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SOUTHERN

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WINTER 2016

Holidays Global

How holidays are celebrated in other cultures

WE LIVE HERE:

Hedman Vineyards’ old, but new Peach Barn is a gem of Southern Illinois

CHEERS TO BEER:

Goose Island: To get to the Island you have to go to the Farm

Life & Style : Xxxxxxxx 2016 1


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Life & Style in Southern Illinois is a publication of The Southern Illinoisan. Contact us at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901, or at P.O. Box 2108, Carbondale, IL 62902. Reach us on the Internet at www.Lifeand StyleSI.com. Life & Style in Southern Illinois is published four times per year and is distributed free of cost to a variety of businesses and hotels in Southern Illinois. © 2016 by The Southern Illinoisan. All rights reserved. For more information, call 618-529-5454. Visit us online at www.thesouthern.com.


Life & Style : Winter 2016

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CONTENTS WINTER 2016

GLOBAL HOLIDAYS How holidays are celebrated in other cultures

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we live here Hedman Vineyards’ old, but new Peach Barn is a gem

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cheers to beer Goose Island: To get to the Island you have to go to the Farm

10 24 21 questions 26 in our backyard

social seen Check out who you know

this issue

in one of our most popular features

how to leisure meet the artist style scenic beauty entrepreneurs gadgets entertainment wine & spirits parting shot

Get a glimpse into the world of Rosslind Rice

Where to buy gifts for the unique individuals on your list from adults to kids

30 self 56 profile

Chris Lamport can help you find balance in your life SIU’s head football coach, Nick Hill, instills humility, hard work, faith and family

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getaways Israel: The birthplace of three of the world’s major religions

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Life & Style : Winter 2016

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contact us

Life and Style in Southern Illinois 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901 618-529-5454

EDITORIAL

Craig H. Rogers publisher 618-351-5038 craig.rogers @thesouthern.com Tom English editor 618-351-5070 tom.english @thesouthern.com Rhonda M. May special projects coordinator/editor 618-351-5077 rhonda.may @thesouthern.com

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get into the Holiday Spirit with Quartz countertops Sample the flavors of the world in our Brand New Expanded Indoor Stone Gallery! 7am - 4pm Monday - Friday Saturdays by appointment

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SOCIAL SEEN

THE STAGE COMPANY’S ANNUAL SPONSOR APPRECIATION GALA Each year, The Stage Company hosts an appreciation gala for its financial supporters. After a short play, guests are treated to music, hors d’oeuvres, wine and punch. This year’s gala was Aug. 26 and 27 at the Varsity Center for the Arts in Carbondale, where The Stage Company is the resident theater group.

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1 Mary Beth and Terry Hileman of Jonesboro 2 Cara Recine of Carbondale and Kim Curlee of Cobden 3 Aur Beck and Fred Betz, both of Carbondale

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4 Perry and Susan Patterson of Carbondale, Sue and Byron York of Murphysboro

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5 Richard Bradley, John and Carolyn Hooker, all of Carbondale. 6 Craig and Jan Hinde of Carbondale, Jim and Sandy Lambert of Carterville 7 Jean Armstrong of Carbondale 8 Dolores Cavaness and Betty King, both of Murphysboro 9 Sam Foskey, Betty and Roland Person, all of Carbondale 10 Chance Morgan, James Earles and Danielle Masterson, all of Carbondale

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11 Gordon and Carol White with Linda Benz, all of Carbondale 12 Jodie and Antonio Salazar of Carterville with Brandyn McGhee of Herrin 13 Armen Asaturian and Jeanne Ferraro, both of Carbondale 14 Vincent Rhomberg of Carbondale with Darrell Bryant and Jeff Franklin, both of Makanda 15 Donald Lawrence of Carbondale with Bill and Sharon Crain of Murphysboro

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16 Maureen Dennis, Betty Arnold and Frances Gilman, all of Carbondale 17 Carolyn Moe, Catherine Field and Chris Moe, all of Carbondale 18 Tom and Linda North of Carbondale 19 Rod and Bonnie Sievers of Carterville

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photos by GREG KUPIEC


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20 Tricia and Mike Burns of De Soto 21 Darcy Kriegsman, Jim Busch, Becky Schneider and Jeanne Ferraro, all of Carbondale 22 Jacquie Betz of Carbondale and Teri McSherry of Cobden 23 Susan Harrocks of Murphysboro and Fred Betz of Carbondale 24 Scott Miller, Kim Miller and Karen Hand, all of Carbondale 25 Clay and Becky Kolar of Carbondale 26 Joyce Hesketh and Tom Hesketh, both of Carbondale 27 Mike Hanes of Carbondale and Judy Askew of Brookport

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SOCIAL SEEN

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM SUMMER RECEPTION On July 8, the University Museum at SIU hosted its Summer Reception to showcase new exhibits.

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1 SIU President Randy Dunn with Carl Lutes, both of Carbondale

4 Richard and Linda Helstern of Carbondale

2 Kati Trotter of Anna

5 Susie Phillips of Murphysboro and Joyce Webb of Carbondale

3 Mark Wagner with Susannah Munson, both of Carbondale

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Life & Style : Winter 2016

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SOCIAL SEEN

LITTLE BLACK DRESS PARTY The biggest girls’ night of the year benefiting the The Women’s Center was held Sept. 9 at SIU Arena in Carbondale. There was live music, food, drinks, and plenty of dancing. This was the 10th year and the event was celebrated with a bang! 1

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12 1 Hariet Baker, Julie Michelle, Vivian Robinson, Mary Ingram and Sharron Lasik 2 Sarah Settles and Andrea Stephens 3 Jennifer Whitfield and Desirae Crow 4 Jodie Salazar, Susan Harrocks, Tamey Horn, Tricia Burns and Kim Coffey 5 Meganne Forney and Ariele Lynch 6 Lori Cook and Susan Grace 7 Carol McCuan and Nancy Pitman

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8 Apryl Gordon, Darcie Hastings, Holly Bryant and Monica Sheets 9 Loretta Mathis, Trakinda Mathis, Charnaine Porter and Yvette Martin

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10 Lynne Martin and Sharron Anderson 11 Kathy Sweeny and Carly O’Keefe 12 Wendy White, Christine McIntosh, Sherry Jeschke and Akemi Walker

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13 Lilli Klekner-Alt, Danielle Boyer, Kara Gilbert and Elisha Deen 14 Sarah Viernum and Lauren Gulbrandsen 15 Brittany Taylor and Tara Taylor 16 Emily Gibson, Shannon Fanenlla, Marisa Perry and Hayley Wissmiller 17 Jan Roe and Sally Bryant

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SOCIAL SEEN

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ST. NICHOLAS 2ND ANNIVERSARY BASH St. Nicholas Brewing Company in Du Quoin celebrated their second anniversary on Aug. 20. Festivities included great beer, food, and cupcakes of course. Music was provided by Chad Harris in the afternoon and then The Storm Crows later in the evening. The brewery introduced a few special release brews like Belgian Witbier Blackberry, Belgian Witbier Cucumber and Belgian Witbier Watermelon. The brewery also paired up with Chuck Stuhrenberg of Big Muddy Brewing Co. to make a special German Alt Beer which was available at the anniversary party. 1 Zoe Gross of Du Quoin, Sadie Horan of De Soto and Gen Horan of Carbondale 2 TJ Booker of Carterville, Kim Booker of Carbondale, Brooke Cerny and Cody Hubble, both of Anna 3 Kelsey Jane Page and Dymin Hayes, both of Benton 4 Willy Martinez of Marion and Tom Harness of Carterville 5 Gene Gross, Patricia Gross, Gary Sullivan, Karen Hand, Tom Welge, Abby Ancell, Ted Wichmann and Sarah

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Andrew, all from St. Nicholas Brewing Company 6 Paul Plett and James McCoy, Brewmaster 7 People enjoying the festivities on the patio 8 Musician Chad Harris 9 Anna Rausenberger of Du Quoin, Mike McCrary of Herrin, with Tyler Pingolt and Maranda Emery, both of Murphysboro 10 Katie Ancell and Abby Ancell from St. Nicholas Brewing Company

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SOCIAL SEEN

SALUKIS BLACK OUT CANCER In what has become a touching and enduring display of heart and community, members of the SIU Salukis football team once again donned commemorative black jerseys during Sept. 17’s decisive win over Murray State in honor of cancer patients and their families. Named the “best charity promotion in college football” just two years ago by Footballscoop.com, the Salukis Black Out Cancer game has raised over $200,000 for the SIH Foundation since 2011 for the effort to build the SIH Cancer Institute and bolster cancer care services for financially vulnerable patients.

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1 1 Trish and Harvey Welch of Carbondale, Saluki Athletic Director Tommy Bell of Carbondale, Memorial Hospital of Carbondale Administrator Bart Millstead of Makanda and SIH VP of Community Affairs Woody Thorne of Makanda 2 Mary Rosenhauer of Carbondale, Salukis #36 Kamahl March of Detroit, Michigan, Jacque Rosenhauer of Diamondback, Mississippi and Dave Rosenhauer of Carbondale 3 Salukis #9 Leonard Garron of Evanston and Angela Upchurch of Carterville 4 Salukis #1 Israel Lamprakes of Daphne, Alabama and Loretta Golden of Murphysboro 5 Salukis #79 Ben Bailey and Noelle Bailey, both of Lamar, Missouri 6 Salukis #49 Tori Millender of Belleville and Taylor Byron of Carbondale

7 Josie Young of Carbondale, Salukis #74 Devin Brunetti of Scottsdale, Arizona, Kristin Germann of Carbondale, Salukis #13 Markese Jackson of East St. Louis and Cindy Jackman of Carbondale

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8 Rindy Eisenhauer, Salukis #72 Ernest Dye, Jr. of Milton, Georgia and Larry Eisenhauer of Murphysboro 9 Burke Watts of Carterville, Nate Watts of Carterville, Bill Courtney of Carrier Mills and Salukis #12 Josh Straughan of Colton, Washington 10 Salukis #44 Torre Hopson of Gary, Indiana, John Moore of Roselle and Salukis #41 Khari Waithe-Alexander of Lilburn, Georgia

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11 Greg Bouhl of Carbondale, Gary Bouhl of Carbondale, Salukis #98 Lane Reazin of Mooreland, Oklahoma and David Bouhl of Carterville 12 Leah Swanson and Paula Frisch, both of Carbondale and Elizabeth Ferguson of Marion

8 photos by DEVIN MILLER 18 Life & Style : Winter 2016


SOCIAL SEEN

SALUKIS BLACK OUT CANCER In what has become a touching and enduring display of heart and community, members of the SIU Salukis football team once again donned commemorative black jerseys during Sept. 17’s decisive win over Murray State in honor of cancer patients and their families. Named the “best charity promotion in college football” just two years ago by Footballscoop.com, the Salukis Black Out Cancer game has raised over $200,000 for the SIH Foundation since 2011 for the effort to build the SIH Cancer Institute and bolster cancer care services for financially vulnerable patients.

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1 1 Trish and Harvey Welch of Carbondale, Saluki Athletic Director Tommy Bell of Carbondale, Memorial Hospital of Carbondale Administrator Bart Millstead of Makanda and SIH VP of Community Affairs Woody Thorne of Makanda 2 Mary Rosenhauer of Carbondale, Salukis #36 Kamahl March of Detroit, Michigan, Jacque Rosenhauer of Diamondback, Mississippi and Dave Rosenhauer of Carbondale 3 Salukis #9 Leonard Garron of Evanston and Angela Upchurch of Carterville 4 Salukis #1 Craig James of Edwardsville and Loretta Golden of Murphysboro 5 Salukis #79 Ben Bailey and Noelle Bailey, both of Lamar, Missouri 6 Salukis #49 Tori Millender of Belleville and Taylor Byron of Carbondale

7 Josie Young of Carbondale, Salukis #74 Devin Brunetti of Scottsdale, Arizona, Kristin Germann of Carbondale, Salukis #13 Markese Jackson of East St. Louis and Cindy Jackman of Carbondale

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8 Rindy Eisenhauer, Salukis #72 Ernest Dye, Jr. of Milton, Georgia and Larry Eisenhauer of Murphysboro 9 Burke Watts of Carterville, Nate Watts of Carterville, Bill Courtney of Carrier Mills and Salukis #12 Josh Straughan of Colton, Washington 10 Salukis #44 Torre Hopson of Gary, Indiana, John Moore of Roselle and Salukis #41 Khari Waithe-Alexander of Lilburn, Georgia

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11 Greg Bouhl of Carbondale, Gary Bouhl of Carbondale, Salukis #98 Lane Reazin of Mooreland, Oklahoma and David Bouhl of Carterville 12 Leah Swanson and Paula Frisch, both of Carbondale and Elizabeth Ferguson of Marion

8 photos by DEVIN MILLER 18 Life & Style : Winter 2016


PINK OUT HERRIN

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Herrin Hospital once again kicked off Breast Cancer Awareness month with the fourth annual Pink Out Herrin balloon release and remembrance in the hospital’s Healing Garden on Monday, Oct. 3. Kathy Cerutti, an integral part of the joint effort between the City of Herrin, Chamber of Commerce and the hospital, said she was inspired to “do something” after her best friend’s mother lost her life to breast cancer a few years ago. That loss, coupled with community support, led to the creation of Pink Out Herrin, complete with pink lights and banners adorning several businesses in the community. Among the women honored during the event was Herrin Hospital’s own Teresa Maxwell. An RN in ICU, Teresa recently completed radiation treatment. After an opening prayer and words from hospital and city leaders, a bell tolled as names of those who lost their battle with the disease were announced. The ceremony culminated in a balloon release.

