Page 1

FIND YOUR COPY INSIDE:

Building a home for

TAHOE SKI HISTORY Chillin’ at

An evening with

GROVER HOT SPRINGS

DAWES THE HEAVY PETS

Chasing their own dreams

IN THIS ISSUE

FUTURE OF TAHOE OLYMPICS We’ve Moved Downtown

Visit the new Patagonia Reno Outlet at

130 South Center St.


THE SOUL OF SKIING CELEBRATES HERE WINTER MUSIC SERIES Saturdays

JAN 7–APRIL 22 : KT Deck JAN 7–APRIL 2 : Events Plaza Stage JAN 7–MARCH 18 : Alpine Bar J A N 6–M A R C H 24, 2017

FRIDAY NIGHT TASTING NOTES & LIVE MUSIC JAN 14, 15; FEB 18, 19, 20, 2017

MOONLIT SNOWSHOE TOUR & DINNER FEBRUARY 18–25, 2017

KID-O-RAMA

Kid Friendly Activities

MARCH 9–12, 2017

2017 AUDI FIS SKI WORLD CUP MARCH 25–APRIL 23, 2017 Saturdays and Sundays

SPRING MUSIC SERIES MARCH 30–APRIL 2, 2017

WINTERWONDERGRASS Live Bluegrass Family Friendly Locally Sourced Food Craft Beer Wine & Spirits

*All events subject to change, check squawalpine.com to confirm dates and for the complete calendar.

S Q U A W A L P I N E .C O M

1-800-403-0206


TheTahoeWeekly.com

What’s Inside

Volume 36 | Issue 01 TM

| JANUARY 12-25

Features

08 Grover Hot Springs 17 Tahoe Local 18 Future of Tahoe Olympics 24 Sierra Stories 26 The Arts

P.O. Box 87 | Tahoe City, CA 96145 (530) 546-5995 | f (530) 546-8113 | TheTahoeWeekly.com

SUBMISSIONS Editoral | editor@tahoethisweek.com Entertainment | entertainment@tahoethisweek.com

Out

18

IN THE OFFICE Courtesy Auburn Ski Club

Edward Hicks

about

Photography | production@tahoethisweek.com

22 Courtesy Bill Briner

26 Local courtesy WINERAM

flavor

Adminstrative Manager Michelle Allen Contributing Writers John Dee, Barbara Keck, Bruce Ajari, Mark McLaughlin, Casey Glaubman, David “Smitty” Smith, Priya Hutner, Katrina Veit, Justin Broglio, Kayla Anderson, Lou Phillips, Sean McAlindin, Tim Hauserman, Alex Green

DEADLINES & INFO Jan. 26 Issue Editorial: 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17 Display Ad Space: Noon Thursday, Jan. 19 Display Ad Materials: 3 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19 Camera-Ready Ads: 3 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19

Light, fluffy powder that you could blow in the wind like a dandelion. Heavy, wet Sierra Cement that packs down the base on the mountains that will last for months (and that will break your back trying to shovel). And that wintery mix of rain and snow in the lower elevations that isn’t that much fun, until you remember that just a bit higher in elevation (aka as most Tahoe resorts) it’s all snow, snow and more snow.

35 35 36 37

Music SCENE

Tasty Tidbits WINERAM Chef’s Recipe Wine Column

Matt Jacoby

The Tahoe Basin has been pounded, and I do mean pounded, by successive winter storms that have brought every manner of winter weather in recent weeks.

30 Puzzles Horoscope Dawes Entertainment Calendar & Live Music 33 Memory Code 34 The Heavy Pets 28 29 30 30

Feet upon feet of white gold has fallen on the mountain bringing our winter wonderland to life, followed by bluebird days over a white horizon that seems to never end. Tahoe is truly a winter wonderland. Explore and enjoy. 

Art Director | Production Alyssa Ganong | production@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 106

Copy Editor Katrina Veit

THE

35

Account Executive Lynette Astors | lynette@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 108

Entertainment Editor Priya Hutner | priya@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 104

From the Publisher

WELCOME BACK, WINTER

Sales Manager Anne Artoux | anne@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 110

Graphic Designer Mael Passanesi | graphics@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 101

Lake Tahoe Facts Events Sightseeing Snowmobiling Cross-Country Skiing Downhill Skiing For the Kids Family Fun Powder Report Snow Trails Announcements

06 08 10 15 17 19 20 21 22 23 25

Publisher & Editor In Chief Katherine E. Hill | publisher@tahoethisweek.com, ext. 102

TAHOE WEEKLY is published weekly throughout the summer and biweekly the rest of the year, with occassional extra issues at holiday times by Range of Light Media Group, Inc. Look for new issues on Thursdays. Subscribe to the free digital edition at issuu.com/TheTahoeWeekly. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com. TAHOE WEEKLY, est. 1982, ©2007. Reproduction in whole or in part without publisher’s express permission is prohibited. Contributions welcome via e-mail. The Weekly is not responsible for unsolicited submissions. Member: North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, North Tahoe Business Association, Incline Community Business Association, Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce, Tahoe City Downtown Association, Truckee Downtown Merchants Association, Tahoe South Chamber of Commerce and Alpine County Chamber of Commerce. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based inks. Please recycle your copy.

ON THE COVER

… the mighty Sierra, miles in height, and so gloriously colored and so radiant, it seemed not clothed with light but wholly composed of it, like the wall of some celestial city... Then it seemed to me that the Sierra should be called, not the Nevada or Snowy Range, but the Range of Light.

– John Muir

Jeremy Jones slashes into 2017 on a splitboard in the Mount Rose area overlooking Lake Tahoe. “Early season is my favorite time to shoot because we can ride powder on south- and east-facing slopes with great light,” notes photographer Ming Poon. | MingPoonPhotography.com @ming.t.poon

Subscribe to the free, digital editions of Tahoe Weekly & Tahoe Powder TheTahoeWeekly.com | issuu.com | issuu app iTunes & GooglePlay | E-Newsletter

Find us at TheTahoeWeekly.com | Keep up-to-date at 4

Facebook.com/TheTahoeWeekly & post your photos on Instagram

@TheTahoeWeekly


January 12-25, 2017

KIDS $74

byop

6 & UNDER SKI FREE ADULT TICKET $79 HOLIDAYs

$40/day $50 Holidays

(bring your other pass Deal) Holidays: 1/14-15, 2/18-26

Upcoming Events:

Wednesdays: 55+ Ski Clinics

1/9-1/13: Learn to Ski & Ride Week 1/25 & 2/1: classic Warren Miller Films at the chateau (955 fairway blvd) 2/2-5: 8th annual ullr fest

DiamondPeak.com • (775) 832-1177 5


TheTahoeWeekly.com

N

TAHOE DONNER

Truckee Donner Lake

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Donner Summit BOREAL

TRUCKEE AIRPORT

Reno & Sparks MT. ROSE

WEST EAST SOUTH

RENO-TAHOE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SUGAR BOWL h Ta

AUBURN SKI CLUB

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Tahoe City

SQUAW CREEK

Marlette Lake

Sunnyside Tahoe Pines Eagle Rock

Volume: 39 trillion gallons

Lake

Spooner Lake

Tahoe

il

Ta h o e R i m

NV

Dollar Hill

GRANKLIBAKKEN

Carson City

Homewood HOMEWOOD

e Ri

Visit plugshare.com for details

m Tr a i l

Tahoma

SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

Meeks Bay

Lake Tahoe sits at an average elevation of between 6,223’ and 6,229.1’. The top 6.1’ of water is controlled by the dam in Tahoe City and holds up to 744,600 acre feet of water.

Size: 22 miles long, 12 miles wide

CA

Age of Lake Tahoe: 2 million years

There is enough water in Lake Tahoe to supply everyone in the United States with more than 75 gallons of water per day for 5 years.

Natural rim: 6,223’

Glenbrook o Ta h

ELECTRIC CHARGING STATIONS

Lake Tahoe is the second deepest lake in the U.S. (Crater Lake in Oregon, at 1,932 feet, is the deepest), and the 11th deepest in the world.

DEEPEST POINT

ALPINE MEADOWS

a Tr

Maximum depth: 1,645 feet

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

SQUAW VALLEY

Average depth: 1,000 feet

Crystal Bay

Kings Beach

Carnelian Bay

Olympic Valley

CASINOS

DIAMOND PEAK

Incline Village

Tahoe Vista

CLAIR TAPPAAN

CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AREAS

oe

NORTHSTAR

Truckee River

ROYAL GORGE

DOWNHILL SKI AREAS

ra Rim T

il

DONNER SKI RANCH SODA SPRINGS

Cave Rock

Lake Tahoe is as long as the English Channel is wide.

Watershed Area: 312 square miles Zephyr Cove

Average Water Temperature: 42.1˚F Emerald Bay

Average Surface Water Temperature: 51.9˚F

Cascade Lake

Average Surface Temperature in July: 64.9˚F

Fannette Island

Shoreline: 72 miles

South Lake Tahoe

Stateline HEAVENLY

CAMP RICHARDSON

Lake Tahoe has a surface area of 191 square miles. If Lake Tahoe were emptied, it would submerge California under 15 inches of water.

Highest Peak: Freel Peak at 10,881 feet Ta h oe

Average Snowfall: 409 inches

R i m Tr ail

Fallen Leaf Lake

Meyers

LAKE TAHOE AIRPORT

FREEL PEAK

Permanent Population: 66,000 Number of Visitors: 3 million annually HOPE VALLEY

Kirkwood

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE

Markleeville

KIRKWOOD

LAKE TAHOE

How the lake was formed

About 3 to 5 million years ago, the valley that would become the Tahoe Basin sank between parallel fractures in the Earth’s crust as the mountains on either side continued to rise. A shallow lake began to form in the resulting valley. Roughly 2 to 3 million years ago, erupting volcanoes blocked the outlet, forcing the lake to rise hundreds of feet above its current elevation, and eventually eroded down to near its current outlet. Between 1 million and 20,000 years ago, large masses of glacial ice covered the west side of the Tahoe Basin. Current geologic theory suggests an earthen berm (moraine) left by a receding glacier near Olympic Valley acted as a dam, causing the lake level to rise and then draw down rapidly when the dam catastrophically failed. Between

7,000 and 15,000 years ago, a four-mile segment of the West Shore collapsed into the Lake causing a massive submerged debris avalanche, widening the Lake by three miles and creating McKinney Bay.1 The Tahoe Basin is mostly granite, with little topsoil, and therefore few nutrients have washed into the lake to promote the growth of algae and other organisms that make water murky. As well, 40 percent of the precipitation falling into the Tahoe Basin lands directly on the lake. The remaining precipitation drains through the decomposed granite soil found in marshes and meadows, creating a good filtering system for water. Urbanization of the Tahoe Basin has eliminated 75 percent of its marshes, 50 percent of its meadows and 35 percent of its steam zone habitats. About 85 percent of all wildlife in the Tahoe Basin use these habitats.

About the lake Lake Tahoe is located in the states of California and Nevada, with two-thirds in California. It is fed by 63 streams and two hot springs. The Truckee River is Tahoe’s only outlet and flows from the dam in Tahoe City east through Reno and eventually drains into Pyramid Lake in the Nevada desert. However, water releases are not permitted when the lake surface level falls below the natural rim at 6,223.’ The lowest lake level on record (measured since 1900) was 6,220.26’ on Nov. 30, 1992. The Lake of the Sky appears blue in color as other colors in the light spectrum are absorbed and blue light is scattered back.

Lake clarity The University of California, Davis, operates the Tahoe Environmental Resarch Center, which monitors, among other

things, the clarity of Lake Tahoe. Clarity has been measured since 1968 and was first recorded at 102.4’. The waters of Lake Tahoe were clear to an average depth of 73.1’ in 2015. The lowest average depth on record was 64.1’ in 1997. Lake Tahoe is losing clarity because of algae growth fueled by nitrogen and phosphorus.

Lake Tahoe’s discovery The first recorded discovery of Lake Tahoe by white explorers was on Feb. 14, 1844, when John Charles Frémont and Charles Preuss spotted the lake from atop Red Lake Peak. The lake went through several names before it was officially named Tahoe in 1945. Tahoe is a mispronunciation of the first two syllables of the Washoe’s word for the lake – Da ow a ga, which means “edge of the lake.” 

Learn more: Visit the Tahoe Science Center in Incline Village or tahoesciencecenter.org. Sources: Tahoe Environmental Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, “Tahoe Place Names” and David Antonucci (denoted by 1).

6


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OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Out

&ABOUT

OUTDOORS & RECREATION, EVENTS & MORE

C H I L L I N ’ AT

Grover Hot Springs

EVENTS CALENDAR JANUARY 12-25, 2017

STORY & PHOTOS BY BY LISA MICHELLE

W

hether you’ve spent a bit too much time on the slopes or just need a day to unwind, Grover Hot Springs is the perfect place to rejuvenate. The 533-acre state park is situated in an alpine meadow of snowmen and sagebrush flanked by snowy Sierra peaks that stretch to more than 10,000 feet. Enough spectacular scenery here to trigger an avalanche of envious social media posts and make the 30-mile drive from South Lake Tahoe well worth the time. Tendrils of steam rise and twist as I sink into the amber-colored water. The mineral pool is fed from six hot springs, and then cooled in a holding tank to an average temperature of 103 degrees. The groundwater heats when it seeps deep into the earth and makes contact with hot magma and rock. The hot water then rises through fractures, collecting minerals as it percolates to a hot spring.

EVERY TUESDAY

Dashing through the snow Incline Village

Snowshoe hikes and lunch for ages 55 and older are on Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. until March 28. Trekkers of all abilities are welcome to join moderate level snowshoe hikes at various locations throughout Tahoe. Enjoy a lunch in the dining hall on the Sierra Nevada College campus. Includes guides, transportation and lunch. $18 without IVGID pass, $15 w/IVGID pass. | yourtahoeplace.com

Preschoolers wanted Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers Preschool Story Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays. Each week is themed. | (530) 546-2012

Toddler Time Truckee

The sun peaks over the eastern Sierra and lights the icy falls. A photographer’s fantasy or a picturesque place to relax with a Thermos of hot cocoa before rewarding yourself with a good soak in the mineral pool. The list of minerals in Grover Hot Springs is as long as Nana’s secret minestrone soup recipe. Sodium, calcium, bicarbonate, silica and sulfate are a few of the main ingredients, but fluoride, potassium, iron and magnesium are just as essential as they soak through the skin. While bathing, hydrostatic pressure rises, causing circulation and oxygen flow to increase. The benefits from an oxygenated circulatory system help to reduce stress and promote sleep. “After a good soak, I feel better inside and out,” says 83-year-old Yure Stankovich, after immersing himself and his knitted beanie. “I sleep like baby with no problems the next day. Humans have used mineral baths as far back as the Bronze Age. People with chronic muscle pain, fibromyalgia and arthritis can benefit from a good Grover soak. The medicinal properties of the waters sulfur content can help to relieve the discomfort of eczema and psoriasis, as well. Grover Hot Springs was established in 1959 and named for Alvin Grover, whose Alpine County homestead included the springs. Today, the park offers much more than a soothing soak. Winter activities include camping, miles of snowshoeing or cross-country skiing, wildlife viewing, swimming in a heated pool (not the mineral pool), geocaching and sledding. Acres of sagebrush-scented meadow allow visitors to ditch the crowds and enjoy a secluded picnic or construct the snowman, or woman, of their dreams. 8

The mineral pool is fed from six hot springs, and then cooled in a holding tank to an average temperature of 103 degrees.

cache of pine seeds buried last summer. The trail and creek meander through Hot Springs Valley and slowly gain elevation. You should reach the partially frozen falls within an hour. At noon, the sun peaks over the eastern Sierra and lights the icy falls. A photographer’s fantasy or a picturesque place to relax with a Thermos of hot cocoa before rewarding yourself with a good soak in the mineral pool.

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO • Bring plenty of food and water. The restaurants are closed for the winter, but the General Store is open.

• Trail maps are available at the Visitor Center.

FROZEN WONDERS AT GROVER FALLS I chose the Grover Falls hike, a 3 miler that starts at the parking lot just past the pools. The trail is usually compacted snow, depending on conditions, and snowshoes are often not necessary. Snow boots or good waterproof hiking boots with an ice traction device, such as YakTrax or Icetrekkers, is highly recommended. This is an easy to moderate hike that can be done with children. Across the meadow, a bridge spans a creek that winds through snowdrifts and granite. Follow the second sign into an open forest of pine and incense cedars. Beware of the Clark’s Nutcracker. These tough little birds flutter from tree to tree; sounding a threatening shrill, similar to frog’s croak, to guard the

Like gliding on snow Tahoe City

Take free intermediate skate ski lessons and free introductory cross-country lessons every Thursday until February at Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area. Intermediate lessons are at 9:15 a.m. Introductory lessons are at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Trail passes and rentals separate. | tahoexc.org

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Like gliding on snow Tahoe City

Free introductory skate skiing lessons every Wednesday until February at Tahoe Cross Country Center. At 9:15 a.m. Trail passes and rentals separate. | tahoexc.org

Babes in Bookland Truckee

• Most cell phones won’t work.

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 6 months to 2 years. | (530) 582-7846

• Roads are plowed, but stay icy long after a storm.

Read with the family Incline Village

• There is a water fountain, changing room, restroom and shower, which can become crowded.

Just heavenly South Lake Tahoe

• Dogs must be leashed at all times. The 3-mile trail to Grover Falls meanders through Hot Springs Valley and takes about an hour to reach.

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. for ages 18 months to 3 years. | (530) 582-7846

• Pools can be crowded and are limited to 50. Long lines can form and wait times can be disappointing, especially on holidays and weekends.

• Hot Springs are closed on Wednesdays.

• Pools are drained and cleaned every night. Bromine is used as a disinfectant and reacts with some of the minerals, causing the water to become discolored. • Pool fees are $10 for adults and $5 for children younger than 16. Day use fee is $8 per vehicle if not using the Hot Springs. 

Call ahead to confirm operating schedule at (530) 694-2249 or visit parks.ca.gov.

Incline Village Library hosts Family Story Time from 4 to 4:45 p.m. Feature stories, finger plays, and wiggle action as part of the experience to encourage a love of books. | (775) 832-4130

Wine Wednesdays at The Loft in Heavenly is from 4 to 7. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass. Free corkage with any entrée. Free guest speaker and/or tasting notes from featured winery. | (530) 523-8024

CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIGHTSEEING

ATTRACTIONS Cave Rock

East Shore

Courtesy Donner Summit Historical Society

Truckee

Donner Summit, just west of Truckee, holds the record for the United States’ snowiest April. On April 1, 1880, a storm dumped 4’ of snow on the Sierra Nevada west slope within 24 hours. A massive snow slide near Emigrant Gap buried Central Pacific Railroad’s tracks under 75’ of snow, ice and rock. For the rest of the month, storm cycles continued to flow in, dropping a total of 298”.

Eagle Rock

West Shore

Eagle Rock, one of the lake’s famous natural sites, is a volcanic plug beside Highway 89 on the West Shore. TART

Explore Tahoe

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 542-2908 | cityofslt.us Urban Trailhead at base of Heavenly Gondola with local exhibits and programs. BlueGo

Fannette Island

Emerald Bay

(530) 541-3030 | parks.ca.gov Lake Tahoe’s only island is located in Emerald Bay & is home to an old tea house. Boat access only. (Closed Feb. 1-June 15 for nesting birds.)

South Lake Tahoe

(775) 586-7000 | skiheavenly.com Enjoy a 2.4-mile ride on the gondola to the top with panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and the Carson Valley. BlueGo

Drive through one of the area’s natural wonders - Cave Rock, the neck of an old volcano. The area is named for the small caves above Highway 50 that were cut by waves when Lake Tahoe was 200 feet higher during the ice ages.

