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VOLUM E 2 4 / I S S UE 41 / N OVEM BER 26, 20 2 0

N O I T I D E M A R G A T S IN

ACHES, O R P P A N AY SEASO D I L O H E CASE: E H T E AS TH K A M

ILERS A T E R L UNITY A M M LOC O C R E YOU SHOP LIK

PLUS

T I N O S D DEPEN

A SKI PRO IN LOCKDOWN MORE RENT RELIEF? HOMEGROWN ATHLETE TALKS PUPPIES & POWDER

A PROPOSAL TO HELP STRUGGLING RENTERS

HOLIDAY MARKETS

WHERE TO SHOP LOCALLY, ONLINE AND IN PERSON


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / NOVEMBER 26, 2020 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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788 WORDS WE WISH WE DIDN’T HAVE TO PRINT.

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE LIMIT YOUR GATHERINGS THIS HOLIDAY AND WEAR A MASK. EACH “PLEASE” REPRESENTS AN OREGONIAN WHO HAS LOST THEIR LIFE TO COVID-19.*

*NUMBER OF COVID-19 DEATHS IN OREGON AS OF 11/18/20 AS REPORTED BY THE OREGON HEALTH AUTHORITY. HEALTHOREGON.ORG/CORONAVIRUS


EDITOR’S NOTE:

The Source Weekly 704 NW Georgia Ave., Bend, OR 97703 t. 541-383-0800 f. 541-383-0088 bendsource.com info@bendsource.com

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On the Cover: Cover design by Darris Hurst. Call for Artists: If you're interested in being a SW featured artist, email: darris@bendsource.com.

EDITOR Nicole Vulcan - editor@bendsource.com REPORTER / CALENDAR EDITOR Megan Burton - calendar@bendsource.com COPY EDITOR Katie Prince FREELANCERS Jim Anderson, Tom Beans, Isaac Biehl, Magdalena Bokowa, Jared Rasic, David Sword SYNDICATED CONTENT Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsney, Brendan Emmett Quigley, Jen Sorensen, Pearl Stark, Tom Tomorrow, Matt Wuerker PRODUCTION MANAGER / ART DIRECTOR Darris Hurst - darris@bendsource.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Shannon Corey - shannon@bendsource.com

The Tower Theatre in downtown Bend is working to lighten the mood during the current two-week freeze by getting creative with its marquee. If we can't laugh, what do we have?

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 4 - Opinion 5 - Mailbox 6 - News More rent relief – The moratorium on rental evictions is set to end Dec. 31. As the pandemic rages on, there’s now a push to extend it. 8 - Feature Shop Local – In a year of increased online shopping (and lots of lockdown restrictions), local retailers share how they’re using Instagram and other social media platforms to sell products and support fellow businesses. Plus, get a list of places to shop for local goods in our roundup of holiday markets and other local shopping options. 15 - Source Picks 16 - Sound 17 - Calendar 25 - Culture A Bend-Focused Online Marketplace – In our ongoing coverage of ways to Shop Local, a story about a platform focused on showcasing local makers and retailers that has its roots in a Bend-area couple. 27 - Chow Last-Minute Turkey – Still haven’t found a place to cook your Thanksgiving dinner? These places might be able to help. 29 - Screen 31 - Outside Ski Pro in Lockdown – The Pro Files are back with a spotlight on local ski pro Lucas Wachs, who’s enjoying puppies, powder and pillows during this extended hiatus from competition. 35 - Real Estate 36 - Advice 37 - Astrology 38 - Craft 39 - Puzzles

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3 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

