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What’s Inside

Volume 36 | Issue 03 TM

| FEBRUARY 9-22

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 | TheTahoeWeekly.com

Features

Editoral | editor@tahoethisweek.com

CELEBRATING 35 YEARS The Tahoe Weekly has grown up a lot over the last 35 years from that first 12-page publication that boasted “Don’t Nobody Bring Me No Bad News” on Feb. 18, 1982 (read the first issue at TheTahoeWeekly.com). The magazine has gone through multiple name variations through the decades, along with expanded coverage and distribution. We’ve grown our coverage to include print and digital versions of Tahoe Weekly, and grown our digital presence to include TheTahoeWeekly.com, @TheTahoeWeekly, facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly and our e-newsletter. More than a year ago, who also grew our print distribution to include South Lake Tahoe, Stateline, Reno and Sparks, and today we’re happy that the magazines fly off the racks. We also began publishing Tahoe Powder ski and snowboard magazine in 2014, which now reaches more 132,000 readers throughout Northern California and Northern Nevada. Through the years we’ve looked to better serve our readers and clients by provided the best in local coverage of the Tahoe Sierra in Outdoors & Recreation, Events & Festivals, Entertainment & Live Music, Food & Wine, and The Arts. With this 35th anniversary edition of Tahoe Weekly, we’re expanding our coverage again with our new Arts & Culture feature in every issue. We’ve been excited to see the arts and culture community in the Tahoe Sierra growing through the years with so many creative endeavors from artists, makers, writers and poets, and many others. We’ll look to explore more of Tahoe’s “Creative Awareness” in each edition, and we’re pleased to feature photographer and artist Keoki Flagg in our inaugural Arts & Culture feature. Thank you to all our readers and clients for your support through the years. 

Entertainment | entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

Out

Arts

Keoki Flagg

culture

27 27 Keoki Flagg 28 The Arts

Local

flavor

Photography | production@tahoethisweek.com

IN THE OFFICE Courtesy Cory Richards

about

24 06 08 10 17 19 20 21 23 24 25 26

Lake Tahoe Facts Sightseeing Events Snowmobiling Cross-Country Skiing For the Kids Family Fun Snow Trails Powder Report Downhill Skiing Announcements

Music SCENE

38 38 Art of the Craft Cocktail 38 Tasty Tidbits 40 Chef’s Recipe 41 Wine Column

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill | publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102 Sales Manager Anne Artoux | anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110 Account Executive Lynette Astors | lynette@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 108 Art Director | Production Alyssa Ganong | production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106 Graphic Designer Mael Passanesi | graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101

THE

Priya Hutner

From the Publisher

Katherine Hill

10 Winter Paddleboarding 16 Tahoe Local 18 Snowshoe Donner Lake 32 Sierra Stories

18

SUBMISSIONS

33 30 Puzzles 31 Horoscope 33 Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 33 Elephant Revival 37 Haunted Summer

Entertainment Editor Priya Hutner | priya@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 104 Copy Editor Katrina Veit Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green

DEADLINES & INFO Feb. 23 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 14 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, Feb. 16 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

ON THE COVER

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

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– John Muir

Dane Shannon blasts through winter during a moment of perfection on Tahoe’s East Shore. Photography by Ryan Salm | RyanSalmPhotography. com @RyanSalmPhotography

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N

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee Donner Lake

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Donner Summit BOREAL

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Reno & Sparks MT. ROSE

WEST EAST SOUTH

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SUGAR BOWL h Ta

AUBURN SKI CLUB

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Tahoe City

SQUAW CREEK

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside Tahoe Pines Eagle Rock

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

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Ta h o e R i m

NV

Dollar Hill

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Carson City

Homewood HOMEWOOD

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Visit plugshare.com for details

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Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

CA

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Natural rim: 6,223’

Glenbrook o Ta h

ELECTRIC CHARGING STATIONS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

ALPINE MEADOWS

a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

SQUAW VALLEY

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

CASINOS

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

CLAIR TAPPAAN

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

ROYAL GORGE

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

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DONNER SKI RANCH SODA SPRINGS

Cave Rock

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Watershed Area: 312 square miles Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F

Fannette Island

Shoreline: 72 miles

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Ta h oe

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually HOPE VALLEY

Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 73.1’ in 2015. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

6


TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

East Shore

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders - Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Donner Summit

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

West Shore

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

Heavenly

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

West Shore

$10 parking (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

High Camp

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

BASE DEPTH:

136”

Squaw Valley BASE DEPTH:

BASE DEPTH:

LAKE TAHOE 8

Natural rim 6,223’

145”

Emerald Bay

Parking fee (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Wed.-Mon. | Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Tahoe City

North Shore

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and the 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART

Tallac Historic Site

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

Taylor Creek Visitor Center

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

Truckee truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built including The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

Reports taken on Friday, February 3, 2017

Mt. Rose Ski Area BASE DEPTH:

157”

102”-160”

Kirkwood Mountain Resort

Vikingsholm Castle

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

REGIONAL SNOW LEVELS Heavenly

North Shore

Trees are heavy with fresh powder along the trails at Tahoe Cross Country following a recent storm. | Katherine E. Hill

Sugar Bowl BASE DEPTH:

96”-158”

Elevation: 6,225.13 | Elevation in 2016: 6,222.08

Tahoe City

Opens late June (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in the summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

Tahoe Maritime Museum

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

Truckee

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Tahoe Science Center

Truckee Railroad Museum

Western SkiSport Museum

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Incline Village

Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Olympic Winter Games

Donner Summit

Fri.-Sun. | Free (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing, exhibits include snowshoes from the 1850s, ski equipment from the 20th Century and a pair of 8-foot-long skis used by John “Snowshoe” Thompson, a legendary mail carrier. Located at Boreal off I-80. TART

Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building. TART

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

Kings Beach

South Lake Tahoe

Incline Village

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Historical Society Incline Village

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe City

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Kings Beach State Rec. Area, (Thurs.-Mon., summer) 969 Tahoe Blvd., (800) 468-2463

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd., (530) 541-5255

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50, (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City 100 North Lake Blvd., (530) 581-6900

Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Road (Depot), (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village Tahoe City

Daily | Free Features official 1960 Winter Olympic items such as skis, promotional literature, collection of official Olympic photographer Bill Briner. Learn the history of skiing in the Sierra. Inside Boatworks Mall. TART

855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe 35 College Dr., (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd., (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Road, (530) 587-3558

TRANSIT: NORTH LAKE TAHOE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com / SOUTH LAKE TAHOE | bluego.org


February 9-22, 2017

9


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

TRANQUILITY OF

winter paddleboarding STORY BY LISA MICHELLE

EVERY TUESDAY

Dashing through the snow Incline Village, Nev. Snowshoe hikes and lunch for ages 55 and older are on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. until March 28. Trekkers of all abilities are welcome to join moderate level snowshoe hikes at various locations throughout Tahoe. Enjoy a lunch in the dining hall on the Sierra Nevada College campus. Includes guides, transportation and lunch. $18 without IVGID pass, $15 w/IVGID pass. | yourtahoeplace.com

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530) 546-2012

There were no boats, no jet skis and no wake boarders. The lake was tranquil. Surrounding me in every direction was the expanse of the mountains decorated by an epic snowfall. I paddled toward Cave Rock in treasured silence and solitude. The emerald water was as clear as ever, revealing a maze of rocks like ancient ruins and I wondered why I hadn’t paddled during winter before today.

Author Lisa Michelle on the waters of Lake Tahoe at Zephyr Cove.

SAFETY TIPS

the expanse of the mountains decorated by an epic snowfall. I paddled toward Cave Rock in treasured silence and solitude.

10

EVERY MONDAY

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit offers Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort. The one-hour tours begin at the top of the gondola every Monday and Friday at 1 p.m. Participants must be intermediate-level skiers/boarders or above and provide their own lift ticket. No reservations: first-come first-served. Until April 7, weather permitting. | goto/ltbmu/skiranger

The lake was tranquil. Surrounding me in every direction was

I had checked the weather that morning, then rechecked the radar before leaving home. But, to be safe, I scanned the sky for threatening clouds. All was clear. The wind was still as I stepped into the frigid water and onto my board. I paddled with a small hydration backpack, making certain I had cleaned out anything that shouldn’t get wet. Access to water through a hose hanging at my chest is much more convenient and safer than digging out a bottle. If you are extremely susceptible to the cold, you can fill your reservoir with warm water, not hot, then place a few hand-warmers in a sock. Place the sock against the reservoir away from your back. Drinking warm water helps increase circulation and will aid in keeping you warm. Also stowed in my backpack were protein bars, a beanie and cell phone, all kept in plastic bags.

FEBRUARY 9-24, 2017

Ski with rangers South Lake Tahoe

I

f you’re allowing your paddleboard to hibernate through the winter, it’s time to consider waking it. Extending your standup paddling season only takes a bit of planning, proper clothing and a break in the weather. According to the National Weather Service office in Reno, Nev., winter storms walloped Tahoe with the seventh wettest January in 114 years of record keeping — and we were only halfway through the month. Storms were lining up and several feet of snow was forecast for the rest of the week. But there was one day between storms when the sun broke through and the wind waited for me to attempt my first winter SUP experience. I pulled into the Zephyr Cove parking lot around 1 p.m. Half the lot was closed and parking was difficult due to work crews demolishing the “Tahoe Queen.” Her paddlewheel was severed. I watched her decks being splintered by a massive excavator and felt nostalgic as I stretched on my wetsuit first and cold surf booties next. A foot of snow glazed the beach. I plowed through with my board in one hand and paddle in the other. Either I launched near the dock or kept walking past tourists questioning my sanity and taking my picture when they thought I wasn’t looking. “It’s freezing out there,” said a woman bundled in a long black fur. “Not really. Warmer than the 38-degree air temperature,” I said as I wrapped my leash around my leg. Lake Tahoe’s water temperature averages between 40 and 50 degrees in the winter.

EVENTS CALENDAR

Working up a sweat on a cold day can go from invigorating to exasperating in a hurry, but I kept myself comfortable in my 4/3mm wetsuit with a slow and steady pace. A dry suit is also an option. My neoprene surf booties are 2mm and better suited for Southern California waves than for Lake Tahoe in winter. My feet were cold, but not the miserable numb bricks that would make me reconsider going out. If purchasing booties for Tahoe, I recommend a thickness between 3 and 5mm. My hands were gloveless and only slightly chilled as I drifted to shore — eager for my next winter paddle. “[A winter SUP experience] is magical,” says Ernie Brassard, founder of Ta-Hoe Nalu Paddle Festival. Without a doubt, I concur.

• • • • • •

The best way to a successful winter SUP session is to personalize it with short, trial paddles. Find what works best for you. Remember, if you plan on falling in you will plan accordingly. A PFD, personal flotation device, is required. According to the U. S. Coast Guard, SUP boards operated outside a surfing, swimming or bathing area are vessels under USCG regulations. While operating a vessel, standup paddlers older than age 13 must have a USCG-approved appropriate Type I, II, III or V life jacket. The Coast Guard does not require the vest to be worn, although it strongly recommends be attached to your board. A child younger than age 12 must wear his or her USCG-approved life jacket at all times. Stay close to shore so you can get out of the water quickly if you need to. There is safety in numbers. Paddle with friends and stay together. If you paddle alone, always let someone know your exact plans. Don’t count on the weatherperson. Check conditions and familiarize yourself with your favorite spots. Always wear your leash. If water becomes choppy and you’re feeling tired or unstable, ride on your knees or sit down and paddle. If you are inexperienced, go with an experienced paddler and stay close to shore. 

Toddler Time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Babes in Bookland Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Read with the family Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts Family Story Time from 4 to 4:45 p.m. Features stories, finger plays, and wiggle action as part of the experience to encourage a love of books. | (775) 832-4130

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in Heavenly is from 4 to 7. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass. Free corkage with any entrée. Free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from featured winery. | (530) 523-8024

EVERY THURSDAY

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village, Nev. The Conversation Café is a drop-in conversation forum hosted by the Senior Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310


February 9-22, 2017

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382

Toddler Story Time Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library hosts story time every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m. with stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 6 months to 3 years. | (775) 832-4130

Preschool story time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years and older. A half-hour stay and play after the reading. | (530) 582-7846

Wine voyages Olympic Valley

Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Café to learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Flights available from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. through April on Thursdays. | squawalpine.com

Help with computers Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First Thursdays of the month are “Beginners Basic Instruction,” second Thursdays are “Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about technology. | (530) 546-2021

EVERY FRIDAY

Great end to the day Incline Village, Nev.

Diamond Peak’s Last Tracks wine/beer tasting events will be held every Saturday through April 15. Buy a late-day lift ticket, valid from 2 to 4 p.m., to take a final chair ride up to Snowflake Lodge for wine or craft beer tastings, paired with appetizers. Participants take a run down a freshly groomed trail. $44. 21+. | RSVP diamondpeak.com

Love a parade Northstar

The Ripperoo Parade around the ice rick at Northstar’s Village is every Saturday through April 4 at 4 p.m. Meet at the Kid’s Ski School entrance at 3:45 pm to participate. Noisemakers and toys will be provided. | northstarcalifornia.com

EVERY SUNDAY

Hearty, good snowshoe Kirkwood

Kirkwood Cross Country & Snowshoe Center offers Soup and Shoe every Sunday at noon. An easygoing snowshoe is followed by soup at the Kirkwood Inn. | kirkwood.com

FEB. 9 | THURSDAY Dogs love books Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library offers Paws To Read from 4 to 5 p.m. Children can practice reading to friendly therapy dogs and receive a free book. All ages welcome. | (775) 832-4130

TERC Talks Incline Village, Nev.

U.S. Forest Service Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit offers Ski with a Ranger at Heavenly Mountain Resort. The one-hour tours begin at the top of the gondola every Monday and Friday at 1 p.m. Participants must be intermediate-level skiers/boarders or above and provide their own lift ticket. No reservations: first-come first-served. Until April 7, weather permitting. | goto/ltbmu/skiranger

Steve Sadro, Ph.D., of UC Davis’s environmental science and policy department, will talk on “Climate change and lake temperature in the Sierra Nevada: There’s no business like snow business.” Through decades of climate and water temperature data from a highelevation catchment in the southern Sierra Nevada, researchers are able to illustrate the magnitude of warming taking place and the role of winter snow-pack in regulating lake temperatures. No-host bar at 5:30; presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP terc.ucdavis.edu

Sample and taste Olympic Valley

Winery Take-Over Tahoe City

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

Winter wines featured Truckee

Ski with rangers South Lake Tahoe

Friday Night Tasting Notes at Plaza Bar at Squaw Valley from 3:30 to 5 p.m. until March 24. Taste craft beers or specialty spirits from popular breweries, wineries and distilleries. Stick around from 5 to 7 p.m. for drink specials and live music. | squawalpine.com

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with G and PG movies. | (530) 582-9669

EVERY SATURDAY

Crack of dawn Olympic Valley

Dawn Patrol gives skiers access to untouched corduroy or fresh powder on coveted intermediate/advanced terrain at Squaw Valley through March 25. Meet at Aerial Tram before 7:40 a.m. Ski from 8 to 9 a.m. before public. Space is limited. | RSVP (800) 403-0206.

Rangers lead the way Mount Rose, Nev.

The Carson Ranger District on the HumboldtToiyabe National Forest offers forest ranger-led snowshoe walks every Saturday through March 26 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., over 2 miles of moderately strenuous terrain in Tahoe Meadows. Meet at on the south side of the road near the white ranger truck. Participants bring snowshoes, sunglasses, sunscreen, a lunch and water. Preregistration is preferred. | (775) 722-3985 or oldertrails@yahoo.com

Events

MORE

“Here, There & Everywhere”| Marcus Caston

Story Time Tahoe City

OUT & ABOUT

FREESKI ADVENTURE Warren Miller Entertainment’s “Here, There & Everywhere” will be shown on Feb. 11 at South Tahoe High School theater at 7 p.m. Take a freeski adventure with industry veterans in Crested Butte, tour Eastern Greenland by dog sled and follow on a Swiss holiday aboard the Glacier Express. Explore the backcountry of Western Montana’s Glacier Country and catch a powder day in British Columbia. The film commemorates Stein Eriksen in Deer Valley, captures the big air at Boston’s Fenway Park and rides the steeps of Squaw Valley. Filmmaker Warren Miller himself is in on-screen interviews. Tickets are $15 and may be purchased at the school. | skinet.com/warrenmiller

Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinner that includes the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from Blackbird Wine Cellars. $30 to $35. | sunnysideresort.com

Ritz-Carlton offers a memorable dining adventure, Winter Vintner Dinner Series, a delectable four-course meal featuring different Northern California wineries and fresh, local ingredients. The series is offered at 6:30 p.m. $125 per person. | RSVP (800) 241-3333

FEB. 10 | FRIDAY Moonlit trek Tahoe Vista

Tahoe Adventure Company offers a Full Snow Moon trek on snowshoes from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Fee includes equipment, guides, hot drinks, trail snacks and permits. | tahoeadventurecompany.com

By the light of the moon Incline Village, Nev. Community Snowshoe Full Moon Hike to Diamond Peak’s Snowflake Lodge. Meet at the resort’s main lodge at 5 p.m. Perfect for ages 9 and older. Light fare to purchase at the top. | RSVP (775) 832-1310

Moonlit snow ski Soda Springs

Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Area will host a full-moon tour with dinner at Summit Station. | Register royalgorge.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

11


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

MORE EVENTS Scott Rokis Photography | Alpenglow Mountain Festival

M O U N TA I N F I L M K I C K S O F F

ALPENGLOW MOUNTAIN FESTIVAL

Alpenglow Sports, Tahoe City’s 39-year-old mountain shop, will host the critically acclaimed Telluride Mountainfilm as the kickoff for California’s premier mountain lifestyle event, the Alpenglow Mountain Festival.

The nine-day Alpenglow Mountain Festival is a celebration of human-powered mountain sports, events, clinics, equipment demonstrations, film and more at venues throughout North Lake Tahoe.

Mountain Festival as a destination event for mountain enthusiasts of all ability levels who are interested in trying a multitude of human-powered sports in a safe and welcoming environment.”

Telluride Mountainfilm brings inspiration and education about important issues to audiences around the world. The tour stops at Olympic Village Lodge on Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. with documentary films that will explore the themes connected to Telluride Mountainfilm’s mission to use the power of film, art and ideas to inspire audiences to create a better world. A special guest Mountainfilm presenter will introduce the films and engage the audience in discussion following the films. Tickets are $12 for adults and $9 for kids.

Geared toward beginner and intermediate winter recreation enthusiast, the Alpenglow Mountain Festival showcases some of the best activities Lake Tahoe has to offer – back-country skiing and splitboarding, Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, natural history events and more.

With more than 50 individual events, the festival offers an immense range of activities that span daily ski and splitboard tours, avalanche education, film and natural history excursions for outdoor enthusiasts of all interests and ability levels. The majority of events are free, so space is limited and participants are encouraged to register online.

“The Mountain Festival was born out of a desire to share our beloved human-powered winter sports with others,” said Brendan Madigan, founder of the Alpenglow Mountain Festival, in a press release. “We’ve designed the

For the daily schedule see the Events calendar or visit alpenglowsports.com.

FEB. 10 | FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

Father Daughter Dance Crystal Bay, Nev.

The eighth annual Father Daughter Dance, hosted by Tahoe SAFE Alliance, is at Tahoe Biltmore from 6 to 9 p.m. Guests will enjoy dancing and music, cake and snacks, and activity booths including crafts, picture-frame decorating, a princess castle and more. Advance $30 and $5 for each additional child, $40 at the door. | tahoesafealliance.org

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Bombay Spice Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Money down the tube Truckee

Sierra College Insights offers “Five Million Dollars for 30 Seconds” Are Super Bowl Ads Worth It?” presented by business professor Kurt Heisinger. Attendees will watch a handful of the ads that air during this year’s most watched event and discuss the attributes and effectiveness of the commercials. Refreshments at 6:30 p.m., talk at 7 p.m. Free. | RSVP sierracollege.ticketleap.com

FEB. 10-11 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY Winemaker’s events Area venues

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Gros Ventre from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Truckee on Friday and Uncorked Tahoe City on Saturday. A winemaker’s tasting event from Bjorn will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Uncorked Squaw on Friday and Petra on Saturday. | teloswine.com

12

FEB. 11 | SATURDAY Ha, ha, ha ha-ha South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Institute for Natural Science offers Woodpecker Watching with Bird Tahoe from 8 a.m. to noon. Don and Lynn Harriman will lead the walk or cross-country ski/snowshoe through the forest, across Taylor creek at the Fallen Leaf Dam, along Fallen Leaf north lakeshore and the moraine. | Register tinsweb.org

Local guided hike Truckee

Local Carmen Carr will lead a hike to Dry Lake at 9 a.m. From the State Route 267 turn north onto Martis Dam Road. Meet at the gate. | (530) 550-5192

From demos to dinner Tahoe City

Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area will hold a demo day at the trailhead from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with the latest’s gear and company reps on hand. Later, a Yurt Dinner Fundraiser is from 6 to 9 p.m. Guests will first enjoy a bonfire and laserguided star tour and telescope viewing, followed by dinner. $40 dinner. | RSVP dinner tahoexc.org.

