. In addition, we are collaborating with the TRTA [Tahoe Rim Trail Association] this winter to gather some back-country skier use data. This type of info is almost completely absent from our area and has the potential to help inform

planning decisions,” added Alliance president David Reichel. The Alliance has raised more than $10,000 to collect data on trail users and the group is working on signage regarding back-country access, safety and awareness. Looking ahead, the Forest Service is working on a back-country access plan for the Lake Tahoe Basin, which is expected to be released in the coming months, which officials say will take into account public concerns on parking. In analyzing the public comments, Noel said people were most interested in open and closed access for snowmobiles and other motorized use, along with increased parking and signage. “The bottom line is that there was a project that presented concerns and this instigated a balancing point. There’s greater awareness and understanding for all involved,” says Lotshaw. “The issue is not resolved but we are seeing progress and working together.”  For more information about the Tahoe Backcountry Alliance, visit tahoebackcountryalliance.org. For more information about LTBMU’s Winter Travel Management Plan, visit fs.usda.gov/goto/ltbmu/wintertravelmgmt.

15


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA H O E L O C A L

ADVERTISEMENT

Family Fun

Elissa Slanger S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

E

lissa Slanger is a pioneer in the ski industry, a woman clearly ahead of her time. She created the first women’s ski program at Squaw Valley in the 1970s and changed the course of ski instruction for women throughout the country when she saw the importance and need for women to learn skiing from other women. “There were very few women ski instructors when I started teaching in the 60s. Back then women only taught children,” says Slanger, who was one of the first women to teach all levels of skiing to both men and women. She molded the culture of women’s ski education.

and started practicing Zen meditation in the early 1960s and then later Tibetan Buddhist meditation. “I lived in Japan and studied Zen Buddhism in Kyoto in 1962,” says Slanger. She is not only a former ski instructor and meditation teacher, but also an artist and author. She wrote the book, “Ski Woman’s Way,” with Dinah Witchel. After teaching skiing, Slanger asked herself what she was going to do next. She decided to go back to school. She received her doctorate in psychology when she was 50 and opened her own practice. Three years ago, Slanger almost died after a ruptured brain aneurysm. The doctors gave her a 5 percent chance of normal recovery, a 50 percent chance of dying and a 50 percent chance of being handicapped. “It was during this time I had all kinds of realizations, epiphanies and insights — my whole attitude about life changed,” she says. It made her take stock in her life and her priorities. Slanger explains that while she was in recovery her perspective on life and the way she had lived changed. It was during this time she realized she was no longer worried about what was ahead of her.

“ We owe a debt of gratitude to this visionary who not only started women’s programs in the U.S. but also mentored many of us who have followed in her extraordinary footsteps.” –Lynn Douglas

ICE SKATING

NORTH LAKE TAHOE

SQUAW VALLEY

INCLINE VILLAGE

(530) 403-0206 | squaw.com Olympic Ice Pavilion at High Camp. Hockey or figure skating rentals. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Snow Play Area on Fairway Blvd., next to the Chateau, on the driving range. Bring own equipment.

MOUNT ROSE Near the Mount Rose summit, enjoy sledding in Tahoe Meadows off Highway 431. Bring equipment.

(530) 542-6262 | citiofslt.com Indoor facility open year-round. BlueGo

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com Ice skating & rentals. Club House. TART

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

(530) 546-0605 | northtahoeparks.com End of National Avenue off Hwy 28. Rentals available. TART

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

TRUCKEE

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com At Truckee River Regional Park. Skate rentals, broomball leagues, ice dancing & hockey lessons. Skate rentals & season passes available. TART

Sledding & cross-country trails. Rentals available. Club House. TART

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SQUAW VALLEY

PUBLIC POOLS

(530) 452-4511 | squaw.com Tubing & mini snowmobiles. TART

INCLINE VILLAGE

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com 25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends).

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

ECHO LAKE

(530) 644-2324 Highway 50 at Echo Lake Road. Bring equipment.*

(800) 403-0206 | squaw.com

SAWMILL POND

Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. Reopens spring 2017. TART

TAYLOR CREEK

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

On Lake Tahoe Blvd. Bring equipment. BlueGo

(530) 543-2600

Highway 89, north of Camp Richardson Road. Bring equipment.* BlueGo

(530) 542-6056 | citiofslt.com 25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. BlueGo

Slanger received the highest level of ski certification and became the only women at the time to be both a director and examiner in the Far West Ski Instructors Association — when the ski industry was a man’s world. “Stan Tomlinson was the ski school director. He was very innovative and one of the great figures in the ski industry at the time,” says Slanger. While teaching at Squaw, she was inspired to offer a weeklong women’s ski course. “I thought it would be fun to put a women’s group together,” she said. Slanger designed the course the way she would have wanted to learn skiing and created a cooperative experience. The clinics at Squaw were so successful she began to offer women’s ski clinics and teach women-specific courses nationwide. She formed her own ski school called, “Women’s Way Ski Seminars,” and trained other instructors. Slanger says it’s hard to believe how far things have come even though she witnessed the evolution of women and education in the world of skiing. Slanger is also a meditation teacher

Do you know someone interesting in Tahoe? To nominate someone you’d like to see featured, e-mail editor@tahoethisweek.com.

16

“I stayed in the moment. I didn’t worry about what was going to happen. I was in the moment as the moment unfolded, as if I was in meditation all day long. I practiced being spiritual for so many years and I still had a fear of dying. I could have slipped away very easily.” Now, at age 83, Slanger’s story is one of innovation, creativity, consciousness and humanitarianism. She hung up her skis a few years ago after a fall when doctors warned that if she hit her head again it could be fatal. She continues to teach meditation, offer workshops and retreats and teaches a series on aging and death and dying. Slanger continues to exercise regularly. Her legacy lives on in Tahoe and Lynn Douglas, program coordinator for Women of Winter, pays homage to Slanger, a woman who has carved a path for the future of women ski instruction in the United States. “Women’s clinics today are a product of the very first program started in the mid-70s by Elissa Slanger,” says Douglas. “Recognizing that women were struggling with learning to ski, she paired women ski instructors with a group of women for a unique one-week course. The program was so successful that she travelled the nation helping other resorts start their own programs. We owe a debt of gratitude to this visionary who not only started women’s programs in the U.S. but also mentored many of us who have followed in her extraordinary footsteps.”

STATELINE

KAHLE PARK

TRUCKEE

(775) 586-7271 | douglascountynv.gov

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Indoor pools with competition pool and warm water pool, diving board, swim training, hydraulic lift and lessons. TART

Off Highway 207. Bring equipment. BlueGo

TRUCKEE & BEYOND

ROCK CLIMBING WALLS

DONNER SUMMIT

TRUCKEE

South side of I-80, Castle Peak exit beyond Boreal Inn frontage road. Bring equipment.*

Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

TAHOE DONNER

(530) 587-3558

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

(530) 587-9437 | tahoedonner.com At Trout Creek Recreation Center. No personal sleds. Family events all season.

SLEDDING & TUBING

YUBA PASS

EAST SHORE

(530) 994-3401

SPOONER LAKE

Highway 49 at Yuba Pass. Bring equipment.*

(775) 831-0494

State park open for general snow play. Bring equipment.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

HOPE VALLEY AREA

(530) 543-2600

CARSON PASS

Snowplay area off Hwy. 89, 3 miles south of Tahoe City. Bring equipment.*

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

GRANLIBAKKEN

(530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com

HOPE VALLEY Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Bring equipment.*

Machine-groomed snow play area; no tubes or toboggans allowed. All ages.

MEISS MEADOW

TAHOE CITY

(775) 882-2766

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

Gentle slope on Highway 89 South, one-eighth mile south of the wye. Bring equipment. TART

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Family Fun. ALL ACTIVITIES ARE WEATHER DEPENDENT. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222. BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org


March 23-April 5, 2017

Courtesy Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences

For the Kids

OUT & ABOUT

ADVENTURE 365 Truckee’s New Outlet Sporting Goods Store

WINTER BLOWOUT SALE Brand name gear at extremely discounted prices!

FAMILY SCIENCE EXPO Tahoe Center for Environmental Sciences hosts the a Science Expo for children of all ages and their families on April 5 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Lake Tahoe Community College in South Lake Tahoe. This year’s theme is Earth and Space Science featuring dozens of hands-on interactive science experiments, activities and demonstrations emphasizing geology, climate and weather, and astronomy. Free admission. | tahoe.ucdavis.edu

Welcome guppies

This camp swings

Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Recreation Center offers swim lessons for a variety of ages and abilities. Programs are designed to follow the American Red Cross Learn-to-Swim guidelines. Session V is from April 3 to May 4. | Register (775) 832-1310

Sparks, Nev. Spring Break Musical Theater Camp is from March 27 to 31 at Sierra School of Performing Arts in Sparks, Nev. An original musical script, “The Birthday Party,” written by musical director Bill Quinby, will expose students in Grades 4 to 9 to stage movement, acting techniques, voice and dance. The camp, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., will culminate with a performance on March 31 at 2 p.m. The cost is $225 for one child. | sierraschoolofperformingarts.org

Kids love cooking Tahoe City Rideout Recreation Center offers Kids Cooking on Wednesdays from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Children learn to cook quick, simple and easy meals with minimal ingredients. This class is for Grades K to 5. Kids will come home with a to-go bag filled with their creations. Session 4 is April 5 to May 3. The fee is $75. | Register tcpud.org

Academic scholarships for teens Liberty Utilities offers academic scholarships for eligible high-school and college students within its service territory. The eight schools in the fifth annual scholarship program are South Tahoe High School, Loyalton High School, Douglas High School, Coleville High School, North Tahoe High School, Truckee High School, Portola High School and Lake Tahoe Community College. The seven high-school scholarships are $500 each. The Lake Tahoe Community College scholarship is $750. Interested students should contact their school’s financial aid office or counselor learn more or to obtain an application. The schools have different deadlines, but all scholarships will be awarded starting mid-May through the end of June. | libertyutilities.com

From puppets to science Truckee KidZone Museum offers Girls Science Club on Saturdays in March from noon to 4 p.m. for ages 5 to 9. This engaging and innovative club encourages girls’ interests in science through hands-on learning in an environment designed to be supportive, enriching, and – most importantly – fun. Students will create circuits that light up a handmade box houses, engineer marble runs and more. Classes are $25 each’ KidZone members receive a 20 percent discount. Reserve a space online. Art Studio Specialty on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. for toddlers, ages 1 to 3. Children will be introduced to a gooey or sticky medium in which to glue, stamp, build or simply explore. Family Fun Fridays are at 11 a.m. Paint on foil, have fun with shaving cream and explore many arts and crafts options. These classes are free to members or with the price of admission to nonmembers. | kidzonemuseum.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities.

Skis · Snowboards · Jackets Pants · Gloves · Beanies · Bags Goggles · Socks · Helmets First Layers · Snow Boots (530) 414-4519 · 11025 Pioneer Trail #104 Near Full Belly Deli

Let the

Good Times Snow

at Granlibakken

Located just outside of Tahoe City.

Ski · Board · Sled & S’more

530-583-4242 | Granlibakken.com

2 for 1 Entrėes

Every Friday at Cedar House Pub Offering cozy fireside dining and featuring pub favorites. Excludes holiday periods. 17


TRAILS

ASC TRAINING CENTER

Trails 10

(530) 426-3313 | auburnskiclub.org

KM 25

Open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Biathlon range, ski jumping hills.

Acres 500

BIJOU CROSS-COUNTRY (530) 542-6056

CAMP RICHARDSON (530) 542-6584 | camprichardson.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Cross-country & snowshoe rentals. Guided ski tours.

CLAIR TAPPAAN LODGE

Groomed 25 KM

KM 4

TERRAIN

Intermediate 50%

KM 35

N/A

Intermediate 40% Advanced 0%

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Trails 5

Novice 67%

(530) 587-7892 | parks.ca.gov

KM 16+

Intermediate 20%

Winter nature trail. Trail guides in museum.

Groomed None

Advanced 13%

GRANLIBAKKEN SKI AREA

Trails 2

Novice 25%

KM 7.5

Intermediate 75%

Groomed None

Advanced 0%

(530) 694-2266 | hopevalleyoutdoors.com

Trails 60 miles

Snowshoe & cross-country lessons, rentals (cash or check only).

Groomed 20 miles

(209) 258-7248 | kirkwood.com 3 trail systems. Two dog-friendly trails.

LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (530) 541-4660 x717 ltccnordiccenter.weebly.com Groomed several times a week.

Groomed 10 KM

Groomed 14 KM

KIRKWOOD

Trails 6+

Shuttle to Soda Springs, Donner Ski Ranch & Sugar Bowl. Overnight wilderness huts.

HOPE VALLEY OUTDOORS

1

N/A

Novice 60%

Open Fri.-Sun. & holidays. Tubing area & warming hut open daily.

Trails 24 KM 80 Acres 4,200 Groomed 80 KM

1

Skiers and snowboarders can pre-purchase reduced-rate lift tickets valid at many North Lake Tahoe ski resorts through the Excellence in Education Skiing for Schools program. Tickets are available for Tahoe Donner Downhill, Homewood and Tahoe Cross Country. Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows tickets are on sale now and are valid beginning on April 1. Tickets may be pre-purchased at exined.org or at Tahoe Dave’s ski shops. Tahoe Cross Country trail passes are available at Alpenglow in Tahoe City.

N/A

EXCELLENT TICKET RATES

Proceeds from the Skiing for Schools program goes to the Tahoe Truckee Unified School District via Excellence in Education Foundation’s grant programs. | (530) 550-7984 or exined.org

Novice 20% Intermediate 60%

3

Advanced 20%

Trails 5 KM 5-7

N/A

Groomed 5-7 KM

NEVADA NORDIC (775) 720-9355 | nevadanordic.org

Groomed 10 KM

N/A

At Spooner Lake State Park.

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA

Trails 18

(530) 542-3270 | northstarcalifornia.com

KM 35

Telemark, track, skating lessons daily. Nordic geocaching. Alpine ticket exchangeable for trail pass.

Acres 600

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Groomed 35 KM

(530) 546-5043 | northtahoeparks.com

KM 11

Maps available at North Tahoe Event Center, Kings Beach. Sled hill, snow play area.

Groomed 11 KM

ROYAL GORGE

Trails 60

(530) 426-3871 | royalgorge.com

KM 200+

Open 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Day lodge & 3 cafés along trail. Offers snowbiking & snowkiting.

Acres 7,500

SQUAW CREEK CROSS COUNTRY

Trails 9

Groomed 200+ KM

(530) 583-6300, x6631 | squawcreek.com

KM 18

Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Guided snowshoe tours. Dog sledding.

Acres 400

SUGAR PINE POINT (530) 525-7982 | parks.ca.gov

Groomed 18 KM

Novice 47% Intermediate 32%

2

Advanced 21%

Novice 45% Intermediate 50%

Advanced 5%

Novice 32% Intermediate 50%

9

2

Advanced 18%

Novice 60% Intermediate 25%

KM 20 Groomed 13.6 KM

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

Trails 2

(530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

KM 4

Sledding & ice skating.

Groomed 4 KM

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

Trails 23

(530) 583-5475 | tahoexc.org

KM 65

Open 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free skate & cross-country lessons on select days.

Acres 3,000

TAHOE DONNER CROSS COUNTRY

Groomed 65 KM

N/A

N/A

Why you should join

Generate a buzz

Contractors Association of Truckee Tahoe (CATT) is holding a membership orientation on March 30 from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport Community Room. Guests can learn about CATT benefits and services and network with others. | memberinfo@ca-tt.com

Tahoe Wedding Industry Group (TWIG) is hosting an educational and networking meeting on April 5 at Granlibakken Tahoe from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Guest speaker Jess VanPernis Weaver of JVP Communications will present “Leveraging PR To Your Advantage — Raise Awareness and Generate New Business.” Any businessperson can benefit from this presentation. The cost is $5 for nonmembers and free to members. Nonmembers can register at brownpapertickets.com/event/2899352. | (530) 563-6392

A fast fundraiser Did you know that more than 3,000 people in the North Tahoe/Truckee community do not always know where their next meal is coming from? Project MANA has developed a fundraising campaign called Fight Hunger Fast. It’s a 24-hour fast to raise $50,000 for hunger relief locally by providing 160,000 meals. During the month of April, community members will conduct a juice or water fast for a 24-hour period. | (775) 298-4161 or projectmana.org

Six weeks that matter

Advanced 15%

Trails 5

Winter camping (call for availability). Guided crosscountry and snowshoe tours offered Jan. to March.

Cooking Matters is a six-week course starting March 27 on Mondays from 4 to 6 p.m. at North Tahoe Family Resource Center in Kings Beach. The series will cover how to shop and prepare healthy meals on a budget, and how to stretch ingredients and food dollars. Taught in English and Spanish and childcare is provided. | Register (530) 546-0952

Volunteers make it work Novice 20% Intermediate 50%

3

•*

5

Advanced 30%

Trails 58

Novice 27%

(530) 587-9484 | tahoedonner.com

KM 100+

Intermediate 44%

Open 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. 7 a.m. for passholders Mon.Fri. (non-storm days). *Weekends & holidays.

Acres 4,800

Advanced 25%

Groomed 100+ KM

Expert 4%

18

Courtesy Homewood Mountain Resort

Advanced 30%

KM 14

(800) 543-3221 | granlibakken.com

Announcements

Novice 20%

Trails 7

(530) 426-3632 | clairtappaanlodge.com

GUIDED TOURS FAT TIRE BIKING TRAILS

Cross-Country Skiing

DOGS OK

TheTahoeWeekly.com

CHILDREN’S SCHOOL WARMING HUTS SNOWSHOE TRAILS

OUT & ABOUT

UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center is in need of volunteers for its second annual South Lake Tahoe Science Expo on April 5. No science background is necessary. Those interested may sign up for shifts at tinyurl.com/ sltsciexpo17. | (775) 881-7560, ext. 7474

April 15 is looming large The Tax Aide Program of the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) offers free tax preparation assistance for locals at the Family Resource Center of Truckee and the North Tahoe Family Resource Center in Kings Beach. Appointments in Truckee will be from 9:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. on Saturdays: March 25 and April 1, 8, 15. Call (530) 587-2513 for an appointment. In Kings Beach, make an appointment on Fridays: March 24 and 31 and April 7 and 14. Call (530) 546-0952 for an appointment. | aarp.org/taxaide

Help buy beacons The Meyers Community Foundation is seeking donations to raise $1,000 to pay for the Beacon Basin program and are asking the community to get involved. The Beacon Basin program offers avalanche transceiver practice and training at the Lake Valley Fire Protection District station in Meyers along with free air-canister refills for back-country airbags. | meyerscommunityfoundation.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Announcements.


March 23-April 5, 2017

Arts

THE ARTS

& CULTURE

CREATIVE AWARENESS

LITERARY NOTES

Creating a space

Apply to Community of Writers

Celebration of Poetry The Sierra Nevada College Poetry Center in Incline Village, Nev., is hosting its annual Poetry Center Celebration from March 31 to April 1 on the college campus. The event will feature poets Cedar Sigo, Lara Mimosa Montes and Lauren Levin. There will be a free reception and readings on March 31 at 7 p.m. in Prim Library on campus. On April 1, the Center hosts free workshops from 9 to 11 a.m. at Sundance Books and Music in Reno, Nev. Space is limited. E-mail jstanley@ sierranevada.edu to register. Look for the annual Tahoe Poetry Slam to return on April 28 at 7 p.m. | sierranevada.edu

Poetry takes to the streets Nevada County Arts Council (NCArts) will present the inaugural Sierra Poetry Festival on April 1 from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Sierra College in Grass Valley. With partial support from the California Arts Council, activities will include a keynote address by California State Poet Laureate Dana Gioia and an array of local, national and international poets and performers. Among the day’s lineup of poets and presenters are Al Young, Kazim Ali, Genny Lim, Molly Fisk, Pablo Frasconi, Maya Khosla, Tahoe-Truckee poets and more. Fringe events will take place in the streets, cafes, art galleries and local libraries to create active and engaging poetry experiences for everyone, including Poetry Place, a literary vendor fair with books, information, literary items and interactive multimedia activities on the day of the festival. NCArts will also be working with Poetry Out Loud and California Poets in the Schools to showcase student poets and Poetry Out Loud champions. As well, Nevada County’s first Poet Laureate Program will be announced during the festival. | nevadacountyarts.org

FOR ARTISTS S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N

N

Photo Creyit

estled in the Ponderosa pines up by the Ritz-Carlton lies the new Rendezvous Cabins built by Mountainside at Northstar. With incredible views of the Mount Rose Wilderness and an extensive trail system accessible from its front doors, these modern rustically furnished huts are an ideal place to get away and absorb the mountain’s natural surroundings. In addition to the luxury accommodations, the developers created the Mountainside Institute as a way for cabin owners to collaborate and create, using the outdoors as a catalyst to build experiences that connect nature and people. The Mountainside Institute includes a seasonal artist residency program to invite noted artists to come to Lake Tahoe for several weeks, work in a cabin and offer open studio hours. Brooklyn-based artist Zaria Forman was the first to take advantage of the program. It was lightly snowing outside and she was working on a 10.5-foot panel perched on a wall with lifelike-looking ice popping out of it. The natural light peeking over the snow-covered windows on to the Antarctica portrait was breathtakingly beautiful. Despite the crazy January weather, Forman made significant progress on her work over the course of a month. This is Forman’s third artist-in-residency experience and

Photo Credit

The Community of Writers at Squaw Valley has announced the dates for the 2017 Summer Writing Workshops and is accepting applications now. The Poetry Workshop is from June 24 to July 1 and the Writing Workshops in fiction, nonfiction and memoir are from July 9 to July 15; the deadline to submit applications is March 28. This year, the Alexander Cushing Scholarship will be awarded to one poet and one writer who are accepted to the program and live within a 75-mile radius of Olympic Valley. The gathering also features workshops and panel discussions during the event open to the public. | communityofwriters.org

“ I’m really affected by my visual surroundings; I loved everything about the space. Being there felt like a retreat. It was so rejuvenating in so many ways and I got work done.” she thoroughly enjoyed it. “It was such a winter wonderland since day one,” said Forman. “Besides Antarctica, this is the only other place I’ve been to that has this much snow. I would come here every winter if I could.” According to Forman, ice is one of the most difficult landscapes to translate to paper: “In 2006, I went to Greenland with my family. Up until then I painted tumultuous skies, hurricanes, tornadoes. But while we were in Greenland, I found out that climate change was a huge issue because the locals had to adapt to the changing environment in order to survive. I realized that I wanted to add meaning to my work instead of just painting things for someone’s wall.” For a challenge, she started drawing water but was afraid of drawing ice. “White is a really hard color to draw,” she said. “I didn’t think I could do it.” But she said that drawing water was the one step that eventually led to her portraying the world’s icecaps. Drawing white

–Zaria Forman ice was the ultimate challenge, but she was up it for because art was ingrained in Forman since she was a child. “My mother was an artist and so I grew up with it,” said Forman, adding that her mother took her to remote places, as far away from civilization as possible to practice landscape photography. After Forman received a formal education in art, a NASA Airborne Extraterrestrial Navigator came across her TED Talk on Apple TV. He invited her by e-mail to Antarctica aboard the National Geographic Explorer. She says that she thought it was a joke, but soon found herself among the towering glacial ice with the rest of the crew. NASA has spent the last eight years revisiting and mapping certain parts of the world to learn more about climate change. “I took thousands of photos and used those plus the memory of the experience to capture it [for her later drawings],” said Forman, adding that she will sometimes mix and match photos and change the shape or

colors of the ice to represent the experience. She then grids out the photos and uses them for reference as she draws out the ice. “One thing that’s really important to my work is to focus on the beauty of these vulnerable regions instead of the destruction. I want to be encouraging, motivating and positive. I want to create a piece that has that special, magical fairy dust of that human experience that you can’t really translate.” The petite artist kept a positive attitude despite going without power for a bit, her panel arriving late and the 4-inch-thick rim of ice around her cabin. She embraced the full experience. “I felt like nothing had been challenging, except wanting to be outside all the time,” she said. “I’m really affected by my visual surroundings; I loved everything about the space. Being there felt like a retreat. It was so rejuvenating in so many ways and I got work done. I mostly enjoyed being so remote on the mountain. I’m lucky and grateful that I got to be there. I woke up every morning ecstatic.” Forman completed her Mountainside residency in early February and her finished piece will be on display for the public on June 21 at an exhibition in Seattle, Wash. Mountainside at Northstar will announce its next artist in the coming months.  For more information about Mountainside, visit mountainsidenorthstar.com. For more information about Zaria Forman, visit zariaforman.com.