Donner Summit

Heavenly

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

Heavenly BASE DEPTH:

High Camp

Olympic Valley

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Aerial tram rides with views of Lake Tahoe, Olympic Heritage Museum, ice skating, events and more. Ticket required. TART

Kings Beach

North Shore

northtahoebusiness.org Kings Beach is a popular spot for dining and shopping with the North Shore’s largest sandy beach located in the heart of town. Free parking at North Tahoe Beach, Brook Street, Minnow and the Christmas Tree lot on Hwy. 28. TART

North Tahoe Arts Center

Tahoe City

Wed.-Mon. | Free (530) 581-2787 | northtahoearts.com Featuring exhibits of work by local artists and works for sale by local artists. TART

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 544-2313 | talart.org Featuring local artists and workshops. Second location at Ski Run Center. BlueGo

Squaw Valley

53”-148”

Reports taken on Friday, January 6, 2017

Mt. Rose Ski Area BASE DEPTH:

BASE DEPTH:

93”

53”-95”

West Shore

$10 parking (530) 525-7232 Park | (530) 583-9911 Tours Home to the historic Ehrman Mansion (open for tours in the summer), see boathouses with historic boats, and General Phipps Cabin built in the late 1800s. TART

Tahoe Art League Gallery

REGIONAL SNOW LEVELS

Kirkwood Mountain Resort BASE DEPTH:

LAKE TAHOE

visittahoecity.com Tahoe City is popular for shopping and dining with historical sites. At the junction of highways 89 & 28, visitors may see the Tahoe City Dam, Lake Tahoe’s only outlet, and Fanny Bridge. Peer into Watson Cabin (1909) in the center of town for a glimpse at pioneer life. Free parking at Commons Beach, Grove Street, Jackpine Street, and the 64 acres at Highways 89 & 28. TART South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5227 | tahoeheritage.org Once known as the “Grandest Resort in the World” as the summer retreat for three San Francisco elite families with the Baldwin Estate, Pope Estate & Valhalla. Grounds open yearround. BlueGo

Taylor Creek Visitor Center

87”

Elevation: 6,223.67 | Elevation in 2016: 6,221.58

North Shore

Tallac Historic Site

BASE DEPTH:

84”

Natural rim 6,223’

Tahoe City

Sugar Bowl

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 543-2674 | fs.usda.gov Features Stream Profile Chamber to view slice of Taylor Creek, nature trails & more. BlueGo

Truckee truckeehistory.org | truckee.com The historic town of Truckee was settled in 1863, and grew quickly as a stagecoach stop and route for the Central Pacific Railroad. During these early days, many of Truckee’s historical homes and buildings were built in-cluding The Truckee Hotel (1868) and the Capitol Building (1868). Stop by the Depot for a walking tour of historic downtown. Paid parking downtown with free lot on Donner Pass Road next to Beacon. TART

Vikingsholm Castle

Emerald Bay

Parking fee (530) 541-3030 | (530) 525-9529 ADA parks.ca.gov or vikingsholm.com Tour the grounds of Vikingsholm Castle, see Eagle Falls and Fannette Island (the Lake’s only island), home to an old Tea House, and explore snowshoeing trails. TART

Watson Cabin

Tahoe City

Opens late June (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Watson Cabin, built by Robert Watson and his son in 1909, is the oldest building in Tahoe City and on the National Register of Historic Places. TART

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January 12-25, 2017

MUSEUMS Donner Memorial Visitor Center

The Tahoe Basin has been blessed with feet upon feet of fresh powder from the mountain peaks to the shores of Lake Tahoe. Pictured here is Tahoe City’s shoreline. | Mael Passanesi

Truckee

Incline Village & Crystal Bay Historical Society Incline Village

Tahoe Maritime Museum

Daily | Free | tahoehistory.org Features local history exhibit focusing on 1870-1970, along with “Bonanza” exhibit. Inside Starbucks building. TART

(530) 583-9283 | tahoemaritimemuseum.org Featuring guided tours, exhibits and handson activities for kids on Tahoe’s maritime history. TART

Lake Tahoe Museum

Tahoe Science Center

South Lake Tahoe

(530) 541-5458 | laketahoemuseum.org Features Washoe artifacts and exhibits on early industry, settlers, and archival films of Tahoe. BlueGo

Donner Summit Historical Society

Soda Springs

donnersummithistoricalsociety.org Museum at the corner of Old Highway 40 & Soda Springs Road. Take the 20-mile interpretive driving tour along Old 40. Maps online or at museum. TART

Gatekeeper’s Museum

Tahoe City

Daily (530) 583-1762 | northtahoemuseums.org Featuring historic photos, the Steinbach Indian Basket Museum and local historical memorabilia. TART

KidZone Children’s Museum

Truckee

Tues.-Sun. | Locals’ first Tues. half price (530) 587-5437 | kidzonemuseum.org For kids up to age 7 with interactive exhibits, science & art classes, the BabyZone for newborns to 18 months & the Jungle Gym for toddlers and older. TART

Incline Village

Western SkiSport Museum

Donner Summit

Fri.-Sun. | Free (530) 426-3313, ext. 113 | auburnskiclub.org Showcasing the history of skiing, exhibits include snowshoes from the 1850s, ski equipment from the 20th Century and a pair of 8-footlong skis used by John “Snowshoe” Thompson, a legendary mail carrier. Located at Boreal off I-80. TART

VISITORS’ CENTERS

Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Olympic Winter Games Tahoe City Daily | Free Features official 1960 Winter Olympic items such as skis, promotional literature, collection of official Olympic photographer Bill Briner. Learn the history of skiing in the Sierra. Inside Boatworks Mall. TART

Kings Beach Kings Beach State Rec. Area, (Thurs.-Mon., summer)

Incline Village 969 Tahoe Blvd., (800) 468-2463

Old Jail Museum

Truckee

(530) 582-0893 | truckeehistory.org One of a few surviving 19th Century jailhouses of its kind in the West used from 1875 until May 1964 (open for tours in the summer). TART

Olympic Museum

Olympic Valley

South Lake Tahoe 3066 Lake Tahoe Blvd., (530) 541-5255

Tues.-Fri. & by appt. | Free (775) 881-7566 | tahoesciencecenter.org University of California, Davis, science education center at Sierra Nevada College. Exhibits include a virtual research boat, biology lab, 3D movies and docent-led tours. Ages 8+. TART

Stateline 169 Hwy. 50, (775) 588-4591

Tahoe City 100 North Lake Blvd., (530) 581-6900

Truckee 10065 Donner Pass Road (Depot), (530) 587-8808

U.S. Forest Service | Incline Village 855 Alder Ave., (775) 831-0914 (Wed.-Fri.)

Truckee Railroad Museum Squaw Valley

(530) 582-7892 | parks.ca.gov The Donner Memorial State Park features exhibits and artifacts on the Donner Party (184647) at the visitor center, and see the towering Pioneer Monument. TART

Tahoe City

(800) 403-0206 | squawalpine.com Squaw Valley, host of the VIII Winter Olympic Games in 1960, celebrates its Olympic History with the symbolic Tower of Nations and Olympic Flame at the entrance to the valley. The Olympic Museum at High Camp features historic memorabilia and photographs. Tram ticket required. TART

U.S. Forest Service | South Lake Tahoe Truckee

Sat.-Sun. & holidays truckeedonnerrailroadsociety.com Located in a caboose next to the Truckee Depot. Exhibits include the train’s role in logging, fighting snow on the railway, the role of Chinese emigrants and a children’s area. TART

35 College Dr., (530) 543-2600

U.S. Forest Service | Tahoe City 3080 N. Lake Blvd., (530) 583-3593 (Fridays)

U.S. Forest Service | Truckee 10811 Stockrest Springs Road, (530) 587-3558

TRANSIT: NORTH LAKE TAHOE & TRUCKEE | laketahoetransit.com SOUTH LAKE TAHOE | bluego.org

11


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Events

MORE

Help with computers Kings Beach

Kings Beach Library offers ongoing computer help from 3 to 4 p.m. First Thursdays of the month are “Beginners Basic Instruction,” second Thursdays are “Computers Questions with Carl LeBlanc,” third Thursdays are “Everything iPhone” and fourth Thursdays are differing themes about technology. | (530) 546-2021

EVERY FRIDAY

Sample and taste Olympic Valley

Friday Night Tasting Notes at Plaza Bar at Squaw Valley from 3:30 to 5 p.m. until March 24. Taste craft beers or specialty spirits from popular breweries, wineries and distilleries. Stick around from 5 to 7 p.m. for drink specials and live music. | squawapine.com

Watching as a family Tahoe Donner

E N J OY C L A S S I C

Warren Miller filming at Diamond Peak (then Ski Incline) circa 1969. | Courtesy Diamond Peak

WARREN MILLER FILMS

Diamond Peak is hosting a free Retro Ski Film + Speaker Series featuring classic Warren Miller films at The Chateau at Incline Village, Nev., as part of its ongoing 50th anniversary celebrations this season. The Retro Ski Film + Speaker Series will include brief historical presentations by noted local historians, filmmakers and former Ski Incline employees, followed by screenings of classic ski and snowboard films including five Warren Miller films from the 1960s through 2006, as well as “Daydreams” from Tahoe legend Craig Beck. The series features Warren Miller’s “Snowriders” (1996) on Jan. 25, followed by Warren Miller’s “Off the Grid” (2006) on Feb. 1, and Craig Beck’s “Daydreams” with Beck discussing the early days of ski filmmaking in Tahoe on Feb. 15. Attendees are encouraged to come dressed in period costumes corresponding to the decade of the featured ski film for each of the movie nights. Diamond Peak will have prizes for those who best represent the decade with the 1990s on Jan. 25 and the 2000s on Feb. 1. For the final event on Feb. 15, come dressed in The Ultimate Tahoe Ski Bum Outfit. The series will begin at 5 p.m. with a brief presentation having to do with the history of skiing in Tahoe, the history of Incline Village or other related topics followed by a retro-themed costume contest. Retro ski films will start at 5:30 p.m. and run for 60 to 90 minutes. The Retro Ski Film + Speaker Series is a free, family-friendly event series. The Chateau will offer a no-host bar and light snacks available for purchase at each event. | diamondpeak.com

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

EVERY THURSDAY

Discuss what’s happening Incline Village

The Conversation Café is a drop-in conversation forum hosted by the Senior Programs staff at Aspen Grove Community Center from 10 to 11:15 a.m. every week except holidays. Participate with people sharing diverse views and a passion for engaging with others over topics and news. $2 donation includes continental breakfast. | (775) 832-1310

Story Time Tahoe City

Tahoe City Library hosts Pre-Schooler Story Time for ages 5 and younger every Thursday from 10:30 to 11 a.m. | (530) 583-3382

12

Toddler Story Time Incline Village

Incline Village Library hosts story time every Thursday from 11:15 to 11:45 a.m. with stories, puppets, music and movement for ages 6 months to 3 years. | (775) 832-4130

Enjoy a free family movie every Friday at Northwoods Clubhouse at 6:30 p.m. with G and PG movies. | (530) 582-9669

EVERY SATURDAY

Crack of dawn Olympic Valley

Dawn Patrol gives skiers access to untouched corduroy or fresh powder on coveted intermediate/advanced terrain at Squaw Valley. Meet at Aerial Tram before 7:40 a.m. Ski from 8 to 9 a.m. before public. Space is limited. | RSVP (800) 403-0206.

Like gliding on snow Tahoe City

Free introductory skate skiing lessons every Wednesday until February at Tahoe Cross Country Center. At 9:15 a.m. Trail passes and rentals separate. | tahoexc.org

Learn about mountain ops Northstar

The Mountain Safety Team is offering guided mountain tours every Saturday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in January at Northstar California during Safety Month. Participants join the Mountain Safety Tour Guide at the top of the Big Springs Gondola. Guests must be age 13 and older and ski at an intermediate or above level. | northstarcalifornia.com

Grooming Show & Tell Northstar

Grooming Show & Tell is every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Northstar in January. Grooming will have a Cat and a driver at the top of the Zephyr lift to show guests how it works and answer questions. | northstarcalifornia.com

Love a parade Northstar

The Ripperoo Parade around the ice rick at Northstar’s Village is every Saturday through April 4 at 4 p.m. Meet at the Kid’s Ski School entrance at 3:45 pm to participate. Noisemakers and toys will be provided. | northstarcalifornia.com

EVERY SUNDAY

Preschool story time Truckee

Truckee Library hosts Story Time every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. for ages 3 years and older. | (530) 582-7846

Wine voyages Olympic Valley

Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Café to learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Flights available from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. until Jan. 26 on Thursdays. | squawalpine.com

Like gliding on snow Tahoe City

Free introductory skate skiing lessons every Sunday until February at Tahoe Cross Country Center. At 9:15 a.m. Trail passes and rentals separate. | tahoexc.org

Learn about mountain ops Northstar

The Mountain Safety Team is offering guided mountain tours every Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in January at Northstar California during Safety Month. Participants join the Mountain Safety Tour Guide at the top of the Big Springs Gondola. Guests must be age 13 and older and ski at an intermediate or above level. | northstarcalifornia.com

Hearty, good snowshoe Kirkwood

Kirkwood Cross Country & Snowshoe Center offers Soup and Shoe every Sunday at noon. An easygoing snowshoe is followed by soup at the Kirkwood Inn. | kirkwood.com

JAN. 12 | THURSDAY Dogs love books Incline Village

Incline Village Library offers Paws To Read from 4 to 5 p.m. Children can practice reading to friendly therapy dogs and receive a free book. All ages welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Moonlit trek Tahoe Vista

Tahoe Adventure Company offers a Full Wolf Moon trek on snowshoes from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. No experience necessary. Fee includes equipment, guides, hot drinks, trail snacks and permits. | tahoeadventurecompany.com

Charity Mixer South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Chamber hosts a Charity Mixer from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Riva Grill to benefit Bread & Broth food bank. Enjoy a raffle, appetizers, drinks and photo booth. Donations accepted. $30 minimum, $20 members. Includes drink and raffle ticket. | Tickets tahoechamber.org

Before you count on it South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Institute for Natural Science hosts a Learn About the Count dinner the night before the Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Count. At Lake Tahoe Pizza Co. from 6 to 8 p.m. Seating is limited. Cost $15. | RSVP tinsweb.org

Winter wines featured Truckee

Ritz-Carlton offers a memorable dining adventure, Winter Vintner Dinner Series, a delectable four-course meal featuring different Northern California wineries and fresh, local ingredients. The series is offered at 6:30 p.m. $125 per person. | RSVP (800) 241-3333

JAN. 13 | FRIDAY You count on it South Lake Tahoe

Tahoe Institute for Natural Science hosts the 36th annual Mid-Winter Bald Eagle Count from 9 a.m. | tinsweb.org

JAN. 13-14 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY Winemaker’s events Area venues

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Farmers Jane/Onward from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Truckee on Friday and Uncorked Tahoe City on Saturday. A winemaker’s tasting event from Easton Terre Rouge will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Uncorked Squaw on Friday and Petra on Saturday. | teloswine.com


January 12-25, 2017

JAN. 13-15 | FRIDAY-SUNDAY How Ski Patrol works Northstar

Join the Trail Closure with the Ski Patrol at Northstar. Guests can see what happens after the lifts stop turning by joining Northstar’s Ski Patrol for a day and learn how they keep all guests safe while closing the mountain. Interested guests can meet at the Summit Patrol Office, top of Comstock Express at 3:15 p.m. to help close the backside trails or at 3:45 p.m. to help close the front side trails. Register kcoe@vailresorts.com | northstarcalifornia.com

JAN. 14 | SATURDAY Big Meadows snowshoe South Lake Tahoe

The Tahoe Rim Trail Association and Sugar Pine Foundation are hosting a snowshoe trek to Big Meadow as part of Winter Trails Day, to offer children and adults new to snow sports the chance to try snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. This is a 3-mile, easy-to-moderate snowshoe. | Register tahoerimtrail.org

Free, guided snowshoeSouth Lake Tahoe

Join a free guided hike at Van Sickle Bi-state Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants will learn about Lake Tahoe’s pristine environment while snowshoeing as part of National Winter Trails Day. | Register (530) 542-6059

How far Tahoe Donner

Snowball Launching Contest is at Tahoe Donner Snowplay at 1:30 p.m. Use one of Snowplay’s snowball launchers to see how far the snowballs will fly. | tahoedonner.com

Kids Night Out Tahoe City

Drop off the little ones, ages 5 and older, at Rideout Community Center from 4 to 10 p.m. every second Saturday of the month. Kids can enjoy a dinner, crafts, movies and games. Preregistration is required. $15 per child. | (530) 583-3440

Snowshoe under the stars Northstar

Tahoe Star Tours will host an evening under the stars pairing stargazing with a snowshoe tour led by local astronomer, Tony Berendsen. Guests of all ages will enjoy an easy to moderate snowshoe walk followed  a view of constellations through high-powered telescopes. Tours are approximately 2 to 2.5 hours. Meet at 5 p.m. at Northstar’s Cross-Country Ski, Telemark & Snowshoe Center. | tahoestartours.com

Inspired by the Alps Alpine Meadows

Alpine Meadows offers a Moonlit Snowshoe Tour and Dinner. Seating times are 5:30, 6:20 and 7:30 p.m. Arrive at Base Lodge 15 minutes before your seating time. Distance ¼-mile. Alps-inspired menu. $35, child; $74, adult. | RSVP squawalpine.com

Know Before You Go Truckee

Granite Chief hosts a free avalanche awareness program with Sierra Avalanche Center at 6 p.m. at the store with an intro to back-country knowledge and avalanche education. Good for novice and seasoned skiers and riders. Raffle. | granitechief.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Mediterranean Winter Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97 per person. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Full moon hike Tahoma

Sierra State Parks Foundation offers a full moon snowshoe hike from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Sugar Pine Point State Park. Hike through history under the stars with state parks guides. $30 adult, $15 ages 12 and younger. | sierraparks.org

JAN. 14-16 | SATURDAY-MONDAY Ski for less Tahoe venues

Skiing For Schools is at participating resorts: Homewood, Tahoe Donner Downhill and Cross Country and Tahoe Cross Country. Lift tickets are offered at discount prices and proceeds go to Excellence in Education to help local schools. | exined.org

OUT & ABOUT

JAN. 15 | SUNDAY Be the first Homewood

Homewood Mountain Ski Resort offers First Tracks Breakfasts in North Lodge from 7 to 7:45 a.m., followed by an early load of Madden Chair and the opportunity to ski early morning laps off Old Homewood Express. | RSVP skihomewood.com

Ski with the best Tahoe City

Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area offers a Skate Ski Clinic with Olympian Marcus Nash from 9 to 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Nash, a nine-time National champion in cross-country went to the 1994 and 1998 Olympics. His emphasis will be on technical development, strength training and increasing endurance. Space is limited. $40, not including trail pass or rentals. | (530) 583-5475

A family affair Northstar

Explore the great outdoors in a fun, unintimidating family-friendly atmosphere on snowshoes. The three-hour tours are open to all ages and ability levels. A guide will lead the group, includes hot chocolate, cookies and snow play. Starts at 1 p.m. | RSVP northstarcalifornia.com

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

january is learn to ski month at tahoe donner! Now is the perfect time to learn to ski! January is National Learn to Ski Month, and Tahoe Donner is celebrating by offering learn to ski packages at a great value. Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Area: First-timers can take advantage of two-for-one private lessons and private lesson packages any midweek, non-holiday day through January 31. We even have deals just for seniors. Call 530-587-9484. Tahoe Donner Downhill Ski Area: Learn to Ski or Ride packages will be offered at just $39 for first timers Jan. 9–13 and Jan. 17–20. The package includes an all-day lift ticket, rental equipment, and a 1.75 hour group lesson for anyone ages 7 and up. See tahoedonner.com/shop to sign up!

Saturday Night Live... Maine Lobster It’s January, and that means it’s time for lobster at The Lodge Restaurant & Pub in Tahoe Donner. Every Saturday night in January, we will offer a variety of Live Maine Lobster specials.. These specials will have limited availability each week while supplies last. Come early, come hungry!

TA H O E D O N N E R .C O M | 5 3 0 - 5 8 7- 9 4 0 0 13


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Naturally Safe Sleep!

More Events JAN. 15 | SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

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Alpine Meadows offers a Moonlit Snowshoe Tour and Dinner. Seating times are 5:30, 6:20 and 7:30 p.m. Arrive at Base Lodge 15 minutes before your seating time. Distance ¼-mile. Alps-inspired menu. $35, child; $74, adult. | RSVP squawalpine.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Mediterranean Winter Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

JAN. 17 | TUESDAY Guided wine tasting Kings Beach

Wine Tahoe offers free guided wine tasting and wine education at North Tahoe Event Center from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Featuring wines from Napa, Sonoma and Burgundy. Wines available for purchase. Limit 18 people. | RSVP (925) 683-15230 or winetahoe.com

JAN. 18 | WEDNESDAY Earn your wings Truckee

All are invited to attend a free FAA Safety Team speaker event at Truckee Tahoe Airport from 6 to 8 p.m. in the main terminal, Board Room A. Larry D. Cheek from the Reno FAA office will discuss aeronautical design decision making, wake turbulence and winter flying. WINGS Pilot Proficiency Program credits will be given to licensed pilot attendees. Limited space. | trucketahoeairport.com

JAN. 19 | THURSDAY About the river Truckee

Truckee River Watershed Council hosts River Talk, a one-hour virtual tour of the projects throughout the watershed. It is a chance for guests to learn about the council’s work and offer comments and feedback. At 8 a.m. in the TRWC office. | RSVP (530) 550-8760

Ta, ta, ta tasting Truckee

Third Thursday Tasting at The Pour House is from 5 to 7 p.m. | thepourhousetruckee.com

In English and Spanish Incline Village

Incline Village Library offers Bilingual Story Time from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Features stories, finger plays and wiggle action as part of the experience to encourage a love of books. | (775) 832-4130

Natural ebb and flow Incline Village

Tahoe Environmental Research Center offers a lecture, The Tahoe Natural Year, by Will Richardson. The planet’s orbit causes shifting weather patterns, migrations of animals, the emergence and disappearance of plants and wildlife and other natural phenomena. Learn about these natural history topics and track the ebb and flow of the Sierra’s seasons. Nohost bar at 5:30 p.m.; public presentation at 6 p.m. | RSVP terc.ucdavis.edu

JAN. 20 | FRIDAY Share and write Incline Village

Lifescapes, a memoir-writing program for seniors, is from 2 to 4 p.m. at Incline Village Library. First and third Fridays of each month. All are welcome. | (775) 832-4130

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a South for the Winter Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

Inspiring conversation Truckee

Sierra College Insights at the Tahoe-Truckee campus features Justin Gifford, Ph.D., on “Black Lives Matter and the Black Panther Party.” The program is from 7 to 8:15 p.m., refreshments from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Dr. Gifford, an associate professor of English at UNR, specializes in American and African American literature and culture. Free. | RSVP sierracollege.ticketleap.com

JAN. 20-21 | FRIDAY-SATURDAY That bike is phat Northstar

Tahoe Fat Bike Summit & Festival hosted by Northstar starts with on Friday with demo bike phase runs from 10 a.m. to noon; the summit is at 1 p.m. Guest speaker Jay Petervary, eight-time Iditarod Trial racer and professional ultra-endurance cyclist will be there. The fat bike festival is on Saturday and starts with a race at 9 a.m. through cross-country trails, back to the Cross-Country, Telemark and Snowshoe Center for music, demos and fun. | northstarcalifornia.com

Winemaker’s events Area venues

Enjoy a winemaker’s tasting event featuring Venge from 5 to 7 p.m. at Uncorked Truckee on Friday and Uncorked Squaw on Saturday. | teloswine.com

JAN. 21 | SATURDAY Local guided hike Truckee

Local Carmen Carr will lead a hike on Lost Trail Lodge at 9 a.m. From the I-80 Donner Pass Road exit drive past the Chevron and 76 service stations and the Inn at Truckee for half a mile and park in the winter parking area. | (530) 550-5192

March on Truckee Meet at Bridge Street and Donner Pass Road at 9 a.m. to walk down Donner Pass Road to Safeway in support of the Million Women March in Washington, D.C. Feel free to carry signs but keep the signs respectful. All welcome. | March on Truckee on Facebook

Lake Tahoe Bi-State Women’s March Area Venues

Soroptimist International of South Lake Tahoe is hosting the Lake Tahoe Bi-State Women’s March from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Meeting in the parking lot behind Hard Rock. The march will continue down Highway 50 to Lakeview Commons. A program with community leaders and advocacy groups will follow. All welcome. | Women’s March on Washington Lake Tahoe on Facebook

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


January 12-25, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

Snowmobiling

ADVERTISEMENT

GUIDED TOURS EAGLE RIDGE SNOWMOBILE TOURS | Truckee / Sierraville (530) 546-8667 | SledTahoe.com

TRAIL AREAS MOUNT ROSE

TAHOE MEADOWS

Intermediate to advance On Mount Rose above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where snowmobilers can enjoy the back country. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends, so visit during the week. Snowmobiling is allowed on the north side of Highway 431 only from the staging area to service road 051. Follow this road northwest to the 1,000-acre riding area.

WEST SHORE

PROSSER LAKE/TRUCKEE AREA Easy to advanced

Take Highway 89 north of Truckee. Various launching sites are along the road at Prosser Lake, Hobart Mills, etc. A large Sno-Park is about 14 miles north of Interstate 80 at Little Truckee Summit. Groomed roads lead to hundreds of miles of back country. Access to Basset’s Station on Highway 49 for lunch and gas (30 miles), Mount Lola at 10,300 ft., Webber Lake trail system, ridges at Independence Lake and more. From Prosser, go east or west of Highway 89 to open areas.*

CISCO GROVE

RATTLESNAKE Easy to advanced

Steep canyon and side slopes at lower end of trail with 7 miles of groomed access. Upper elevations feature ridges and bowls. Route follows Rattlesnake Road to Magonigal Summit. Trailhead at Cisco Grove exit north off Interstate 80.*

HOPE VALLEY

BLACKWOOD CANYON

HOPE VALLEY

The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Snowmobilers should follow the road about 2.5 miles, then take a left across the bridge and continue up Barker Pass Road to large open areas, some steep bowls and many roads.*

Located at the junction of Highways 88 and 89 south of South Lake Tahoe. Sno-park on the south side of Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Much of Hope Valley is open to snowmobiling, but some areas are not; stay in designated areas. Ungroomed routes to Willow Creek (8.5 miles) and Tamarack Lake (1 mile) and groomed routes to Blue Lakes (11.5 miles) and Forestdale (3.5 miles). Stage from Hope Valley Sno-Park.*

Intermediate to advanced

Easy to moderate

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL Intermediate

A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road off Highway 89 south of Truckee. Turn onto Cabin Creek and look for the unmarked trailhead 1 mile from the highway. Enjoy gentle, rolling slopes. Parking is limited.