A fellow Oregon journalist recently created a hilarious “Bingo” game filled with all the common phrases heard at any one of the many coronavirus briefings hosted by the governor and state health officials. One of the phrases heard, in different iterations at recent press conferences, involves officials telling the public what they’re doing for Thanksgiving Day—typically involving tales of small, intimate gatherings without the usual fanfare. If we can’t glean some humor from the seemingly endless press conferences journalists have had to attend during this pandemic, then all is lost, I think. I won’t trouble you with yet another tale of how I am spending my own Thanksgiving Day, but I do hope you, readers, have a welcome day off to reflect and refresh. The day always gets me thinking about the ongoing acknowledgements we can direct toward those who traditionally occupied these lands. In 2020, with so much renewed conversation around racial justice, it seems all the more fitting to ponder this topic and to learn more about the lands upon which we live. The Warm Springs, Northern Paiute, Wasco and Klamath tribal communities are among those on whose ancestral lands Bend and other Central Oregon towns sit. Oregon State University offers a helpful map and primer on land acknowledgement on its website, for those wanting to learn more. Find it at: guides.library.oregonstate.edu/land-acknowledgments/oregon


OPINION

In a Week Focused on Gratitude, Supporting the Local Economy Should Play a Big Part WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / NOVEMBER 26, 2020 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

4

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or a good many people, the year 2020 has opened up an opportunity to think about the notion of gratitude. While Thanksgiving offers Americans the traditional trigger to reflect on the topic, the entire year has been a lesson in examining what we have and what we don’t. Those who have seen their livelihoods maintained, their homes intact and their good health continued will have gratitude for what they have preserved. Those who have lost houses in fires, lost loved ones to COVID-19 or who have been among the hundreds of thousands of Oregonians on the unemployment line may likewise focus on gratitude as a method of keeping calm and carrying on. Whatever your take on this holiday’s origins— or its current pandemic iteration devoid of large gatherings and friends— this week is yet another reminder of what we have and what we’ve lost. Even if we ourselves have remained whole, someone we know has not—and in that, we see the connectivity of community. This year, when Thanksgiving Day gives way to Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday and Giving Tuesday, the Shop Local issue you hold in your hands, will, we hope, offer some reminder of that interconnectedness, and the need to place our hopes and dreams—and equally as important, our dollars—into the hands of the people who live here. A business owner we talked to recently recounted a story that illustrates how shopping local translates to giving local and supporting the people who have lost so much this year. He discussed losing a bid for a local government project to an out-of-state bidder. On the same day the winning-bid announcement came out, that owner received a letter asking for support for a giving campaign sponsored

by that same government entity. Without much humor, the businessperson suggested the agency ask the out-ofstate bidder for support, since his business was diminished after losing that contract. That out-of-state support was probably not forthcoming. The same idea carries forward in retail. When we put our dollars into local businesses, those businesses are in turn more capable of supporting the nonprofits of the community. This year, more than ever, they are doing so much for those in need, and somehow press on doing more with less. Devoting an entire issue to “Shopping Local” is centered on this notion every year here at the Source Weekly—and this year, that notion and its message is only more important. Nonprofits in our community have worked tirelessly to house people, feed people, to provide moral and financial support during this difficult year, and so much more, and they deserve our continued support. While some are unable to open their wallets to give, most of us need to open our wallets to purchase necessities such as food, medicine and basic supplies—and even a holiday gift or two. These, too, can be purchased from local stores, shops, farms and purveyors. Every time we do so, we buoy our community a little more; we buffer it from the incessant economic strife that is hovering closely to so many this year. This week, whether we are sitting down for a humble meal or a small, intimate and more elaborate one, we hope the notion of gratitude encourages our community to support itself. It’s the best way we can get through this, together. 


Letters

O

The Alzheimer’s Association marks these events by recognizing the more than 16 million family members and friends across the U.S.—including 188,000 in Oregon—who are currently caring for a person living with Alzheimer’s. According to the 2020 Alzheimer’s Association Facts and Figures report, caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias provided an estimated 18.6 billion hours of unpaid assistance, a contribution to the nation valued at $244 billion. If Alzheimer’s caregivers were a state, they would be the fifth largest in the country. And, nearly 60% of Alzheimer’s caregivers report their stress level as high or very high. I have been involved with the Central Oregon Walk To End Alzheimer’s as a volunteer leader for the past three walk years. I am dedicated to having a world without Alzheimer’s because I don’t want future generations having to deal with this hideous disease. My father, who suffered from dementia passed away in August of this year and we are still reeling from his passing. Alzheimer’s needs to be eradicated so that other families do not need to endure the ravages of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. In recent years Congress has made funding Alzheimer’s and dementia research a priority and it must continue. It is my hope that Senators Wyden and Merkley and our area congressional representatives will continue to support an increase in Alzheimer’s research funding at the National Institutes of Health. During these challenging times— and always—the Alzheimer’s Association offers help and support for caregivers and the general public online and on the phone. Visit alz.org or call the 24/7 Helpline at 800.272.3900 for more information. —Cindy Bene