19


THE ARTS

Arts

TheTahoeWeekly.com

CALENDAR ONGOING EXHIBITS

TAL artists Lake Tahoe Community College | Until March 24

Gil Martin CCIA Courthouse Gallery | Until March 24

Latimer Art Club Show Sparks Museum & Cultural Center Until March 25

THE

SOLO

EXCURSIONS ON

D I S P L AY

“Art from WNC” CCIA The Bric | Until March 30

“A View Within” Sierra Arts Foundation | Until March 30

Shahri Masters Incline Village Library | Until March 30

Keoki Flagg Tahoe City Visitors Center | Until March 30

NAA Winter Show Brewery Art Center | Until March 30

Scare Project Riverside Studios | April 7-May 5

Tom Walker Lake Tahoe Community College | Until April 3

Jane Cassidy SNC Tahoe Gallery | April 6-May 19

Norma Cili El Dorado County Library | Until April 8

Mahsan Ghazianzad & Grant Miller Metro Gallery | Until April 21

The photography of Nicole Dreon will be featured at Riverside Studios in March with her collection “Solo.” As a photojournalist and writer, Dreon has covered stories about women boxers in Uganda, a special surfing community in Senegal, and an all-women’s rally car race in Morocco, just to name a few. Using her camera to capture unique shots of humanity all over the world, she frequently travels solo to remote places like the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Cambodia. Her photography collection, “Solo,” offers a glimpse into Dreon’s travels and the people and places she’s discovered along the way. | riversideartstudios.com

His works will be on display through March. Flagg is a fine art, nature, outdoor sports and adventure photographer based in Lake Tahoe. He has worked on all seven continents, creating images for Fortune 500 corporations, including Disney, VISA, the California and New Zealand Tourist Boards, ESPN, Warren Miller Films, Audubon, National Geographic Adventure and numerous outdoor magazines. | gotahoenorth.com

categories featuring Best of Show, “Man on a Mission” by Ronnie Rector of Incline Village; First Place, watercolor, “Wild and Free” by Christen Elder of Carson City; First Place, oil, “Corks” by Gary Helseth of Carson City; People’s Choice, Road to the Future Show, watercolor, “Corner of Musser and Carson Streets,” Tara Bay, Carson City; and People’s Choice, oil, “Wine Time in Carson Valley” by Nancy Clark of Carson City. | nevadaartists.org

T-shirt design contest

Masters at work

Print fans welcome

Tahoe City Tahoe City Downtown Association is inviting all artists to submit T-shirt design ideas for the 72nd 4th of July celebration at Commons Beach. Submissions from artists of all experience levels are

Incline Village, Nev. Shahri Masters artwork will be on display at Incline Village Library through the month of March. She was inspired by her daughter toward creativity for healing and recently began painting. Her work has

Meyers Bona Fide Books offers Open Print Studio on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those who want to work on linocuts or wood block prints and those who have taken a letterpress class at Tahoe Letterpress are welcome. Assistance and some supplies are on site. | bonafidebooks.com

SNC Student Show Holman Arts & Media Center | April 27-May 19

Dotty Molt McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until April 27

Bobbie Crawford McKinley Arts & Culture Center | Until April 27

Winter Art Exhibit Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe | Until April 30

A Place in the Country

Nicole Dreon | Riverside Studios

Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 21

Peter Stichbury

Out and about

Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28

Spinifex: Aboriginal Paintings Nevada Museum of Art | until May 28

Great Basin Native Artists Carson City Visitors Bureau | Until June 19

“Image Nation” Truckee Recreation Center | Until June 30

“Maynard Dixon: The Paltenghi Collections” Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

Miradas Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16

“On the Water” Tahoe Maritime Museum | Until summer 1ST & 3RD WEDNESDAY

Gathering of Artists North Tahoe Arts Center THURSDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art (except 1st Thursday) 2

ND

FRIDAY

Senior art classes & tours Nevada Museum of Art SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art 2 ND SATURDAY

Free admission Nevada Museum of Art Kids’ Art day Nevada Museum of Art Art Walk Reno 20

Man on a Mission Ronnie Rector | Brewery Arts Center encouraged. The design for this art call will be selected based on adherence to the association’s theme, which represents a fun, family-friendly beach bash and fireworks celebration. Artwork submissions are due by the end of March. Designs may be submitted to Dana Tanner Powell at dana@visittahoecity.com.

Local artist highlighted Tahoe City The Tahoe City Visitors’ Center presents the artist of the month: local Keoki Flagg.

been well received and she has sold several pieces. She currently has three commissions in progress. Masters is also the author of three books. | (775) 832-4130

Best of winter show Carson City, Nev. The Nevada Artists Association announces the winners of its “Winter Art Show,” which runs through March 31 in the NAA Gallery located at Carson City’s Brewery Arts Center. Judges awarded honors in seven

South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League announces exhibits being shown around South Lake Tahoe. A Cup of Cherries Café hosts a display of wintry photographs and paintings by TAL artists Donna Reid, Lois Loveless, Cherie Pinsky, Michael Schaer, Barb Gustafson and Rick Espinor through mid-April. The newest “Art Around Town” exhibit is at Bank of the West, featuring wildlife portraits by Barb Gustafson, Carroll Sue Jones, Nancy Lynch, Nina Major and Ellen Nunes through mid-April. “Presenting the Tahoe Art League” exhibit at the Lake Tahoe Community College features a sampling of the diverse media and talent of the art league’s membership. More than 20 artists are represented in this winter exhibit, featuring paintings, prints, photographs, sculptures and ceramics. The show is open to the public through March 24. | talart.org

Therapeutic exhibit Truckee Image Nation, a new art installation featuring Nevada County veterans, comes to the Truckee Community Recreation Center until June 30. Image Nation is an initiative of the Nevada County Arts Council in partnership with Welcome Home Vets, funded in part by the California Arts Council and local contributions. The photographs, self-portraits and pictures of veterans’ hands are the result of


THE ARTS

March 23-April 5, 2017

TAHOE INCLINE SPORTS

Jennifer Dunn did photographic typology projects with photos of similar objects combined into grids. Four self-portrait pencil drawings are by Azltand Carriollo, Dowain Swain, Kody Valdez and Amanda Yau. Kurt Meyer’s color photographs feature a truck partially burned in the recent Little Valley fire. | arts4nevada.org

Formerly Tahoe Bike & Ski

$24 Basic/Sport Ski Package $30 Performance Ski Package $36 Demo Ski Package $15 Kid's Shape Skis* $20 Youth Basic Ski Package (11-14 years old) $14 XC (Touring) Rental or Snowshoe Rental $26 Snowboard & Boots Strap-in bindings $20 Kid's Snowboard & Boots* Strap-in bindings $6 kids $7 adults Helmets with rental

Gathering of Artists Tahoe City Gathering of Artists is every first and third Wednesday of the month at North Tahoe Arts Center. Artists are welcome to drop in and share studio space from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. | northtahoearts.com.

Lots of art for $5 Reno, Nev. Art Walk Reno starts at 5 p.m. the first Thursday of every month throughout the year. Guests can see the works of local and regional artists on display in venues within the Arts District, between Liberty Street and Second Street and Virginia Street and Arlington Avenue. The walk begins at West Street Market in downtown Reno. Tickets are $5. | artspotreno.com

a therapeutic workshop with veteran and master photographer Michael Llewellyn. Image Nation helps veterans express themselves and connect with each other and society, a key element in treating post-traumatic stress disorder. Llewellyn, a veteran himself, has been working in photography since 1988. “I have personal experience with the debilitating social isolation caused by episodes of trauma,” Llewellyn said in a press release. “The practice of photography offered me insight into understanding creative self expression, which contributed to the success of my career.” | tdprd.org

Call for exhibits Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts will feature the works of members in the exhibit from April 5 to 30 at the North Tahoe Art Center. NTA is now accepting applications; the deadline to apply is March 27. In gratitude for its members’ generous support, application and exhibit fees are waived for this exhibit. | northtahoearts.com.

Water, water everywhere Sparks, Nev. The Sparks Museum & Cultural Center presents “Truckee Meadows Reflections,” the Latimer Art Club Show, through March 25. This exhibition detailing historical water usage highlights artists from Latimer who explore the theme of water in their artwork showcasing a wide variety of mediums. | (775) 355-1144

Students represent Carson City, Nev. The Capital City Arts Initiative announces its exhibition, “ART from WNC,” at the Community Development Building until March 30. The exhibition presents art from students of Western Nevada College. Two graphic design projects are by graphic communications students, including Sarah Benson, Melessa Camilon, Martina Doan, Rachel Guthrie, Zephen Guthrie, Stephany Hash, Zach Leonard, Ace McClellan, Jesse Mireless, Gina Padilla, Heath Proctor, Jennifer Smith and Stephen Wadsworth. Noah Shek, Oakley Workman and

Oils at the library South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League announces two new exhibits. A series of oil paintings by Tom Walker is now at Lake Tahoe Community College Library until April 3. Many locals have met Walker while taking in a show at MontBleu or touring his uniquely landscaped property on a summer garden tour. But, few are aware of his skills with the paint brush. This exhibit features plein air works from Hope Valley, Fallen Leaf Lake and Kiva Beach. A one-woman show of oil paintings by Norma Cili will be on display at the El Dorado County Library until April 8. Cili has studied extensively at home and abroad. This collection features plein air and studio works. | talart.org

$3 off Skis & Poles or Board Only

t

Drop in for fun South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League offers Tuesday Just for Fun workshops from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. with silk painters and watercolorists. Socialize and learn from each other the techniques of applying dyes on silk and watercolor paints on paper. There will be some demonstrations and information on materials and techniques. The free workshops will be at the South Lake Tahoe Senior Center. All ages and artistic abilities welcome. | RSVP (530) 542-6094 or addiesilkart@aol.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Arts.

or

4th Day ½ OFF reg. price (on 4 day rentals only!)

Good for entire party. Coupon not valid w/ other offers. Expires May 31, 2017

Package is: Skis, Boots & Poles Ski Pants, Gloves, Boots, Sleds & Goggles Available All ski rentals are shape skis

*10 years & under/130cm or smaller

(775) 413-5144

930 Tahoe Blvd #702, Incline Village, NV

TahoeBikeSki.com

Located in Raley’s Center behind Rookies

License #954258

PLUMBING SERVICE & REPAIR DRAIN CLEANING & ROOTER SERVICES Frozen pipe thawing specialist Quality, professional work at reasonable rates. Locally Owned & Operated | Honest & Reliable Not a Franchise Company Call our office

(530) 525-1807

Ask about our Free Whole House Plumbing Inspection | RooterConnection.com

MICKEY’S

BIG MACK CHARTERS

Seeing what’s inside Reno, Nev. “Karen Rips and Paula Chang: A View Within” will be on display at Sierra Arts Foundation until March 30. The artists’ command of material and technique inspires an important dialogue about people’s interpretations, responses and relationships to medical images. They inspire the viewer to open up about personal experiences with life and death. At the heart of this exhibition, the artists’ textiles expose viewers to the inner beauty found within their own bodies, challenging them to embrace change and find common ground. | sierra-arts.org

5th Day FREE!

• YEAR-ROUND SPORTFISHING • ALL GEAR PROVIDED • 43’ SPORTFISHER

$90* $850 FULL BOAT

*Discount for Cash

(large cabin w/ restroom)

(530) 546-4444 or (800) 877-1462

(up to 13 people)

S����� B��� C�., C�������� B��, N���� L��� T����

MickeysBigMack.com

FREE BOWLING

each person who bowls 2 games at regular price gets a 3rd game free with this coupon

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center VOTED BEST POOL ROOM ON THE NORTH SHORE! Automatic Scoring “Bumper Bowling,” Video Arcade, Billiards, Video Poker, Cocktails, ATM, Full Swing Golf Simulator 920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

bowlincline.com

Smoke Free Every Day!

Coupon good for the entire party. Limit 1 free game per person per visit. Not valid with other offers. Not valid for league or tournament play.

21


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is the world’s slowest mammal? 2. HISTORY: Which was the only Confederate state capital east of the Mississippi that did not fall to the Union Army during the Civil War? 3. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel “Catch-22”? 4. MOVIES: What famous movie had the tagline, “In space no one can hear you scream”? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Who does the Swiss Guard protect? 6. MEDICINE: What is an otolaryngologist more commonly known as? 7. MUSIC: Which 1980s song featured the lyrics, “Risin’ up, straight to the top, had the guts, got the glory”? 8. FOOD & DRINK: What is sauerkraut made from? 9. AD SLOGANS: What product featured the slogan, “When it rains, it pours”? 10. FAMOUS QUOTES: Which U.S. president once said, “Tact is the ability to describe others as they see themselves”?