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4 1 Carol Snuffer of Carterville

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2 Lisa Pulley of Marion and Marcia Matthias of Carbondale 3 Allison Larson of Carterville and Liz Lively of Herrin (seated), Matt Morgan of Carterville and Heather Russell of West Frankfort

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4 Daisy Walker of Herrin 5 Tom Harness of Carterville and Debbie Hogg of Marion

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6 Kathy Cerutti of Herrin, Terence Farrell of Herrin and Rev. Sherry Black of Whittington 7 Dana West of Johnston City, Herrin Mayor Steve Frattini and Herrin Chamber Executive Director Jennifer Buckley

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8 Brooke Carter of Carterville, Joni Johnson of Lake of Egypt and Tynette Jansen of Herrin 9 Samantha Melvin of West Frankfort, Teresa Maxwell of Marion and Ashley Davis of Harrisburg 10 Marlene Simpson of Herrin and Cathy Brandon of Herrin 11 Vic Ritter, Glenda Botwinski, Sue Cravens and Judy Randall, all of Herrin

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SOCIAL SEEN

SINGING WITH THE STARS BRINGS FUN TO MCLEOD SUMMER PLAYHOUSE The friends of McLeod Summer Playhouse held its annual “no talent necessary” talent competition, “Singing with the Stars,” Friday, June 3, at the McLeod Theater. Jan Payne of Payne Gaertner and Associates was declared the winner of the “MSP Idol of the Year Award.” A fierce field of competitors which included Panera’s General Manager Ralph Behrens, SIU Interim Chancellor Brad Colwell, SIU English Department Professor Anna Jackson, Carbondale Gastroenterologist Dr. Melissa Martinez-Mateo singing with husband, surgeon Dr. Carlos Gonzalez, Firefighter D.W. Presley and Market Executive at Banterra Bank, Jeff Speith also vied for the title. Mike Kasser, of Southern Illinois Health Care, served as emcee, with Ronda Dunn, John Pfeifer and Cinnamon Wheeles-Smith as the on-stage judges. Jeena Mee Dosch provided musical accompaniment. The event was organized by FMSP Board president, Carolyn Donow. Vice President Darrell Bryant led the star recruitment efforts. FMSP Board members volunteered time and helped underwrite the event.

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5 1 Martha and Tom Campbell of Murphysboro

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2 Darrell Bryant and Jeff Franklin of Carbondale

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3 Dr. Carlos Gonzalez and Dr. Melissa Martinez of Carbondale 4 Rae Goldsmith of Carbondale, John Pfeifer of Marion and San Chan of Carbondale 5 Amy and Ralph Behrens of Carterville 6 Dr. Suven and Emmaline Shankar of Makanda

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7 Jackie Nunley and Rosi Ervin, both of Carbondale

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8 Kathy Fralish of Carbondale and Brad Colwell of Murphysboro

9 photos by STEVE BUHMAN 20 Life & Style : Winter 2016

6 Moore-Connelley of Carbondale 14 Betty and Orrie Rouse of Energy, Joyce Eddings of Carbondale, Carol Belt of Marion and Milly Kaiser of Murphysboro 15 Dr. Cristian Sarateanu of Carbondale, Lindsay Ledbetter of Herrin and Tara Hardwick and Matt Gaugh of Carterville 16 The Stars of SWTS 2016 17 Peter Alexander, Vince Rhomberg and San Chan, all of Carbondale 18 Faith Miller, Carolyn Snyder and Lynette Miller, all of Carbondale 19 Tammy Holmes and Catherine Shaw, both of Carbondale

9 Anna and Greg Wright of Marion with Shane and Jessica Carsrud of Carbondale

20 Faith Miller of Carbondale, Susan Ford of Gorham, Jan Radtke of Makanda with Sheila Simon, Jenny Chan and Perry Knopp, all of Carbondale

10 Carlos and Nelly Gonzalez of Maracay, Venezuela

21 Dr. Eugenio and Dr. Tanya Vargas of Carbondale

11 Herb and Carolyn Donow of Makanda

22 Jan Payne, winner of the MSP 2016 Idol of The Year Award

12 Tom and Cinnamon Smith, Deanna and Wayne Wheeles, all of Carbondale

23 Dan and Caryn Skiles of Carbondale

13 Tom Connelley and Dr. Marci

24 Jan Payne with SWTS dancing partner Nathanial Washington


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SOCIAL SEEN

DR. GUSTAVE ANNUAL APPRECIATION PARTY Each year, Dr. Fred Gustave hosts an event at Walker’s Bluff to show his appreciation for regional dental offices. The theme for the Oct. 6 gathering was ‘boots ‘n’ bulls’ — and featured a bull riding station, music by Murphy 500, who was shooting a music video at the event, custom party favors and cowboythemed food and décor. 1 Peggy Bunselmeyer 2 Brittany Chin, Lexi Williams and Nikki Boatwright 3 Kim Followell, Heather Reed, Susan Haithcoat, Stephanie Eubanks, Denice Bailey and Jeanna Deaton

9 Melanie Wyatt, Veronica Lenzini and Tammy Barrett 10 Dr. Fred Gustave and Rhonda Gustave, hosts of the event 11 Kelley Gustave and Michael Patterson

4 Brooke Burroughs and Anisha Bradley

12 Jessica Moore, Molly Pierson, Ashlee Woll and Andrea Green

5 Stacey McKinney, Amy Stacey, Carolyn Harmon, Natalie Richardson, Heather Turner, Jessica Morgan and Tamra Kelly (front)

13 Kim James and Rachel Spolarich

6 Andi Nix, Jen Meyer and Dr. Dianna Gaultney

15 Dr. Dan Massie, Stacey Massie, Veronica Lenzini and Taylor Poore

7 Patsy McKenzie and Jim Knott

16 Dr. Geoffrey Partlow and Cindy Cline

8 Katie Pobst, Angela Barnes, Courtney Harrell and Stephanie Weber

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17 Ellen Cook and Dusty Chamness

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21 QUESTIONS

GETTING TO KNOW

Rosslind Rice

Rosslind “Roz” Rice of Carterville jokes that she is “paid to talk” and that is a very good thing, since it is both an avocation and a hobby. The communications coordinator/spokesperson for Southern Illinois Healthcare, Roz’s career started in high school when she scored a news internship at a tiny television station in a cornfield. From there, she spent several years in radio news, including a short stint as a deejay back in the waning days of vinyl, and later worked in local news when she took a shot at marketing and advertising. Today, Roz co-hosts “In Focus” on WSIU Television from time to time and calls her fulltime position at SIH “the perfect job” since it combines MARCEL PROUST her love of media and was a French writer storytelling. who believed that people In her spare time, must know and understand Roz takes part in themselves before they could the annual Hospice know or understand others. He Red Carpet Oscars developed a list of subjective Gala (“wonderful questions he felt would help people, and the only reveal to people their true ones who could ever selves. We fashioned our convince me to wear questions after his. a corset and tutu on stage in front of my friends, coworkers and family”) and loves to travel. On regular days, she can often be found heckling her neighbor’s peacock and waging an unwinning war against feckless vermin in her wooded neighborhood. 1. What is your current state of mind? Moderately amused 2. What is your favorite avocation/hobby? I devour books, newspapers, magazines. I’m a raging bibliophile. 3. Which living person do you most admire? My 13-year-old niece, Devrah. I admire her spunk, wit and steely determination. 4. What is your most treasured possession? My Bible. It is a living history book 24

Life & Style : Winter 2016

photo by BYRON HETZLER


with lots of handwritten notations inside. 5. When and where were you happiest? Walker’s Bluff, Mother’s Day dinner 2015, with all three of my sons. Best time ever! 6. What is your most obvious characteristic? Verbose, I am deemed unfit for Twitter. 7. If you could rid the world of one disease what would it be? Cancer. I hate cancer. 8. What song would you sing for your American Idol audition? I can belt out a pretty spot on version of Blondie’s “Rapture” circa 1981. Please don’t judge me. 9. What is the trait you most dislike in others? Dishonesty. 10. What is your greatest extravagance? Without question, ethnic food: Asian, Indian, Thai, and Vietnamese. I might require an intervention. 11. If someone wrote a biography about you, what do you think the title should be? That’s a toss up between “I’m Talking, and I Can’t Shut Up” for an autobiography or “Her Deadline Was Yesterday,” for a biography. 12. Which words or phrases do you overuse most? “Hiya, girlpants!” 13. Who is the most famous person you have ever met? I met several musicians in my radio days. Conway Twitty? Billy Ray Cyrus? Sir Mix-a-Lot? Who is higher on the fame-om-meter? 14. What do you value most in your friends? Their honesty and humor. 15. If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why? I would like to fly. A frequent lament is that I’ve misplaced my invisible jet. 16. If you were to die and come back as a person or animal, what do you think it would be? Probably some kind of bird. I seem to have a Vulcan mind meld with the neighbor’s peacock. 17. If a theme song played every time you entered a room, what would it be? The quiz says “Pocket Full of Sunshine” although I’m wondering if it should be “Maniac?” 18. What is your guilty pleasure? That I’ll admit to? Thai iced coffee from Thai Taste and those awesome, little Bequet caramels from Neighborhood Co-op. 19. What is your favorite smell? Lavender. 20. If money were no object, where in the world would you choose to live? A boathouse on Bainbridge Island, Washington, and a beach house on Highway 30-A in Florida. I’d use my new superpowers to fly back and forth. 21. What is your personal motto? “Just start — some is better than none.” As an epic procrastinator, I read a version of this quote in a Jon Acuff book. Changed my life. Life & Style : Winter 2016

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IN OUR BACKYARD

Retail

adventures await Where to buy gifts for the unique individuals on your list from adults to kids

TOP LEFT: Cork & Rind in St. Charles, Missouri offers a full service cheese shop. TOP RIGHT: European Entitlements’ mission in Ste. Genevieve, Missouri is to provide perfectly tasteful products of exquisite quality at a reasonable price. MIDDLE: ASL Pewter in Ste. Genevieve, Missouri sells a variety of pieces that you won’t find anywhere else. BOTTOM LEFT: Goat Milk Loaf from Bathhouse Soapery is a castille soap of olive oil swirled with rich goat milk to give you a soap that is perfect for smoothing and soothing the skin. BOTTOM RIGHT: Fast Lane Classic Cars in St. Charles, Missouri sells automobiles, related memorabilia, antiques, clothing and toys.

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by NELLIE BARIL Every year, while shopping for friends and family members, the same scenario unfolds: Trudging through the big-name chain stores, bleary eyed and uninspired, looking for something different, something unexpected, for the unique individuals in your life. Why not step outside the box for a refreshing retail adventure at one of the many distinctive shops in Ste. Genevieve and St. Charles, Missouri? Handcrafted bath bombs, pewter butter keepers, 1:18 scale die cast cars, aged gouda cheese from Jersey cows — these items and more will have even the most hard-to-impress person on your list excitedly exclaiming, “Where did you get this?” In the French Colonial town of Ste. Genevieve, ASL Pewter is keeping a traditional craft alive with an extensive offering of functional pewter items for the home and office. The studio and store are owned and operated by Thomas Want and Patricia Hooper, two selfMore? Go to proclaimed history enthusiasts LifeandStyleSI.com who have been recognized the for more information world over for their work. ASL about these shops and a video that will show Pewter sells a variety of pieces you how pewter that you won’t find anywhere vessels are made. else, including drinking vessels, serving pieces, flatware, inkwells, shaving sets, and countless other items inspired by history and tradition. The artists use both original, in-house made molds and authentic vintage molds dating back to the 1600s to create functional pieces of art using Provided photos one of the oldest known alloys. An afternoon European Entitlements offers handmade German toys that will delight the youngsters in your life. spent perusing the shelves of ASL Pewter will reveal the fascinating artistry involved in pewter making while also providing a wide variety of interesting gift options. Another shop keeping with the theme of Ste. Genevieve’s French heritage is European Entitlements. Every product in this charming store is imported from one of a dozen European countries including France, Germany, England, Sweden and Spain. The mission of the store is to provide perfectly tasteful products of e x q u i s i t e quality at a reasonable price. On that promise they definitely deliver. Handmade Patricia and Thomas Hooper, owners of ASL Pewter German in Ste. Genevieve. toys will delight the expertly crafted accessories. For gifts you youngsters truly cannot find anywhere else in the region, in your and sometimes even the nation, European life while Entitlements is a requisite shopping stop in English Ste. Genevieve. garden If wine, cheese, beer, and spirits are what tools and you’re looking for, Cork & Rind in St. Charles is fine Italian the place to visit. Owners Michael and Elizabeth leather Kinney are proud to offer a selection of both products foreign and domestic products that turn the will outfit spotlight on small-production companies those who recognized for their experience and superior have a quality. For a shop small in size, they offer a taste for Cork & Rind in St. Charles, Missouri. bountiful variety of wine, cheese, and other unique, Life & Style : Winter 2016

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IN OUR BACKYARD

Provided photos

LEFT: Tea Tree and Peppermint infused soaps add an invigorating feel to your skin but can also clarify and condition the scalp and hair if used as a shampoo bar. MIDDLE: Coffee scrubs are all the rage and the Cioccolato has to be the queen of them all. Cioccolato is a decadent blend of fresh coffee and chocolate that gets tired and dull skin percolating! RIGHT: Goat Milk and Oatmeal soap slices are a healthful way to cleanse troubled skin.

Cork & Rind in St. Charles offers fresh artisan bread delivered on Saturday mornings from Pekara Bakehouse.