Skate clinic Soda Springs

Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Area offers an intermediate/advanced skate clinic with Dave Eastwood. $51 with trail pass, $42 clinic only. | Register royalgorge.com

Blast to the past Blairsden

Johnsville Historic Ski Bowl offers a sledding day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Plumas Eureka State Park. Lost Sierra Café open. Intof Lodge with fire pit. Dogs on leash OK. | skijohnsville.com

February is family film month Minden, Nev.

Minden Library will be showing free movies in February geared toward adults and teens with a romantic theme at 10:30 a.m. “Chocolat” (PG-13) is today. Coffee and treats available. | (775) 782-9841


February 9-22, 2017

One lump or two? Loyalton

A Teddy Bear Tea Party will be held at 2 p.m. at Loyalton Museum. Adopt a stuffed bear for $10. A silent auction will be held for a big bear. | RSVP (530) 993-4379

Après ski party Homewood

Homewood Mountain Resort Passholder Party is at 89 Bar & Grill from 4 to 8 p.m. Includes free beer and wine for the first hour, music by Ike & Martin, shot skis, costumes and raffle prizes and games. $10, free passholders. | RSVP skihomewood.com

Kids Night Out Tahoe City

Drop off the little ones, ages 5 and older, at Rideout Community Center from 4 to 10 p.m. every second Saturday of the month. Kids can enjoy a dinner, crafts, movies and games. Preregistration is required. $15 per child. | (530) 583-3440

Snowshoe under the stars Northstar

Tahoe Star Tours will host an evening under the stars pairing stargazing with a snowshoe tour led by local astronomer, Tony Berendsen. Guests of all ages will enjoy an easy to moderate snowshoe walk followed a view of constellations through high-powered telescopes. Tours are approximately 2 to 2.5 hours. Meet at 5 p.m. at Northstar’s CrossCountry Ski, Telemark & Snowshoe Center. | tahoestartours.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Bombay Spice Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Going to the dogs Olympic Valley

Gallery Keoki’s Annual Celebrity Hound Hobnob, a fundraiser for the Squaw Valley Avalanche Rescue Dog and Education Fund, is from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be a silent auction and raffle. A suggested donation or raffle ticket purchase is suggested. The Squaw Valley Dog Team and its human handlers will share stories and Pawdegraph prints. No RSVP. | gallerykeoki.com

Full-moon lake effect Truckee

Full Moon Snowshoe Tour is at Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Area from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Enjoy the full moon on this guided snowshoe hike above Donner Lake. | tahoedonner.com

Freeski adventure South Lake Tahoe

Warren Miller’s “Here, There & Everywhere” will be shown at South Tahoe High School theater at 7 p.m. Take a free-ski adventure with industry veterans in Crested Butte, tour Eastern Greenland by dog sled and follow on a Swiss holiday aboard the Glacier Express. $15. | skinet.com/warrenmiller

Full-on moon hike Tahoma

Sierra State Parks Foundation offers a full moon snowshoe hike from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Sugar Pine Point State Park. Hike through history under the stars with state parks guides. $30 adult, $15 ages 12 and younger. | sierraparks.org

FEB. 12 | SUNDAY Blast to the past Blairsden

Johnsville Historic Ski Bowl offers a sledding day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Plumas Eureka State Park. Lost Sierra Café open. Intof Lodge with fire pit. Dogs on leash OK. | skijohnsville.com

OUT & ABOUT

FEB. 13 | MONDAY It’s all snow to me Tahoe Donner

Tahoe Silicon Mountain presents “The Physics of Snow” with Benny Bach, UNR associate professor from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pizza on the Hill. Bach will discuss snow formation, snow crystals, the different types and qualities of snow and how those characteristics are influenced by temperature, wind, humidity and more. $5 includes pizza and salad. | RSVP tahoesiliconmountain.com

FEB. 14 | TUESDAY Rise and shine Truckee

Good Morning Truckee is held from 7 to 8:30 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport on the second Tuesday of every month. Open to everyone. $12, $10 chamber members; includes breakfast. Topic is the housing challenge presented by Stacey Caldwell of TTCF. | (530) 587-8808

Rock that wedding Incline Village, Nev.

Tahoe Wedding Industry Group is hosting an educational and networking meeting featuring a presentation by leadership coach Ruth Schwartz from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at The Chateau. The topic is “Be a Wedding Sales Rock Star, Understanding Couples Motivations to Buy.” $45, free members. | tahoeweddinggroup.net

Dance proud, sisters Truckee

The Truckee/Tahoe community has been gathering to perform the One Billion Rising Flash Mob since 2014. All are welcome to join in dancing at 3:30 p.m. in front of the train station. Light refreshments will be held immediately after at Tahoe University. The choreography will be taught at InnerRhythms Dance Centre on Feb. 12 from 1 to 2 p.m. Free. The choreography can also be learned at onebillionrising.org.

Sweet sunset hike Tahoe Donner

Bundle up with a companion for a special Valentine’s Day evening to watch the sunset above Donner Lake. Meet at Alder Creek Adventure Center at 4:15 p.m. to caravan up to the trailhead. Dress in warm layers, including hats and gloves and bring water and a headlamp. $25 includes guide and snowshoe rental. | RSVP tahoedonner.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Valentine’s Day Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

FEB. 15 | WEDNESDAY SNC launches series Incline Village, Nev.

Sierra Nevada College offers US Bank Speaker Series from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in TCES 139/141. Dr. Johannes Ziegler, founder and CEO Miaplaza Inc. will speak. Ziegler also founded Tahoe Silicon Mountain, a networking group of 500 tech professionals. Free. | sierranevada.edu

What’s on your mind Incline Village, Nev.

Incline General Improvement District board of trustees will host an open house from 5 to 8 p.m. at The Chateau. This is an opportunity for the community to talk with elected officials. IVGID Venues, North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District, Incline Village Community Hospital and Washoe County Sheriff’s Department will also have reps there.| RSVP Misty Moga at mam@ivgid.org or (775) 832-1360

KIDS $74

byop

6 & UNDER SKI FREE

ADULT TICKET $79 HOLIDAYs

$40/day $50 Holidays

(bring your other pass Deal) Holidays: 2/18-26

Upcoming Events:

Wednesdays: 55+ Ski Clinics 2/10 & 3/10: Snowshoe to snowflake lodge 2/18-26: Child Ski Center Theme days 3/1: classic Warren Miller Films at the chateau (955 fairway blvd) 3/4: uphill/downhill dash

DiamondPeak.com • (775) 832-1177

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

13


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

MORE EVENTS FEB. 15 | WEDNESDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Black activism explored Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Library presents Greta de Jong, UNR professor of African American history, speaking on “You Can’t Eat Freedom: Struggles for Social Justice After the Civil Rights Movement” at 6:30 p.m. On the efforts of black activism and beyond the 1960s and the opposition encountered. Free. | (775) 881-4130

FEB. 16 | THURSDAY A hero’s gift Incline Village, Nev.

North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District will be hosting a Community Blood Drive from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the main fire station on Tanager Street. Food and beverages, courtesy of Hyatt Regency Resort and Mofos Pizza. Make an appointment at (775) 831-0351, ext. 0 or visit bloodhero.com and use sponsor code: INCLINE.

In English and Spanish Incline Village, Nev.

Incline Village Library offers Bilingual Story Time from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Feature stories, finger plays and wiggle action as part of the experience to encourage a love of books. | (775) 832-4130

at Granlibakken

Located just outside of Tahoe City.

Ski · Board · Sled & S’more

North Tahoe Business Association hosts an open house from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at North Tahoe Event Center for community and business people to network and provide input on how to make Kings Beach a better place. Food and beverages will be served. All are welcome. | RSVP (530) 546-9000 or info@northtahoebusiness.org

FEB. 17 | FRIDAY Ahoy, lil’ matey Tahoe City

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers an Ode to Seafood Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

14

February is family film month Minden, Nev.

Tails are wagging Northstar

Lifescapes, a memoir-writing program for seniors, is from 2 to 4 p.m. at Incline Village Library. First and third Fridays of each month. All are welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Every Friday at Cedar House Pub Offering cozy fireside dining and featuring pub favorites. Excludes holiday periods.

Celebrate National Winter Trails Day by participating in a free, guided snowshoe hike in Van Sickle Bi-State Park. Bring equipment and water, dress in layers. Cocoa and snacks provided at the visitor center afterward. Event is open to first 20 people to register. | Register kedwards@cityofslt.us

Feeling the pain Truckee

Share and write Incline Village, Nev.

2 for 1 Entrėes

Free to celebrate South Lake Tahoe

Third Thursday Tasting at The Pour House is from 5 to 7 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

Tahoe Maritime Museum hosts preschool story time, “Ships, Sails and Nautical Tales,” from 11 to 11:30 a.m. every other Friday of the month. The program is directed at ages 3 to 5 and will feature books that have maritimerelated themes. | danielle@tahoemaritime.org

530-583-4242 | Granlibakken.com

Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter offers a number of activities for its first day. Beginner back-country ski tour at 8 a.m. AIARE Level 1 avalanche education at 8 a.m. Classic Nordic ski tour with Olympian Glen Job at 8:30 a.m. Skate ski with Olympian Katerina Nash at 9 a.m. Youth back-country splitboard tour at 9 a.m. Beginner skate ski clinic at 9 a.m. Valentine’s Day snowshoe hike at 9 a.m. Women’s beginner ski tour and intermediate skate ski clinic at 11 a.m. A mountain film at 7 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

Ta, ta, ta tasting Truckee

The future of the town Kings Beach

Good Times Snow

Way to start a festival Area venues

Minden Library will be showing free movies in February geared toward adults and teens with a romantic theme at 10:30 a.m. “Barefoot in the Park” (not rated) is today. Coffee and treats available. | (775) 782-9841

A free community health talk on “How Perception Influences the Experience of Pain” is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at TFH Center for Health and Sports Performance. Physical therapist Whitney Rogers explores the beneficial role of pain neurophysiology education in giving relief to patients who experience chronic pain. | RSVP (530) 587-3769

Let the

FEB. 18 | SATURDAY

FEB. 17-18 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY Winemaker’s events Area venues

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Shane from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Truckee on Friday and Uncorked Tahoe City on Saturday. A winemaker’s tasting event from Russell Herman will be from 5 to 7 p.m. at Petra on Saturday. | teloswine.com

The 9th annual Black Tie & Tails Fundraising Gala is at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe from 5:30 to 11 p.m. More than 350 guests, many with their canine companions, will be greeted by a Hollywood-style red carpet entry, followed by champagne and hors d’oeuvre, an elegant dining experience, music, dancing and entertainment. $175. Benefits Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe. | (530) 582-2468

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers an Ode to Seafood Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Inspired by the Alps Alpine Meadows

Alpine Meadows offers a Moonlit Snowshoe Tour and Dinner. Seating times are 5:30, 6:20 and 7:30 p.m. Arrive at Base Lodge 15 minutes before your seating time. Distance one-quarter mile. Alps-inspired menu. $74, $35 child. | RSVP squawalpine.com

FEB. 18-20 | SATURDAY-MONDAY Blast to the past Blairsden

Johnsville Historic Ski Bowl offers Winterfest and sledding days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Plumas Eureka State Park. Longboards will be used on Sunday. Lost Sierra Café open. Intof Lodge with fire pit. Dogs on leash OK. | skijohnsville.com

FEB. 18-25 | SATURDAY-SATURDAY Be a super star Tahoe Donner

Winter Superstars Week at Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area offers events for all ages and abilities: ski and snowboard races, sled pull and mini terrain park competition. Details will be posted on the Web site, including a free Glowstick Parade and Carnival is on the last day on Snowbird run. Guests receive glowsticks for the parade playing carnival games. The parade starts at 6:30 p.m. | tahoedonner.com


February 9-22, 2017

FEB.18-26 | SATURDAY-SUNDAY Ski for less Tahoe venues

Skiing For Schools is at participating resorts: Homewood, Tahoe Donner Downhill and Cross Country and Tahoe Cross Country. Lift tickets are offered at discount prices and all proceeds go to Excellence in Education to help local schools. | exined.org

FEB. 19 | SUNDAY Mountain festival on a roll Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter continues: Intermediate back-country ski tour at 8 a.m. AIARE Level 1 avalanche education at 8 a.m. Women’s intermediate back-country ski tour at 9 a.m. Beginner skate ski clinic at 9 a.m. Women’s beginner splitboard tour at 9 a.m. Alpenglow 20 km pre-race ski at 11 a.m. Women’s specific intermediate skate ski clinic at 11 a.m. Daily yoga at noon. | alpenglowsports.com

A family affair Northstar

Explore the great outdoors in a fun, unintimidating family-friendly atmosphere on snowshoes. The three-hour tours are open to all ages and ability levels. A guide will lead the group, includes hot chocolate, cookies and snow play. Starts at 1 p.m. | RSVP northstarcalifornia.com

Poetry and prose Truckee

Literary Arts & Wine is a monthly reading series held every third Sunday at Art Truckee at 5 p.m. All are welcome. | literaryartsandwine.com

Inspired by the Alps Alpine Meadows

Alpine Meadows offers a Moonlit Snowshoe Tour and Dinner. Seating times are 5:30, 6:20 and 7:30 p.m. Arrive at Base Lodge 15 minutes before your seating time. Distance one-quarter mile. Alps-inspired menu. $74, $35 child. | RSVP squawalpine.com

FEB. 20 | MONDAY Mountain festival on a roll Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter continues: Daily yoga at 7:30 a.m. AIARE Level 1 avalanche education at 8 a.m. Intermediate back-country ski tour at 9 a.m. Intermediate skate ski clinic at 9 a.m. Avalanche beacon practice at 12 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

FEB. 21 | TUESDAY Mountain festival on a roll Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter continues: Daily yoga at 7:30 a.m. Beginner back-country ski tour at 8 a.m. Intermediate splitboard tour at 9 a.m. Snow safety with the Sierra Avalanche Center at 9 a.m. Intermediate ski skate clinic at 9 a.m. Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival at 7 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

Experience the wine Kings Beach

Wine Tahoe offers free wine-tasting experiences from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at North Tahoe Event Center the third Tuesday of each month. Space is limited. No walk-ins. | RSVP info@winetahoe.com

Back-country films Tahoe City

The 12th Annual Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival will show at Granlibakken Resort at 7 p.m. presented by DPS Skis. The event is a fundraiser for Sierra Watershed Education Program. $10. | alpenglowsports.com

FEB. 22 | WEDNESDAY Membership 101 Truckee

Truckee Chamber of Commerce Membership 101 is from 8 to 9 a.m. at the California Welcome Center. Learn how to get a user/

OUT & ABOUT

login and take control of a free, full business page on truckee.com Web site. Assistance offered by Jessica Carr of Sierra Small Business Development Center. Coffee and pastries. | info@truckee.com

Mixing it up South Lake Tahoe

Mountain festival on a roll Area venues

Mountain festival on a roll Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter continues: Women’s specific AIARE Level 1 avalanche education at 8 a.m. Beginner back-country ski tour at 9 a.m. Benson Hut overnight trip at 9 a.m. Daily yoga at 12 p.m. Full moon snowshoe run at 6 p.m. Women, Wine & Wax at 6:15 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

SNC launches series Incline Village, Nev.

Sierra Nevada College offers US Bank Speaker Series from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in TCES 139/141. Nora Betyousef Lacey, founder of Nora Betyousef Foundation and Assyrian Art Institute will speak. Free. | sierranevada.edu

FEB. 23 | THURSDAY Mountain festival on a roll Area venues

Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter continues: Women’s specific AIARE Level 1 avalanche education at 8 a.m. Intermediate back-country ski tour at 8 a.m. Daily yoga at 4 p.m. Winter film series with Adrian Ballinger and Cory Richards at 7 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

Winery Take-Over Tahoe City

Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinner that includes the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from Schramsberg Vineyards and J. Davies Vineyards. $30 to $35. | RSVP sunnysideresort.com

The Tahoe Chamber After Five mixer starts at 5 p.m. Details TBA. | tahoechamber.org

FEB. 24 | FRIDAY Alpenglow Sports Mountain Festival Winter continues: Women’s specific AIARE Level 1 avalanche education at 8 a.m. Intermediate back-country ski tour at 8 a.m. Squaw Valley lift-accessed back-country tour at 9 a.m. Daily yoga at 12 p.m. | alpenglowsports.com

Mountain dining experience Northstar

The Mountain Table Dinner Series 2017 offers a dining experience in Northstar’s Zephyr Lodge. The dinner will feature Bonny Doon Vineyards complemented by a menu featuring locally and regionally sourced produce and proteins prepared by Zephyr Lodge Executive Chef Aramis Torres. Seating for all dinners will be family style. | RSVP northstarcalifornia.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Basque Country Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

FEB. 24-25 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY Winemaker’s events Area venues

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Honig from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Truckee on Friday and Uncorked Squaw on Saturday. | teloswine.com

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FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TA H O E L O C A L

Doug Read Courtesy Laura Read

STORY BY TIM HAUSERMAN

D

oug Read is a powerful skier, ice skater, bike rider, builder and wood carver of everything, from the benches and tables at Tahoe Cross Country to the giant arrow in front of the Sugar Pine Cakery in Lake Forest. He is an adventurer, practical joker and can tell a tall tale. But, most importantly, according to longtime friend and fellow community supporter Larry Sevison: “He is very generous with his time. If there is anything going on, he’s involved in it.” In 1974, Sevison’s son, Lance, perished after getting lost skiing in the back of Northstar. After the tragedy, Read was part of a small group that formed the Tahoe Nordic Search & Rescue Team to help prevent similar tragedies in the future. Since that time, Read, now 69 years old, has joined the other brave men and women of Search & Rescue more than 150 times to head out on searches to rescue those who are lost. Often they head into blizzard conditions in the dark in a race against time and the elements. “Doug is probably responsible for saving more lives in the back country than anyone else,” says fellow TNSART member Randall Osterhuber. He was also instrumental in organizing The Great Ski Race, which was started in the 1970s by Skip Reedy.

“ Doug is probably responsible for saving more lives in the back country than anyone else.” –Randall Osterhuber “We worked hard at developing that race, making it part of the community. It got more and more popular. It evolved into the biggest fundraiser for Tahoe Nordic Search & Rescue,” says Read, who was involved every step of the way in working to make the race a success, which returns March 5. In addition to his work with Search & Rescue and The Great Ski Race, Read was the North Tahoe High School Nordic coach for five years in the 1990s and works tirelessly to assist Tahoe Cross Country as both a board member and volunteer. Now, you can also find him helping out and providing comic relief at the new ice-skating rink at the Tahoe City Winter Sports Park. When he and wife, Laura, bought a second home in Sierraville, he dove into that community and started the annual Tour De Manure bike ride around Sierra Valley cow country. The June 17 event attracts a lot of

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Tahoe locals whom the Reads have convinced to come enjoy the valley for the day. Read grew up in Illinois, went to college in Michigan and served in the Navy in Florida. In 1970, while traveling across the country with friends, he drove over the Mt. Rose Highway and saw Lake Tahoe for the first time. His reaction, he says was: “Oh my God, are you kidding me?”

its fullest. He has raced in 16 Loppet races in Europe and America. These are 50-kilometer, endurance, cross-country ski races that attract thousands of racers. Sevison tells how Read decided to go for a bike ride one day. He rode all the way up to Seattle, then into Canada. He then caught a train across Canada and rode his bike into New England. There he went into a truck stop and talked a truck driver into giving him a ride to Chicago to visit his parents. Later, he convinced another trucker to give him a ride with his bike back home to Tahoe. Once, he and Osterhuber climbed to the top of the remote peak in rural Nevada and skied all the way into the town of Austin, a feat that has probably never been done before. “I could tell you a million stories about Doug Read,” says Osterhuber.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT Doug and Laura in Yosemite, spring 2016.

He continued on, traveling to Washington and Alaska, but he couldn’t get the beauty of Tahoe out of his mind. So he came back, got a job at Olympic Village Inn and has been a part of Tahoe ever since. His first “Tahoe home” was sleeping on the deck of Larry Sevison’s house in Carnelian Bay while he looked for a place. He worked in ski shops and as a laborer for Sevison’s construction firm while he learned to ski the back country that he now knows like the back of his hand. He became a builder, first for himself, but later found it more enjoyable to work for others. A few years ago he saw a huge metal arrow hanging from a tree and it gave him an idea. “We would sneak around at night and install three-foot-long wood arrows and people would come in the morning and see the surprise,” he says. Since then he has built a few wood arrows that are more than 12 feet long and he has taken to making tomahawks and pumpkin carvings. It’s all part of Read’s playful personality. “Absolutely one of the funniest guys I’ve ever known,” says Osterhuber. “I’ve been on the ground laughing, he is so funny.” Read has a drive to experience life to

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Doug Read likes to “surprise” locals with handmade arrows

While Tahoe and skiing are true joys, Read is quick to focus on the close relationships he developed with his fellow searchers, who for decades have tromped through deep powder into gale force winds under the constant threat of avalanche. “You spend the night out in the middle of a nasty storm, you get a different closeness. There are some difficult times out there. Finding people that are really in trouble. Getting them out and getting them home is really special,” Read says. “I’ve made so many fine friends through the years, I feel blessed.”  For more information on Tahoe Nordic Search & Rescue, visit tahoenordicsar.com.

Do you know someone interesting in Tahoe? To nominate someone you’d like to see featured, e-mail editor@tahoethisweek.com.