Letters must be received by noon Friday for inclusion in the following week’s paper. Please limit letters to 250 words. Submission does not guarantee publication. Opinions printed here do not constitute an editorial endorsement of said opinions. Letter of the week receives $5 to Palate!

1918 H1N1 The Bend Bulletin continues to propagate racism and hate by printing letters to the editor that contain racist terminology. On 22 October an editorial outlined that the racist term “China Virus” is acceptable, and not racist, based on previous viruses’ names such as the "Spanish Flu." The author clearly missed the background of the 1918 H1N1 flu as it started in Kansas—that’s right here in the United States. From there, the U.S. spread the virus throughout the world by sending infected imperialist troops to Europe in 1918 where the virus was spread through soldiers living in close, unsanitary conditions on the fronts. The U.S. media downplayed reports of this devastating flu, while the Spanish media reported what was happening. Thus, the term “Spanish Flu.” The 1918 H1N1 flu started the same place many other modern global tragedies do, right here in the United States. If virus naming is to be based on past precedence, clearly COVID-19 should be referred to as the “American Virus.” Second, arguing it’s OK to use racist terms in reference to a virus is akin to saying racial slurs towards minority populations are OK because those terms were also used in the past. A few other things were also prevalent in the past: minority populations forced into bondage, illegally deported en masse and humiliated on a daily basis by being denied access to “white” bathrooms, services and schools by those advocating and creating the racial slurs. Terrifyingly, these are all still prevalent today. This is all the more reason that we all, the Bend Bulletin included, stop allowing this kind of racist language to be used or printed. Using this type of language to describe humans is not OK, and it is not OK to be used to describe a virus, either.  For a timeline of the 1918 H1N1 flu visit:  cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/1918-commemoration/pandemic-timeline-1918.htm  —Jade Alex Sharpe

PLEASE STAY HOME AND STAY THE COURSE

Recently our County Commissioners are requesting that restaurants/bars be allowed to open. I don’t want us to open anything at this time. I understand the economic concerns, but there’s more to the picture. The holiday season is upon us, which for Bend means people are coming into town from all over the place. The CDC is discouraging travel, but people aren’t listening, let alone celebrating with people outside of their household. I’m hearing people bragging about family coming into town and even having 20 people in their homes. Here’s the deal—you have your family event and then people hang out after the holiday to take in Bend. If restaurants and bars are open— guess what, that’s where they will go. So many of these people are from out of town and who knows who they have had contact with, especially if they are coming from the Portland area. This should be concerning to all. Some of the outbreaks that have occurred is due to people letting their guard down…now is not the time. So that being said, we need to hold tight until our virus numbers go down and a vaccine is available which is right around the corner. No openings over Christmas as well. We need to be looking at what celebrating with our loved ones in 2021 will look like. Please stay the course. — Mary Fleischmann

RE: NINE MONTHS INTO THE PANDEMIC, IT’S TIME TO RESTORE REPRESENTATIVE GOVERNANCE, OPINION, 11/19 This editorial is not without some merit. However, if we want to save lives, listen to the doctors, not businesses. Businesses had six months to weigh in and offer changes, was this recent lock down truly a surprise to anyone? Unfortunately, the biggest challenge to your perspective is that Republican legislators have taken to a regular habit of walking out of Salem if they don’t get their way. Perhaps that is a better starting point for fixing the system? —Erik Fernandez, via bendsource.com

Letter of the Week:

A valid point about the breakdown of the democratic process in Salem, Erik. Thanks for writing in, and come on by for your gift card to Palate! —Nicole Vulcan

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5 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

NOVEMBER IS ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AWARENESS AND NATIONAL FAMILY CAREGIVERS MONTH

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Send your thoughts to editor@bendsource.com.