MARTIS PEAK

Intermediate to advanced Best access and limited parking about one-quarter mile north of Brockway Summit below the top of Highway 267 on the Truckee side. No groomed trails, but many old lumber roads exist. Take a good map, as it’s easy to become turned around.

LOST SIERRA

YUBA PASS

Easy to advanced The route north from Yuba Pass off Highway 49 is popular for snowmobilers, and shares the trail system with Nordic skiers for the first mile before branching off. Snowmobilers can head north on the trail and travel through Gold Lake Highway. Then, head south to Bassett’s or north to Gold Lake. This route offers a variety of terrain and beautiful views of the Sierra Buttes and the Lakes Basin. More than 100 miles of trails. Take Highway 89 north of Truckee, and then take Highway 49 to Yuba Pass. Trailhead parking is 6 miles east of Bassett’s Station.*

LITTLE TRUCKEE SUMMIT Easy to advanced

There are several marked routes with about 110 miles of groomed trails. Marked snowmobile trails follow roads to Webber Lake and Yuba Pass, Rim and Ridge Loops, Bald Ridge Loop and Treasure Mountain, Pass Creek Loop, Independence Lake Loop, Meadow Lake Loop and Jackson Meadow. Most trails are groomed. Trailhead at Jackson Meadow Road, about 14 miles north of Truckee on Highway 89.

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Snowmobiling. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

15


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Let the

Good Times Snow

at Granlibakken

Located just outside of Tahoe City.

Ski · Board · Sled & S’more

More Events JAN. 21 | SATURDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

March on Kings Beach There will be a March on Kings Beach in support of the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., from noon to 2 p.m. Meet in front of North Tahoe Event Center. March will proceed on the sidewalk along Highway 28 toward Coon before looping back along the beach. Feel free to carry signs but keep the signs respectful. All welcome. | March on Kings Beach on Facebook

Family-friendly snowshoe trek Incline Village, Nev.

Tahoe Institute for Natural Science offers Wonders of Winter Snowshoe Trek from 9:30 to noon. This scenic, 2-mile, roundtrip hike will wind through Tahoe Meadows and up Chickadee Ridge, into an open field, Lodgepole pine forests and scenic vistas of the lake. Along the way, naturalist, Sarah Hockensmith will discuss winter ecology concepts and the survival strategies and adaptations employed by animals from the Lake Tahoe Region. Ages 10+. | Register tinsweb.com

530-583-4242 | Granlibakken.com

2 for 1 Entrėes

Every Friday at Cedar House Pub Offering cozy fireside dining and featuring pub favorites. Excludes holiday periods.

All things back country Alpine Meadows

Join the 11th annual Lake Tahoe Backcountry Demo Event featuring alpine touring, telemarking and splitboarding. Free with lift ticket or pass. | alpenglowsports.com

How fast Tahoe Donner

Fastest Tube Event is at Tahoe Donner Snowplay from 1 to 2:30 p.m. | tahoedonner.com

Cats and dogs in snow Olympic Valley

ADVENTURE 365

Truckee’s New Outlet Sporting Goods Store

Check out one of Squaw Valley’s amazing cats (grooming machine) that maintain impeccable corduroy. Cat operators are available to show you the machines and allow you to sit in the driver seat. Dogs and dog handlers from the Squaw Valley Avalanche Rescue team will also be on hand. At the base of Funitel 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. | squawalpine.com

Spirited dinner party Truckee

Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a South for the Winter Pop Up Dinner. There is one tasting menu for the gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. $97. Seating is limited. | RSVP cedarhousesporthotel.com

JAN. 24 | TUESDAY Appreciate the favor Tahoe City

Tahoe City Downtown Association celebrates its members and volunteers at 5:30 p.m. Meet TCDA staff, board of directors and fellow business members for food, fun and drinks at The Blue Agave. Enjoy a drink and complimentary appetizers while mingling and chatting about Tahoe City’s bright future. | visittahoecity.org

JAN. 25 | WEDNESDAY Pizza fundraiser South Lake Tahoe

Animal Coalition of Tahoe presents Pizza for Pups dinner at Blue Dog Gourmet PizzaMidtown from 6 to 8 p.m. Proceeds will go to help families spay and neuter their pets. There will be a raffle as well. $10 adult, $5 child, age 12 and younger. | Tickets info@ tahoeanimals.org

Historic ski film Incline Village

Diamond Peak hosts historic ski films on select Wednesdays as part of its 50th Anniversary Celebration. Watch the classic ski/ snowboard film Warren Miller’s “Snowriders” and listen to local historians tell stories about the history of skiing and snowboarding in the Lake Tahoe region starting at 5 p.m. | diamondpeak.com

Promote local writers Truckee

Literary Arts & Wines is a monthly reading series every third Sunday at 5 p.m. to promote the work of emerging regional writers at Art Truckee. | literaryartsandwine.com

Whose night out? Tahoe Donner

WINTER BLOWOUT SALE Brand name gear at extremely discounted prices!

Skis · Snowboards · Jackets Pants · Gloves · Beanies · Bags Goggles · Socks · Helmets First Layers · Snow Boots (530) 414-4519 · 11025 Pioneer Trail #104 Near Full Belly Deli 16

On the first Friday of every month from 5 to 9 p.m., ages 4 to 9 year are to a night out of games, dinner, arts and crafts, movie and bedtime story at Northwoods Clubhouse. Parents may enjoy a night out while the trained staff is on hand. Space is limited. Pre-registration and payment is required at least one day in advance. $20 per child. | RSVP (530) 587-9437

Mountain know-how Truckee

Tahoe Mountain Sports presents Master the Mountain series of free in-store avalanche education at 6 p.m. Avalanche Airbag Debate will cover the difference between passive and active safety gear. Gear reps will prove why their airbags are the best. | tahoemountainsports.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Events.


ASC TRAINING CENTER

Trails 10

(530) 426-3313 | auburnskiclub.org

KM 25

Open 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Biathlon range, ski jumping hills.

Acres 500

BIJOU CROSS-COUNTRY (530) 542-6056

CAMP RICHARDSON (530) 542-6584 | camprichardson.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. Cross-country & snowshoe rentals. Guided ski tours.

CLAIR TAPPAAN LODGE

Groomed 25 KM

KM 4

TERRAIN

Intermediate 40%

Shuttle to Soda Springs, Donner Ski Ranch & Sugar Bowl. Overnight wilderness huts.

Groomed 14 KM

Advanced 0%

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Trails 5

Novice 67%

(530) 587-7892 | parks.ca.gov

KM 16+

Intermediate 20%

Winter nature trail. Trail guides in museum.

Groomed None

Advanced 13%

GRANLIBAKKEN SKI AREA

Trails 2

Novice 25%

KM 7.5

Intermediate 75%

Groomed None

Advanced 0%

HOPE VALLEY OUTDOORS (530) 694-2266 | hopevalleyoutdoors.com

Trails 60 miles

Snowshoe & cross-country lessons, rentals (cash or check only).

Groomed 20 miles

KIRKWOOD (209) 258-7248 | kirkwood.com 3 trail systems. Two dog-friendly trails.

LAKE TAHOE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (530) 541-4660 x717 ltccnordiccenter.weebly.com Groomed several times a week.

J

amie Orr is committed to community and to Tahoe, and was part of a project to open the Tahoe Mountain Lab, a large co-working office space and the first of its kind in South Lake Tahoe.

N/A

Novice 60%

Open Fri.-Sun. & holidays. Tubing area & warming hut open daily.

STORY BY LISA MICHELLE

Groomed 10 KM

KM 14

(800) 543-3221 | granlibakken.com

N/A

Trails 7

(530) 426-3632 | clairtappaanlodge.com

1

Advanced 30%

Trails 6+ KM 35

Trails 24 KM 80 Acres 4,200 Groomed 80 KM

1

N/A

The concept was simple: offer a comfortable place for business owners, freelancers and entrepreneurs in which to create and collaborate. Besides providing the option of leasing individual office space or conference rooms, Tahoe Mountain Lab (TML) would offer open-concept desks. This shared space allows members to work communally as opposed to alone in their home or private office. The memories Orr acquired as a child in Tahoe eventually persuaded her and husband, David Orr, to give their daughter a Tahoe childhood. “We were looking at a photo album of our daughter’s first year and most of the pictures were taken in Tahoe,” says Orr. That’s when the two agreed they needed to find a way to move to South Lake Tahoe — permanently.

Novice 20% Intermediate 60%

3

“ It’s important that I’m

Advanced 20%

not the only person

Trails 5 KM 5-7

Jamie Orr

Novice 20% Intermediate 50%

N/A

benefiting from the

Groomed 5-7 KM

work that I do.”

NEVADA NORDIC (775) 720-9355 | nevadanordic.org

Groomed 10 KM

N/A

At Spooner Lake State Park.

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA

Trails 18

(530) 542-3270 | northstarcalifornia.com

KM 35

Telemark, track, skating lessons daily. Nordic geocaching. Alpine ticket exchangeable for trail pass.

Acres 600

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

Groomed 35 KM

(530) 546-5043 | northtahoeparks.com

KM 11

Maps available at North Tahoe Event Center, Kings Beach. Sled hill, snow play area.

Groomed 11 KM

ROYAL GORGE

Trails 60

(530) 426-3871 | royalgorge.com

KM 200+

Open 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Day lodge & 3 cafés along trail. Offers snowbiking & snowkiting.

Acres 7,500

SQUAW CREEK CROSS COUNTRY

Trails 9

Groomed 200+ KM

(530) 583-6300, x6631 | squawcreek.com

KM 18

Open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Guided snowshoe tours. Dog sledding.

Acres 400

SUGAR PINE POINT (530) 525-7982 | parks.ca.gov

Groomed 18 KM

Novice 47% Intermediate 32%

2

Advanced 21%

Novice 45% Intermediate 50%

Advanced 5%

Novice 32% Intermediate 50%

9

2

N/A

N/A

Advanced 18%

Novice 60% Intermediate 25% Advanced 15%

Trails 5 KM 20

Winter camping (call for availability). Guided crosscountry and snowshoe tours offered Jan. to March.

Groomed 13.6 KM

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK

Trails 2

(530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

KM 4

Sledding & ice skating.

Groomed 4 KM

TAHOE CROSS COUNTRY

Trails 23

(530) 583-5475 | tahoexc.org

KM 65

Open 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free skate & cross-country lessons on select days.

Acres 3,000

TAHOE DONNER CROSS COUNTRY

Groomed 65 KM

Novice 20% Intermediate 50%

3

•*

5

Advanced 30%

Trails 58

Novice 27%

(530) 587-9484 | tahoedonner.com

KM 100+

Intermediate 44%

Open 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. 7 a.m. for passholders Mon.Fri. (non-storm days). *Weekends & holidays.

Acres 4,800

Advanced 25%

Groomed 100+ KM

Expert 4%

OUT & ABOUT

TA H O E L O C A L

GUIDED TOURS FAT TIRE BIKING TRAILS

TRAILS

DOGS OK

Cross-Country Skiing

CHILDREN’S SCHOOL WARMING HUTS SNOWSHOE TRAILS

January 12-25, 2017

In December 2013, the Orrs left Silicon Valley, their jobs and the security of steady paychecks with only the seed of an idea. Orr held the belief that if there is not an existing entrepreneurial ecosystem in place, then you need to create one. And that’s what she did. Along with her husband and Jesse Walker, an urban planning consultant, Orr opened the first Tahoe Mountain Lab on Ski Run Boulevard in South Lake Tahoe. These founders maintain that magical things can happen when you put people together in the right environment, that the power of collaboration can help improve a business. And improve business they did. With only four individual office spaces in the original building and about 1,000 square feet of co-working space, the Lab filled up fast. “We were quickly outgrowing it. By our one-year anniversary, we had already closed escrow on the Tribune Building and we moved into the renovated space by our second anniversary,” says Orr. In less than three years, Orr and her new partners’ hard work paid off. Currently, there is a waiting list to obtain an office in TML. The 11,000-square-foot space houses people busy generating everything from a skateboarding blog to a global corporation. It is the sense of community that members seem to find most beneficial. “There are people here with all different kinds of knowledge and expertise and they are so willing to collaborate. We’ve already used a translation and editing service,” says Carl Ribaudo, who runs his

marketing consulting firm, SMG, from his offices in TML. The success of the space inspired the folks at Vail Resorts to take notice. Along with TML, they developed a ski-in, ski-out co-working space at Heavenly Mountain Resort. The second Tahoe Mountain Lab is located in Heavenly’s Lakeview Lodge on the California side of the resort. Orr believes that co-working spaces are becoming the modern community center and that’s just fine with her. “It’s important that I’m not the only person benefiting from the work that I do,” says Orr, who is continually offering herself to her community. She recently donated her time and knowledge at a TED Talk on emergent behavior. She has taught at both Sierra Nevada College and Lake Tahoe Community College where she is also a board member. Elementary and middle school kids have benefitted from her 3-D printing workshops. The South Lake Tahoe Economic Development Task Force was led and facilitated by Orr. Big Brothers Big Sisters of El Dorado Country gained a presence in South Lake due to Orr and the donation of office space. Along with nine other women, Orr established the Tahoe Women’s Community Fund. In its first year, they awarded more than $22,000 in grants and now have more than 200 members. Orr doesn’t just believe in the benefits of a strong community and an allinclusive work ethic, she lives it. Her many accomplishments demonstrate her belief that one way to make Tahoe better and obtain a sense of community is to work hard at it. 

Do you know someone interesting in Tahoe? To nominate someone you’d like to see featured, e-mail editor@tahoethisweek.com.

17


FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

TAHOE’S WINTER OLYMPICS SKI MUSEUM TO CELEBRATE OLYMPIC, SKI HISTORY STORY BY TIM HAUSERMAN · PHOTO COURTESY BILL BRINER

T

18

ahoe’s Olympic legacy and ski history of the Sierra Nevada will find a home under one roof in the new 1960 Winter Olympics Ski Museum to open in 2020 at the entrance to Olympic Valley. The world-class facility will focus on the 1960 Winter Olympics, as well as the fascinating and ground-breaking ski history of the Sierra Nevada. But first the proposed site must be approved, the building and grounds need to be designed, and a whole lot of money needs to be raised to make it a reality. The Squaw Valley Ski Museum Foundation (SVSMF) and its new executive director, Sandy Chio, are working hard to make it happen. The Foundation is working now to seek approval to build the museum at the Squaw Valley Park located on the south side of Squaw Valley Road. The park currently includes ball fields, a playground, restrooms, pickleball courts and parking. The bike trail also passes through the park. “After extensive review of many sites in Olympic Valley and in North Lake Tahoe, the Squaw Valley Park location offers the greatest opportunity for a successful and sustainable Olympic legacy and ski culture museum. The top reasons include its visibility and convenient access from Highway 89 and an already established regional user base that complements the visitors the museum would likely draw,” said David Antonucci, SVSMF board president. The hope is that the museum will enhance the park and provide a year-round amenity for those visiting Olympic Valley. Over the next several months, the foundation will be going through the Placer County planning process, which will include public hearings. The Foundation needs funds to get the museum through the planning and design process and SVSMF is seeking individual donations, corporate sponsorships, and private and public sector grants. The project needs to raise $250,000 this winter to complete the environmental documentation and develop the groundwork for a more

extensive campaign to build the facility. The museum will have three main sections when completed, says Chio. The Olympic Legacy section will focus on the power and majesty of the 1960 Winter Olympics. “There are so many ways to bring the stories to life,” said Chio. The exhibit will include a variety of Olympic-era photos and souvenirs, including a collection that is on display at the Museum of Sierra Ski History & the 1960 Winter Games, currently headquartered in the Boatworks Mall in Tahoe City.

The world-class facility will focus on the 1960 Winter Olympics, as well as the fascinating and groundbreaking ski history of the Sierra Nevada. A Western Ski History section will focus on the ski heritage of the Sierra from the longboard races of the northern Sierra, to ski pioneers such as Snowshoe Thompson, who delivered mail across the Sierra. A major component of this section will be Auburn Ski Club’s extensive collection at the Western Ski Sport Museum at Boreal Mountain Resort, which will be transferred to the Olympic Valley venue once construction is complete. (See Sightseeing for details on the museums.) Finally, a Western Winter Sports Hall of Fame section will be a Northern California/Northern Nevada snow sports Hall of Fame. The Sierra has been home to a long list of ski-industry heroes and Olympic champions who will be recognized and honored.  For more information or to donate, visit olympicskimuseum.com.


FEATURE

January 12-25, 2017

ALPINE MEADOWS (530) 581-8374 | squawalpine.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tickets also good at Squaw Valley.

BOREAL MOUNTAIN RESORT (530) 426-3666 | rideboreal.com 9 a.m.-9 p.m. All tickets good until 9 p.m.

DIAMOND PEAK (775) 832-1177 | diamondpeak.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Last Tracks Feb.-April.

DONNER SKI RANCH (530) 426-3635 | donnerskiranch.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tubing hill.

GRANLIBAKKEN (530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com Fri.-Sun. & holidays only. Snow play area, open daily. Warming hut open daily.

HEAVENLY

BRINGING THE GAMES BACK TO TAHOE STORY BY CASEY GLAUBMAN · PHOTO COURTESY BILL BRINER

A

s the site of the 1960 Winter Olympics, The Reno Tahoe area is steeped in Olympic tradition with the 1960 Winter Games held at Squaw Valley and along the West Shore of Lake Tahoe. In fact, if you’ve ever skied at Squaw Valley, then chances are you noticed the large Olympic rings adorning the signs at the entrance of Olympic Valley. And, many would like to see the Winter Olympics return to the region. Perhaps nobody is more excited about the prospect than Jon Killoran, CEO of the Reno Tahoe Winter Games Coalition, an organization created with the purpose of helping pave the way for a Winter Olympics bid. Most recently, the Coalition had its eyes set on a potential bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games. However, with the by the United States Olympic Committee’s decision to pursue a bid for the 2024 Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles, any plans for the Winter Olympics have been put on the back burner until a decision is made on the Summer Games. “We think the Olympic Games, winter or summer, is a great thing for our country,” says Killoran. In the interest of allowing the USOC to put its full concentration toward one bid process at a time, Killoran and the

(775) 586-7000 #1 | skiheavenly.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays; 8:30 a.m. weekends. Sledding, tubing, cross-country and snow bikes available.

HOMEWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT (530) 525-2900 | skihomewood.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Snowcat skiing.

KIRKWOOD (877) 547-5966 | kirkwood.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cross-country ski, tube, dog sled, Snowcat tours.

MT. ROSE SKI TAHOE (775) 849-0704 | (800) 754-7673 | skirose.com

Coalition have turned their immediate attention toward other, shorter-term goals. The Coalition is instead actively pursuing “other competitions with beneficial economic impact for the area, as well as raising the amount of elite level athletics happening in the area,” says Killoran. In fact, it recently secured the 2018 National Junior Olympic CrossCountry championships for Reno, an elite-level competition that brings in about 3,000 competitors annually. Additionally, this winter Squaw Valley will host a stop on the Audi FIS World Cup ski tour, which Killoran says will only bring more attention to the world-class facilities available in the region. Most recently the Coalition helped put on an international elite-level curling competition in Las Vegas, an event that saw a record number of people in attendance. You heard right. Curling. In the desert. And it was wildly successful. It’s exactly this type of enthusiasm and outsidethe-box thinking that may be necessary to help bring any future Olympic Games back to the Reno Tahoe area.  For more information, visit renotahoewintergames.org.

9 a.m -4 p.m.

NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA (530) 562-1330 | northstarcalifornia.com 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Tubing lanes and lift.

SIERRA-AT-TAHOE (530) 659-7475 | sierraattahoe.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 8:30 a.m. weekends & peak times. Tubing, snowshoe trails.

SODA SPRINGS (530) 426-3901 | skisodasprings.com 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thurs.-Mon. & holidays Snow tubing 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. daily.

SQUAW VALLEY (530) 583-6955 | squawalpine.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dawn Patrol 7:40 a.m. select dates. Tickets also good at Alpine Meadows.

SUGAR BOWL (530) 426-1111 | sugarbowl.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Connects to Royal Gorge Cross Country.

TAHOE DONNER DOWNHILL (530) 587-9444 #2 | tahoedonner.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Base 6,835’ Vertical 1,802’

2,400

Base 7,200’ Vertical 500’

380

Base 6,700’ Vertical 1,840’

655

Base 7,031’ Vertical 750’

505

Base 6,200’ Vertical 300’

10

Base 6,540’ CA 7,200’ NV Vertical 3,500’

4,800

Base 6,230’ Vertical 2,510’

Base 7,800’ Vertical 2,000’

MILITARY DISCOUNTS

NIGHT SKIING

TERRAIN

TERRAIN PARKS

SKIABLE ACRES

SHUTTLE BUS

ELEVATION

Novice 25% Intermediate 40%

Advanced 35%

Novice 30% Intermediate 55%

6

2

Advanced 15%

Novice 18% Intermediate 46%

Advanced 36%

Novice 25% Intermediate 50%

Advanced 25%

Novice 25% Intermediate 40% Advanced 35%

Novice 20% Intermediate 45%

3

5

3

3

Advanced 35%

Novice 15% 2,010

Intermediate 40% Advanced 30% Expert 15%

Novice 12% 2,300

Intermediate 30% Advanced 38%

Expert 20%

Novice 20%

Base 8,260’ Vertical 1,800’

1,200+

Base 6,330’ Vertical 2,280’

3,170

Base 6,640’ Vertical 2,212’

2,000

Base 6,700’ Vertical 550’

200

Base 6,200’ Vertical 2,850’

3,600

Base 6,883’ Vertical 1,500’

1,650

Base 6,750’ Vertical 600’

120

Intermediate 30% Advanced 40%

Reno

*Ski areas open depending on conditions.