February 9-22, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

Snowmobiling

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GUIDED TOURS EAGLE RIDGE SNOWMOBILE TOURS | Truckee / Sierraville (530) 546-8667 | SledTahoe.com

TRAIL AREAS MOUNT ROSE

TAHOE MEADOWS

Intermediate to advance On Mount Rose above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where snowmobilers can enjoy the back country. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends, so visit during the week. Snowmobiling is allowed on the north side of Highway 431 only from the staging area to service road 051. Follow this road northwest to the 1,000-acre riding area.

WEST SHORE

PROSSER LAKE/TRUCKEE AREA Easy to advanced

Take Highway 89 north of Truckee. Various launching sites are along the road at Prosser Lake, Hobart Mills, etc. A large Sno-Park is about 14 miles north of Interstate 80 at Little Truckee Summit. Groomed roads lead to hundreds of miles of back country. Access to Basset’s Station on Highway 49 for lunch and gas (30 miles), Mount Lola at 10,300 ft., Webber Lake trail system, ridges at Independence Lake and more. From Prosser, go east or west of Highway 89 to open areas.*

CISCO GROVE

RATTLESNAKE Easy to advanced

Steep canyon and side slopes at lower end of trail with 7 miles of groomed access. Upper elevations feature ridges and bowls. Route follows Rattlesnake Road to Magonigal Summit. Trailhead at Cisco Grove exit north off Interstate 80.*

HOPE VALLEY

BLACKWOOD CANYON

HOPE VALLEY

The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Snowmobilers should follow the road about 2.5 miles, then take a left across the bridge and continue up Barker Pass Road to large open areas, some steep bowls and many roads.*

Located at the junction of Highways 88 and 89 south of South Lake Tahoe. Sno-park on the south side of Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Much of Hope Valley is open to snowmobiling, but some areas are not; stay in designated areas. Ungroomed routes to Willow Creek (8.5 miles) and Tamarack Lake (1 mile) and groomed routes to Blue Lakes (11.5 miles) and Forestdale (3.5 miles). Stage from Hope Valley Sno-Park.*

Intermediate to advanced

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CABIN CREEK TRAIL Intermediate

A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road off Highway 89 south of Truckee. Turn onto Cabin Creek and look for the unmarked trailhead 1 mile from the highway. Enjoy gentle, rolling slopes. Parking is limited.

MARTIS PEAK

Intermediate to advanced Best access and limited parking about one-quarter mile north of Brockway Summit below the top of Highway 267 on the Truckee side. No groomed trails, but many old lumber roads exist. Take a good map, as it’s easy to become turned around.

LOST SIERRA

YUBA PASS

Easy to advanced The route north from Yuba Pass off Highway 49 is popular for snowmobilers, and shares the trail system with Nordic skiers for the first mile before branching off. Snowmobilers can head north on the trail and travel through Gold Lake Highway. Then, head south to Bassett’s or north to Gold Lake. This route offers a variety of terrain and beautiful views of the Sierra Buttes and the Lakes Basin. More than 100 miles of trails. Take Highway 89 north of Truckee, and then take Highway 49 to Yuba Pass. Trailhead parking is 6 miles east of Bassett’s Station.*

LITTLE TRUCKEE SUMMIT Easy to advanced

There are several marked routes with about 110 miles of groomed trails. Marked snowmobile trails follow roads to Webber Lake and Yuba Pass, Rim and Ridge Loops, Bald Ridge Loop and Treasure Mountain, Pass Creek Loop, Independence Lake Loop, Meadow Lake Loop and Jackson Meadow. Most trails are groomed. Trailhead at Jackson Meadow Road, about 14 miles north of Truckee on Highway 89.

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Snowmobiling. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

17


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Brilliant blue skies twinkle over Schallenberger Ridge at Donner Lake.

Photo caption.

MAGICAL DONNER LAKE S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y K AT H E R I N E H I L L

T

he brilliant blue sky is nearly blinding against the freshly fallen snow surrounding Donner Lake following a barrage of recent winter storms. A snowshoe on a bright, sunny day is just the medicine I need to cure the doldrums that had started to set in following January’s massive snowfall. It’s not the amount of snow – bring it - or even the shoveling, the ski traffic or the winter driving – it’s the overcast days that lingered on and on following the storms. I was craving those bluebird winter days that the Tahoe Sierra is famous for.

from the eastern end of the lake with the Visitor Center, beaches and summer campground, then extends back into Coldstream Canyon (another great spot for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing) wrapping around both sides of Schallenberger Ridge along the south and western ends of Donner Lake. There’s a lot to explore at the park, but for this outing we followed the Lakeside Interpretive Trail, which was buried in several feet of fresh snow.

the bright blue sky contrasts with the trees covering the mountainside that have yet to shed their snow. It’s breathtaking. Priya Hutner enjoying a winter trek at Donner Memorial State Park.

“As we trekked through the woods, we soon emerged on the south side of Donner Lake giving way to expansive views of the north shore that looked like a postcard.”

Donner Creek meanders through Donner Memorial State Park.

18

My friend Priya Hunter and I were as chatty as schoolgirls as we started off on our snowshoe trek from Donner Memorial State Park. After weeks of steady snows that had us snowbound for extended periods, we had a lot to catch up on and a snowdrenched forest in front of us to explore. The parks wraps around much of Donner Lake

There’s a well-worn trailhead near the parking lot at the entrance station that’s easy to find. While most of the park is not heavily used in the winter months, the Lakeside trail is usually user packed by snowshoes and skis throughout the season. Feel free to follow the trail around the lake, or to break you own trail. The trail meanders through the forest crossing Donner Creek, which is flowing at a good pace despite the heavy snowpack. As we trekked through the woods, we soon emerged on the south side of Donner Lake giving way to expansive views of the north shore that looked like a postcard. Snowcovered Donner Ridge stands over Donner Lake dotted by rows of lakefront homes and homes perched high above on the ridge at Tahoe Donner,

We trek down to the beach to enjoy the scenery, half joking that there’s so much snow that we can’t discern where the beach ends and the lake begins. We cover about 2 miles on our outing, stopping to chat with locals and visitors with the same goal in mind – enjoying this brilliant winter day, before heading over to Donner Lake Kitchen for a hearty brunch and well-earned Bloody Mary’s.  Donner Memorial State Park is open year-round, along with the Visitor Center, which tells the story of the emigrants that came West, the Donner Party, local Native peoples and the construction of the transcontinental railroad. For more information, visit parks.ca.gov.


ASC TRAINING CENTER

Trails 10

(530) 426-3313 | auburnskiclub.org

KM 25

Open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Biathlon range, ski jumping hills.

Acres 500

BIJOU CROSS-COUNTRY (530) 542-6056

CAMP RICHARDSON (530) 542-6584 | camprichardson.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Cross-country & snowshoe rentals. Guided ski tours.

CLAIR TAPPAAN LODGE (530) 426-3632 | clairtappaanlodge.com

Groomed 25 KM

KM 4

TERRAIN

Intermediate 50%

Trails 7

Novice 60% Advanced 0%

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Trails 5

Novice 67%

(530) 587-7892 | parks.ca.gov

KM 16+

Intermediate 20%

Winter nature trail. Trail guides in museum.

Groomed None

Advanced 13%

GRANLIBAKKEN SKI AREA

Trails 2

Novice 25%

KM 7.5

Intermediate 75%

Groomed None

Advanced 0%

(530) 694-2266 | hopevalleyoutdoors.com

Trails 60 miles

Snowshoe & cross-country lessons, rentals (cash or check only).

Groomed 20 miles

(209) 258-7248 | kirkwood.com 3 trail systems. Two dog-friendly trails.

LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (530) 541-4660 x717 ltccnordiccenter.weebly.com Groomed several times a week.

N/A

Intermediate 40%

KIRKWOOD

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Groomed 10 KM

Groomed 14 KM

HOPE VALLEY OUTDOORS

N/A

KM 14

Open Fri.-Sun. & holidays. Tubing area & warming hut open daily.

1

Advanced 30%

Shuttle to Soda Springs, Donner Ski Ranch & Sugar Bowl. Overnight wilderness huts.

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License #954258

Novice 20%

Trails 6+ KM 35

Trails 24 KM 80 Acres 4,200 Groomed 80 KM

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1

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Trails 5 KM 5-7

OUT & ABOUT

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TRAILS

DOGS OK

Cross-Country Skiing

CHILDREN’S SCHOOL WARMING HUTS SNOWSHOE TRAILS

February 9-22, 2017

N/A

N/A

MickeysBigMack.com

Groomed 5-7 KM

NEVADA NORDIC (775) 720-9355 | nevadanordic.org

Groomed 10 KM

At Spooner Lake State Park.

100% EMPLOYEE OWNED

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA

Trails 18

(530) 542-3270 | northstarcalifornia.com

KM 35

Telemark, track, skating lessons daily. Nordic geocaching. Alpine ticket exchangeable for trail pass.

Acres 600

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Groomed 35 KM

(530) 546-5043 | northtahoeparks.com

KM 11

Maps available at North Tahoe Event Center, Kings Beach. Sled hill, snow play area.

Groomed 11 KM

ROYAL GORGE

Trails 60

(530) 426-3871 | royalgorge.com

KM 200+

Open 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Day lodge & 3 cafés along trail. Offers snowbiking & snowkiting.

Acres 7,500

SQUAW CREEK CROSS COUNTRY

Trails 9

Groomed 200+ KM

(530) 583-6300, x6631 | squawcreek.com

KM 18

Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Guided snowshoe tours. Dog sledding.

Acres 400

SUGAR PINE POINT (530) 525-7982 | parks.ca.gov

Groomed 18 KM

MOUNTAIN HARDWARE & SPORTS

Novice 47% Intermediate 32%

2

Advanced 21%

Novice 45% Intermediate 50%

Advanced 5%

Novice 32% Intermediate 50%

9

2

N/A

N/A

Advanced 18%

Novice 60% Intermediate 25% Advanced 15%

Trails 5 KM 20

Winter camping (call for availability). Guided crosscountry and snowshoe tours offered Jan. to March.

Groomed 13.6 KM

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

Trails 2

(530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

KM 4

Sledding & ice skating.

Groomed 4 KM

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

Trails 23

(530) 583-5475 | tahoexc.org

KM 65

Open 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free skate & cross-country lessons on select days.

Acres 3,000

TAHOE DONNER CROSS COUNTRY

Groomed 65 KM

Novice 20% Intermediate 50%

3

•*

5

Advanced 30%

Trails 58

Novice 27%

(530) 587-9484 | tahoedonner.com

KM 100+

Intermediate 44%

Open 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. 7 a.m. for passholders Mon.Fri. (non-storm days). *Weekends & holidays.

Acres 4,800

Advanced 25%

Groomed 100+ KM

Expert 4%

YOU ARE HERE TO PLAY, WE CAN MAKE YOUR ADVENTURES LAST LONGER! 11320 Donner Pass Rd. - Truckee, 96160 CA - (530)587-4844 www.mountainhardwareandsports.com 19


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

ADVENTURE 365 Truckee’s New Outlet Sporting Goods Store

WINTER BLOWOUT SALE Brand name gear at extremely discounted prices!

Skis · Snowboards · Jackets Pants · Gloves · Beanies · Bags Goggles · Socks · Helmets First Layers · Snow Boots

For the Kids

Courtesy North Tahoe Arts

ART TO TAKE HOME North Tahoe Arts will host Kids Art Saturdays, seven free art workshops for ages 2 to 12. Each workshop allows children to create an art project that is meant to be taken home. Artists volunteer their time to give children a chance to discover the fun of creating. Parents must remain with the children; the times are noon to 2 p.m. Make a Valentine is on Feb. 11. Paint the Snowman is on March 4 immediately following the Tahoe City SnowFest Parade. Paint the Easter Egg is on April 15, following the Commons Beach egg hunt. A Gift for Mom is on May 6 and A Gift for Dad is on June 10. Paint the Pumpkin is on Sept. 30 at the Tahoe City Oktoberfest. Make an Ornament is on Dec. 2. The weeklong Kids Art Camps for ages 5 to 12 offered in Tahoe City and Kings Beach have been tentatively scheduled for July 10 to Aug. 4, pending the school district’s snow-day extensions. | northtahoearts.com

(530) 414-4519 · 11025 Pioneer Trail #104 Near Full Belly Deli Winter classes for babies

Learning journaling

Truckee Family Resource Center of Truckee offers winter early-learning classes. Spanish speakers are welcome to all programs and scholarships are available. For parent of infants 3 months old to crawling, there is Baby & Me I from Feb. 10 to March 17 on Fridays from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Lactation consultant Cindy Bansen, R.N. will lead the class. The fee is $72. | truckeefrc.org

South Lake Tahoe Kid’s Nature Journal Club is on Feb. 11 and 25 from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Kids can learn skills for exploring the natural world and how to capture adventures in a nature journal. Some materials are provided. Participants should bring a notebook and pen and dress for the outside weather. Friends of the Library offer On Feb. 25 the Lego Block Party is from 10 to 11 a.m. The entire family can design, build and invent with Legos. All creations will be displayed in the library for a month. | (530) 573-3185

Play holiday days Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Parks and Recreation offers EPIC Base Camp at Lake Tahoe School, for Grades K to 5, is offered from Feb. 21 to 24 and April 10 to 13. Campers will enjoy activities that include swimming, arts and crafts, games and more. | (775) 832-1310 or yourtahoeplace.com

School’s out for holiday Truckee Truckee Donner Recreation and Park District offers holiday camps when school is out for Grades K to 5 at the Community Recreation Center. February Fun Days is offered during Ski/Skate Week from Feb. 21 to 24. Spring Fling Camp is from April 10 to 14. | (530) 582-7720 or tdrpd.org

Learn the code

20

Incline Village, Nev. Incline Village Library offers Coding Camp from Feb. 21 to 24 from 3 to 5 p.m. This introduction to computer science for kids, Grades 3 and up, is designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. Choose from a variety of fun projects and earn a Certificate of Completion. Registration is required. There are 10 seats available, but those who bring their own devices can be added. | (775) 832-3140

Little ones like to congregate Incline Village, Nev. Tahoe Tiny Timbers Gym Time at Incline Village Recreation Center is for ages newborn to 5 on Tuesdays and Fridays from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. This is an opportunity for youngsters to socialize and use gross motor skills in a stimulating environment. Caregivers/parents must be present. | yourtahoeplace.com

Free gym time Truckee Toddler Gymtime is for walking children to age 3 and their parents/ caregivers. They can enjoy socialization and active play with play equipment, including pushing and riding toys, balls, hoops, slides and tunnel mazes. This drop-in class in the big gym at the TTUSD District Office is parent-facilitated and free of charge. It will be on Thursdays from 9:30 to 11 a.m. following the school district schedule. | truckeefrc.org CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


February 9-22, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

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NORTH LAKE TAHOE

SQUAW VALLEY

INCLINE VILLAGE

(530) 403-0206 | squaw.com Olympic Ice Pavilion at High Camp. Hockey or figure skating rentals. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Snow Play Area on Fairway Blvd., next to the Chateau, on the driving range. Bring own equipment.

MOUNT ROSE Near the Mount Rose summit, enjoy sledding in Tahoe Meadows off Highway 431. Bring equipment.

(530) 542-6262 | citiofslt.com Indoor facility open year-round. BlueGo

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com Ice skating & rentals. Club House. TART

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

(530) 546-0605 | northtahoeparks.com End of National Avenue off Hwy 28. Rentals available. TART

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

TRUCKEE

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com At Truckee River Regional Park. Skate rentals, broomball leagues, ice dancing & hockey lessons. Skate rentals & season passes available. TART

Sledding & cross-country trails. Rentals available. Club House. TART

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SQUAW VALLEY

PUBLIC POOLS

(530) 452-4511 | squaw.com Tubing & mini snowmobiles. TART

INCLINE VILLAGE

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com 25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends).

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Highway 50 at Echo Lake Road. Bring equipment.*

SAWMILL POND

Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. Reopens spring 2017. TART

TAYLOR CREEK

On Lake Tahoe Blvd. Bring equipment. BlueGo

SNOWSHOEING

WinterSportsPark.com 530-583-1516

CROSS COUNTRY SKIING

(530) 543-2600

Highway 89, north of Camp Richardson Road. Bring equipment.* BlueGo

(530) 542-6056 | citiofslt.com 25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. BlueGo

SLEDDING

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SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

ICE SKATING

ECHO LAKE

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STATELINE

KAHLE PARK

TRUCKEE

(775) 586-7271 | douglascountynv.gov

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Indoor pools with competition pool and warm water pool, diving board, swim training, hydraulic lift and lessons. TART

Off Highway 207. Bring equipment. BlueGo

TRUCKEE & BEYOND

ROCK CLIMBING WALLS

DONNER SUMMIT

TRUCKEE

South side of I-80, Castle Peak exit beyond Boreal Inn frontage road. Bring equipment.*

Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

TAHOE DONNER

(530) 587-3558

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

(530) 587-9437 | tahoedonner.com At Trout Creek Recreation Center. No personal sleds. Family events all season.

SLEDDING & TUBING

YUBA PASS

EAST SHORE

(530) 994-3401

SPOONER LAKE

Highway 49 at Yuba Pass. Bring equipment.*

(775) 831-0494

State park open for general snow play. Bring equipment.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

HOPE VALLEY AREA

(530) 543-2600

CARSON PASS

Snowplay area off Hwy. 89, 3 miles south of Tahoe City. Bring equipment.*

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

GRANLIBAKKEN

(530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com

HOPE VALLEY Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Bring equipment.*

Machine-groomed snow play area; no tubes or toboggans allowed. All ages.

MEISS MEADOW

TAHOE CITY

(775) 882-2766

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

Gentle slope on Highway 89 South, one-eighth mile south of the wye. Bring equipment. TART

65KM OF GROOMED TRAILS Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Family Fun. ALL ACTIVITIES ARE WEATHER DEPENDENT. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222. BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org

CAFE AND COZY DAY LODGE LESSONS AND RENTALS SNOWSHOEING TRAILSIDE DAY HUTS

TahoeXC.org 530-583-5475 21


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

MORE KIDS Exploring is fun

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20

Little classes for little people

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be included in Shop Local.

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In-home talks · Group presentations

(530) 546-5612 · TheStormKing.com 22

Support for families Kings Beach North Tahoe Family Resource Center offers support and assistance for local families. The Community Child Car Seat Program offers free car-seat safety checks, carseat installations and discounted car seats to qualifying families. Certified car-seat technicians will answer all questions. Interested parents must make an appointment. Support groups for moms and infants are on Tuesdays from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Community House in Kings Beach. Moms or caregivers can get help with proper breastfeeding techniques, postpartum concerns, infant nutrition and infant care. On Mondays, the center offers legal assistance and mediation on family law, employment, landlord-tenant disputes and other civil issues. Those with questions must make an appointment. | (530) 546-0952

Making the scene Stateline, Nev. Teen Scene is every Friday night at the Kahle Community Center, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. for Grades 6 to 12. Kids can shoot hoops, play volleyball, climb the rock wall and play arcade or video games. The night is free to passholders or $5 for drop-ins. | (775) 586-7271

For children especially Reno, Nev. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum offers educational exhibits, classes and hands-on activities designed for children. Discover Your Way is the first Sunday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon. Families with children on the Autism Spectrum and with sensory processing disorders are given special admission before the general public. This monthly program provides an opportunity to enjoy sensory-friendly time at the museum and allows parents to network. Small Wonder Wednesdays is from 9 to 10 a.m. for ages 5 and younger. Tots can participate in story time and explore the museum for a full hour before it opens to the public. Visit the museum after 4 p.m. every Wednesday and the admission is half price. Members and children younger than age 1 always enter free. The museum stays open until 8 p.m. All classes are free to members and nonmembers with the price of admission. | nvdm.org

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities.

for walking, personal protection and exercise

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Public and Private Wine Classes Sommelier Services We Can Train Your Staff, Maximize Your Wine Program and Help With Your Fundraiser

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Truckee The Family Room program at the Truckee Elementary School is from Mondays to Fridays from 10 a.m. to noon. Space is limited in this free program. The Family Room is a bilingual program dedicated to encouraging the development of literacy and school readiness in families with children ages 3 and younger. Activities include a mix of reading, music and crafts, while parents create supportive peer networks. The Family Room includes a free lending library of English and Spanish children’s books. | (530) 587-2513 or truckeefrc.org

Hardwood Canes

Assisting Businesses Build Effective Wine Programs

Expertise and Ethics

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Truckee Truckee Donner Recreation and Park District offers several ongoing classes for babies and parents. Mommy & Me Curiosities is on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 9 to 10:30 a.m. for ages 1 to 3. Baby & Me Discoveries is on Wednesdays from 11 to noon for ages 1 to 3. Baby Bears Yoga is on Tuesdays from 11 to noon for ages 2 to 5. The instructor for all is Renee Grennan; classes are held at the Community Art Center and can be paid for the month or by drop-in fee. Music Together Family Class is on Tuesdays from 10 to 10:45 a.m. or Saturdays from 11 to 11:45 a.m. for age birth to 5. Parents must stay with students. Brooke Chabot is the instructor. | Register tdrpd.org

Truckee KidZone Museum offers Art Studio Specialty on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. for toddlers, ages 1 to 3. Children will be introduced to a gooey or sticky medium in which to glue, stamp, build or simply explore. Family Fun Fridays are at 11 a.m. Paint on foil, have fun with shaving cream and explore many arts and crafts options. Bilingual Sing Along with Brooke Chabot is on Feb. 23 at 10:30 a.m. Kids will learn bilingual songs that will provide them with the basic musical skills needed to enjoy school and social musical activities. Bilingual Story Time is on Feb. 28 at 11 a.m. Ileana will captivate the kids with a new book and songs to sing. All classes are free to members or with the price of admission to nonmembers. | kidzonemuseum.org

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February 9-22, 2017

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OUT & ABOUT

Bowl Incline North Shore’s Complete Family Recreation Center

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T R A I LS

TheTahoeWeekly.com > Beginner’s guide to snowshoeing

920 Southwood Blvd., Incline Village (775) 831-1900 email: bowlink@aol.com

> Snowshoeing among the pines in Tahoe Donner > Lake Tahoe views from Chickadee Ridge

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bowlincline.com

> Trek to Coldstream Canyon > Touring Tahoe Meadows

TAHOE INCLINE SPORTS Formerly Tahoe Bike & Ski

SKI TOURING & SNOWSHOEING

$24 Basic/Sport Ski Package $30 Performance Ski Package $36 Demo Ski Package $14 Kid's Shape Skis* $20 Youth Basic Ski Package (11-15 years old) $14 XC (Touring) Rental or Snowshoe Rental $26 Snowboard & Boots Strap-in bindings $20 Kid's Snowboard & Boots* Strap-in bindings $5 kids $6 adults Helmets with rental

TAHOE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL

LEVEL: Easy to moderate A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road. This is a nice area for downhill practice while cross-country skiing. The terrain has gentle, rolling slopes. From Interstate 80, take Highway 89 south 3 miles, then turn right on Cabin Creek Road. The unmarked trailhead is 1 mile from the highway. Limited parking is available in a road cut, when plowed. There is moderate snowmobile use in the area.