NEWS

Waiting Week Payouts Begin for Unemployed Oregonians By Nicole Vulcan

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / NOVEMBER 26, 2020 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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early 250,000 Oregonians who have received unemployment benefits this year have another payment on the way and another 170,000 will see an additional benefit in the coming weeks. The Oregon Employment Department announced Nov. 23 that it had begun issuing “waiting week” payments for Oregonians who received “regular” unemployment insurance benefits since the start of the pandemic. When someone submits a claim for unemployment benefits in Oregon, they typically have to wait one week before they start receiving unemployment funds. For those who found themselves out of work unexpectedly and without a savings cushion, that “waiting week” can mean they fall behind in making payments for rent, utilities and other necessities. Under the new

pandemic-era Oregon Employment Department guidelines, claimants can now get benefits for the week they waited—meaning if someone filed a claim on March 8, 2020 or after under regular unemployment insurance, they get that payment, equal to the amount of their other regular weekly payments. People who are receiving—or received—unemployment benefits through the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program, or the Disaster Unemployment Assistance programs will not receive a new waiting week payment since those programs already paid claimants during their first week. OED issued 246,300 payments on Nov. 23, and said those people should receive their waiting week benefit within three business days. Payments owed to another 170,000 people will have to

be manually processed and thus will take longer to disburse. “The Department estimates that while most will people will receive their waiting week benefit by the end of December, it may take until the end of January for claimants receiving Pandemic Unemployment Emergency Compensation (PEUC), Extended Benefits (EB), or benefits through Workshare to receive their waiting week payment,” according to an OED press release. “Eligible claimants whose waiting week falls between March 29, 2020 and July 25, 2020 also will receive the $600 Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation payment in addition to their weekly benefit amount.” Sen. Ron Wyden (D), who represents Oregon in Washington, D.C., said he his monitoring the waiting-week change:

“I’ll keep pressing the department to ensure it distributes every eligible waiting week check in a timely manner and resolves claims stuck in adjudication for thousands of Oregonians so they too can get the benefits they are entitled to. And I will continue pushing my legislation to extend into 2021 my Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program for self-employed and gig workers facing the ongoing economic fallout from this public health crisis.” Starting next year, waiting weeks will once again be part of the OED program. The waiting week has been waived for regular UI initial claims filed from March 8 through Jan. 2, 2021. People can check on the status of their claim by visiting the Online Claim System at unemployment.oregon.gov. 

Push to Extend Eviction Moratorium By Nicole Vulcan

T

hroughout the pandemic, Oregonians struggling to pay the rent have had some relief in the form of a statewide moratorium on evictions. With the COVID-19 crisis far from over and a deadline looming for the end of that eviction ban, stable housing advocates are pushing to extend that eviction moratorium. On Nov. 23, Oregon’s House Interim Committee on Housing heard testimony in favor of the Rental Housing Stabilization Proposal, which would offer extended relief for people in danger of losing their rental housing when the current moratorium ends Dec. 31. The new proposal, supported by the Oregon Housing Alliance, the Stable

Homes for Oregon Families coalition and other housing advocates, would extend the current eviction moratorium to July 1, 2021 for renters experiencing a qualified financial hardship. Renters would have until July 1 to pay back any missed rent during the COVID crisis. The proposal would also set up a landlord compensation fund that could see landlords recouping up to 80% of back rent owed to them. Over half of renters have resorted to borrowing, dipping into savings or reducing spending on food or medicines in order to pay the rent this year, according to a September Housing Insecurity Report issued by Portland State University’s Homelessness Research

