Page 1

Answer the call of the mountains at

ALPENGLOW MOUNTAIN FESTIVAL

The

THREE DOT BROTHERHOOD The Mystery of the

RED VIOLIN

“THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES” Empowering women through words

BEWITCHED BY THE BACK COUNTRY SKIING WITH JEREMY BENSON WINTER

February 17 - 25

alpenglowsports.com


GREAT DAYS DON’T END WITH THE LAST RUN

EVENTS & ACTIVITIES Kid-O-Rama February 17–24 A FULL WEEK OF NONSTOP FUN FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES

For full details and a complete list of events, please visit:

SquawAlpine.com/kid-o-rama

• Big Truck Day • Disco Tubing • Game & Craft Room • Kids Après S’mores • Oakley Grom Jam • Winter Music Series • Mini-Snowmobiling


“When we first saw the Boulders site, we were stunned by the spectacular views, and how the natural rock outcropping blends perfectly with a seemingly endless sea of trees.” Jeff Goodwin, Principal of BAR Architects, San Francisco

Set within the ski-in, ski-out community of Mountainside, the Boulders enclave offers three distinct approaches to mountain living, all offering the resort-style amenities of Mountainside. “Residents love to tell us how Mountainside helps them unplug, and truly connect.” says Ron Barnes, Senior Strategist of Mountainside Partners. “That it’s the ideal natural environment to relax and let their kids live a little more free range. For us, a connection to the land, and to each other, is what Boulders is all about.”

Your priorities are set in stone. So is your escape.

NOW SELLING 2,9OO – 4,9OO sq ft Priced from under $2.5M Up to 1,6OO sq ft of outdoor living space

MountainsideNorthStar.com

877.495.7984

OW N E R S H I P I N C L U D E S full access to all Mountainside amenities, The Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe family spa membership and Tahoe Mountain Club membership.

All information is subject to change. All imagery is representational. View may vary per home.


TheTahoeWeekly.com

FEBRUARY 15-21, 2018 16 FEATURES

with Jeremy Benson 10 Alpenglow

SUBMISSIONS

Mountain Festival 30 Sierra Stories

Events Calendar & Editorial editor@tahoethisweek.com

OUT & ABOUT

Entertainment entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

06 Lake Tahoe Facts 08 Sightseeing

MAKING IT HAPPEN

15 For the Kids

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102

ARTS & CULTURE 19 Three Dot Studios 20 The Arts

Sean McAlindin

FUN & GAMES 22 Puzzles 23 Horoscope

Keoki Flagg

MUSIC SCENE 24 The Mystery of the Red Violin 24 Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 27 “The Vagina Monologues”

Joy Strotz

Photography production@tahoethisweek.com

10 Events 18 Deep ‘n’ Daring

LOCAL FLAVOR 31 Tasty Tidbits

20

TM

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 TheTahoeWeekly.com

Skiing Mt. Judah

24

Volume 37 | Issue 4

31 Meet Your Maker

Sales Manager Anne Artoux anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Art Director Alyssa Ganong production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106 Graphic Designer Justeen Ferguson graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101 Entertainment & Food Editor Priya Hutner priya@tahoethisweek.com Copy Editor Katrina Veit Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green, Lisa Michelle

33 Wine Column

UPCOMING DEADLINES

34 Chef’s Recipe

MARCH 8, 2018 ISSUE Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, March 1 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, March 1 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, March 1

FIND US ONLINE AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com DIGITAL EXCLUSIVES 2017-18 Downhill Ski Guide

TAHOE WEEKLY: 37 YEARS STRONG FROM THE PUBLISHER

2017-18 Nordic Ski Guide Tahoe Music & Festivals: Winter Snow Trails Sledding & Ice Skating Winter Adventures

Each year on the anniversary of the first edition of Tahoe Weekly published on Feb. 18, 1982, I like to reflect on how the magazine has grown from that first 12-page issue touting “Don’t Nobody Bring Me No Bad News.” I also like to go back and flip through the first issue of “North Tahoe Week” proclaiming “Biggest Winter in Years!” on the cover. You, too, can enjoy a blast from our past by going to issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly where we’ve uploaded the digital version of the inaugural issue. Through the decades, Tahoe Weekly has expanded its coverage from Events and Entertainment (still at our core) to include coverage of Recreation & Outdoors, Food & Wine, and Arts & Culture. We’ve also expanded our distribution and our coverage area through the years to include the Tahoe Sierra (from the Tahoe Basin to

Kirkwood and Truckee), the Lost Sierra, Reno, Sparks and beyond. We are grateful for our loyal readers and clients that have supported us for nearly 40 years and for the feedback that guides us. And, we’re not done yet. We always have something in the works. The 40th anniversary is coming fast, and I’m already pondering ideas for a celebration. Thanks to all of our dedicated readers and clients for supporting the Tahoe Weekly.

2017 Tahoe-Reno Golf Guide Fishing Spots Community Meetings Support Groups Worship Services Past Digital Editions

Follow us to win If you haven’t heard, we have a Facebook contest that’s as simple as can be. Visit us at facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly and click Like, or Follow us on Instagram @TheTahoeWeekly, and you’re entered. We’re giving away weekly prizes throughout the winter. n

ON THE COVER

at TheTahoeWeekly.com | issuu.com | issuu app iTunes & GooglePlay | E-Newsletter

4

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & post your photos

TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light. – John Muir

SUBSCRIBE to the FREE, DIGITAL EDITIONS OF TAHOE WEEKLY

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TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/ TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com.

@TheTahoeWeekly

Brennan Lagasse takes a moment to enjoy the views while back-country skiing the Mount Rose area above Lake Tahoe. “After a fresh coating of snow, like starving fish, skiers, riders, snowmobilers and other snow enthusiasts alike swarmed to enjoy the coveted snow,” said photographer Ming T. Poon of the conditions after a recent snowstorm. Congratulations to Poon for winning the 2018 Photo of the Year at the 18th Annual Powder Awards. | Photography by MingPoonPhotography.com, @ming.t.poon


SKI WHERE THE SNOW IS. SKI MT. ROSE

AT 8260’, THE HIGHEST BASE ELEVATION OF ANY RESORT IN TAHOE, IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR SNOW, YOU’LL FIND IT AT MT. ROSE.

80

TRUCKEE

RENO 267

431

INCLINE VILLAGE

89

JUST 10 MINUTES FROM INCLINE VILLAGE

LAKE TAHOE

TAHOE CITY

395 28

50

50

STATELINE

CARSON CITY

SWEET FILMS. EPIC PRIZES.

MARCH 9

ROSES ARE RAD WINTER FILM FESTIVAL SUBMISSIONS ARE UNDERWAY.

SUBMISSION AND EVENT DETAILS AT SKIROSE.COM/ROSESARERAD


TheTahoeWeekly.com

Donner Summit

Truckee Donner Lake

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

h Ta

SUGAR BOWL

N

WEST EAST SOUTH

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

Tahoe Vista

ALPINE MEADOWS

NV

Dollar Hill

Lake

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

il

Ta h o e R i m

CASINOS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

Tahoe City

SNO-PARKS

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

SQUAW CREEK

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Olympic Valley SQUAW VALLEY

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

MT. ROSE

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

DONNER SKI RANCH

ROYAL GORGE

SKY TAVERN

il

SODA SPRINGS

CLAIR TAPPAAN

BOREAL

Reno & Sparks

TAHOE DONNER

AUBURN SKI TRAINING CENTER

Eagle Rock

NEVADA NORDIC

Glenbrook

Carson City

Volume: 39 trillion gallons There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Homewood o Ta h

HOMEWOOD

e Ri

DID YOU

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

KNOW

CA Cave Rock

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years Watershed Area: 312 square miles

Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F

Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet

Ta h oe

R i m Tr ail

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

Fannette Island

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Fallen Leaf Lake

BIJOU PARK / LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

ECHO LAKES

Natural rim: 6,223’ Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Shoreline: 72 miles Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

HOPE VALLEY

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 69.2 in 2016. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

Emerald Bay, punctuated by Fannette Island, is always spectacular. | Anne Artoux

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

East Shore

Kings Beach

North Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders at Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

Donner Summit

North Tahoe Arts Center

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

West Shore

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo

Tahoe City

Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Tahoe City

North Shore

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

Tallac Historic Site

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

Truckee

$10 parking | parks.ca.gov (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Sugar Pine Point State Park is home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

High Camp

Vikingsholm Castle

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Parking fee | Tours in summer only (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

REGIONAL SNOW LEVELS Heavenly BASE DEPTH:

32”

Emerald Bay

Reports taken on Friday, February 9, 2018

Mt. Rose Ski Area

Squaw Valley

BASE DEPTH:

BASE DEPTH:

21”-56”

18”-49”

Kirkwood Mountain Resort BASE DEPTH:

Sugar Bowl

40”

BASE DEPTH:

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Tours in summer only (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Truckee

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Historical Society Incline Village Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building in Incline Village. TART

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Tahoe Science Center

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Truckee Railroad Museum

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

Western SkiSport Museum

Donner Summit

Fri.-Sun. | Free (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing, exhibits include snowshoes from the 1850s, ski equipment from the 20th Century and a pair of 8-footlong skis used by John “Snowshoe” Thompson, a legendary mail carrier. Located at Boreal off I-80. TART

South Lake Tahoe

VISITORS’ CENTERS Kings Beach Kings Beach State Rec. Area (Thurs.-Mon., summer)

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd. (800) 468-2463

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd. (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50 (775) 588-4591

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

Tahoe City

Old Jail Museum

10065 Donner Pass Rd. (Depot) (530) 587-8808

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Tahoe City

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe Maritime Museum

100 North Lake Blvd. (530) 581-6900

Truckee

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village 855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

35 College Dr. (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd. (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Rd. (530) 587-3558

32”-56”

Follow us on Facebook for our weekly snow report

LAKE TAHOE 8

Natural rim 6,223’

Elevation: 6,227.95 | Elevation in 2017: 6,225.68

TRANSIT: NORTH LAKE TAHOE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH LAKE TAHOE | bluego.org


February 15-21, 2018

9


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

A N S W E R T H E C A L L O F T H E M O U N TA I N S AT

EVENTS CALENDAR

Alpenglow Mountain Festival

FEBRUARY 15-22, 2018

EVERY MONDAY

Scott Rokis

PHOTOS BY SCOTT ROKIS | COURTESY ALPENGLOW SPORTS

Silver Ski Clinics Mount Rose

The Silver Ski Clinics, for ages 50 and older, are every Monday throughout the season at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe. Meet in Timbers in the Main Lodge at 9 a.m. for a tech talk and coffee. The group clinic is from 9:30 until 11:30 a.m. | skirose.com

Ski with a Ranger South Lake Tahoe

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit hosts Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort every Monday at 1 p.m. until April 2. Tours begin at Tamarack Lodge at the top of the Heavenly Gondola. Lasts 1 hour. First come, first served, limited to 12. | (530) 543-2730

Free play Truckee

Truckee Library hosts an unstructured playtime for children and parents from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Toys are provided. | (530) 582-7846

EVERY TUESDAY

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530) 546-2012

Scott Rokis

Let’s hear it for moms Kings Beach

A

lpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter returns from Feb. 17 to 25 featuring a nine-day celebration of humanpowered mountain sports, events, clinics, equipment demos, presentations, films and more. It explores some of the best activities the Tahoe Sierra has to offer and is the only mountain lifestyle event in North America that is almost entirely free and community centric. The event is designed for beginner and intermediate mountain recreation enthusiasts. Tahoe Weekly will have details on the summer festival from June 16 to 24 when they are announced. The fifth year for the Alpenglow Mountain Festival showcases more than 75 events from back-country skiing and splitboarding, to cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, natural history, yoga, live music, educational workshops, social gatherings, back-country cooking, dog-friendly events, winter astronomy events, Tailgate Talks covering topics including back-country skiing and waxing, and much more. “The Mountain Festival was born out of the desire to share the mountain pursuits which drew us to Tahoe with others,” according to Brendan Madigan, founder of the Mountain Festival, said in a press release. “We’ve designed the Mountain Festival as a destination event for mountain enthusiasts of all ability levels who are interested in trying a multitude of human-powered sports in a safe and welcoming environment.” Read the Events calendar in this issue or at TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of daily activities. Registration for most events requires a deposit to reserve a spot that is refunded upon participation. For more information or to register, visit alpenglowsports.com. 10

Mom’s Café is every Tuesday from 10:30 a.m. to noon at North Tahoe Family Resource Center. Meet other moms, get help with breastfeeding techniques, postpartum concerns, infant nutrition and infant care. Groups in English and Spanish. | northtahoefrc.org

Toddler Time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts summer Story Time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Babes in Bookland Truckee

Festival highlights Mountainfilm Tour & Kickoff | Mountainfilm travels year-round and worldwide with a selection of current and best-loved films from the festival archives at Olympic Village Lodge on Feb. 17. Mountainfilm screens feature documentaries on environmental issues, epic adventures, eye-opening politics and humanitarian causes, along with short gems and rare films. Backcountry Bartending & Snowshoe Crawl | Join Michelle Shea of Adventure Dining Guide on Feb. 18 for a happy hour snowshoe crawl, while learning the tricks of the trade for mixing drinks in the back country. Tahoe Backcountry Women talk | Elite ski mountaineer Kim Havell shares adventurous tales from numerous mountain journeys with female partners spanning a more than 20-year career in the back country on Feb. 21. Ladies only.

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Winter Film Series | Alpenglow Sports presents Barry Blanchard and his film “The Mountain, An Arrow Pointing Up” for the final installment of the 12th annual Winter Film Series on Feb. 22. Blanchard, one of Canada’s foremost alpinists, will tell why he’s dedicated his adult life to finding the most epic first ascents across the globe. Showing images from alpine adventures in the Canadian Rockies, European Alps, Pakistani Karakorum and Greater Himalaya, Everest and K2, Blanchard will illustrate the ways in which mountains engage and inspire, and demonstrate how climbing soothes the soul. Nachtspektakel | The Nachtspektakel, a European-inspired uphill ski touring event, on Feb. 23 features a skin up for spectacular views of Lake Tahoe, a backcountry social and bonfire and a threecourse catered meal. 

