Media Kit 2023-24

Page 1

MEDIA KIT 2023-2024

THE SUNFLOWER

WHO ARE WE?

Kansans got out to the polls to voice their views on Tuesday. Most of the races saw close numbers. Here are the results as of 7:20

Midterm election results out

BY MIA HENNEN news@thesunflower.com

Just three months after Kansas saw historic turnout in the primary election, where voters overwhelmingly voted to protect the right to an abortion, voters showed up at the polls again to vote on multiple key races and issues. The two most high-profile races were the governors and the Kansas attorney general, as well as a few seats in the House and Senate. The ballot also included two state constitutional amendments.

The Sunflower published its first issue in 1896 and has been serving as the primary news source for Wichita State University ever since.

Spike in bike thefts raises student property concerns

GOVERNOR’S RACE Incumbent Laura Kelly, governor since 2019, was re-elected to serve another term, after a close race with former Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt. RACE FOR HOUSE AND SENATE Republican Jerry Moran will continue to represent Kansas in the Senate, where he has served since 2011. Moran ran against Democrat Mark Holland. As for representatives elected for districts in Kansas’ House, Republican Tracey Mann, Republican Jake LaTurner, Democrat Sharice Davids, and Republican Ron Estes won their ATTORNEY GENERAL RACE The attorney general race between Republican Kris Kobach and Democrat Chris Mann was close, with Kobach narrowly securing the win. Kobach is known for being vocal about national issues, like unconfirmed claims of voter fraud and illegal immigration. Kobach ran for governor in 2018 and lost to Kelly before running in the 2020 Senate race and losing to Roger Marshall, one of Kansas’ two senators.

put cameras there because that’s pretty dangerous.’” In an email to The Sunflower, Herl con- firmed that there are no cameras covering The Flats’ bicycle racks. According to Herl, Shocker Hall and The Suites have cameras that cover the bicycle racks. “I would definitely like it if they put cameras in place around them,” Wertfall said. “A lot the bike racks around places probably should have cameras anyway. Especially, if people walk by them at night.” Williams said that it would be helpful if the police informed students about the rise in thefts.

“No one here really knew about the bikes being stolen, so I feel like … they definitely need to say, ‘Hey, we’re having bike issues,’” Williams said. Herl said students can help protect their bicycles by investing in nicer locks.

“[Students] spend plenty of money on a bike that’s very nice and buy a $10-15 cable lock,” Herl said. “A heavy U-bolt lock: Well, that’s solid. can’t remember a single bike that’s ever been stolen off of [those.]”

Cynthia Shrader, a first-generation fresh

man living at

-

The Sunflower is an editorially independent, student-run publication housed in Elliott Hall on WSU’s main campus.

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

Two state amendments were on the ballot this midterm. The first, the “legislative veto” amendment, was just narrowly rejected by Kansas. If passed, the amendment would have allowed legislatures in the Kansas government to override the Governor on rules and regulations.

The 45 students who work for The Sunflower distribute print publications every Thursday during the school year on the main campus, to other WSU campuses and to several businesses in Wichita, and they publish almost every day online.

one she let a friend borrow. Both had locks and were stolen and never found.

“I called the campus police, and, honestly, everyone told me that that was a mistake because they said usually [the police] won’t do anything about it,” Williams said. “I had a detective talk to me and say, ‘Well, you know, we can’t really do anything because there was no camera.’ … I said that ‘you should