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delights. The owners don’t just stock items based on a high price tag either. Quality is key. During the holiday season, custom gift baskets and packages are popular among customers of Cork & Rind. Even if you know little about wine and cheese, the staff is happy to create a unique combination of the many styles and flavors offered. Stepping into Bathhouse Soapery on Main Street in St. Charles, shoppers immediately encounter both the beauty and luxury of the products offered. Charlene Wilson, the founder and owner of Bathhouse Soapery, says customers experience her products “through all five senses” and that smelling, touching, and viewing the handcrafted soaps and bath luxuries is encouraged to fully appreciate the quality of the items she has been producing for over fifteen years. All of the products at Bathhouse Soapery are sold exclusively in their retail shops, making the countless available gift options truly unique. There are products for every skin type and need, for customers with maturing or very dry

skin to men and women simply looking for a spa-inspired skincare regimen. From tobacco and rum shave soap to gardenia sugar scrub, a plethora of pampering products awaits at Bathhouse Soapery. Boys and girls of all ages are sure to be entertained for hours on end at St. Charles’ full service classic car dealership, Fast Lane Classic Cars. Over the last 23 years, owners David and Laura Williams have built a business that offers quite the memorable shopping

Fast Lane Classic Cars in St. Charles, Missouri sells automobiles, related memorabilia, antiques, clothing and toys.


Fast Lane Classic Cars in St. Charles, Missouri sells automobiles, related memorabilia, antiques, clothing and toys.

experience. Beyond the 180 classic and muscle cars on display in two showrooms, Fast Lane sells automobile related memorabilia, antiques, clothing, and toys. From Hot Wheels to neon signs, there are a multitude of items to cater to any car enthusiast. With free admission to the service, detail, and restoration departments, shoppers can embark on a self-guided tour while filling their bags with car merchandise from an abundantly unique collection. Modern, out of the ordinary gifts await in the culturally rich towns of Ste. Genevieve and St. Charles, Missouri. Both locations offer exceptional gift options sure to please every recipient on your list. Put an end to the tired annual tradition of purchasing the same humdrum gifts and show up this year with something extraordinary.

Proudly made in the U.S.A.

Since 1976 Mon-Fri, 8:30 am - 5:15 pm Sat, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

618.529.5888

2355 Sweets Drive, Carbondale, IL 62902 www.dogwoodfireplaceandlawn.com

Shopping destinations ASL Pewter 183 South Third Street Ste. Genevieve, MO 63670 573-883-2095 www.aslpewter.com European Entitlements 102 South Main Street Ste. Genevieve, MO 63670 573-883-8233 or 573-880-9289 www.europeanentitlements.com Cork & Rind 555 First Capitol Drive Saint Charles, MO 63301 636-896-4404 www.corkandrind.com Bathhouse Soapery & Caldarium 401 S. Main Street St. Charles, MO 71457 501-525-7627 www.bathhousesoap.com Fast Lane Classic Cars 427 Little Hills Ind Blvd. Saint Charles, MO 63301 636-940-9969 www.fastlanecars.com

Find other Aveda locations at 800.328.0849 or aveda.com

Salon Euphoria, LLC 701b South Illinois Ave. Carbondale, Illinois 62901 618.549.5874

Life & Style : Winter 2016

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SELF

Chris Lamport of Southern Strategy Works and his son, Sam are trying to balance life. photo by BYRON HETZLER

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Are you

happy? Chris Lamport can help you find balance in your life by LES O’DELL Are you happy? Truly happy? If you were able to say “yes,” count yourself fortunate and among the minority. A 2013 Harris Poll found that only about one-third of Americans would describe themselves as very happy. Getting to happy, said Life Coach Chris Lamport of Murphysboro-based Southern Strategy Works means bringing balance into life by bridging the gap between where we are and where we really want to be. “I don’t know if people are happy or not, but I do believe most aren’t fulfilled, living a life they have definitively chosen, or understand how much control they really do have,” Lamport explained. “I believe most get caught in their daily routines of work, sleep, eat, etc. Creating a healthy balance requires one to definitely decide they want something different. That they are no longer going to “go with the flow” or accept the status quo. Amazing things start to happen when one realizes how much control they have to shape their own future.” He said we feel out of control and out of balance because we are told we can have it all — all ranging from success at work to new cars, from the latest technology and toys, and everything great relationships to fantastic health — then struggle with unrealistic expectations. “Every day we are blasted by ads, but they are never put into perspective,” he added. “People are seeing things that are all reasonable, but together they are unrealistic and overwhelming. They create a lot of angst and stress — feelings that things just aren’t right. It is so easy to get busy in the day-to-day and lose track of what you really want or

Provided

Life Coach Chris Lamport of Murphysborobased Southern Strategy Works has a newfound passion for creating a healthy, balanced lifestyle.

what your real definition of success is.” Lamport, a licensed engineer, speaks from experience. He said while he was enjoying professional and financial success, a life coach made him realize

how unbalanced his own life had become and how he was sacrificing his family for the other areas of accomplishment. “I learned to go down a different path,” he recalled, “one where instead of sacrificing all of the other important areas of life to achieve in one area, you achieve more success in all areas and increase your own sense of well-being.” Since creating his own healthy balance, Lamport has dropped Ready for a 60 pounds, completed two change? full marathons, To get one-on-one started two personal training and life companies, coaching for those ready transitioned for a change contact careers, checked Chris Lamport at chris@ off my first southernstrategyworks. bucket list, and com or www. learned to play southernstrategyworks. the upright bass, com or by phone at all while spending 618-559-4555. more time with family, friends, and hobbies than ever before. Today, he helps others by asking the tough questions and providing accountability as a life coach. He said the action begins with answering a few tough questions: 1. Where do you really, truly want to be? What do you desire? 2. How can you best get to where you want to be? 3. What resources are you lacking to get there? 4. What is step one? “The process taught me that you can truly achieve anything you desire,” he said. “You have to have a plan that actually works. Hoping, dreaming and praying alone do not work; there has to be action.”

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HOW TO

Affordable and “ready for the pot.”

How to bring out the best flavor of every bean by BARB EIDLIN You are probably not aware of it, but a quiet revolution took place while you were paying attention to other things. Coffee has moved into its third wave. If you are like most Americans, somewhere between crawling out of bed in the morning and checking your email at the office, you have a cup of coffee, most likely from an automatic coffee maker, and most likely the coffee you drink is from a major brand. This is first wave coffee. First wave coffee is from the 20th century, when folks in the coffee business began providing coffee that was affordable 32

Life & Style : Winter 2016

and “ready for the pot.” Coffee brands like Folgers and Maxwell House became household names in the United States. This wave kept Americans happy and caffeinated for a long time. But somewhere in the late 1990s, people began to notice there was difference between how the equipment for making coffee, the beans and the roasts all affected the taste of the beverage. Out of this, the second wave, or “specialty coffee” movement was born. Companies like Starbucks, Seattle’s Best, or Caribou Coffee emerged to provide individually tailored experiences to their customers. Today, the third wave of coffee is here to slow us down. Characterized by a coffee lover’s interest in the “character” of their coffee, the third wave puts the product itself at center stage. This has given rise

to small, local roasters like The Paducah Coffee Company in Paducah or Jen’s Joe in Southern Illinois. Jessica Strenge of the Paducah Coffee Company uses a Diedrich Roaster — which is made right here in the USA — to baby her beans. “Stephen Diedrich not only taught me all about my roaster but, I’ve seen them actually being made in their facility in Idaho,” she stated. Jessica relates her decision to go into the coffee roasting business was inspired by her aunt and uncle who left their day jobs to roast coffee in Cancun, Mexico in the 80s. “I’ve always felt as if I had gold when I had a bag of their coffee.” Like many small roasters, Strenge’s coffee comes from all over the world, including the United States.


Specialty drinks and flavors.

“Our green coffee importer has several ports in the United States, all of which have different coffees, so I have quite a selection when it’s time to order,” said Strenge. Strenge reflected that getting specialty, high grade coffee to roast is a privilege. “I strive to bring out the best flavor of each bean because I have learned of all of the care and hard work that is put into these beans before I get them. The whole process from farmer, to hand picking of the cherries, to the drying method and distribution all over the world puts the pressure on me to honor their work by delivering the best final product I know how.” This sentiment is echoed by Jen LeDuc, owner and operator of Jen’s Joe, whose products can be found in a range of places in Southern Illinois, as well as in her newly opened retail store in Carbondale. On her website LeDuc expresses that “Coffee is more than drink, beverage, morning jolt, etc. It has a complexity beyond the meeting of water and coffee grounds. It includes the great number of people involved in the craft and

Character.

Get caffeinated! Paducah Coffee Company In the alley at 207 Broadway St., Paducah, Kentucky 217-683-3455 paducahcoffee.com Jen’s Joe 212 S. University Avenue, Carbondale 618-521-2580 jensjoe.com

science of growing, harvesting, processing, roasting and brewing coffee. In the end, it produces a range of tastes and smells which is vast and fascinating.” LeDuc uses an Ambex ym-2, — a roaster designed for small cafes — to yield her best results. So when the roasting is over and it’s time to brew – what is the best way to do it? Jessica Strenge summed it up “In my opinion, if the coffee you are drinking is premium, it does

not need any added ingredients. It does need a burr grinder, the best water available, and a simple brewing method. I use the pour over method everyday — that way I can choose the temperature of the water as well as smell and watch the whole process!” Pour over coffee is just what it sounds like: A handheld cone, usually with a filter, is held over a cup, and hot water is slowly poured over coffee grounds. It is helpful to remember that coffee begins its life as a fruit. Like any fruit it is sensitive, so things like contaminates in the water can affect the taste of your coffee. The rest of the secret seems to be in the accessories. Whether you like your coffee made with the pour over method, or cold brew, or love espresso; the third wave of the coffee movement is there for you. And hand roasted coffee makes a great holiday gift, as do grinders and other coffee brewing accessories. So stop in to visit Jessica Strenge of Paducah Coffee Company or Jen LeDuc of Jen’s Joe and sit and have a cup, or bring home a bag of beans and enjoy your brew at home. Life & Style : Winter 2016

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COVER

Global holidays How other cultures celebrate the season

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COVER

Diwali

thinkstock.com

A little girl holds Rangoli and decorates with oil lamps for Diwali celebration in India.

The Global/International holiday season, however, kicks off weeks earlier, with the Hindu holiday Diwali, or “festival of lights.” This year Diwali began on Sunday, Oct. 30 and continued for five days until Thursday, No. 3. An official holiday in much of Asia, the festival celebrates the victory of light over darkness, or good over evil. At this time of year, it is customary for people to clean and renovate their homes and offices. On the main night, people wear new clothes or a best outfit. Congregations join in Pujas (literally, acts of worship) and prayers are offered to Lakshmi in particular, the goddess of fertility and prosperity. Evenings are times for celebration — fireworks are common, as are family feasts, and the sharing of Mithai (sweets), and exchanges of gifts between family and friends. Indian desserts are intensely sweet, and different from western fare in that they are generally cooked, not baked. The big three deserts in the region seem to be: Gulab Jamon, Kheer, and Gajar ka halwa. If you are in the mood to try these dishes, visit Bombay Olive or Reema’s Indian Cuisine in Carbondale, India Delight in Marion or Tandoor Indian Bar & Grill and Namaskar in Cape Girardeau. Each of these restaurants also have their specialties. Ask your server to explain the choices.

St. Lucia’s Day (St. Lucy’s Day)

Milad an-Nabi is celebrated in a carnival like manner, with large street parades. Homes and mosques are decorated.

Milad an-Nabi

Because their calendar is lunar and therefore moves in cycles within the Gregorian calendar year, the American Islamic world joins the season by celebrating the Prophet’s Birthday, or the Milad an-Nabi (or Mawlid) as it is commonly known in Muslim culture on Dec. 13. While some strict sects do not observe this holiday, it is dedicated to commemorating the birth of the Prophet Muhammad. In some countries, Milad an-Nabi is celebrated in a carnival-like manner, with large street parades. Homes and mosques are decorated. Charity and food are given and stories of the life of the Prophet Muhammad are told. Food served varies from culture to culture, Sam’s Café, Reema’s Indian Cuisine and Pita Alley in Carbondale all serve Halal food and would be a great choice to celebrate this holiday. Folks looking to connect for religious services can touch base with the Carbondale Muslim Center or the Islamic Center of Carbondale.

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Dec. 13 marks St. Lucia’s Day, a celebration of charity and bravery as exemplified by a young woman who brought food and aid to Christians hiding in the catacombs. St. Lucia’s day is celebrated most commonly in Scandinavia, where traditionally, the St. Lucia’s day is celebrated most commonly eldest daughter plays in Scandinavia, where traditionally, the eldest “St. Lucia,” dresses in daughter plays ‘St. Lucia,’ dresses in a white robe, sports red ribbons, and a wears a crown a white robe, sports of candles and greens. red ribbons, and a wears a crown of candles and greens which symbolize new life in the darkest days of winter. Food has a big role in the celebration of St. Lucia, and here in Southern Illinois this tradition is held by the folks at Hedman Vineyards, who mark the day with a Christmas Dinner in the Peachbarn. This year they will celebrate on Sunday, Dec. 11. The Peachbarn has a cozy, rustic atmosphere with exposed beams and hand-painted Swedish pastoral scenes. In years past the Christmas Dinner was served with Swedish Christmas songs and games, providing entertainment for all. According to Amanda Blakely of Hedman Vineyards & Winery, this year the dinner will include a Julboard — a very traditional smörgåsbord — with all traditional food in a buffet style. The exact menu is to be announced and will pull primarily from Swedish culture.


Solstice/Yule

Countdown to Christmas—Las Posadas

Las Posadas is nine days of religious observance celebrated mostly in the Mexican culture and by MexicanAmericans. It generally begins on Dec. 16 and ends on Dec. 24. Traditionally, in the evenings Mexican families participate in processions that recreate the pilgrimage of Mary, Joseph, and baby Jesus to Bethlehem. Las Posadas translates from Spanish as “The Inns” and calls to mind the stable where the family was forced to seek shelter and Jesus was born. Mass is generally held after the procession. Celebrations after that where champurrado (a Mexican hot beverage) and pan dulce (sweet bread) are served, and piñatas are burst by the children. In the region authentic pan dulce can be found at Panaderia La Unica in Carbondale. And, while not yet on their schedule, St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Anna has, in previous years, has celebrated Los Posadas with the community.