Story time Zephyr Cove, Nev.

The Zephyr Cove Library hosts a children’s story time every Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Enjoy stories, songs, activities and coloring. | (775) 588-6411

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in Heavenly is from 4 to 7. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Enjoy free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from the featured winery. | (530) 523-8024

EVERY THURSDAY

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village, Nev. The Conversation Café is a drop-in conversation forum hosted by the Senior Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


2017/2018

Erik Bergen

WINTER TRANSIT

FREE NIGHT SERVICE THROUGH 4/8/18

EXTENDED DAILY SERVICE THROUGH 4 /8/18

SQUAW VALLEY TO TAHOE CITY TRANSIT CENTER TO KINGS BEACH TO CRYSTAL BAY

Daily 30 Minute Service Incline Village, Kings Beach, Tahoe Vista, Carnelian Bay, Tahoe City, Northstar.

Squaw Valley Clock Tower Village at Squaw Valley Resort at Squaw Creek Squaw Valley Rd / Hwy 89 River Ranch Tahoe City Transit Center Swigard’s Hardware Gear and Grind Café Lighthouse Shopping Cntr. Lake Forest Dollar Hill Carnelian Bay Tahoe Vista Kings Beach Crystal Bay

7:00PM 7:05 7:13 7:20 7:23 7:30 7:33 7:35 7:37 7:40 7:42 7:48 7:53 7:57 8:00

8:00PM 9:00PM 8:05 9:05 8:13 9:13 8:20 9:20 8:23 9:23 8:30 9:30 8:33 9:33 8:35 9:35 8:37 9:37 8:40 9:40 8:42 9:42 8:48 9:48 8:53 9:53 8:57 9:57 9:00 10:00

10:00 10:05 10:13 10:20 10:23 10:30 10:33 10:35 10:37 10:40 10:42 10:48 10:53 10:57 11:00

11:00PM 11:05 11:13 11:20 11:23 11:30 11:33 11:35 11:37 11:40 11:42 11:48 11:53 11:57 12:00AM

12:00AM 12:05 12:13 12:20 12:23 12:30 12:33 12:35 12:37 12:40 12:42 12:48 12:53 12:57 1:00

1:00AM 1:05 1:13 1:20 1:23 1:30 1:33 1:35 1:37 1:40 1:42 1:48 1:53 1:57 2:00

CRYSTAL BAY TO KINGS BEACH TO TAHOE CITY TRANSIT CENTER TO SQUAW VALLEY

Crystal Bay 7:00PM Kings Beach 7:03 Tahoe Vista 7:07 Carnelian Bay 7:12 Dollar Hill 7:18 Lake Forest 7:20 Lighthouse Shopping Center 7:23 Grove St. 7:25 Bank of America 7:27 Tahoe City Transit Center 7:30 River Ranch 7:37 Squaw Valley Rd / Hwy 89 7:40 Resort at Squaw Creek 7:47 Village at Squaw Valley 7:55 Squaw Valley Clock Tower 8:00

8:00PM 9:00PM 8:03 9:03 8:07 9:07 8:12 9:12 8:18 9:18 8:20 9:20 8:23 9:23 8:25 9:25 8:27 9:27 8:30 9:30 8:37 9:37 8:40 9:40 8:47 9:47 8:55 9:55 9:00 10:00

10:00PM 10:03 10:07 10:12 10:18 10:20 10:23 10:25 10:27 10:30 10:37 10:40 10:47 10:55 11:00

11:00PM 11:03 11:07 11:12 11:18 11:20 11:23 11:25 11:27 11:30 11:37 11:40 11:47 11:55 12:00AM

12:00AM 12:03 12:07 12:12 12:18 12:20 12:23 12:25 12:27 12:30 12:37 12:40 12:47 12:55 1:00

1:00AM 1:03 1:07 1:12 1:18 1:20 1:23 1:25 1:27 1:30 1:37 1:40 1:47 1:55 2:00

TART–Regional Routes Daily Hourly Service Via Highway 267 and Highway 89. TART–FREE Year-Round Night Service Extended operations until 2am! Daily Service to Donner Summit Runs Through 3/11/18 Connect to Sugar Bowl and Boreal via Truckee Local Route. Runs daily through mid-March. North Lake Tahoe Express Daily airport shuttle from 5:30am–midnight. NorthLakeTahoeExpress.com (866)216-5222.

TAHOE CITY TRANSIT CENTER TO GRANLIBAKKEN TO SUNNYSIDE TO TAHOMA

Tahoe City Transit Center Granlibakken Sunnyside Homewood Tahoma P.O.

6:30PM 7:30PM 8:30PM 9:30PM 6:35 7:35 8:35 9:35 6:45 7:45 8:45 9:45 6:50 7:50 8:50 9:50 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00

10:30PM 10:35 10:45 10:50 11:00

11:30PM 11:35 11:45 11:50 12:00AM

12:30AM 12:35 12:45 12:50 1:00

TAHOMA TO HOMEWOOD TO SUNNYSIDE TO GRANLIBAKKEN TO TAHOE CITY TRANSIT CENTER

Tahoma P.O. Homewood Sunnyside Granlibakken Tahoe City Transit Center

7:00PM 8:00 7:10 8:10 7:15 8:15 7:20 8:20 7:30 8:30

9:00 9:10 9:15 9:20 9:30

10:00 10:10 10:15 10:20 10:30

NORTHSTAR TO KINGS BEACH TO CRYSTAL BAY Northstar Village Sawmill Hwy 267 Stewart Hwy 267 Commonwealth Kings Beach Crown Crystal Bay

6:30PM 7:30PM 8:30PM 9:30PM 6:40 7:40 8:40 9:40 6:50 7:50 8:50 9:50 6:53 7:53 8:53 9:53 6:55 7:55 8:55 9:55 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00

CRYSTAL BAY TO KINGS BEACH TO NORTHSTAR Crystal Bay Kings Beach Dave’s Hwy 267 Commonwealth Sawmill Northstar Village

7:00PM 8:00PM 7:05 8:05 7:10 8:10 7:20 8:20 7:30 8:30

9:00 9:05 9:10 9:20 9:30

10:00PM 10:05 10:10 10:20 10:30

11:00 11:10 11:15 11:20 11:30

12:00AM 12:10 12:15 12:20 12:30

10:30PM 10:40 10:50 10:53 10:55 11:00

11:30PM 11:40 11:50 11:53 11:55 12:00AM

11:00PM 11:05 11:10 11:20 11:30

1:00 1:10 1:15 1:20 1:30

12:00AM 12:05 12:10 12:20 12:30

TahoeTruckeeTransit.com | Text “TART” to 24587


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

President’s Week

SALE

Warren Miller filming at Diamond Peak in 1969 | Courtesy Warren Miller Entertainment

RETRO WARREN MILLER SKI FILM SERIES

All Skiwear & Winter Clothing

25% OFF

Diamond Peak Ski Resort hosts a free Retro Warren Miller Ski Film Series at The Chateau in Incline Village, Nev., on Thursdays from Feb. 15 through March 29. The series will again include brief presentations on local history followed by screenings of classic Warren Miller ski and snowboard films: Feb. 15 | Warren Miller’s “Winter People” (1972) featuring speaker Mark McLaughlin on the “History of the 1960 Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley” Feb. 22 | Warren Miller’s “In Search of Skiing” (1977) featuring Richard Antell on “Weather History of Lake Tahoe” March 1 | Warren Miller’s “Snowonder” (1982) featuring speaker Mark McLaughlin on “Reign of the Sierra Storm King” March 8 | Warren Miller’s “White Winter Heat” (1987) featuring speaker Mark McLaughlin on “History of Lake Tahoe and the Comstock” March 15 | Warren Miller’s “Steeper & Deeper” (1992) featuring Richard Antell on “Celebrities of Lake Tahoe’s northeast shore”

530.583.1874

400 SQUAW CREEK ROAD

OLYMPIC VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

Events will begin at 5 p.m. with a brief presentation. The ski films will start around 5:30 p.m. The Retro Ski Film + Speaker Series is a free, family-friendly event. The Chateau will offer a no-host bar and popcorn at each event. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to watch the film trailers. Click on Adventure & Environmental Films under Out & About. | diamondpeak.com

EVERY THURSDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

Ladies Day Clinics Mount Rose

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annual presidents’ weekend sale * While supplies last * Limited to stock on hand *

www.mountainhardwareandsports.com 11320 Donner Pass Rd. - Truckee, 96160 CA - (530)587-4844 12

Ladies Day Clinics run Thursdays to March 15. Meet for coffee in Timbers for at 10 a.m. These clinics offer a fun and social atmosphere where female skiers and riders of low-intermediate to advanced abilities gain confidence and improve technique. $25, free with pass. | skirose.com

EVERY FRIDAY

Silver Ski Clinics Mount Rose

The Silver Ski Clinics, for ages 50 and older, are every Friday throughout the season at Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe. Meet in Timbers in the Main Lodge at 9 a.m. for a tech talk and coffee. The group clinic is from 9:30 until 11:30 a.m. | skirose.com

Fridays are fun Truckee

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382

Family Fun Fridays at KidZone Museum starts at 11 a.m. Play-based class designed to inspire exploration and discovery through art. For ages 5 and younger. Free with admission. | kidzonemuseum.org

Toddler Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

Fresh from the farm Alpine Meadows

Story Time Tahoe City

Incline Village Library hosts story time every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m. with stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 18 months to 3 years. | (775) 832-4130

Tahoe Food Hub’s Farm Shop is open for winter every Thursday and Friday from noon to 6 p.m. It features food from more than 40 farms and carries produce in season. | tahoefoodhub.org

Preschool story time Truckee

Ski with a Ranger South Lake Tahoe

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years and older. A half-hour stay-and-play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Fresh from the farm Alpine Meadows

Tahoe Food Hub’s Farm Shop is open for winter every Thursday and Friday from noon to 6 p.m. It features food from more than 40 farms and carries produce in season. | tahoefoodhub.org

Help with computers Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First Thursdays of the month are “Exploring the Interweb,” second Thursdays are “Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about technology. | (530) 546-2021

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit hosts Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort every Monday at 1 p.m. until April 6. Tours begin at Tamarack Lodge at the top of the Heavenly Gondola. Lasts 1 hour. First come, first served, limited to 12. | (530) 543-2730

S’more, please Tahoe Vista

North Tahoe Regional Park is the place to grab free s’mores between 2 and 4 p.m. in the Ramada. | (530) 546-4212

Happy hour tastings Olympic Valley

Friday Night Tasting Notes is at Plaza Bar every Friday until April 20 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Craft beers or specialty spirits, a different one featured each Friday along with live acoustic music. | squawalpine.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


WINTER February 17 - 25 2018 February 17 - 25 2018 presented presented by by

a NINE DAY celebration OF HUMAN POWERED SPORTS INCLUDING guided BACKCOUNTRY TOURS, nordic skiing, FIlMS and more Info Info & & Registration Registration at at alpenglowsports.com alpenglowsports.com


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

EVENTS EVERY FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with G and PG movies. Until March. | (530) 582-9669

EVERY SATURDAY

AIRPORT SHUTTLE SERVICE

North Lake Tahoe Express Daily airport shuttle 6:00am–midnight Every Day Low Fares $49 One way per person $98 Round-trip per person Large group discounts NorthLakeTahoeExpress.com (866)216-5222

Fire-pit family movies South Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe AleWorX, FNCTN and Sierra-atTahoe bring family-friendly movies every Saturday from 5 to 10 p.m. at Lake Tahoe AleWorX. Enjoy self-pour brews and oven-fired pizzas while huddled around fire pits with your friends and family. Until April 30. | sierraattahoe.com

Winter Fireworks Olympic Valley

Squaw Valley puts on a fireworks show every Saturday through March 31 at 7 p.m. with free live music before the show and free hot cocoa during the show at Plaza Bar. There will be an additional show on Feb. 18. | squawalpine.com

EVERY SUNDAY

Build together Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Lego Club from 12 to 1 p.m. | (530) 582-7842

FEB. 15 | THURSDAY River Talk Truckee

NorthLakeTahoeExpress.com

Learn about the Truckee River and how to help restore and protect it in a one-hour presentation from the Truckee River Watershed Council at 8 a.m. | RSVP (530) 550-8760

Ta, ta, ta tasting Truckee

FOLLOW US TO WIN

Third Thursday Tasting at The Pour House is from 5 to 7 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

Back by popular demand Incline Village, Nev. Diamond Peak Ski Resort hosts Retro Ski Film + Speaker Series at The Chateau at 5 p.m. A brief presentation by local historian Mark McLaughlin, followed by screenings of Warren Miller’s “Winter People.” No-host bar and popcorn. Free. | diamondpeak.com

FEB. 16 | FRIDAY

Gift Certificate MORE PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS WEEKLY

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FACEBOOK OR INSTAGRAM YOUR NO. 1 SOURCE FOR ARTS, LIVE MUSIC, EVENTS, ENTERTAINMENT, FOOD & WINE & SNOW REPORTS

TGIF ski Soda Springs

Boreal Mountain Resort hosts Feel Good Friday. Lift tickets are $25 and $5 goes to charity. From 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. | rideboreal.com

Share and write Incline Village, Nev.