Expert 10%

Novice 11% Intermediate 56%

7

6

Advanced 33%

Novice 25% Intermediate 50% Advanced 25%

Novice 30% Intermediate 40%

1

Advanced 30%

Novice 25% Intermediate 45%

4

3

Advanced 30%

Novice 17% Intermediate 45% Advanced 38%

Truckee

THE RESORTS

CHILD CARE

Downhill Skiing & Snowboarding

Novice 40% Intermediate 60%

3

Advanced 0%

19


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

For the Kids

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of kids’ activities. Winter classes for babies Truckee Family Resource Center of Truckee offers winter early-learning classes. Spanish speakers are welcome to all programs, and scholarships are available. Baby & Me II is for parents and babies, 8 to 14 months old, from Jan. 13 to Feb. 3 on Fridays at noon to 1:15. The fee is $48. For parent of infants 3 months old to crawling there is Baby & Me I from Feb. 10 to March 17 on Fridays from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Cindy Bansen, RN and lactation consultant will lead the class. The fee is $72. | truckeefrc.org

Belt it out to the back rows

ICE SKATING,

H O C K EY F U N

Truckee Ice Rink offers many classes and programs for skaters. Ice Skating lessons are available for ages 3 to 6; beginners, ages 5 and older; and intermediate skaters, ages 5 and older. The fee, which includes skates, is $33 per session for three classes or $15 per drop-in class. Session 3 on Fridays starts on Feb. 3. Session 3 on Saturdays starts on Feb. 4. Ice Dancing lessons for intermediate or advanced skaters is on Saturdays. This class will give skaters a new way to workout to music. Participants do not need to have partners to attend. The fee is $33 per three-class session or $15 per drop-in class. Session 3 starts on Feb. 4.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Explore Tahoe’s ice skating rinks

Hockey League for ages 7 to 14 runs until March 6. Ages 8 to 12 will meet on Wednesdays and ages 12 to 14 on Thursdays; times will vary between 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. The fee is $95.

Hockey Skills is on Mondays or Tuesdays for Grades 1 to 7. Skates are included; participants should bring mouthpiece, gloves, helmet, elbow pads and winter clothing. Session 2 runs from Jan. 30 to Feb. 27. The fee is $50 per session when paid in advance. | tdrpd.org

Carson City, Nev. Wild Horse Children’s Theater will be holding auditions for the musical, “Annie, Kids.” Auditions for this production include ages 4 to 15 and will be held at the Brewery Arts Center Performance Hall in Carson City, Nev., on Jan. 12 from 4 to 7 p.m. and  on Jan. 14 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Callbacks are on Jan. 14 after auditions. Auditions are by appointment only; call for a slot. To schedule an audition time or for more information, contact Pat Josten at (775) 887-0438 or pat@wildhorsetheater.com.

Exploring is fun Truckee KidZone Museum offers Art Studio Specialty on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. for toddlers, ages 1 to 3. Children will be introduced to a gooey or sticky medium in which to glue, stamp, build or simply explore. Family Fun Fridays are at 11 a.m. Paint on foil, have fun with shaving cream and explore many arts and crafts options. Bilingual Sing Along with Brooke Chabot is on Jan. 12 and 26 at 10:30 a.m. Kids will learn bilingual songs that will provide them with the basic musical skills needed to enjoy school and social musical activities. Harvest of the Month introduces navel oranges and Meyer lemons at 11 a.m. on Jan. 12. Harvest of the Month is an initiative of the California Department

SIDESHOW BOB’S

Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be included in Shop Local.

HISTORIAN & AUTHOR MARK MCLAUGHLIN’S

Please call & email your name, phone # and DATE, PLACE and TIME of birth (I can figure out the time, if unknown) (805) 903 2302 · astrobarb@yahoo.com

20

1” $50 2” $75

Order books direct at:

JAN. 17 | FEB. 21 | MAR. 21

TheStormKing.com

or pick up a copy at: Geared for Games • Alpenglow Sports Gratitude Gifts • Mind Play

In-home talks · Group presentations

(530) 546-5612 · TheStormKing.com

3” $100 4” $125 | $20 per inch

All ads included in free digital edition.

Assisting Businesses Build Effective Wine Programs

Wine Tahoe & Boisset Collection offers FREE WINE TASTING experiences.

Find out ‘why you are here’ and what gifts you have to share with humanity to make this a better place!

+ FREE Tarot reading

Tahoe Donner Snowplay hosts Night Tubing on select nights throughout the winter with tubing under the lights until 6:30 p.m. on Feb. 3 and March 3. Also make plans for the annual Snowball Launching Contest on Jan. 14, the Fastest Tube races on Jan. 21 and the Winterpalooza on Jan. 28 with a day full of snowman building, tube races, relay races and more. | tahoedonner.com

Helping Collectors Sell, Buy and Manage Their Collections

NEWEST BOOK

Barb Heiam-Bjornsen Intuitive Astrologer

Natal· Solar Return· Relationships· Current Transits Astrocartography· Personal Grael Chart

Snow fun at Tahoe Donner

Black & white

581-2343

(530) CA & NV Licensed & Insured

6 Astrological Chart Readings

Reno, Nev. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum offers educational exhibits, classes and hands-on activities designed for children. Squiggle Bots will be offered from Jan. 12 to 15 in the Spark!Lab. Children can invent an artistic robot, better known as a “Squiggle Bot,” using a variety of materials. Kids can make DIY Speakers on Jan. 14 and 15 in The Shop. The set of speakers can amplify the sound of a favorite SmartPhone or music player. Small Wonder Wednesdays is from 9 to 10 a.m. for ages 5 and younger. Tots can participate in story time and explore the museum for a full hour before it opens to the public. Visit the museum after 4 p.m. every Wednesday and the admission is half price. Members and children younger than age 1 always enter free. The museum stays open until 8 p.m. All classes are free to members and nonmembers with the price of admission. | nvdm.org

Color

Residential & Commercial

for

For children especially

Advertise in Shop Local!

Window Cleaning Since 2000

Astrology Humanit y

of Public Health that features nutrition education and resources to support healthy lifestyle habits such as eating fruits and vegetables every day. Marble Machines Workshop is on Jan. 21 at 11 a.m. This creative ball-run contraption, made from familiar materials, is designed to send a rolling marble through tubes and funnels, across tracks and bumpers and into a catch at the end. All classes are free to members or with the price of admission to nonmembers. | kidzonemuseum.org

3rd Tuesday of each month 5:30 p.m to 7:00 p.m. Reservations: (925) 683-1520 info@winetahoe.com

Making Your Wine Events Really Special Expertise and Ethics Public and Private Wine Classes Sommelier Services We Can Train Your Staff, Maximize Your Wine Program and Help With Your Fundraiser

WineProWest.com

North Tahoe Event Center Kings Beach

3 Sommelier Louis Phillips Level 30+ Years Experience

Space is limited. Sorry no walk ins.

WineGuru123@gmail.com - (775) 544-3435


January 12-25, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

ADVERTISEMENT

Family Fun

Spend the day by Lake Tahoe at NORTH LAKE TAHOE’S ONLY ALL-INCLUSIVE WINTER RECREATION FACILITY ICE SKATING

NORTH LAKE TAHOE

SQUAW VALLEY

INCLINE VILLAGE

(530) 403-0206 | squaw.com Olympic Ice Pavilion at High Camp. Hockey or figure skating rentals. TART

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Snow Play Area on Fairway Blvd., next to the Chateau, on the driving range. Bring own equipment.

MOUNT ROSE Near the Mount Rose summit, enjoy sledding in Tahoe Meadows off Highway 431. Bring equipment.

(530) 542-6262 | citiofslt.com Indoor facility open year-round. BlueGo

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com Ice skating & rentals. Club House. TART

NORTH TAHOE REGIONAL PARK

(530) 546-0605 | northtahoeparks.com End of National Avenue off Hwy 28. Rentals available. TART

TAHOE CITY WINTER SPORTS PARK (530) 583-1516 | wintersportspark.com

TRUCKEE

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com At Truckee River Regional Park. Skate rentals, broomball leagues, ice dancing & hockey lessons. Skate rentals & season passes available. TART

Sledding & cross-country trails. Rentals available. Club House. TART

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SQUAW VALLEY

PUBLIC POOLS

(530) 452-4511 | squaw.com Tubing & mini snowmobiles. TART

INCLINE VILLAGE

(775) 832-1300 | inclinerecreation.com 25-yard, 8-lane indoor pool at Incline Recreation Center, swim lessons, aqua fitness, 1-meter spring diving board, inflatable slide (weekends).

OLYMPIC VALLEY

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

Highway 50 at Echo Lake Road. Bring equipment.*

SAWMILL POND

Swimming Lagoon & Spa at High Camp at Squaw Valley, free form lagoon with 50-meter lap lanes, two islands with waterfalls and native boulders. Reopens spring 2017. TART

TAYLOR CREEK

On Lake Tahoe Blvd. Bring equipment. BlueGo

SNOWSHOEING

WinterSportsPark.com 530-583-1516

CROSS COUNTRY SKIING

(530) 543-2600

Highway 89, north of Camp Richardson Road. Bring equipment.* BlueGo

(530) 542-6056 | citiofslt.com 25-yard indoor/outdoor year-round pool. Lessons. BlueGo

SLEDDING

(530) 644-2324

(800) 403-0206 | squaw.com

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE

ICE SKATING

ECHO LAKE

Full Service Bar

& Restaurant

STATELINE

KAHLE PARK

TRUCKEE

(775) 586-7271 | douglascountynv.gov

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com Indoor pools with competition pool and warm water pool, diving board, swim training, hydraulic lift and lessons. TART

Off Highway 207. Bring equipment. BlueGo

TRUCKEE & BEYOND

ROCK CLIMBING WALLS

DONNER SUMMIT

TRUCKEE

South side of I-80, Castle Peak exit beyond Boreal Inn frontage road. Bring equipment.*

Community Recreation Center offers 29’ climbing wall & 12’ bouldering wall. All ages & levels. Lessons available. TART

TAHOE DONNER

(530) 587-3558

(530) 582-7720 | tdrpd.com

(530) 587-9437 | tahoedonner.com At Trout Creek Recreation Center. No personal sleds. Family events all season.

SLEDDING & TUBING

YUBA PASS

EAST SHORE

(530) 994-3401

SPOONER LAKE

Highway 49 at Yuba Pass. Bring equipment.*

(775) 831-0494

State park open for general snow play. Bring equipment.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

HOPE VALLEY AREA

(530) 543-2600

CARSON PASS

Snowplay area off Hwy. 89, 3 miles south of Tahoe City. Bring equipment.*

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

GRANLIBAKKEN

(530) 581-7533 | granlibakken.com

HOPE VALLEY Highway 88 at Blue Lakes Road. Bring equipment.*

Machine-groomed snow play area; no tubes or toboggans allowed. All ages.

MEISS MEADOW

TAHOE CITY

(775) 882-2766

(209) 295-4251

Highway 88 near Carson Pass. Bring equipment.*

Gentle slope on Highway 89 South, one-eighth mile south of the wye. Bring equipment. TART

65KM OF GROOMED TRAILS Call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100, to be listed in Family Fun. ALL ACTIVITIES ARE WEATHER DEPENDENT. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222. BUS & SHUTTLE SCHEDULES

North Lake Tahoe & Truckee: laketahoetransit.com | South Lake Tahoe: bluego.org

CAFE AND COZY DAY LODGE LESSONS AND RENTALS SNOWSHOEING TRAILSIDE DAY HUTS

TahoeXC.org 530-583-5475 21


OUT & ABOUT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Courtesy Auburn Ski Club

Powder Report

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete Powder Report. on Jan. 15 and the Chuck Lyda Memorial Biathlon Weekend on Feb. 11 and 12. The 15km Tahoe Mountain Sports President’s Cup is on Feb. 20. | Register auburnskiclub.com

Snowshoe Cocktail Races South Lake Tahoe Save the dates for this winter’s returning Snowshoe Cocktail Races on Jan. 21, Feb. 18 and March 18 at Beacon Bar & Grill at Camp Richardson. Great prizes awarded to the fastest and cleanest at the obstacle course finish line. Enjoy food and drink specials. Free to participate. | camprichardson.com

The place to race

SUPERTOUR LANDS ON

DONNER SUMMIT Top cross-country athletes from across America will converge at Auburn Ski Club Training Center on Jan. 21 to 22 for the fourth stop on the USSA’s annual SuperTour, which kicked off in December in Bozeman, Mont. The SuperTour is a series of International Ski Federation sanctioned cross-country ski races taking place across the U.S., produced by the USSA, together with its divisions and clubs. It’s a vital piece of the USSA’s development program and a proving ground for athletes with aspirations of making it to the U.S. Ski Team and competing on the FIS World Cup tour and in the Olympic Winter Games. Athletes also vie for points during the SuperTour to earn Continental Cup leader starts and World Cup starts. There will also be spots available for the 2017 FIS Nordic World Ski Championships from Feb. 22 to March 5 in Lahti, Finland. Those spots will be awarded after the conclusion of the U.S. Cross Country Championships in January. | auburnskiclub.org

Vote for Duncan

Wax on, race off

Truckee Truckee resident Duncan Lee is vying to win North America’s Top Snowmobiler contest. Lee, who grew up in Incline Village, is a professional back-country snowmobile athlete, an American Institute of Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE) course instructor and an AIARE board member. The vote-based contest, which started in November and ends in February, goes head to head so the contestant with the most votes advances to the next round. As of press time, Lee is in Round 2. There’s a semi-final round and the final round to go. One vote per day per person allowed. | supertraxmag,com/nats

Tahoe Donner Wax your skis on Jan. 15 for the Sierra Skogsloppet race on Jan. 16. Tahoe Donner Cross Country and Far West Nordic wax gurus will wax and structure your skis to get them in the best shape for racing. This free clinic is from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at Tahoe Donner Cross Country Ski Area. The Skogsloppet is on Jan. 16 at 10 a.m. This fun, 15km course around the Euer Valley is put on by Truckee’s middle and high school Nordic ski teams as a fundraiser. There will also be a 2km race for kids. No race registration is required. Tahoe Donner Challenge is on Feb. 12. This is race or tour and participants choose their route on the trails of the crosscountry center, with checkpoints at Drifter Hut, Hawks Peak and in the Euer Valley. The Tour D’Euer starts at 10 a.m. on March 26. This 25-year tradition offers participants the opportunity to tour Euer Valley and collect raffle tickets as they ski; the more they ski, the more tickets they receive. The winners are announced at a spring barbecue and music on the patio. | tahoedonner.com

Know before you go Truckee North American Ski Training Center offers Avalanche School from Jan. 13 to 15 at Cedar House Sport Hotel. NASTC is an AIARE school, which means it can offer the AIARE L1 curriculum. This is a three-day intensive seminar is designed to give participants an understanding of avalanche formation, observation skills, the ability to use an avalanche transceiver and probe and how to dig a snow study pit. There is time spent daily in the classroom and in the field. | Register skinastc.com 22

Racing season in full swing Norden Auburn Ski Club continues the season’s fun racing series. Next up is biathlon races with the 10th Mountain Division Biathlon

Soda Springs Boreal Mountain Resort is off and running races this season. On Jan. 21 and 22 and Feb. 5, is the USASA Slopestyle 1 and 2 as part of the North Tahoe Series. The Burton Qualifier opens on Jan. 28 to the first 100 riders to register for this open-format snowboarding event. On Feb. 11 to 12 is USASA Boardercross as part of the North Tahoe Series. The third annual Boreal Banked Slalom is on Feb. 18. This costume race includes live music and après ski party and benefits the High Five Foundation. On March 3 is Friday Night Expression Session where riders, skiers and snowskaters battle it out under lights in hopes of standing on the top of the podium. On March 4 is Transworld TransAm and on March 24 is Tom Sims World Championship. | rideboreal.com

Book now for Rim Trail hikes Tahoe venues The registration for Tahoe Rim Trail’s 2017 Guided Thru Hikes opens Jan. 25, starting at 10 a.m. The Guided Thru Hikes will be offered July 22 to Aug. 5 and Aug. 26 to Sept. 9. The registration for Guided Hike Segments opens on Feb. 8, starting at 10 a.m. Segment Hikes will be offered on Sundays from June 18 to Sept. 17, on Wednesdays from June 21 to Sept. 13 and on Fridays from June 23 to Sept. 8. Last year’s dates sold out in one day. | tahoerimtrail.org

Learn about grooming, ski patrol Northstar The Mountain Safety Team is offering guided mountain tours every Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in January at Northstar California during Safety Month. Participants join the Mountain Safety Tour Guide at the top of the Big Springs Gondola. Guests must be age 13 and older and ski at an intermediate or above level. Trail Closure with the Ski Patrol is from Jan. 13 to 15. Guests can see what happens after the lifts stop turning by joining Northstar’s Ski Patrol for a day and learn how they keep all guests safe while closing the mountain. Interested guests can meet at the Summit Patrol Office, top of Comstock Express at 3:15 p.m. to help close the backside trails or at 3:45 p.m. to help close the front side trails. To register, e-mail ski patrol supervisor Kolina Coe at kcoe@vailresorts.com. Grooming Show & Tell is every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Northstar Grooming will have a Cat and a driver at the top of the Zephyr lift to show guests how it works and answer questions.

Fat bike festival Northstar The Tahoe Fat Bike Summit & Festival hosted by Northstar is Jan. 20 to 21. The festival on Friday will start with demo bike phase runs from 10 a.m. to noon and the summit is at 1 p.m. Guest speaker Jay Petervary, eight-time Iditarod Trial racer and professional ultra-endurance cyclist, will be there. The fat bike festival is Saturday and starts with a race at 9 a.m. through cross-country trails, back to the Cross-Country, Telemark and Snowshoe Center for music, demos and fun. | northstarcalifornia.com

Nordic stunners from Far West Tahoe venues Tahoe Rim Tour & Race at North Tahoe High School is on Jan. 29; a classic wave starts at 9 a.m. and a skate wave starts at 9:30 a.m. The 26km will end at Northstar California Cross-Country Ski Center. Preski the course on Jan. 25. There will be an aid station at Starratt Pass. Lunch is hot chili and cornbread. The California Gold Rush at Royal Gorge is on March 19 with a wave start at 9 a.m. Participants can choose the 45km Gold Rush, the 30 km Silver Rush or the 15km Bronze Rush. Billy Dutton Uphill at Squaw Valley USA is on April 9 at 8 a.m. The distance is 3.2 miles of strenuous uphill. This is a fundraiser for the Far West Junior Nordic program. | farwestnordic.com

Historic ski films Incline Village, Nev. Diamond Peak will be hosting an historic ski film series on select Wednesdays as part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration. Watch classic Warren Miller ski films and listen to local historians as they tell stories about the history of skiing and snowboarding in the Lake Tahoe region at The Chateau through February. On Jan. 25, enjoy Warren Miller’s (1996) with Warren Miller’s “Snowriders” (1996) and a 1990’s costume contest; on Feb. 1 Miller’s “Off the Grid” (2006) will be shown with a speaker and a 2000 costume contest; and on Feb. 15 see Craig Beck’s “Daydreams” and listen to his commentary with an ultimate Tahoe costume contest. The event will feature a speaker at 5 p.m., with the films at 5:30 p.m. Admission is free. | diamondpeak.com

Fun and fair event Homewood USASA Slalom and Giant Slalom Competition will be on Jan. 29. The USASA will host three events at Homewood Mountain Resort for the South Tahoe Series. The United States of America Snowboard and Freeski Association is a local-based, amateur ski and snowboard event series. The goal is to facilitate fun and fair events for all ages across the country, to attract snowboarders and freeskiers, promote their development, provide member education and influence the future of our sports. This event will be a single-day race event with an awards ceremony. The resort will provide discounted lift tickets for the participants and the parents.  | skihomewood.com


January 12-25, 2017

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OUT & ABOUT

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T R A I LS

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SKI TOURING & SNOWSHOEING

$24 Basic/Sport Ski Package $30 Performance Ski Package $36 Demo Ski Package $14 Kid's Shape Skis* $20 Youth Basic Ski Package (11-15 years old) $14 XC(Touring) Rental or Snowshoe Rental $26 Snowboard & Boots Strap-in bindings $20 Kid's Snowboard & Boots* Strap-in bindings $5 kids $6 adults Helmets with rental

TAHOE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

TRUCKEE

CABIN CREEK TRAIL

LEVEL: Easy to moderate A marked route of 3 to 6 miles follows old logging roads and Cabin Creek Road. This is a nice area for downhill practice while cross-country skiing. The terrain has gentle, rolling slopes. From Interstate 80, take Highway 89 south 3 miles, then turn right on Cabin Creek Road. The unmarked trailhead is 1 mile from the highway. Limited parking is available in a road cut, when plowed. There is moderate snowmobile use in the area.

DONNER MEMORIAL STATE PARK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 582-7892

The park is mostly flat and open year-round. Skiers can enjoy the forests and boulder fields, glide down to the lake and meander through the park. There is an unmarked, 9.6-km, skier-packed trail starting near the Emigrant Trail Museum. For the more adventuresome, glide over the hills into Coldstream Canyon. TART

PETER GRUBB HUT/CASTLE PEAK LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous

A marked Nordic ski trail begins at the Castle Peak/Boreal interchange on Donner Summit off Interstate 80, west of Truckee. Take the Castle Peak exit and follow it for one-quarter mile to the intersection for the trailhead to the north that goes up Castle Valley and over Castle Pass. Follow unmarked trail to Peter Grubb Hut. For overnight stays at Peter Grubb Hut, call (530) 426-3632 for reservations.

POLE CREEK TRAIL SYSTEM LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Unmarked trails follow roads along Pole Creek and Silver Creek Drainages. Trailhead 6 miles south of Truckee on Highway 89. Some parking on west side of highway. Trails follow U.S. Forest Service roads. Several loops.

SAGEHEN SUMMIT

LEVEL: Easy to moderate An unmarked route follows the road up to the creek bottom. Lateral roads offer many side trips. Trailhead at Sagehen Summit on the west side of Highway 89, 8 miles north of Truckee. Limited parking.

NORTH SHORE

BROCKWAY SUMMIT LEVEL: Easy to strenuous

Brockway Summit off Highway 267 offers an abundance of areas to ski. Between Northstar and Kings Beach, there are turnouts on both sides of the highway where Nordic skiers and snowshoers can follow logging and utility roads.

PAGE MEADOWS

LEVEL: Easy to moderate

On Mount Rose high above Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Meadows offers an expansive area where skiers can stretch their legs. Head up Highway 431 from Incline Village until you reach the meadows before the summit. This is a busy area on the weekends for skiers, snowshoers and snowmobilers, so try skiing during the week.

WEST SHORE

BLACKWOOD CANYON

$3 off Skis & Poles or Board Only

LEVEL: Moderate to strenuous The meadows in Blackwood Canyon offer a great place to get into the wilderness off Highway 89 on the West Shore. Follow Highway 89 south from Tahoe City and park at the Kaspian Recreation Area. Skiers can glide along the road (not plowed in winter) or through the meadows. For a longer outing, head up the mountain to Barker Pass. This area also is open to snowmobilers.