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 582-7892

The park is mostly flat and open year-round. Skiers can enjoy the forests and boulder fields, glide down to the lake and meander through the park. There is an unmarked, 9.6-km, skier-packed trail starting near the Emigrant Trail Museum. For the more adventuresome, glide over the hills into Coldstream Canyon. TART

PETER GRUBB HUT/CASTLE PEAK LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous

A marked Nordic ski trail begins at the Castle Peak/Boreal interchange on Donner Summit off Interstate 80, west of Truckee. Take the Castle Peak exit and follow it for one-quarter mile to the intersection for the trailhead to the north that goes up Castle Valley and over Castle Pass. Follow unmarked trail to Peter Grubb Hut. For overnight stays at Peter Grubb Hut, call (530) 426-3632 for reservations.

POLE CREEK TRAIL SYSTEM LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Unmarked trails follow roads along Pole Creek and Silver Creek Drainages. Trailhead 6 miles south of Truckee on Highway 89. Some parking on west side of highway. Trails follow U.S. Forest Service roads. Several loops.

SAGEHEN SUMMIT

LEVEL: Easy to moderate An unmarked route follows the road up to the creek bottom. Lateral roads offer many side trips. Trailhead at Sagehen Summit on the west side of Highway 89, 8 miles north of Truckee. Limited parking.

NORTH SHORE

BROCKWAY SUMMIT LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Brockway Summit off Highway 267 offers an abundance of areas to ski. Between Northstar and Kings Beach, there are turnouts on both sides of the highway where Nordic skiers and snowshoers can follow logging and utility roads.

PAGE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to moderate

On Mount Rose high above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where skiers can stretch their legs. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends for skiers, snowshoers and snowmobilers, so try skiing during the week.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

$3 off Skis & Poles or Board Only

LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Skiers can glide along the road (not plowed in winter) or through the meadows. For a longer outing, head up the mountain to Barker Pass. This area also is open to snowmobilers.

MEEKS MEADOWS LEVEL: Easy

Meeks Meadows on the West Shore off Highway 89 offers a vast area to ski. The trailhead is across from the Meeks Bay Fire Station; look for the log cabin with red trim. Follow the U.S. Forest Service road or meander through the meadow and down to Meeks Creek.

t

TAYLOR CREEK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 573-2600 Developed for beginners, this well-marked series of trails allows skiers to explore the area. Terrain is mostly flat and is good for the entire family. Take Highway 89 south around Emerald Bay to the Fallen Leaf Lake Area. Turn on Cathedral Road and park in the Sno-Park. Marked trails start at the parking lot with three trails near Fallen Leaf Lake. On the Lake side of Highway 89, follow the road to the Visitor Center to access the Tallac Historic Trail. SnoPark Permit required.*

Ski or snowshoe along an old road that meanders through a forest and into a cluster of meadows. Take Highway 89 south from Tahoe City, then turn right on Pine Avenue and right on Tahoe Park Heights Road. At the crest of the hill, take the middle fork, which becomes Big Pine Road, then take a left on Silver Tip. The parking area is at the top of the road.

SEE OUR EVENTS CALENDAR FOR GUIDED SNOWSHOE TREKS. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

reg. price (on 4 day rentals only!)

Good for entire party. Coupon not valid w/ other offers.

Expires May 31, 2017

Package is: Skis, Boots & Poles Ski Pants, Gloves, Boots, Sleds & Goggles Available

(775) 413-5144

930 Tahoe Blvd #702, Incline Village, NV

TahoeBikeSki.com

Located in Raley’s Center behind Rookies

PROTECT

YOUR LIVELIHOOD & BUSINESS R.L. Milsner, Inc.

LEVEL: Easy to moderate | (530) 525-7982

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

or

4th Day ½ OFF

All ski rentals are shape skis

*10 years & under/130cm or smaller

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

The Ed Z’berg/Sugar Pine Point State Park is a spectacular spot to cross-country ski or snowshoe among the dense forests of the West Shore or along Lake Tahoe’s shores. The park offers more than 18 km of marked ski trails. Three groomed trails begin at the campground, 9 miles south of Tahoe City, with two skier-packed trails on the lake side of the park, accessed from the Day Use entrance. Winter camping available. The park also offers a number of guided tours throughout the season including full moon snowshoe tours, ski tours of the 1960 Olympic crosscountry trails, historic snowshoe tours and the family Junior Ranger program; call for dates. No dogs allowed on trails. TART

5th Day FREE!

Insurance Brokerage

Basic Commercial Insurance Business & Workers Compensation

Weather Insurance Limited perils subject to policy terms & conditions.

Business interruption caused by weather/climate

Intellectual Property Insurance Media liability, the three types of Patent Insurance

Litigation Reimbursement Insurance Personal Insurance Needs Insurance counseling for businesses Expert witness services

Mike Mansel Office (530) 386-6717 | Cell (925) 899-5845 Certified Insurance Counselor 11025 Pioneer Trail, Ste. 220, Truckee, CA 23


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Courtesy Cory Richards

Powder Report Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete Powder Report. E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Read more about TINS in Tim Hauserman’s story on Tahoe’s bald eagles

Eagles have landed

DUO RECOUNTS

EVEREST CLIMB

Alpenglow Sports continues its 11th annual Winter Film Series, sponsored by Tahoe Weekly magazine, with high-altitude mountaineers Adrian Ballinger and Cory Richards on Feb. 23. The pair will round out the series with a tandem show on their #EverestNoFilter oxygen-less, Snapchat-captured attempt of the world’s tallest peak, Mount Everest. | alpenglowsports.com

Know before you go Tahoe venues Sierra Avalanche Center is offering motorized-specific avalanche education this winter. Three-day Level 1 classes are offered to snowmobilers for free. Registration is open for classes now in South Lake Tahoe from Feb. 10 to 12 and Feb. 24 to 25, and Mount Rose from March 17 to 19. | sierraavalanchecenter.org

Snow Camping 101 Area venues Tahoe Rim Trail Association hosts Snow Camp 101 trips from Feb. 11 to 12 and March 11 to 12. Participants can learn how to melt drinking water, enjoy no bugs, test out new equipment, never worry about refrigeration and enjoy complete solitude and silence. | tahoerimtrail.org

Lovers run in Reno Reno, Nev. Reno Run 4 Love, a 4-mile Valentine’s themed road race in downtown Reno is on Feb. 12 at 8:30 p.m. The Catholic

24

Charities of Northern Nevada and St. Vincent’s Programs will be accepting in-kind donations on race morning: toothbrushes, toothpaste, deodorant, shampoo, soap, hats, scarves, gloves, coats and socks. The post-race party is at 10 a.m. with champagne, beer, chocolate and prizes. | renorun4love.com

Wax on, race off Tahoe Donner Tahoe Donner Challenge is on Feb. 12. This is race or tour and participants choose their route on the trails of the crosscountry center, with checkpoints at Drifter Hut, Hawks Peak and in the Euer Valley. | tahoedonner.com

Racing season in full swing Norden Auburn Ski Club continues the season’s fun racing series. Next up the Chuck Lyda Memorial Biathlon Weekend on Feb. 11 and 12. The 15km Tahoe Mountain Sports President’s Cup is on Feb. 20. | Register auburnskiclub.com

Tahoe venues Despite heavy snowfall during the week of the annual Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Count, many volunteers participated in one of Tahoe Institute For Natural Science’s most successful counts to date, including writer Tim Hauserman for his Tahoe Weekly story on “Majesty of Tahoe’s bald eagles.” This year, volunteers tallied 27 bald eagles, an impressive total given the challenging conditions. Based on the details of each observation, an impressive 23 adults, two sub-adults and two immatures were delineated. A large cluster of activity was concentrated around the southeast corner of Lake Tahoe, but eagles were seen all around the lake. | tinsweb.org

New Tahoe XC lodge eyed Tahoe City The Tahoe Cross Country Ski Education Association, which owns Tahoe Cross Country located outside Tahoe City is holding a series of public workshops for the Historic Lodge Project. The project proposes to reconstruct the historic Schilling Lodge, which was donated to the Association, at Tahoe Cross Country to provide expanded services to skiers. There are five proposed locations for the lodge and the Association is hosting public workshops to garner input on the proposal. The workshops will be held from 3 to 7 p.m. on Feb. 11 and 12 and on March 11 and 12 at the Fairway Community Center in Tahoe City. As well, an online survey is available to provide input. Details on the project and the lodge are available online. | theschillinglodge.com

Head to Head Kirkwood The 9th annual Head 2 Head Ski Challenge is on Feb. 18 at Kirkwood. This fundraiser for the Kirkwood Ski Education Foundation is a day of racing with an awards ceremony, followed by a dinner and auction at Off the Wall Bar. The kids will enjoy a separate pizza and game night. | Register (831) 662-2975.

Snowshoe Cocktail Races South Lake Tahoe Save the dates for this winter’s returning Snowshoe Cocktail Races on Feb. 18 and March 18 at Beacon Bar & Grill at Camp Richardson. Great prizes awarded to the fastest and cleanest at the obstacle course finish line. Free to participate. | camprichardson.com

Get your race on Twin Bridges Sierra-at-Tahoe offers USASA races open to members and riders of all ages. Nonmembers can join at registration. The USASA SBX/SX #2 is on Feb. 11, the USASA Pipe #1 is on Feb. 25 and the USASA Slopestyle #2 is on Feb. 26. Preregistering saves $5. All races are from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Competition time is at 10:30 a.m. | sierraattahoe.com

The place to race Soda Springs Boreal hosts the USASA Boardercross as part of the North Tahoe Series on Feb. 11 to 12, with the third annual Boreal Banked Slalom on Feb. 18. This costume race includes live music and après ski party and benefits the High Five Foundation. | rideboreal.com

Back-country biking, skiing fun Tahoe City Ski with Tav Streit and brothers Wyatt and Charlie Fereday in a 20km pre-race ski from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Feb. 19 at Tahoe Cross Country. The Alpenglow 20km XC Ski Race and Fat Bike Race are on Feb. 26. Participate in one for $25 or both for $40. The Fat Bike Race starts at 8 a.m. in the ski area’s Upper Yellow Meadow and the cross-country ski race starts in waves at 10 a.m. Ski 20 km, 10 km or 5 km. All ages welcome. | tahoexc.org

Rippin’ video contest Olympic Valley The 4th Annual Shreddit Showdown from Granite Chief is a video-submitted contest where contestants get out on the slopes, in the park or in the back country to put together his or her best shots in a 3-minute edit. The top 3 contestants of each age group get to sit back and watch their edit while the entire theater hoots and hollers in excitement. Deadline for submissions is March 4. Prizes include Blizzard skis and Technica boots. | granitechief.com


February 9-22, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

ALPINE MEADOWS (530) 581-8374 | squawalpine.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tickets also good at Squaw Valley.

BOREAL MOUNTAIN RESORT (530) 426-3666 | rideboreal.com 9 a.m.-9 p.m. All tickets good until 9 p.m.

DIAMOND PEAK (775) 832-1177 | diamondpeak.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Last Tracks Feb.-April.

DONNER SKI RANCH (530) 426-3635 | donnerskiranch.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tubing hill.

GRANLIBAKKEN (530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com Fri.-Sun. & holidays only. Snow play area, open daily. Warming hut open daily.

HEAVENLY (775) 586-7000 #1 | skiheavenly.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays; 8:30 a.m. weekends. Sledding, tubing, cross-country and snow bikes available.

HOMEWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT (530) 525-2900 | skihomewood.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Snowcat skiing.

KIRKWOOD (877) 547-5966 | kirkwood.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cross-country ski, tube, dog sled, Snowcat tours.

MT. ROSE SKI TAHOE (775) 849-0704 | (800) 754-7673 | skirose.com 9 a.m -4 p.m.

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA (530) 562-1330 | northstarcalifornia.com 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Tubing lanes and lift.

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE (530) 659-7475 | sierraattahoe.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 8:30 a.m. weekends & peak times. Tubing, snowshoe trails.

SODA SPRINGS (530) 426-3901 | skisodasprings.com 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thurs.-Mon. & holidays Snow tubing 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. daily.

SQUAW VALLEY (530) 583-6955 | squawalpine.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dawn Patrol 7:40 a.m. select dates. Tickets also good at Alpine Meadows.

SUGAR BOWL (530) 426-1111 | sugarbowl.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Connects to Royal Gorge Cross Country.

TAHOE DONNER DOWNHILL (530) 587-9444 #2 | tahoedonner.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Base 6,835’ Vertical 1,802’

2,400

Base 7,200’ Vertical 500’

380

Base 6,700’ Vertical 1,840’

655

Base 7,031’ Vertical 750’

505

Base 6,200’ Vertical 300’

10

Base 6,540’ CA 7,200’ NV Vertical 3,500’

4,800

Base 6,230’ Vertical 2,510’

Base 7,800’ Vertical 2,000’

MILITARY DISCOUNTS

NIGHT SKIING

TERRAIN

TERRAIN PARKS

SKIABLE ACRES

SHUTTLE BUS

ELEVATION

Novice 25% Intermediate 40%

Advanced 35%

Novice 30% Intermediate 55%

6

2

Advanced 15%

Novice 18% Intermediate 46%

Advanced 36%

Novice 25% Intermediate 50%

Advanced 25%

Novice 25% Intermediate 40% Advanced 35%

Novice 20% Intermediate 45%

3

5

3

3

Advanced 35%

Novice 15% 2,010

Intermediate 40% Advanced 30% Expert 15%

Novice 12% 2,300

Intermediate 30% Advanced 38%

Expert 20%

Novice 20%

Base 8,260’ Vertical 1,800’

1,200+

Base 6,330’ Vertical 2,280’

3,170

Base 6,640’ Vertical 2,212’

2,000

Base 6,700’ Vertical 550’

200

Base 6,200’ Vertical 2,850’

3,600

Base 6,883’ Vertical 1,500’

1,650

Base 6,750’ Vertical 600’

120

Intermediate 30% Advanced 40%

Reno

*Ski areas open depending on conditions.

Expert 10%

Novice 11% Intermediate 56%

7

6

Advanced 33%

Novice 25% Intermediate 50% Advanced 25%

Novice 30% Intermediate 40%

1

Advanced 30%

Novice 25% Intermediate 45%

4

3

Advanced 30%

Novice 17% Intermediate 45% Advanced 38%

Truckee

THE RESORTS

CHILD CARE

Downhill Skiing & Snowboarding

Novice 40% Intermediate 60%

3

Advanced 0%

25


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Announcements

Courtesy Tahoe SAFE Alliance

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Announcements.

WIDE SELECTION OF

SKI & SNOWBOARD EQUIPMENT BASIC RENTALS FINEST DEMOS SALES

20-50% OFF SELECT ACCESSORIES & ALL OUTERWEAR & CLOTHING

Now with 2

Convenient Locations! TAHOE CITY (530) 583-3356 170 N. LAKE BLVD.

KINGS BEACH (530) 553-1660 8499 N. LAKE BLVD.

WillardSportShop.com

A SPECIAL

GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT

The eighth annual Father Daughter Dance, hosted by Tahoe SAFE Alliance, will be on Feb. 10 at Tahoe Biltmore from 6 to 9 p.m. Guests will enjoy dancing and music, cake and snacks, and activity booths including crafts, picture-frame decorating, a princess castle and more. Guests will have an opportunity to purchase a keepsake photo from Danielle Hankinson Photography and a souvenir photo flipbook from Action Flipbooks. Before the event, tickets are $30 and $5 for each additional child. Tickets will be $40 at the door. | tahoesafealliance.org

Working with contractors

Icy inspirations

Truckee Truckee Chamber presents “Legal Basics for Independent Contractors and Businesses that Hire Them,” a Knowledge Bites workshop, on Feb. 16 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at the Truckee Tahoe Airport. Mark L. Lasser, managing attorney of the Lasser Law Office will present. The cost is $30 in advance or $20 for members until Feb. 13. After Feb. 13, cost is $10 more. | (530) 587-8808 or truckee.com.

Truckee Truckee River Winery’s 2017 Wine n’ Ice will take place on March 8 and will benefit the Truckee River Watershed Foundation. Ten competitors will be given the chance to sculpt 300-pound blocks of ice into awe-inspiring sculptures. This year’s carving competition theme is centered on what the Truckee River means to the sculptor and how it inspires him or her. Guests can watch the competition while enjoying wine, food from various vendors, music by a local DJ and winter games. Participants must be age 18 or older and have their own carving tools. Registration ends on Feb. 20. | truckeeriverwinery.com

The lowdown on pipes

Pipe Keepers is a volunteer monitoring program that teaches community members to examine storm water entering Lake Tahoe and its tributaries. Keep Tahoe Blue is offering introductory training classes for Pipe Keepers at League to Save Lake Tahoe Education Center on Feb. 12 from 2 to 4 p.m. and at Tahoe Keys Property Owners Association Pavilion on March 7 from 4 to 6 p.m. | Register protect@ keeptahoeblue.org

Parade sign-ups sought The annual Kings Beach Snowfest Parade is set to take place on March 11 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The smalltown, big-time parade features entries from more than 30 local community organizations and businesses. Parade entry registrations for groups and businesses are being accepted now. To register, complete the online parade participant form. Those interested in becoming a sponsor can register as a parade sponsor and receive free parade entry. The deadline to register as a parade participant and/or sponsor is Feb. 13. | northtahoebusiness.org

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Clear snow loads Tahoe venues Local country and other government agencies strongly encourage homeowners and businesses to consider having the snow and ice cleared from roofs. Everyone should be cognizant of the danger posed by heavy snow loads on roofs and the importance of recognizing the warning signs of potential structural weaknesses. Older buildings, including flat and lowpitched roofs are at the greatest risk of buckling under heavy snow and ice accumulations. The area typically has the highest roof snow loads in March and there is the potential for many more heavy storms this winter. Roofs that are having problems sag, leak severely, have cracked or split wood members, bends or ripples in supports, cracks in walls, drywall and foundations and sprinkler heads that have dropped down below ceiling or ceiling tiles. Doors that pop open and doors or windows that are difficult to open are also signs that the roof is in trouble.

To safely remove snow from roofs, use a snow rake for pitched roofs, which are available at most hardware stores. Start from the edge and work your way into the roof, shaving the snow down to 2 or 3 inches rather than scraping it clean. Plastic shovels are best to use because metal tools may cause damage to the roof. Shovel snow from roofs, throwing the snow over the side, away from the building. Remove large icicles carefully if they are hanging over doorways and walkways. Protect utility meters and piping from falling snow, icicles and melting water. Keep gutters and drains clean, free of ice and snow and keep downspouts clean at ground level. Do not use blow torches or electric heating devices to remove snow and ice. Do not try to remove ice or icicles from utility wires or meters. Call your utility company for assistance. Clear snow away from all exhaust vents to prevent the buildup of carbon monoxide and the potential for dangerous CO level buildup in your home or business. Always consider solar panels as being energized and remember to never use metal objects or tools on or in the immediate vicinity of them. Most experts strongly recommend leaving a solar panel as is. For those with propane tanks, propane lines have been known to shift and crack and release propane, possibly causing an explosion. If you smell propane in or near your property, move to a safe distance and call 911. Residents should clear propane tanks, gas lines and regulators of snow right away and call their propane company with any questions. 