Yule is also associated with the celebration of Solstice. The word solstice is derived from the Latin, sol (sun) and sister (to stand still); so Winter Solstice means “sun stands still in winter.” On solstice night — the longest night of the year — Pagans celebrate the beginning of the yule season. This is the time of year when the darkness gives way to light. Historically on this night fires are lit to symbolize the warmth and the life-giving properties of the sun. Crops and trees are “Wassailed” with toasts. Until the 16th century, the winter months were a time of famine in northern Europe, so many of the cattle were harvested so that they wouldn’t have to be fed. This makes meat a part of this celebration’s bounty. The Southern Illinois Pagan Alliance will celebrate this year’s yule on Dec. 17. Get baking! For more puff pastry hors d’oeuvres, see lifeandstylesi.com

Puff pastry hors d’oeuvres for the pastry impaired cook So you’ve decided to host a party this year, but you aren’t sure what to serve. Because obviously you want something extra fancy, something that will allow you to shine nearly as brightly as folks on the red carpet. My advice is to serve up a slate of hors d’oeuvres wrapped in puff pastry, the superelegant dough perfected by — who else? — the French. In France, it’s called mille-feuille, which translates into “a thousand leaves.” That’s their way of describing the recipe’s many layers of fat sandwiched between an equal number of layers of dough. The pastry puffs up as the trapped butter gives off steam as it cooks, resulting in a confection that is remarkably light and airy. But it’s not exactly a breeze to produce. So here’s a simpler version, known variously as rough puff pastry, quick puff pastry, or blitz puff pastry. It’s actually not much quicker than full blown puff pastry, but it certainly is much easier to prepare. This recipe yields about a pound of dough, enough to produce several dozen hors d’oeuvres. It is followed by some suggestions for fillings for those hors d’oeuvres. Making rough puff pastry is like making regular old pie dough, at least to start. You combine butter and flour, then add ice-cold

water. But for rough puff pastry you don’t break down the butter into small chunks, as you would for pie dough. Rough puff pastry should look downright shaggy and chunky after you’ve first mixed it. It won’t become very smooth until you roll and fold it and develop all those layers. Puff pastry freezes beautifully when it is protected by plastic wrap and foil, so it’s a great choice to prep it ahead of the party. Cut it into quarters first, then sock it away. The day before the event put the pastry in the refrigerator to let it slowly defrost. On the day of the party, work with one piece at a time, keeping the remaining sections chilled until you need them. As it bakes, puff pastry blows up to eight times its original height without the aid of a leavener. It is one of baking’s miracles. Even if you don’t consider yourself a baker, give it a whirl. I tend to consider myself pastry impaired. But if I can do it, so can you. And here are some tips to keep in mind while mixing, rolling and folding the dough: ■ Make sure all the ingredients are cold. ■ When you first roll out the dough, its edges will be round-ish. Square them off with a bench scraper or knife. As you fold the dough, make sure that the ends and the corners of all three folds stack up right on top of each other.

■ Work quickly and sprinkle enough flour on the counter, the dough and the rolling pin to keep the dough from sticking. ■ Dust off the flour before folding the dough. ■ Don’t skip the resting times between folds; it allows the gluten to relax and reduces shrinkage. And here are some tips for rolling out the dough to make hors d’oeuvres: ■ Refrigerate the rolled dough briefly (about 15 minutes) before cutting it. ■ Use a sharp knife to make straight firm cuts and avoid squishing the sides. Squished sides make the layers stick together, which prevents them from rising. ■ Don’t let the egg wash get on the cut edges, which can glue them shut in the oven.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Sara Moulton was executive chef at Gourmet magazine for nearly 25 years, and spent a decade hosting several Food Network shows. She currently stars in public television’s “Sara’s Weeknight Meals” and has written three cookbooks, including “Sara Moulton’s Everyday Family Dinners.” — SARA MOULTON, The Associated Press Life & Style : Winter 2016

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Hanukkah

Hanukkah is a Jewish holiday celebrated for eight days and nights. This year it begins on Saturday, Dec. 21 and continues through Sunday, Jan. 1. In Hebrew, the word “Hanukkah” means “dedication,” and the holiday marks the re-dedication of the holy Temple in Jerusalem. The center ritual to Hanukkah is the lighting of the menorah, a candelabra that holds nine candles — eight of them to symbolize the miraculous eight days that lamps, which should not have had the oil to burn, lit the temple, cleansing it of its poor condition — and a ninth to light them all. Families light one candle on the first night, two on the second, etc. after sundown during the eight days of the holiday while reciting prayers. Food surrounding this holiday is deepfried, caloric and absolutely delicious. As Hanukkah celebrates the miracle of oil, it is traditional to eat fried foods such jamfilled doughnuts known as sufganiyot and potato pancakes known as latkes. Rabbinic literature suggests there is also a tradition of eating dairy products, such as cheese, during Hanukkah so many dishes will contain dairy. In many households, gifts are exchanged during this time — one given on each night of

thinkstock.com

Hanukkah celebrates the miracle of oil. It is traditional to eat fried foods such jam-filled doughnuts known as sufganiyot.

the holiday. Unfortunately, there are few places one can get a good latke while eating out, but last year Chabad SIU had a latke making party to celebrate the season. To find out if they will be making a repeat performance, or to find out more about the worship and holiday schedules, contact them at chabadsiu.com.

Kwanzaa

Others looking to connect with the Jewish community in Carbondale can get in touch with Congregation Beth Jacob. There are no tickets for their High Holiday services, and you do not have to be a member to attend the services. They invite everyone to all services and events. Regionally, people can connect with the Jewish Federation of Southern Illinois.

Kwanzaa is a mostly secular holiday created by Dr. Maulana Karenga, a professor and chairman of Black Studies at California State University, Long Beach, in 1966 in response to the Watts riots in Los Angeles. Kwanzaa, a seven-night festival, commemorates values and concepts reflective of African culture. The name Kwanzaa comes from the phrase “matunda ya kwanza” which means “first fruits” in Swahili. On each of the seven nights, the family gathers and a child lights one of the candles on the Kinara (candelabra), and each night one of the seven principles, called the Nguzo Saba, is discussed. The principles are values of African culture which help to build and reinforce community among African-Americans: unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith. Kwanzaa celebrations often include songs and dances, African drums, storytelling, poetry reading and a large traditional meal. There are many different interpretations of what “Kwanzaa food” is, and some of that depends on the area of the world the families’ culture came from. But let’s just say that Kwanzaa is a delicious tribute to soul food, African recipes and even Caribbean flavors. While there aren’t specifically advertised “Soul Food” restaurants in Southern Illinois, people have their own favorite spots where they get good greens, okra, rice and beans or jambalaya. Most of those places sell barbeque — they’re almost as numerous as churches — and you have to find the restaurant you like best. For information about Kwanzaa, its history and celebrations in the community, get in touch with the African American Museum of Southern Illinois.

The Southern File Photo

Students light the seven candles of the kinara during a 2010 Kwanzaa celebration at SIUC’s Grinnell Hall.

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Want to learn more? Diwali Bombay Olive 518 S Illinois Avenue, Carbondale 618-457-6680 Reema’s Indian Cuisine 709 S Illinois Avenue, Carbondale 618-457-6666 thinkstock.com photos

Customs and traditions concerning the celebration of the Chinese New Year vary widely but red paper decorations are a decoration that most use.

Chinese New Year

And bringing up the pack, on the other side of the darkest part of the year, is the celebration of the Chinese New Year. This year — the year of the fire rooster — begins on Saturday, Jan. 28. The New Year festival is centuries old. Traditionally, the festival was a time to honor deities and ancestors. Within China, regional customs and traditions concerning the celebration of the Chinese New Year vary widely, which means across the globe, they do too. But most contain a gathering of family, a thorough cleansing of the house to sweep away ill-fortune and make way for good luck to come in. Red paper decorations will decorate windows and doors. Firecrackers will be lit and money will be given in red paper envelopes printed with wishes of wealth, prosperity and longevity. If you’re planning on eating out, keep an eye on your local restaurants for New Year’s inspired dishes. St. Louis hosts their annual Lunar New Year Festival this year on Saturday, Feb. 20. This two-day festival includes a 10-course banquet offered at several Chinatown restaurants from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday night. Saturday’s schedule includes a parade, night market and dozens of performances.

India Delight 104 N Print Avenue, Marion 618-997-8493 Tandoor Indian Bar & Grill 3049 William Street, Cape Girardeau 573-339-2014 Namaskar 1001 Broadway Street, Cape Girardeau 573-803-2891 Hindu Temple and Cultural Society of Southern Illinois 1209 E. Walnut Street, Carbondale www.sitemple.com 618-889-5954

St. Lucia’s Day (St. Lucy’s Day) Hedman Vineyards 560 Chestnut Street, Alto Pass 618-893-4923 www.peachbarn.com

Milad an-Nabi

Islamic Center of Carbondale 511 S. Poplar, Carbondale 618-549-3868 www.icc-carbondale.com

Las Posadas Panaderia La Unica 213 W. Main Street, Carbondale 618-457-6513 St. Mary’s Catholic Church 402 Freeman Street, Anna 618-833-5835 www.stmarysunionco.org

Solstice/Yule Southern Illinois Pagan Alliance www.sipagan.com/ community

Hanukkah Congregation Beth Jacob 618-529-1409 www. bethjacobcarbondale.org Jewish Federation of Southern Illinois www.simokyfed.com

Kwanzaa Sam’s Café 521 S. Illinois Avenue, Carbondale 618-549-2234 Reema’s Indian Cuisine 709 S Illinois Avenue, Carbondale 618-457-6666 Pita Alley 1711 W. Main Street, Carbondale 618-351-6111 Carbondale Muslim Center 530 N. Wall Street, Carbondale 618-457-6522 www.carbondale-mc.com

African American Museum of Southern Illinois 618-457-2217 www shopatuniversitymall. com/store/ african-american-museum

Chinese New Year St. Louis’ Lunar New Year Festival Friday, Feb. 19 and Saturday, Feb. 20 www.lunarnewyearstl. com

2017 is the year of the fire rooster.

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WE LIVE HERE

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Hedman Vineyards’ old, but new Peachbarn A gem of Southern Illinois by NELLIE BARIL

P

ulling into the parking lot of Hedman Vineyards & Winery, a tall, proud barn stands in full view, a well-cared for building with a front door as blue as the crisp, clear sky above it. Covered in perfectly weathered wood siding that displays naturally faded shades of gray and brown, the structure’s peak, just above the loft window, stretches high into the skyline. The windows are framed with a peach-pink color, redolent of the fresh fruit that comes from the rich land of the Hedman orchards. Flowering plants and trees line the perimeter of the barn and outdoor pavilion, while the rolling acres of lush vineyards appear just behind the barn, stretching back to where the forest begins. The overwhelming natural beauty of the property is what initially inspired Anders and Gerd Hedman to make Southern Illinois their new home when they first visited the area more than 22 years ago. On a year sabbatical from her position as a physical therapist in Stockholm, Sweden, Gerd took a travel abroad job opportunity to work at a facility in Carbondale. The couple temporarily moved here looking to have an adventure in the United States after their two daughters had grown up and moved out. One year quickly turned into two and what has blossomed from that original overseas excursion is a beautiful peach orchard and charming refurbished barn that now houses a Swedish café, tasting room, gift shop and winery. The Hedmans fell in love with the natural beauty of Southern Illinois and what Gerd called “a nice, laid back area with friendly people.” The weather and agriculture were appealing to the Hedmans, with a longer growing season than what they were accustomed to in Sweden. Commercially made wine made from grapes grown in Sweden is marginal and the Scandinavian climate does not allow for much success growing peaches. While Anders could purchase grape juice to make wine at home in Sweden, the appeal of using estate-grown grapes directly from his own piece of land was much more enticing. The Hedmans decided to take a break from their respective careers as a carpenter and physical therapist, to “grow some ‘exotic’ peaches” as Gerd describes their initial plans. After years spent renovating the peach barn and nearby farmhouse, where the two live, Hedman Vineyards & Winery opened to the public in 2005. Now they not only have two acres of peaches but also ten acres of grapes that they use to make their award-winning wines.

The three story barn at Hedman Vineyards in Alto Pass, originally built in 1945, has been fully renovated without sacrificing any of the structure’s traditional charm. photos by BYRON HETZLER

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WE LIVE HERE

As avid wine enthusiasts, planting a vineyard and producing wine made sense to the Hedmans. Enjoying wine is a journey of smell, taste, and sight and Hedman Vineyards Peachbarn offers a similar voyage with the delightful aromas and flavors of the café and the year-round natural beauty right outside the doors of the barn. Anders and Gerd took me on an informative tour of the property, from outside the front entrance to around the back where sweeping, panoramic views of the vineyard and Shawnee National Forest abound.

The structure blossoms The three story barn, originally built in 1945, has been fully renovated without sacrificing any of the structure’s traditional charm. When the Hedmans purchased the property it was in a state of disrepair — almost falling down. The café on the first level was originally used as dirt floor stables and corn storage. The second level was the fruit processing center for the peach orchard. Gerd recognized the potential of the aged barn and knew it could be transformed into something fantastic with some hard work and determination. “Barns in the countryside are part of the rich cultural 42

Life & Style : Winter 2016

heritage of the area, but they’re disappearing.” Gerd said. This is one barn that has luckily been saved. The café is now a cozy and intimate space for diners eager to embark on a culinary adventure. Patrons faithfully return to the Peachbarn to enjoy traditional Swedish fare while sipping estate-made wines in the friendly atmosphere. On the second floor is the new tasting room and gift shop, which was completed in May 2016. The café and tasting room were both originally on the first floor in what is now used solely as the restaurant. The issue with the original setup was that patrons who only wanted to visit for wine

tastings were sometimes unable to find a space to stop and relax. If they wanted to enjoy a glass of wine, but not sit down to eat, they were sometimes unable to find a seat if the room was filled with diners. With the new tasting room upstairs, “customers can stay and linger longer now,” Gerd explained.