MEEKS MEADOWS LEVEL: Easy

Meeks Meadows on the West Shore off Highway 89 offers a vast area to ski. The trailhead is across from the Meeks Bay Fire Station; look for the log cabin with red trim. Follow the U.S. Forest Service road or meander through the meadow and down to Meeks Creek.

t

TAYLOR CREEK

LEVEL: Easy | (530) 573-2600 Developed for beginners, this well-marked series of trails allows skiers to explore the area. Terrain is mostly flat and is good for the entire family. Take Highway 89 south around Emerald Bay to the Fallen Leaf Lake Area. Turn on Cathedral Road and park in the Sno-Park. Marked trails start at the parking lot with three trails near Fallen Leaf Lake. On the Lake side of Highway 89, follow the road to the Visitor Center to access the Tallac Historic Trail. SnoPark Permit required.*

Ski or snowshoe along an old road that meanders through a forest and into a cluster of meadows. Take Highway 89 south from Tahoe City, then turn right on Pine Avenue and right on Tahoe Park Heights Road. At the crest of the hill, take the middle fork, which becomes Big Pine Road, then take a left on Silver Tip. The parking area is at the top of the road.

SEE OUR EVENTS CALENDAR FOR GUIDED SNOWSHOE TREKS. * Sno-park permits required. Go to ohv.parks.ca.gov/snoparks or find locations at (916) 324-1222.

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SUGAR PINE POINT STATE PARK

The Ed Z’berg/Sugar Pine Point State Park is a spectacular spot to cross-country ski or snowshoe among the dense forests of the West Shore or along Lake Tahoe’s shores. The park offers more than 18 km of marked ski trails. Three groomed trails begin at the campground, 9 miles south of Tahoe City, with two skier-packed trails on the lake side of the park, accessed from the Day Use entrance. Winter camping available. The park also offers a number of guided tours throughout the season including full moon snowshoe tours, ski tours of the 1960 Olympic crosscountry trails, historic snowshoe tours and the family Junior Ranger program; call for dates. No dogs allowed on trails. TART

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FEATURE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

SIERRA STORIES BY MARK McLAUGHLIN

W inter Survival in the West | P a r t I

S

earch and rescue headlines usually focus on skiers and snowboarders who venture outside resort boundaries and lose their way. The recent rescue of a family of three on Dec. 25, 2016, at the Grand Canyon serves as a reminder that winter travelers in the West must also play it smart if they expect to come out alive. Food, water, gasoline, warm blankets and winter attire are minimum requirements; avoiding sketchy back-country roads and paying attention to the weather forecast are also critical decisions. A northern Arizona sheriff ’s official said it was a “Christmas miracle” that searchers rescued Eric and Karen Klein, as well as their 10-year-old son Isaac, last month just hours before a major winter storm roared into the region. The Pennsylvania family was attempting to reach the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, which was already closed for the winter season, and ultimately became stuck in snow on an impassable road that Google Maps indicated was a viable route. Karen, a 46-year-old community college professor, marathon runner and triathlete, decided that she was in the best physical condition to go for help. She set off into the woods while Eric and Isaac remained with the car. Karen trudged 26 miles through snow up to 3 feet deep before reaching a closed park entrance station that was still 30 miles from the nearest highway. Karen was so exhausted from her 24-hour trek she was too tired to start a fire and just laid down in the building. Fortunately, her husband had climbed a hill to acquire cell phone reception and he alerted authorities. Eric and Isaac were soon rescued and taken to a hospital with minor injuries. On the second day, snowmobilers found Karen alive at the cabin. She was taken to a Utah hospital where she faced possible amputation of one or more toes damaged by frostbite. Karen kept it in perspective: “In the grand scheme of things, you know what? It’s [only] a few toes. Don’t worry about it.”

SPOONER SUMMIT RESCUE In February 1937, Maude LaNear and her 2-year-old baby Donna were found alive in their car 15 days after it had be24

Truckee railroad tracks, circa December 1992. | Mark McLaughlin

come stuck and buried in a raging blizzard near Spooner Summit above Lake Tahoe’s East Shore. Her husband Earl had tried to reach help in Carson City, but died miles from his destination in temperatures nearly 30 degrees below zero.

TWO MONTHS SNOWBOUND One of the most remarkable stories that I have read regarding survival in cold temperatures with little food occurred in 2012 in Sweden when snowmobilers pulled 44-year-old Peter Skyllberg from his snowbound vehicle. He had survived subzero temperatures and subsisted solely on snowmelt for two months. Doctors suspect that Skyllberg had entered into a dormant state that slowed his metabolism, similar to that of a bear in hibernation.

STRANDED IN REMOTE NEVADA One of the most memorable incidents of survival in our region is the story of the Stolpa family. It’s been 24 years since viewers across the nation watched the dramatic rescue of James and Jennifer Stolpa and their 5-month-old son Clayton.

During periods of low storm activity, it’s easy to forget how severe winter weather can make traveling in the West perilous, even deadly, for the unprepared, and the lessons learned from their ordeal should not be forgotten. In November 1992, after years of drought, Tahoe-Truckee residents were praying fervently for snow. They got it in December when powerful cold fronts pounded the Tahoe Sierra. Rangers at Echo Summit recorded nearly 17 feet of snow that month. It was the wettest start to a winter in 10 years. During the all-important Christmas/ New Year’s holiday period, persistent rain, wind and heavy snow caused havoc with air, rail and road travel. Hotels in Truckee and Tahoe City were overwhelmed. Blinding snow shut down most flights at the Reno airport, stranding 3,000 passengers. Trains were delayed and most major highways were closed. Avalanches cut electric power to 15,000 people. De-spite the inconvenience, skiers, ranchers and hydrologists were

During periods of low storm activity, it’s easy to forget how severe winter weather can make traveling in the West perilous, even deadly, for the unprepared, and the lessons learned from their ordeal should not be forgotten. giddy with delight. On Jan. 4, 1993, a young California family attempting to travel to Idaho became lost somewhere in the frozen desolation of northern Nevada. James Stolpa, a 21-year-old Marine private, his 20-year-old wife Jennifer and their infant son Clayton had left Castro Valley for Idaho on Dec. 29 and hadn’t been heard from since. James had intended to drive their pickup truck to his grandmother’s funeral in Pocatello, but their plan to head east

TA H O E

over Donner Pass was thwarted when Interstate 80 was closed by heavy snow. Without telling anyone they changed their itinerary and drove north on Interstate 5 toward Redding. North of Redding, more deep snow closed that road, so the Stolpas turned east onto Highway 299, hoping to connect to Interstate 80 again via Nevada State Route 140. They passed through the little community of Vya, Nev., about 150 miles north of Reno and found themselves on Washoe County Road 8A. The road cuts through the far northwest corner of Nevada, a remote region of high desert and rugged mountains where they got stuck in snow. The Stolpas had made a major, possibly fatal mistake. During winter storms, travelers in the Intermountain West should always stick to main highways where roads are likely to be cleared first and where help is nearby if needed. Deep snow blanketed the desert floor and overnight temperatures were below zero. The stranded family stayed with the vehicle for three days, waiting for another car to drive by. None did. They had a few blankets, but the only food was a holiday fruitcake, corn chips, coconut cookies and a jar of prenatal vitamins. James and Jennifer knew that their meager fare wouldn’t last long. After four days huddled in the truck, the family grew determined to find help on Nevada State Route 140, about 20 miles away. To prepare for their battle with the elements, James pulled on a pair of his wife’s nylon stockings — he had no thermal underwear. He also grabbed an extra pair of socks to wear inside his sneakers — he had no boots. Jennifer bundled up as best she could. To protect baby Clayton, they tucked him into a child’s sleeping bag and inserted that into an adult bag. James then zipped Clayton’s warm cocoon into a vinyl garment bag, which he planned to pull behind him over the snow like a little sleigh. It was a life or death gamble. Read Part II in the next edition.  Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin is a nationally published author and professional speaker. His award-winning books are available at local stores or at thestormking.com. You may reach him at mark@ thestormking.com. Check out his blog at tahoenuggets.com, or read more at TheTahoeWeekly.com.

Nostalgia

CROSSING DONNER PASS If you think driving over Donner Pass during a winter storm is tough now, you’re lucky that you didn’t have to cross the Summit in 1952. In late December 1951, traffic over trans-Sierra Highway 40 was down to one lane on Donner Pass. The California Highway Patrol closed the road for a time and convoyed motorists from Truckee over the mountains to California. Highway 40 would later be shut down for 28 consecutive days.

Photograph and caption are from Tahoe historian Mark McLaughlin’s newest book “Snowbound: Legendary Winters of the Tahoe Sierra” available in local stores or at thestormking.com. Courtesy Nevada Historical Society


January 12-25, 2017

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Announcements. New book store to open Look for a new bookstore with the opening of Word After Word Books in downtown Truckee in January. The new book fills a much-needed niche in the region after the closure of Bookshelf following the owner’s retirement in December. World After World Books is located on Commercial Row sandwiched between Sweets and Uncorked. The name of the store was inspired by the poem “Spelling” by Margaret Atwood: “A word after a word after a word is power.” Looks for details on the store’s opening at facebook.com/ wordafterwordbooks

Whatever your genre Every other Tuesday, Tahoe Writers Work, an open workshop for writers of any genre meets at 6:30 p.m. at Bona Fide Books. The next meetings are on Jan. 17 and 31. | bonafidebooks.com

A year with purpose “Living Our Dreams in 2017,” a New Year’s vision-creation play-shop with Liz Luoma, is on Jan. 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at For Goodness Sake. Participants will take time to reflect on the past year to see what was enjoyed, what was learned, what can be let go of and what can be taken into the upcoming year. Bring a potluck dish to share and a personal beverage. The suggested donation is $20; there is a $5 materials fee. | Register (714) 478-9561

Get creative in 2017 Arts in Wellness offers a Winter 2017 Creative Group on Thursdays starting on Jan. 19 at For Goodness Sake. The class from 9 to 11:30 a.m. will follow the book, “Anatomy of the Spirit: The Seven Stages of Power and Healing,” by Caroline Myss. There will be chapter readings, meditations and sharing facilitated by Polly Triplat. A donation of $15 for each class is suggested. | artsinwellness.org

New year, new laws A Knowledge Bites workshop on Jan. 19 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Truckee Tahoe Airport will address new California legislation that became effective on Jan. 1, as well as other important laws and related issues that employers should be aware of including: salary test requirements under the 2017 Fair Labor Standards Act, update and drug and alcohol/marijuana, sexual harassment, family medical leave, social media and employee/employer relations and aggrieved employees under the Labor Code Private Attorneys General Act. Knowledge Bites are presented by the Truckee Chamber of Commerce in partnership with Sierra Business Council’s Small Business Development Center. The cost before Jan. 13 is $55 for chamber members and $65 for nonmembers. After Jan. 13, the cost is $10 more. Space is limited. | Register (530) 587-8808 or truckee.com

Unveiling of site plan California State Parks and California Tahoe Conservancy will hold a public meeting on the Kings Beach State Recreation Area preferred alternative site plan. The meeting will be held on Jan. 18 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the North Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach. Information on the Kings Beach State Recreation Area

Announcements

OUT & ABOUT

General Plan Revision and Kings Beach Pier Rebuild Project will be posted on the Web site. | bit.ly/2d3nt1V

Recycle used trees IVGID’s Christmas tree recycling program allows residents to drop trees off at Preston Field until Jan. 27. Trees of any length must be free of decorations, nails and tree stands. | (775) 832-1203

Eco-submissions sought The Tahoe Fund has opened its online project submission portal for environmental organizations that would like to partner with the Tahoe Fund to help solve environmental challenges at Lake Tahoe. Organizations are invited to submit project ideas by Jan. 29. The Tahoe Fund is seeking projects for its 2017 Signature and Premier Project Portfolios. These are late-stage projects that will improve Lake Tahoe’s environment by enhancing the water quality of the lake, restoring watersheds, providing healthier forests, improving transportation and fostering outdoor recreation. The organization also seeks projects to build a greater sense of stewardship in the Tahoe Basin. | tahoefund.org

Raffle of a lifetime Raffle tickets are selling fast for the chance to win an all-expenses-paid trip for two to the Super Bowl LI. The raffle, with the grand prize donated by the NFL, supports the Gene Upshaw Memorial Golf Classic on July 9 and 10, 2017, at Schaffer’s Mill Golf & Lake Club in Truckee. This celebrity tournament is the signature event for the memorial fund established in the football great’s name. Only 300 tickets are sold at $100 each. Raffle tickets can be purchased at Tahoe Forest Health System Foundation and the Gene Upshaw Memorial Tahoe Forest Cancer Center, or by calling (530) 5826277. | gu63.org

Rent a space now The 2017 Business Expo on March 31 at Harvey’s Lake Tahoe is accepting booth registrations. Booth space is available to Tahoe Chamber member businesses only and is assigned on a first-paid, first-reserved basis. All businesses registered on or before Feb. 1 will be eligible to attend the EXPO Prep Workshop free of charge. Sponsorship opportunities are available, as well. | (775) 588-1728 or tahoechamber.org

It takes a community The Community of Writers at Squaw Valley announced the dates for the 2017 Summer Writing Workshops and is accepting applications now. The Poetry Workshop is from June 24 to July 1 and the Writing Workshops in fiction, nonfiction and memoir are from July 9 to July 15; the deadline to submit applications is March 28. | communityofwriters.org

Buy a ticket, make a donation Vail and Northstar, through their Epic Promise grant, has donated all-day, $111 lift tickets to support Tahoe SAFE Alliance’s mission: to end the incidence and trauma of domestic violence, sexual violence and child abuse in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee. These tickets for the 2016-2017 ski season can be used any day with no restrictions at any domestic Vail-

C O U N T TA H O E ’ S

BALD EAGLES

Volunteers are invited to help with the 36th annual mid-winter Bald Eagle count on Jan. 13 from 9 a.m. to noon. There are 26 stations located around the Lake Tahoe Basin that need volunteers. Participants must commit to showing up 15 minutes early and staying for the entire three-hour session. This year, Tahoe Institute for Natural Science will be holding a special learn about the count dinner the night before the survey from 6 to 8 p.m. at Lake Tahoe Pizza Co. in South Lake Tahoe. The cost is $15 for the dinner. | tinsweb.org

operated property including Northstar, Heavenly and Kirkwood in Lake Tahoe and Breckenridge, Beaver Creek, Vail, Keystone, Park City, Afton Alps, Mt. Brighton and Wilmot. There are no blackout dates; they are good on any holiday. Every $111 raised will provide three hours of counseling to one child. The purchase of a ticket is considered a donation and no refunds will be given. An email containing the ticket voucher number will be emailed within 48 hours. Voucher numbers can be redeemed at any ticket window at any of the resorts. | tahoesafealliance.org

Watch where you park Winter parking restrictions around the greater North Lake Tahoe area are in effect until May 1. Parking along roadway shoulders during this time is prohibited. When parking in downtown areas, visitors are encouraged to use designated public parking lots. County officials also advise renters with vacation homes to alert their tenants of seasonal parking restrictions. Illegally parked vehicles may be ticketed and fined or towed, if necessary. | placer.ca.gov

Seeing-eye skiers needed Ski for Light is looking for experienced cross-country skiers to serve as ski guides for blind, visually and mobility impaired adults. Ski for Light, Inc. is an all-volunteer, not-for-profit corporation founded in 1975. It was created by a group of Norwegian-Americans who were familiar with a program in Norway, the Ridderrenn, and the success that program has enjoyed teaching blind/visuallyimpaired and mobility-impaired people the Norwegian national sport of cross-country skiing. | sfl.org

Keeping it real and safe Taylor Creek is the most popular interpretive center in the Tahoe Basin. Visitation spikes in the fall when the kokanee salmon begin spawning up the creek and the waters turn alive with the bright red fish — visits from humans and bears alike. Unfortunately, there is no proper way to responsibly protect the salmon and bears from selfie-taking visitors, which putts all three in danger. The Tahoe Fund is working with the U.S. Forest Service to design a new overlook at Taylor Creek that will provide a viewing location that will significantly lower the issue of human-bear conflicts. The fundraising goal is $28,000. All donations welcome. | tahoefund.org

Volunteer for food bank Project MANA seeks volunteers to help sort and organize donated food items for distribution. Some tasks require heavy lifting and physical activity. Volunteer time slots are from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays, Monday and Tuesday mornings for an hour, Tuesday and Wednesdays from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., and Monday through Friday in the morning. Volunteers must complete a monthly training to learn more about Project MANA programs and policies. | volunteer@projectmana.org or (775) 298-0107

25


THE ARTS

Arts

TheTahoeWeekly.com

THE

VIBRANT

LANDSCAPES AT

WO L F DA L E ’ S Wolfdale’s Restaurant in Tahoe City is featuring oil paintings by Andy Skaff through January. Skaff’s love of the West provides the inspiration for his light-filled, vibrant landscapes. His paintings have been exhibited at the Napa Valley Museum, the Oil Painters of America Western Regional exhibit in Santa Barbara, the Sunset Magazine Western Idea House in Truckee and are part of the permanent collection of Martis Camp Lodge, the Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe, the Tahoe Forest Cancer Center and the Larkspur Hotel Group. He is a member of the California Art Club and North Tahoe Arts. A selection of his paintings and news of upcoming exhibits can be found at www.askaff.com.

Show us your tats Tahoe City Tahoe Maritime Museum will offer an exhibit, “Ink and Ivory,” which will feature two nautical art forms. Scrimshaw, attributed to American sailors, is the art of intricate carvings on bone, ivory and other found objects. These works of art capture visuals of the past and tell the story of environmental impact, laws and regulations. “Ink and Ivory” will also trace the nautical tradition of tattooing. Tattoos were meant to bring sailors luck, offer skin-deep evidence of their travels and convey sentimental tributes to wives and sweethearts back home. The museum curators would like to feature tattoos specific to nautical tradition or Tahoe, such as intricate Tahoe maps, whimsical lake monsters, boats and lakescapes. A professional photo shoot will be scheduled for mid-February for all chosen tattoos. Submissions are being accepted now; they should include a snapshot and the story behind the tattoo. Those interested in contributing should contact barbara@tahoemaritime.org.

Mindfully creative Tahoe venues Arts in Wellness offers “Mindfulness in the Microcosms,” an iPhone Photography Workshop, facilitated by Emily ademacher, on Jan. 14 and 21 and Feb. 11 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at North Tahoe Arts Center. Participants can learn to find beauty anywhere through iPhone photography of the micro-world, how to be mindful of the smaller complexities often take for granted and the basics of photographic composition and the iPhone’s basic camera and editing applications. The workshop fee is $60. | artsinwellness.org 26

Summer Grove Andy Skaff | Wolfdale’s

New executive director has clout Tahoe City Tahoe Public Art’s board of directors selected Mia Hanak as the organization’s first executive director. The organization’s mission is to enhance and preserve the natural beauty and history of North Lake Tahoe through visual arts that promote environmental stewardship and cultural unity. A proven leader with more than 15 years of executive director experience, Hanak has a track record of delivering public environmental art exhibitions and installations worldwide. She demonstrates a capacity to galvanize effective collaborations and partnerships, critical to expanding the reach and impact of the organization. Before moving to Lake Tahoe in 2015, Hanak was the executive director for environmental art organizations serving the San Francisco Bay Area and the international community through traveling exhibitions with the United Nations. She is now looking forward to utilizing her vast network and expertise to bring unique art experiences to the Lake Tahoe community. | tahoepublicart.org

The physics of art Incline Village, Nev. Wolff Soren’s oil and acrylic paintings are on display through the month of January at Incline Village Library. Soren’s work pays homage to people and events that inspire him. His influences range from Peter Higgs to Al Held, from Lisa Randall to Jan Vermeer, as well as Roger Penrose and Naum Gabo. He believes that the most creative people are scientists working on the cutting edge of cosmology and particle physics with theoretical scientists asking questions that hover on the boundaries of human perception. | (775) 832-4130

Two new in January South Lake Tahoe An exhibit of oil paintings by Sheila Walker, titled “Friends,” is at Lake Tahoe

Community College library in January. Walker has been painting for a number of years; she learned several media before finding herself most comfortable with oil. She connects on an emotional level and seems to see inside and bring out the essence of her subjects. An amazing series of primary color collages by Carol Brown is on display at El Dorado Library on Rufus Allen Boulevard. | talart.org

From common to elegant Carson City, Nev. The Capital City Arts Initiative presents, “Pocket Ziggurat,” by artist Chelsea Pegram at the CCAI Courthouse Gallery until Jan. 19. In her sculptures, Pegram explores materials, context and collaboration through gestures and constructions, transforming common building materials into simple and elegant forms. In planning “Pocket Ziggurat,” Pegram imagined the gallery space as a desert vista with ancient religious structures emerging from the sand and dirt. The pedestals and shelving recede and hover off the walls and floor to display small sculptures and gestures. | arts-initiative.org

ines how makers, craftspeople and painters created fine objects that exemplified the breadth of American creative expression during a period of enormous political, social and cultural change in the United States. Folk art is not typically made by professionally trained artists and does not attempt to emulate art made in urban centers by classically trained artists. The exhibit will remain on view through Jan. 22 at the Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Visual Arts, E. L. Wiegand Gallery. Consisting of more than 60 works, the exhibit showcases rare and fine portraits; vivid still life and landscapes; figurative and animal sculptures; whimsical trade signs; furniture and other household objects from artists living across New England, the Midwest the Mid-Atlantic and the South between 1800 and 1925. Along with the exhibit are talks and presentations at the museum. On Jan. 20 at noon Art Bite presents Wild Woman Katherine Case on Linoleumcut Printmaking. Case converses about

Whimsical and innocent Reno, Nev. The Sierra Arts Gallery hosts a solo exhibition by Lisa Kurt, “Somewhere in the desert there’s a forest,” until Jan. 27. Kurt has become known for her distinctive illustrative characters full of whimsy and innocence with a touch of sadness between the lines. There will be an artist’s reception on Jan. 19 from 6 to 8 p.m. with refreshments courtesy of Wild River Grille. | sierra-arts.org

From humble folk Reno, Nev. Nevada Museum of Art welcomes works by 19th-Century rural American artists “A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America” exam-

Tahoe

Rob Snyder | Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe


January 12-25, 2017

artistic traditions, her work in the community and the California and Nevada artists and crafts(wo)men that inspire her. | nevadaart.org

Visually contemporary Carson City, Nev. “THEN AND NOW: Works by Elaine Jason and Maria Arango-Diener” showcases two GAA Commission artists who exemplify the diversity of contemporary visual arts in Nevada. The exhibit hosted by the Nevada Arts Council will run through Jan. 23 at the OXS Gallery in Carson City. The abstract forms that connect Jason’s neon sculptures relate to the aesthetics of sculptural constructivism as well as the layering of events and places in her life. Jason began incorporating neon into some of her sculptures in the mid-1980s and has since approached her process as a puzzle that is solved as each piece comes together. Arango-Diener creates woodcut prints that illustrate how her materials imprint her work. The wood grain, texture of the paper and consistency of the ink all lend themselves to the style and subject matter found in her prints. | nac.nevadaculture.org

Glass artist featured Tahoe City Lynn McGeever is the featured artist at the Tahoe City Visitors Information Center in January. This Tahoe City artist has been working with glass since the 1970s and fusing glass since 1986. She gets her inspiration from her travels and the local region. Her handcrafted original designs are on display through January. | gotahoenorth.com

Exhibition features Northern California artists Northstar The Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe, has joined with SLATE Art Consulting to feature a new winter exhibition of the works of 31 Northern California artists throughout the hotel’s lobby and public areas through April.

professionally printed onto poly canvas. Proposals should include a preliminary color rendition and a brief narrative description of the artwork. Proposals are due Feb. 24. Winners will be announced in May. An $80 honorarium will be awarded for each selected banner. Proposals should be e-mailed to info@ northtahoebusiness.org.