Lifescapes, a memoir-writing program for seniors, is from 2 to 4 p.m. at Incline Village Library. First and third Fridays of each month. All welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Winemaker’s events Truckee

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Alois Lageder wines from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Truckee. | (530) 550-5200

Dinners with a mountain view Truckee

DELIVERING THE FUN SINCE 1982

Northstar California presents Mountain Table Dinners, a unique dining experience in Zephyr Lodge. Charles Krug Winery featured with menu of locally and regionally sourced produce and proteins. Live music, dinners family style. Ages 21+. | northstarcalifornia.com

SV Snow Removal facebook.com/thetahoeweekly

@TheTahoeWeekly

thetahoeweekly.com | P (530) 546-5995

14

d Squaw Valley d 10 years experience d Local references d We use shovels & snow blowers Call Bob at (530) 412-2703

FEB. 17 | SATURDAY Warren Miller Ski Day Warren Miller Co. is asking everyone to honor the late Warren Miller and take a ski run for Warren in his memory. Hit your favorite mountain and post to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using #ripwarrenmiller. Tagged photos and videos may be selected for use in the authorized Warren Miller documentary in production. | Warren Miller on Facebook

Big Truck Day Olympic Valley

Kids and families can check out the machinery that makes the mountain tick as part of the Kid-O-Rama festivities at Squaw Valley from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. including a Snow Grooming CAT, Giant Loader, snowmobile, a Squaw Valley Department fire truck, and a 4x4 cart on display across from Rocker at Squaw Valley, along with face painting and warm cookies near the trucks in the afternoon. | squawalpine.com

Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival offers a beginner back-country ski tour, an avalanche course, yoga, skate/ski clinic, intermediate back-country ski tour, snowshoe with your dog, women’s beginner back-country ski tour and Mountainfilm on Tour Festival kickoff party. | alpenglowsports.com

Classic or skate Soda Springs

Auburn Ski Club offers a beginner/advanced cross-country ski clinic for classic and skating from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. $20 includes equipment. | auburnskiclub.org

Get up, get out South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Kickoff to Walking with America starts at 1:30 p.m. for a flash-mob practice. Walking is at 2 p.m. Meet at Lakeview Commons; ends at Heavenly Village (2 miles). Special guest South Lake Mayor Wendy David. Food, music and fun. | walkingwithamerica.com

Writers unite South Lake Tahoe

Young Adult Writers’ Meetup, on the first and third Saturday of each month, is from 3 to 4 p.m. at South Lake Tahoe Library. Meet with fellow writers for an afternoon of socializing, discussion and writing. Laptops available for use in the library. Snacks provided. | (530) 573-3185

Winemaker’s events Olympic Valley

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Alois Lageder wines from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Squaw Valley. | (530) 584-6090

Struggles for survival Truckee

Sierra Speaker Series presents “The Donner Party Chronicles” with Frank Mullen from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Donner Memorial State Park Visitor Center. Author Mullen gives a day-byday account of the Donner Party’s struggle for survival journeying across the trail West. Complimentary refreshments, beverages available for purchase. $5 donation suggested. Free parking. | sierrastateparks.org

Rare gems featured Olympic Valley

Mountainfilm is at Olympic Village Lodge. Mountainfilm screens feature documentaries on environmental issues, epic adventures, eyeopening politics and humanitarian causes, along with short gems and rare films. These films will set the stage for a week of mountain culture, inspiration and education. | mountainfilm.org

Snowshoe stargazing Northstar

This easy-to-moderate snowshoe tour features a talk about the cosmos, poetry reading and telescopic view of the night sky. 2.5

hours long. Meet at 5 p.m. at Northstar Cross Country, Telemark & Snowshoe Center. $66 ages 13+; $47 ages 10 to 12. Snowshoe rentals available for fee. | RSVP northstarcalifornia.com

Snowshoe to dinner Alpine Meadows

Enjoy a snowshoe tour to the mid-mountain Chalet at Alpine Meadows followed by a seated dinner featuring Alps-inspired menu. | RSVP (800) 403-0206

Fetchin’ good time Northstar

The 10th annual Black Tie & Tails Fundraising Gala is at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe. Proceeds go to Humane Society of TruckeeTahoe. $175. | (530) 582-2462

FEB. 17-24 | SATURDAY-SATURDAY Kids, kids everywhere Area venues

Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows offer a weeklong kids’ extravaganza at the annual Kid-O-Rama from Feb. 17 to 24 for kids of all ages. Highlights include the Big Truck Event on Feb. 17 at Squaw Valley and Feb. 20 at Alpine Meadows, as well as street parties and kids’ concerts, a game and craft room, live music, and the debut of Disco Tubing featuring snow tubing with lights, lasers and live music. There are fireworks shows on Feb. 17, 18 and 24, with a Kids S’mores Après Party on Feb. 21 at Alpine Meadows and Feb. 23 at Squaw. | squawalpine.com

FEB. 17-25 | SATURDAY-SUNDAY Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival is a bi-annual, nine-day celebration of humanpowered mountain sports, events, clinics, equipment demos, presentations, films and more. Explores the best activities Lake Tahoe offers and is the only mountain lifestyle event in North America that is almost entirely free and community centric. | alpenglowsports.com

FEB. 18 | SUNDAY Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival offers an avalanche course, yoga, intermediate back-country ski tour, women’s intermediate back-country ski tour, ski/skate clinic, crosscountry touring with your dog and snowshoe happy hour and back-country bartending. | alpenglowsports.com

Tour of ground and sky Tahoe Adventure Company offers The Sun’s Lost Siblings, an astronomy guided snowshoe tour followed by a tour of the sky with Tony Berendsen. From 5 to 9 p.m., 1 to 3 miles. Easy to moderate. Ages 8+. Tour includes equipment, guides, permit fees, hot drinks and snacks. $85. | tahoeadventurecompany.com

Snowshoe to dinner Alpine Meadows

Enjoy a snowshoe tour to the mid-mountain Chalet at Alpine Meadows followed by a seated dinner featuring Alps-inspired menu. | RSVP (800) 403-0206

FEB. 19 | MONDAY Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival offers a beginner back-country ski tour, an avalanche course, yoga, back-country photography seminar and field session, avalanche beacon practice and tailgate talk with Nate Greenberg. | alpenglowsports.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 17


February 15-21, 2018

Courtesy Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows

OUT & ABOUT

For the Kids

Spend the day by Lake Tahoe at NORTH LAKE TAHOE’S ONLY ALL-INCLUSIVE WINTER RECREATION FACILITY

KIDS, KIDS EVERYWHERE Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows offer a weeklong kids’ extravaganza at the annual Kid-O-Rama from Feb. 17 to 24. Kid-O-Rama offers non-stop fun for kids of all ages. Highlights include the Big Truck Event on Feb. 17 at Squaw Valley and Feb. 20 at Alpine Meadows featuring fire trucks, snowplows and grooming machines, with fireworks and coca on Feb. 17, 18 and 24. There are also street parties and kids’ concerts, a game and craft room, live music, and the debut of Disco Tubing featuring snow tubing with lights, lasers and live music. A Kids S’mores Après Party will be held Feb. 21 at Alpine Meadows and Feb. 23 at Squaw. | squawalpine.com

Full Service Bar & Restaurant SLEDDING /// XC SKIING /// ICE SKATING /// SNOWSHOEING

Working with clay

Little ones like to congregate

Children’s Ceramics led by Susan Dorwart are for Grades 1 to 6 at the Truckee Community Arts Center. Ongoing classes will be from 3:45 to 5:15 p.m. on Mondays and Thursdays. Learn to use coils, slabs and sculpture techniques. Pay by the month or pay drop-in fees. | tdrpd.org

Tahoe Tiny Timbers Gym Time at Incline Village Recreation Center is for ages newborn to 5 on Tuesdays and Fridays from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. This is an opportunity for youngsters to socialize and use gross motor skills in a stimulating environment. Caregivers/parents must be present. | yourtahoeplace.com

No screens in the back country

A room for young families

Tahoe Rim Trail Association is hosting its 11th annual Youth Backcountry Camps in partnership with the Tahoe Institute for Natural Science. These exciting four-day adventures get youth away from screens and outside on a lifechanging journey into the wild. Youth participants will make new friends while backpacking 3 to 6 miles per day. They’ll learn new back-country skills and support fellow adventurers in the wild while exploring the flora and fauna of the Tahoe Basin. Youth participants are provided all gear, food and instruction. The camps are available to ages 12 to 14 from June 19 to 22 and July 23 to 26. The camps are available to ages 14 to 17 from July 9 to 12 and Aug. 20 to 23. The cost is $365 per person. Registration is open now. Partial scholarships are available. | tahoerimtrail.org  

The Family Room program resumes Monday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to noon in Room 19 at Truckee Elementary. The Family Room is a Spanish and English program dedicated to encouraging the development of literacy and school readiness in age 3 and younger. Activities include a mix of reading, music and crafts, while parents create supportive peer networks. The room includes a free lending library of English and Spanish children’s books. | truckeefrc.org

Making the scene

Teen Scene is every Friday night at the Kahle Community Center in Stateline, Nev., from 6:30 to 9 p.m. for Grades 6 to 12. Kids can shoot hoops, play volleyball, climb the rock wall and play arcade or video games. The night is free to passholders or $5 for drop-ins. | (775) 586-7271

W INTER S PORTS P ARK . COM | 530-583-1516

TAHOE CITY, CA

Ice skating, dancing lessons Truckee Regional Park Ice Rink is the place for ice-skating lessons with Gus Gustafson. Classes are Friday afternoons and Saturday mornings for ages 3 to 6 and beginners 1 and 2 and intermediates ages 5 and older. Adults are welcome to join in the classes if they are willing to learn with children. Ice-dancing lessons will also be offered with Gustafson for ages 13 and older. Skaters must be intermediate or advanced ice skaters. No partner is necessary to attend. The 30-minute lessons over three weeks will include basic steps and beginning dances. | tdrpd.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities.

LESSONS & RENTALS SNOWSHOEING COZY DAY LODGE

65KM OF GROOMED TRAILS TRAILSIDE DAY HUTS FULL SERVICE CAFE

T AHOE XC . ORG | 530-583-5475 15


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

BEWITCHED BY THE BACK COUNTRY SKIING WITH JEREMY BENSON

The view south along the Pacific Crest from Andesite Peak.

STORY & PHOTOS BY SEAN MCALINDIN

“I loathe lift lines,” says “Backcountry Ski & Snowboard Routes: California” guidebook author Jeremy Benson. “I can’t stand the powder frenzy. I like to hike and ski smooth snow on my own time.” In the age of Internet information availability, there is still something to be said for holding a solid guidebook in your hands. The amount of time, dedication to detail and penchant for exploration it took to compile this well-written compendium is impressive. And I’m more apt to explore new areas once I’ve opened it. Benson estimates he spent thousands of hours preparing the book. “It got me to explore some places that are off the beaten path,” he says. As we skirt the Sugar Bowl ski-area boundary

ABOVE: Benson looks from the cornice into the void. LEFT: Local author and athlete Jeremy Benson climbs

the northern ridge of Mount Judah. BELOW: Benson skis heavy powder in the northeast

glades on Mount Judah.

16

to the north and make our way up to the radio reflection towers of Mount Judah, the previous night’s snowstorm is still gently blowing through after delivering several inches of thick powder on the ski track Benson set three days earlier. Due to the low tide of this year’s Tahoe winter, Judah Express is now open but Summit Chair is not. The ski area boundary is marked, but the conditions are not regularly monitored or maintained by Sugar Bowl. On reaching the summit, Benson skis to the edge of a formidable cornice and looks out over the misty forest below. There have been several natural snow slides already this morning. Benson stomps at the cornice edge to see how the snow reacts. It doesn’t take much to send the heavy blocks of Sierra cement tumbling down the avalanche path. “I love breaking cornices,” he says. “It’s one of my favorite things to do.” We ski a little farther up the crest until Benson spots a suitable spot to drop into the east side of the mountain. A handful of heavy turns lead us through a steep gully and onto the debris field of the slide. Although the snow is rather thin, the slide has piled up at least 10 feet of heavy glop beneath us. A fullgrown pine tree has snapped in half vertically from the pressure. It’s a fine demonstration of how even a small avalanche can have powerful effects. We skin through the tranquil forest and up the northern shoulder of Judah. Back on top, we drop through some rocks and down a gently sloping glade with decent shin-deep snow. It’s certainly the first real powder turns I’ve had in the reluctant winter of 2017-18.

“I’VE SKIED ALL THE ROUTES A N D TA K E N THE TIME TO GET THE I N F O R M AT I O N CORRECT AND INCLUDE R E L E VA N T PHOTOS.” –Jeremy Benson

Benson grew up in southern Connecticut before attending Saint Michael’s College in Vermont where he skied Stowe and other East Coast stalwarts four to five times a week. “If you grow up appreciating skiing on the East Coast hard pack and ice, pretty much anything out here is going to be amazing,” he says. Since moving to Tahoe in 2001, Benson has averaged 120 to 150 days a year while waiting tables, gear testing and freelance writing by night. When he’s not skinning and skiing, Benson heads for drier country to feed an avid mountain-bike racing habit. “I’m all about year-round fitness by biking in the summer and skiing in the winter, but lately I’ve been mixing them around a bit with the unpredictable weather we’ve experienced,” he says. He released his first guidebook with publisher Mountaineers Books, “Mountain Bike Tahoe: 50 Select Singletrack Routes,” last spring. “Backcountry

Ski & Snowboard Routes: California” came out in October and has already sold more than 2,000 copies. The guidebook covers everything from the southern Cascades of Mount Shasta and Mount Lassen through the Lost Sierra, Lake Tahoe, the East Side and all the way down to the southern end of the Sierra Nevada. While Paul Richens Jr.’s 1999 publication of “50 Classic Backcountry Ski and Snowboard Routes in California: Mount Shasta to Mount Whitney,” features many well-known overnight treks throughout the region, Benson’s book includes nearly 100 mostly day trips. “I’m out trekking every week, but it’s only once or twice a year that I overnight, so I thought this guide would be helpful to most back-country enthusiasts,” he says. “I’ve skied all the routes and taken the time to get the information correct and include relevant photos.” After another quick lap to the top, we ski off the summit and down to the parking lot, visions of a pure, cold, vaporous land still lingering in our minds. There’s so much to explore in the California winter if only we had more time. | mountaineersbooks.org or jeremywbenson.blogspot.com n


February 15-21, 2018

OUT & ABOUT

EVENTS FEB. 19 | MONDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

Rethinking education South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Mountain Lab hosts member Blake Boles from noon to 1:30 p.m. Topics examined will include cultural beliefs around college, entering the professional class and adult management of youth’s time and experiences; the consequences of these beliefs and how to rethink, re-prioritize and relax. Free; light lunch. | tahoemountainlab.com

FEB. 20 | TUESDAY Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival offers an intermediate back-country ski tour, yoga, women’s beginner back-country ski tour, back-country photography seminar and field session, tools for basic back-country travel lesson, how to cook with cast-iron skillets lesson and tailgate talk with Phantom Wax application demo. | alpenglowsports.com

Big Truck Day Alpine Meadows

Kids and families can check out the machinery that makes the mountain tick as part of the Kid-O-Rama festivities from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Alpine Meadows ski area including a Snow Grooming CAT, snowmobiles, and other machines. | squawalpine.com

Meet and support South Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe Women in Networking is at Tahoe Mountain Lab from noon to 1:30 p.m. The group’s purpose is to foster friendships, support others’ business ventures and assist community philanthropies. | tahoemountainlab.com

S.T.E.A.M. Tuesdays Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library offers kids a fun way to explore different ways to learn about technology. From 4 to 5 p.m. A new activity each week. On the first, third and fourth Tuesday of the month. | (775) 832-3140

Young professional mixer Incline Village, Nev. Tahoe Regional Young Professionals hosts a mixer from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Local. $10, free members. | tahoetryp.org

Give or get help South Lake Tahoe

Ink(ubator) is a roundtable discussion for entrepreneurs at Tahoe Mountain Lab from 6 to 8 p.m. Talk about your latest endeavor, roadblock and success. Get help and advice or give some out to someone else. Every third Tuesday of the month. | tahoemountainlab.com

Whatever your genre Meyers

Tahoe Writers Works is an open workshop for writers of any genre. Meets every other Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Bona Fide HQ. | bonafidebooks.com

FEB. 21 | WEDNESDAY Meet the Mayor South Lake Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe Mayor Wendy David hosts a community conversation at 9 a.m. at the Senior Center with councilmember Brooke Laine.

Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival offers a beginner back-country ski tour, yoga, intermediate back-country ski tour, avalanche rescue workshop, intermediate ski/skate clinic, adventure writing workshop and Tahoe Backcountry Women talk. | alpenglowsports.com

Nevada going high tech Incline Village, Nev. Sierra Nevada College Tahoe Business Speaker Series features Ed Zschau, a former U.S. congressman and Silicon Valley CEO. He will discuss why Northern Nevada is poised to become a vibrant high-tech enterprise center and how education, entrepreneurship and economic development initiatives are making possible. From 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at SNC Tahoe Center for Environmental Science, Room 139. Free and open to the public. | sierranevada.edu

Help from the young Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts Senior to Senior from 2 to 3:30 p.m. A group of tech-savvy seniors from Incline High School will be available to help older persons with computer-related questions. Bring laptop, tablet, phone, e-reader or other device and learn something new. | (775) 832-4130

In English and Spanish Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library offers Bilingual Story Time from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Features stories, finger plays and wiggle action as part of the experience to encourage a love of books. Third Wednesday of every month. | (775) 832-4130

Radon talk Incline Village, Nev.

IVGID Public Works offers a free radon presentation at 6 p.m. at Incline Recreation Center. Radon is the primary cause of lung cancer among non-smokers and elevated levels of radon have been found in 34 percent in Incline Village homes. | ivgid.org

FEB. 22 | THURSDAY

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Winter is for everyone Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Winter Mountain Festival offers an intermediate and beginner backcountry ski tours, yoga, avalanche beacon practice and film series. | alpenglowsports.com

Back by popular demand Incline Village, Nev. Diamond Peak Ski Resort hosts Retro Ski Film + Speaker Series at The Chateau at 5 p.m. A brief presentation by a speaker TBD, followed by screening of Warren Miller’s “In Search of Skiing.” No-host bar and popcorn. Free. | diamondpeak.com

Mix it up Truckee Truckee Chamber of Commerce is hosting a mixer at Tahoe Oil & Spice from 5 to 7 p.m. | truckee.com

Benefit dinner Truckee

Mountain Area Preservation offers a benefit dinner at Stella Restaurant from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. The fundraiser includes a four-course dinner with passed canapes and wine pairings. A vegetarian option is available. $200/person. | RSVP (530) 582-6751

Impact of small changes South Lake Tahoe

“One Degree of Change,” a community conversation about elevating the Tahoe area is presented by El Dorado Community Foundation at 6:30 p.m. at Lake Tahoe Community College. Speakers include the foundation’s Bill Roby, Chris McNamara and Darcie Goodman Collins. Free; registration required. | eventbrite.com

Free film series Olympic Valley

The 12th annual Alpenglow Winter Film Series continues with “The Mountain, An Arrow Pointing Up” featuring alpinist Barry Blanchard. At Olympic Valley Lodge. Doors open at 7 p.m. Free. | alpenglowsports.com

The Ultimate Destination The Incline Village Visitors Center is your North Lake Tahoe concierge offering: Discounted single-day ski tickets | Art gallery | Locally curated gift shop Winter hours: Monday–Friday 8:30am–5pm | Weekends & Holidays 10am–4pm

Discover Lake Tahoe’s breathtaking landscape, rich history and unique culture when you book one of the following activities through ActivityTickets.com ~ Alpenglow Expeditions in Squaw Valley Learn backcountry skiing and riding from the experts. Borges Sleigh and Carriage Rides at Sand Harbor Glide along the shores with breathtaking Tahoe views. Tahoe Adventure Company Experience a full moon kayak or forest snowshoe. Carson City Symphony Discover classical music in the Sierra. ActivityTickets.com | (800) Go-Tahoe Incline Village Visitors Center 969 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village, NV

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events. 17


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Courtesy Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows

Deep ‘n’ Daring Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Deep ‘n’ Daring events. Honor Warren Miller

HIT THE SLOPES,

SHRED T H E LOV E

Boarding for Breast Cancer’s Shred the Love is Feb. 16 and 17 at Alpine Meadows. The event includes a ski and snowboard lap-a-thon, tribute ride, silent auction and music by Chi McClean. The festivities will start with an art auction, coffee and Jazz Cider performing at Dark Horse Coffee in Truckee. | Register b4bc.org

18

The outpouring of sentiment from Warren Miller’s recent passing has been overwhelming, and many have asked how to honor his life, according to Warren Miller Co. Miller did not want a public memorial service. Instead, he simply wanted skiers and riders to hit a favorite run or do something else in his memory.  On Feb. 17, Warren Miller Co. is asking everyone to honor his wishes and take a run for Warren. Hit your favorite mountain and post to Instagram, Twitter or Facebook using #ripwarrenmiller. Tagged photos and videos may be selected for use in the authorized Warren Miller documentary in production. | Warren Miller on Facebook

Back-country avalanche ed Tahoe Donner North American Ski Training Center is providing back-country guiding and avalanche education at Tahoe Donner Adventure Center on Feb. 23 and March 3. Get out and explore the back-country skiing with professional instructors and guides. A trail pass is required for any off-piste skiing or boarding within the cross-country ski area boundary. Space is limited. Reservations are suggested. Beginners are welcome. | (530) 386-2102

Wax dem skis, boards Soda Springs Boreal Mountain Resort hosts The Airblaster Board Games on Feb. 24 at 9

a.m. with Subaru WinterFest at Boreal Ski Resort is Feb. 24 and 25. Demo the latest equipment from Nordica and LibTech, grab great giveaways and hot chocolate, support Adaptive Sports Chapter, participate in the Subaru scavenger hunt or take a group photo in the giant Subaru Adirondack chair. The Subaru/Leave No Trace Traveling Trainers will educate the winter sports community about to enjoy the snow ethically and responsibly. | rideboreal.com

No spillage allowed South Lake Tahoe Camp Richardson Resort’s annual snowshoe cocktail races are on Feb. 17 and March 17, a favorite with visitors and locals. Racers, cocktail trays in hand, navigate through obstacles and up and down the beach. The winner is the fastest and cleanest — no spillage allowed — at the finish. Competitors can win prizes that range from snowshoes and dining certificates to equipment and marina rentals. Registration is free and there are multiple race categories. Snowshoes are provided. | camprichardson.com

Family race fun Olympic Valley Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Foundation hosts Peak2Peak Family Fun Race on Feb. 21 at Squaw Valley NASTAR race course at 10 a.m. Kids and adults of any age, regardless of experience, can

race a giant slalom and parallel slalom in family categories. Register on race day at Wildflour Bakery at 8 a.m. or online. Proceeds will benefit the foundation. | squawalpine.com

Motorized avalanche training Sierra Avalanche Center offers a 24hour course that provides an introduction to avalanche risk management for motorized users. Learning will occur through a mix of classroom and field practice, with an emphasis on field practice whenever possible. This course follows the guidelines for Recreational Level I Avalanche Training as established by the American Avalanche Association. Classes will be offered from Feb. 23 to 25 in South Lake Tahoe; and March 2 to 4 in Incline Village, Nev. | sierraavalanchecenter.org

Shreddit Showdown accepting films Truckee Granite Chief ’s fifth annual Shreddit Showdown Ski Movie Contest is accepting 3-minute ski movies from Feb. 15 to 25. Film categories include Adult, Teen Grom and Filmmaker. Award categories include Grand, Second, Third, People’s Choice and Silver Bullet. Prizes range from skis and boots to an avalanche airbag. The Shreddie Awards will be on March 8 at Tahoe City Art Haus & Cinema. | granitechief.com


February 15-21, 2018

Arts

& CULTURE

THE ARTS

CREATIVE AWARENESS

The Three Dot Brotherhood STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

Support Tahoe City arts, culture center Siren Arts at Tahoe City, a local grassroots organization, has begun a community campaign for a multi-use community space to be developed in Tahoe City, and has identified the former Tahoe City firehouse and Community Center as a potential location. These buildings sit on part of the parcel that is Commons Beach, which was deeded “to the people of Tahoe City” through an Act of Congress by Ulysses S. Grant in 1872. Placer County, which owns the land, is actively considering uses for the

L

ake Tahoe has always attracted those with big dreams and the imaginative bent to make them a reality. Yet for every C. F. McGlashan or Alexander Cushing there have been scores of unknowns who banded together to build something from nothing. It’s common for Tahoe locals to start their own businesses on the side to supplement their incomes as they scrape out a living in this beautiful place. Still others dive in head first staking their livelihood and reputations on the line as they pursue their passions. One studio in King’s Beach is setting a model for strategic partnership in the world of craftsmanship. Hidden high on Speckled Avenue on the north end of the grid is a unique space known as Three Dot Studios. Brothers in craft Andy Cline, Tyler Joersz and Devin Price first met at a Crystal Bay construction job site in 2006. “Cline came in to build this crazy hand rail,” says Joersz. “He had a mohawk and his crew started by

ABOVE: From left, Julian Sanders, Devin Price, Andy Cline and Tyler Joersz of Three Dot Studios. BELOW: A piece created by Roundwood Furniture. | Courtesy Three Dot Studios

Firehouse properties and has issued a Request for Information to see what type of outside interest comes forward to develop the buildings. Siren Arts is responding to the RFI with a proposal to create an arts and

Ukuleles created by Tyde Music. | Courtesy Three Dot Studios

cultural facility that can host a number of uses for the community. Imagine a space in the heart of town that hosts classrooms for workshops, artist studio spaces, art gallery, a 250-retractable seat theater, a place to hold year-round farmers’ markets, local events, affordable live/work housing and much more. Siren Arts is seeking support for the idea of a community center at the Firehouse properties and is asking community members to visit the Web site to learn more, to watch its presentation and to sign up to voice support for the idea of a community center. The Tahoe Weekly is a supporter of the proposal. Should Placer County choose Siren Arts’ proposal, there would be a public process with an opportunity to offer input for uses of the property. | sirenarts.org

playing music that we actually liked. We’ve been building together ever since.” When the Great Recession hit in 2007, Cline decided to abandon the struggling construction market and commit himself fully to his own furniture business that he had first started as a side gig seven years earlier. “It was a desire I had to make a change,” he says. “I brought these guys along to that end.” Together they went all in at Roundwood Furniture creating functional art using organic, rustic, recycled metals and exotic hardwoods. “Ninety-nine percent of our materials are reclaimed from the Tahoe Basin via cabins, boat houses, piers and fences,” says Cline. “The intensity of the conditions on the lake are magnified in the wood. The wind, weather and sand increases the impact. Instead of going into the ground it gets turned into functional art where it has another life and a story that gets shared with others. Lake Tahoe brought 60 years of tattooing on it and the character of that piece is now brought into someone’s living space. There’s something that happens with that process that doesn’t

“I DON’T THINK ANY O F U S W O U L D H AV E ARTISTIC SUCCESS IF WE WEREN’T IN A GROUP TOGETHER. IT’S PEOPLE HELPING EACH OTHER TO SUCCEED.” –Andy Cline happen with new wood that brings it to the next level.” After a few years of furniture building with Cline, Joersz and Price noticed the piles of scrap wood building up outside of the shop. Rather than haul them to the dump, they began to fashion this usable material into musical instruments. Hence, Tyde Music was born in 2010.