Strange but true

by Samantha Weaver

If it could avoid its inevitable dissipation, the typical cloud could circumnavigate the earth in less than two weeks. It’s not clear exactly how they do it, but, according to those who study such things, bald eagles mate while they’re in midair. Junior Whirl: 1. Sap, 2. Tact, 3. Upend, 4. Veer, 5. Wit, 6. Yak, 7. Zest, 8. Acrid, 9. Blip, 10. Coy. Hocus Focus differences: 1. Pail is missing, 2. Coat is shorter, 3. Sun is missing, 4. Hat is missing, 5. Tent flap is different, 6. Flashlight is missing.

If you want to determine how fast a plant will sprout, I guess you ought to use a seedometer.

CryptoQuip

1. The three-toed sloth, 2. Tallahassee, Florida, 3. Joseph Heller, 4. Alien (1979), 5. The pope, 6. Ear, nose and throat doctor, 7. “Eye of the Tiger,” 8. Cabbage, 9. Morton Salt 10. Abraham Lincoln

TRIVIA TEST

22

In the United States, nuns have a longer life expectancy than any other demographic group.


March 23-April 5, 2017

Horoscopes

PUZZLES FOR KIDS

FIRE

FUN & GAMES

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

You have been dealing with a rich mix of energies. At worst, you feel pulled in a variety of directions. At best, you are able to be present in and enjoy each of them. Your ambitions are on the rise, yet your drive may be on hold. Focus on deciphering your goals, but take it slow for now.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

A process of clearing the way continues. Although it may be tempting to look back, don’t bother. The current is moving too fast. Trust and cooperate with the flow of the current. The time has come to up the ante on your learning curve as well. Get ready to go hard.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

Searching for that silent sweet spot continues. Ironically, realizing it requires that you break new ground. As long as you know what you are aiming for, you will feel at peace. That is the goal. What you want to feel peaceful about, specifically, may not yet be clear.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

A creative impulse is rising, fast. Already you can feel the current speeding up. This momentum will continue all week. Despite the pull of Venus, your determination is growing stronger as well. This is one of those times when you shift into low and crawl up the mountain.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

Breaking through your illusions so you can identify your dreams is important now. Dreams are real even if they are still just in your mind. Illusions are dreams that have no reality to them. There is nothing wrong with having illusions but it is good to identify them and set them free.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

There is something special in the air, a spring spell of creative magic. Once you see it, you will want it like satisfying a deep hunger. Achieving it may not be straightforward, however. It will require inventiveness and resolve. This is a call to pull out your lucky charms.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

A soul-searching journey continues. That it includes finding your place and/or center in the world is not a contradiction. You are the embodiment and vehicle for your soul. It seeks self-actualization. Self-realization implies becoming aware of these truths and committing to them.

MAGIC MAZE

END IN THE MIDDLE

Something fresh and new is making its way into your world, and just in time for spring. Yet you will have to meet it halfway, at least. At first, it will seem to be coming right at you. But then the tables will turn and you will have little choice but to engage in hot pursuit.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21) Oh lucky yay. Here is an invitation to come out and play. The twist is that the game stands to include a competitive edge. So, what can you do to show up prepared? Probably the first measure is to be aware. This is hardly an occasion for slippers. More like boots with cleats.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19) A breakthrough has occurred and this is just the beginning. Spring has arrived early for some and you are among them. In keeping with the season, you feel aroused and this impulse will deepen yet. Love is in the air and you want some but if the love is not so available you will probably settle for some fun.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) A series of rather deep changes have been steadily underway for over a year now. These are challenging you to move on and perhaps away… from old perspectives. But doing so won’t come so easily. You have work to do and it may amount to some deliberate adjustments of your perspectives.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) Hopefully you have taken the opportunity to catch-up on your beauty sleep. Spring suggests action and that is exactly what you are about to take, by choice or circumstance. Expect to push harder for the next couple of months… no, make that, years.

Tails in Tahoe Lucky

Horton

Maurey

Aladdin

Lucky is a man about town. He’s learning to walk on a leash and loving every minute of it. He is just 2 years old, and enjoys a low key lifestyle complete with belly rubs and snack treats.

I sit nicely on my bed and love playing with toys. I am not much of a face licker but boy do I love rolling over for belly rubs. I am soft and sweet and pretty darn cool.

Was abandoned with his sister Toffee who has been adopted. He is friendly, a little shy at first. Gets along with other cats.

Although the beginning of his life was a bit crowded, he seems to enjoy the company of other cats and is sweet and affectionate with visitors, adults and children alike.

Pet Network (775) 832-4404 bschilpp@petnetwork.org www.petnetwork.org

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org

WARF (775) 833-2319 info@tahoewarf.com www.tahoewarf.com

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org 23


MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

WinterWonderGrass

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

MARCH 23-APRIL 6, 2017

GOING BEYOND BLUEGRASS

MARCH 23 | THURSDAY

S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

TAHOE & TRUCKEE

FRUITION BREAKING THE MOLD Fruition is a band that has performed at most of the WinterWonderGrass festivals. Folk, rock, Americana, soul and blues, Fruition continually breaks the genre mold. Band member Kellen Asebroek remembers 24

Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Bias and Dunn Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Jenni Charles & Jessie Dunn Moody’s 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Bobby G Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. “Love Sick” LTCC Theatre 7:30 p.m. Jackie Flynn & Kevin Flynn The Improv 9 pm. RENO & BEYOND

“We choose the kind of bands that keep playing if the power goes out and offer a positive message. It takes different ingredients to create a stew — who’s going to play together, who will find themselves on the tram.” playing at the top mountain at Emigrant lift last year. “It was definitely a once-in-a-lifetime, insane experience,” says Asebroek. “We loaded whatever we could carry onto the gondola and ski patrol took us up on snowmobiles. I held my keyboard and guitar under one arm. I was dressed in a hoodie and cowboy boots and played on a Snowcat.” Asebroek is a solo artist and DJ, as well as one of the band’s songwriters and lead vocalists. “Many of the songs we write are about falling in love or watching love fall apart, what’s going in the world, aspects of the human condition and loving self,” he says. “We are storytellers, we tell stories.”

COSMIC AMERICANA “We’re a grassroots, do-it-yourself band,” says Tyler Grant of Grant Farm, who describes the band’s music as “cosmic Americana.” According to Grant, their new album is a workingman’s album because it focuses on the struggles people face in their day-to-day lives, such as high rents, health care and bills. He is from a bluegrass background and a veteran of the festival. “We’ve evolved into rock ‘n’ roll. I’m a big bluegrass guy and love traditional bluegrass,” he says. Grant also coordinates the “Pickin’ on the Dead” shows at the festival and he speaks highly of the festival founder. “Scotty is a visionary. His ethos of positivity, gratitude and fun is WinterWonder-

–Scotty Stoughton GRANT FARM

interWonderGrass Tahoe is one of the area’s premier festivals. It has received so much traction that several event clips appeared in Warren Miller Entertainment’s most recent film: “Here, There and Everywhere.” This year’s stellar lineup has everyone abuzz. “This year the event adds a fourth stage and a new expo village that cultivates lifestyle brands. We host the festival at the bottom of two epic mountains [Squaw Valley and Steamboat Springs in Colorado],” says Jennifer Brazill, partner and organizer of the festival. “Most of the bands are acoustic and roots based. We find up-andcoming bands to introduce people to. We expose bands to new fans and fans to new bands — it’s a win-win. Scotty Stoughton is the lead on talent and Mike Welle manages our site operations and bar concessions.” Stoughton, the festival’s founder, is a musician with a knack for gathering talented artists to perform, which is key in making the event successful. He understands how hard musicians work and seeks artists who are into a communal vibe, who enjoy hanging with and playing with other artists at a big event. Ego-driven musicians need not apply. Expect a variety of musical genres that stretches beyond the grass — this is not a strictly bluegrass gathering. Stoughton is passionate about booking artists who are genuine. There’s a yogic wisdom to his approach: intention, integrity, community and raising the collective vibratory flow through conversation. “It’s about all of us contributing to a higher purpose,” he says. “It’s about the power of community. We choose the kind of bands that keep playing if the power goes out and offer a positive message. It takes different ingredients to create a stew — who’s going to play together, who will find themselves on the tram.” Environmental awareness, social consciousness and making a difference in the world are at the root of the festival’s mission. Stoughton’s creative community inspires everyone.

Courtesy WinterWonderGrass

W

Grass,” says Grant. Women artists are out in full force this year. Emily Frantz of Mandolin Orange, Sarah Vos of Dead Horses, Allie Kral of Yonder Mountain String Band, Mimi Naja of Fruition and Jenni Charles of Dead Winter Carpenters are just a few who will bring a powerhouse of feminine energy. Late-night performances feature Infamous Stringdusters, Brad Parsons Band, Front Country, The Deer, Hot Buttered Rum, Dustbowl Revival, Lil’ Smokies and Everyone Orchestra. One thing that stands out about the artists and organizers of WinterWonderGrass is how conscious, philosophical and passionate they all are. If this is any indication of what to expect, this festival will be a fun and expansive experience. WinterWonderGrass Tahoe is from March 31 to April 2 at Squaw Valley, with daily beer tastings from 2 to 5 p.m.  For more information and a daily schedule, visit winterwondergrasstahoe.com.

Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Buddy Emmer Band Gilley’s 5 p.m. Jason King Band Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. The Kid and Nic Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Mike Mains & the Branches Peppermill 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Platinum Circus Circus 8 p.m. The Floor Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Reckless Envy Atlantis 8 p.m. Growwler does Reno St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Cliff Porter’s Full Blast 90’s Party The Saint 9 p.m. Bleep Bloop 1 Up 10 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Pinocchio” Laughing Owl Productions 11 a.m. “Mother Hicks” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Joey Medina The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Dorothy Parker: Words to Live By” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Grandma Lee Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

MARCH 24 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Four Count Northstar Village 2 p.m. Oskar Blues Plaza Bar 3:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Pamel Parker Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Kendal Naughton Sunnyside 6 p.m. Tuck Wilson Cedar House Pub 6 p.m. Julie Brisbin w/Jenni Charles & Will Richardson Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Indigo Girls Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Indigo Girls Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 7:30 p.m. The Mile Bar of America 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 25


March 23-April 5, 2017

The Sam Ravena Group Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Fort Knox 5, All Good Funk Alliance, The Rhino Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Afroman Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Roger That! & Mr. Smeaggs Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. Thunder Cover Cabo Wabo 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. DJ JB & DJ Josbeatz Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Pastor Ryan MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. “Women in Jeopardy” Lake Tahoe Golf Course 7:30 p.m. “Love Sick” LTCC Theatre 7:30 p.m. Jackie Flynn & Kevin Flynn The Improv 9 pm. RENO & BEYOND Reckless Envy Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Buddy Emmer Band Gilley’s 5 p.m. Greg Austin Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Apple Z Silver Legacy 8 p.m. The Kid and Nic Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Mike Mains & the Branches Peppermill 8 p.m. Platinum Circus Circus 8 p.m. Thom Yeoman and the New Harvesters Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Arizona Jones Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Take 2 Harrah’s 9 p.m. 28DaysOfScratch 3rd Street Bar 9 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. Mel & Gia Java Jungle 9 p.m. Spirit Award The Saint 9 p.m. French Montana Lex GSR 10 p.m. Two Way Street Atlantis 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke+Literary The Holland Project 4 p.m. Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Pinocchio” Laughing Owl Productions 11 a.m. “Bus Stop” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. “Mother Hicks” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Joey Medina The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Privileged” Eldorado 7:30 p.m. “Dorothy Parker: Words to Live By” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Grandma Lee Pioneer Underground 9 p.m.

MARCH 25 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Pamela Parker & The Fantastic Machine KT Sun Deck 1 p.m. Lumination Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Jacked Up Squaw Village 2 p.m. Paul David Northstar Village 2 p.m. Lantz Laswell and the Vibe Tribe Kirkwood 2 p.m. Angele Carrol Alder Creek Café 5 p.m. Mike Badinger Cedar House Pub 6 p.m. The Roemers Lakeside Casino 7 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. The Mile Bar of America 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. The Sam Ravena Group Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Dingo Weasel Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Sneaky Creatures Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m.

Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers Hard Rock 10 p.m. Thunder Cover Cabo Wabo 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties Guest DJ Homewood 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. DJ Scene & DJ Rick Gee Harrah’s 8 p.m. Guest DJ Classic Cue 9 p.m. DJ Max Kronyak MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. “Women in Jeopardy” Lake Tahoe Golf Course 7:30 p.m. “Love Sick” LTCC Theatre 7:30 p.m. Jackie Flynn & Kevin Flynn The Improv 9 pm. RENO & BEYOND Reckless Envy Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Greg Austin Boomtown 5 p.m. Buddy Emmer Band Gilley’s 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Kurupt of Tha Dogg Pound Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Doug Stanhope Cargo 8 p.m. Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo Nugget Casino 8 p.m. Vince Gill & Lyle Lovett Reno Ballroom 8 p.m. Knightfall, Kill the Precedent, Viqueen Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Apple Z Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Platinum Circus Circus 8 p.m. Tom Bennet Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Coburn Station The Saint 8 p.m. The Kid and Nic Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Mike Mains & the Branches Peppermill 8 p.m. Arizona Jones Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. Tim Tucker Band Java Jungle 9 p.m. Sleeptalk & The Color Wild 3rd Street Bar 9 p.m. Take 2 Harrah’s 9 p.m. Colbie Caillat Grand Sierra 9 p.m. Konflikt Peppermill 10 p.m. Two Way Street Atlantis 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Clutch Lex GSR 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Pinocchio” Laughing Owl Productions 11 a.m. Grandma Lee Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. “Bus Stop” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. “Mother Hicks” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Joey Medina The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Privileged” Eldorado 7:30 p.m. “Dorothy Parker: Words to Live By” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Drunken Shenanigans Brewery Arts Center 8 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Special Events Reno Beer Crawl Downtown Reno

MUSIC SCENE

PHUTURE primitive WITH LOVE AND LIGHT

April 1 | 10 p.m. MontBleu Resort | Stateline, Nev.

RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Rock River Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Chronixx & Zincfence Redemption w/Jah 9 & Max Glazer Federation Sound Cargo 8 p.m. Two Way Street Atlantis 8 p.m. ImpuritiesA World WithoutMan Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Dorothy Parker: Words to Live By” Brüka Theatre 2 p.m. “Mother Hicks” Reno Little Theater 2 p.m. “Bus Stop” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Joey Medina The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m.

BASS MUSIC LEGENDS Phutureprimitve and Love and Light both have had an impact on the electronic and bass music scene. After much anticipation, they will be playing under the same roof. | montbleuresort.com

DRAKE WHITE AND THE BIG FIRE

MARCH 27 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Local music Mondays West Shore cafe 6 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Patrick Walsh Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. Hypha Suds, ChopsJunkie, Sudakra Moe’s BBQ 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Rock River Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Old 97s w/Ha Ha Tonka Cargo 8 p.m. EVR Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m.  DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

MARCH 28 | TUESDAY

March 30 | 6:30 p.m. Grand Sierra Resort | Reno, Nev. COUNTRY FESTIVAL NIGHT In The City returns with Drake White and The Big Fire. The band has opened for acts such as Eric Church, Luke Bryan and Lynyrd Skynyrd and is known for its signature blend of rock and country, Drake White recently released a debut album: “Spark.” | grandsierraresort.com

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

TAHOE & TRUCKEE

MARCH 26 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Groove Foundry Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music 89 Bar & Grill 2 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m.  Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Love Sick” LTCC Theatre 2 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Jackie Flynn & Kevin Flynn The Improv 9 pm.

Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Bread & Butter Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic and Show+ Tell Sierra Hot Springs 6:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Lucas Arizu Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW and Dr. Spitmore Comma Coffee 11:30 a.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

Beauty and the Beast March 17 to April 2 1:45pm (weekends only) 4:30pm & 7:30pm April 3-6 » 6:30pm

Lake Tahoe Dance Collective Repertory Showcase April 7 » 7pm April 8 » 2pm & 7pm April 9 » 2pm

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

25


TheTahoeWeekly.com

“WOMEN IN JEOPARDY”

March 24-25, 30-31 & April 1 | 7:30 p.m. Lake Tahoe Golf Course | South Lake Tahoe DIVORCEES MARY AND JO are suspicious of their friend Liz’s new dentist boyfriend. He’s not just weird, he may be a serial killer. His hygienist just disappeared. As they attempt to get to the bottom of the mystery, their imaginations run wild. Yet, the women are driven to save their friend. | valhallatahoe.com

DRUNKEN SHENANIGANS

C A L E N D A R | MARCH 23-APRIL 6, 2017 MARCH 28 | TUESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25 Tyler Stafford Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Leon Fleisher and Katherine Jacobson UNR Nightingale Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. EVR Atlantis 8 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Greg Morton The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Privileged” Eldorado 7:30 p.m.

MARCH 29 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. TAUK Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chapin River Ranch 3:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Electroswing Burlesque The Loft 8 p.m. Greg Warren & Paula Bel The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

March 25 | 8 p.m. Brewery Arts Center | Carson City, Nev. COMICS AND STORYTELLERS P.K. Hutchinson, Josie Spadoni, Matt “Tiny” Lowe, Ethan Pickett and Bryant Tarpley, recount their most embarrassing and outrageous tales of drunken shenanigans and party stupidity and poke fun at some of the more regrettable things they’ve done. The evening is hosted by Nick Josten. | breweryarts.org

THE GROWLERS

L-Cubed UNR Randall Rotunda 12 p.m. Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bogg Jazz Ensemble Peppermill 6 p.m. Leftover Crack, Starving Wolves, Bad Cop Bad Cop + Local Jub Jub’s 6 p.m. Tyler Stafford Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. EVR Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. The Growlers Cargo 9 p.m. The Wiz Kid Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Greg Morton The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Privileged” Eldorado 7:30 p.m.

MARCH 30 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

March 29 | 9 p.m. Cargo Concert Hall | Reno Nev. THE GROWLERS ARE AN American band. They have released five albums, three EPs and a number of singles. Each new record from The Growlers has something gripping enough that makes it as exciting as a debut. Enjoy the new sleek style that’s brought on by late-night antics and a craving for danger that can only be settled by exploring new scenes and avenues. | cargoreno.com

26

Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort WinterWonderGrass Squaw Valley WinterWonderGrass Allstars Squaw Village 2 p.m. Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Todd Wees Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Hot Buttered Rum Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Bobby G Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. “Women in Jeopardy” Lake Tahoe Golf Course 7:30 p.m. Greg Warren & Paula Bel The Improv 9 p.m.

MUSICNOTES

RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Drake White & The Big Fire Grand Sierra 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Novelists Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Drinking with Clowns Peppermill 7 p.m. Anoushka Shankar UNR Nightingale Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. EVR Atlantis 8 p.m. The Hubcap Stealers Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Atomika Circus Circus 8 p.m. Chandler P St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. The Wiz Kid Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Greg Morton The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Let It Be” Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. Geechy Guy Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

MARCH 31 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort WinterWonderGrass Squaw Valley Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. WinterWonderGrass Allstars Squaw Village 2 p.m. Jeff Campbell Northstar Village 2 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Live music Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Tyler Stafford Nakoma Resort 5 p.m. Tuck Wilson Cedar House Pub 6 p.m. Chi McClean Sunnyside 6 p.m. Lisa Marie Johnston Cottonwood 7 p.m. Audio Threat Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Steve & Tom Bar of America 8 p.m. Front Country w/The Deer Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Davy Knowles Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Reggie Hall MontBleu 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. Gotcha Covered Cabo Wabo 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Willy Wonka Kids” Truckee Community Theater 6:30 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. “Women in Jeopardy”Lake Tahoe Golf Course 7:30 p.m. Greg Warren & Paula Bel The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND EVR Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Look Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Night Fever Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Soundwave Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Novelists Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Atomika Circus Circus 8 p.m. Mucca Pazza Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Drinking with Clowns Peppermill 8 p.m. Melissa Dru Harrah’s 9 p.m. Kelly Proud Java Jungle 9 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. The Electric ft. Valentine Rodeo The Saint 9 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

Gov’t Mule

MUSIC SCENE

High Sierra tickets on sale The 27th Annual High Sierra Music Festival returns this year from June 29 to July 2 at the Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds in Quincy with discounted tickets on sale until March 27. The Festival has been recognized for its trademark sense of community and annual traditions among festivalgoers and music lovers. The picturesque location, wide variety of artists, unique musical settings and affordable prices have all combined to make High Sierra the ultimate, intimate festival experience. The Festival features intimate artist playshops, an interactive Family Area, daily parades, fabulous food with no waiting lines, yoga, pilates and dance classes, along with the opportunity to just relax and camp with good friends. With a full spectrum of music offered on multiple daytime stages and multiple nighttime venues, the High Sierra Music Festival is an anticipated yearly event and an experience for people of all ages. Performers that have been recently added to the lineup include Gov’t Mule, BoomBox, David Lindley, Lebo & Friends feat. Melvin Seals, The Brothers Comatose, Manic Focus, El Ten Eleven, Sweet Crude, Hamish Anderson and Skerik. | highsierramusic.com

Trocadero reopens after 50 years Downtown Reno has a new music venue. The historic Trocadero building once hosted celebrities such as singer Sophie Tucker, comedian Chico Marx and pianist Victor Borge. But, for more than 50 years the Trocadero has sat dormant. Partners Marcus Lee and Ryan Goldhammer want to offer a new experience in the Reno music scene. The upscale establishment will be the up and coming place to see shows with a state of the art sound system and affordable drinks. Scott Pemberton performs April 8. The grand opening for the venue will be hosted in April. | thetrocadero.com –Priya Hutner

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Check out the 2017 Music on the Beach lineup

The Sextones kick off Music on the Beach North Tahoe Business Association has announced the summer lineup for Music on the Beach, the free summer concerts are offered every Friday from June 30 to Sept. 1 at Kings Beach State Recreation Area at 6 p.m. Local and regional bands scheduled to


March 23-April 5, 2017

perform will offer attendees a wide variety of musical genres. New this year, NTBA has announced that Alibi Ale Works’ craft beers will be exclusively served at the concert series. The series kicks off on June 30 with The Sextones. | northtahoebusiness.org

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com Outdoor Concert Series lineup

Kravitz, Simon join Outdoor Concert Series Harvey’s Tahoe continues to turn up the heat, adding two new performers to their lineup for the summer Outdoor Concert Series. Paul Simon will perform on June 25, while Lenny Kravitz will be performing on July 14. | harveystahoe.com

Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Seattle Symphony, LA Phil, Reno Phil and more in an intimate setting surrounded by the majesty of Lake Tahoe at this year’s Classical Tahoe from July 28 to Aug. 12. The sixth season brings together America’s greatest classical musicians for three weeks to perform nine stunning concerts under the direction of Maestro Joel Revzen. The season opens with the Classical Tahoe White Nights Gala on July 9. | classicaltahoe.org

catalyst, or it brings

Lake Tahoe Summer Music Festival’s concert dates

people together and takes the barriers down because there is focal point.” –Amy Ray Dirty Cello to open Valhalla Festival The Valhalla Art, Music & Theatre Festival opens on June 21 with a performance by Dirty Cello. Tickets go on sale April 1. This year’s festival season has also been extending through October featuring live music, art workshops, tango and more to be announced soon. The Tahoe Improv Players will also return with performances throughout the season. | valhallatahoe.com

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

Battle of the Bands

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Hard Rock International is calling on emerging musicians to take center stage for its Battle of the Bands competition. Hard Rock, in partnership with ReverbNation, has opened registration at hardrockrising.com through March 30 for musicians to participate. Following open registration, entrants will receive a unique URL to share, encouraging their fans to vote online. The act who receives the largest number of online votes will become the wildcard winner for their local Hard Rock. The online voting period is from May 1 to 6. The top three acts and one wildcard winner in each market will perform as part of the Hard Rock Rising Battle of the Bands competition taking place around the world between May 18 and 25. A panel of international music industry professionals will then narrow the local winners down to four regional finalists and one global grand prize winner. | hardrockrising.com 

The 49th Season of the Reno Philharmonic has been announced featuring the return of Pops on the River on July 8 at Wingfield Park in downtown Reno. Pops on the Rocks welcomes back audience favorite LaKisha Jones along with guest vocalists Chloe Lowery and Rob Evan. Along with the Reno Phil Orchestra and Maestro Laura Jackson, enjoy performances of legendary rock and pop songs including “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Stairway to Heaven,” “Hotel California,” “Like a Prayer” and “Man in the Mirror.” | renophil.com