Diversity of creativity Carson City, Nev. The Capital City Arts Initiative announces its exhibition, “ART from SNC,” at the Brick in Carson City, Nev. Nine student artists from Sierra Nevada College in Incline Village, Nev., are featured. The exhibition, open to the public until Jan. 30, includes paintings, drawings,

Cobalt like the lake Incline Village, Nev. Cobalt Artist Studio presents Lainie Vreeland’s exhibit of hand-pressed/torn mono-prints through January. Vreeland explores imaginative textural techniques by hand pressing and enhancing a wide variety of blank papers, enhancing them with layers of hand-blended acrylic paints. Sarah Smith’s paintings will be on display in February. Smith is always pushing herself to stretch her methods and to better express whatever needs a voice. Her public murals can be seen around Tahoe including KidZone Museum and Truckee Elementary School. There will be an artist’s reception for her on Feb. 11 from 4 to 6 p.m. It is open to the public. Workshops at the studio include Watercolor Painting in the Batik Method on Jan. 21 and Painting Dramatic Skies in Watercolor on Feb. 4. | cobaltartiststudio.com

Print fans welcome Meyers Bona Fide Books in South Lake Tahoe offers Open Print Studio on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those who want to work on linocuts or wood block prints and those who have taken a letterpress class at Tahoe Letterpress are welcome. Assistance and some supplies are on site. In January Makers Monday is offered from 6 to 9 p.m. The free session will offer mail art, print club and projects to share and brainstorm. | bonafidebooks.com

CALENDAR ONGOING

Leiko Ikemura Nevada Museum of Art | Until Jan. 15

Dennis Parks Nevada Museum of Art | Until Jan. 17

“Pocket Ziggurat” CCAI Courthouse Gallery | Until Jan. 19

“A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America” Nevada Museum of Art | Until Jan. 22

THEN AND NOW OXS Gallery | Until Jan. 23

Lisa Kurt Sierra Arts Gallery | Until Jan. 27

“Blue Brilliance” Incline Village Visitors’ Center Until Jan. 30

“ART from SNC” CCIA’s the Brick | Until Jan. 30

Sheila Walker Lake Tahoe Community College Until Jan. 31

Connection to nature Truckee The artwork of Jess Weems will be on display at Atelier Truckee until Feb. 28. Weems searches for the intersection between belief and fact, the spiritual and the scientific. He draws attention to the aesthetic beauty of scientific data, migration patterns and geological processes for the bigger picture of our interconnected universe. The materials he uses are beeswax, resin, earth pigments, thread, fabric and paper and the processes of application are physical and technical. Atelier hosts many workshops including Introduction to Knitting and Tahoe String Art Maps both on Jan. 15., Writing for Artists on Jan. 18 and Art Journal on Jan. 19. | ateliertruckee.com

THE ARTS

Carol Brown El Dorado Library | Until Jan. 31

Wolff Soren Incline Village Library | Until Jan. 31

Truckee’s Big Life Community Recreation Center Until Jan. 31

Lynn McGeever Tahoe City Visitors Center | Until Jan. 31

Andy Skaff Wolfdale’s restaurant | Until Jan. 31

The Peaceable Kingdom with the Leopard of Serenity Edward Hicks | Nevada Museum of Art

Artists featured include Jonah Burlingame, Maria Burtis, Elaine Coombs, Pauletta Chanco, Micah Crandell-Bear, Joanne Fox, Holly Van Hart, Carol Lefkowitz, David Nyquist, Thea Schrack, Amy Lee Solomon, Jeff Snell, Rob Synder, David Wellner and Diane Williams. Works from the collection are clearly labeled and additional information about the artists is also provided. There are notes to help with a self-guided tour, a walkthrough map and price sheet of the SLATE winter collection at the concierge desk. Private tours of the rotating art collection, led by one of the exhibition’s curators, can also be arranged for groups of eight or more, through SLATE Art Consulting. | ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe

Hang it proudly Kings Beach North Tahoe Business Association (NTBA) is inviting proposals for streetlight banner art to be displayed along the main street in Kings Beach this summer on a rotating schedule. The banners for this art call will be selected based on design and content. Proposals from artists of all experience levels, young and old, established and emerging, are encouraged. The selection committee is looking for artwork that is colorful, meaningful and will enhance downtown Kings Beach. The 18-inch-by-36-inch banners, hung from streetlights, will be viewed by motorists and pedestrians. NTBA will have selected artwork

Jill Brugler WNC Carson Galleries | Until Feb. 3

photography, printmaking and mixedmedia pieces that show the diversity of the students’ creativity. The participating student artists are Collyn Aubrey, Lily Luna Bennett, Piera Bernhard, Bryce Betterley, Garrett Effa, Meiasha Gray, Miranda McFarland, Vanessa O’Neill and Ian Wieczorek. | (775) 721-7424

The art of nature Incline Village, Nev. The Visitor Center in Incline Village features a new art exhibit called, “Blue Brilliance,” which will be on display until Jan. 30. The exhibit features the works of the students of Sierra Nevada College associate professor Mary Kenny’s printmaking class. Students used images photographed within the Tahoe Basin from their Instagram accounts. The relief printing process is like using an inkpad and stamp. Linocut is a type of relief printing in which linoleum is used as the printing surface. The material is cut with small gouge tools. Using these gouges and knives, the artist cuts the design into four pieces of linoleum. Each of the linoleum blocks is printed with colored ink applied to the raised surface and transferred onto the paper. In addition to the prints, there will be several sculptural pieces in the exhibition, which were created by ad-vanced students in SNC’s art department. | gotahoenorth.com

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com

for a complete list of Arts.

Sarah Smith Cobalt Artist Studio | Feb. 11-28

Gabie Strong SNC Garage Door Gallery | Until Feb. 17

Tarek Al-Ghoussein Nevada Museum of Art | Until Feb. 19

“Glyphs and Houses” Carson City Community Center Until Feb. 24

“Placer Creates” Placer County venues | Until Feb. 28

Jess Weems Atelier Truckee | Until Feb. 28

Charlie Macquarie SNC Garage Door Gallery March 2-10

Frontier Fellows SNC Tahoe Gallery | Until March 2

Abe Blair Nevada State Museum | Until March 20

Winter Art Exhibit Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe | Until April

Peter Stichbury Nevada Museum of Art | Until May

A Place in the Country Nevada Museum of Art | Until June

“On the Water” Tahoe Maritime Museum | Until summer

27


FUN & GAMES

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Puzzles

Trivia test

by Fifi Rodriquez

1. ASTRONOMY: What makes the planet Mars appear red? 2. INVENTIONS: What is the Latin meaning of the velocipede, an early type of bicycle? 3. GEOGRAPHY: What is the largest freshwater swamp in North America? 4. MEDICINE: What are vasodilators? 5. HISTORY: When did Canada win its independence? 6. MUSIC: Which 20th Century bandleader was known as “the king of swing”? 7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What type of plant was used to make the first paper? 8. MOVIES: What was Indiana Jones’ trademark weapon in the movie series? 9. LITERATURE: In Shakespeare’s play, what is Julius Caesar warned about just before his death? 10. LANGUAGE: What is the name for bird eggs that were laid at the same time?

Strange but true

by Samantha Weaver

Junior Whirl Answerts: 1. Tampering, 2. Tramping, 3. Migrant, 4. Margin, 5. Grain, 6. Rang, 7. Gar, 8. Ra, 9. R (rook). Differences: 1. Strap is missing, 2. Post is missing, 3. Skateboard is missing, 4. Collar is different, 5. Stripe is missing, 6. Number is changed.

A song written about somebody with a legal claim on his property could be titled “Lien On Me.”

CryptoQuip

1. Abundance of iron oxide, 2. Swift foot, 3. Okefenokee, 4. Medicines that dilate blood vessels, 5. 1867, 6. Benny Goodman, 7. Papyrus, 8. Bullwhip, 9. The Ides of March, 10. A clutch

TRIVIA TEST

28

Noon and midnight are the only times that have their own names. The origin of the term “midnight” is obvious, since it occurs in the middle of the night, but how did 12 p.m. come to be called noon? The word itself is derived from the Latin word “nono,” which means “nine.” Still doesn’t seem to make sense? Here’s how lexicographers trace the evolution of the word: If hours are counted from dawn–roughly 6 a.m.–instead of midnight, nine hours into the day would be 3 p.m., or midafternoon. Lacking accurate portable timepieces, ancient Romans used the term “nono” to refer to the midafternoon in a general sense. Over time, as the pronunciation of the word shifted to “noon,” the meaning of the word shifted to “midday.” Once society began to be run according to the accuracy of clocks, noon was pinpointed as 12 p.m.


January 12-25, 2017

Horoscopes

PUZZLES FOR KIDS

FIRE

FUN & GAMES

EARTH

AIR

WATER

Michael O’Connor is an astrologer, counselor and life coach | SunStarAstrology.com

Capricorn (Dec 21-Jan 19)

Taurus (Apr 20-May 21)

Your mood is sober and your mind focused. Cultivating your skills and talents, prospectively to make more money, is highlighted. Meanwhile, things are shaking close to home and you feel the need to see a bigger picture, in detail.

Searching for a light to lead the way finds you deciphering where to look. While accessing new tools and strategies makes sense, silent prayers and affirmations arise instinctively. Either way, set your sights on actions that breed confidence.

Aquarius (Jan 19-Feb 19) Happy to hang out behind the scenes, your perspective is philosophical, your scope global. Clearing the cobwebs of yesteryear seems important. Expressing yourself in new and beautiful ways feels right.

Pisces (Feb 19-Mar 20) Dreams of possibility, prompted by necessity and backed by positive action is likely. Making key connections will become increasingly important. Drawing on the skills and leadership of others increases opportunities.

Aries (Mar 21-Apr 20) A blend of social enthusiasm and professional seriousness is likely as 2017 begins. It could take little more than the wind to cause you to lean to one side or the other. Yet, a spirit of leadership to uplift and inspire rises steadily.

MAGIC MAZE ON THE EDGE

Gemini (May 21-Jun 21) Inspirations to socialize are strong and you want to play. Yet, early on you are in a mood to observe and listen more than have words to say. This vocal ice melts progressively as your oratorical skills increase, especially under the full moon’s light.

Cancer (Jun 21-Jul 22) Striking a balance between politely playing the social game and speaking your truth is likely as the year begins. You want to be fair but must weigh between realism and idealism. Ideals will take an early lead but the truth of your reality will win.

Leo (Jul 22-Aug 23) Ringing in the year with cheers and horns, aside, you are otherwise in a sober, analytical mood. Your ambitions are rising steadily prompting you to brainstorm for new ways to earn some honest bucks and perhaps with multiple streams.

Virgo (Aug 23-Sep 22) Wading through waist deep fears, you want to feel like a winner again. Your mind is bent on how and innovation is inspiring your focus. Your first task includes getting out of the swamp. Strategy is required and you need to clarify your ‘why’.

Libra (Sep 22-Oct 22) Despite desires to socialize and play, you are happy to hover close to home. Expansion and increase are realities that transcend wishful thinking. Notions of necessity is the natural consequence and you need a plan.

Scorpio (Oct 22-Nov 21) Sharp and sober thinking are leading your way into 2017. More than merely an impact, you want to make a difference. To also earn returns is inspiring excitement about the possibilities. Your wide-open heart will be met with equal imagination.

Sagittarius (Nov 21-Dec 21) You have much on your mind to the extent of feeling mired by it. Social activities may be a healthy solution. Deeper involvements like joining the club are even better. Also, clear the clutter and create beauty at home.

Tails in Tahoe Trinity

Cake

Squeaker

Holly

I enjoy lounging in a cozy spot in the sun. I am always the first cat to go outside on the porch in the morning, and will spend most of my day outside watching the dogs and birds.

She is intelligent and an award winning companion. Has a mellow and loving temperament. Enjoys the company of people, hesitant with cats and ok with her fur friends.

Squeaker, female, Tortie Point Siamese mix. Short hair. 5-years-old. Spayed, shots, chipped.

Holly is a friendly, playful and affectionate young lady. She will be the first one to greet you when you come home. She enjoys playing with wand toys or chasing that pesky red dot!

Pet Network (775) 832-4404 bschilpp@petnetwork.org www.petnetwork.org

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org

WARF (775) 783-8737 karen.joseph@att.net www.tahoewarf.com

Humane Society of Truckee-Tahoe (530) 587-5948 www.hstt.org 29


THE MUSIC SCENE

Music SCENE TheTahoeWeekly.com

The

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

LIVE MUSIC, SHOWS & NIGHTLIFE

AN EVENING WITH

CALENDAR

JANUARY 12-26, 2017

Dawes

JAN. 12 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

Matt Jacoby

Jan. 20 | 8 p.m. | $25-$35 | MontBleu Resort Casino | Stateline, Nev.

Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern & Grill 5 p.m. Moon Gravy Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Allen Havey & Alycia Cooper The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

I

caught Dawes’ drummer Griffin Goldsmith fresh off a recording session with Dave Rawlings Machine in Nashville, Tenn., on his way back to his native Los Angeles. “It went really well,” Goldsmith says of the session. “It was over a lot more quickly than I expected.” That sense of time moving quickly is a recent theme for Dawes, which released their second album in little more than a year in September. “We’re All Gonna Die” has so far been supported by a smattering of dates across the U.S. and the U.K.; now the indie, folk rock band is set to embark on a 50-date North American tour called, “An Evening with Dawes.” Goldsmith spoke about the recording process at the famed EastWest Studios on Sunset Boulevard, the birthplace of classic albums such as The Beach Boy’s “Pet Sounds” and Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” “It was awesome, man,” he says. “Relatively easy and really fun.” The new album presents somewhat of a departure from Dawes’ roots rock sound in favor of an indie-Motown, neo-soul vibe uncannily at peace with its oracular title. The new sound was influenced by Grammy-nominated producer Blake Mills, longtime band friend and founding member of the prototype group, Simon Dawes, which took its name from both his and Goldsmith’s brother guitarist/ songwriter Taylor’s middle names. “The songs were definitely a completely different batch than before,” says Goldsmith. “I think the biggest thing was working with Blake. He’s very responsible for the way the record sounds. He has a very specific way he does things that changes depending on the artist he is working with. 30

“It’s continued to be an uphill trajectory as opposed to an artist that comes out the gates with a huge hit and then doesn’t know how to follow it up.” –Griffin Goldsmith But we all kind of formed our musical influences around the same time so we get along really well in the studio.” “We’re All Gonna Die” is plainly more progressive and beat-forward than previous Dawes’ records; there’s a clear emphasis on space, texture, rhythm and percussion. Goldsmith insists that the freer range of sound grew from the approach of beginning each recording with a focus on the “feel” of the songs as originally composed by his brother Taylor. “We were trying to get back to inspiration of what it was when he wrote it,” he says. “Wherever your head was at is very indicative of how the song’s supposed to sound. And oftentimes those rhythmic things are very subtle. For us, we’d get in the tracking room and start with Taylor on the acoustic guitar or piano depending on how he first composed the tune. We’d start there and try to do stuff that worked.” This soulful methodology opened up room for Goldsmith to experiment more fully with his drum sounds and the prominence of his contributions are fully apparent in the album mix. “My intention is always definitely how to best serve the tune,” he says. “But on some of these songs, there’s a little more room for stuff happening and more wild

sounds. I’d worked with Blake a lot before and knew what to expect. I got to bring all my gear, which was a lot, in order to figure out what was sounding best. There was even one sound where we used a Pelican drum case as a kick drum on a couple songs.” Nearly a decade into their career, Dawes continues to gain renown for their musicality and songwriting. It’s the slow, steady ascent that keeps the men motivated about the possibilities of the future. “In a way we want to be playing the arenas like any band would, but in a way this is kind of what’s kept us around and excited about things,” says Goldsmith. “It’s continued to be an uphill trajectory as opposed to an artist that comes out the gates with a huge hit and then doesn’t know how to follow it up. We’ve slowly gathered a really awesome devoted fan base and more of them come out every year. We are doing venues we’ve never done before and to still to be in that position after eight years of touring is pretty cool.” | montbleuresort.com

In Stride Music Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Jason King Band Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Just Us Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Nef the Pharaoh Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Whiskerman Peppermill 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Frank Perry Combo Sands Regency 8 p.m. Kick Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ MoFunk Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. John Mulrooney Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. DC Ervin Pioneer Underground 8 p.m. Open Dance Floor Studio on 4th 8 p.m.

JAN. 13 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 p.m. Tyler Stafford Nakoma Resort 5 p.m. Live music Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Tuck Wilson Granlibakken 6 p.m. Matthew Szlachetka Cottonwood 7 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Coburn Station Bar of America 8 p.m. Nathan Owens MontBleu 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Afrolicious w/Planet Booty Crystal Bay Club 10 p.m. Johnny Young Band Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. Guest DJ Classic Cue 9 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m.


January 12-25, 2017

Open Mic & Karaoke Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Allen Havey & Alycia Cooper The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Kick Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Paul Covarelli Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Take 2 Harrah’s 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Just Us Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Escalade Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Big Bad Boogie Rock Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Trippin’King Snakes Carson Nugget 8 p.m. Limbo State and Evil Ash Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Halie O’Ryan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Whiskerman Peppermill 8 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. Fastlane Circus Circus 9 p.m. All In All Atlantis 10 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Mustard Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Calendar Girls” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. DC Ervin Carson Nugget 7:30 p.m. Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. John Mulrooney Laugh Factory 7:30& 9:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Sheep Dip 53 Eldorado 8 p.m. DC Ervin Pioneer Underground 9 p.m.

JAN. 14 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Live music KT Sun Deck 1 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Chi McLean Squaw Village 2 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m.

Richard Blair Alder Creek Café 5 p.m. Serina Dawn Band Donner Ski Ranch 6 p.m. Mike Badinger Granlibakken 6 p.m. Tainted Love Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Steve & Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Nathan Owens MontBleu 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. Coburn Station Bar of America 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. The Heavy Pets Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Audiodub & Two Peace Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Dorothy w/The Georgia Flood & Moondog Matinee Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. Live music Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. Another Damn Disappointment Pastime Club 10 p.m. Johnny Young Band Cabo Wabo 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties Big View Bar Homewood 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Pump Up the Jams Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 6:45 & 8:45 p.m. Justin Rupple Hard Rock Casino 8 p.m. Allen Havey & Alycia Cooper The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Kick Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Paul Covarelli Boomtown 5 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Take 2 Harrah’s 6 p.m. The Fire Brewery Arts Center 7 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. The Demon Rock Off Rockbar 7 p.m. R. Kelly Grand Sierra 8 p.m. Whiskerman Peppermill 8 p.m. Escalade Max’s Casino 8 p.m. George Pickard Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Left of Reason & The Electric Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Trippin’King Snakes Carson Nugget 8 p.m. Big Bad Boogie Rock Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Halie O’Ryan Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Rebekah Chase Boomtown 9 p.m. Blues at 3rd Street Sands Regency 8 p.m. Fastlane Circus Circus 9 p.m. All In All Atlantis 10 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m.

Not just Pizza!

Project MANA

(Making Adequate Nutrition Accessible)

Emergency Hunger Relief Organization serving the North Shore and Truckee since 1991 Our mission is to reduce the incidence of hunger and its detrimental effects upon individuals, families, the community and the region.

(775) 298-4161 WEEKLY FOOD DISTRIBUTION LOCATIONS AND TIMES: MONDAYS TAHOE CITY | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Fairway Community Center, 330 Fairway Drive TUESDAYS TRUCKEE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community Arts Center, 10046 Church Street WEDNESDAYS KINGS BEACH | 3:00pm to 3:30pm Community House, 265 Bear Street THURSDAYS INCLINE VILLAGE | 3:00pm to 3:30pm St. Patrick’s Church ProjectMana.org 341 Village Blvd.

HAPPY HOUR Daily 3-7pm SALADS • SANDWICHES • BEER/WINE

Daily Soup, Lunch & Pasta Specials Daily Specials - Italian Wednesdays Mexican Thursdays, Fishy Fridays Arcade Games • Wi-Fi • HDTV Sports NFL Sunday Ticket on HDTVs with Specials!

Live music every Wednesday evening 6–9pm

$1 OFF! ANY MEDIUM PIZZA $2 OFF! ANY LARGE PIZZA or pay regular price and get a MINI Cheese Pizza FREE!

Not good with any other offers. Good through 01/25/17 view full menu & daily specials at cbspizza.com

TO GO Orders Welcome Open 11am-10pm Daily

546-4738

5075 N. Lake Blvd., Carnelian Bay • Next to 7-11

DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance DC Ervin Pioneer Underground 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Calendar Girls” Reno Little Theater 2 & 7:30 p.m. John Mulrooney Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Sheep Dip 53 Silver Legacy 8 p.m. “Decadence” Harrah’s 10 p.m.

THE MUSIC SCENE

AFROLICIOUS

JAN. 15 | SUNDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Live music 89 Bar & Grill 2 p.m. Matthew Szlachetka Northstar Village 2 p.m. Kip Yager Granlibakken 6 p.m. Matthew Szlachetka Squaw Village 2 p.m. Nahko & Medicine for the People w/The Late One’s MontBleu 8 p.m. Unkle Funkle McP’s TapHouse 9 p.m. Diego’s Umbrella w/Sam Chase Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. DJ Parties Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Pastime Club 9:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Andrew The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 4:15 & 7:15 p.m. Allen Havey & Alycia Cooper The Improv 9 p.m.

Jan. 13 | 10 p.m. Crystal Bay Casino | Crystal Bay, Nev. AFROLICIOUS IS back in Tahoe bringing their unique energetic eclectic sound that is an infectious mix of classic funk, disco, Afrobeat, Latin, seductive dance floor percussions, and electronic grooves. Get your afro-funk on and dance the night away. Planet Booty plays the after party. | crystalbaycasino.com

TAINTED LOVE

RENO & BEYOND Tristan Selzler Brasserie St. James 12 p.m. Sunday Jazz Wild River Grille 2 p.m. Classix Three Pioneer Center 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Deep Groove Red Dog Saloon 5:30 p.m. Crush Boomtown 6 p.m. First Take Rockbar Theater 6 p.m. Tyler Stafford Peppermill 6 p.m. Stig Studio on 4th 8 p.m. All In All Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Left of Centre Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 5 p.m. DJ Kronik Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Steve Starr Rockbar 6 p.m. Premier Karaoke Show The Point 6:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

Jan. 14 | 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe | Stateline, Nev. TAINTED LOVE TAHOE’S tribute band knows how to get a crowd up and dancing. With a nostalgic sound, the band plays hits of the 1980s that not only make you want to sing along but get you moving with their high-energy show. | harrahstahoe.com

NOW PLAYING

Tahoe 3-D Movie Science Center

Lake Tahoe in Depth

Major Motion Pictures · Independent Films Live Music · Dance Performances

See it at the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center 291 Country Club Drive Incline Village, Nevada

Phone: (775) 881-7562 Email: tercinfo@ucdavis.edu Hands-on science activities, Web: terc.ucdavis.edu

Guided tours & 3-D movies Open Tues.—Fri., 1—5 p.m.