Giving back big Truckee Tahoe Pay It Forward is a group created to give thanks to all of the public service crews that have worked so hard and endlessly to keep towns clean and safe. These crews include snow plow drivers and crews, police, public utility district workers, power linemen, CHP, the CalTrans crews, Placer County Sheriff ’s personnel, EMTs, firemen and any other public works and/or utilities workers that have played a part in the floods and snow removal. These service men and women can receive a growing list of things that participating community businesses are providing, such as hot drinks, snacks, meals and more. Coffeebar Bakery, Starbucks and Tuff Beanz in Truckee and I.V. Coffee Lab and Rubicon Pizza in Incline Village, Nev., and Firesign Café in Tahoe City have gift cards that community members can donate to. Service people can walk into any of these places with an employee ID or current paycheck stub and get a drink or snack. Marg’s Taco Bistro will match dollar for dollar contributions up to $1,000 to host a taco party for service workers at a future date. More businesses are jumping on board every day. | facebook.com/ truckeetahoepayitforward


Arts

ONGOING

CREATIVE AWARENESS

Sara Smith Cobalt Artist Studio | Feb. 11-28 Gabie Strong SNC Garage Door Gallery | Until Feb. 17 Tarek Al-Ghoussein

Keoki Flagg

Nevada Museum of Art | Until Feb. 19

“Glyphs and Houses” Carson City Community Center | Until Feb. 24

Matthew McIver Metro Gallery | Until Feb. 24

E V O LV I N G W I T H T H E T I M E S

Liz Penniman McKinley Arts & Cultural Center | Until Feb. 24 McKinley Arts & Cultural Center | Until Feb. 24

Wolff Soren Incline Village Library | Until Feb. 28 “Placer Creates” Placer County venues | Until Feb. 28

Jess Weems Atelier Truckee | Until Feb. 28 NTHS students North Tahoe Arts Corison Loft | Until Feb. 28

TAL artists A Cup of Cherries | Until Feb. 28 TAL artists Bank of the West | Until Feb. 28 Heidi Reeves NLT Visitor Center | Until Feb. 28 Charlie Macquarie SNC Garage Door Gallery | March 2-10

Frontier Fellows SNC Tahoe Gallery | Until March 2 Ronda Eden Copeland Building Gallery | Until March 4

THE ARTS

& CULTURE

ARTS CALENDAR

Lainie Vreeland

February 9-22, 2017

S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

K

eoki Flagg is an iconic Tahoe artist and photographer. He has traveled the world, illuminating his life experiences through the lens of his camera for more than 35 years. This adventurer has made his home in Tahoe and his renowned Gallery Keoki is nestled in the Village at Squaw. Entering the gallery, one is enveloped by larger-than-life landscapes. The bold blues of Lake Tahoe create a sense of standing on the shore with waves lapping at your toes. Turn to another wall and there are photographs of the sheer, steep, white, snowcovered Sierra, many with world-class skiers leaving fresh tracks on mind-bending verticals. Or you may find yourself face to face with Flagg’s famous shots of dogs in a meadow or perched on a chair lift.

Abe Blair Nevada State Museum | Until March 20 TAL artists Lake Tahoe Community College | Until March 24

Gil Martin CCIA Courthouse Gallery | Until March 24 Latimer Art Club Show Sparks Museum & Cultural Center | Until March 25

“Art from WNC” CCIA The Bric | Until March 30 Winter Art Exhibit Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe | Until April

CELEBRITY

HOUND HOBNOB

F E B . 11 | 6 - 8 P. M . G A L L E RY K E O K I V I L L A G E AT S Q U A W

A large-scale installation of Keoki Flagg’s work.

Meet Squaw Valley Dog Team & their handlers

A Place in the Country Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 21

Peter Stichbury Nevada Museum of Art | Until May 28 Spinifex: Aboriginal Paintings Nevada Museum of Art | until May 28

Great Basin Native Artists Carson City Visitors Bureau | Until June 19

“Maynard Dixon: The Paltenghi Collections” Nevada Museum of Art | Until July 16 “On the Water”

Each room of the gallery tells a story. One highlights his trips to Antarctica where he captured playful penguins in the wild. He captures scenes of immense nothingness in a landscape of white where a speck of humanity reminds us of the infinite space we live in and how small we are in this universe. Flagg’s photographs are alive with energy; they pop off the wall and take the observer on a journey.

Keoki Flagg on top of a tram during the shoot for the Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Ski Patrol 2017 Calendar.

Tahoe Maritime Museum | Until summer TUESDAY

Open studio workshops SLT Senior Center

“ It’s about human immersion in the natural world and

1 ST & 3 RD WEDNESDAY

how it makes you feel in that moment, how it elicits

Gathering of Artists North Tahoe Arts Center

an emotional sense and power.”

THURSDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art (except 1st Thursday) 2 ND FRIDAY

Senior art classes & tours Nevada Museum of Art SATURDAY

Print shop open Bona Fide Books SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Guided art tours Nevada Museum of Art 2 ND SATURDAY

Free admission Nevada Museum of Art Kids’ Art day Nevada Museum of Art Art Walk Reno

“It’s not what we recognize, but how it feels,” says Flagg of his art. “It’s about human immersion in the natural world and how it makes you feel in that moment, how it elicits an emotional sense and power.” Flagg has watched and participated in the evolution of his gallery and his photography. He’s moved with the changes in technology that have brought him into the digital age. Even his old cameras displayed behind glass tell a story. Flagg continues to reinvent his art. “I took over 1 million photographs last year and only two made it into the gallery. These were timeless moments that grab you by the heart,” he says.

–Keoki Flagg

Flagg stitches shots together to create one seamless photograph. He calls this technique “pentimental,” and describes it as “a process of stripping away and or building on an image to reveal the true intention of the artist and/or the true nature and feeling of the image and its moment.” A pentimental stitch is the process in which Flagg creates his uniqueness and then floats his photographs on acrylic to create original distinction to his artwork. “The technology we are embracing is some of the best of new and the best of the old,” he says. “I manipulate reality, pushing the envelope and incorporating new technologies and process photographs

to evoke and convey an image.” According to Flagg, there are three components that are key to his art and originality: “It still has to have that organic touchy, feely textural component. It has to be unequivocally defended as original and guarantee that it will be unique and original every time and the third is the magic of discovery, trusting the process and getting out of the way to let it happen.” The birth of his book, “Elemental,” was a 25-year labor of love. Local resident and writer Jeff Brunings and editor Craig Hammond helped Flagg bring his vision to reality, combining the written words of Flagg’s life dance with the depth and beauty of his photography. “This book was my spiritual why — why we choose this lifestyle. It taught me about what makes my art shine. It’s not a moment in time but time in the moment,” he says. Large-scale installations of Flagg’s art can be found in many Tahoe residences. “I feel like we’re on a mission to help people find their own voice,” says Flagg. He and his business partner, Lynn Gibson, help homeowners envision largescale art pieces on the walls of their home, enabling them to bring the natural world into their living space. Flagg created the Women of the Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows Ski Patrol 2017 Calendar to raise money for the ski patrollers and support avalanche education. The gallery is also hosting the annual Celebrity Hound Hobnob, a benefit for the Squaw Valley Avalanche Rescue Dog & Education Fund, on Feb. 11. What has Keoki Flagg learned from his years as an extreme photographer and artist? “Perspective is everything,” he says.  For more information, visit gallerykeoki.com.

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THE ARTS

Arts

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE

CAMERA AS

PAINTBRUSH Nevada State Museum will present, “Beyond Nature’s Light,” the photography of Abe Blair until March 20. Many grand vistas and unique geologic features occur in Nevada and eastern California. Through careful study of a scene and extensive knowledge of his medium, Blair captures the mood and power of natural scenes many never see. “As an artist choosing to work in photography, I am always trying to push the limits of my cameras, whether film or digital. I am traditional in my method, working to get the image correct in the camera without building one in the computer. I use my camera as a painter would use a brush, focusing on the mood and power of a pre-visualized scene before the camera even comes out of the bag,” he says. There will be a free reception with light refreshments on March 9 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. | (775) 687-4810

“Tahoe Glow” Abe Blair | Nevada State Museum

Love him, yeah, yeah, yeah Reno, Nev. Sierra Arts Foundation Gallery will host “Ron Campbell: Pop Up” from Feb. 17 to 19. Campbell, who is now retired, appears occasionally at art shows showcasing his pop art paintings. Campbell paints during the exhibit, creating new works and personal paintings on the Letters of Authenticity for customers who purchase any of his works. Campbell was one of the animators on the Beatles film, “Yellow Submarine” and the director of “The Beatles” 1960s TV cartoon series. For more than 50 years, he was involved in cartoons including Scooby Doo, The Smurfs, Rugrats, Flintstones and Jetsons. | sierra-arts.org

The physics of art Fab ’n’ Funky Tahoe City North Tahoe Arts presents its annual Fab ’n’ Funky exhibit and sale in February. Featured ARTisan Shop artists are clearing out his or her inventories offering a variety of arts and crafts at deeply discounted prices. Works on sale include original paintings, pastels, watercolors, photography and more. Exhibits in the Corison Loft for the month of February will feature art by students at North Tahoe High School. In April, the exhibit will feature North Tahoe Arts members. | northtahoearts.com

Hooked on painting Tahoe City North Lake Tahoe Chamber CVB Resort Association announces the February Visitor Center artist of the month: Heidi Reeves. She moved to North Tahoe in 1979, but it wasn’t until 1992 that she took her first watercolor class and she was hooked. She paints everything from landscapes to portraits and started teaching watercolor classes in 2001 in Tahoe, Reno and Grass Valley. In 2003, she had a one-woman show at North Tahoe Arts, participated in a European show in 2005 and a Small Painting Show in 2006 at Pogan Gallery. More recently, her art medium has shifted to pastels and it is opening her up to a new awareness of color and textures. | gotahoenorth.com

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Incline Village, Nev. Wolff Soren’s oil and acrylic paintings are on display through the month of February at Incline Village Library. Soren’s work pays homage to people and events that inspire him. His influences range from Peter Higgs to Al Held, from Lisa Randall to Jan Vermeer, as well as Roger Penrose and Naum Gabo. He believes that the most creative people are scientists working on the cutting edge of cosmology and particle physics with theoretical scientists asking questions that hover on the boundaries of human perception. | (775) 832-4130

Bill Stevenson is a Truckee photographer for whom the art of taking pictures is practically genetic. Both Stevenson’s great-great grandfather and great-grandfather photographed living on the edge of the American frontier from their home in Leavenworth, Kan. | (800) 468-2463

paper and the processes of application are physical and technical. Atelier hosts many workshops including Love for Watercolor on Feb. 10, Painting Miniatures in Watercolor on Feb. 11, Ceramic plates on Feb. 24 and Natural Dyeing on Feb. 25. | ateliertruckee.com

Connection to nature

Cobalt like the lake

Truckee The artwork of Jess Weems will be on display at Atelier Truckee until Feb. 28. Weems searches for the intersection between belief and fact, the spiritual and the scientific. He draws attention to the aesthetic beauty of scientific data, migration patterns and geological processes for the bigger picture of our interconnected universe. The materials he uses are beeswax, resin, earth pigments, thread, fabric and

Incline Village, Nev. Cobalt Artist Studio presents Sara Smith’s paintings, which will be on display in February. Smith is always pushing herself to stretch her methods and to better express whatever needs a voice. Her public murals can be seen around Tahoe including KidZone Museum and Truckee Elementary School. There will be an artist’s reception for her on Feb. 11 from 4 to 6 p.m. It is open to the public.

Art that affords spirit Incline Village, Nev. In February, the Incline Village Visitors Information Center will bring together four artists who work in four different mediums for a new show titled “Whimsical Spirit.” The exhibit runs through April 30, with an artists’ reception on Feb. 17. Troi Follansbee is a native Californian artist who creates mosaic sculptures using many types of materials, called tesserae. Follansbee will display a new series entitled, “Get Busted,” which features a spontaneous style. Ellen Beauregard uses mixed medium within her large paintings from tar, epoxy and metals. She uses color, texture and luster to balance the composition of each piece. Anastiscia Chantler-Lang is a selftaught artist from Toronto, who relocated to Tahoe in 2015 after traveling extensively and working in fashion and handbag design. She uses pastels and colored pencils to convey her feelings and experiences while living in the Sierra region.

“Black Bear” Sara Smith | Cobalt Artist Studio


February 9-22, 2017

THE ARTS

The selection committee is looking for artwork that is colorful, meaningful and will enhance downtown Kings Beach. The 18-inch-by-36-inch banners, hung from streetlights, will be viewed by motorists and pedestrians. NTBA will have selected artwork professionally printed onto poly canvas. Proposals should include a preliminary color rendition and a brief narrative description of the artwork. Proposals are due Feb. 24. Winners will be announced in May. An $80 honorarium will be awarded for each selected banner. Proposals should be e-mailed to info@northtahoebusiness.org.

The best of summer featured

Workshops at the studio include Painting Water in Watercolor on March 4, Painting Interesting Animals on March 11 and Painting Lake Tahoe in Oil with a Palette Knife on March 18. | cobaltartiststudio.com

Truckee Truckee Public Arts Commission invites the community to the community exhibit “Truckee Summer Snapshots: A Collaborative Community Photo Mural.” The show will feature Truckee’s best summertime photos, submitted by members of the community. Celebrate the new season and look back on Truckee’s Big Life summer, illustrated by hundreds of photos on the walls at the Truckee Community Recreation Center. The show will run through February. | tdprd.org

What’s at SNC

Water, water everywhere

Incline Village, Nev. Sierra Nevada College offers “This Place: Selection from the Frontier” by Frontier Fellows until March 2, at the Tahoe Gallery. An artist reception will be on March 2 from 5 to 7 p.m. with an artist’s talk at 5:30 p.m. Gabie Strong will host an exhibition until Feb. 17 at the Garage Door Gallery. “Library of Approximate Locations” by Charlie Macquarie will be at the Garage Door Gallery from March 2 to 10. An artist’s reception will be on March 8 from 5 to 7 p.m. with an artist’s talk at 5:30 p.m. | sierranevada.edu

Sparks, Nev. The Sparks Museum & Cultural Center presents “Truckee Meadows Reflections,” the Latimer Art Club Show, through March 25. This exhibition detailing historical water usage highlights artists from Latimer who explore the theme of water in their artwork showcasing a wide variety of mediums. Meet the artists and enjoy light refreshments at the exhibit’s reception on Feb. 25 from 4 to 7 p.m. | (775) 355-1144

Out and about South Lake Tahoe Tahoe Art League announces exhibits being shown around town. A Cup of Cherries Café hosts a display of wintry photographs and paintings by TAL artists Donna Reid, Lois Loveless, Cherie Pinsky, Michael Schaer, Barb Gustafson and Rick Espinor through mid-April. The newest “Art Around Town” exhibit is at Bank of the West, featuring wildlife portraits by Barb Gustafson, Carroll Sue Jones, Nancy Lynch, Nina Major and Ellen Nunes through mid-April. “Presenting the Tahoe Art League” exhibit at the Lake Tahoe Community College features a sampling of the diverse media and talent of the art league’s membership. More than 20 artists are represented in this winter exhibit, featuring paintings, prints, photographs, sculptures and ceramics. The show is open to the public through March 24. | talart.org

Hang it proudly Kings Beach North Tahoe Business Association (NTBA) is inviting proposals for streetlight banner art to be displayed along the main street in Kings Beach this summer on a rotating schedule. The banners for this art call will be selected based on design and content. Proposals from artists of all experience levels, young and old, established and emerging, are encouraged.

Come shop with us at The Resort at SquawCreek!

530.583.1874

400 SQUAW CREEK ROAD

OLYMPIC VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

Passion for community Reno, Nev. Metro Gallery in City Hall hosts “No Expectations,” an exhibition by photographer Matthew McIver until Feb. 24. From his passion for community and photography is a series that is inspired by architecture, sustainability, water and art. | reno.gov

Blending experience Reno, Nev. “Extravagant Chemistry: New Paintings” by Liz Penniman is in the West Gallery in McKinley Arts & Culture Center until Feb. 24. A Californian native with influences from the San Francisco’s Figurative Movement and a background that includes a hand in the color palette of Jeff Koon’s studio, Penniman believes in allowing the paint to take precedence over subject. She currently lives in California, working in her Truckee studio blending her experience in color, composition, texture and abstraction. East Gallery in McKinley Arts & Culture Center hosts abstract painter Lainie Vreeland’s “Light Abundant” until Feb. 24. A business owner, writer and artist, Vreeland creates innovative and imaginative compositions centered on water, forms and plant life as they interact with light. “My abstract artwork represents deep and cheerful songs from my heart to yours,” says Vreeland. | (775) 334-6264

TAHOE UNIVERSITY 39˚20’32”N 120˚12’13”W

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Arts. 29


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. MYTHOLOGY: Who was the queen of the warrior women called Amazons? 2. GOVERNMENT: What did the 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution do? 3. ADVERTISEMENTS: What luggage company used a gorilla in a 1970 advertisement to show how tough its Samsonite brand was? 4. ART: Where is The Field Museum located? 5. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Which U.S. president had the nickname “Old Rough and Ready”? 6. GAMES: What is a grand slam in bridge? 7. HISTORY: In what year did the French invade England (The Battle of Hastings)? 8. LITERATURE: Which famous Beat poet wrote the poem titled “Howl”? 9. GEOGRAPHY: The Leonardo Da Vinci-Fiumicino Airport is located in what city? 10. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a petroglyph?

Strange but true

by Samantha Weaver

Have you ever wondered why a “down” in American football is called that? In the early days of the sport, when the ball carrier was tackled, he was supposed to yell “Down!” to avoid getting hit by other players.

Junior Whirl: (Across) 1. Eben, 3. Carl, 5. Nolan, 10. Seton, 11. Yates, 12. Silas, 13. Naldo, 14. Neil, (Down) 1. Evers, 2. Edsel, 3. Conan, 4. Royal, 6. Orson, 7. Nigel, 8. Otis, 9. Otto. Hocus Focus differences: 1. Earflap is missing, 2. Jacket is different, 3. Scarf end is shorter, 4. Dock is missing, 5. Cloud is smaller, 6. Sign is different.

I know a guy who compliments his fellow carpenters by declaring “Boy, you do miter fine work!”

CryptoQuip

1. Hippolyta, 2. Limits presidents to two terms, 3. American Tourister, 4. Chicago, 5. Zachary Taylor, 6. Winning all 13 tricks, 7. 1066, 8. Allen Ginsberg, 9. Rome, Italy, 10. Rock carving

TRIVIA TEST

30

It was 20th-century American writer and political activist Max Eastman who made the following sage observation: “It is the ability to take a joke, not make one, that proves you have a sense of humor.”


February 9-22, 2017

Horoscopes

PUZZLES FOR KIDS

FIRE

FUN & GAMES

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Tip of the Week

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22)

The New Moon in Aquarius seed is rounding its first corner, a.k.a. the 1st Quarter. It carries with it the impulse of new ideas. The emphasis is especially upon practical considerations, in keeping with the early days of this Universal 1-Year, the first of a round of nine. The effects of these shifts will be to inspire and activate new initiatives whose time has come. Given the Aquarian theme, these new assertions will have a revolutionary tone.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) Last week’s New Moon in your sign is activating new perspectives and actions. This will become more noticeable this week and for the next few. Seeing a bigger picture has already begun and will be complemented by a strong wave of forward thinking, starting soon.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) The lights are going on in the back of your mind. As your subconscious is illumined, you will begin to see the world anew. Your drive and determination will be ignited. With a growing focus on financial interests and possibilities, the timing is auspicious. Your job is to consciously engage.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20) Last week’s New Moon has activated an assertive charge in you. As if suddenly, you want to explore new territory. This is in keeping with your expanding social horizons. This impulse will continue to grow all month. Your focus is practical. Currently, your lesson is to exercise patience and compassion all the while.

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21) Advancing cautiously amidst a flow of inner and outer changes continues. These changes may even be deemed transformations if you stand back far enough. Yet now, some of your best efforts are best directed inward. As you focus on confronting and clearing inner doubts and blocks, your outer flow will be smoother.

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21) Some of the clouds that gathered and obscured the sun’s light have cleared. You can see the blue skies through the openings. Inspired, you can breathe more fully again. Acting upon this initiative, you are eager to reach out, to engage others. Making new friends is featured.

Introductions to unusual or at least unexplored territory continues. These may well include a metaphysical element. Either way, they are shaking your world. How you choose to embrace flow with and adapt to these impulses is another question. It could go either way.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23) Your social network is growing or at least the impulse and opportunity for it to do so are present. Yet, your business and/or other practical interests remain central. As you are in an important learning curve which includes exploring new methods and directions, you are wise to answer this call.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22) Subtle yet real shifts in your habitual rhythms have begun. Positively, these will include improvements in your overall lifestyle. With your ambitions steadily rising, these are all part of the success story you are creating. Regarding the outcome, avoid questions like ‘what will happen?’ and replace them with I will.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22) Your mood is more playful of late, animated. There remains some drama in the air, however, especially on relationship fronts. This trend will continue. Positively, new momentums will be initiated. These could have romantic overtones. Meanwhile, attending to practical needs close to home remains important.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21) Things are shifting and shaking close to home. It could be as simple as the introduction of new perspectives. Then comes the digestion process. The focus could well be on health. Activating new and healthier attitudes and actions may be necessary. Give more than you might usually for best results.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21) A flood of new thoughts and perspectives are flowing in. These could even prove to alter some of your attitudes and perceptions altogether. Positively, you are feeling more playful, even sporty. Some of your thoughts are directed to larger social realities, to what is fair and just.

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19) The time has come to make some very deliberate changes in your world. These could include important renovations. You may still be in the planning stages, yet are eager to begin. These improvements may be directed to your home environment, but perhaps also to your inner world, your subconscious.

Tails in Tahoe Trinity

Noodle

Squeaker

Holly

I enjoy lounging in a cozy spot in the sun. I am always the first cat to go outside on the porch in the morning, and will spend most of my day outside watching the dogs and birds.