“Right out of the gate, our ukuleles were more popular that the typi-cal luthier builds because of our artistic approach and the materials we use,” says Joersz. “We let Mother Nature speak to us in the build. We even try to find a way to use nail holes as sound portals.You get the beauty of wood and sound of the wood. The sound they make makes people happy.” The team came up with the title and ellipsis logo of Three Dot Studios to cover both companies and Tyde Music now has its own luthiery workshop next to Roundwood Furniture. They most recently brought on digital artist Julian Sanders who specializes in computer-generated inlays. By sparring their various trades in a shared space, the artists are able to think outside the box and use atypical tools to accomplish pioneering designs in both furniture and luthiery. “It’s really an artistic collaborative,” says Cline. “It stems from our experience with the creative process. It’s a constant blossoming of how one idea breeds more ideas. By the time we’re done with one design, we have three more designs that I am dying to try. Other people that see our work are then inspired. For us it’s a lot of telling the story of Mother Nature, but in reality, I don’t think any of us would have artistic success if we weren’t in a group together. It’s people helping each other to succeed.” | threedotstudios.com 

19


THE ARTS

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Arts

THE

NATURE

UNCHECKED Gallery Keoki in the Village at Squaw Valley hosts Keoki Flagg’s newest Image Collection release on Feb. 17 from 5 to 7 p.m. For eight days, Flagg island hopped in Ecuador and took photos of the region, which is protected under a National Park system. “The natural world with all of its wonders has always been my source of creative inspiration,” says Flagg. “Exploring earth and experiencing new places brings an emotional immediacy and vibrancy to my artistic voice. Representing beautiful nature unchecked, the Galapagos has always been one of those magical places that have beckoned, filling my imagination with visions of exotic wildlife.” He also shot underwater with his standard Nikon D810 pro camera encased in a water housing. “Day after day I was exposed to beautiful raw earth and magnificent creatures. It touched me deeply, inspiring a sense of the magic of natural life and the act of immersing oneself into the wild. I was reminded that there was no other moment than now,” he says. There will be a slideshow presentation of his experience along with the unveiling of his newest world adventure collection. No RSVP is necessary; kids are welcome. | gallerykeoki.com

Art of the Basin and Range Incline Village, Nev. “Basin and Range” features 18 Southern Nevada artists who were invited to create as a response to and in honor of a tract of Nevada land covering 700,000 acres, now identified as the Basin and Range National Monument. This area not only includes wildlife and desert landscapes and formations, but also ancient and contemporary artwork: petroglyphs carved an estimated 4,000 years ago and Michael Heizer’s mile-long “City.” The exhibit will be at the Tahoe Gallery until March 23. An artists’ talk and reception is on Feb. 15 from 5 to 7 p.m. “Volte-Face” (about face) by Bryan Cera explores the motif of the human face through a collection of digitally fabricated sculptures and images. Through many forms of mediating the human image, Cera invites viewers to examine both utopian and cynical elements of emergent technologies and the ways they shape human identity. It will be on display until March 9 at Garage Door Gallery. | sierranevada.edu

“Galapagos” Keoki Flagg | Gallery Keoki

Plating delicious photos South Lake Tahoe Benko Art Gallery announces a show of South Lake Tahoe macro photographer David Mori until March 15. The beauty of the forms that we see almost every day in local nature are rendered in black and white film and digital photography. Mori is also an accomplished culinary artist whose career has taken him as far as Antarctica. His imagery incorporates his focus on textures and the abstract patterns and compositions that he sees through the lens, plating Tahoe’s natural forms for the viewer to savor. An opening event will be on Feb. 17 from 6 to 11 p.m. Make Tahoe Quantum – An Art Show (within an art show), is a monthly, curated installment presented by maketahoe.com at Benko Art Gallery. | (530) 600-3264

Get in your element Truckee Truckee Public Arts Commission is calling for submissions for the spring  exhibit at the Truckee Donner Community Recreation Center; it will be called “Elements: Our Region.” The exhibit will feature paintings, drawings, sculpture and photography and will be on display from March to June. An opening reception will be held on March 9 from 5 to 7 p.m. All media will be accepted. Submissions are due on Feb. 16. Everyone is encouraged to participate. Guidelines and entry forms are available online. | tdrpd.org

Art of Burning Man talk South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League announces a general meeting on Feb. 21 from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Aspen Room at Lake Tahoe Community College. At 8 p.m. “The Art of Burning Man: Three Local Artists Present on Their Burning Man Art Projects” will start. The artists are Malcolm Tibbetts, Jessica Levine and Jared Benvenuto. | talart.org

Tahoe art work wanted South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Arts Alliance is calling for artists to display in South Lake Tahoe City Hall Art Gallery. Installations will rotate on a quarterly basis. The gallery space consists of several walls in the lobby of City Hall and will be seen by all those coming to the airport. Preference will be given to artists and art organizations residing in South Lake


February 15-21, 2018

Silky animals of the wild Reno, Nev. Miranda Roberts presents “Wild About Silk” with paintings of the illustrated children’s animals from her soon-to-bepublished new book for children entitled “Moyo’s Journey.” The colorful exhibit will be at South Valleys Library until Feb. 21. | (775) 851-5190

THE ARTS

Don’t Just Decorate...Define Your Space.

TM

Reflecting permanence Reno, Nev. University of Nevada, Reno art department alumnus Joan Arrizabalaga will mount a solo exhibition, “Reflections,” as part of University Galleries’ exhibition series that investigates the permanent collection. It will be on display until Feb. 23 at UNR’s Sheppard Contemporary, Church Fine Arts. | unr.edu

Proud, assertive Australian artists

ki Tahoe and artwork with a Tahoe theme. The first installation will be on March 4 with an opening of March 5. The installation will be on display until June 16. Exhibitors will be chosen by Feb. 21. | info@tahoeartalliance.org

Unsettling exhibit Carson City, Nev. For nearly a decade, Reno photographer Paul Baker Prindle has documented sites from California to New York that look extraordinarily ordinary. Yet each of these places and their everyday landscapes has a horrific story to tell. Each photograph is of a location where gay men, lesbians and transgender individuals were murdered. Baker Prindle’s series, “Memento Mori,” is the featured exhibit at the Nevada Arts Council’s OXS Gallery through March 9.

Reno, Nev. “Marking the Infinite: Contemporary Women Artists from Aboriginal Australia” presents nine women at the forefront of international contemporary art. Featuring 70 works in media ranging from paintings on canvas, paper and eucalyptus bark, to woven installations and video projections, the show is both culturally specific and globally alert. Organized by the Nevada Museum of Art, Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery,  Marking the Infinite will be on view from Feb. 17 through May 13. Although hailing from some of the most remote communities on the planet, the work of the nine women artists speaks loudly and clearly to the contemporary age. The artists are: Nonggirrnga Marawili, Wintjiya Napaltjarri, Yukultji Napangati, Angeline Pwerle, Carlene West, Regina Pilawuk Wilson, Lena Yarinkura, Gulumbu Yunupingu and Nyapanyapa Yunupingu. While these women are some of the most acclaimed Australian artists working today, for many it is their first exposure to American audiences. Their artworks are proud assertions of who they are and their pride in their communities. | nevadaart.org

Art at the library Incline Village, Nev. Monika Piper Johnson’s artwork will be on display at Incline Village Library through February. She is an award-winning plein air oil painter living in Incline Village, Nev. She started painting still lifes and moved to landscapes. Her work can also be seen in James Harold Galleries in Tahoe City and Village Interiors and Cobalt Artist Studio in Incline Village. | (775) 832-4130

Untitled

Paul Baker Prindle | OXS Gallery

“Human lives were forever ended in ignominious, plain places and I’ve purposely recorded these locals after years of growth and development have obscured any traces that once scarred the land. Each site I visited was an unsettling disappointment, bearing few, if any, clues to the value of the life that ended there. The photograph produced is a weak, but concrete, tie back to the criminal events that occurred at each site,” says Baker Prindle. An artist’s reception and talk is Feb. 20 at 5:30 p.m. | nvculture.org

Keoki Flagg Fine Art Photography From All Seven Continents For a complimentary consultation please contact Lynn Gibson, (530) 414-8500, lynn@gallerykeoki.com Please join us on February 17th, from 5-7 pm for an artist reception and new image unveiling.

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Roaring good art show Truckee Riverside Studios and High Fives Foundation seventh annual Lion Heart Art Show will be on display until the end of February. This show feature artists who made masterpieces using 12-inchby-12-inch panels of wood. Each panel sells for $100. Proceeds will benefit the CR Johnson Healing Center, a program service of the High Fives Foundation that provides resources to athletes in recovery from a sports-related injury. | riversideartstudios.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Arts.

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FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. MOVIES: What was the title of the first James Bond movie? 2. MUSIC: How old was Sid Vicious of the “Sex Pistols” when he died? 3. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the birthstone for the month of February? 4. U.S. PRESIDENTS: What were the names of President Barack Obama’s family dogs? 5. TELEVISION: Who played the lead in the TV series “The Rockford Files”? 6. TRANSPORTATION: What is the large airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic? 7. MEASUREMENTS: How many acres are in a hectare? 8. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Iceland? 9. LANGUAGE: What does the word “cognoscente” mean? 10. HISTORY: “The Summer of Love” in 1967 is associated with which U.S. city?

Hocus Focus differences: 1. Car is different, 2. Leg is moved, 3. Hair is different, 4. Pocketbook is missing, 5. Sign is different, 6. Basement window is missing. Trivia Test: 1. “Dr. No,” starring Sean Connery, 2. 21, 3. Amethyst, 4. Bo and Sunny, 5. James Garner, 6. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, 7. 100, 8. Reykjavik, 9. A connoisseur, 10. San Francisco.

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February 15-21, 2018

Horoscopes

FIRE

FUN & GAMES

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19)

by Samantha Weaver

According to the National Chicken Council’s annual Chicken Wing Report – yes, there is such a report, and it is strategically timed for release just before the Super Bowl – 1.35 billion wings were consumed during Super Bowl weekend this year. That’s an all-time high; the number crunchers have determined that if all those wings were laid end-to-end, the resulting line of poultry would stretch 394 million feet. That would be long enough to circle the Earth three times – or to cross a road 13 million times.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23)

The world is your oyster. Now, why don’t others quite recognize that? You are willing to share it… Playing with wild ideas and concepts has everyone talking these days. For your part, you want to dive right in and deeply too. Engaging with others to share the experience is a source of excitement and inspiration. But first, you want to make it clear whose oyster it is…

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20)

A concentrated, creative focus is underway. You are determined to make positive changes in your overall life flow. Financial increase is likely to be a central theme. A learning curve is implied and may require that you share knowledge and skills development as much as receive it. The time is right to entertain new methods and strategies.

Strange but true

Are you ready to take new initiatives? Well, ready or not, the time has come for you to do so. This will become increasingly apparent over the next 2-3 weeks and will linger throughout spring too. The main thing now is an attitude of willingness. Once it is securely in place, your focus and determination to succeed will come to the fore.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20)

Sometimes you want to go big, while at others you want to dive deep, and sometimes you want both, like now. How to achieve this goal is for you to decide. At worst, you are feeling a push-pull stress factor going on inside you. The solution to the riddle is available regardless of your circumstance. Ask how and be open to receive an answer.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22)

Gadzooks Picasso, you are feeling creative these days. Whether playing, dancing, performing, inventing, expressing, creating, making love…, you are in the mood to try new approaches. Your ambitions are strong and your energy levels are high so the time is right to take the initiative. Think beyond usual perimeters and parameters then ride that thought wave.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21)

Reaching beyond existing limits continues. A financial increase is featured. Yet, you feel determined to do it your way. While you want more, you are extra reluctant to settle for average or ordinary. This resolve may be pushing you, therefore, to be inventive. Brainstorming for ideas is likely too. Go crazy and get outlandish to stretch your mind.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21)

Big shifts are shaking and they may be leaving you feeling a bit insecure. Yet, these can be interpreted as representing an invitation to expand your perspectives. Doing so may require courage, so add that to the top of your objectives. Consider that over analysis and excess imagination are the instigators of fear.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

Your ambitions continue to steadily rise. You are inspired by the prospect of revealing yet another layer of what makes you unique and special. Yet, you also feel like ducking out of the limelight these days. This is a call within to lay claim to what makes you special to you yourself. It likely has to do with enjoying creative expression, as an end in itself.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22)

Talk about multi-dimensionality! Okay, perhaps you are simply multitasking. Either way, you are digging deeper than you have for a while. This is producing a process of change in your attitude and usual lifestyle rhythms. Exercising more discipline with time management could prove helpful, even necessary. Play with time and break free of repetitive patterns.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

You are undergoing a mini-cycle of change. You usual self-concept and mode of perspectives is under review. Strange and inexplicable events may be prompting you to question things, perhaps everything. This can be the source of anxiety. Keep breathing and allow the process to unfold. Enjoy entertaining concepts and perspectives you have not before considered.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21)

Sometimes we expand without and sometimes within and sometimes both. This is one of those times when inner and outer reaching is important, perhaps necessary. The outer reach is to open your mind to new perspectives and interpretations. The inner reach is to access hidden reserves of faith. Help is available in both domains, but you have to ask for it.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

Many changes over the past year continue to produce waves both within and without. Although it is likely that your scope of friends and alliances has likely grown, you find yourself having to access courage and face some fears. Knowing your best direction is extra important now and this is a core motivation behind your process.

23


MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

The Mystery of the Red Violin STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

FEBRUARY 15-22, 2018

FEB. 15 | THURSDAY Elizabeth Pitcairn will perform with TOCCATA on the legendary Red Mendelssohn Stradivarius.

Feb. 17 | 3:30 p.m. Cornerstone Church Incline Village, Nev.

Feb. 18 | 3:30 p.m. St. Gall Catholic Church Gardnerville, Nev.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 4 p.m. Bias and Dunn Cottonwood 7 p.m. Northstar McP’s Pub 8 p.m. The Chuck Hughes Trio Moody’s 8 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Amir K w/Benji Aflalo The Improv 9 p.m.

Feb. 23 | 7 p.m. St. Theresa Catholic Church South Lake Tahoe

Feb. 25 | 3:30 p.m. St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church | Reno, Nev.