Getting a taste “We’ve been talking about doing it for years so we finally did it!” Gerd said of the new Peachbarn tasting room. Almost all of the renovations have been done by Anders and Gerd. Their attention to detail is evident when observing the many

design elements of the renovated tasting room. It was previously used for storage and wine processing by the Hedmans but has been beautifully transformed into a serene and welcoming space for customers. There is a beautifully built three-sided wine tasting bar with plenty of space to take time to sample the wide array of wines offered at Hedman Vineyards. The exposed beams and posts in the tasting room are part of the barn’s original structure, adding to the bucolic feel of the building. Colorful kurbits, traditional Swedish ornamentation hand painted by


ABOVE: The café at Hedman Vineyards in Alto Pass is now a cozy and intimate space for diners eager to embark on a culinary adventure. LEFT TOP: The overwhelming natural beauty of the property is what initially inspired Anders and Gerd Hedman to make Southern Illinois their home. LEFT BOTTOM: The Tasting Room at Hedman Vineyards in Alto Pass has ample room for weekend visitors to the wine trail, no matter the size of the group.

Gerd, appear on the overhead beams, stairway rails and the outdoor eaves of the barn, offering a glimpse into the culture of Scandinavia. The Peachbarn tasting room welcomes in natural light from several tall windows, most of which have comfortable, mid-century style leather arm chairs beneath them. A long table with beautiful, exposed timbers and chandeliers overhead is set out on one side for large groups. Several small tables are scattered throughout the tasting room for enjoyment of

wine, imported beer and appetizer platters of pickled herring, creamed caviar and lingonberries. “People walk up [from the cafe] and love it! They bring their glass of wine and say, ‘Oh! This is big!’” said Gerd. Soft lighting and the rustic charm of the Peachbarn make for a cozy atmosphere yearround. The Traminette, released in September, is a cool, crisp refreshment for wine enthusiasts coming in from the heat and humidity that Southern Illinois is famous for in the late summer

months. Swedish Glogg, produced with the spiciness of cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, cloves and orange peel helps to warm patrons of the Peachbarn during the blustery winter months.

Entertainment at the Barn Don’t let the peaceful environment fool you though. Hedman Vineyards offers lively entertainment in various forms. Live music is featured monthly in the spacious tasting room. Musicians previously performed only in the outdoor pavilion

and depending on the weather, guests would sometimes have to sit indoors while the music stayed outdoors. Now, the tunes and melodies have room to bounce off of the high ceilings in the tasting room while still fostering an intimate feeling for guests who are relaxing with a glass of wine. The Hedmans host dance lessons once a month in the tasting room and often enjoy participating in the classes themselves. The room is an ideal location to learn the Fox Trot, Rumba and Waltz, tapping your toes on the dark gray tiles Life & Style : Winter 2016

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WE LIVE HERE

and swinging around the spacious room. With a 60-person capacity in the Peachbarn tasting room there is ample room for weekend visitors to the wine trail, no matter the size of the group. The large space is ideal for bridal showers, rehearsal dinners and birthday parties. The full restaurant menu is not available in the tasting room but appetizers are available. A buffet is set up for private events. Recently, the Hedmans hosted a double birthday party in the new tasting room for two women celebrating their 85th birthdays. Gerd spoke of the event with a jovial attitude, saying she was happy to cater to the needs of the group who were celebrating such a special milestone birthday.

Swedish hospitality and hopes The Hedmans love to make their customers feel like family. They were warmly welcomed to this area in the mid-90s and have enjoyed making friends with the locals since then. Hospitality is important to Anders and Gerd and they try to make each guest feel welcome and comfortable, no matter the 44

Life & Style : Winter 2016

length of their stay at the Peach Barn. In the summertime, Gerd grows her own herbs and most of the vegetables used in the Peachbarn kitchen. The peaches in August and the grapes in September are incorporated into recipes Anders and Gerd create in the cafÊ and are also featured in two of the themed dinners throughout the year. Other fruits and vegetables are locally sourced as much as possible. Anders and Gerd are happy to make their recipes gluten free or vegetarian whenever possible upon request so that every visitor is comfortable and satisfied. The welcoming atmosphere that the Hedmans have created in the renovation, as well as their passion for pleasing their guests, is what makes the Peachbarn such a gem of Southern Illinois. Over the past 22 years, the hard work and unique vision of the Hedmans has turned their property into a staple of the Shawnee Hills Wine Trail. And they aren’t stopping any time soon. There is a charming bed and breakfast suite on the same level of the cafÊ that the Hedmans hope to reopen. Gerd also


spoke of their hopes to build a deck on the rear of the barn so that visitors have the option of relaxing outdoors while admiring the panoramic view of vineyards and woodlands. “It’s a process. We’re always building and doing things all the time. Trying to include and expand,” Gerd said excitedly. Walking through the tasting room one more time before I left, I noticed several vintage Swedish posters from the early twentieth century adorning the length of the west wall. Anders walked with me and described the scenes in each poster, pointing out advertisements for travel and what makes Sweden such a desirable travel destination. He spoke fondly of their country of origin and yet it’s apparent that the pair are happy with their choice to make a rich and fulfilling life here in Southern Illinois. This combination of the Hedman’s love and pride for their home country and heritage mixes perfectly with their appreciation of the new life they have made in Alto Pass. They have created a unique experience in the hills of the Shawnee National Forest for visitors to the Peachbarn. Both the property and its owners stand out from many of the attractions in Southern Illinois. The Peachbarn’s renovations over the last several years are an amalgamation of tradition and innovation and I, for one, can’t wait to see what else the Hedmans have in store for us!

Come visit with us! or Kom och besök oss Hedman Vineyards 560 Chestnut Street, Alto Pass 618-893-4923 www.peachbarn.com LEFT: A light fixture made of wine glasses from wineries on the Shawnee Wine Trail in the Peach Barn at Hedman Vineyards in Alto Pass. TOP: The gift shop at Hedman Vineyards Peachbarn offers a voyage with delightful aromas and flavors from Sweden. TOP OPPOSITE PAGE: The café at Hedman Vineyards in Alto Pass is now a cozy and intimate space for diners eager to embark on a culinary adventure. BOTTOM OPPOSITE PAGE: Hedman Vineyards in Alto Pass has a beautiful peach orchard and charming refurbished barn that now houses a Swedish café, tasting room, gift shop and winery.

Life & Style : Winter 2016

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LEISURE

Got a case of

Catch these films to keep you warm and cozy this season

cabin fever? A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965)

You, your pare nts and your yo unger siblings will love this “P eanuts” classic, whether it’s the first or tent h time you’ve watched it.

fore e B e r a m t h The Nig s (1993) Christma

es you stmas giv vie fore Chri e B liday mo o re h a a tm sk for in (Sally a The Nigh ce ld n u a co m g you ing, ro everythin Santa Claus, sing se of ts, added do n n se a re h p it w — — ) r! e forev and Jack . ss e n rk a d

Serendipity (2001)

rfect er look as pe No one will ev ing as John while ice skat in te Beckinsale Ka d an Cusack Serendipity.

Harry Potter Series

The Holiday (2006)

This romantic co medy has Came ron Diaz trading her Los Angeles mansion for Kate Winslet’s charmi ng English cotta ge so that each can ta ke a December vacation from their vario us problems. Fo r all of its predictability Th e Holiday is the perfect heartwarming wi nter movie for nig hts too cold to leave yo ur couch.

All of the Harry Potter movies will make you want to sn uggle under an invisibility cloak with a ni ce warm Butte rbeer and settle in for a long winter’s na p.

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946)

movies go, this As far as Christmas st. If you’re film really is the be movie that’s ay lid ho looking for a ymation deeper than the Cla film is a great s thi s, rie Rudolph sto choice.

46

Life & Style : Winter 2016

Up (2009)

in ying with u’ll be cr o g the y t in b h u tc o a No d tes of w u in m e k 0 a 1 it will m the first tion, but s you a ip im sh n a n o r Pixa the relati te a ci re you app our life. have in y


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Life & Style : Winter 2016

47


MEET THE ARTIST

Repairing Wacinton On the Trail of the Whispering Giants with Peter Wolf Toth

Talk to the artist If you are interested in supporting Peter Toth in his work, you can reach him through his studio in Edgewater, Florida, where he has a roadside gallery. Call ahead for an appointment at 386-795-0291. He can also be found on Facebook.

story and photos by BARB EIDLIN Peter Toth is swinging his mallet into a chisel, which rings as it digs in to the wood. For those of you unfamiliar with the statue, it depicts a Chickasaw Chief whose name translates as “to have understanding,” stands 35 feet tall, and is carved from a 56,000pound piece of Red Oak. Toth carves his statues by hand — no chainsaws or power tools here. And he’s on a mission. “The City of Paducah knew there was a problem when the feathers fell off the statue,” said Toth. Toth is trimming the rot off the statue of Wacinton (Way-chintoo) that stands in Paducah’s George Noble Park in front of the tennis courts. “So they got in touch with me and I thought I’d better come fix it,” he said. “People say to me ‘I don’t get why you do it,’ but I say, it’s about honoring people who have faced hardship and injustice — specifically the Native American people of North America. This is my way of bringing attention to their plight.” Toth experienced persecution first hand as he and his family were driven from their homeland in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. As a boy, he and his family lived in exile in Yugoslavia after the Soviets crushed the 1956 uprising there. “It made me aware of what could be taken away,” Toth said. Toth’s family finally emigrated to the United States. By the time he was in his 20s he found himself living in California, where he was inspired to carve his first monolith into a large stone edifice at Wind and Sea Beach in La Jolla, California. Toth soon switched to wood, and was moved to sculpt a second, monumental sculpture. During this process,

LIN

he

48

Life & Style : Winter 2016

ABOVE: Wacinton, a statue created by Peter Wolf Toth stands in Paducah’s George Noble Park in Paducah. MIDDLE RIGHT TOP: Peter Wolf Toth works to repair the statue of Wacinton in Paducah. MIDDLE RIGHT BOTTOM: Peter Wolf Toth swings his mallet into a chisel as he works to repair the statue of Wacinton in Paducah. FAR RIGHT: Wacinton, a statue created by Peter Wolf Toth stands in Paducah’s George Noble Park in Paducah. BELOW: Toth paints and sculpts, and shows his work out of his roadside studio in Edgewater, Florida.

he had an epiphany about what would become his life’s mission: to make a sculpture of a native American in each of the 50 states, as a way of honoring them. Thus, the “Trail of Whispering Giants” was born, and in May 1988, Toth completed his goal of a statue in each of the fifty states with a statue of a Polynesian in Haleiwa, Hawaii. Toth received no payment for his sculptures, only some lodging, meals, and the donation of the tree from which his sculptures were made. He still doesn’t receive payment. He supports himself by selling his own art, though usually not that of the 55-foot nature. Toth paints and sculpts, and shows his work out of his studio “on the southwest corner of 102 Arthur Avenue and US 1 in Edgewater, Florida.” Toth also draws an income from the sales of his book, “Indian Giver”, which chronicles his work and is available on Amazon.com. Toth’s restoration of Wacinton took over three weeks. He installed a telephone pole in the back of the statue, braced by Steel plate in the back, and a steel boot at the base, to stabilize the sculpture. Paducah Power System donated their time to set poles around the structure to be used in the stabilization process. And all this in 98 degree weather with humidity that pushed the heat index even higher. But this does not seem to bother Toth, who relates that he is used to extreme temperatures. He worked on a statue in Valdez, Alaska and in subzero cold in Delaware, for six months. Another time he worked during a two-week heat wave in


MEET THE ARTIST

Repairing Wacinton On the Trail of the Whispering Giants with Peter Wolf Toth

Talk to the artist If you are interested in supporting Peter Toth in his work, you can reach him through his studio in Edgewater, Florida, where he has a roadside gallery. Call ahead for an appointment at 386-795-0291. He can also be found on Facebook.

story and photos by BARB EIDLIN Peter Toth is swinging his mallet into a chisel, which rings as it digs in to the wood. For those of you unfamiliar with the statue, it depicts a Chickasaw Chief whose name translates as “to have understanding,” stands 35 feet tall, and is carved from a 56,000pound piece of Red Oak. Toth carves his statues by hand — no chainsaws or power tools here. And he’s on a mission. “The City of Paducah knew there was a problem when the feathers fell off the statue,” said Toth. Toth is trimming the rot off the statue of Wacinton (Way-chintoo) that stands in Paducah’s George Noble Park in front of the tennis courts. “So they got in touch with me and I thought I’d better come fix it,” he said. “People say to me ‘I don’t get why you do it,’ but I say, it’s about honoring people who have faced hardship and injustice — specifically the Native American people of North America. This is my way of bringing attention to their plight.” Toth experienced persecution first hand as he and his family were driven from their homeland in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. As a boy, he and his family lived in exile in Yugoslavia after the Soviets crushed the 1956 uprising there. “It made me aware of what could be taken away,” Toth said. Toth’s family finally emigrated to the United States. By the time he was in his 20s he found himself living in California, where he was inspired to carve his first monolith into a large stone edifice at Wind and Sea Beach in La Jolla, California. Toth soon switched to wood, and was moved to sculpt a second, monumental sculpture. During this process, 48