& Action Collaborative. As of the date of that report, 34.8% of tenants overall owed back rent, with 56% of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color tenants owing back rent. “At least two-thirds reported paying their rent in full each month since March. But the number has declined from over 90% in March to 67% in July,” reads a summary of the report. “The statewide eviction moratorium expires in five short weeks, which means that parents living on the edge will have to find a new place to stay during the most difficult school year of our lifetimes,” stated Alison McIntosh of Oregon Housing Alliance in a Nov. 23 press release. “Lawmakers can prevent more students trying to do remote learning in

a shelter by taking action now to protect both renters and landlords.” On Nov. 19, Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek called for Gov. Kate Brown to declare a “catastrophic disaster” in the state, which would allow the legislature to convene a remote special session in December. “We need to utilize some portion of the state’s reserves as soon as possible to help struggling Oregonians and small businesses through the winter months,” Kotek wrote in a press release. “I am particularly interested in seeing the state spend $100 million to keep Oregonians housed and stabilize the rental market as the pandemic continues into 2021.” 

With a Spike in Cases, Capacity Concerns for Oregon’s ICUs By Nicole Vulcan

T

he spike in Oregon’s COVID-19 numbers that began in early November is causing Oregon’s Intensive Care Units to also see an increase in patients. According to the most recent data from the Oregon Health Authority, Region 1, which includes the majority of the Portland metro area, had 337 staffed ICU beds available, with 278 occupied as of Nov. 24. Region 7, which includes Bend, Central Oregon and much of eastern Oregon, had 47 beds available as of Nov. 20, with 41 occupied. Data from St. Charles Health System, which services Bend, Redmond, Prineville and the surrounding areas, showed that 21 of St. Charles Health System’s 30 ICU beds were full (or 70% occupied) as of Nov. 23.

Courtesy Oregon Health Authority

On Nov. 20, the Oregon Health Authority reported it was changing the way it tracks cases in COVID-19 testing. Now, instead of reporting the number of new people tested, it is tracking the number of tests administered. “Early in the pandemic, we measured the number of new people tested,” OHA explained in an email. “People who tested negative were counted only once, no matter how many negative tests were administered to them. That provided an accurate count of people with COVID-19, but it has had the effect of undercounting the number of COVID-19 tests that were actually performed. “Since then, testing has expanded and the state’s capacity has increased significantly, and that is leading to a

Occupied hospital beds as of Nov. 24, the most recent statewide data available as of press time.

recalculation of testing that will be based on the number of tests administered.” That change moved Oregon’s most recent percent positivity calculation from 12.9% to 6.7%.

“While the percentage is lower now, it’s still above the level that would indicate declining spread and a safe level to fully reopen schools and businesses,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. 


NEWS

Noticias en Español

Escrito por/By Nicole Vulcan Traducido por/Translated by Jéssica Sánchez-Millar Comienzan los pagos de la semana de espera para los habitantes desempleados de Oregon Cerca de 250,000 habitantes de Oregon que recibieron prestaciones por desempleo este año tienen otro pago en puerta –otros $170,000 para que en las próximas semanas haya una prestación adicional. El departamento de empleo de Oregon (OED por sus siglas en inglés) anunció el 23 de noviembre que había comenzado a otorgar pagos de “semana de espera” para los habitantes de Oregon que recibieron prestaciones de seguro de desempleo “regulares” desde que comenzó la pandemia. Cuando una persona presenta un reclamo de prestaciones por desempleo en Oregon, generalmente tiene que esperar una semana antes de comenzar a recibir dinero debido al desempleo. Para aquellos que se quedaron sin trabajo de manera inesperada y sin un ahorro guardado, esa “semana de espera” puede significar que se atrasen en el pago de la renta, de los servicios públicos u otras necesidades. Bajo la era de la pandemia, según las pautas a seguir del departamento de empleo de Oregon, los solicitantes ahora reciben las

Las personas pueden checar el estado de su solicitud por medio de sistema de reclamos en línea: unemployement. oregon.gov.