Noodle’s sleek coat makes him extra aerodynamic for all his outdoor adventures. He is the kind of dog you can take on some rad backpacking trips as well as beach adventures. Strong and lean.

A female, Tortie Point Siamese mix with short hair. She is 5 years old and spayed with shots and chipped. Sweet and friendly, but shy at first.

Holly is a friendly, playful and affectionate young lady. She will be the first one to greet you when you come home. She enjoys playing with wand toys or chasing that pesky red dot!

Pet Network (775) 832-4404 bschilpp@petnetwork.org www.petnetwork.org

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org

WARF (775) 790-4066 bfh3rd@gmail.com www.tahoewarf.com

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org 31


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

Dia mond Peak | A L a k e Ta h o e g e m Foeger successfully re-designed Ski Incline to provide a pleasurable experience for the whole family. Over his career he had headed ski schools at Badger Pass in Yosemite National Park, Sugar Bowl and Alpine Meadows at Lake Tahoe. He also helped design Northstar California. Foeger was an affable instructor, known as much for his sense of humor as for his care in resort design to preserve and protect the environment. Foeger’s awardwinning layout of Ski Incline was called a model for modern ski-slope development. Ski Incline was the first resort in the West to utilize a snowmaking system and when it opened on November 19, 1966, it featured three chair lifts, a T-bar surface lift and nicely groomed terrain. In the 1980s, improvements at Ski Incline added more chairlifts and expanded snowmaking capability. In 1987, under the direction of Ski Resort manager Jurgen Wetzstein, the area doubled in size and was renamed Diamond Peak to highlight the addition of longer, more advanced runs on the new upper mountain. The addition of the mile-long Crystal Quad chairlift was icing on the cake. Since then about $15 million has been invested in capital improvements, which produced new highspeed detachable chairlifts that cut the ride time in half, beautifully renovated lodges and a new, more efficient snowmaking system. Diamond Peak ranks fourth among Tahoe resorts for the continuity and skiability of terrain between its high and low points — ahead of such notable resorts as Mt. Rose, Homewood, Alpine Meadows and even Kirkwood. Diamond Peak is celebrating a big birthday this year. The resort’s marketing slogan is: “Don’t worry, ski happy.” 

Peak ski development. But, the savvy investor was waiting to see how successful Norman Biltz’s winter sports program would be. Although Biltz and his partners envisioned ski runs, jumps, tramways and tows, lodges, bobsledding, ice skating and other related winter activities in their “Tahoe Alps” project, Rifle Peak was the key cog in the whole plan.

Ski Incline was the first resort in the West to utilize a snowmaking system and when it opened on November 19, 1966, it featured three chair lifts, a T-bar surface lift and nicely groomed terrain.

C

elebrating its 50th anniversary this winter, Diamond Peak is probably the most overlooked and underrated ski resort in the Tahoe Basin. With an impressive 1,840 feet of vertical, a variety of trails and breathtaking views of Big Blue, Diamond Peak is without a doubt a premier Tahoe ski destination. This hidden jewel boasts miles of unpopulated runs, open tree skiing and an intermediate cruiser called Crystal Ridge that is rated among the “World’s 100 Best Ski Runs” by CNN Travel. Diamond Peak is geared toward an exciting family experience, but diehard skiers can challenge themselves in Solitude Canyon, an expert area that’s killer after a powder storm. Diamond Peak is privately owned by Incline Village property owners, but the public is always welcome. Like many Tahoe ski resorts, Diamond Peak has an interesting history. During the late 1800s, the region was logged of its timber to support the Comstock mining boom near Virginia City, Nev. Cord wood and cut lumber harvested from forestland along the North Shore were loaded into tram cars and hauled 1,400 feet up to Incline Summit by a double track tramline. Built in 1880, this steam-powered cable railway was 4,000 feet long and became known as “The Great Tramline of Tahoe.” Powered by two massive 12-foot-diameter iron bull wheels, the innovative logging operation inspired the moniker: Incline. By 1897, nothing remained except for stripped forestland, logging roads and crumbling flumes. Despite fits and starts, alpine skiing at Incline was still nearly 70 years in the future. There was a flurry of activity in the late 1930s when it seemed that lift-served, downhill skiing was about to become a reality near Incline. Norman Biltz, owner of the Cal Neva Lodge in Crystal Bay, had returned from Europe where he was inspired by the possibility of building an Austrian-style resort at Lake Tahoe. In August 1937, Biltz ordered a feasibility study for developing nearby Rifle Peak, elevation 9,488 feet, into a ski resort. Joining Biltz for the exploration of Rifle Peak 32

Diamond Peak’s Crystal Ridge Run. | Jeff Engerbretson

was noted Reno architect Frederick De Longchamps, along with engineers and local expert skiers Halvor Michelson and Wayne Poulsen. Poulsen, future founder of Squaw Valley, spent much of the 1937-38 season on top of Rifle Peak where he scouted skiing terrain and snow deposition. Poulsen and his buddies from the University of Nevada, Reno ski team had built crude cabins at the summit out of old flume wood for winter shelter. That winter, the snowiest on record in the Tahoe Sierra, Poulsen lived off canned stew that his skiing friends would bring him periodically. The Rifle Peak project caught the attention of Captain George Whittell, an enigmatic San Francisco real-estate tycoon who owned most of the Nevada side of Lake Tahoe. In the summer of 1938, Whittell proposed building a $1 million casino and hotel resort at Sand Harbor in hopes of cashing in on the much anticipated Rifle

Unfortunately, Wayne Poulsen came down from the mountain reporting that Rifle Peak was poorly suited for a ski resort. A southern exposure and proximity to Lake Tahoe resulted in a wet, unstable snowpack and that in many years the snow on the lower elevations would melt too quickly in the spring. In the early 1960s, George Whittell sold 9,000 acres of land to Art Wood, an Oklahoma-based developer. Wood and his associate, Harold B. Tiller, envisioned the creation of Incline Village: a masterplanned, vacation resort community. A cornerstone amenity for this concept was a new ski area called Ski Incline. It was a stroke of genius that Art Wood hired legendary Austrian ski pioneer Luggi Foeger to design and build the $2 million ski area. When Foeger looked over the initial layout of the project, he told Wood that the location was all wrong from a skier’s perspective. The original proposal situated the resort on the slopes of Rose Knob Peak, a high-elevation ridge not far from Rifle Peak. Foeger argued that the proposed runs were too steep for beginner and intermediate level skiers and the slopes faced south instead of north, which better protected the snow. And, in Foeger’s mind, the proposed runs were poorly cut.

TA H O E

Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com, or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

Nostalgia

SNOWIEST WINTER ON RECORD If you think January 2017 was stormy, in February 1938 Donner Pass was inundated with more than 28 feet of snow in just two weeks. Tahoe City’s residents shoveled 17 feet in 16 days. The main highways were buried under drifts approaching 20 feet deep. The road between Truckee and Tahoe City was blockaded for two weeks and residents at the lake were cut off from fresh food, medicine, newspapers and mail. The winter of ’38 is the snowiest of record, with a total of 819 inches at Donner Pass.

Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s newest book “Snowbound: Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” available in local stores or at thestormking.com Courtesy Truckee Donner Historical Society


The LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

CALENDAR

FEBRUARY 9-23, 2017

GRACE AND MAGIC OF

FEB. 9 | THURSDAY

Elephant Revival

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Bias and Dunn Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Everyday Outlaw Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Jason King Band Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. The Vegas Road Show Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Rebelution With Passafire Grand Sierra 8 p.m. The Kid ‘N Nic Show Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Fort Defiance w/Bluegrass Lex The Saint 9 p.m. Truth and Joker 1 Up 10 p.m. Poperz Grand Sierra Lex GSR 10 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Bruce Baum The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Bill Kalmenson Pioneer Underground 8 p.m. Special Events 2017 Third Coast Dance Film Festival Nevada Museum of Art

FEB. 10 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Ike & Martin Sierra-at-Tahoe 1:30 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Serina Dawn and Drew Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Don Kahn Nakoma Resort 5 p.m. Randy Blake Sunnyside 6 p.m. Julie Courtney and Doug Nichols Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Funk Assassination Bar of America 8 p.m. Live music Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Haunted Summer Moody’s 8:30 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Bearwulf Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. The Revivalists w/Con Brio and Hibbity Dibbity Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

THE MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE February 9-22, 2017

STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

Feb. 18 | 9 p.m. | $20 advance | $25 at the door | Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev.

E

lephant Revival’s washboard-playing siren Bonnie Paine is in her Cherokee County hometown of Tahlequah, Okla. visiting family during a short break from tour. “There’s a lot of baby showers these days,” she says. “I’m looking through CDs with my niece to choose birth music. Someday, I want to be a singing doula.” Her delightful and serene demeanor comes through the phone line just as effortlessly as it does on stage where she charms listeners with her otherworldly voice and ancestral percussion. Ten years into their calling, what sets Elephant Revival apart is the clear affinity Paine and her band mates convey to one another and the audience. “We’ve all been really close friends for a long time,” she says. “There’s definitely a sense of camaraderie between us. And we all share a lot of common interests.” This collective journey brings them back to Lake Tahoe on Feb. 18 for a special performance in the Crown Room at Crystal Bay Club with Dead Horses. The after party features The Drunken Hearts. “The people are super fun and there’s beautiful water,” says Paine of Tahoe. “We love going on nature adventures together and seeking out the clean water wherever we go.” Forever one to let life and art follow its

insatiable curiosity. This sense of indelible kinship is something Paine continues to pursue through her work with Elephant Revival. “What motivates me in some ways is the feeling of being connected to something bigger and for the people receiving the art to feel connected, too,” she says. “I think the root of a lot of suffering is feeling isolated and forgetting you are a part of something bigger. Art does that in a way

“Letting the songs come into bloom is the idea, so we’ll have to see what unfolds.” –Bonnie Paine natural current, Paine shares the story of how she began playing music as a little girl under the mentorship of Oklahoma Red Dirt legend Randy Crouch. “When I was 5, we moved across the street from the girls who would eventually become my stepsisters,” she says. “The older sister Christy had a drum set. I’d go up in my brother’s room and watch her play drums through the window. Eventually, I made friends with the younger sister and got to play the drum set.” As Paine tells it, one day Paine’s brother climbed up a tree in the front yard to ask Christy if she wanted to play drums in Randy Crouch’s band. Soon thereafter, they were all living on her father’s land where Crouch provided Bonnie and her three sisters with free music lessons. “He’s an incredible songwriter,” Paine says of Crouch. Christy’s mother and Bonnie’s father would later marry, thereby permanently joining the two families together thanks in no small part to a young daughter’s

you can’t tell people. They have to be led through it by themselves until they open up to something they feel they can relate to.” Even as Elephant Revival gains national recognition for its intimate performances and soulful songwriting — with banner dates upcoming at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, Strawberry and Bottlerock music festivals, as well as Northwest String Summit — the band chooses to stay focused on artistic practice rather than the ephemeral frills of popularity. “It feels like a lot is still coming creatively,” says Paine. “That’s the only thing I can get a sense of a trajectory of. I think it’s important to let the creative process follow its course before planning how to capture it. If we don’t, it’ll freeze before it’s done unfolding or something like that.” The band is consistently seeking ways to evolve their music, changing instruments mid-show, bringing new sonic ideas into the studio and seeking out unique collaborations, including a recent string of shows with the Colorado Symphony.

With the addition of Chicagoan drummer/ producer Darren Garvey to the lineup, Paine has begun recording and performing on cello, an instrument she’s played as a hobby for more than a decade. “I’ve been on tour for most of those years and having a cello you need to play it consistently,” says Paine, “I’d come home and play it once or twice a month, but now we bring it on the road. I’ve always written on cello. I’d teach the band the song and then I’d play percussion on it. But on our last album [“Petals”], we felt like the cello was an important piece, so we recorded it on three songs. Now when I play it live, there’s a solid drummer with us. [Garvey] plays a stripped down set and he’s really sensitive to our dynamics, which is rare in a drummer.” After some valuable time with family, Paine is returning to Boulder, Colo., for five days of rehearsal on new material with the band. “Nowadays, we only get to do this two or three times a year, so it’s kind of like going to camp,” she says. “We have a ton of new songs in the works. A lot of time, they come fully formed and we hope people will get creative with the parts. We’ll take the time to look at older songs, too, maybe accentuate the bridge here, make it more of a minor feel or introduce new melodic or rhythmic ideas.” As to be expected, she hopes the sessions will be filled with inspiration, imagination and a good helping of old-fashioned merriment. “We stay focused, but also like to play around,” says Paine. “It can be pretty goofy and dorky sometimes, as long as we’re having a good time. And if we’re not having fun, we take a break. But usually we are, so it works out. Letting the songs come into bloom is the idea, so we’ll have to see what unfolds.”  Tickets on sale at crystalbaycasino.com.

33


THE MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE REVIVALISTS

FEB. 10 | FRIDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. DJ Daniel Rooney HQ MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

Feb. 10 | 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. THE REVIVALISTS, a seven-piece New Orleans roots-driven, rock band, has logged countless miles on the road, cultivating a high-octane show and a studio presence equally steeped in instrumental virtuosity and charismatic vocal magnetism. | crystalbaycasino.com

POOR MAN’S WHISKEY

Feb. 11 | 8 p.m. Moe’s BBQ | Tahoe City THE WINTER WHISKEY Tour 2017 comes to Tahoe when Poor Man’s Whiskey, a band at the forefront of the growing Northern California bluegrass /rock scene, performs. Enjoy a wonderful night of bluegrass and Americana music. You can be sure the band will be performing its two favorite and very popular hit Tahoe songs “Sierra Girl” and “Snow in Tahoe.” | facebook.com/moesoriginalbbqtahoe

GALACTIC WITH GENE EVARO JR.

Feb. 12 | 9 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. NEW ORLEANS BAND Galactic has consistently pushed artistic boundaries on the road and in the studio, approaching music with open ears and drawing inspiration as much from the sounds bubbling up from the city’s streets as from each other. Geno Evaro Jr. opens for Galactic for a super funky night of tunes. | crystalbaycasino.com 34

The Kid ‘N Nic Show Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Look Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Greg Kihn w/Greg Golden Band Rockbar 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. The Vegas Road Show Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. TOMA Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Nef The Pharaoh Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Thunder Cover Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Mcoy Tyler & The Coffis Brothers The Saint 8 p.m. Chubby Checker and the Wildcats Nugget Sparks 8 p.m. Reckless Envy Harrah’s 9 p.m. Mike Furlong Band Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. LTJ Bukem 1 Up 10 p.m. The Spazmatics Circus Circus 10 p.m. Digital Underground Lex GSR 10 p.m. Platinum Atlantis 10 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “The Vagina Monologues” Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. “Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind” Reno Little Theater 7:30 & 10 p.m. Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Bruce Baum The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. A Don Rickles & Regis Philbin Laughfest Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Bill Kalmenson Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Valentine’s Day Ball Atlantis Casino 6 p.m. Reno Auto Show Reno-Sparks Convention Center Reno Mardi Crawl Reno venues

FEB. 11 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Gene Evaro Jr. Band KT Sun Deck 1 p.m. Jelly Bread Kirkwood 2 p.m. Irieties Sierra-at-Tahoe 2 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Sam Chase Squaw Village 2 p.m. Serina Dawn Band Alpine Bar 3 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Ike & Martin Ski Homewood 4 p.m. After Eights Alder Creek Café 5 p.m. Presley, Perkins, Lewis & Cash Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Funk Assassination Bar of America 8 p.m. Violin Femmes MontBleu 8 p.m. Live music Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Poor Man’s Whiskey Moe’s BBQ 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Morast & McCormick Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Drinking with Clowns Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Big Blue View Bar 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. Guest DJ Classic Cue 9 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. DJ Max Kronyak HQ MontBleu 10 p.m.

Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND TOCCATA Soiree Genoa Lake Country Club 3 p.m. The Kid ‘N Nic Show Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Look Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Ambrosia Boomtown 6 & 8 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Colin Ross Jazz Quartet Piper’s Opera House 6:30 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Fortunate Strangers Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. The Vegas Road Show Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Thunder Cover Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Jake Nielsen’s Triple Threat Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Chubby Checker and the Wildcats Nugget Sparks 8 p.m. Mike Furlong Band Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. A$AP Ty Beats & D. Lynch Jub Jub’s 9 p.m. The Spazmatics Circus Circus 10 p.m. Ryan Moe & Friends 1Up 10 p.m. Platinum Atlantis 10 p.m. Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Anton Styles Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Echo Lex GSR 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “The Vagina Monologues” Brewery Arts Center 2 & 7 p.m. Bill Kalmenson Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind” Reno Little Theater 7:30 & 10 p.m. Bruce Baum The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Bailazo del Amor y La Amistad Reno Events Center 8:30 p.m. “Decadence” Harrah’s 10 p.m. Special Events 17th annual Jazz in the Schools UNR Nightingale Concert Hall King of the Cage MMA fights Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Reno Mardi Crawl downtown Reno Reno Auto Show Reno-Sparks Convention Center

FEB. 12 | SUNDAY

Apple Z Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 9 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 2 p.m. Bruce Baum The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Special Events Reno Run 4 Love Reno Ballroom 8:30 a.m. 17th annual Jazz in the Schools UNR Nightingale Concert Hall Reno Auto Show Reno-Sparks Convention Center 2017 Lunar New Year Festival Nugget Casino

FEB. 13 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Live music West Shore cafe 6 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Cliff & Dave Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Swing Time St. James Infirmary 7 p.m. Reno Philharmonic Orchestra w/Conrad Tao Carson City CC 7:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

FEB. 14 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

David Beck Tahoe University 5 p.m. Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Gladkill, Charles The First Moe’s BBQ 10 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Patrick Walsh Sierra-at-Tahoe 1:30 p.m.  Patrick Walsh Sierra-at-Tahoe 1:30 p.m. Live music 89 Bar & Grill 2 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. Galactic w/Gene Evaro Jr. and Joy & Madness Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 4:15 & 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Reno Jazz Orchestra w/Tom Scott UNR Nightingale Concert Hall 2 p.m. Reno Philharmonic w/Conrad Tao Pioneer Center 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. Cliff & Dave Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. First Take Rockbar Theater 6 p.m. Platinum Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m.

CW and Dr. Spitmore Comma Coffee 11:30 a.m. TOCCATA Soiree Incline Village 3 p.m. P’Opera Fine Vines Wine Shop 4 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tyler Stafford Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Jamie Rollins Boomtown 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Reel Big Fish & Anti-Flag w/Ballyhoo and PhewPhewPhew Cargo 7 p.m. Valentines w/Enuff z’Nuff Rockbar Theater 7 p.m. Reno Philharmonic Orchestra w/Conrad Tao Pioneer Center CC 7:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 9 p.m. DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance K-Von The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Love Letters” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. “Privileged – A Speakeasy Experience” NoVi Eldorado 7:30 p.m. “Decadence” Harrah’s 10 p.m.

FEB. 15 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Ike & Martin “MS Dixie” 5:30 p.m. Pigeons Playing Ping Pong with Organ Freeman


February 9-22, 2017

RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tyler Stafford Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Jason King Band Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance K-Von The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Privileged – A Speakeasy Experience” NoVi Eldorado 7:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m.

FEB. 16 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. Ben Fuller Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Tahoe Donner Northwoods Clubhouse 6:30 p.m. Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Ben Gleib Show The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Jason King Band Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m.

Justin Lee Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Berlin Phil Wind Quintet UNR Nightingale Concert Hall 7:30 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Poperz Lex GSR 10 p.m. End of the Universe 1Up 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. K-Von The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Craig Shoemaker Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

FEB. 17 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. Lucas and Darcy Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Tyler Stafford Nakoma Resort 5 p.m. Kendal Naughton Sunnyside 6 p.m. Ike & Martin Jake’s on the Lake 6 p.m. Moon Gravy Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Soul Persuaders Bar of America 8 p.m. Live music Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Zion-I and John Wayne & the Pain Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. City Hearts Tahoe Biltmore 9 p.m. Rabbit Wilde Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Garage Openers HQ MontBleu 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open mic Art Truckee 7 p.m. Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Versa-Style Dance Company Truckee High School 7 p.m.

Not just Pizza!

Project MANA

(Making Adequate Nutrition Accessible)

Emergency Hunger Relief Organization serving the North Shore and Truckee since 1991 Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region.

(775) 298-4161 WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS AND TIMES: MONDAYS TAHOE CITY | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Center, 330 Fairway Drive TUESDAYS TRUCKEE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community Arts Center, 10046 Church Street WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House, 265 Bear Street THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church ProjectMana.org 341 Village Blvd.

HAPPY HOUR Daily 3-7pm SALADS • SANDWICHES • BEER/WINE

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Live music every Wednesday evening 6–9pm

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546-4738

5075 N. Lake Blvd., Carnelian Bay • Next to 7-11

Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Ben Gleib Show The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Keith Alan Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Ramon Ayala Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justin Lee Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Easy Rider Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Everyday Outlaw Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Melissa Dru Harrah’s 9 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. Soundwave Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Redfield Clipper & Bazooka Joe The Saint 9 p.m. YOOKie at 1 Up 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Teddy P and XM Fredie Lex GSR 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Privileged – A Speakeasy Experience” NoVi Eldorado 7:30 p.m. K-Von The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Craig Shoemaker Pioneer Underground 9 p.m. Special Events Lunar New Year Festival Reno Ballroom

FEB. 18 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Coburn Station KT Sun Deck 1 p.m. California Reprecussions Sierra-at-Tahoe 1:30 p.m. Jesse Dunn Duo Northstar Village 2 p.m. Irieties Sierra-at-Tahoe 1:30 p.m. Live music Kirkwood 2 p.m. The Sextones Squaw Village 2 p.m. Jesse Dunn Duo Alpine Bar 3 p.m. TOCCATA Soiree Tahoe TBA 3 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Richard Blair Alder Creek Café 5 p.m. Mark Mackay Hard Rock 7 p.m.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

RENO PHILHARMONIC

AND CONRAD TAO

Brantley Gutierrez

Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Ben Gleib Show The Improv 9 p.m.