Life & Style : Winter 2016

ABOVE: Wacinton, a statue created by Peter Wolf Toth stands in Paducah’s George Noble Park in Paducah. MIDDLE RIGHT TOP: Peter Wolf Toth works to repair the statue of Wacinton in Paducah. MIDDLE RIGHT BOTTOM: Peter Wolf Toth swings his mallet into a chisel as he works to repair the statue of Wacinton in Paducah. FAR RIGHT: Wacinton, a statue created by Peter Wolf Toth stands in Paducah’s George Noble Park in Paducah. BELOW: Toth paints and sculpts, and shows his work out of his roadside studio in Edgewater, Florida.

he had an epiphany about what would become his life’s mission: to make a sculpture of a native American in each of the 50 states, as a way of honoring them. Thus, the “Trail of Whispering Giants” was born, and in May 1988, Toth completed his goal of a statue in each of the fifty states with a statue of a Polynesian in Haleiwa, Hawaii. Toth received no payment for his sculptures, only some lodging, meals, and the donation of the tree from which his sculptures were made. He still doesn’t receive payment. He supports himself by selling his own art, though usually not that of the 55-foot nature. Toth paints and sculpts, and shows his work out of his studio “on the southwest corner of 102 Arthur Avenue and US 1 in Edgewater, Florida.” Toth also draws an income from the sales of his book, “Indian Giver”, which chronicles his work and is available on Amazon.com. Toth’s restoration of Wacinton took over three weeks. He installed a telephone pole in the back of the statue, braced by Steel plate in the back, and a steel boot at the base, to stabilize the sculpture. Paducah Power System donated their time to set poles around the structure to be used in the stabilization process. And all this in 98 degree weather with humidity that pushed the heat index even higher. But this does not seem to bother Toth, who relates that he is used to extreme temperatures. He worked on a statue in Valdez, Alaska and in subzero cold in Delaware, for six months. Another time he worked during a two-week heat wave in


Lincoln, Nebraska, where the temperature reached 105 degrees. Whenever he is working on one of the Giants, he said “I feel closer to nature; closer to the Great Spirit.” Toth has been honored for his work by many Native American tribes, and has been made an honorary member of the Chickasaw Nation. His is also proud to be an American. “It’s the best nation on earth. But we have our shortcomings and must always strive to do better. I also made these statues to raise our nation’s conscience to remind us to do that,” he said. Visiting Toth’s sculptures has also become a pastime for some people. Folks involved in Geocaching have pinpointed many of the Whispering Giants throughout the US and around the world. Others keep a checklist and cross the statues off as they visit them. Googling “Trail of Whispering Giants” will bring up information about a statue near you. Life & Style : Xxxxxxxx 2016 49


STYLE

Brr, it’s

cold out! Get your winter gear ready before the first big chill

Cooler temperatures mean it’s time to get those socks out of the drawers and sweaters out of the back of the closet, but don’t forget the one essential to top your look off — the hat, of course! Here are some top styles to add flair and keep your warm and cozy. Embellished Beanies. Add sparkle to the old classic. Simple knits get jazzed up with pearls and rhinestones. The Pom Pom. If you are going to top it off, have fun with it. Trapper style. Several clothing companies are offering a feminine version of the trapper hat. Shearling-lined neutrals will go with any style Full of faux fur. Whether braving the cold in Southern Illinois or Siberia, you cannot go wrong with a fur hat. After all, the Russians know what cold is and how to handle the temps. Oversized and slouchy knits. Beanies come is all shapes and styles, but the oversized style will keep you warm while looking cool. Menswear inspired. Newsboy caps, military-style caps and berets are a modern way to add a hat to your everyday wardrobe. — Life & Style in Southern Illinois

Brixton ‘Fiddler’ Newsboy Cap Old World inspiration meets modern style in this chic newsboy cap crafted from lightweight cotton with a subtle herringbone weave. COST: $34.00, nordstrom.com Fox Fur-trim Wool and Alpaca-blend hat Turn up your glam factor with The Fur Vault’s wool-alpacablend hat, trimmed with luscious fox fur. COST: $350.00, macys.com

50 Life & Style : Winter 2016


Chanel Newsboy Hat This orange, tan velvet corduroy features a silver Chanel logo and bow. COST: $399.00, snobswap.com

UGG® Dyed sheepskin shearling (Turkey) fur trapper hat in Chestnut features a chin strap with logo detail. COST: $205.00, neimanmarcus.com

Embellished cashmere and fur knitted beanie Dolce & Gabbana has given us the most charming of chalet-worthy looks with this black beanie. Knitted from warm cashmere, this piece features faux pearl and crystal embellishments for notable eye-catching appeal. COST: $1,895, mytheresa.com

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CC Beanie Slouchy in taupe. COST: $14.00, glicks.

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51


CHEERS TO BEER

Goose Island

story and photos by SHAWN CONNELLY

Most folks who know beer know that Goose Island Beer Company was one of the first craft breweries to see local, regional and national success grow out of their Lincoln Park neighborhood brewpub in Chicago. Established in 1988, Goose Island was an early adopter and proponent of brewing techniques and beer styles that would later become some of the most popular buzzwords in the industry – namely barrel-aging and the India Pale Ale style. Fast forward to 2011 and the innovative brewery got the attention of none other than Anheuser Busch InBev (ABI), the world’s largest brewer. Looking to establish its 52

Life & Style : Winter 2016

To get to the Island you have to go to the Farm

craft beer credibility, ABI purchased Goose Island and the brewery became a model for many more craft brewery acquisitions by large brewing entities ever since. While many diehard craft beer fans decried the purchase as “selling out,” based on the craft beer industry’s popular definition of craft beer as small, independent and traditional, Goose Island has proven that they have not compromised in terms of quality or integrity when it comes to ingredients or passion for what makes good beer … or is it what makes beer good? Either way, a recent trip out west reveals why the folks at Goose Island are considered among the best at their craft. While they may no longer be independent in terms of ownership, Goose Island now


enjoys an independence few breweries will ever experience; having access to resources they could have only dreamed about just several years ago. Chief among these resources is an ingredient that is critical to beer and even more critical to the beer style they helped popularize in the United States – the IPA. Goose IPA is a multi-award winning version of the British style ale with plenty of hop aroma and flavor yet balanced bitterness to make its appeal broad and its fan base deep among a sea of IPA beers flooding the market. A big part of Goose IPA’s success has been and still is the uncompromising quality of the hops used in the beer. Hop varieties are as diverse and varied as wine grapes and popular varietals are often very scarce and difficult to obtain due to demand. Enter Elk Mountain Farm. Since being acquired by ABI, this hop farm in Boundary County in Northern Idaho has become very important to Goose Island beer, in general, and its IPA in particular. Spanning 1,700 sprawling acres, and sitting on the 49th parallel just 10 miles south of the Canadian border, Elk Mountain Farm in tiny Bonners Ferry (population about 2,500) provides a nearly ideal environment for growing hops that closely mimics the conditions of the best hopABOVE: A Goose Island OMG is accompanied by a bucket of just-picked hops from the farm. BELOW: A signpost in the growing regions of Europe with camp on the hop farm points in all directions including Canada which is 10 miles away. OPPOSITE PAGE TOP: Approaching long, sunny days, moderate Elk Mountain Farm via helicopter is stunning. Elk Mountain Farm is the largest hop farm in the United States with more temperatures and just the than 1,700 acres. OPPOSITE PAGE BOTTOM: Walking in between two rows of hop bines, the author is holding Cascade hops that have been freshly picked. right amount of precipitation annually. Step away from the 18-foot hop bines and look in will surely show up in Goose any given direction and you’ll see Island beers of the future. An a view that rivals the best idyllic up close look at the operation at paintings of the American west Elk Mountain Farm is proof you’ll ever see. enough that quality Being the largest has not suffered commercial hop simply based on farm in the Want to go to the who owns the contiguous farm? The hop harvest brewery. On United States, at Elk Mountain Farm the contrary, Elk Mountain may be over but we’re still this farm and Farm grows dreaming of warm summer its workers hops for ABI days on the 49th parallel in Northern Idaho. Check out represent the brands and for a video of Elk Mountain benchmark for Goose Island, Farm with this story at hop growing but given lifeandstylesi.com in the United Goose Island’s States and, arguably, hop-forward the world. attitude, this hop To simply call Ed Atkins heaven has become extra the “general manager” at Elk special for hopheads, producing Mountain is to understate the over 60 different varieties and man’s role and his attitude investing in dedicated facilities toward what he does. A fourth for growing and developing generation farmer, born and new experimental varieties that Life & Style : Winter 2016

53


CHEERS TO BEER

ABOVE: Elk Mountain Farm general manager, Ed Atkins, explains hop harvesting methods. RIGHT: Once picked, hop flowers are immediately processed to remove stems and leaves before moving to the kiln room to dry.

raised in Bonners Ferry, Atkins lives and breathes hops. Whether out amongst the seemingly never-ending rows of hop bines, in the massive kilning facility or sitting down to a five course paired dinner with beers brewed using Elk Mountain hops, the passion Atkins and his staff show for their labor is clear. The fact is, it doesn’t matter whether the hops grown at Elk Mountain eventually go into Budweiser, Michelob or Goose Island beers, Adkins sees to it that they are the very best hops in the world, period. This level of perfectionism and dedication doesn’t come easy, but a few days spent on the grounds of this big farm in little Bonners Ferry, Idaho, certainly make the work rewarding and the beer worth every drop. SHAWN CONNELLY is the founder of BREWTHINK. COM; a certified beer judge with the BJCP; and a professional freelance beer writer. He can be reached at thebeerphilosopher@yahoo.com. 54

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PROFILE

Nick Hill ’s new approach SIU’s head football coach instills humility, hard work, faith and family by LES O’DELL Sure, Nick Hill is one of the youngest head coaches in collegiate football at age 31. Certainly he leads the football program at his alma mater where he was one of the most prolific passing quarterbacks, leading the Southern Illinois Salukis to three playoff wins and a place in the national semifinals. And while he even has six years of professional football experience, he considers himself no better than anyone else. “I am just a regular guy from Southern Illinois,” he says. “I don’t need much more than that or need recognition or accolades. We’re all the same. Yes, I’m going to try to be a leader, but I was brought up to stay grounded and keep things in perspective.” Hill often reflects on growing up in Du Quoin and the qualities of humility, hard work, faith and family. He says all of them envelope his approach to football. “We all have a higher calling and there are more important things in life,” he explains. “We have to have a balance and know that we are playing a game. At the same time we have to do everything we can to prepare this team the best we can and then go out there and play. The outcome is going to come — good or bad. Regardless, we can go to bed every night knowing that we have done our best. That way there are no regrets because those are the things that keep you up at night: the ‘shouldas,’ ‘wouldas’ and ‘couldas.’” Preparing means lots of long hours, especially during the football season. Hill says coaches often work until 10:30 p.m. or later on Sundays and arrive at the team offices before 6:30 a.m. on Mondays. Still, the intense schedule does not take away from a focus on family. The coach has declared an hour of office time on Sunday evenings as “family time,” and staff members’ spouses and children — including Hill’s wife, Alicia, and daughter, Skylar — are encouraged to join them for dinner and a break from film study and game preparations. He says that family time is important to both immediate families and the much larger Saluki Football family. “We like to think our family is part of this much larger family,” Hill explains, opening his arms wide as to encompass all 105 studentathletes on the team. “I told our staff when we started that I wanted all of our guys to know your kids’ names and to see you with your children. I want them to know what kind of dad you are. I want them to see you as a husband, because they need that. A lot of our guys grew up without dads. They need to see what it really means when we tell them to be a man — it’s not just something that happens on the football field.” He adds that in some ways that is as important as wins and losses. “Obviously we want to win football games. I love this game, but more than that, I love having a relationship with these guys and seeing them grow as people. Getting to see them change and mature, to watch them become young men, that’s why we coach college football.” SIU head football coach Nick Hill in his office at the Boydston Center. photo by BYRON HETZLER

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SCENIC BEAUTY

Moments

ABOVE: Even the simplest view takes on an added elegance with a dusting of snow. BELOW: A hardy squirrel braves a snowstorm to pilfer bird seed.

in the snow

Southern Illinois can be a spectacular, but temporary, winter wonderland photos and story by LES WINKELER “Walking in a winter wonderland …” The words of that venerable Christmas carole conjure up visions of snow-laden peaks like Denali or Mount Ranier, quaint New England inns or ski resorts in Colorado. Southern Illinois? Not even on the radar. 58

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And, with good reason. Southern Illinois is synonymous with catching big bass at Crab Orchard Lake, picnics on lazy Sunday afternoons at Giant City State Park, or viewing wildflowers in the Shawnee National Forest. But, the region has its wintry moments. Generally speaking, moments is the correct term. Snowfall tends to be sporadic. And, given the recent history of mild winters in Southern Illinois, the snow normally disappears in a few days. The same natural qualities that make this region so unique in spring through fall, make Southern Illinois a special place to be in the winter … whether talking about the rich diversity of wildlife, the abundance of lakes or the Shawnee hills. There is perhaps no more stunning sight in Southern Illinois than a male cardinal perched on a snowy branch. If your timing is just right, you might find a white pelican trying to grab a fish at Crab Orchard Lake. And, if a cold snap follows a significant thaw, impressive sheets of ice can be found at Burden Falls, Lusk Creek

ABOVE: Sheets of ice coat bluffs in the Shawnee National Forest near Stone Face. ABOVE LEFT: A female cardinal finds a place in the sun amid a late-winter snowfall. MIDDLE LEFT: Cardinals are never more beautiful than in the snow. BOTTOM LEFT: Phragmites blowing in the wind sets a stark scene at Sahara Woods. BELOW: Burden Falls are literally frozen in time during the winter.