Classical Tahoe returns for summer season Experience a virtuoso orchestra of musicians from the Metropolitan Opera

March 24 | 7:30 p.m. | $45 | Harrah’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev.

have an event and either

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Pops on River returns

STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

gathering point. You

something that is a

Check out the lineup for 2017-18 season

C O N F L U E N C E O F A R T, A C T I V I S M

context and a good

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

The Lake Tahoe Summer Music Festival joins the Lake Tahoe Dance Collective for concerts at the Gatekeeper’s Museum in Tahoe City and at West End Beach on Donner Lake for its 2017 summer series from Aug. 15 to 20 featuring the 20-piece Academy Orchestra. This year for the first time, the Festival is also presenting an Open Rehearsal at the Tahoe Maritime Museum/Tahoe Tree Company in Tahoe City on Aug. 16. This free event designed for families with children will be an opportunity to see how an orchestra comes together through practice. | tahoemusic.org

Indigo Girls

“I find art to be a good

the art itself is saying

Lake Tahoe Music Festival releases summer dates

MUSIC SCENE

T

hirty years after their debut, Indigo Girls are still going strong, both as musicians and advocates for human and environmental rights. These two disciplines complement each other so well that Amy Ray and Emily Saliers have built their lives around them in hopes of protecting those less fortunate than themselves through music and art. “We’re both motivated by activism and doing something good in the world,” says Ray. “We try to mix into the tapestry of people who are all connected. It’s a bigger purpose that making money or making music.” Ray believes that art has the power to spur discussions and connections that can lead to real changes. “I find art to be a good context and a good gathering point,” she says. “You have an event and either the art itself is saying something that is a catalyst, or it brings people together and takes the barriers down because there is focal point. It allows us access to make noise for people who get hurt and we can amplify voices from communities not being heard.” In partnership with Native American activist and former Green Party vice-presidential candidate Winona Duke, Indigo Girls have created a nonprofit called Honor the Earth. “Our mission is to create awareness and support for Native environmental issues and to develop needed financial and political resources for the survival of sustainable Native communities,” reads the organization’s mission statement. “Honor the Earth develops these resources by using music, the arts, the media and Indigenous wisdom to ask people to recognize our joint dependency on the Earth.” Indigo Girls recently performed at Standing Rock, N.D., in support of the discontinuation of Dakota Access Pipeline construction. Even though their progress was halted when President Donald Trump reopened construction through an executive order and all protestors were arrested and removed, Indigo Girls found the experience to be inspiring. “It’s hard, isn’t it?” riffs Ray. “Everything people have been working on is being dismantled. I know it’s cliché, but right now I think local politics is going to be our place. We’ve got to take it back to square one. You can gut the EPA, climate change, human rights on all these things, but we can still have a sanctuary cities and clean water. It’s depressing all the things that have

been undone, but we have to remember all the advances that are still being made, especially in a local way.” Ray shared a poignant story of witnessing a group of local high school students who came to visit Standing Rock main camp as part of a field trip. “They came to hear the speakers that were part of the American Indian Movement,” she recalls. “It was amazing try to see it through their eyes that at this point their people are making a stand. They’re gathering to see elders speak, completely rapt, listening and learning. It was a safe enough space for teacher and parents to bring their children, even though there’s all this militarized police presence and violence at the front lines against protesters. They believed in the elders and the safe space of the camp. I’ll never forget those teachers walking down that hill. This is why this needs to be more than just a pipeline protest. This is what’s going to make these kids believe their future.” When they’re not taking their art to the front lines, Ray and Saliers are releasing new music and continuing to collaborate with various artists from around the country. They put out their most recent album “One Lost Day” in 2015 and will be recording new music with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra this year. When they play in South Lake, Indigo Girls will be joined by singer/songwriter Lucy Wainwright Roche and violinist Lyris Hung. “What gets us excited is the input from other musicians that we meet who inspire us,” says Ray. “It’s hearing new stuff and seeing great things that develop. Our audience is really great. When we play new songs, they react in an honest way, so we can tell if it’s working or not, and it’s good to have that musical dialogue.” Ray and Saliers met in high school in Decatur, Ga., and continued writing their early material throughout college at Emory University in Atlanta. Although they have now been in a successful musical partnership for more than three decades, Ray says that they are great friends who love making art together. “We’re like siblings,” says Ray. “Music was simply way to get together and hang with all of our friends. Sometimes you just get lucky.”  For more information or for tickets, visit harrahslaketahoe.com.

27


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TAUK

C A L E N D A R | MARCH 23-APRIL 6, 2017

Kristine Condon Photography

MARCH 31 | FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

March 29 | 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. INSTRUMENTAL ROCK-FUSION quartet TAUK are at it again. Watch the band’s performance of their original track, “Time’s Up,” which includes a nod to Led Zeppelin’s classic, “No Quarter.” | crystalbaycasino.com

BOB LOG III

April 2 | 8 p.m. The Saint | Reno, Nev. BOB LOG III IS A bluesman that wears a full-body, human-cannonball suit and a helmet wired to a telephone receiver that allows him to devote his hands and feet to guitar and drums. He plays slide on a vintage Silvertone archtop guitar and offers an outrageous show. | thesaintreno.com

Cook Book Atlantis 10 p.m. Nightowls 1 Up 10 p.m. The Wiz Kid Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Bus Stop” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Greg Morton The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Privileged” Eldorado 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. Geechy Guy Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Lady Luck Tattoo Arts & History Expo Circus Circus

APRIL 1 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort WinterWonderGrass Squaw Valley Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Drop Theory KT Sun Deck 1 p.m. Achilles Wheel Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. WinterWonderGrass Allstars Squaw Village 2 p.m. Decoy Northstar Village 2 p.m. Ideateam Kirkwood 2 p.m. Caribbean Beach Party w/live Reggae Band Sugar Bowl Ike & Martin Ski Homewood 4 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Steve & Tom Bar of America 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Phutureprimitive w/Love and Light MontBleu 9 p.m. Brad Parsons Band w/Pickin’ on the Dead Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. The Good Samaritans, Zephyr, Galactica Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Hunter & the Dirty Jacks Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Live music Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Big Blue View Bar 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. Guest DJ Classic Cue 9 p.m.

DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Willy Wonka Kids” Truckee Community Theater 6:30 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Dancing with our Sierra Stars Tahoe Biltmore 7 p.m. “Women in Jeopardy” Lake Tahoe Golf Course 7:30 p.m. Augie Smith Hard Rock 8 & 10 p.m. Greg Warren & Paula Bel The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND EVR Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Drinking with Clowns Peppermill 6 p.m. Despised Icon, Carnifex, Fallujah Jub Jub’s 6:30 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. “Spiritual Masterworks” Reno Chamber Orchestra 7:30 p.m. Atomika Circus Circus 8 p.m. Novelists Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Killer Whales The Saint 8 p.m. Melissa Dru Harrah’s 9 p.m. Cook Book Atlantis 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ MoFunk Circus Circus 9:30 p.m. DJ Spryte Peppermill 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m.  Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Geechy Guy Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Bus Stop” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Greg Morton The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Privileged” Eldorado 7:30 p.m. The Rat Pack Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Utility Players Sands Regency 8 p.m. Special Events Lady Luck Tattoo Arts & History Expo Circus Circus

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

Project MANA

(Making Adequate Nutrition Accessible)

Emergency Hunger Relief Organization serving the North Shore and Truckee since 1991 Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region.

(775) 298-4161 WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS AND TIMES: MONDAYS TAHOE CITY | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Center, 330 Fairway Drive TUESDAYS TRUCKEE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community Arts Center, 10046 Church Street WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House, 265 Bear Street THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church ProjectMana.org 341 Village Blvd.

28

See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Guided tours & 3-D movies Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

(or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. “Spiritual Masterworks” Reno Chamber Orchestra 2 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Steve Lord Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bob Log III The Saint 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Penny MSML Jub Jub’s 9 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 2 p.m. “Bus Stop” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Greg Morton The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Lady Luck Tattoo Arts & History Expo Circus Circus

Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Local music Monday West Shore cafe 6 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort WinterWonderGrass Squaw Valley Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Coburn Station Alpine Meadows 1 p.m. WinterWonderGrass Allstars Squaw Village 2 p.m.

Not just Pizza!

HAPPY HOUR Daily 3-7pm SALADS • SANDWICHES • BEER/WINE

Daily Soup, Lunch & Pasta Specials Daily Specials - Italian Wednesdays Mexican Thursdays, Fishy Fridays Arcade Games • Wi-Fi • HDTV Sports NFL Sunday Ticket on HDTVs with Specials!

Live music every Wednesday evening 6–9pm

$1 OFF! ANY MEDIUM PIZZA $2 OFF! ANY LARGE PIZZA or pay regular price and get a MINI Cheese Pizza FREE!

Not good with any other offers. Good through 04/5/17 view full menu & daily specials at cbspizza.com

TO GO Orders Welcome Open 11am-10pm Daily

546-4738

APRIL 3 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

APRIL 2 | SUNDAY

NOW PLAYING Lake Tahoe in Depth

Jason King Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music 89 Bar & Grill 2 p.m. Ike & Martin 89 Bar & Grill 4 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Willy Wonka Kids” Truckee Community Theater 2 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Greg Warren & Paula Bel The Improv 9 p.m.

5075 N. Lake Blvd., Carnelian Bay • Next to 7-11

CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Steve Lord Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Ty Alex and Django Soulo The Saint 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

APRIL 4 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Hans Eberbach Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. “Cello Bello” UNR Nightingale Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m.


March 23-April 5, 2017

Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 5 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. The Werks w/Brothers Gow Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chapin River Ranch 3:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:30 p.m. Kivi Rogers & Ken Garr The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND L-Cubed UNR Randall Rotunda 12 p.m. Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Hans Eberbach Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

APRIL 6 | THURSDAY

MUSIC SCENE

STS9 Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 7:30 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Kivi Rogers & Ken Garr The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Hans Eberbach Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. The Kegels, Boss’Daughter, Bucket Flash Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Nathan Owens Motown & Soul Circus Circus 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Sue Costello The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Hand to God” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. Special Events Banff Mountain Film Festival Silver Legacy 7 p.m.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Spring Loaded 2017 Heavenly Resort Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. SNC Concert Choir St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church IV 7 p.m.

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be included in Shop Local.

Full Service Hair Salon

Tousle & Tame Bridal Services

530.581.0485

600 N. Lake Blvd. Suite H - Tahoe City, CA

At the bottom of Grove Street. By the Lake.

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR MARK MCLAUGHLIN’S

NEWEST BOOK

Order books direct at:

TheStormKing.com

or pick up a copy at: Geared for Games • Alpenglow Sports Gratitude Gifts • Mind Play

In-home talks · Group presentations

(530) 546-5612 · TheStormKing.com Advertise in Shop Local! Color | 1” $50 · 2” $75 · 3” $100

Black & white | $20 per inch All ads included in free digital edition. 29


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

L ansford Hastings | D o n n e r P a r t y V i l l a i n ? trading some food and shiny trinkets in exchange for the two frightened young men. After reaching Oregon City, Hastings spent the winter acting as the attorney for Dr. John McLaughlin, the general manager of Fort Vancouver. In 1843, Hastings traveled to Sutter’s Fort in the southern Sacramento Valley. John Sutter, a Swiss national, and Hastings (the first trained American lawyer to enter California) became friends. Both agreed that Alta (Northern) California should shed Mexican rule and become an independent republic. Both were strong-willed entrepreneurs who recognized that the region offered tremendous opportunity for men with the vision to grab it for their own.