Young voter registration on the rise in the state

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THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING STUDENT
JOURNALISM.
WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY’S STUDENT NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1896 www.thesunflower.com Nov. 10, 2022 Volume 127 Issue 13 MARK HOLLAND 359,348 votes 36.7% JEANNA REPASS 373,857 votes 38.5% CHRIS MANN 476,024 votes 49.0% BOB HERNANDEZ 80,650 votes 36.2% JERRY MORAN 590,733 votes 60.3% SCOTT SCHWAB 569,215 votes 58.7% DEREK SCHMIDT 467,103 votes KRIS KOBACH 496,376 votes RON ESTES 141,967 votes 47.5% 51.0% 63.8% KANSAS SENATE ELECTION 2022 | PROJECTED WINNER 98% EXPECTED VOTES IN KANSAS SECRETARY OF STATE ELECTION 2022 PROJECTED WINNER KANSAS GOVERNOR ELECTION 2022 | PROJECTED WINNER KANSAS ATTORNEY GENERAL ELECTION 2022 | PROJECTED WINNER 97% EXPECTED VOTES IN KANSAS U.S HOUSE 4 ELECTION 2022 | PROJECTED WINNER 86% EXPECTED VOTES IN
BY DANIELLE WAGNER suzwagner65@gmail.com In previous elections, young voters have made up a small percentage of voter turnout. Organizations like Rock the Vote are aiming to change that narrative. During a meeting hosted by Rock the Vote on Nov. 2, panelists from different organizations discussed the importance of youth voting. Clarissa Unger, co-founder and executive director of Students Learn Students Vote Coalition, provided resources for student voters to utilize in the meeting. “Through the Students Learn Students Vote Coalition, what we are doing is trying to work towards a world in which every college student has easy and equal access to the voting process,” Unger said. In the 18-19 age group, Kansas voter registration saw an increase of 42% since the 2018 election. Youth voter registration saw a spike for the Aug. primary, a ballot containing abortion-related amendments. “We need to push back on this myth that young people don’t influence elections,” Abby Kiesa, deputy director of CIRCLE said. “We know that young people matter to elections.” Out of 11,368 WSU students eligible to vote, 7,746 cast a ballot in 2020, 68% of the student population. This is 24% higher than the number of student voters in 2018. At Wichita State, the Shockers Vote! Coalition is working towards increased voter registration and turnout on campus. Engagement opportunities for first-time voters are one of their main priorities. Their goal for the 2022 election is to increase both voter registrations and participation by 10%. One of their strategies to raise voting morale is to reach out to student organizations to urge them to attend or host election events. They are also providing individual departments with voter information for students.
KANSAS’ DECISIONS
Infographic by Thy Vo The Sunflower Infographic by Thy Vo The Sunflower
p.m.
9. Information and data from National Election Pool (NEP)
Central time on Nov.
The other amendment, the “Election of County Sheriffs,” passed with over 60% of Kansans voting in favor. Now, counties will be required to elect their sheriff instead of having one appointed. This amendment approval blocks counties from attempting to consolidate law enforcement.
STUDENT VOICES With the results out, students around Wichita State’s campus cite different reasons for choosing to vote or not in this year’s midterm. Tom Tanguma, a junior studying creative writing and literature: “I’ve been a really active voter since 2016, so that’s kind of about it. just vote on everything now … also thought constitutional amendment one that we were voting on was also very important to vote on because it would take a lot of power away from the Executive Branch state-wise that just thought was an egregious overstep.” Tri Nguyen, a pre-nursing student: “I just feel like it’s the right thing to do. My parents voted, so we all just voted together,” Ana Ramos, WSU student: “I really wanted to [vote], I ordered my mail-in ballot – because I’m not from here, so needed a mail-in ballot –and never got it … was really mad.” WICHITA STATE UNIVERSITY’S STUDENT NEWS SOURCE SINCE 1896 www.thesunflower.com Oct. 27, 2022 Volume 127 Issue 11 Infographics by Thy Vo The Sunflower BY JAYCIE NELSON editor@thesunflower.com Dead Center Vintage featured old clothes, new trends and the history of humanity all wrapped into one pop-up shop. The vintage clothing store set up shop outside the RSC on Thursday. The pop-up shop brought in four clothing racks holding every- thing, like vintage Wichita State shirts, mismatched vests and royal blue sweaters. Haven Massey, a current edu- cation major at Wichita State, was helping run the event and wanted to help promote the small business and interact with other students. The vintage clothing store opened in February of 2020 and is located