Canyon or Giant City. And, if the roads clear, there is nothing more breathtaking than a drive through Giant City, Ferne Clyffe, Sahara Woods State Fish and Wildlife Area or the Saline County Conservation Area. The best part about this frozen wonderland, at least for those who crave warm weather — it’s incredibly temporary. The signs of spring are always just around the corner. Life & Style : Winter 2016

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‘Glam’ up

ENTREPRENEURS

head to toe for holiday parties

story and photos by LAUREN BUSER Southern Illinois is full of independent business owners with big dreams and ambitions. There is no lack of open-mindedness when it comes to small businesses. As independently owned shops continue to pop up, so do the stories that go along with them. “It’s hard to be a small business in a small town,” stated salon owner Ashley Burkey of Murphysboro. Burkey is taking on that challenge with GLAM Salon. Local business owners are where it’s at when it comes to quality product and treatment. GLAM Salon became an addition to Murphysboro on April 13. On the corner of 16th and Walnut Street, it’s located right past the hustle and bustle of downtown shops. Like many small business owners, Burkey’s story of love for her job is one for the books. Burkey has been doing hair for 13 years. She is the mother of three and like many mothers, she loves her children dearly and puts them first above all. She has learned how to prioritize her time over the years. Her hopes and dreams of being a salon owner were not hindered. For the longest time, the dream was to open her own shop. While this was an achievable dream, she knew that her children came first. Burkey knew her job as a mother was much more important than her own salon, but nothing could stop this multitasking mother with a dream. She opened an in-house salon and began doing hair with her young children at her side. Deciding the time was right, she opened GLAM. Burkey is proud to call GLAM a unique salon. Salons, in general, are meant to pamper and make everyone feel like a princess and GLAM strives to do just that. Burkey’s three-year-old daughter helps to bring a princess mindset to the shop and is GLAM’s number one spokesgirl.

She has been heard promoting her mother’s business on WCIL FM radio. Burkey hosts events for little girls including princess party deals and is planning to have visits from Disney’s ‘Frozen’ character, Elsa, over Christmas break. GLAM also offers many packages for those who want it all. For the ‘Big Princesses’, Burkey offers hair cocktails every Saturday just to make a girl feel pampered in every way. The atmosphere is truly half of the enjoyment at the salon. Burkey worked hard to give the salon an inviting feel, a place where women can find relaxation and a little fun. She believed she could build a unique salon and with the GLAM family, she has done just that. “Everyone that works here is passionate about what they do,” said Burkey. Be sure to look for GLAM online and check out the salon’s Facebook page for the hair cocktails and hairstyles that you could be enjoying on your Saturday. Don’t forget to “GLAM UP” your holiday season. Seek out your head to toe treatment soon.

ABOVE: Owner Ashley Burkey had a dream to open her own shop. GLAM Salon became an addition to Murphysboro on the corner of 16th and Walnut Street. She is seen here with her daughter. LEFT: Burkey’s three-year-old daughter helps to bring a princess mindset to the shop and is GLAM’s number one spokesgirl. BELOW: GLAM Salon offers a wide variety of products.

Make your appointment GLAM Salon 101 S 16th St, Murphysboro 618-565-5252 www.facebook. com/GlamSalonSI Hours: 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday-Friday and 9 am to 2 pm Saturdays. By appointment only.

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GETAWAYS

Israeli

enlightenment The birthplace of three of the world’s major religions

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Tel Aviv as seen from Jaffa. photo by Diana Lambdin Meyer

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GETAWAYS

photos by DIANA LAMBDIN MEYER

ABOVE: The Dome of the Rock is a shrine located on the Temple Mount in the Old City of Jerusalem. It is one of the oldest works of Islamic architecture. RIGHT: One of the stations of the cross in Jerusalem.

by DIANA LAMBDIN MEYER It was about noon on a Saturday, the Sabbath, when we arrived in Safed, a city of 30,000 in northern Israel. Because the town is widely recognized as the most observant in Israel, there wasn’t a car on the streets and certainly not a restaurant or café open anywhere. And I was hungry. That’s what happens when a Christian farm girl from the Midwest travels to the Holy Land for the first time. You need to plan ahead on Saturdays or you just may end up missing a meal or two. That was the least significant of many lessons I learned on my eight-day tour of Israel last spring, one that introduced me to the birthplace of three of the world’s major religions and helped me understand, ever so slightly better, the complexities of life in this multifarious region of the Mideast. When I told my parents in Southern Illinois that I was going to Israel, their first reaction was concern for my safety. “Why do you want 64

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But answering my mother’s question this time was a little more complex. The answer certainly was rooted in a childhood filled with Sunday school lessons and services at the Wolf Lake Methodist Church in Union County. Jerusalem, Nazareth, Bethlehem, the Sea of Galilee — these are places we sang about and studied from afar. Why wouldn’t I want to go there? But the answer to my mother’s question was also in large part my adult desire to understand the world and its people better. My belief is that you can best do that when you do it one-on-one. to go there?“ my mother asked with particular emphasis on the word ‘there.’ As a professional travel writer who has worn out two passports and countless pieces of luggage, there are very few places on the planet that I wouldn’t want to go, most notably Afghanistan, Turkey and Syria right now. I got pretty close to Syria on this trip, hence why my mother was so concerned for my safety.

Beginning in Jerusalem We started in Jerusalem, the beautiful city of seven hills. We entered the Old City through the Damascus Gate, which stands upon ruins of the Hadrian Gate, built around the first century AD. Of course, everywhere you look in Jerusalem are layers of ruins from previous civilizations. Within just a few steps, you cover several chapters of religious history — each


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GETAWAYS we soon learned, ever so slightly different based on the religion responsible for the interpretation of the site. From our perch in the City of David, we looked out upon the Valley of Jehoshaphat and the tombs of the Kidron Valley, heard lessons about the Dome of the Rock where Muslims believe that Mohammed ascended to heaven and took photos of the glistening Russian Orthodox Church of Mary Magdalene located on the Mount of Olives. As we walked about, our guide pointed out the distinct sections of Jerusalem known as the Arab quarter, the Jewish quarter, the West Bank. From one moment to the next, my mind was scrambling to remember Sunday school classes, world history lessons and tidbits from daily news reports. I sat on the southern steps to the City of David, realizing that Jesus had passed this very way, and texted my Uncle Lonnie, a Biblical scholar, asking for clarification on a number of the questions that bounced through my jet-lagged brain that day. Later, we entered the plaza of the Western Wall, sometimes known as the Wailing Wall. This is believed to be the western wall of the Temple Mount, which contains the Foundation Stone, where the Jewish people believe Heaven and Earth meet. We washed our hands at public basins where feral cats also drank. The men then went through one entrance while the women went to another. Slowly and as reverently as possible, I approached the wall, astutely aware of the women around me with their head coverings, scriptures and prayers. They rocked back and forth, some sitting in lawn chairs as their prayers continued for hours. Their murmured words filled the courtyard like the sound of cooing doves. It was peaceful and comforting, and tears filled my eyes. I was wearing black slacks and a dark long-sleeved blouse, as Western women should when touring these holy places, but I felt out of place. I didn’t have a prayer written on folded paper to place between the ancient stones, but I longed to touch the wall anyway, to have a tactile experience equal to that in 66

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ABOVE: Men pray at the Western Wall where so much faith from so many religions for so many centuries is so freely expressed. BELOW MIDDLE: A woman prays at the Western Wall in Jerusalem. BOTTOM: A cat visits the hand washing stations at the plaza of the Western Wall in Jerusalem.

my soul. I stood there a long time, not in prayer so much as in awe. To the best of my ability, I opened my heart and mind and spirit to the energy around me. I came away believing that if God is indeed anywhere on this planet, it is here at the Western Wall where so much faith from so many religions for so many centuries is so freely expressed. Two tips I offer for those traveling to Jerusalem: Pack a really good pair of walking shoes because this city, like no other, offers a challenging terrain of uneven surfaces, cobblestone streets and crumbling stones to avoid. The second tip: Increase your understanding of this region by re-reading appropriate religious and world history books. Even if you are not into history, it is in your face here, so you might as well prepare for it.

A history lesson The next day we visited Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem. Nothing prepares you for this. We arrived on a beautiful spring day with perfect blue skies and daffodils blooming in a garden and small arboretum surrounding the museum. The exterior space


REUTERS

The conical ceiling of the Hall of Names is pictured at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem.

honors the 23,500 people who risked their lives to help the Jewish people during WWII. You’ll recognize names like Oskar Schindler and be overwhelmed by the many that history has otherwise forgotten. The museum itself is not a pretty building. It is gray untreated concrete. The interior is not welcoming. There is no color, muted lighting and exhibits in black and white. This is not meant to be an enjoyable experience. Our guide this day told us her parents survived Auschwitz, the last of the concentration camps to be liberated. She said it matter-of-factly, with no emotion. Throughout our 90-minute tour, she continued her monologue with no expression as she explained one painful exhibit after another. I suppose that’s what you have to do when reliving this period of history each day. One exhibit included a photo album kept by the commander at Auschwitz and letters from

German officers to their families describing the work they do. “The best way to do it is do it more often,” one officer wrote to his children. Nothing prepares you for a day at Yad Vashem. Still, it’s the most visited site in all of Israel and one that should not be missed. We spent another day exploring the streets of Jerusalem as we walked the Stations of the Cross, ending at the Church of the Sepulchre. I walked on my knees to touch the spot where it is believe the cross was anchored, and I passed on the opportunity to buy a plastic crown of thorns souvenir, made in China. Some things are too tacky for words.

Along the River Jordan As we left Jerusalem and headed toward the Dead Sea, we turned north, driving along the banks of the River Jordan. We stopped at a winery in the Golan Heights on the northern border Israel shares with Syria. Before this day, I had no understanding

photo by Diana Lambdin Meyer

In Golan Heights is the adorable little village of Ain Karem, where John the Baptist was born and raised.

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GETAWAYS

LEFT: Safed, a city of 30,000 in northern Israel, is considered one of the four Holy cities of Israel. RIGHT: A piece of art is displayed before a gallery whose doorway is painted blue in the Israeli town of Safed.

of this region other than as a dangerous, war-torn place. Instead, I witnessed a beautiful landscape dominated by rolling hills, verdant farmland and pleasant homes. This is the grape growing/ wine making region of Israel. While there are a dozen boutique wineries in the region, the most significant winery in the country is aptly called the Golan Heights Winery. My brother in Southern Illinois now has a bottle in his collection. Also in the Golan Heights is the adorable little village of Ain Karem, where John the Baptist was born and raised. Surrounded by olive and lemon trees and a vineyard on the hill, Ain Karem is a popular weekend getaway filled with art galleries, a culinary center and boutique hotels. I really wished we could have stayed longer in Ain Karem. Instead, we spent the night at a lovely farmstead on Mount Canaan called the Mitzpe 68

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Hayamim Hotel. We walked the grounds, played with the baby goats and enjoyed a fresh breeze from the Sea of Galilee. Dinner, and breakfast the next morning, were delightful with mountains of organic fruits and vegetables, veal and duck, all raised within a few feet of our table.

Safed on the Sabbath Of course, I should have eaten a little more at breakfast or stuffed a few rolls in my bag, because this was the day we traveled on Safed. I would be very hungry before the day ended. Safed may be spelled several ways – Zefat, S’vat, Tsfat – depending on your faith or historical perspective. Located at about 3,000 feet above sea level in the hills overlooking the Sea of Galilee, Safed is at a higher elevation than any other Israeli city. It is considered one of the four Holy cities of Israel. Many believe that God’s

presence resides directly above Safed. Doorways of many homes and businesses are painted blue in order to ward off evil. The belief is that God is in heaven, heaven is in the sky and the sky is blue, so evil will not enter through a doorway wrapped in God’s presence or the color blue. I loved Safed and would have liked to explore it on a day other than the Sabbath in order to get to know its people better. But we moved on to Nazareth and Cana. My favorite totally tacky souvenir was a tiny bottle of Jesus’ first miracle wine hawked as “water into wine” wine. We sipped some and it was indeed as bad as you might imagine.

Safe in Tel Aviv We worked our way back to Haifa on the Mediterranean coast and south to Tel Aviv. We spent an entire day exploring the art galleries, restaurants and public spaces of Jaffa. Biblically, the port of Jaffa is where Jonah tried to set

out on the Mediterranean in an attempt to escape God and was eaten by the whale. Therefore, you’ll see images of whales throughout Jaffa. One day, while exploring the massive Shuk Carmel market in Tel Aviv, my friends and I sat at an outdoor communal table to enjoy some falafels. In a few moments, we were joined by members of the Israeli military who placed their AK-47s on the table between us as we ate. We talked for several minutes about the market, and about other places for good food in Tel Aviv. At no time in my eight days in Israel did I experience any concerns for my safety, only people and experiences that opened my mind and my heart to this complex and enjoyable part of the world. I’d go back again in a heartbeat. DIANA LAMBDIN MEYER is a freelance travel writer originally from Wolf Lake in Union County. She lives in Kansas City.


ABOVE: Exploring the massive Shuk Carmel market in Tel Aviv can be quite an experience. BOTTOM LEFT: Images of whales are plentiful in Jaffa. Biblically, the port of Jaffa is where Jonah tried to set out on the Mediterranean in an attempt to escape God and was eaten by the whale. BOTTOM RIGHT: Exploring the massive Shuk Carmel market in Tel Aviv can be quite an experience. Different types of olive are plentiful.