THE MUSIC SCENE

Feb. 12 | 4 p.m. | Pioneer Center | Reno, Nev. Feb. 13 | 7:30 p.m. | Carson City Community Center | Carson City, Nev. Feb. 14 | 7:30 p.m. | Pioneer Center | Reno, Nev. JOIN THE RENO Philharmonic and worldrenowned pianist, Conrad Tao, performing the works of Mozart, Prokofiev and Dvorak. Classix Four: Temptation is a collection of works rife with love, jealousy and passion just in time for Valentine’s Day. Maestro Laura Jackson is featured. | renophil.com

CRAIG SHOEMAKER

Feb. 16 | 8 p.m. & Feb. 17 | 9 p.m. Feb. 18 | 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. Pioneer Underground | Reno, Nev. CELEBRATE VALENTINE’S week with Craig Shoemaker, the Love Master. Shoemaker’s been on Broadway, performed standup comedy for four presidents and has guest starred in recurring acting roles on network TV. He’s an award-winning producer and best-selling author. Passionate about going beyond the com-edy, Shoemaker officiates weddings of “HaHa-trimony,” as well as assists people in mastering love and happiness. | renotahoecomedy.com

NOW PLAYING

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

Lake Tahoe in Depth

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Guided tours & 3-D movies Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

(or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

Hidden Figures

Feb. 9 » 5:15 p.m. & 8 p.m.

The Lego Batman Movie

Feb.10 - March 2 » 5 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.

2:30 p.m. matinee showings on weekends and Ski/Skate week (check website for dates)

Academy Awards Party Feb. 26 » 4 p.m. FREE

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

35


THE MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

RAMON AYALA Feb. 17 | 8 p.m. Silver Legacy Casino | Reno, Nev. NORTEÑO MUSIC sensation Ramon Ayala performs live with his son Ramon Ayala Jr. The Mexican accordionist, vocalist and songwriter has been performing across the world for more than 40 years and is known for his signature songs and definitive instrumental styling. Ayala has more than 100 albums, has appeared in 13 films and has received multiple American and Latin Grammy awards. Ayala defined much of Norteño music with his distinctive accordion playing and lyrics. | silverlegacyreno.com

DATSIK

Feb. 25 | 8 p.m. Cargo Concert Hall | Reno, Nev. SINCE LAUNCHING the Datsik brand, Troy Beetles continues to evolve as a solo artist while pushing his beloved bass music world to new lengths, both on a personal artistic level and as a genre. From bedroom producer to chart-topping artist, internationally touring act and owner and founder of the enterprising Firepower Records, Datsik is poised to make bass music the sound of the future. | cargoreno.com

VERSA-STYLE DANCE COMPANY

Feb. 17 | 7 p.m. Truckee High School | Truckee ARTS FOR THE Schools presents VersaStyle Dance Company at the Truckee High School theater. The L.A.-based dance ensemble combines hip-hop, salsa and more into one act that proves the importance of crossing racial and socioeconomic boundaries through a common passion. | artsfortheschools.org 36

FEB. 18 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

FEB. 19 | SUNDAY

Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Soul Persuaders Bar of America 8 p.m. Live music Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Bazooka Zoo Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Achilles Wheel Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Elephant Revival w/Dead Horses and The Drunken Hearts Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Garage Openers HQ MontBleu 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Big Blue View Bar 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. Guest DJ Classic Cue 9 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7 & 9 p.m. Ben Gleib Show The Improv 9 p.m.

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Patrick Walsh Sierra-at-Tahoe 1:30 p.m. Live music 89 Bar & Grill 2 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Serina Dawn Band Squaw Village 2 p.m. Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus Hyatt Regency 3 p.m. Dark Star Orchestra Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. The Chris Robinson Brotherhood w/Kat Meyers & the Buzzards Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 4:15 & 7:15 p.m. K-Von The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Ben Gleib Show The Improv 9 p.m.

CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. George Pickard Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Eldorado 11 a.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Silver Legacy 11:30 a.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Circus Circus 12 p.m.

RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Starlighters Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justin Lee Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Easy Rider Silver Legacy 8 p.m. 80s New Wave Dance Party Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Brandy Clark Nugget Casino 8 p.m. Soundwave Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. City Hearts 1 Up 10 p.m. Drinking With Clowns The Saint 10 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Fashen Peppermill 12:45 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Eldorado 1 & 6 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Silver Legacy 2 & 7 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Circus Circus 3 & 8 p.m. Craig Shoemaker Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Privileged – A Speakeasy Experience” NoVi Eldorado 7:30 p.m. K-Von The Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “The Untamed” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. “Decadence” Harrah’s 10 p.m. Special Events Lunar New Year Festival Reno Ballroom

RENO & BEYOND

RENO & BEYOND Live music chez louie 10 a.m. Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. George Pickard Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. First Take Rockbar Theater 6 p.m. #Twins #LOL Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Audioboxx Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Eldorado 2 & 6 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Silver Legacy 3 & 7 p.m. Leung’s White Crane Dance Assoc. Circus Circus 4 & 8 p.m. Elvis Lives! Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Special Events Lunar New Year Festival Reno Ballroom  

FEB. 20 | MONDAY

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Live music West Shore cafe 6 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m.

FEB. 21 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW and Dr. Spitmore Comma Coffee 11:30 a.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Robey’s Boomtown 6 p.m. Steve Lord Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Marbin, Cranialgalactic Orchestra Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. Attila Cargo 8 p.m. American Introvert, Drove, Erin Drive & Crosstown Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Larry Wilson The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Privileged – A Speakeasy Experience” NoVi Eldorado 7:30 p.m.


February 9-22, 2017

Kristie Pellegrino Kristie Pelligrino | Lake Tahoe Dance Collective

FEB. 22 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Ike & Martin “MS Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Electroswing Burlesque The Loft 8 p.m.

THE MUSIC SCENE

Haunted Summer H A U N T I N G , E T H E R E A L A N D I N N O VAT I V E S T O R Y B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

Feb. 10 & 11 | 8:30 p.m. | Moody’s Bistro | Truckee

RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Steve Lord Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. The Robey’s Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Larry Wilson The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Privileged – A Speakeasy Experience” NoVi Eldorado 7:30 p.m.

FEB. 23 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 10 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Robey’s Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Art Mulcahy Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Stevie Nicks Reno Event Center 8 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Bijou 1Up 10 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ Ivan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. DJ Punktematrix Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “The Vagina Monologues” Potentialist Workshop 7:30 p.m. Larry Wilson The Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Grimm’s 8” Brüka Theatre 10 a.m.

Repertory Showcase announced The Repertory Showcase: An Evening with Lake Tahoe Dance Collective has been announced for April 7 through 9 at the Tahoe Art Haus & Cinema in Tahoe City. The Showcase is the first production of the 2017 season of the Lake Tahoe Dance Collective, with more performances to be announced soon. Tickets will be available soon for the Showcase featuring dance spanning classical ballet, a mid-century modern classic, and two contemporary premieres. Tickets are $25 and $20 for students and seniors with advance purchase. | laketahoedancecollective.org

Audition for “Young Frankenstein” It’s bawdy. It’s naughty. It’s Mel Brooks’ spoof of old Hollywood horror movies. Truckee Community Theater is delighted to present “Young Frankenstein” from June 8 to 11. The production will be directed by Carrie Haines and choreographed by John Paul Rivard. There are lead roles for eight men and women, many supporting parts and a chorus of up to 25 dancers and singers. The finale is a tap number, so practice your time steps. “Young Frankenstein” will be directed by Carrie Haines and choreographed by John Paul Rivard. Auditions for roles is on Feb. 28 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at Truckee Community Arts Center. Callbacks will be on March 1, with a first read-through on March 2. Rehearsals will begin on April 25. Performances will be from June 8 to 11. | truckeecommunitytheater.com

Wanderlust tickets on sale The 2017 Wanderlust Festival at Squaw Valley will be held from July 20 to 23, with tickets now on sale. Inclusive of diverse styles of yoga, top musical performers, farm-totable dining and the thought-provoking Speakeasy lecture series, Wanderlust provides a multi-day, retreat amid breathtaking scenery for mindful adventurers. This summer’s unique blend of musicians, DJs and performing artists headlining the season includes Little Dragon, Bonobo, St. Paul and the Broken Bones, Jamestown Revival, Lettuce and Quixotic. | wanderlust.com

B

ridgette Moody and John Seasons met while each was playing in different bands. They eventually left the projects they were involved in to play music together. Apparently it was synchronicity. They fell in love and started making beautiful music. Neither realized that what they would create together, Haunted Summer, would change their trajectory and their lives. “We were making music for ourselves. We made some demos and people loved what we were creating and wanted to work with us. It was surreal,” said Seasons. Moody concurs: “We wanted to write what came out of us. We were out to make music we were happy with.”

The duo considers Highland Park, an historic neighborhood in Los Angeles, as their home base. It’s an eclectic, ethnic neighborhood with a hotbed of music and bars. “We’ve done a lot of touring all over the country and throughout the West Coast, California, Oregon and Washington,” says Moody. Haunted Summer is currently working on a new album entitled, “Spirit Guides,” which is due to be released this summer. “The title track ‘Spirit Guides’ is about accepting the universe, looking at symbols and getting an answer to a question, that gets you centered and spiritual,” says Seasons. Moody adds, “It’s about accepting,

“ We play music that takes you somewhere and transports you to another place.” –Bridgette Moody Both say initially they were writing for the love of music and for themselves. They never expected it to blow up and become what is has. “The reaction to our music was overwhelming,” says Seasons. “People offered to back us and help us. It was a vindicating moment. We knew the choices we made were right for us and this was a career move.” When asked about their sound, Moody says, “I think of it as a nostalgic sound. It can sound futuristic.” “The way we write lyrics are like diary entries and the lyrics and writing are a big part of us,” Seasons says. The couple shares in both the writing of their lyrics and composition of their music. “We play music that takes you somewhere and transports you to another place,” says Moody. “We strive to make music that is experimental. We throw out the rule book about traditional ways to play music,” says Seasons. For instance, when they play with their guitar pedals, it’s not traditional. “We play how we feel. We are open to letting things be what they will be when we play live. That is the adventurous side of the band,” Seasons says.

living in truth and that is the best anyone can do. It’s about following the signs we see and being willing to accept your truth.” When working in the studio, the couple plays most of the instruments on their recordings. They enlist a drummer and woodwind player to support them. Moody not only lends her evocative, outer worldly vocals to the band, but also plays guitar, synthesizer and keyboards. Seasons plays guitar. When performing live, they travel with a drummer, bassist, woodwind and string players. Moody admits that when she is writing and playing, she drops into a zone. She loves that they have the space to be experimental and adventurous. According to Seasons, their band members are vital. “They are our family. We are fortunate to have our friends play with us. There is a trust and friendship that enables us to let go more as a group.” With a sound reminiscent to that of Enya and Loreena McKennitt, Moody and Seasons create music that takes the listener on a journey. Haunted Summer will be performing at Moody’s Bistro Bar & Beats on Feb. 10 and 11.| moodysbistro.com. 

37


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Local

flavor

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

Ryan Dierks

TA S T Y TIDBITS

T H E A RT O F T H E C R A F T C O C K TA I L

From snow to soup

S T O R Y & P H O T O S B Y P R I YA H U T N E R

R

yan Dierks, co-owner of the Truckee Tavern & Grill, has a reputation. If you want a cocktail in Truckee, he is one of the masters of the art of craft cocktails. The bar features all manner of unique bottles of spirits and Dierks knows his stuff. “Cocktail programs are a whole different animal,” says Dierks, who is also the bar manager. He and his staff prep for hours to make the bar ready for an evening. The infusions, bitters and syrups used in the cocktails are all made in house; the garnishes are cut to precision and lined up along the bar creating a beautiful setting for the eye to behold. They use all fresh juices and cut their own ice cubes with a chain saw.

Crawl, don’t walk

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Watch the video on how Truckee Tavern makes ice cubes with a chain saw

You won’t find a soda gun at this establishment. If you ask for a rum and coke, you get a Coca Cola classic in a bottle. If you order a drink with tonic, Q-tonic and Fentimans are the two brands behind the bar. Dierks and his bartenders wield a hand-held soda siphon that makes seltzer using Truckee water. The siphon has been used in bars since the 1800s. Truckee

BLUEPRINT OF THE

C O C K TA I L S AT U R D AY S I N F E B R U A R Y 6 - 7 : 3 0 P. M . | $ 9 0 | 2 1 +

Barrel-aged aromatic bitters with subtle hints of orange and coconut flakes laced with golden raisins are used to prepare the Old Fashioneds and Manhattans. Tavern & Grill also makes its own ginger syrup using a blend of raw and cooked ginger. If you are a fan of ginger beer, they make that, too. “We do as much in house as possible and if someone can produce it better, we buy it,” says Dierks. The bitters for the establishment’s cocktails are sensational. Barrel-aged aromatic bitters with subtle hints of orange and coconut flakes laced with golden raisins are used to prepare the Old Fashioneds and Manhattans. Banana bitters are used for rum drinks and saffron cardamom bitters are used for Gin Fizz cocktails. “Dealers Choice” is one of Truckee Tavern’s most popular cocktails on the menu. The bartenders ask their customers a few pertinent questions about their preferences: do they like citrus or boozy, fruity or herbal? Do they have a spirit of choice? These questions give the bartender a sense of what type of cocktail they will 38

Tahoe City Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area hosts a Yurt Dinner Fundraiser on Feb. 11 from 6 to 9 p.m. Guests will ski or snowshoe to the ski area’s Yellow Hut for hot beverages, a bonfire and laser-guided star tour and telescope viewing with resident outreach astronomer Gigi. Ski or snowshoe rentals are included. At 7:30 p.m., Tahoe XC Junior Ski Team will serve three different soups, fresh breads, fresh salad and an array of desserts. Water and non-alcoholic beverages included; guests may also bring a favorite beverage. A door prize is up for grabs. There are only 50 spots available. | Register tahoexc.org

design for their customers. “It’s about good customer service. Giving them what they want yet introducing them to something they don’t necessarily know about,” Dierks says. Dierks doesn’t want to be called a mixologist. “Being a bartender is about an authentic human experience between you and the customer. The bar is hallowed ground, a place where CEOs and plumbers sit together and shed the weight of the day. The bartender is the emcee,” he says. “It’s a place to meet new people, have good conversation over a good cocktail. Making a good cocktail is another tool in the tool box.” Many of the craft cocktail creations are inspired by the seasons. Dierks looks at produce availability and sets the menu from there. Dirty Martini’s are made with Truckee Tavern’s housemade brine: a blend of capers, olives, champagne vinegar and herbs. Currently, the tavern is serving up

music-themed cocktails, such as “Stairway to Heaven,” “Jolene,” “Pumpkin” and “Formerly Known As.” Dierks, a self proclaimed cocktail nerd, offers all manner of trivia and knowledge about the process of making and preparing the cocktails he serves. He reads books and blogs to drink up everything about the world of cocktails. A fun twist at Truckee Tavern is the cocktail classes. Every Saturday night through the winter season, Truckee Tavern will be hosting cocktail classes from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the side bar. “The purpose of the class is twofold: We want to offer people a different culinary experience and to help people be more confident as to what to order at a bar — not all bars are cocktail bars,” he says. Participants learn about cocktails in order to demystify them and make them more approachable and to learn the basic of ingredients of simple cocktails they can build on. Over the last two years the biggest thing that has changed for Dierks is how he has come to mentor people and share his love of craft cocktails. Jason Gifford, Ian Hadder, Michelle O’Shea and Bryce Tomberlin are the crew that tend bar with Dierks. Tomberlin won last year’s annual Bartender Competition at West Shore cafe. This year’s competition will be held on Feb. 26.  For more information or to register for the cocktail classes, call (530) 587-3766 or visit truckeetavern.com. Priya Hutner is a writer, health and wellness consultant, and natural foods chef. Her business, The Seasoned Sage, focuses on wellness, conscious eating and healthy living. She offers healthy organic meals for her clients. She may be reached at pria78@ gmail.com or visit theseasonedsage.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com to read more.

Reno, Nev. Reno, the crawl capital of the world, announces its upcoming events. On Feb. 11, Mardi Crawl is from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. (not a typo). It starts at the West 2nd Street Bar; revelers collect beads at each of the 15 (no cover) bars on the crawl. Hotel discounts are available, too. The night includes entertainment, music and a costume contest; reserve a cup now. On March 11, get out your green clothing for the Leprechaun Crawl from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. For $5, guests receive a cup and map to more than 25 participating bars. Themed entertainment includes go-go dancers and DJs. On April 22, the Steampunk Stroll will take place from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. The fee is $10 for a premium mug and map. There will be a costume contest and entertainment. Upcoming crawls include: Epic Crawl/ Lightsaber Battle on June 3, Pirate Crawl on Aug. 19, Zombie Crawl/Thriller Dance on Oct. 21 and Pajama Crawl on Nov. 18. | Register crawlreno.com

Sweets for studies Carson City, Nev. The 18th Annual Feast of Chocolate presented by the American Association of University Women, Capital Branch is on Feb. 11 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Plaza Hotel & Event Center in Carson City, Nev. Enjoy chocolate samplings and participate in a raffle for prizes. The proceeds will benefit local scholarships and AAUW fellowships. The fee is $15, $12 for ages 65 and older. | (775) 267-3427

A sensory experience Reno, Nev. Sierra Music Society presents “Decadence, Divas & Divos,” an evening of food, wine, soloists and fun on Feb. 12 at 4 pm. at Fine Vines Wine Shop. For $75, guests will enjoy wine tastings and food pairings in three courses with a wine sommelier selecting and discussing the wines. Beautiful music sung by soloists from P’Opera! in an up-close-andpersonal setting will be the entertainment. This special Valentine’s treat promises to be an exceptional evening in which to indulge the senses. Seating is limited. | RSVP (775) 233-5105 or poperanv.org


TA S T Y

Tidbits

Barbara Keck

MORE

LOCAL FLAVOR

February 9-22, 2017

LAKE VIEW DINING

WINERY TA K E O V E R S Sunnyside Restaurant and Lodge presents Ox’s Picks Winemaker’s Dinners that include the expertise of a winery representative in house, as well as a specialty paired entrée with a glass of wine from the featured winery of the week. Prices range from $30 to $35. Schramsberg Vineyards and J. Davies Vineyards on Feb. 23, Mauritson Wines/Rockpile Wines on March 9, St. Supery Estate Vineyards and Winery on March 23 and Alfaro Family Vineyards & Winery on April 6. Gros Ventre Cellars will be featured at a date to be determined in April. | sunnysideresort.com

Brewery brews winners

Architecture of alcohol

Reno, Nev. IMBĪB Brewing Company was awarded two medals in the 2017 Best of Craft Beer Awards, a competition honoring the nation’s breweries. The brewery will receive national exposure in beer magazines, social media and promotional materials helping to solidify Reno’s reputation as a beer destination. Of the five beers that were entered in the competition by IMBĪB Custom Brews, two were awarded medals, including for the second year in a row, a gold medal for its Nevada Weisse Ale. It also received a silver medal for its traditional Belgian Dark Strong Ale. This brings the grand total to five medals won in this competition since the brewery opened its doors in May 2015. | imbibreno.com

Craft cocktail enthusiasts and those who want to become one are invited to participate in Truckee Tavern and Grill’s new Blueprint of the Cocktail class on Saturdays from 6 to 7:30 p.m. through the end of February. Participants will learn a simple, executable formula to easily craft cocktails at home and how to become confidant and discerning when ordering at a bar. The experience will include conversation focused on the ratios and ingredients that make the most classic cocktails timeless and the art of simple modifications that allow for creation of sophisticated, one-of-a-kindfrom-scratch cocktails. Participants will have hands-on experience creating and sampling two cocktails while noshing on cheese and charcuterie. Classes are $90 per person, gratuity included. They are limited to 10 participants per session, ages 21 and older. Reservations are available on a first-come, first served basis. | Register (530) 587-3766

A great way to end the day Incline Village, Nev. Diamond Peak’s Last Tracks Wine/Beer Tasting events will be held every Saturday afternoon through April 15. Take advantage of a late-day lift ticket, valid from 2 to 4 p.m., followed by a final chair ride up to Snowflake Lodge to experience breathtaking views, wine or craft beer tastings paired with appetizers. When the event is over, participants can take a run down a freshly groomed trail. Last Tracks features a different winery, brewery or themed flight each week; the schedule will be on the Web site. Tickets will be available for purchase online or through Guest Services. Tickets are $44 and include a ski lift ticket. Diamond Peak season passholders receive a $5 discount. Participants must be able to ski or snowboard down an intermediate run and be age 21 and older to attend. | Register diamondpeak.com

open daily at 4pm

.

12 p.m h c n u or l ekend Feb. 18 f n e p o e s’ day w

th

on

th

th 0 , 19 & 2

ent presid

HacDelLago.com

Facebook.com/HaciendaDelLago BOATWORKS MALL AT TAHOE CITY MARINA ·· (530) 581-3700 760 NORTH LAKE BLVD. SUITE #30 ·· TAHOE CITY, CA

Nightly 5-6 p.m.