Donner Party leader James Reed possessed a similar

T

his winter marks the 170th anniversary of the tragic tale of the Donner Party. Many mistakes were made by a variety of people, but historians have labeled California land promoter Lansford Hastings as the villain in the story. Hastings was the man who steered the Donner Party wrong, enticing the wagon train to take a primitive, untried trail through the rugged Wasatch Mountains of Utah as a shortcut to the Pacific Coast. The subsequent delays and loss of supplies, livestock and wagons culminated in the pioneers reaching the Sierra too late to cross due to early snow. Hastings’ role in that decision is well understood, but the leading members of the Donner group also spurned sober advice from experienced mountain man James Clyman who warned them the new route was dangerously risky. Donner Party leader James Reed possessed a similar character flaw as did Lansford Hastings – both men overestimated their own leadership abilities while underestimating the challenge of western terrain. Hastings was the “expert” who briefly mentioned a new shortcut to California in his popular 1845 guidebook, “The Emigrants’ Guide to Oregon and California.” Technically, there should have been nothing wrong with Hastings promoting a cutoff that would save time and miles on the overland trip to California. Others were also developing alternate routes and parts of the California Trail changed frequently during the 1840s. Hastings’ mistake was that he spoke confidently about a route that he had never seen himself; one that included forcing oxen-drawn wagons down a narrow, rugged canyon and then crossing a deadly salt desert with no water. Ultimately, early snowstorms hit the Tahoe Sierra in October 1846, trapping the group. Hastings’ uninformed suggestion that emigrant families could negotiate the cut-off was a reckless gamble and history has never forgiven him for it. So, who was this overly ambitious lawyer from Ohio who dreamed of his own empire in Mexican-controlled California? Born in 1819 in Ohio, Lansford Warren Hastings graduated from law school and practiced as an attorney; twice he was appointed a judge. In 1842, Hastings decided to travel to Oregon Country in the Pacific Northwest. He apparently left his wife and children in Ohio and joined an emigra30

Lansford Hastings. | Courtesy Frank Titus collection

tion party captained by Dr. Elijah White and piloted by the legendary frontiersman Thomas Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick had just returned from California after leading the 1841 Bidwell Party in a first, but ultimately unsuccessful attempt to bring loaded wagons into California. As the White-led party traveled west, the doctor was rejected as captain after an altercation involving the killing of barking dogs. Hastings was only 23-years-old, but the young lawyer suddenly found himself captain of a wagon train comprised mostly of frontier farmers with women and children. Ironically, Hastings almost didn’t survive his first leadership role. When the wagon company reached Independence Rock (Wyoming), they all stopped to scratch their names in the sandstone surface. Hastings and another man spent so much time on their autograph for posterity that the wagon train moved on without them. A band of hostile Indians attacked Hastings and his companion, stealing their clothes and threatening to scalp them. Instead of killing them the Indians decided to hold them for ransom for more valuables from the main party. Mountain man Fitzpatrick saved the day, however, by

character flaw as did Lansford Hastings – both

Hastings decided to establish his own city called Montezuma, located near the mouth of the San Joaquin River. Before Hastings’ could start building Montezuma, however, he sailed to Mexico during the summer of 1844, made an overland crossing to the Gulf of Mexico, and then returned to Ohio to promote American emigration to California. Back in Ohio, Hastings wrote his “Emigrant’s Guide,” but he was unable to get it published. He raised money to print the book by giving a series of presentations on the benefits of western emigration; his efforts paid off when the book was released in Cincinnati in early 1845. Sales of Hastings’ book was surprisingly good and his promotional circuit took him to New York where he met Sam Brannon, a Mormon leader who was organizing a contingent of the faithful to sail for California. Hastings’ told Brannon about “Montezuma” and encouraged him to bring the Mormons to northern California.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

men overestimated their

TheTahoeWeekly.com

own leadership abilities

Mark McLaughlin recounts the lessons from the Donner Party

while underestimating the challenge of western terrain. Sutter and Hastings feared a British or French takeover of California, and they wanted to persuade the native Californios that an alliance with the United States would be in their best interest. The two men also wanted Americans to head west to populate northern California, where Sutter and Hastings could be leaders of an independent state and provide the American newcomers with jobs and land. It was a grand vision; one that Sutter called New Helvetia or New Switzerland. Sutter, who had arrived in the late 1830s, had been working toward establishing his own republic for several years. After his arrival in California, he had obtained a large land grant from the Mexican government and was in the process of building a substantial fort at the confluence of the Sacramento and American rivers. After seeing Sutter’s fledgling dream taking root,

TA H O E

In August 1845, Hastings returned to Sutter’s Fort so that he could meet Mormons and other emigrants who he anticipated traveling to California the following year. In the spring of 1846, Hastings’ headed east along the California Trail and finally saw how dangerous his shortcut was. Tragically, his confidence was not shaken at the thought of families breaching mountain canyons and stumbling across parched deserts. It was a reckless decision that led to the Donner Party meltdown and their demise in the Sierra snow. Just 20 years later, following the Confederacy’s loss in the Civil War, Hastings wrote another guidebook and established American plantation colonies in Brazil, but that’s a story for another day.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com, or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

Nostalgia

LA NIÑA CONDITIONS The Winter of 2010-11 was the 8th snowiest in the Tahoe Sierra since records began in 1879. Storms that year built up an 18-foot snowpack at Donner Pass, one of the deepest ever measured there. Despite the plethora of powder delivered by La Niña conditions in 2011, the peak snow depth at Donner Memorial State Park paled in comparison to that endured by the Donner Party in 1847. The top of the monument’s pedestal is 22 feet high, the estimate of depth that winter.

Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s newest book “Snowbound: Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” available in local stores or at thestormking.com. Courtesy Mark McLaughlin


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

DINING GUIDE Jason’s | American

La Mexicana | Authentic Mexican

Taqueria La Mexicana opened in 1997 and brought the tried and tested family recipes from their taqueria in Norwalk that made them successful. Tahoe locals instantly began to notice the fresh ingredients and authentic dishes and La Mexicana quickly became a locals’ favorite for fast, affordable and delicious Mexican food prepared fresh daily. La Mexicana also features an authentic Mexican bakery (fresh bread baked daily), carniceria and a full grocery store to meet your needs while visiting Lake Tahoe. Come taste the difference or order online through Eat 24. 8515 Brook Ave. Kings Beach | lamexicanakb.com | Daily 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. | (530) 546-0310

Las Panchitas | Mexican

Serving fine Mexican food since 1975 and at Lake Tahoe since 1982, delicious Chinga-Lingas head the appetizer list. Authentic Chili Relleños are made from fresh-roasted chiles stuffed with jack cheese, and Fiesta Tostadas are created from a flour tortilla with beans, ground beef, chile colorado, chile verde, lettuce, sour cream, guacamole and cheese. The Chicken, Shrimp and Sirloin Fajitas are enough for two. 8345 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach | Full bar with delicious margaritas | Dinners from $10.95 | (530) 546-4539

RENO

Daughters Café | Hungarian

Located in a Victorian House on the corner of First and Bell Streets in the Downtown Truckee River District of Reno, Daughters Café offers unique homemade seasonal selections for breakfast and lunch. Choices include Hungarian Chicken Paprikas, Smoked Grits, Homemade Limoncello, fresh daily soup, eggs, omelets, sausage, salad and potatoes. They serve Magpie Coffee and all food is made to order and impeccably fresh. Family owned and operated by mom Barb, and daughters Skye and Bianca. This restaurant will hug you with warmth as if you have come home. Menu changes seasonally and is posted daily on the web. The Beignets alone are worth a visit during your holidays. 97 Bell Street, Reno, Nev. 89503 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. TuesdaySunday (Brunch) | (775) 324-3447 | daughterscafe.com

flavor

WA R M S T H E S O U L S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R · P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y S L O W F O O D L A K E TA H O E

W

ho doesn’t love soup and spending time with the people in the community? Slow Food Lake Tahoe and Tahoe Food Hub in collaboration with local restaurants have brought back Community Soup Night. Soup night promotes the use of seasonal and locally grown food grown within 100 miles of the Tahoe-Truckee region and benefits the two nonprofits, according to Slow Food Lake Tahoe board member Cheryl Schrady. Both Tahoe Food Hub and Slow Food Lake Tahoe are committed to creating a more sustainable food community. Slow Food Lake Tahoe manages the Truckee Demonstration Garden and holds workshops throughout the year on topics such as how to raise chickens, make bone broth or grow onions and garlic. Tahoe Food Hub operates the Farm Shop at the base of Alpine Meadows Road and supplies many local restaurants with fresh

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Chef Tom Marrin of Full Belly Deli shares his recipe for Fennel and Sorrel Char-Braised Chicken Soup

“ I draw from [Tahoe] Food Hub’s seasonality and the different things they have available and look at flavor profiles that are similar.”

–Chef Tom Marrin

TRUCKEE

El Toro Bravo | Mexican

This is outstanding Mexican cuisine with recipes that have made El Toro Bravo a favorite in Truckee for 25 years. Located in a quaint, old-time, Truckee house, with a friendly ambience to go with your meal. Happy Hour Monday to Friday from 4 to 6 p.m. Topping the menu are tender Steak and Chicken Fajitas, Chimichangas, Tacoladas, Chili Relleños, Snapper Santa Cruz, Grilled Prawns and the unusual Oysters 444. Patio dining, weather permitting. 10816 Donner Pass Road, on the west end of Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Service from 11:30 a.m. | Full bar | (530) 587-3557

Pianeta | Italian Cucina

One of the Tahoe area’s best, Pianeta transports the palate with sophisticated, yet rustic Italian food in a warm, cozy atmosphere. The Antipasti features Bruschetta Olivata, Filet Mignon Carpaccio, Housemade Grilled Sausages & Crab Cakes. Pianeta makes most pasta in house with dishes like Veal Meatballs with Pesto & Linguini Pasta, Chicken & Prosciutto Cannelloni with Porcini Cream Sauce & Ravioli della Casa. 10096 Donner Pass Road, along Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Open for dinner nightly | Full bar and wine list | Happy Hour at the Bar Mon.-Fri. from 5 to 6:30 p.m. | (530) 587-4694

To be included in the Dining Guide, call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100.

LOCAL FLAVOR

Community Soup Night

KINGS BEACH

Jason’s Beachside Grill, a locals’ favorite for more than 30 years offers casual dining in a rustic atmosphere. Savor American classics like Slow Roasted Prime Rib, Teriyaki Chicken, Pasta, Blackened Salmon and Jason’s famous Baby Back Ribs, along with nightly specials. Jason’s boasts the largest salad bar on the North Shore and gourmet halfpound burgers and sandwiches. There’s a kids’ menu, and a large selection of spirits, wine and microbrews. 8338 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, next to the North Tahoe Event Center | Daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. | (530) 546-3315

March 23-April 5, 2017

produce and sustainable products. The local restaurants that host soup nights donate space; the chefs who prepare the food donate their time. “The chef uses vegetables that are in season and available from Tahoe Food Hub,” says Schrady. Guests can see and taste for themselves how to incorporate some of the more unique vegetables such as rutabaga, turnips, celery root or other less understood pro-

duce. Kale and white bean soup, butternut ginger and hearty vegetable soup have all been featured at soup night events. Schrady says that any guest who plans to attend the event this year should BYOB: Bring Your Own Bowl. The event routinely sells out with 250 to 300 people attending. “And what restaurant has 300 bowls on hand?” asks Schrady. “The event raises awareness of where our food comes from and coming together

as a community to enjoy a meal together,” Tahoe Food Hub founder and executive director Susie Sutphin. Chef and owner of Full Belly Deli Tom Marrin is preparing a unique and special soup for the next soup night on March 29. This is Full Belly Deli’s fourth time hosting the event. Marrin says he looks at what the Tahoe Food Hub has available and uses as much of their products as possible. For the next soup night, he is preparing a fennel and sorrel soup with char-braised chicken. “I try to do something different and push the envelope, making something people haven’t had before,” says Marrin, who regularly orders from Tahoe Food Hub. “I want to support their cause. I draw from Food Hub’s seasonality and the different things they have available and look at flavor profiles that are similar.” For instance, for his soup night dish, he is substituting sorrel for chard. Marrin says that he is grateful to the Food Hub for the unique products they bring locally. “It’s going to be a fun night and packed to the gills. We will also serve beer and wine, a green salad using the Food Hub’s products and bread we make here,” he says. A bowl of soup and piece of bread is $5 and salad can be added for an additional $2. Beer and wine and additional food items are available for purchase from the host restaurant. “It’s a great community event and a meal that people don’t have to cook themselves,” says Schrady. The event is on March 29 at Full Belly Deli from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Local musician Aaron Oropeza will perform. For more information, visit tahoefoodhub.org or slowfoodlaketahoe.org. 