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GADGETS

Get moving! Which fitness tracker should I get? Got a New Year’s resolution to finally lose some weight? A digital fitness tracker is a useful tool for measuring your physical activities and motivating you to when your level of fitness is one level up from sitting on the couch. Now is the perfect time to invest in a healthy lifestyle whether it be a holiday gift purchased for yourself or a family member who needs a little motivation to get moving. All basic trackers use sensors to monitor your movements. Some of the more advanced trackers often connect and sync wirelessly with a computer or mobile device to store data about your day-to-day activities. The types of activities monitored vary by tracker, but can include number of steps taken, calories consumed, hours of sleep and heart rate among others. Other models offer smartwatchlike alerts for incoming calls, texts, IMs, and e-mail. They can provide motivational support in the guise of challenges, badges, interaction with online friends, and a vibrating alert when it’s time to get up and go. According to consumerreports.org here are some features to consider before buying: 70 Life & Style : Winter 2016

Garmin Vivomove TM Whether you take your steps in 3-inch heels or 3-piece suits, vívomove (pictured above) gives you the luxury of all-day activity tracking² without losing style. The elegant timepiece tracks steps, monitors sleep and syncs with Garmin Connect™ Mobile to view your stats in more detail. Cost: $149.99; garmin.com garmin.com

Fitbit Charge 2TM Make every beat count with a fitness wristband (pictured at left) built with PurePulse® heart rate, multi-sport modes, guided breathing sessions & interchangeable bands. Cost: $149.95; fitbit.com fitbit.com

Style Many trackers are designed to be worn on the wrist, but some can be worn as pendants or clipped to your clothing. Choose a look you’ll feel comfortable wearing every day.

Display The more advanced trackers reveal their data — using words, numbers and symbols — on a watchface-like display. Others share that info via a simple LED light display or only via an app. Before you make a final decision, preview the tracker’s companion app in the Apple App Store or on Google Play to make sure it lives up to your expectations.


misfit.com

Misfit Swarovski Activity Crystal Swarovski and Misfit joined forces to bring the most advanced tracking technology into beautiful Swarovski jewelry. The Swarovski Activity Crystal is designed to be always on — it has a four-month battery life and is water resistant. And it is designed to help you look great throughout your day, whether playing sports or celebrating a special occasion. Cost: $119.00; misfit.com

Compatibility Before you pull out your wallet, make sure the device will work with your cell phone or computer. Some trackers sync only with Apple’s iOS. Others only with Android.

Accuracy Trackers are not foolproof. They use sensors and algorithms to parse footsteps, punches thrown, stairs climbed, hours slept. That means there’s some degree of imprecision. If you need hard data, you may want to pursue a function-specific device. In general, heart rate monitors that strap to your chest and transmit info to your activity tracker are more precise than the in-device sensors applied to your wrist.

Battery Life Depending on the sophistication of the device, battery life can stretch from one day to several months. A tracker with a color touchscreen and an variety of sensors will need to be charged more frequently than a simple band with a few LED lights on its face.

Water How often do you encounter water when you work out? Some trackers are just splash proof. Others can withstand a hardy shower — indoors or out. But if you’re going to wear your tracker in the pool, it should be waterproof. Keep in mind that a fitness tracker is like a gym membership: Only beneficial if you use it. Here’s a few fitness trackers that we like. Sources: www.consumerreports.org — Life & Style in Southern Illinois Life & Style : Winter 2016

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ENTERTAINMENT

Paducah premieres Holiday shows that are sure to dazzle and daze by LAUREN BUSER The holiday season is approaching fast, with many fun activities to schedule. Holiday parties and light shows are quickly approaching and will soon be over. This year, try a new holiday tradition and visit the Luther F. Carson Four Rivers Center for a holiday show! “We believe the arts strengthen the community in many ways — culturally, educationally, economically, socially, and spiritually.” This is one of the many beliefs followed by the Carson Center’s mission statement. They also believe that the arts destroy most barriers due to culture, income, tradition, and nature. The Carson Center is located in downtown Paducah and is a non-profit organization. This center can seat up to 1,806 people in the main hall with seating only 72

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photos provided

The Carson Center is a glittering home for performing arts in Lowertown and presents top-notch concerts, theater, classical music and dance, from local talent to big entertainment names.

being 112 feet away from the stage at the most. They believe that in order to be a successful arts organization, those involved, including board members, volunteers, and employees, must uphold morally ethical actions and values. Cirque Dreams lights up

the 2016 holiday season with its critically acclaimed holiday stage extravaganza. Enjoy Cirque Dreams Holidaze at 6 p.m. on Nov. 27. Enjoy this Christmas musical as it transports you to a real winter wonderland. Be holidazed when you watch Christmas twirl about the stage. With over 20

acts and 30 different artists, this fun-filled play will get you ready for your holiday! If the 50s and 60s are more your holiday time speed, enjoy Shawn Klush: Celebrating Elvis and Christmas. Enjoy Shawn’s beautiful tribute to his musical idol, Elvis Presley, as well as other tribute artists including Jake Rowley. This show plays at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 2 which will feature many of the biggest hits Elvis had when he was young, and many from his later years. Plus many of his most famous Christmas songs. Chip Davis’s Mannheim Steamroller Christmas plays at 7:15 p.m. Dec. 7. Grammy Award winner Chip Davis has created a show that features the beloved Christmas music of Mannheim Steamroller along with dazzling multimedia effects. Before Christmas, you can also come in for a night of Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker at 7 p.m. Dec. 13. From the delicate Russian costumes to a 60-foot Christmas tree, this must-see ballet is greatly talked


ABOVE: Cirque Dreams Holidaze lights up the 2016 holiday season with its critically acclaimed holiday stage extravaganza at 6 p.m. on November 27. TOP RIGHT: Shawn Klush: Celebrating Elvis and Christmas plays at 7:30 p.m. on December 2 and will feature many of the biggest hits Elvis had when he was young, and many from his later years. Plus many of his most famous Christmas songs. BOTTOM RIGHT: The original, direct from Russia, Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker will wow the audience at 7 p.m. on December 13.

about! Check out the Carson Center’s website for information on Platinum and Gold level tickets which include a Nutcracker doll and the official Moscow Ballet Book for this one of a kind ballet. Get involved with the Luther F. Carson Four Rivers Center via volunteer work, sponsorship, or making a donation. The center is nonprofit and appreciates your help and support in keeping its doors open. They also host many fundraising events for the performing arts and arts education. Tom Bulleit was the featured guest at the latest fundraising event, Distiller’s Dinner. Partners also involved in this event to support the center are Midtown Market, Paducah Bourbon Society, Green Door Floral and Décor, Paducah Life, and Murray State Universities NPR Station. There are also opportunities with the center for scholarships, workshops, and summer opportunities. This center offers you the opportunity to broaden your artistic horizon. Broadway style plays, musicals and ballets can dazzle you and your family this year.

Buy your tickets now! Luther F. Carson Four Rivers Center 100 Kentucky Ave, Paducah, KY Box office: 270-450-4444 Box Office Hours: 10 a.m.to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Closed Saturday and Sunday Exception: Open two hours prior to each performance Email: boxoffice@ thecarsoncenter.org Website: www.thecarsoncenter. org Parking: Parking is free at the Carson Center in the facility parking lots. Valet parking is available at $5 per vehicle. Please note that for most events, Parking Lot A is reserved for donor, valet, and handicap parking. Municipal parking lots are located within 1 block of the Center. Also, there is ample on-street parking in the downtown area and it is free of charge.

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WINE & SPIRITS

Dinner party

[‚pqQ΋ɂdÀ² Vintners and brewers share their favorite holiday recipes and offer beverage suggestions to pair

by BARB EIDLIN The holiday season is upon us, and all across the land, people are planning meals with and for their families. They are also stocking their cellars with adult beverages meant to enhance the taste of the food and soften the mood of the company. But what exactly goes with what? Life & Style checked in with a few of our local vintners and brewers to get their take on what they pair with their favorite recipes. Brandi Nance, the marketing director for Blue Sky Vineyard tackles the most common — and therefore the most difficult pairing of all — Turkey and all the trimmings. For this dish she recommends serving their Blue Sky’s Vintner’s Select, a newer release, dry white wine made from the highest quality grapes available each vintage year. “It’s a wonderfully aromatic, lighter-bodied white wine with pronounced notes of fruit and flowers. It’s an excellent contrast to the many savory, substantial foods of Thanksgiving,” Nance said. Not a fan of turkey or looking to try something different this year? Paul Plett, the Assistant Brewer at St. Nicholas Brewing Co. suggests branching out by serving Grilled Lamb with Fig Chutney paired with Belgian Dark Strong, one of the brewery’s terrific beers available for take away in their signature growlers. Brewed with six different malts, this dark, rich, complex Belgian ale has notes of stone fruit like apricots or cherries and pepper balanced with a toasted malt backbone. The dark stone fruit and pepper will accentuate the rich meat and nicely balance the tart chutney. And for those folks looking to eat a little lighter, Plett suggests trying a Grilled Salmon with Lemon paired with the brewery’s Belgian White. The Belgian White is an unfiltered wheat beer spiced with coriander and chamomile and fermented with a special 74

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Art Services

Grilled Leg of Lamb is served with a Fig Chutney. It pairs well with Belgian Dark Strong from St. Nicholas Brewing Co.

Belgian yeast. The bright citrus flavors and light body of this lovely beverage make this crisp and refreshing brew a great companion to most seafood. To make this Plett offers this simple recipe: “Place the salmon skin down on oil brushed foil and cover the top with lemon slices. Then grill (or bake) the salmon until it flakes easily with a fork.” Great holiday meals also require interesting starters and mouth-watering desserts. Owners George Majka and Jane Payne of Pomona Winery have been setting taste buds aflutter for 25 years with their fruit-based wines. Like their wines, sometimes the simplest recipe is the most elegant and the most delicious. Majka and Payne suggest a cheese fondue paired with a bottle of their Jonathan Oak Aged Reserve to start your meal. In a crock pot, melt one pound of Swiss cheese (or other soft, white cheese) along with half a cup of Jonathan Oak Aged Reserve and serve with bruschetta or other any other favorite dipping items. Use the rest of the bottle to fill your company’s glasses and enjoy the light fruit taste of this semi-dry complex varietal made from Jonathan apples. Mellowed

with medium toasted French white oak that imparts an earthy bass note, this wine pairs well with most cheese and can stand up to game meats. Nance at Blue Sky is also a fan of pairing cheese with wine — is there anyone who isn’t? — and suggest pairing cheese bites with their Rocky Comfort Red. This sweet red is ripe and jammy, with delicious flavors of cherry and cranberry. It has a fresh, fruity acidity and a long-lasting finish, which make it a great match for holiday fare. This wine also goes well with duck, herbed pork and veal, steaks and stews. And after the meal, come the sweets. Pomona Winery offers a terrific recipe for Tipsy Berries which is worth making in bulk as it works well with both desserts and as an added accent to drinks. Start with a good selection of strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries, etc. Rinse the berries and put them in a lidded container with anywhere from one half to a full bottle of Pomona’s strawberry or blueberry wine along with one to three tablespoons of sugar for flavor depending on the sweetness level of the berries and marinate for at least 24 hours. Enjoy poured over ice in a glass with sprite, club soda or champagne. It makes a great topping spooned over ice cream, pound cake, cheesecake or even brownies for a stellar finish. Nance from Blue Sky suggests serving a bread pudding and pairing it with their Cream Sherry dessert wine. “This is an absolutely heavenly pairing,” she said. “Nothing says ‘holiday’ better than a homemade piece of sweet, warm bread pudding.” This sweet sherry is replete with rich aromas of butterscotch and almonds and nuances of toffee with a creamy finish. Created by slowly baking their estate grown Niagara grapes, this Blue Sky wine showcases a golden color and rich flavors.


Need More? For more interesting recipes and pairings, or to order wine, get in touch with Brandi Nance at Blue Sky Vineyard, Paul Plett at St. Nicholas Brewing Co., or George Majka and Jane Payne at Pomona Winery by following this article online at lifeandstylesi.com.

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WINE & SPIRITS Paul’s St. Nicholas’ Grilled Leg of Lamb with Fig Chutney For the lamb: Rub: Paprika, salt, black pepper, ground coffee. Rinse the lamb and pat dry with a paper towel. Rub the lamb liberally with the seasoning — ideally the night before — wrapping it in plastic wrap and resting in the fridge. Sear over hot coals, then slow cook till it reaches 130 to 140 degrees on meat thermometer. For the Chutney: 5 shallots, 12 ounces of fresh figs, ¼ cup sugar, ¼ cup apple cider vinegar, garlic, salt, pepper. Saute the shallots, then add the other ingredients. Simmer till done about 10 to 12 minutes. Add more sugar or vinegar to taste if needed. Serve Chutney over grilled lamb.

Blue Sky Cheese Bites 8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature 3/4 cup (about 3 ounces) blue cheese crumbles 3/4 cup dried cranberries, finely chopped 1 1/2 cups pecans Pretzel sticks In a medium bowl, beat together cream cheese, blue cheese, and dried cranberries until smooth. Dampen hands to prevent sticking and form cream cheese mixture into approximately 24 tablespoon-sized balls. Cover and refrigerate for at least two hours or until firm. In the meantime, toast the pecans by spreading out on a sheet pan and baking in a preheated 350°F oven until lightly toasted and fragrant, for 7 to 10 minutes. Allow pecans to cool and finely chop them. Roll chilled cheese balls in chopped pecans, pressing nuts so that they adhere. Keep cheese balls refrigerated until ready to serve. Just before serving, skewer each cheese ball with a pretzel stick. 76

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An Affordable Assisted

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Senior 65+ on Medicaid or who only receive minimum Social Security income can also qualify. Call to schedule a tour and complimentary lunch for you and a guest.

955 Villa Ct., Carbondale, IL

618-351-7955

www.prairieliving-slf.com Life & Style : Winter 2016

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PARTING SHOT

p.s. photo by BYRON HETZLER

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The sandstone formations at Garden of the Gods in the Shawnee National Forest are the perfect place to capture Mother Nature’s splendor.


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