CLASSICAL

T

here are few things humans like more than a good mystery — other than solving one, of course. When Elizabeth Pitcairn’s grandfather put forth a $1.6-million secret bid at a 1990 Christie’s auction to win ownership of the legendary Red Mendelssohn Stradivarius violin, she was just shy of her 17th birthday. In 1720, Antonio Stradivari crafted the historic instrument at his small shop in Cremona, Italy. It is said to be from the golden period of Stradivari’s work, which includes some of the most acoustically perfect creations ever achieved by man. For nearly two centuries, the whereabouts of the violin were unknown. Those years were beautifully reimagined in the fictional 1998 Canadian film “The Red Violin.” Eventually the instrument found its way into the hands of Hungarian violinist and composer Joseph Joachim, who was a close collaborator of Johannes Brahms. It surfaced again in 1930s Berlin when bought by descendants of composer Felix Mendelssohn. The violin was still in impeccable condition by the time it was won at auction by the Pitcairns on Thanksgiving Day.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Watch Elizabeth Pitcairn perform Cantabile with TOCCATA

“It was the most amazing violin I’d ever played,” says Pitcairn. “I immediately fell in love with it.” Heiress to the PPG Industries fortune of a Scottish industrial family from Pittsburg, Pitcairn has studied violin since she was age 3. 24

“ This violin is very much like a fine wine. It has this bouquet of color sensations and sounds. Something happens in the middle of the piece and I’m just like, ‘Wow.’ I get prickles. You have to wonder what you have in your hands and who’s played it.” –Elizabeth Pitcairn “My great-grandfather started the company and my grandfather was an art collector and philanthropist,” she says. “We were one of the original Scottish immigrant families to come over around the same time as the Rockefellers and the Carnegies. PPG at one time manufactured 70 percent of plate glass in America.” Her distant relatives also had a hand in naming the South Pacific’s Pitcairn Islands of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame. While she continued her musical education at University of Southern California, Pitcairn kept the violin a secret until her public concerts with the mysteriously euphonious instrument began to garner attention. “Ever since then it’s been pretty much a whirlwind,” she says. “[The red violin] attracts a lot of people into concerts halls that wouldn’t normally go there. And it helps to raise money for special causes and my music camp, Luzerne Music Center, in upstate New York.” The quality of a Stradivarius is defined by three things: power of projection, ease of execution and beauty of sound. “It’s a particular type of instrument that asks you to play a certain way,” says Pitcairn. “So, the better your technique, the more you get out the instrument.” Although they been together now for 28

years, she doesn’t consider herself the owner of the violin, but more of a passing companion. “This violin is very much like a fine wine,” she says. “It has this bouquet of color sensations and sounds. Something happens in the middle of the piece and I’m just like, ‘Wow.’ I get prickles. You have to wonder what you have in your hands and who’s played it.” Pitcairn returns to Tahoe to join TOCCATA’s 13th Winter MusicFest from Feb. 17 to 25. “I love what James does,” says Pitcairn of TOCCATA conductor James Rawie. “He’s an entrepreneur and self-starter. He really cares about his musicians and his singers. Once I went up there and played, I continued to visit twice a year. This community is really special for me. It’s like my second family at this point. I feel so appreciative for everyone and the audience makes me want to keep coming back.” Pitcairn will be performing Concerto No. 4 in D Major by Mozart and Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso in A minor, Op. 28 by Camille Saint-Saëns.  For more information and tickets, call (775) 515-7077 or visit toccatatahoe.com. Pitcairn is currently accepting scholarship applications for Luzerne Music Center summer youth programs at luzernemusic.org.

RENO & BEYOND Lee Jones Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tully Green Bella Fiore Wines 5:30 p.m. Johnathan Barton Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Denver Saunders Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Kyle Rea Orchestra Peppermill 7 p.m. Frank Perry Jazz Combo 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Havok, Condemned Existence Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Atomika Atlantis 8 p.m. Krashkarma/Qarin/American Slacker Society Shea’s Tavern 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ R3volver Silver Legacy 9 p.m. DJ Mo Funk Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Enfo & Twyman Peppermill 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Comedy Night at the Lex Grand Sierra 7 p.m. “Open House” Restless Artists Theatre 7:30 p.m. “The Royale” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Magic of Eli Kerr Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “The Lion in Winter” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Joe Dosch Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

FEB. 16 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Lee Jones Gunbarrel Tavern 11 a.m. Live music Plaza Bar 3 p.m. Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 4 p.m. Mel Wade & Gia Nakoma 5 p.m. Pete Charles & Gary Stutz Auld Dubliner 7 p.m. Jazz Cider Dark Horse Coffee 7 p.m. Panda Cottonwood 7 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Steve & Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Christopher Hawley Rollers Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Ron’s Garage McP’s Pub 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Dead Winter Carpenters w/Front Country Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Afroman Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. New Wave Crave Bar of America 9:30 p.m. Michael Russell Trio Fat Cat Bar 10 p.m. Sage Armstrong w/Nandez The Loft 10 p.m.


February 15-21, 2018

RENO & BEYOND Atomika Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Starlighters Boomtown 5 p.m. Jack Di Carlo Gold Hill Hotel 5:30 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Tune Yards Cargo 7:30 p.m. Art Lande Laughing Planet Café 7:30 p.m. Mojo Green Sparks Nugget 8 p.m. John Dawson Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Carolyn Dolan & Peter Supersano Harrah’s 8 p.m. Kyle Rea Orchestra Peppermill 8 p.m. All In Harrah’s 8 p.m. Raymon Ayala Reno Ballroom 8 p.m. 2 Coney Dogs Ceol Irish Pub 8 p.m. Rock N Roll Experience Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Jimmie Menezes 3rd Street Bar 9 p.m. The Look Boomtown 9 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10 p.m. Trey Stone Atlantis 10 p.m. LoudPVCK 1 Up 10 p.m. The Beat The Bluebird 10 p.m. DJ Parties Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Polo Lounge 9 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. Guest DJs St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Open House” Restless Artists Theatre 7:30 p.m. “The Royale” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Magic of Eli Kerr Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Jamie Kennedy Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “The Lion in Winter” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. DisMANtled Comedy Tour Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Brew HaHa 2018 Sparks Nugget

High Sierra Music Festival releases lineup The 28th Annual High Sierra Music Festival, returning to the Lost Sierra from July 5 to 8, has announced its lineup, as first reported at TheTahoeWeekly.com. As well, advance four-day passes, VIP packages and parking passes are now on sale. This year’s lineup features The String Cheese Incident for two nights, Sturgill Simpson, Lettuce, The Wood Brothers, The California Honeydrops, Spafford, Lebo & Friends and much more. Read the lineup to date at TheTahoeWeekly.com. | highsierramusic.com

W HO S 1 # S ’ OE H TA

MAGIC FUSION STARRING AWARD-WINNING MAGICIANS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

“Don’t even think twice, JUST GO” “What a perfect date night for me and my husband” “Highly recommend to anyone coming to Lake Tahoe”

Granger Smith

DJ Parties DJ Cat East Peak Lodge 1 p.m. Live DJ Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Live DJ Hard Rock 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Art Truckee 7 p.m. Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Vagina Monologues” Truckee Community Arts Center 6 p.m. “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Electrify: Rock N Roll Burlesque Show Hard Rock 9 p.m. Amir K w/Benji Aflalo The Improv 9 p.m.

Justin Halgren

C A L E N D A R | FEBRUARY 15-22, 2018

MUSIC SCENE

Live Performances 7-nights a week

Reserved tickets, dinner reservations and info:

WWW.THELOFTTAHOE.COM 530-523-8024

OUTDOOR BAR & GRILLE NOW SERVING LUNCH DAILY STARTING AT 11A

Country stars coming to Carson Valley Country stars Granger Smith, Clint Black and Trace Adkins will be heading to TJ’s Corral as part of the spectacular summer lineup in the Carson Valley, as first reported at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Smith will be performing tunes from his latest album “When The Good Guys Win”  on June 16. Then, Black will command the stage on June 29 performing his classic hits plus new favorites from his “On Purpose” album. Multiple ACM awardwinner Adkins makes a stop on his  “How Did We Get Here” tour on July 14. | carsonvalleyinn.com

FEB. 17 | SATURDAY

Panda Village at Squaw 2 p.m. Chi McLean Alpine Bar 2 p.m. DJ Mancub and Disco Terrorist Coffeebar Squaw 3 p.m. Chi McClean Alpine Meadows Deck 3 p.m. Elizabeth Pitcairn & TOCATTA Cornerstone Church 3:30 p.m. Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 4 p.m. Live music Hard Rock 4 p.m. Live music Plaza Bar 6 p.m. Peter and Dan Cottonwood 7 p.m. Theory of a Dead Man w/Spirit Animal Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Reno Chamber Orchestra w/Clive Greensmith UNR Church of Fine Arts 7:30 p.m. Steve & Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m Color Me Badd w/Kai & Drop N Harmony MontBleu 8 p.m. Christopher Hawley Rollers Moody’s 8:30 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

Courtesy Wanderlust

TAHOE & TRUCKEE

MarchFourth, Stars headline Wanderlust Wanderlust, producer of the largest yoga lifestyle events in the world, reveals its lineup for the 2018 summer season. The festival returns to Olympic Valley from July 19 to 22. This summer’s blend of musicians, DJs and performing artists headlining the summer season include Stars, Tank and the Bangas, MarchFourth, Eric Krasno, Allen Stone, Nick Mulvey, as first reported at TheTahoeWeekly.com. | wanderlust.com 25


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

C A L E N D A R | FEBRUARY 15-22, 2018 TASTINGS

specials

music

get to know the people who feed us!

2-6pm Last Friday of the Month

Farm Shop

OPEN Thurs & Fri 12 to 6pm 150 Alpine Meadows Rd.

530.562.7150 tahoefoodhub.org

FEB. 17 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

Pat Ellis & Blue Frog Bband McP’s Pub 8 p.m. Ren Thomas Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Eric Lindell Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. The Motet w/The Main Squeeze Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. New Wave Crave Bar of America 9:30 p.m. DJ Parties Live DJ Big Blue View Bar 12 p.m. DJ Cat East Peak Lodge 1 p.m. DJ Mancub, Disco Terrorist Coffeebar Squaw 3 p.m. Live DJ Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Live DJ Hard Rock 10 p.m. Live DJ Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Electrify: Rock N Roll Burlesque Show Hard Rock 9 p.m. Amir K w/Benji Aflalo The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Atomika Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Starlighters Brother Dan 5 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Afroman Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Reno Chamber Orchestra w/Clive Greensmith UNR Church of Fine Arts 7:30 p.m. All In Harrah’s 8 p.m. Tiffany Haddish Grand Sierra 8 p.m. John Dawson Band Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Wheatstone Bridge Pignic Patio 8 p.m. Kyle Rea Orchestra Peppermill 8 p.m. Dance Party St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. The Starlighters Boomtown 9 p.m. Easy Street Repaved The Saint 9 p.m. Rock N Roll Experience Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10 p.m. Trey Stone Atlantis 10 p.m. Twista Lex Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Fleetwood Smack The Bluebird 10 p.m. DJ Parties Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. DJ Chris English El Jefe’s 9:30 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Four Color Zach Peppermill 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m.

Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Edna Purviance & Charlie Chaplin Silent Film Festival Reno Little Theater 12:30 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Silver Legacy 1 & 6 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Eldorado 2 & 7 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Circus Circus 3 & 8 p.m. DisMANtled Comedy Tour Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Open House” Restless Artists Theatre 7:30 p.m. “The Royale” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Magic of Eli Kerr Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Jamie Kennedy Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “The Lion in Winter” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Tiffany Haddish Grand Sierra 8 p.m. “Essence” Harrah’s 10 p.m. Special Events Chinese New Year parade & festivities Carson City

FEB. 18 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Pamela Parker Kirkwood Village 12 p.m. Pop-Up Record Store Alibi Truckee 2 p.m. Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 4 p.m. Dark Star Orchestra Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. The Motet w/Monophonics Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Murs Hard Rock 9:30 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. Comedy Smackdown MontBleu 8 p.m. Amir K w/Benji Aflalo The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Elizabeth Pitcairn & TOCATTA St. Gall Catholic Church 3:30 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Steve Lord Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Paul Covarelli Boomtown 6 p.m. Joshua Cook & The Key of Now Peppermill 6 p.m. John Shipley Gold Hill Hotel 6:30 p.m. Royce The Point 7 p.m. Reno Chamber Orchestra Nightingale Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. Hins and Vincy Reno Ballroom 8 p.m. Trey Stone Atlantis 8 p.m.

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

The Shape Of Water Feb 15

Black Panther Feb 15- March 1

Granite Chief Shreddit Showdown March 8

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

26

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Guided tours & 3-D movies Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

(or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Bluegrass Open Jam Alibi Ale Truckee 6 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Dr. Spitmore Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Joshua Cook & The Key of Now Peppermill 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Steve Lord Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Rock N Roll Experience Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Leung’s White Crane Dance Silver Legacy 11 a.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Eldorado 11:30 a.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Circus Circus 12 p.m.

FEB. 20 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Peter & Dan Northstar Village 2 p.m. Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

NEWEST BOOK

Lake Tahoe in Depth See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

FEB. 19 | MONDAY

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR MARK MCLAUGHLIN’S

NOW PLAYING Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Rock N Roll Experience Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Mo Funk Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Leung’s White Crane Dance Silver Legacy 2 & 6 p.m. “Open House” Restless Artists Theatre 2 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Eldorado 3 & 7 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Circus Circus 4 & 8 p.m. Jamie Kennedy Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

Project MANA

(Making Adequate Nutrition Accessible)

Emergency Hunger Relief Organization serving the North Shore and Truckee since 1991 Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region.

(775) 298-4161 WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS AND TIMES: MONDAYS TAHOE CITY | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Center, 330 Fairway Drive TUESDAYS TRUCKEE | 3:30pm to 4pm Sierra Senior Center, 10040 Estates Drive WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House, 265 Bear Street THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church 341 Village Blvd. ProjectMana.org

Order books direct at

TheStormKing.com or pick up a copy at: • Geared for Games • Gratitude Gifts • Alpenglow Sports • Mind Play

Group presentations · In-home talks

(530) 546-5612 · TheStormKing.com


February 15-21, 2018

“The Vagina Monologues” EMPOWERING WOMEN THROUGH WORDS S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

MUSIC SCENE

SKI OR RIDE FOR FREE

THEATER

P

laywright and activist Eve Ensler wrote and first performed “The Vagina Monologues” in 1996. The series of monologues was drawn from hundreds of interviews conducted by Ensler with women who shared their most intimate feelings and thoughts about their vaginas. “The Vagina Monologues” explores how women feel about their body image, sexual experiences, both pleasurable and horrifying, cultural atrocities, human trafficking, genital mutilation, rape and sexual abuse. Ensler interviewed women from all walks of life, ages, races, sexual

“ T H E VA G I N A MONOLOGUES” FEB. 16

|

6 P. M .

|

$20

COMMUNITY ART CENTER TRUCKEE FEB. 23 & 24

|

8 P. M .

L A K E TA H O E C O M M U N I T Y C O L L EG E S O U T H L A K E TA H O E

orientations and geographical backgrounds, creating a forum that encourages them to speak out and be empowered, aware and more comfortable in their bodies. The play is poignant, shocking, disturbing and, at times, hilarious. Twenty-two years later, “The Vagina Monologues” is heralded and performed throughout the world. Tahoe SAFE (Stopped Abuse For Everyone) Alliance and the Youth Team Peace Project, a Truckee High School club facilitated by the Alliance, hope to bring awareness of teen-dating violence and sexual violence with their production of “The Vagina Monologues” on Feb. 16 at Truckee’s Community Arts Center. Kate Ruttenberg and Mira Polochko direct the production featuring 13 local actors performing the monologues to benefit the Alliance. Lake Tahoe Community College in South Lake Tahoe will be presenting a separate production of “The Vagina Monologues” on Feb. 23 and 24. “Every year a new monologue is created. This year the focus will include

The Tahoe SAFE Alliance cast of “The Vagina Monologues” are, from left, Michele Jones, Andrea Chapman, Jessica Robinson, Lisa Abrahams, Tobi Waldron, Emily Abrahams, Loren McCormac, and co-director Mira Polochko. | Courtesy Tahoe SAFE Alliance

the transgender community,” says Kassie Reisbeck, the SAFE Alliance’s community outreach and prevention educator, of the Truckee production. The new monologue is written to help bring an end to violence against transsexual and non-binary, nonconforming people. “It’s important to keep the conversation going and break stigma. Our hope with the performance is that we can bring an end to sexual violence. It can happen to anyone; it can happen to our neighbors, family and friends. We need to bring awareness of sexual violence locally,” says Reisbeck. “The Tahoe SAFE Alliance conducted a survey of 100 adults in North Lake Tahoe; 49 percent of the community said sexual violence was not a problem or only a minor issue in our area. It is important to understand that sexual violence affects the community. It must not be kept behind closed doors. Victim blaming and the rape culture are stigmas that need to be broken. And, one of the biggest stigmas is it’s not happening locally,” she said. “People don’t like talking about the issue. It makes our job harder to bring the conversation out. Another stigma that needs to be broken is that sexual assault happens by a stranger. Acquaintance rape is more common. Pressure and coercion are more prevalent. Education is important. We help students to learn to communicate and know their boundaries,” says Reisbeck. 