31


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA S T Y Courtesy Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe

Tidbits

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits. cooking. Guests are encouraged to walk around the kitchen, joining conversations that are free flowing and educational. There is one tasting menu for each gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. The cost is $97 per person. The series includes Yucatan Adventure Pop Up on March 24 and 25 and “Sakura” Pop Up on March 31 and April 1. | cedarhousesporthotel.com

Feedback on good food Tahoe Donner Tahoe Donner announces that The Lodge Restaurant & Pub was recognized by OpenTable, an online restaurant review and reservation site, as a 2017 Diners’ Choice winner for the fourth consecutive year. The Lodge was voted amongst the highest restaurants in North Lake Tahoe in the following categories: Best Service, Best Food, Best Value, Most Booked, Best Ambiance and Best Overall. | tahoedonner.com

HOPPING WITH HOPS

Winery takeovers

BrewSKI, a local craft brew fest, is on March 25 at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Twelve breweries will showcase their most glorious hops on an outside deck at the Winters Creek Lodge. The party will stop when the beer runs out. | skirose.com

Soup’s on Truckee Tahoe Food Hub and Slow Food Lake Tahoe announce Community Soup Night on March 29 at Full Belly Deli. The community is welcome to enjoy soup and bread for $5 and salad for an extra $2 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. There will be live music by Aaron Oropeza and a raffle. Slow Food Lake Tahoe also needs volunteers for both nights. See feature in this issue. | slowfoodlaketahoe.org

Kings Beach Lunch Specials Daily Early Bird Special 4-6pm

Dinner Special 4-10pm

$3.50 Margaritas $3.50 Dos Equis $2.50 Draft Bud

25% Off Mexican Combo Dinners

Full

Bar

Open 11:30am-10:00pm (530) 546-4539 8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach

Pop in for a Pop Up Truckee Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Pop Up Dinner Series several times per month. Designed and formatted like a spirited dinner party, a Stella Pop Up event is an exploration into creative

Wild Winter Wednesday

March 29th benefits Humane Society of Truckee Tahoe

Half-Price Wine Night

Every Thursday

HAPPY HOUR

Tahoe City Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinners that include the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from the featured winery of the week. Prices range from $30 to $35. Enjoy St. Supery Estate Vineyards and Winery on March 23 and Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery on April 6. Gros Ventre Cellars will be featured at a date to be determined in April. | sunnysideresort.com

Explore a world of wines Olympic Valley Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Cafe and learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Each Thursday, from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., the Wine Voyage will showcase different wine regions from around the globe.  Participants can enjoy a taste of three wines and wine fact cards. Old World Regions are featured in March and April. Prices vary. | plumpjacksquawvalleyinn.com

3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday to Friday

riverRanchlodge.com · 530-583-4264 32


March 23-April 5, 2017

LOCAL FLAVOR

W I L L A M E T T E VA L L E Y BY LOU PHILLIPS

T he New B urgundy CREATIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN AN ELEGANT LOG CABIN Vegan Sauté • Sustainable Fresh Fish • Filet Mignon • Organic Chicken Local Seasonal Produce • Unique Winter Additions Voted Best Place to Take a Date for 17 years EST. 1985

Charlie Soule Chef/Owner

THE SOULE DOMAIN Open for dinner nightly at 6pm - Please make reservations

Steve Soule Head Waiter

Stateline Dr. next to Tahoe Biltmore, Crystal Bay, North Lake Tahoe

530-546-7529 | www.souledomain.com

O

ur worldwide wine tour’s next stop is Oregon’s Willamette Valley, aka “The New Burgundy.” The Willamette Valley is becoming a great wine region because it has the magic combination of exceptional soils, climate and wine producers who blend talent, dedication and resources to get the most out of the grapes. Along with the quality of the wines, another reason for the comparison to the holy wine grail of Burgundy is because the signature grapes are the same: mainly Pinot Noir, but increasingly Chardonnay. This is a young wine region; significant development started in the 1980s. Coastal Oregon’s cool climate was a challenge for the winemakers for many years. Until the turn of the century, there was significant quality variance as the producers tried to figure out how to determine which grapes would thrive in the cool and inconsistent weather. Two factors have changed the game: the climate has been steadily warming — although it is still cooler than most — and the winemakers have learned not only which grapes work best, but which clones work best for the climate and soils. The results are beauty in the glass because the Pinots are structured with significant acid and tannin; plentiful, complex, fresh dark-berry/cherry flavors and a haunting earthiness. These characteristics create a magic balance that makes for great wines that are delicious and intriguing when young and improve with age. As a bonus, Willamette Valley is among the few top wine regions where some of the best producers’ wines fall into the middle of the pack pricewise. This is probably because these typically family owned, legacy wineries bought land at a fraction of today’s prices and were in the

Bethel Heights Vineyards | Courtesy Bethel Heights Vineyards

WINEMAKER EVENTS game before the accolades started pouring in. Perhaps more importantly, these folks seem to have a respect and humility rarely seen in the wine world and have held pricing in check. Some worthy of highlight are The Eyrie Vineyards, Argyle Winery, Christom Vineyards, Ponzi Vineyards and Ken Wright Cellars, all of whom consistently overdeliver at all price points. Their baselevel bottles offer class and complexity at $30 or less and their upper-tier offerings are world-class stunners at values compared to other elite wines. In the end, Willamette Valley is one of the few regions that compares with France’s Burgundy at delivering world-class Pinot Noir. Because of a more reliable climate, these Oregon wines bring the yummy far more consistently, as well as more affordably, than their French counterparts. This may be the last of the good old days for prices that don’t break the bank because French and California wine companies are gobbling up vineyards and wineries, which has already raised prices. Stick with Willamette Valley and ask your wine purveyor for his/her suggestions — you can’t go wrong. 

$12 tastings | Meet the winemaker Taste 3 wines | Bottle signing

kanzler March 24

Truckee

5 - 7 p.m.

| March 25 Petra

uncorked wine bar & retail wine shop

add $ 6 glass of

wine

cheese plate $12 Happy Hour everyday from 3-5 pm

LOCATED IN:

Old Town Truckee Cobblestone Tahoe City The Village at Squaw Valley

TelosWine.com

Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier and his consulting business WineProwest.com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 544-3435 or lou@ wineprowest.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns.

Nightly 5-6 p.m.

Fine Italian Food & Spirits

Locals Love Lanza’s!

(530) 546-3315

JasonsBeachSideGrille.com

8338 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, CA

(530) 546-2434 Bar - 4:30 p.m. Dinner - 5 p.m. 7739 N Lake Blvd - Kings Beach

LanzasTahoe.com

33


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Antipasti, Homemade Pastas & Rustic Regional Entrées

CREAM SOUPS B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

Dinner served nightly in an ingenious Italian atmosphere HAPPY HOUR

Sunday-Thursday 5-6 p.m. In Downtown Truckee - (530) 587-4694

pianetarestauranttruckee.com Helping Collectors Sell, Buy and Manage Their Collections

T

Assisting Businesses Build Effective Wine Programs Making Your Wine Events Really Special Expertise and Ethics Public and Private Wine Classes

Sommelier Services

We Can Train Your Staff, Maximize Your Wine Program and Help With Your Fundraiser

530.583.3324 2905 Lake Forest Road, Tahoe City

BacchisTahoe.com

WineProWest.com 3 Sommelier Louis Phillips Level 30+ Years Experience WineGuru123@gmail.com -

(775) 544-3435

he method and even the first ingredients are normally the same and only the main vegetable is substituted when making cream soup. For example, mushroom soup is made with onions, garlic, butter, salt and pepper, chicken or vegetable stock, potatoes, whatever herbs you want if any and of course, mushrooms. Broccoli soup is made the same way but substituting the broccoli for the mushrooms. Start by sautéing the garlic and onion in butter, add the main veggie and sauté a little more, add the potato and continue to sauté, add the stock, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to let it simmer for 20 minutes or until all the ingredients are tender. Then puree, season and garnish when it is served. There are exceptions to every rule and cream soups are not exempt from them. If the soup is a light soup, such as asparagus, then I will use only half the onion and no garlic. That is because the flavor of the asparagus would be overpowered and lost to the garlic. Most vegetables are hearty enough so that the garlic complements them. If you notice, I did not put cream into the ingredients for the mushroom or the broccoli cream soup. That is because you don’t always need it. Once you have pureed the soup, you have the base. This base is ready to be seasoned and you do not have to add the cream. Think of it as creaming when you put it through the blender or food processor. People are so in-tune with what they eat these days that they are looking at everything that passes between their lips with thoughts of how good is for them. Just the mention of cream will send them running to the health food store. The cream, when added, will add a little more

body to the soup, but it is not a necessary ingredient. The soup can be as good without it. If you do add cream, add it to what you are serving at the moment and then your leftover soup can be served as a chilled soup. Again it can be served with or without the cream.

The cream, when added, will add a little more body to the soup, but it is not a necessary ingredient. The soup can be as good without it. You can use about any vegetable for a soup. Mushroom, broccoli, cauliflower and zucchini are all well-known soup veggies. You can also use fiddleheads, spinach and even garlic as your veggie. Now that you know how easy making a cream soup can be, go ahead and try a couple different ones. Remember, just because we are getting into the warmer months, soups are still a great possibility as a meal or an appetizer. They are also great hot or cold so make a cream soup and enjoy.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

American Bistro & Wine Bar

Open Daily at 11:00 a.m. for Lunch and Dinner Breakfast Saturday & Sunday from 8 a.m. for 1 Wednesday Dinners 22-course min. per person. Please present coupon when ordering. Not valid w/other promotions. Expires 04/05/17

Newly Remodeled Expanded Dining Room. Available for Private Parties, Events and Weddings. Watch your favorite sporting events

Happy Hour Everyday 4-6:30 pm Tuesday all night!!!

SpindleshanksTahoe.com

400 Brassie Ave, Suite B - Kings Beach - (530) 546-2191 34

MUSHROOM SOUP

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 2 lbs. washed & sliced mushrooms 3 large red potatoes, peeled & sliced A tiny bit of chopped parsley for garnish 4 oz. heavy cream, if desired

1 yellow onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, diced 28 oz. chicken stock Salt & pepper to taste

Sauté the onion and garlic until the onion starts to get translucent. Add the mushrooms and sauté until they are fully wilted and then add the potatoes. Continue to sauté for about 2 minutes so the potatoes start to sweat. Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil and then turn the heat down to a simmer. Let simmer for about 20 minutes and then puree in a blender or food processor. Be careful and puree in small batches because the hot liquid will expand rapidly when you turn on the machine. Also use a cloth to be sure you hold the top on tight. Once the soup is pureed, season with salt and pepper. Place back on the stove and turn on the heat to medium if you are going to add cream. Sprinkle a little chopped parsley on top as a garnish and serve.


LAKEDANCE TAHOECOLLECTI VE CHRI STI N HANNA, ARTI STI CDI RECTOR

ANNUAL REPERTORY SHOWCASE APRI L7TH, 7PM APRI L8TH, 2PM &7PM APRI L9TH, 2PM

TAHOEARTHAUSCI NEMA SEASON SPONSOR

WORKSBYDAI ANELOPESDA SI L VA, CHRI STI N HANNA, ERI CKHAWKI NS, AND A WORLD PREMI EREBYDEBORAHLOHSE FEATURI NG GUESTSCAL VI N THOMAS AND DAI ANELOPESDA SI L VA

TI CKETSAVAI LABLEAT TRUNKSHOW, LAKET AHOEDANCECOLLECTI VE. ORGORCALL( 800)8383006 THI SPERFORMANCEI SBROUGHTTO YOUWI THTHESUPPORTOF


Photo by Matt Bansak

Fuel Dock

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday Weather Permitting

Enjoy lakefront dining & shopping at the Tahoe City Marina.

ALPINE HOME Design · Lighting · Furnishing · Rugs · Accessories

Alpine Home Furnishings Dockside 700 Tahoe Yacht Club Tahoe Canvas Co. A & M Marine Tahoe Marine Supply Center for Spiritual Living Lake Tahoe Parasailing Tahoe Sailing Charters

FULL SERVICE DESIGN FIRM & MOUNTAIN HOME FURNITURE STORE. Call or visit our 3,800 sq. ft. showroom to schedule a home consult.

(530) 583-1039

TahoeCityMarina.com

Alpine Home Furnishings · Tahoe City Marina · 700 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA 96145 · 530.564.0971 · AlpineHomeFurnishings.com

THREE COMMERCIAL SPACES FOR LEASE at the Tahoe City Marina

1,196 square feet 3,178 square feet 3,500 square feet

Mael Passanesi

Triple Net Lease option

For more information contact

Jim at (530) 583-1039

March 23 to April 5, 2017  

Greg Garrison ascends the southeast slope of Jakes' Peak to explore the back country on Lake Tahoe’s West Shore. Outdoor enthusiasts have ra...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you