Explore a world of wines Olympic Valley Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Cafe and learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Each Thursday, from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., the Wine Voyage will showcase different wine regions from around the globe.  Participants can enjoy a taste of three wines and wine fact cards. February highlights Burgundy Varietals and Old World Regions are featured in March and April. Prices vary. | plumpjacksquawvalleyinn.com CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

39


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

STIR FRY B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

Kings Beach Lunch Specials Daily Early Bird Special 4-6pm

Dinner Special 4-10pm

$3.50 Margaritas $3.50 Dos Equis $2.50 Draft Bud

25% Off Mexican Combo Dinners

Full

Bar

Open 11:30am-10:00pm (530) 546-4539 8345 North Lake Blvd. - Across from the State Beach

Antipasti, Homemade Pastas & Rustic Regional Entrées Dinner served nightly in an ingenious Italian atmosphere HAPPY HOUR

Sunday-Thursday 5-6 p.m. In Downtown Truckee - (530) 587-4694

pianetarestauranttruckee.com

W

hile writing this week’s article, I wondered if I should be doing a stir fry. We are getting into the heart of the winter season, which is usually the time for the comfort foods, such as meatloaf, casseroles and stew, possibly the most popular of all the comfort foods. All of these dishes are hearty, which is great for a cold winter day after spending a few hours out on the slopes. Just the thought of them will start to warm the insides and are inexpensive to make, which also is a good thing to consider after making it through the long holiday season. A stir fry is one of those meals that can fall into the comfort-food category or it also can be a light dish, as well. It is fairly simple to make and can be done in one pan — or two when you consider the rice or complimenting starch to go with it. The most common accompaniment with a stir fry is rice. Noodles also go great, whether you are talking about chicken, beef, pork or seafood. At times, I will serve the main dish with boiled potato wedges seasoned with butter and parsley. It is easy to imagine many possibilities for making and serving a good stir fry. Start with your main ingredient. This will be the meat or seafood, but can just as easily be a vegetable. If you are using meat or seafood, brown them in the pan first. You will notice I said brown and not cook. That is because the meat will be cut into pretty thin slices for a stir fry and you want to sear it first and not finish it, which could lead to overcooking. This main ingredient will be added to the veggies toward the end so everything finishes at the same time. Once the meat has been seared, put it

on a plate and sauté your veggies. Carrots, onions, celery and other root vegetables should all be sliced about the same thickness. Unlike stew where the vegetables are cut into good-sized chunks to hold up during the long cooking time, stir frying happens quickly so you want to slice the veggies one-quarter-inch thick so they can cook fast but still retain crunchiness.

A stir fry is one of those meals that can fall into the comfortfood category or it also can be a light dish, as well. Any of the flowering vegetables, such as broccoli, should be quickly blanched before adding to the stir fry. Squashes, such as zucchini and yellow squash, also can be sliced, while bell peppers can be cut into 1-inch strips. Start with the firmer veggies, such as carrots, and let them get maybe a half-minute to a minute head start before adding the squash and then finally the broccoli. Add the meat back in and season immediately. Let everything finish cooking for a few minutes and serve over rice or noodles or with potatoes and enjoy.  Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

RECIPE American Bistro & Wine Bar

Open Daily at 11:00 a.m. for Lunch and Dinner Breakfast Saturday & Sunday from 8 a.m. for 1 Wednesday Dinners 22-course min. per person. Please present coupon when ordering. Not valid w/other promotions. Expires 02/22/17

Newly Remodeled Expanded Dining Room. Available for Private Parties, Events and Weddings. Watch your favorite sporting events

Happy Hour Everyday 4-6:30 pm Tuesday all night!!!

SpindleshanksTahoe.com

400 Brassie Ave, Suite B - Kings Beach - (530) 546-2191 40

For 4 to 6 · From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith 2 chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch strips 1 celery stalk, sliced ¼-inch thick ½ yellow squash, sliced ¼-inch thick ½ red bell pepper, cut into strips 1 clove garlic, diced 7 basil leaves, sliced thin 1½ T soy sauce ½ t chili paste or oil (if desired) Salt and pepper to taste

1 carrot, sliced ¼-inch thick 1 small onion, sliced thin ½ zucchini, sliced ¼-inch thick ½ green bell pepper, cut into strips 1 T fresh ginger, minced 1 T sesame oil 1 T Hoisin sauce ¼ C vegetable oil

Be sure to have everything cut and laid out on your cutting board before starting. Cook the rice or noodles first. Get your wok or sauté pan hot. Add 2 to 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil and the chicken and brown on all sides. Remove from pan onto a plate before it is finished cooking. Add another 2 to 3 tablespoons of oil with the onion, carrot and celery. Sauté about half a minute to a minute stirring constantly. Add the garlic, ginger, squash and peppers and sauté a minute. Add the broccoli. Keep stirring for another half minute and add the chicken back in with the Hoisin sauce, half the soy sauce and half the sesame oil. Add the chili paste, if desired. Taste before adding the rest of the soy sauce, sesame oil, salt and pepper. Season with the remaining sesame oil and soy sauce, salt and pepper to finish. Add the basil during the last few stirs.


February 9-22, 2017

LOCAL FLAVOR

WINE BY LOU PHILLIPS

P ian eta R ist orante CREATIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN AN ELEGANT LOG CABIN Vegan Sauté • Sustainable Fresh Fish • Filet Mignon • Organic Chicken Local Seasonal Produce • Unique Winter Additions Voted Best Place to Take a Date for 17 years EST. 1985

Charlie Soule Chef/Owner

THE SOULE DOMAIN Open for dinner nightly at 6pm - Please make reservations

Steve Soule Head Waiter

Stateline Dr. next to Tahoe Biltmore, Crystal Bay, North Lake Tahoe

530-546-7529 | www.souledomain.com

WINEMAKER EVENTS $12 tastings | Meet the winemaker Taste 3 wines | Bottle signing

gros ventre

N

estled in the heart of Truckee’s historic downtown is Pianeta Ristorante with a cozy atmosphere, excellent Northern Italian cuisine, unique wine and cocktail program and an amazing staff. Pianeta has been a welcome respite for dining aficionados since 1998. Co-owners and operators Nicole and Tom Beckering greet you at the door or from behind the bar with the type of energy and charm that make you feel like family. In the kitchen, talented executive chef Bill Arnoff leads the culinary team. “The beauty of rustic Italian is that the different flavors stand on their own,” says Arnoff. “Italian at its best is fresh, intense and well-balanced.” I can attest that philosophy comes through in spades on the plate. And with Mr. Beckering offering a wine list that complements the food to a T, all that’s left is to take you on a dinner journey Pianeta style.

Executive chef Bill Arnoff. Courtesy Pianeta

February 10 Squaw 5 - 7 p.m. | February 11 Petra 6 - 8 p.m.

bjorn 5 - 7 p.m.

February 10 Truckee | February 11 Tahoe City In true Northern Italian style, a pasta dish was next up and we chose the Pasta di Olio featuring angel-hair with four types of mushrooms, tomatoes, spinach and pine nuts, topped with garlic, olive oil and fresh basil. Italians love Lambrusco with mushroom dishes and we enjoyed the Monte Delle Vigna that brought the classic dark/tangy cherry profile with the bright bubbles of a good Lambrusco.

“On a cold winter night in Truckee, there is truly nothing better than the cozy atmosphere and amazing

shane 5 - 7 p.m.

February 17 Truckee | February 18 Tahoe City

russell herman 6 - 8 p.m. February 20 Petra

2 glasses of wine

cheese plate $21 Everyday from 3-5 pm

Old Town Truckee Cobblestone Tahoe City The Village at Squaw Valley

TelosWine.com

in pen eno! o Nowown R T Mid

Try our

New England Clam Chowder

or take a

A great start is the Insalata Robyn, named after founding owner Robyn Stills. This salad reflects her sensibilities of freshness, boldness and balance. On a bed of butter leaf lettuce and spinach there is a palate of vegetables, olives, gorgonzola and crunchy croutons with an authentic Tuscan vinaigrette. Italian white wines are made to dance with food and Pianeta features a wonderful Verdicchio from producer Colle Stefano by the glass that feels alive on the palate with brilliant citrus and almond flavors enhanced with a mineral streak that stands right up to the bold salad flavors and textures.

LOCATED IN:

Italian offerings at Pianeta Ristorante.”

Tiramisu. | Courtesy Pianeta

uncorked

For entrees, we went with Chicken Marsala in the classic wine-reduction with orecchiette pasta, and the Agnello doublecut lamb chops served with goat cheese ravioli and a mint pesto. Have to go to Piedmonte for the wine and the Produtorri de Barbaresco was a home run with licorice, roses, dried cherries and beautiful earthnotes embracing and enhancing the food. Dessert? You bet. A generous portion of Tiramisu with espresso-soaked lady fingers, mascarpone cream and chocolate sauce. Pianeta has an exceptional dessert wine list. We invited the Taylor 10 Year Old Tawny Port with rich notes of caramel, roasted nuts and smoke for the final dance. On a cold winter night in Truckee, there is truly nothing better than the cozy atmosphere and amazing Italian offerings at Pianeta Ristorante. Mange. 

Fresh Catch home to cook yourself!

Serving fresh fish, salads, soup & more.

Daily from 11:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

10089 West River Street · Truckee (530) 582-5000 · MorgansLobsterShack.com

Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier and his consulting business WineProwest.com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 544-3435 or lou@ wineprowest.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns.

41


LOCAL FLAVOR

TheTahoeWeekly.com

M O R E TA S T Y T I D B I T S

COOKING PINE NUTS F A M I LY T R A D I T I O N Tahoe Weekly reader Sharon Porteous Vogelsang was inspired by Priya Hutner’s recent story on “Foraging for pine nuts” to share her family’s recipe for cooking pine nuts. “I am writing in response to the recipe you had in a November issue on pine nuts. Both of my parents and grandparents were from Nevada, and we always had pine nuts as a treat around the holidays. However, we cooked them differently. I thought that your readers might like to try this, as the nuts turn out moist and salty,” wrote Vogelsang. Pine nuts foraging season runs from September to mid-November. Hutner’s story and her recipe for roasting pine nuts are available at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 38

Pop in for a Pop Up Truckee Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Pop Up Dinner Series several times per month. Designed and formatted like a spirited dinner party, a Stella Pop Up event is an exploration into creative cooking. Guests are encouraged to walk around the kitchen, joining conversations that are free flowing and educational. There is one tasting menu for each gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. The cost is $97 per person. Seating is limited; reservations are necessary. The series includes Bombay Spice Pop Up on Feb. 10 and 11, Valentine’s Day Pop Up on Feb. 14, Ode to Seafood Pop Up on Feb. 18 and 19

DINING GUIDE KINGS BEACH

Jason’s | American

Jason’s Beachside Grill, a locals’ favorite for more than 30 years offers casual dining in a rustic atmosphere. Savor American classics like Slow Roasted Prime Rib, Teriyaki Chicken, Pasta, Blackened Salmon and Jason’s famous Baby Back Ribs, along with nightly specials. Jason’s boasts the largest salad bar on the North Shore and gourmet halfpound burgers and sandwiches. There’s a kids’ menu, and a large selection of spirits, wine and microbrews. 8338 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, next to the North Tahoe Event Center | Daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. | (530) 546-3315

La Mexicana | Authentic Mexican

and Basque Country Pop Up on Feb. 24 and 25. | cedarhousesporthotel.com

Free on Wednesdays

South Lake Tahoe Wine Wednesdays are at The Loft in Heavenly. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week, with a guest speaker and/or tasting notes from the featured winery. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass until 4 to 7 p.m. | (530) 523-8024

Cooking with plants Truckee Tammy Garbarino offers a “Plant-Based Cooking” class at the Truckee Community Recreation Center. Learn how to feed yourself and your family with satisfying, healthy home-cooked meals. Seasoned cooks and newbies can benefit from

Las Panchitas | Mexican

Serving fine Mexican food since 1975 and at Lake Tahoe since 1982, delicious Chinga-Lingas head the appetizer list. Authentic Chili Relleños are made from fresh-roasted chiles stuffed with jack cheese, and Fiesta Tostadas are created from a flour tortilla with beans, ground beef, chile colorado, chile verde, lettuce, sour cream, guacamole and cheese. The Chicken, Shrimp and Sirloin Fajitas are enough for two. 8345 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach | Full bar with delicious margaritas | Dinners from $10.95 | (530) 546-4539

RENO

Daughters Café | Hungarian

Located in a Victorian House on the corner of First and Bell Streets in the Downtown Truckee River District of Reno, Daughters Café offers unique homemade seasonal selections for breakfast and lunch. Choices include Hungarian Chicken Paprikas, Smoked Grits, Homemade Limoncello, fresh daily soup, eggs, omelets, sausage, salad and potatoes. They serve Magpie Coffee and all food is made to order and impeccably fresh. Family owned and operated by mom Barb, and daughters Skye and Bianca. This restaurant will hug you with warmth as if you have come home. Menu changes seasonally and is posted daily on the web. The Beignets alone are worth a visit during your holidays. 97 Bell Street, Reno, Nev. 89503 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. TuesdaySunday (Brunch) | (775) 324-3447 | daughterscafe.com

Lanza’s | Italian

TAHOE CITY

42

From the kitchen of Sharon Porteous Vogelsang Pine Nuts

5T Salt

Water

Fill a large skillet half way with water, add the nuts (no need to test for bad ones by floating, as I have found that many of those prove to be good) and salt them heavily; about 5 tablespoons. Bring to a boil and simmer until the water evaporates, stirring and adding more salt now and then. Let cool, then enjoy. Hint: To make clean-up easier on the pan and spoon, first coat with cooking oil to combat the resin. Also, if they are too salty for your taste, wash or rub off some of the salt when finished cooking.

bringing variety to the kitchen and your palate. The class will be on Mondays from 6 to 7:30 p.m. until March. A $10 materials fee is due at class. | Register tdprd.org

drink orders; those who visit all the saloons can be entered into the grand prize drawing. | visitvirginiacitynv.com

Crawling with saloons

The Mountain Table Dinner Series 2017 offers a dining experience in Northstar’s Zephyr Lodge. Each dinner will feature a winery or brewery complemented by a menu featuring locally and regionally sourced produce and proteins prepared by Zephyr Lodge executive chef Aramis Torres. Seating for all dinners will be family style. Northstar will support Tahoe Food Hub for each dinner of the series, as part of its EpicPromise program. A number of ingredients used in the menus will be sourced from the Tahoe Food Hub. On Feb. 24, Bonny Doon Vineyards will be featured and on March 17, Merryvale Vineyards will be featured. | RSVP northstarcalifornia.com 

Virginia City, Nev. The Devil Made Me Do It Saloon Crawl is on Feb. 11 in Virginia City from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. In celebration of Valentine’s Day, participants select a cup color based on their relationship status: single, taken or not sure. With the cups, they go forth and sample tasty beverages from Virginia City’s historic saloons. Sign up to be Cupid, a group’s designated driver and be rewarded with a special cup, goodies and a chance to win a $50 gas card. Ball Breaker Saloon Crawl is on March 11. On Saint Patrick’s weekend, follow the rainbow and find a pot of gold. All crawl participants receive discounts on full specialty

Fresh mountain dining

To be included in the Dining Guide, call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100.

Taqueria La Mexicana opened in 1997 and brought the tried and tested family recipes from their taqueria in Norwalk that made them successful. Tahoe locals instantly began to notice the fresh ingredients and authentic dishes and La Mexicana quickly became a locals’ favorite for fast, affordable and delicious Mexican food prepared fresh daily. La Mexicana also features an authentic Mexican bakery (fresh bread baked daily), carniceria and a full grocery store to meet your needs while visiting Lake Tahoe. Come taste the difference or order online through Eat 24. 8515 Brook Ave. Kings Beach | lamexicanakb.com | Daily 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. | (530) 546-0310

Traditional Italian food since the 1930s, and Lanza’s has been a long-time favorite with locals, as well as visitors. It’s been voted best Italian restaurant for many years. Guests will find a great family atmosphere featuring family recipes and large portions. Most dinners are between $12 and $19. Lanza’s also offers a nice selection of Italian and California wines. Lanza’s now offers gluten-free pizza and spaghetti. Offsite catering available. 7739 North Lake Blvd., King’s Beach (next to Safeway) | No reservations | Dinner at 5 p.m. | Full Bar and Happy Hour 4:30 p.m. | (530) 546-2434

PINE NUTS

Bacchi’s | Italian

Since 1932, this family owned restaurant has taken pride in serving family style Italian food in a checkered tablecloth setting with touches of Old Tahoe. Servers bring large tureens of minestrone soup, followed by a salad bowl for the table and a generous antipasto tray with some housemade delicacies. The menu has more than 40 selections including their renowned housemade ravioli. The large dining room easily seats big parties. 2905 Lake Forest Road (2 miles east of Tahoe City off Hwy. 28) | Dinner from 5:30 nightly | Bar opens at 4 p.m. | Extensive wine list and banquet room | (530) 583-3324

TRUCKEE

El Toro Bravo | Mexican

This is outstanding Mexican cuisine with recipes that have made El Toro Bravo a favorite in Truckee for 25 years. Located in a quaint, old-time, Truckee house, with a friendly ambience to go with your meal. Happy Hour Monday to F riday from 4 to 6 p.m. Topping the menu are tender Steak and Chicken Fajitas, Chimichangas, Tacoladas, Chili Relleños, Snapper Santa Cruz, Grilled Prawns and the unusual Oysters 444. Patio dining, weather permitting. 10816 Donner Pass Road, on the west end of Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Service from 11:30 a.m. | Full bar | (530) 587-3557

Pianeta | Italian Cucina

One of the Tahoe area’s best, Pianeta transports the palate with sophisticated, yet rustic Italian food in a warm, cozy atmosphere. The Antipasti features Bruschetta Olivata, Filet Mignon Carpaccio, Housemade Grilled Sausages & Crab Cakes. Pianeta makes most pasta in house with dishes like Veal Meatballs with Pesto & Linguini Pasta, Chicken & Prosciutto Cannelloni with Porcini Cream Sauce & Ravioli della Casa. 10096 Donner Pass Road, along Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Open for dinner nightly | Full bar and wine list | Happy Hour at the Bar Mon.-Fri. from 5 to 6:30 p.m. | (530) 587-4694

WEST SHORE

The West Shore Café and Inn | Seasonal California cuisine

With its beautiful surroundings, warm ambiance and seasonal menus, the West Shore is a lakefront favorite among Tahoe’s community and visitors alike. Enjoy lakefront dining with breathtaking views of Lake Tahoe, while experiencing our seasonal menus, which always draws from the best seasonal meats, seafood and produce available. Reservations strongly encouraged. Free Lakeside S’mores 4 to 4:30 & Après Ski Specials 3 to 5 p.m. 5160 West Lake Blvd., Homewood | (530) 525-5200 | WestShoreCafe.com

(530) 546-3315

JasonsBeachSideGrille.com

8338 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, CA

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits.


SKI OR RIDE FOR FREE

Purchase a CA or NV Tahoe license plate and get two free Alpine or Nordic tickets to the Tahoe resort of your choice*. For more information or to purchase your license plate online, visit tahoeplates.com. Julia Mancuso U.S. Ski Team

*restrictions apply

PLAY BY DAY | PLAY BY NIGHT

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EARN DOUBLE POINTS ON YOUR FAVORITE SLOTS

Saturday, February 18 12pm - 5pm

(775) 886-6630 • GrandLodgeCasino.com • 111 Country Club Drive Incline Village, NV 89451 Facebook.com/Grand.Lodge.Casino Players Advantage Club® membership and valid photo ID required. Must be 21 years of age. Promotion subject to change without notice. Complete rules and restrictions available in Casino Services. Employees of Grand Lodge Casino (GLC) and its affiliates not eligible. GLC is not responsible for any typographical errors or misprints on any mail pieces or advertisements. GLC management reserves all rights. Please visit our website for complete details on our privacy policy. Gambling Problem? Call 800.522.4700. ©2017 Grand Lodge Casino


Photo by Matt Bansak

Fuel Dock

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday Weather Permitting

Enjoy lakefront dining & shopping at the Tahoe City Marina.

ALPINE HOME Design · Lighting · Furnishing · Rugs · Accessories

Alpine Home Furnishings Dockside 700 Tahoe Yacht Club Tahoe Canvas Co. A & M Marine Tahoe Marine Supply Center for Spiritual Living Lake Tahoe Parasailing Tahoe Sailing Charters

FULL SERVICE DESIGN FIRM & MOUNTAIN HOME FURNITURE STORE. Call or visit our 3,800 sq. ft. showroom to schedule a home consult.

(530) 583-1039

TahoeCityMarina.com

Alpine Home Furnishings · Tahoe City Marina · 700 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA 96145 · 530.564.0971 · AlpineHomeFurnishings.com

THREE COMMERCIAL SPACES FOR LEASE at the Tahoe City Marina

1,196 square feet 3,178 square feet 3,500 square feet

Mael Passanesi

Triple Net Lease option

For more information contact

Jim at (530) 583-1039

Feb.9-22, 2017  

Dane Shannon blasts through winter during a moment of perfection on Tahoe's East Shore. Photography by Ryan Salm | RyanSalmPhotography.com @...

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