Purchase a CA or NV Tahoe license plate and get one free Alpine or Nordic ticket to the Tahoe resort of your choice*. For more information or to purchase your license plate online, visit tahoeplates.com. jeremy jones pro snowboarder & big mountain freerider *restrictions apply

CELEBRATING 37 YEARS Consistently Covering the Tahoe Sierra

For more information or to purchase tickets about the Truckee performance, visit tahoesafealliance. org. For more information on the South Lake Tahoe performance, visit ltcc.edu.

DELIVERING THE FUN SINCE 1982 facebook.com/thetahoeweekly @TheTahoeWeekly thetahoeweekly.com p (530) 546-5995 27


MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THEORY OF

A DEADMAN

Feb. 17 | 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev.

WITH THEIR SIXTH studio album, “Wake Up Call,” Theory of a Deadman has hit the reset button, diving into a new sound and new approach. The more melodic, intimate style that defines the project is a bold move for this rock band. Theory of a Deadman hits South Lake Tahoe on the heels of their new album. Spirit Animal opens for the band. | harrahslaketahoe.com

ALIBI ALE POP-UP

RECORD STORE ROCK

Alexander Korostinsky

FEB. 20 | TUESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

VINYL

Feb. 18 | 2-6 p.m. | Alibi Ale | Truckee MARK SEXTON OF the band The Sextones loves vinyl and without a local record shop or place in Tahoe to buy, sell and trade records he approached co-owner of Alibi Ale, Kevin Drake, to host an afternoon for people to come and listen to music on vinyl. Participants can buy, swap and trade albums. “The resurgence of vinyl is all over the place. Vinyl is a rising market and young people are interested in dusting of their parents old record players,” says Sexton. The vinyl will spin at Alibi’s first Pop-Up Record Store event. | (530) 5365029 or The Record Swap on Facebook

MURS

Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Tunesday Open Mic Brewforia 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Joshua Cook & The Key of Now Peppermill 6 p.m. Mark Miller Boomtown 6 p.m. Jamie Rollins Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Tune-in Tuesdays Ceol Irish Pub 7 p.m. First Take Renaissance Reno 7 p.m. University Symphony Nightingale Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 8 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. StBTtLCO, Alphabet Cult, Surly Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Dorothy Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Saint Wknd & Jerry Folk 1 Up 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Raj Sharma Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

FEB. 21 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

RAP

Feb. 18 | 9:30 p.m. Hard Rock Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev. MURS IS A SUCCESSFUL and prolific independent rapper. He has recorded a string of revered collaborative albums with Fashawn, 9th Wonder and Slug of the hip-hop group Atmosphere. He’s also the owner and founder of the groundbreaking Paid Dues Festival, which highlights the best underground rap. Murs is set to drop his latest album, “A Strange Journey Into The Unimaginable.” | hardrockcasinolaketahoe.com

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Ike & Martin “M.S. Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chapin River Ranch 3:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 p.m. Vince Morris The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Mary Law Common Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Joshua Cook & The Key of Now Peppermill 6 p.m. Jamie Rollins Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Stephen Lord Boomtown 6 p.m. Ed Musselman Max’s Casino 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m.

DJ Parties Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Sam Forbes Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic St. James Infirmary 1 p.m. Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Raj Sharma Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

ERIC LINDELL

FEB. 22 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 4 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Magic Fusion” The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Vince Morris The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tully Green Bella Fiore Wines 5:30 p.m. Brother Dan Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. CeCe Gable w/Bill Hecht Renassiance Reno 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Justin Lee Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Keyser Soze Peppermill 7 p.m. Frank Perry Jazz Combo 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Escalade Atlantis 8 p.m. SWIGS/Snailmate/Coolzey/Weapons of Mass Destruction Shea’s Tavern 8 p.m. Datsik, Space Jesus, Riotten, Carbin Cargo 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ R3volver Silver Legacy 9 p.m. DJ Mo Funk Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Enfo & Twyman Peppermill 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Open House” Restless Artists Theatre 7:30 p.m. “The Royale” Good Luck Macbeth 7:30 p.m. The Magic of Eli Kerr Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Raj Sharma Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Michael Quezada Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

R&B, BLUES

Feb. 17 | 9 p.m. Moe’s Original BBQ | Tahoe City ERIC LINDELL IS accomplished on guitar, harmonica, keyboards and bass and has performed with many of New Orleans’ top musicians. He brings foot-stomping R&B, swamp pop, funk and blues that has won him critical and popular acclaim across the country. | facebook.com/pg/ moesoriginalbbqtahoe

THE MOTET WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

FUNK

Feb. 17 & 18 | 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. THE MOTET PERFORM two exciting nights in Tahoe with a line up of great funk. The Main Squeeze opens for Motet on Feb. 17 and the wildly popular Bay Area Monophonics open the show on Feb.18. The Motet cover a lot of ground stylistically while never losing sight of the groove. | crystalbaycasino.com


February 15-21, 2018

MUSIC SCENE

TOCCATA

TAHOE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & CHORUS James Rawie, Conductor

13th Tahoe Symphony Orchestra Winter Fest

EPIC ELIZABETH PITCAIRN &

THE RED MENDELSSOHN

STRADIVARIUS

Mozart Violin Concerto #4 in D Major & Mozart Mass in C Minor Saturday Feb. 17, 3:30PM Cornerstone Church, Incline Village

Sunday Feb. 18, 3:30PM

St. Gall Catholic Church, Gardnerville

Friday Feb. 23, 7:00PM*

St. Theresas Catholic Church, So. Lake Tahoe FREE ADMISSION* to Celebrate the Life of Diane McCall

Sunday Feb. 25, 3:30PM

St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, Reno

Soiree Fundraisers Limited Availability February 19th, 3PM Genoa Lakes Golf Club

February 24th, 3PM

Private Residence at Montreaux in Reno

For Soiree tickets & Info Call 775-833-2478 ToccataTahoe@gmail.com Info: 775-313-9697 Auditions: 775-833-2478

Ticket Prices: $40 preferred /$30 adult / $25 senior $5 students 19-23 / 18 & under free Tickets for seniors, students and youth are for general admission seating. Students and youth in preferred seating are $15 All dates and selections subject to change • See toccatatahoe.com for final dates & times

29


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Tamsen Donner | H e r D r e a m & L e g a c y but at this time he is in fine health and sitting upon the table as I write. He bears no resemblance to our family, being a true copy of his father.” Tamsen worried about her husband, too: “I have had excellent health since I saw you, but Mr. Dozier has twice been reduced very low since we were married. His precarious health and our strong dislike to slavery has caused us to determine upon removing to some western state. But not until next year.” Life in the lush southern countryside was comfortable for Tamsen and her family, but tragedy intruded and changed everything. A June 28, 1831, letter from Tamsen explained the situation all too clearly: “My sister I send you these pieces

were married. George had other children by his first two wives and over the next six years Tamsen gave birth to three girls: Frances, Georgia and Eliza. Tamsen loved her new life in Sangamon County, Ill. George owned two large and profitable farms with prime farm and grazing land, as well as extensive orchards planted with

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Read more about the Donner Party from Mark: > Lessons learned from the Donner Party > Lansford Hastings: Donner Party villain? > How did a 17 year old survive alone?

More than once she refused an opportunity to escape with rescuers, but instead chose AUTHOR’S NOTE: I first met Ann Smith in Reno in 1996 where we were both attending a sesquicentennial celebration of the 1846 pioneer migration to California. The ill-fated Donner Party was part of that migration. Ann was Tamsen Donner’s great-granddaughter and heir to her family’s collection of memorabilia including artifacts, news clippings, photographs and correspondence. She later shared copies of letters with me written by Tamsen to her sister, Elizabeth, long before she moved to Illinois and met George Donner. A half dozen of these letters had never been seen by historians or scholars until I donated them to the Huntington Library in Los Angeles County. The story that follows is based on those letters.

T

amsen Donner lost her life 171 years ago in the harsh Sierra winter of 184647. She was the wife of George Donner, the principle organizer of a Californiabound wagon train from Illinois. Poor decisions and lack of leadership, bad advice and an early winter trapped the Donnerled group before they could cross the Sierra and reach the safety of California. Thirty-six members of the party died that winter, including Tamsen and George. More than once she refused an opportunity to escape with rescuers, but instead chose to stay behind with her husband who was seriously ill and could not travel. Tamzene “Tamsen” Eustis was born into a respected, wealthy family in Newburyport, Mass., on Nov. 1, 1801. She enjoyed a happy childhood and her love of books was evidence of a curious mind and foreshadowed a lifelong passion for education. After graduating with her teacher’s certification, she took a job at a school in Maine. Later she was offered a position as an instructor in an academy in Elizabeth City, N.C. Tamsen was not making enough money to survive economically in Maine, so she took the job. Though it meant a major upheaval in her life, Tamsen had no doubts about her decision. In a letter to her sister Elizabeth, dated 1824, Tamsen wrote: “There is one impression, however, which rises above this huge chaos and presses itself upon my notice [to leave]. It is that the hand of God is remarkably visible in directing my steps. So fully aware am I that he will guide 30

Tamsen Donner’s daughter, Frances, looked just like her. | Courtesy Mark McLaughlin

me, that I feel not the least hesitation in proceeding.” Tamsen said goodbye to her family and steamed south along the coast to North Carolina. By 1829 she was 28 years old and still single at a time when virtually all women were married by age 20. But Tamsen Eustis was no spinster. Teaching children was as important as marriage to this young woman professional. She wrote and spoke excellent French and was a trained botanist. That year, however, she met and married Tully Dozier in Camden County, N.C. Tamsen had finally found the right man. She wrote: “I do not intend to boast of my husband, but I find him one of the best of men – affectionate, industrious and possessed of an upright heart, these are requisite to make life pass on smoothly.” Within two years they were the proud parents of a healthy baby boy. Tamsen’s teaching salary combined with Tully’s farming income earned them a comfortable living. The diminutive schoolteacher was an incredible bundle of energy, “scarce five feet tall and less than one hundred pounds.” Life for Tamsen seemed pleasant enough, but frequent winter fevers and widespread influenza epidemics constantly threatened her family’s health. She mentioned that her little boy “has been very sick, and for a few days we feared we should lose him

to stay behind with her husband who was seriously ill and could not travel. of letters that you may know that I often wrote to you even if I did not send. I have lost that little boy that I loved so well. He died on the 28th of September. I have lost my husband who made so large a share of my happiness. He died the 24th of December. I prematurely had a daughter, which died on the 18th of November. I have broken up housekeeping and intend to commence school in February. O, my sister, weep with me if you have tears to spare.” Tamsen Dozier’s time in North Carolina was just about over. Her recently widowed brother sent an urgent plea for Tamsen to come to Illinois and help him raise his children. His call for help plucked Tamsen from the piedmont of North Carolina and pulled her West, where she again found work as a schoolteacher. In Springfield, Ill. while teaching botany to her pupils, Tamsen met George Donner, a wealthy landowner, twice widowed. George was described as a “big man, fully six feet tall, with black hair shot with silver. He was of cheerful disposition and easy temperament. Neighbors came to him for advice and sympathy” and most people just called him “Uncle George.” On May 24, 1839, Tamsen and George

TA H O E

> Donner Party archeology

fruit trees. They lived in a large five-room, two-story house. In a letter home, Tamsen wrote her sister: “I find my husband a kind friend, who does all in his power to promote my happiness and I have as fair a prospect for a pleasant old age as anyone.” But Tamsen’s contentment did not diminish George’s desire for adventure and economic opportunity. Despite George’s advanced age of about 60 years and his

HISTORY TA L K S AT RETRO SKI FI LM SERI ES A B O U T 7 P. M . | T H E C H AT E A U I N C L I N E V I L L A G E , N E V. Feb. 15 | History of the 1960 Winter Olympics March 1 | Reign of the Sierra Storm King March 8 | History of Lake Tahoe and the Comstock

apparent satisfaction with the comfort of their beautiful home and farm, April 1846 found the Donner family on the overland trail to California and into history.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on History under the Explore Tahoe tab.