(or by appointment, closed all holidays)

TahoeScienceCenter.org (775) 881-7566

La La Land Jan. » TBD

The Founder Jan. » TBD

Visit TahoeArtHausCinema.com for showtimes, schedule, events + tkts

THE COBBLESTONE CENTER 475 N LAKE BLVD., TAHOE CITY, CA | 530-584-2431

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

LAKE TAHOE’S BEST SELECTION OF LIGHTING

C A L E N D A R | JANUARY 12-26, 2017

Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance John Mulrooney Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.  

JAN. 16 | MONDAY

TAHOE & TRUCKEE Live music West Shore cafe 6 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tyler Stafford Peppermill 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Classix Three Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. Joey Carmon Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

Custom Design Tuesday - Friday 10 am - 4 pm Monday & Saturday by appointment Pricing competitive with the internet

LAKETAHOELIGHTING.COM

530.546.3902 8726 N. LAKE BLVD. KINGS BEACH, CA

JAN. 17 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rabbit Wilde Crystal Bay Club 9 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Lucas Arizu Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Patrick Major Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Tyler Stafford Peppermill 6 p.m. Scott Parsons Project Boomtown 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. Classix Three Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. Joey Carmon Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Jackson Perdue Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

JAN. 18 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Ike & Martin “MS Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Evening with Celebrity Physhic/Medium Rebecca Fearing The Loft Theatre 7:30 p.m. Amir K & Allen Strickland Williams The Improv 9 p.m.

32

RENO & BEYOND

JAN. 15 | SUNDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Patrick Major Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Tyler Stafford Peppermill 6 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. This Wild Life w/Royal Teeth, Oyster Kids Jub Jub’s 7 p.m. Rick Monroe Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Joey Carmon Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Jackson Perdue Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

JAN. 19 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE

Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern & Grill 5 p.m. Erica Lee Cottonwood 7 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Bobby G Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Amir K & Allen Strickland Williams The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Jaime Rollins Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. The Novelists Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Johnzo West & The Wayward Souls Peppermill 7 p.m. Joey Carmon Band Atlantis 8 p.m. Memories in Glass Jub Jub’s 8 p.m. The Expendables w/HIRIE, Tribal Theory Cargo 8 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Boondoggle Live St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Fista Cuffs 1 Up 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ MoFunk Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Jackson Perdue Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Calendar Girls” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m.

JAN. 20 | FRIDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m.  Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 4 & 8 p.m. The Kepple Band Nakoma Resort 5 p.m.

THE EXPENDABLES

Jan. 19 | 8 p.m. | Cargo | Reno, Nev. THE EXPENDABLES enjoyed a laid-back lifestyle growing up in Santa Cruz. They surfed, skated, partied and played music. The band has staked its claim in the California surf/rock genre by headlining venues from coast to coast. Blending reggae, punk rock, and 1980s-style dueling guitar solos, the Expendables have made heads turn and floors shake for years. Also on the ticket are Hirie and Tribal Theory. | cargoreno.com

DC ERVIN

Jan. 12 | 8 p.m. & Jan. 13 | 9 p.m. Jan. 14 | 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. Pioneer Underground | Reno, Nev. Jan. 13 | 7:30 p.m. Carson Nugget | Carson City, Nev. DC ERVIN IS an actor and writer, known for “Fifty Shades of Black,” “Gay Hunt” and “She Wins.” A second-generation comedian who gets a lot of his inspiration from his father, DC made his national television debut on ABC’s “The Evidence.” He has won the Ontario Comedy Competition and was a finalist in the Bay Area Comedy Competition. He’s made an appearance on “Who’s Got Jokes?” on TV One. His unique brand of comedy is not a come see, but a must see. | renotahoecomedy.com

“MOTOWN:

THE MUSICAL” Joan Marcus

THE MUSIC SCENE

Jan. 24-29 | Times vary Pioneer Center | Reno, Nev. THIS IS THE TRUE American-dream story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson and many more. Motown shattered barriers, shaped our lives and made us all move to the same beat. Featuring classic songs such as “My Girl” and “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” experience the story behind the music in this recordbreaking smash-hit. | pioneercenter.com


January 12-25, 2017

EDM PRODUCER MEMORY CODE OFFERS

C A L E N D A R | JANUARY 12-26, 2017 Live music Plaza Bar 5 p.m. Tuck Wilson Granlibakken 6 p.m. Ike & Martin Jake’s on the Lake 6 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Live music 968 Park Hotel Coffee Bar 7:30 p.m. Tahoe Dance Band South Lake Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Dawes MontBleu 8 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m. Audioboxx Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. Guest DJ Classic Cue 9 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open mic Art Truckee 7 p.m. Punk Rock Karaoke Tourist Club 9 p.m. MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Amir K & Allen Strickland Williams The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Joey Carmon Band Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Paul Covarelli Boomtown 5 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Erin & The Project Harrah’s 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Corky Bennett Reno Senior Center 7:30 p.m. Johnzo West & The Wayward Souls Peppermill 8 p.m. Styx Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Just Us Max’s Casino 8 p.m. The Novelists Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Apple Z Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Escalade Carson Nugget 8 p.m. Arizona Jones Band Silver Legacy 8 p.m. George Pickard Boomtown 9 p.m. Heroes of Rock & Roll Circus Circus 9 p.m. Reckless Envy Atlantis 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 & 11 p.m. DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V & DJ Bob Richards Eldorado 10 p.m. DJ Romeo Reyes Lex GSR10 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. Boggan and guest DJs 1 up 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Jackson Perdue Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Sean Peabody Carson Nugget 7:30 p.m. “Calendar Girls” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “The Explorers Club” Restless Artists Theater 7:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. World Open Dance Floor Comma Coffee 8 p.m.

JAN. 21 | SATURDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Jody Sweet Piano Best Pies 11 a.m. Live music KT Sun Deck 1 p.m. Serina Dawn Duo Squaw Village 2 p.m. Live music Northstar Village 2 p.m. Live music Tamarack Lodge 3:30 p.m. Green Weather Alder Creek Café 5 p.m. Mike Badinger Granlibakken 6 p.m. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Steve & Tom Gar Woods 8 p.m. Chris Costa Tahoe Biltmore 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Gar Woods 8 p.m. The Stone Foxes Moe’s BBQ 9 p.m. Hare of the Dawg String Band Whiskey Dick’s 9 p.m. Killer Dueling Pianos MontBleu 9 p.m. Live music Steamers Bar & Grill SLT 9 p.m.

Actors Killed Lincoln Pastime Club 10 p.m. Audioboxx Cabo Wabo 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties Big View Bar Homewood 12 p.m. DJ party Northstar Village 5:30 p.m. Arty the Party Harrah’s 8 p.m. DJ David Aaron MontBleu 10 p.m. Pump Up the Jams Rookies 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke MontBleu 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 6:45 7 8:45 p.m. Amir K & Allen Strickland Williams The Improv 9 p.m.

THE MUSIC SCENE

“The Great Rose Window” STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

RENO & BEYOND Joey Carmon Band Atlantis 4 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Paul Covarelli Boomtown 5 p.m. Corky Bennett Bavarian World 6 p.m. GHI Jazz Living the Good Life 6 p.m. Erin & The Project Harrah’s 6 p.m. Live music David Walley’s Hot Springs 6 p.m. Craig, Terri, Rocky & D. Spiteri Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Erika Paul Sierra Arts Gallery 7 p.m. The Purple Experience Atlantis 8 p.m. Calling Ophelia Studio on 4th 8 p.m. Johnzo West & The Wayward Souls Peppermill 8 p.m. Just Us Max’s Casino 8 p.m. Apple Z Silver Legacy 8 p.m. The Novelists Carson Valley Inn 8 p.m. Escalade Carson Nugget 8 p.m. Arizona Jones Band Silver Legacy 8 p.m. George Pickard Boomtown 9 p.m. Heroes of Rock & Roll Circus Circus 9 p.m. Black Market III Sands Regency 10 p.m. Reckless Envy Atlantis 10 p.m. Garage Boys Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ I Harrah’s 9 p.m. DJ Roni V Eldorado 9 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 9 p.m. Country Music Nights Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Chris English Peppermill 1 a.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke w/Darren Castle Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Karaoke The Point 9 p.m. Karaoke Spiro’s Sports Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Calendar Girls” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. “The Explorers Club” Restless Artists Theater 7:30 p.m. Jackson Perdue Laugh Factory 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. “Decadence” Harrah’s 10 p.m. Special Events TEDx Grand Sierra 9 a.m.

JAN. 23 | MONDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Live music West Shore cafe 6 p.m. Mark Wilson McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Himmel Haus 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Line Dancing Nakoma Resort 7 p.m. Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND CW & Mr. Spoons Comma Coffee 12 p.m. Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Tandymonium Boomtown 6 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

I

ncline Village’s Mike Adamo, the drum mer for Mama’s Cookin’, Peter Joseph Burtt and the King Tide and The Truth Cartel, certainly knows something about percussion. After all, he is the man who wrote the popular drumming manual, “The Breakbeat Bible.” Now he’s dipping his foot into electronic dance music (EDM) as producer Memory Code with his premiere album, “The Great Rose Window.”

a similarly dramatic way as if Adamo is trying to make the sounds he plays with bigger than they truly are. Obscure ideas are introduced on a grand scale and soon fall into familiar grooves. “Auric Fields (Interlude One)” plays a bit lighter delivering steady R&B woven beneath Spanish guitar. On “The Alchemical Angels Pts. 1 & 2,” he samples The O’Jays’ “Cry Together” into a futuristic

The keyboard plugs out a recognizable melody and the beat breaks down into pure nasty drums before opening up into a bass-morphing flow of vibrations. Adamo’s album opens with a female computer voice welcoming the listener into “The Great Rose Theme” intro — a throbbing break beat enters over heavy keyboards and a sound dose of glitch. “Our prayer music is a bridge to higher consciousness. In it we go beyond words to the realm of pure spirit where music and feeling and healing are one,” says Lady Robot in “Hello Love,” the No. 2 track. This kind of sentiment is quickly juxtaposed by some dirty funk straight off the streets of 1970s Compton. The keyboard plugs out a recognizable melody and the beat breaks down into pure nasty drums before opening up into a bass-morphing flow of vibrations. The heavy whir and sputter continue uninterrupted until “The People of Orphalese (Shine On)” begins with another theatrical voiceover before degenerating into the rise and fall of a calm, energized syncopation. The album continues on in

digital breakdown, and then turns Ray, Goodman & Brown’s “All I Have” into the new-age soul funk of “For the Moments (Interlude Two).” Later on, “Fly Vibes (Interlude Three)” manipulates a chill beat to the flutter of dragonfly wings.

E X C L U S I V E C O N T E N T AT

TheTahoeWeekly.com

Listen to “Looking In” from “The Great Rose Window”

In the end, “Mind Angels, Pts. 1, 2 & 3” and “Silver Threads & Mercury Drops, Pts. 1 & 2” lead us back to where we started: heavy keyboard drone, in-and-out break-beat, bass and snare drawn and bent, adjacent and complimentary. Adamo turns space into beats until the cows come home, Lady Robot outsourcing the memory into oblivion. 

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THE MUSIC SCENE

TheTahoeWeekly.com

The Heavy Pets

CHASING THEIR OWN DREAMS STORY BY SEAN MCALINDIN

Jan. 14 | 9 p.m. | $10-$12 | 21+ | Moe’s Original BBQ | Tahoe City

JAN. 23 | MONDAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

DJ Parties Amp Ent DJ Silver Legacy 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Java Jungle 7 p.m. Gold Hill Hotel 7 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 9:30 p.m. Open Mic w/Tany Jane Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Blazing Mics! Jub Jub’s 9:30 p.m. Live Band Karaoke Eldorado 10 p.m.

JAN. 24 | TUESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Buddy Emmer Band Harrah’s 8 p.m. Grey Mitchell McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. DJ Parties Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. DJ Keenan Whiskey Dicks 9 p.m. Karaoke Pastime Club 10 p.m Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic w/Ryan Taylor Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Lucas Arizu Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. RENO & BEYOND

T

he musical edification of The Heavy Pets’ guitarist Jeff Lloyd began at an early age in the small town of Goshen, N.Y. “My dad used to make me identify what he was listening to in order to impress his friends,” he says. “I could recognize voices and sounds from when I was really little.” As a teenager, Lloyd bought a Yahama Eterna acoustic guitar from his uncle and began jamming to his parents’ old vinyls. “I’d memorized the records to where I knew where every skip was,” he says. “I’d sit and play along with the Allman Brothers, Jethro Tull, Mountain and learn every riff, just figuring it out by ear.” Once he unearthed a Jimi Hendrix documentary on a grainy old VHS cassette, the rest was history. “From then on I was literally and figuratively lighting my guitar on fire,” he says. A couple of years later, Lloyd met co-guitarist Mike Garulli at Goshen High School.

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TheTahoeWeekly.com Listen to The Heavy Pets’ “Stolen Smile”

“We were both the guys who brought acoustic guitars to school,” Lloyd says. “At lunch time he would go sit with his group of friends and play something for them and I had my little group of friends. Then one day we said we should just sit together so we’d have a bigger circle of friends. Soon after, Mike’s dad dropped him off with his bass stack in my basement and that was that.” Although they became quick comrades, Lloyd and Garulli initially came from different ends of the musical spectrum, a fact that has continued to influence the diverse sound of the band to this day. “Mike was in an up-and-coming hardcore band and I was really into Phish,” Lloyd says. “Although we found some common ground with Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin, musically we were coming from different places. I think that was really important. He was coming to me with wild ideas and I think I was maybe like that for him, too.” 34

Their decision to start a band was settled the summer of 1997 while traveling together to Limestone, Maine, to attend a Phish festival known as the Great Went. “We had just become friends and musical partners,” Lloyd says. “Basically we are out there on a hill overlooking 80,000 people talking about how this is amazing and we know what we need to do. It was just so incredibly inspiring to see so many people come together for one band.” The remainder of the band was founded through connections made at Syracuse University where they ended their college career on an impromptu jam session with Parliament-Funkadelic. “It was a pretty wild and crazy party, and one hell of way to finish school,” he says. Lloyd and the rest of The Heavy Pets later reconnected with Parliament-Funkadelic after moving to South Florida to work for an Internet marketing company in preparation for their musical ambitions. “We moved there with the idea we were going to save some money, start a band the right way,” Lloyd says. “We put money away for a couple years and then went right into being a full-time band.” The Heavy Pets have since played more than 1,300 shows across the country, earning a regular spot in the rotation at most major jam-band festivals and an especially strong following in the Southeast. “I understand that jam band is a dirty word to certain people, but we’re not your uncle’s jam band,” Lloyd says. “Our focus is on songwriting and playing really highenergy rock ‘n’ roll.” Ten years into their professional career, The Heavy Pets aren’t looking back. They’ll be rocking Moe’s Original BBQ in Tahoe City toward the middle of an 11-shows-in-12-days West Coast tour with the Brothers Gow from San Diego. “When people ask us whether we think we’re successful or not, I say, yes, simply for the fact that we get to do this,” says Lloyd. “There’s a feeling when everything’s clicking and we’re playing a really great show that’s addictive and I couldn’t ever give it up. We’re still chasing the dream and living a life that we are proud of and rewarded through. It’s pure magic at its best.” 

CW and Dr. Spitmore Comma Coffee 11:30 a.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bill Wharton Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Canyon White Living the Good Life 6:30 p.m. DG Kicks Big Band 3rd Street Bar 8 p.m. Iration w/Protoje Cargo 8:30 p.m. Black & Blues Jam Sidelines 8:30 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Eldorado 10 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Motown: The Musical” Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. Tim Gaither Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m.

JAN. 25 | WEDNESDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Ike & Martin “MS Dixie” 5:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ Chris English Cabo Wabo 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Mellow Fellow Truckee 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Classic Cue 9 p.m. Auld Dubliner 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Electroswing Burlesque The Loft 8 p.m. Jerry Rocha and Ronnie Schnell The Improv 9 p.m.

Railroad Earth Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. Mic Smith McP’s TapHouse 8 p.m. Rustler’s Moon Bar of America 8 p.m. Live music Rookies 9:30 p.m. Stan Charles Pastime Club 10 p.m. Bobby G Cabo Wabo 10 p.m. DJ Parties Roger That! The Loft 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Classic Cue 8 p.m. Open Mic Alibi Ale Works 9 p.m. Karaoke Fat Cat Bar 9 p.m. Lip Sync w/Dreu Murin MontBleu 9 p.m. Karaoke The Grid 9:30 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance Magic Fusion The Loft 7:15 p.m. Jerry Rocha and Ronnie Schnell The Improv 9 p.m. RENO & BEYOND Gil Eldorado 4:30 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Dave Leather Sassafras 6:30 p.m. Terri, Craig & Mick Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Decades Carson Valley Inn 7 p.m. Big Mo & The Full Moon Band Peppermill 7 p.m. Jaime Rollins Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Bobbie & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Bazooka Zoo’s Groovy Good Time Bash St. James Infirmary 9 p.m. Ill.gates & KJ Sawka 1 Up 10 p.m. Ashley Red Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s Nugget 5 p.m. DJ MoFunk Silver Legacy 8 p.m. DJ Trivia Singer Social Club 8 p.m. DJ Bobby G Living the Good Life 8:30 p.m. Country Music Night Grand Sierra 10 p.m. DJ Montague Eldorado 10:30 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Karaoke Club Cal Neva 8 p.m. Karaoke West 2nd Street 8 p.m. Karaoke The Point 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Bottom’s Up Saloon 9 p.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Motown: The Musical” Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. “Calendar Girls” Reno Little Theater 7:30 p.m. Tim Gaither Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. Country Artists Tribute Show Harrah’s 7:30 p.m. “The Explorers Club” Restless Artists’ Theatre 7:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m. Will C Pioneer Underground 8 p.m.

RENO & BEYOND Dave Leather Comma Coffee 12 p.m. John Shipley Eldorado 4:30 p.m. Bill Wharton Carson Valley Inn 6 p.m. Max Minardi Peppermill 6 p.m. The Robeys Boomtown 6 p.m. Terri & Craig Glen Eagles 7 p.m. Rick Metz Blues Jam Sands Regency 7 p.m. Bobbie R. & Paul J. Eldorado 8:30 p.m. Ashley Red Eldorado 10:30 p.m. DJ Parties DJ & Dancing Gilley’s 6 p.m. DJ Jamie G John Ascuaga’s 7 p.m. Johnny Bailey Vinyl Club St. James Infirmary 8 p.m. Bingo & Country Rock DJ Silver Legacy 8 p.m. Justincredible DJ Carson Station 9 p.m. Open Mic & Karaoke Open Mic Red Dog Saloon 7 p.m. Open Mic Firkin & Fox 7 P.m. Theater, Comedy & Dance “Motown: The Musical” Pioneer Center 7:30 p.m. Tim Gaither Laugh Factory 7:30 p.m. “Happy Birthday, Wanda June” Brüka Theatre 8 p.m.

JAN. 26 | THURSDAY TAHOE & TRUCKEE Aaron Oropeza Truckee Tavern 5 p.m. 80’s music night Mellow Fellow Truckee 8 p.m.

Burning Man ticket prices up

Burning Man is increasing the ticket prices for this year’s festival with general admission now $425. The tickets have risen sharply since the first festival was held in 1992 with tickets at $25. The tickets range from a high of $1,200 during the pre-sale on Feb. 1 to $190 for the low income program, which is open from Feb. 15 to April 17. Vehicle passes remain at $80. This year’s Burning Man will be held from Aug. 27 to Sept. 4 in the Black Rock Desert. | tickets.burningman.org


Local

TA S T Y TIDBITS

FOOD & WINE, RECIPES, FEATURES & MORE

Craft beer scene expands Area venues Tahoe’s craft beer offerings just keep getting better in 2017 with the announcement of a new South Lake Tahoe brewery and the expansion of an Incline Village, Nev., favorite into Truckee. South Lake Brewing Company, the newest craft brewery to Tahoe, is eyeing to open a taproom in February at the former Ace Hardware location at the wye. The new brewery is the brainchild of South Lake Tahoe locals Chris and Nicole Smith. South Lake Brewing’s offerings include the Angora IPA, Marlette Blonde, Barrett Brown and Emigrant Saison. The taproom will feature six taps to start and outdoor seating. Membership to the growler club, the Bär Society, is now open. | southlakebeer.com Alibi Ale Works recently announced that it will be opening a second taproom in downtown Truckee in April, according to co-owner Kevin Drake. The tap room will be located on Bridge Street and will feature the tasty drafts that Alibi Ale Works has become known for. | alibialeworks.com

An app that appetizes Likemoji is a local technology startup that wants to change the way people choose where they dine. This free app in the Apple App store offers a fast way to share specifics about a person’s dining and entertainment experiences. Likemoji helps potential diners find the places best suited to their needs by highlighting the popular opinion of the crowd, without spotlighting a single person’s negative experience. The company is currently partnering with local Reno and Tahoe business owners. It will be offering local in-app incentives and promotions and running sweepstakes giveaways to help drive additional engagement and value for the local user base and participating businesses. Interested persons can download Likemoji for free in the Apple App store. | likemoji.com

Winter farmers’ market Alpine Meadows Tahoe Food Hub’s Farm Shop is now open for winter every Thursday and Friday from noon to 6 p.m. The Farm Shop features more than 25 farms within 100 to 150 miles of North Lake Tahoe. The cooler and shelves are stocked with fresh, local and seasonal fruits and vegetables. A variety of specialty food products, pasture-raised eggs and grass-finished meats are available, as well as local specialty food products from Long Dream Farm, The Souper Wagon, Liberty Food & Wine Exchange and Lobo Baking and Born & Bread. | tahoefoodhub.org

Explore a world of wines Olympic Valley Dive into the cellar at PlumpJack Bar & Cafe and learn about wine varietals, regions and discover new worldly wines to love. Each Thursday, from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., the Wine Voyage will showcase different wine regions from around the globe.  Participants can enjoy a taste of three wines and wine fact cards. January features Rhone Varietals, February highlights Burgundy Varietals and Old World Regions are featured in March and April. Prices vary. | plumpjacksquawvalleyinn.com CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

January 12-25, 2017

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flavor

Wine film company

F I N D S A H O M E I N TA H O E

S T O R Y B Y B Y K AY L A A N D E R S O N · P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y W I N E R A M

I

nternational filmmaker Colin West came to North Lake Tahoe in the winter of 2014 to shoot a wine-focused adventure TV episode and fell in love with the mountains prompting him to move his filmmaking business to Tahoe. West has had to travel across the world and back several times to find his niche for his business. He ultimately put down roots in North Lake Tahoe, choosing it over the many exotic locations in which he’s worked. The Washington state native studied in Italy when he was 18 years old, apprenticing under Diletta Frescobaldi of the Marchesi De’Frescobaldi wine family. Immersed in the world-famous leader in fine Tuscan wines, West received a plethora of knowledge in Italian history, agriculture and language. “The Marchesi family has been producRupert Critchley, left, and Colin West, right, flying a drone in Piedmonte, Northern Italy.