downtown on Douglas Avenue. The idea for the shop was quickly followed by its opening. “We’d always kind of day- dreamed about it, but we had never actually made concrete plans, like we were going to do it until like the month before,” Kenzie Borland, co-owner of Dead Center Village, said. Borland will be graduating from Wichita State in December with a major in communications. While Borland’s business partners were more interested in vintage clothing, Borland was more focused on the business aspect. “Small businesses are the backbone of the communities that we live in,” Borland said. Borland is passionate about bringing Dead Center Village into the community and onto Wichita State’s campus. “I think it’s really cool to be able to tell the history of humanity through vintage clothing,” Borland said. Students set up vintage pop-up on campus for a day Wichita State student browses the clothing rack at the Dead Center Vintage Pop up event. The shop set up outside the Rhatigan Student Center on Oct. 20. Photo by Jaycie Nelson / The Sunflower LOCATION 2011 N Innovation Blvd DESCRIPTION Officers responded to The Suites for stolen bike AUG. 24 LOCATION 4105 Mike Oatman Dr DESCRIPTIONIndividual reported bicycle stolen over the weekend SEPT. 06 LOCATION 4105 Mike Oatman Dr DESCRIPTIONWSUPD took report for a stolen bike SEPT. 16 LOCATION1975 N Research P DESCRIPTION WSUPD makes bicycle theft report at the station SEPT. 26 LOCATION 1935 N Research Pl DESCRIPTIONWSUPD took report of a bicycle theft OCT. 08 LOCATION 1950 N Research Pl DESCRIPTION Individual reporting bicycle stolen OCT. 10 LOCATION 1815 N Innovation Blvd DESCRIPTION An individual reports their bike being stolen from John Bardo Center OCT. 20 LOCATION 2011 N Innovation Blvd DESCRIPTION Individual reports bicycle reported stolen and lock damaged at The Suites SEPT. 01 LOCATION 2011 N Innovation Blvd DESCRIPTION Individual reported their bike was stolen SEPT. 15 LOCATION 4105 E Mike Oatman Dr DESCRIPTION WSUPD took report of a stolen bicycle SEPT. 26 LOCATION 2011 N Innovation Blvd DESCRIPTION An individual reported their stolen bike SEPT. 29 LOCATION 2020 N Perimeter Rd DESCRIPTION Individual reporting bicycle stolen OCT. 10 LOCATION 2020 N Perimeter Rd DESCRIPTION Individual reporting bicycle stolen OCT. 10 LOCATION 2020 N Perimeter Rd DESCRIPTION WSUPD took report of a bicycle theft OCT. 25 BIKE THEFTS REPORTED Fall 2022 FROM WSU CRIME LOG BY MIA HENNEN news@thesunflower.com
Three months into the fall semester, bike thefts are more than double the amount of all last semester, raising concerns about students’ property. Spring 2022 saw only four bike thefts; this semester has already seen 14. With the number of thefts rising, students who live on campus, like Caleigh Wertfall, feel unsafe leaving their bikes out for too long. “Very often, I’ll make sure to go out and check the bike rack to make sure my bike is still there. I don’t want to leave it unattended for too long,” Wertfall said. Corey Herl, university police captain, said there does not seem to be a reason for the uptick in bicycle thefts. “This is a ripe environment where there are a lot of bikes … it’s just a convenient place to steal from because there’s more of them here than anywhere else,” Herl said. Bike thefts have been high in the past: Fall 2019 saw 18 bike thefts during the semester. Between Spring 2020 and Spring 2022, bike thefts averaged at almost six bike thefts per semester. Zöe Williams, a third-year student, had two bikes at the start of the year: one she used and
Shocker Hall, chose not to bring her bike to campus for a few reasons, one of them being safety. “I was really worried about someone, you know, breaking my lock for a bike at all,” Shrader said. Currently, Herl said he does not know if there are plans to expand camera coverage, specifically at The Flats. Williams said she is frustrated by the lack of action. “It doesn’t seem like they really care that they’re being stolen,” Williams said.
ON
FALL 2022 SPRING 2022 FALL 2021 SPRING 2021 FALL 2020 FALL 2019 SPRING 2020 NUMBER OF BIKE THEFTS REPORTED 18 6 6 1 12 4 14 Since the start of the fall semester, bike thefts has increased around the Wichita State campus. Photo illustration by Mia Hennen / The Sunflower Data and information collected from WSU Campus Crime Log CONTACT US THY VO Advertising Manager and Design Editor admanager@thesunflower.com 316-978-6905 MIA HENNEN Editor in Chief editor@thesunflower.com 316-978-6906
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2023-24 PUBLICATION CALENDAR

SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

Aug. 21, 2023

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Sept. 14, 2023

Fall sports issue

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