Nostalgia

CALIFORNIA CLIMATE LENGTHS LIFE In his 19th Century book, “The Mediterranean Shores of America; Southern California,” Dr. Peter C. Remondino stated, “From my personal observations, I can say that at least an extra 10 years’ lease on life is gained by a removal to this coast from the Eastern States; not 10 years to be added with its extra weight of age and infirmity, but 10 years more with additional benefit of feeling 10 years younger during the time.” Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s award-winning book, “The Donner Party: Weathering the Storm” available in stores or at thestormking.com. Courtesy Mark McLaughlin collection


Local

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

February 15-21, 2018

LOCAL FLAVOR

flavor

Meet Your Maker

TA S T Y TIDBITS

A C E L E B R AT I O N O F L O C A L F O O D S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

Courtesy Brew HaHa

W

BEERS FOR ARTS The Brew HaHa 2018 returns on Feb. 16 in Sparks, Nev. This annual benefit at Sparks Nugget is for Sierra Arts Foundation and features more than 100 micro and macro-beer tasting plus entertainment with Mojo Green. VIP admission is at 7 p.m. and cost $65 per ticket; general admission is $50 per ticket at 8 p.m. Prices will be $10 more the day of the event. | nuggetcasinoresort.com

hen you walk into the Tahoe Food Hub Farm Shop, you are drawn to the rich colors of the plethora of produce. Walking around the store there are local products from dry blends of soup, dry beans and grains, to jars of pickles and condiments, tinctures and balms, all made locally. The shop just received a shipment of locally grown farro, which is a wonderful hearty winter grain. The deep freezer holds a variety of meats and other frozen products to choose from. The fridge holds artisan products from local makers with shelves of organic sauces, soups, syrups, homemade pastas, fresh butter and cheeses, to name a few. Founder Susie Sutphin hands me a pink lady apple from Sunset Ridge Fine Fruits in Newcastle to try. It is crunchy, sweet and

Dinner by the light of the moon Alpine Meadows After the mountain closes and the winter moon rises, experience a snowshoe tour to the mid-mountain Chalet at Alpine Meadows. Enjoy an intimate seated dinner where guests will be served an Alpsinspired menu with dishes like potato cheese soup, chicken cordon bleu and apple strudel. Offered on Feb. 17, 18 and 24, and March 10. | RSVP (800) 403-0206

Dinners with a mountain view Northstar Northstar California presents Mountain Table Dinners, a unique dining experience in Zephyr Lodge. Each dinner will feature a winery, brewery or spirits company complemented by a menu featuring locally and regionally sourced produce and proteins. Guests will enjoy live music, as well. Seating for all dinners will be family style. This event is for ages 21 and older. On Feb. 16, Charles Krug Winery will be featured and on March 9, Rodney Strong Vineyards will be featured. | northtahoebusiness.org

¡Ole tequila! Kings Beach Caliente offers tequila tastings on the first Thursday of the month at 5:30 p.m. Admission is complimentary if you purchase one full-priced cocktail from the bar before the tasting. Participants must be age 21 and older to attend. Complimentary appetizers are included. The next event is on March 1. | calientetahoe.com CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

Every last Friday of the month, the shop highlights two local makers to bring in their products for shoppers to sample. absolutely one of the best apples I’ve had all season. Linnea Whitney manages the shop located at the base of Alpine Meadows Road next to the Crest Café. “I thought I’d be living on a farm,” said Whitney, a self-proclaimed foodie. “I started out as a volunteer, then projects started popping up and Susie offered me a job. I eventually took over the Farm Shop and now work full time as project manager. I have access to the best food you can get.” Sutphin started a new venture called “Meet Your Maker.” Every last Friday of the month, the shop highlights two local makers to bring in their products for shoppers to sample. The idea of sampling products from local bakers and cooks who prepare and sell things in the shop was something Sutphin had been mulling over. “I wanted to hold an event that celebrates our producers and the name, Meet Your Maker, just came up,” Sutphin said. I received a call from Sutphin to be one of the makers. My business, The Seasoned Sage, provides healthy organic foods for people too busy to cook. I prepared two

soups, a red lentil and butternut squash dal soup and an Italian wedding soup. Luca Adriani of Born and Bread was the other maker featured. “I call it natural leavened bread,” said Adriani of the bread he makes. “I use a 24-hour fermentation process, which allows the breakdown of the starches, so the bread is more digestible. Some people with gluten intolerance can enjoy the bread.” Luca’s bread was baked to perfection; a deep-brown, caramel-colored exterior and crunchy crust with a soft middle yielded a fabulous slightly tangy taste that was

Luca Adriani of Born and Bread creates natural leavened bread and Tahoe Weekly Food Editor Priya Hutner creates healthy organic foods through her business The Seasoned Sage.

absolutely delicious. Adriani’s bread was a perfect complement to the soups I prepared, both were gluten free and dairy free. People started streaming in around 2:30 p.m. and samples were tried and tasted. Tahoe Weekly ’s Anne Artoux sampled the Italian wedding soup and immediately added it to her basket of produce. Jonathon Aylward, a local resident, popped in the shop after skiing and also tried the Italian wedding soup. He sipped the broth and offered this: “The broth is so good. It reminds me of how you feel after a long night of great conversation. This is like drinking that feeling.” The next Meet Your Marker event is Feb. 23 featuring Small Batch Sauce Company from North Lake Tahoe serving enchilada and barbecue sauce. The Farm Shop is open Thursdays and Fridays. For more information, visit Born and Bread on Facebook, theseasonedsage.com or tahoefoodhub.org.  Priya Hutner is a writer, health and wellness consultant, and natural foods chef. Her business, The Seasoned Sage, focuses on wellness, conscious eating and healthy living. She offers healthy organic meals for her clients. She may be reached at pria78@gmail.com or visit theseasonedsage.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to read more.

31


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Jeff Freeman | Cedar House Sport Hotel

TA S T Y T I D B I T S

INVENTIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN A COZY, ROMANTIC LOG CABIN Sustainable Fresh Fish | Organic Chicken | Local Seasonal Produce

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cheese plate for $12 Uncorked Happy Hour Monday-Friday 3-5 p.m .

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Meet your (veggie) maker

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Pop in for a Pop Up TelosWine.com

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Truckee Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel in Truckee offers a Pop Up Dinner Series several times per month. Designed and formatted like a spirited dinner party, a Stella Pop Up event is an exploration into creative cooking. Guests are encouraged to walk around the kitchen, joining conversations that are free flowing and educational. The cost is $97 per person. The series includes Chinese New Year Pop-Up on Feb. 16 and 17; Winter Series #2 Pop-Up on Feb. 23 and 24; Indian Holi Fest Pop-Up on March 2 and 3; Marchtoberfest Pop-Up on March 9 and 10; St. Patrick’s Day Pop-Up on March 16 and 17; Yucatan Pop-Up on March 23 and 24 and Italian Easter Pop-Up on March 30 and 31. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Alpine Meadows New this winter at the Tahoe Food Hub Farm Shop is the Meet Your Maker series on the last Friday of every month from 2 to 6 p.m. until March 30. Meet Your Maker gives the public a chance to meet the people who grow, raise and make our food. The next events are Feb. 23 and March 30. Every Meet Your Maker will have two to three producers with samples and information. Other featured guests will include specialty food producers and other culinary artisans who make products such as pasta, cheese, sauces, jams and more. There will be shop specials, local music and, occasionally, the fun will roll into the evening with a cooking class, workshop or food film. | tahoefoodhub.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits.

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Mountain Area Preservation offers a dining experience on Feb. 22 at Stella Restaurant at the Cedar House Sport Hotel in Truckee from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. The fundraiser includes a four-course dinner with passed canapés and wine pairings. A vegetarian option is available. Tickets are $200 per person and seating is limited. | RSVP nikki@mapf.org or (530) 582-6751


February 15-21, 2018

LOCAL FLAVOR

ANY PORT IN STORY BY LOU PHILLIPS

a W inter Storm

Y

ou may know that port is a rich, dark, viscous, fortified wine full of concentrated and complex flavors and textures and has a little extra pop of alcohol compared to other wines. Grapes for the finest versions grow in incredibly steep ancient vineyards that rise precipitously from the banks of the Douro River in northwest Portugal. What you probably do not know is that these elixirs are capable of solving pernicious winter problems.

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Tawny ports lean more toward caramel/nutty flavors and color, and enhance crème brûlée and ice cream, as well as orchard fruit-based desserts. Yep, it’s cold outside. Let’s get warm, you say? Well, port can warm the cockles of snow-country denizens. Cold toes, hands and hearts will all warm with even a tipple or two. It is much more than the spirits at work here. Port’s typical cinnamon, nutmeg and raisin flavors elicit a big dose of winter comfort.

Steep port vineyards | Courtesy Tourisima Oporto

Winter dinners call for richer desserts and these can be a wine-match challenge. Port’s variety of styles and balanced sweetness make it a great dessert wine and because of port’s intense, flavor you’ll only need a small pour to satisfy.

Vintage port. | Lou Phillips

orchard fruit-based desserts, such as peach or apple pie. My ultimate tawny port-dessert match is a homemade custard banana and coconut cream pie — yummy. Sacré bleu! What if you have no dessert but want to end a meal with something memorable? This next port type is so darn delicious and complex you’ll forget you forgot the dessert. Vintage ports are the ethereal iron fist in a silk glove of the wine world: powerful, earthy, tannic and explosive with fruit, yet full of lift and grace from acid and minerality. These are made to age and improve for decades. The best part of vintage port is that it is so satisfying you don’t need to match it with anything but your lips. Late-bottled vintage ports, which are quite nice, are not the same as true vintage versions so, when in doubt, ask your wine guru for help. Final port tip: You don’t need to break the bank on your port exploration because offerings starting as low as $10 deliver unique and memorable wine experiences.  Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier in Tahoe and his consulting business wineprowest. com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 5443435 or wineguru123@gmail.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns. Click on Wine Column under the Local Flavor tab.

Come in for some New England Clam Chowda or add Fish to one of our Delicious Salads! BuzzFeed.com

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Truckee, CA - 10089 W. River St. - (530) 582-5000 Reno, NV - 1401 S. Virginia St. - (775) 683-9300 Daily from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. MorgansLobsterShack.com

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Basic ruby port. | Lou Phillips

At the value level, ruby ports, such as Cockburn’s Special Reserve, are fresh and fruit-forward while retaining enough acid and backbone to avoid being cloying. Dark fruit and/or chocolate desserts make for an absolute mouth party with a sip of ruby port. Tawny ports, which are often aged longer and will indicate the length of barrel aging on the label, lean more toward caramel/nutty flavors and color, and enhance crème brûlée and ice cream, as well as

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

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sually during this time of year, stews and casseroles become great meal choices because of how hearty they are on a cold winter night. Stew is, after all, the quintessential comfort food and winter is the peak season for a nice big bowl of it. A good stew is inexpensive and can be made in batches to last a few days or frozen for a few meals in the next month or two. Stew meat is not as costly as the choicer cuts of New York strip or rib-eye, but because of the braising process, the chunks can still become so tender they melt in your mouth. Along with the potatoes, carrots, celery, onions and whatever other veggies you want to add, you can easily get up to five meals for less than $20.

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Nightly 5-6 p.m.

A lot of people ask me what the difference is between a stew and a casserole. There is really not that much difference. They are both made similarly with the meat being browned, the veggies sautéed and the liquid added to finish the cooking. Technically, I think a casserole is usually baked in the oven in a single deep dish. It is the dish that gives it its name. A stew or a soup is usually cooked on the stove top. If you notice, I said usually. This is because when I think of a stew or a soup, the broth in a stew is much thicker. Anytime you have a thick broth, it becomes much easier to burn over direct heat when the pot is sitting on the open flame. This means you have to watch it more closely and stir it often because once the bottom of the pot burns, the burnt flavor is almost impossible to get rid of. Any time you are going to stir a stew, chowder or other item with a thick liquid, start by gently using the rounded bottom of the ladle to see that nothing is stuck on the bottom of the pot. If there is nothing stuck, then stir it well so nothing stays on the bottom too long. If there are chunks stuck to the bottom that is the first sign there may be something burning down there. Still using the

bottom of the ladle, give it a little prod to see if it will easily break free. If it does, bring the ladle straight up and give it a taste just to be sure. If the chunk won’t budge, it is probably burnt. Avoid scraping at all costs. Sample the top layer and slowly ladle the stew into another pot from the top, being careful not to stir it up. As you make your way to the bottom, sample more frequently and stop if you start to taste the burnt flavor. Once the stew is burnt, there isn’t much you can do to save it. If it isn’t too bad, you can mask it a little with fresh lemon. Although it is not one of the normal ingredients, lemon can actually go better in stew than you think. Lemon also is good to add to something that has a little too much salt. Like with any seasoning, the quantity used is important. Using a pot or pan that fits in the oven will allow you less chance to burn and also cut down on how often you stir it. You do still want to stir once in a while, but since the stew is getting its heat from all around and not just one spot it will cook more evenly. Whether you call it a soup or a stew or you cook it on the stove top or in the oven, make a big enough batch for a few meals and enjoy.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Click on Chef’s Recipe under the Local Flavor tab.

BEEF STEW

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith

Locals’ Lakefront Menu 3-Course $29.00 sunday - thursday excludes holiday periods

ChristyHill.com 115 Grove St., Tahoe City CA 530-583-8551 34

2 lbs. stew meat, 2-inch cubes 2-3 carrots, sliced thick 3 celery stalks, sliced thick ½ package frozen sweet corn 2 T vegetable oil 2 rosemary sprigs Salt and pepper, to taste

5-6 red potatoes, large even chunks 1 large yellow onion, diced large 2 cloves garlic, diced 2 cans beef broth 4 bay leaves 4 thyme sprigs

Tie the rosemary and thyme sprigs together with twine. Boil the potatoes in a separate pot until cooked, but firm, and immediately cool under cold water. Get the pot hot on the stove. Brown the meat on all sides in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Remove the meat and add the other tablespoon of oil to sauté the onion, carrots, celery and garlic. Add all the ingredients, season with a little salt and pepper and simmer for 1 hour, stirring often. Or, place the pot in a 350-degree F oven for 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Remove the bay leaves and sprigs, add more salt and pepper to taste, if needed before serving. Note that the meat will become more tender when you reheat it.


Photo by Matt Bansak

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Brennan Lagasse takes a moment to enjoy the views while back-country skiing the Mount Rose area above Lake Tahoe. "After a fresh coating of...

Feb. 15 to 21, 2018  

Brennan Lagasse takes a moment to enjoy the views while back-country skiing the Mount Rose area above Lake Tahoe. "After a fresh coating of...