“I’ve been to over 35 countries and Lake Tahoe is still one of the most unique, beautiful places in the world.” –Colin West ing wine for over 200 years. Michelangelo would trade his sculptures for this wine, Marchesi has sent wine to King Louis VIII,” says West. “I was fascinated in this business that mixes art, culture, science, agriculture and business.” After his internship, West returned to Washington and received a degree in international business with a minor in marketing in 2008 at the peak of the recession. It was tough for anyone trying to enter the workforce. West says he applied to more than 120 jobs before finally getting an offer for a sales position with Charles Shaw wines. He opted to turn down the position, however, and instead flew to South Australia to obtain an MBA in wine.

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

Watch an episode of WINERAM

“I was fluent in Italian and met a guy who was from Italy also studying wine. I went back to Italy to start a wine business, but the partnership didn’t work out so I became a sommelier in Rome,” says West. After his second stint in Italy, West traveled to New Zealand to try out another job in the wine industry. “That’s when things really started happening,” he says. “I went and lived in

Auckland as a wine specialist for a wine search engine, but I hated the desk job. So I picked up and went back to Queenstown [New Zealand] to become a sommelier.” While working as a sommelier in “the land of the long white cloud,” West began running a wine tour business in Central Otago. He soon got the idea to film Wine Region-A-Minute (WINERAM) reviews, incorporating an experience of wine, travel, adventure and lighthearted wine education. He shared his video footage with friend and videographer Rupert Critchley, who had worked on a Steven Spielberg production; the two formed a partnership in the wine/film business. Critchley and West spent six months filming the first WINERAM TV series in New Zealand. A year later, they went to Australia to shoot the second season of the wine adventure series and a feature film, “Vintage,” that is in the post-production phase now. After finishing filming in Australia, West went back to the U.S. to start on WINERAM’s third season, which is how West ultimately found Lake Tahoe. While producing the third season of WINERAM, all shot in the western United States, one of West’s sponsors suggested shooting a wine adventure episode in Lake Tahoe. West and his team wrote an episode on experiencing the Tahoe lifestyle with wine —hot tubbing at a mountain cabin and snow biking. West enjoyed his experience so much that he packed up his L.A. office within three

hours and came right back to Tahoe. “I decided to move the business to Tahoe because of its proximity to the wine country. There’s an international airport close by and this is a great place to network,” he says. “I was surprised to find so many talented photographers, videographers and people who understand this industry.” Since WINERAM’s inception four years ago, it has now had several series featured on Hulu TV, ABC International, Amazon Prime and more. “I’ve been to over 35 countries and Lake Tahoe is still one of the most unique, beautiful places in the world,” says West. “After filming here, Lake Tahoe turned into home fairly quickly; I am loving it and never want to leave.”  For more information, visit wineram.com.

Indu’s Asian

Noodles & Curries Christmas Tree Village 868 Tahoe Blvd. Incline Village

775.831.8317

IndusAsianNoodles.com 35


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Z W I E B E L R O S T B R AT E N B Y C H E F D AV I D “ S M I T T Y ” S M I T H

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Sunday-Thursday 5-6 p.m. In Downtown Truckee - (530) 587-4694

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ow, I made it. The holidays are over and I made it through and can still use my fingers to type as they were meant. For a while there, I wasn’t quite sure of what the outcome would be. I mean, it was really too close to call. At one point I thought about calling my sister, who is a nurse, and asking her for some advice. I had been eating so much turkey I thought I might end up growing feathers. Yes, I know, we’ve all heard it all. If you eat the seeds of an apple or watermelon one will grow in your stomach and so on. Well, this I have to say was different. I was starting to walk with a distinct strut and instead of replying with a “huh” when I wasn’t paying attention when I should have been, I would give a little cluck.

This is a fairly simple steak dinner that can also be a meal fit for any special occasion. Now that the holidays are over, most of us won’t be eating turkey for at least a little while. We have been eating these massive and elaborate meals that often took hours to prepare since Thanksgiving and it’s time for red meat. There are a couple important things to remember now that I have decided a redmeat meal is in order. First and probably foremost, it has to be easy to prepare. There has been all too much time spent in the kitchen for the last month and I want to fix something fairly simple. With the weather colder and snowier, it’s the time of year for the casseroles and stews and other comfort foods to start making their appearance on the menu but not before one meal that includes a piece of red meat and a knife and fork. The meal I have in mind is zwiebelrostbraten also called beef schnitzel by some. This is a fairly simple steak dinner that can also be a meal fit for any special occasion. The thing that makes this different from a steak is the toppings. Some dishes use mushrooms or different sauces to distin-

guish themselves, and this one uses onions. Crispy fried onions served over the top of the meat are what create the signature of the dish. There is a sauce that can vary by using different recipes, but can be extremely simple if you want. That is, you can make a sauce using a wine reduction and a demi glaze, but you also can use shallots and water to deglaze the pan for a pan sauce, and with the addition of the onions the meal is complete. Try the simple way and enjoy. 

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TheTahoeWeekly.com

Try some of Chef Smitty’s other beef recipes > Beef Satay > Beef Stir Fry

Smitty is a personal chef specializing in dinner parties, cooking classes and special events. Trained under Master Chef Anton Flory at Top Notch Resort in Stowe, Vt., Smitty is known for his creative use of fresh ingredients. To read archived copies of Smitty’s column, visit chefsmitty.com or TheTahoeWeekly.com. Contact him at tmmsmitty@gmail.com or (530) 412-3598.

ZWIEBELROSTBRATEN

From the kitchen of: Chef David “Smitty” Smith

American Bistro & Wine Bar

Open for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Don’t wait in the cold for breakfast!

Newly Remodeled Expanded Dining Room Available for Private Parties, Events and Weddings Watch your favorite sporting events

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1 steak (rib eye or New York strip or other sirloin, you also can slice a piece of round steak in which case I would pound it out a little like a cutlet.) ½ yellow onion, sliced as thin of rings as you can slice ½ shallot, fine diced 3 T flour 1 T butter Oil to fry the onion ½ C water Slice the yellow onion as thin as possible in rings. Lightly dust with flour so the rings are coated, but with not a lot of excess. Get the oil hot (around 350 degrees or so when you dip one piece of onion in it immediately starts to boil) and fry the onions until golden, stirring constantly so they do not clump together. This won’t take long. Remove from the oil onto a paper towel and set near the stove to keep warm while you cook your steak. Use a heavy pan, like a skillet if you have one or sauté pan and get it hot. If using a rib eye, my favorite, or a New York, I don’t usually pound it out but if using a lesser cut of meat pound it like a cutlet. Get the pan hot and sear one side of the steak. Flip it over and put it right into the oven at 350 degrees. Cook until it is done to your desired wellness. Remove the steak and brown the diced shallots in butter on the stove top. Add the water to deglaze the pan and let reduce to half, scraping any drippings off the bottom of the pan. Pour the sauce over the steak and top with the fried onions.


January 12-25, 2017

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A N E W Y O R K S TAT E BY LOU PHILLIPS | PHOTOS C O U R T E S Y F O X R U N V I N E YA R D S

o f Wine, Part I Vintners are making a worldwide name for themselves with crisp and minerally complex Rieslings. These beauties from top producers, such as the aforementioned Fox Run Vineyards, Ravines Wine Cellars and Sheldrake Point Winery, fare quite well with Germany’s best — at a fraction of the cost.

CREATIVE AMERICAN CUISINE IN AN ELEGANT LOG CABIN Vegan Sauté • Sustainable Fresh Fish • Filet Mignon • Organic Chicken Local Seasonal Produce • Unique Winter Additions Voted Best Place to Take a Date for 17 years

Celebrating 30 years Charlie Soule Chef/Owner Vineyard in winter.

Vintners are making a worldwide name for themselves with crisp and minerally complex Rieslings. The primary reason for the shift to quality is people who are committed to finding which grapes thrive in specific regions and braving the challenging climatic conditions. New York features two main wine regions: Finger Lakes and Long Island. We will focus on Finger Lakes in Part I and save Long Island for Part II in the next edition of Tahoe Weekly. This region was glacier-etched thousands of years ago; glaciers created not only the Finger Lakes but deposited an amazing amalgam of mineral and soil components. This is cold-weather viticulture here. Scott Osborne, proprietor of Finger Lakes star winery, Fox Run Vineyards, says wineries deal with everything from losing entire vineyards to deep winter freezes, to crops sizes varying from 50 to 60 percent from year to year because of untimely frosts. That’s tough on the old business model and demonstrates how devoted, or crazy, these folks are to make wine here. And what wines they are. The calling cards here are show-stopping Rieslings.

Open for dinner nightly at 6pm - Please make reservations

Steve Soule Head Waiter

Stateline Dr. next to Tahoe Biltmore, Crystal Bay, North Lake Tahoe

530-546-7529 | www.souledomain.com

I

n the 1970s, when Frank Sinatra sang, “Start spreadin’ the news,” he sure wasn’t touting New York wines. Now, we are spreadin’ the news that New York state is making some mighty fine wine. It has always made a lot as the third largest U.S. producer, but until recently the wines were mostly funky jug versions from hybrid and native grapes.

THE SOULE DOMAIN

WINEMAKER EVENTS $10 tastings | Meet the winemaker Taste 3 wines | Bottle signing Riesling is the star.

As you might expect, the other grapes thriving here are also well suited to coolclimate viticulture. On the white side, the Gewürztraminer grape expresses itself here in both the dry, spicy, lychee style and in amazing ice wines that match the great sweet wines of Alsace. Chardonnay from the Finger Lakes region is more like Chablis than California Chardonnays, being taut and precise. In reds, there are sleek versions of Pinot Noir and the Austrian varietal Blaufränkisch, called Lemberger here. These reds are typically medium-bodied wines with spice, featuring bright red and blue fruits and a tarry minerality — they are excellent food wines. As a wine educator and a native of New York, I’ve made a point to do tastings of New York wines that turned out to be fun and informative as the climate, soils and winemaking give unique and tasty expressions of the respective varietals. If you want to do the same, check with your local wine purveyor to see what he or she can get or check with the wineries directly because they all ship direct.  Lou Phillips is a Level 3 Advanced Sommelier and his consulting business WineProwest.com assists in the selling, buying and managing wine collections. He may be reached at (775) 544-3435 or lou@ wineprowest.com. Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for more wine columns.

farmers jane /onward January 13 | 5 - 7 p.m. January 14 | 5 - 7 p.m.

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TA S T Y

Tidbits

Visit TheTahoeWeekly.com for a complete list of Tasty Tidbits. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

Promoted in the kitchen

ARCHITECTURE

OF ALCOHOL

Craft cocktail enthusiasts and those who want to become one are invited to participate in Truckee Tavern and Grill’s new Blueprint of the Cocktail class on Saturdays  from 6 to 7:30 p.m. from Jan. 14 through the end of February. Participants will learn a simple, executable formula to easily craft cocktails at home and how to become confidant and discerning when ordering at a bar. The experience will include conversation focused on the ratios and ingredients that make the most classic cocktails timeless and the art of simple modifications that allow for creation of sophisticated, one-of-a-kind-from-scratch cocktails. Participants will have hands-on experience creating and sampling two cocktails while noshing on cheese and charcuterie. Classes are $90 per person, gratuity included. They are limited to 10 participants per session, ages 21 and older. Reservations are available on a first-come, first served basis. | Register (530) 587-3766

DINING GUIDE KINGS BEACH

Jason’s | American

Jason’s Beachside Grill, a locals’ favorite for more than 30 years offers casual dining in a rustic atmosphere. Savor American classics like Slow Roasted Prime Rib, Teriyaki Chicken, Pasta, Blackened Salmon and Jason’s famous Baby Back Ribs, along with nightly specials. Jason’s boasts the largest salad bar on the North Shore and gourmet halfpound burgers and sandwiches. There’s a kids’ menu, and a large selection of spirits, wine and microbrews. 8338 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach, next to the North Tahoe Event Center | Daily 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. | (530) 546-3315

La Mexicana | Authentic Mexican

Las Panchitas | Mexican

Serving fine Mexican food since 1975 and at Lake Tahoe since 1982, delicious Chinga-Lingas head the appetizer list. Authentic Chili Relleños are made from fresh-roasted chiles stuffed with jack cheese, and Fiesta Tostadas are created from a flour tortilla with beans, ground beef, chile colorado, chile verde, lettuce, sour cream, guacamole and cheese. The Chicken, Shrimp and Sirloin Fajitas are enough for two. 8345 North Lake Blvd., Kings Beach |  Full bar with delicious margaritas | Dinners from $10.95  |  (530) 546-4539

RENO

Daughters Café | Hungarian

Located in a Victorian House on the corner of First and Bell Streets in the Downtown Truckee River District of Reno, Daughters Café offers unique homemade seasonal selections for breakfast and lunch. Choices include Hungarian Chicken Paprikas, Smoked Grits, Homemade Limoncello, fresh daily soup, eggs, omelets, sausage, salad and potatoes. They serve Magpie Coffee and all food is made to order and impeccably fresh. Family owned and operated by mom Barb, and daughters Skye and Bianca. This restaurant will hug you with warmth as if you have come home. Menu changes seasonally and is posted daily on the web. The Beignets alone are worth a visit during your holidays. 97 Bell Street, Reno, Nev. 89503 | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. TuesdaySunday (Brunch) | (775) 324-3447 | daughterscafe.com

Lanza’s | Italian

TAHOE CITY

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Calling craft cocktail creators Homewood The West Shore cafe will host its third annual Bartender Competition on Feb. 26. The event is open and free for all local Lake Tahoe bartenders to enter. The competitors will be judged on three different categories and cocktails and each cocktail must each contain whiskey and

To be included in the Dining Guide, call (530) 546-5995, ext. 100.

Taqueria La Mexicana opened in 1997 and brought the tried and tested family recipes from their taqueria in Norwalk that made them successful. Tahoe locals instantly began to notice the fresh ingredients and authentic dishes and La Mexicana quickly became a locals’ favorite for fast, affordable and delicious Mexican food prepared fresh daily. La Mexicana also features an authentic Mexican bakery (fresh bread baked daily), carniceria and a full grocery store to meet your needs while visiting Lake Tahoe. Come taste the difference or order online through Eat 24. 8515 Brook Ave. Kings Beach | lamexicanakb.com | Daily 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. | (530) 546-0310

Traditional Italian food since the 1930s, and Lanza’s has been a long-time favorite with locals, as well as visitors. It’s been voted best Italian restaurant for many years. Guests will find a great family atmosphere featuring family recipes and large portions. Most dinners are between $12 and $19. Lanza’s also offers a nice selection of Italian and California wines. Lanza’s now offers gluten-free pizza and spaghetti. Offsite catering available. 7739 North Lake Blvd., King’s Beach (next to Safeway) | No reservations | Dinner at 5 p.m. | Full Bar and Happy Hour 4:30 p.m. | (530) 546-2434

Tahoe Donner Alder Creek Café, located within the Alder Creek Adventure Center, opened its doors with Joe Casey acting as kitchen supervisor. Under Casey’s leadership, the restaurant blossomed into a locals’ lunch favorite, known for healthy, organic creations that change seasonally. He was promoted to chef in November 2016. Casey has more than 20 years of experience in the food and beverage industry, including graduating from the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco. He has cooked at many restaurants in the Lake Tahoe and Truckee region, such as Tahoe Donner’s Lodge Restaurant & Pub before helping launch the Alder Creek Café. To meet growing demand, the café has also expanded its hours to 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  daily for the winter season. | tahoedonner.com

Bacchi’s | Italian

Since 1932, this family owned restaurant has taken pride in serving family style Italian food in a checkered tablecloth setting with touches of Old Tahoe. Servers bring large tureens of minestrone soup, followed by a salad bowl for the table and a generous antipasto tray with some housemade delicacies. The menu has more than 40 selections including their renowned housemade ravioli. The large dining room easily seats big parties. 2905 Lake Forest Road (2 miles east of Tahoe City off Hwy. 28) | Dinner from 5:30 nightly | Bar opens at 4 p.m. | Extensive wine list and banquet room | (530) 583-3324

TRUCKEE

El Toro Bravo | Mexican

This is outstanding Mexican cuisine with recipes that have made El Toro Bravo a favorite in Truckee for 25 years. Located in a quaint, old-time, Truckee house, with a friendly ambience to go with your meal. Happy Hour Monday to F riday from 4 to 6 p.m. Topping the menu are tender Steak and Chicken Fajitas, Chimichangas, Tacoladas, Chili Relleños, Snapper Santa Cruz, Grilled Prawns and the unusual Oysters 444. Patio dining, weather permitting. 10816 Donner Pass Road, on the west end of Commercial Row, downtown Truckee  | Service from 11:30 a.m. | Full bar |  (530) 587-3557

Pianeta | Italian Cucina

One of the Tahoe area’s best, Pianeta transports the palate with sophisticated, yet rustic Italian food in a warm, cozy atmosphere. The Antipasti features Bruschetta Olivata, Filet Mignon Carpaccio, Housemade Grilled Sausages & Crab Cakes. Pianeta makes most pasta in house with dishes like Veal Meatballs with Pesto & Linguini Pasta, Chicken & Prosciutto Cannelloni with Porcini Cream Sauce & Ravioli della Casa. 10096 Donner Pass Road, along Commercial Row, downtown Truckee | Open for dinner nightly | Full bar and wine list | Happy Hour at the Bar Mon.-Fri. from 5 to 6:30 p.m. | (530) 587-4694

WEST SHORE

The West Shore Café and Inn | Seasonal California cuisine

With its beautiful surroundings, warm ambiance and seasonal menus, the West Shore is a lakefront favorite among Tahoe’s community and visitors alike. Enjoy lakefront dining with breathtaking views of Lake Tahoe, while experiencing our seasonal menus, which always draws from the best seasonal meats, seafood and produce available. Reservations strongly encouraged. Free Lakeside S’mores 4 to 4:30 & Après Ski Specials 3 to 5 p.m. 5160 West Lake Blvd., Homewood | (530) 525-5200 | WestShoreCafe.com

tequila. In addition, each bartender must create three cocktails that fit three categories: batch, warm and cold cocktail. Contestants can sign up on the Web site by submitting a cocktail for the batch part of the competition, including ingredients, measurements and what makes it so special. Submissions will be accepted until Jan. 20, 2017. The top 10 entries, as judged by a panel of experts, will be selected and announced on Jan. 22 and invited to compete in the finals at the West Shore cafe. The competition is from 1 to 5 p.m. and the public is invited to attend and help review the cocktails. Tickets will be available for $10 presale or $15 at the door. Tickets will allow participants to judge the batch cocktail portion of the competition by sampling 10 different drinks. The other two cocktails, which include a warm and cold, will be evaluated by a panel of judges. Winners will be announced at the end of the competition and prizes will be awarded for the top three contestants. | westshorecafe.com

Pop in for a Pop Up Truckee Stella at Cedar House Sport Hotel offers a Pop Up Dinner Series several times per month. Designed and formatted like a spirited dinner party, a Stella Pop Up event is an exploration into creative cooking. Guests are encouraged to walk around the kitchen, joining conversations that are free flowing and educational. There is one tasting menu for each gathering, seating is communal and each course is served at the same time with commentary from the Stella kitchen team. The cost is $97 per person. Seating is limited; reservations are necessary. The series includes Mediterranean Winter Pop Up on Jan. 14 and 15, South for the Winter Pop Up on Jan. 20 and 21 and Chinese New Year Pop Up on Jan. 27 and 28. | cedarhousesporthotel.com

Visiting chef from Italy Reno, Nev. Chef Errico Recanati from Loreto, Ancona, Italy will guest-host culinary exhibition classes at arte italia from Jan.  22 to 24. Chef Errico Recanati’s describes his approach to cooking as “tradition, acquired over time, merged with modern technique.” Recanati’s Ristorante Andreina  is internationally known for its quintessential Marche-regional dishes, showcasing both meats and seafood. For each culinary class, the visiting chef will prepare a traditional Italian dinner including: antipasto, primo piatto, secondo piatto and dolce. The menus change for each class. The chef may use fish, poultry, meats, dairy products, garlic, herbs and olive oil in the recipes. Some recipes may include nuts. All classes are 6 to 8:30 p.m. | arteitaliausa.com

Free on Wednesdays South Lake Tahoe Wine Wednesdays are at The Loft in Heavenly. Free wine tasting from different featured winery each week, with a guest speaker and/or tasting notes from the featured winery. Half off all house and selected wines by the glass until 4 to 7 p.m. | (530) 523-8024


SKI OR RIDE FOR FREE Nightly 5-6 p.m.

jeremy jones Pro Snowboarder & Big Mountain Freerider

Purchase a CA or NV Tahoe license plate and get two free Alpine or Nordic tickets to the Tahoe resort of your choice*. For more information or to purchase your license plate online, visit tahoeplates.com. *restrictions apply

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FREE Backcountry Class with NASTC

TAHOE UNIVERSITY 39˚20’32”N 120˚12’13”W


Photo by Matt Bansak

Fuel Dock

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday Weather Permitting

ALPINE HOME Design · Lighting · Furnishing · Rugs · Accessories

Enjoy lakefront dining & shopping at the Tahoe City Marina. Alpine Home Furnishings Dockside 700 Tahoe Yacht Club Tahoe Canvas Co. A & M Marine Tahoe Marine Supply Center for Spiritual Living Lake Tahoe Parasailing Tahoe Sailing Charters

RING IN THE NEW YEAR Toast the new year with one of our signature drinks tables. Finishes include petrified wood and chiseled marble.

Call or visit our 3,800 sq. ft. showroom to schedule a home consult.

(530) 583-1039

TahoeCityMarina.com

ocated in the heart of downtown Tahoe City, the Marina is one of the largest and oldest marinas on the Lake, built in the 1940s. Offering services for every aspect of boating, the Marina is dedicated to serving our customers in a highly efficient manner with an emphasis on customer satisfaction.

Alpine Home Furnishings · Tahoe City Marina · 700 N. Lake Blvd. Tahoe City, CA 96145 · 530.564.0971 · alpinehomefurnishings.com

COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE 1,196 square feet available now for lease at Tahoe City Marina, 700 N. Lake Blvd., Tahoe City, CA Triple Net Lease option Additional space also available For more information contact Jim at (530) 583-1039

Jan. 12-25, 2017  

Jeremy Jones slashes into 2017 on a splitboard in the Mount Rose area overlooking Lake Tahoe. "Early season is my favorite time to shoot bec...

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