de desalojo hasta el 1 de Julio del 2021 para aquellos arrendatarios que reúnen los requisitos debido a que están pasando por dificultades financieras y daría a los arrendatarios hasta el 1 de Julio para pagar la renta no pagada durante la crisis debido a COVID. La propuesta también establecería un fondo de compensación para los terratenientes que podría permitir que los terratenientes recuperen hasta el 80% del alquiler que se les debe. De acuerdo al reporte de Housing Insecurity Report emitido en septiembre por la Universidad del estado de Portland Homelessness Research and Action Collaborative, más de la mitad de los arrendatarios han recurrido a prestámos, a usar sus ahorros, a meter mano a su cuenta de ahorros o a disminuir sus gastos de comida o medicinas para pagar su renta este año. Conforme a la fecha de ese reporte, 34.8% de los arrendatarios en general deben renta atrasada, con el 56% de arrendatarios negros, indígenas y personas de color debiendo renta atrasada. El resumen del reporte indica, “Por lo menos dos tercios reportaron haber pagado cada mes la renta en su totalidad desde el mes de marzo, pero la cantidad ha bajado de más del 90% en marzo al 67% en julio. 

Impulso para extender la prórroga de desalojo Durante la pandemia, a los habitantes de Oregon que les ha costado pagar la renta han tenido algo de ayuda de parte de la prórroga de desalojo a nivel estatal. Con la crisis de COVID-19 lejos de terminar y la fecha límite que se avecina para finalizar con la prohibición de desalojos, los activistas por las viviendas estables están promoviendo una extensión a esa prórroga de desalojo. El 23 de noviembre, el comité interino de vivienda de la cámara de representantes de Oregon escuchó un testimonio a favor de la propuesta de estabilización de vivendas de alquiler, la cual ofrece la extensión de ayuda para las personas en peligro de perder sus viviendas de alquiler ya que la prorroga actual vence el 31 de diciembre. La nueva propuesta, apoyada por la alianza para la vivienda de Oregon (Oregon Housing Alliance), la coalición de Stable Homes for Oregon Families y otros activistas para la vivenda, extendería la prórroga actual

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prestaciones por la semana que esperaron—lo cual quiere decir qué si alguien presentó una solicitud el 8 de marzo del 2020 o después de esa fecha bajo el seguro de desempleo regular, ahora recibirán ese pago, igual a la cantidad de sus otros pagos semanales habituales. Las personas que están recibiendo –o que recibieron—prestaciones de desempleo a través del programa de asistencia por desempleo debido a la pandemia o por parte del programa de asistencia por desempleo debido a una catástrofe no recibirán un nuevo pago de semana de espera ya que esos programas ya pagaron a los solicitantes durante su primera semana. OED emitió 246,300 pagos el 23 de noviembre y se espera que esas personas reciban sus prestaciones de semana de espera en un lapso de tres días hábiles. Los pagos que se le deben a otras 170,000 personas tendrán que ser procesados manualmente y por lo tanto tomarán más tiempo en procesarse. Sin embargo, a partir del próximo año, las semanas de espera formarán de nuevo parte del programa de OED. La semana de espera ha sido suspendida para las solicitudes iniciales presentadas del 8 de marzo al 2 de enero del 2021.


FEATURE

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N O I T I D E M A R G INSTA As the holiday season approaches, local retailers make the case: shop like your community depends on it. By Magdalena Bokowa

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atten down the hatches. That’s the motto for this upcoming holiday season. It might seem somewhat fantastical, but as a small retailer in Bend, riding out this next round of Covid-19 closures is akin to captaining a weather-beaten ship taking on a concerning amount of water. Your crew is exhausted, the captain is slightly disheveled and all that’s left is resounding optimism — because let’s face it, it’s eight months into a global pandemic and there isn’t much else when faced with an impending storm surge. “They weathered together the fiercest storms of faction,” wrote Thomas Macaulay back in 1650, some thirty years before the first pilgrims arrived on America’s shores and to which, fittingly, envelopes this week’s holiday. Shipping metaphors aside, weathering the COVID-19 storm looks a bit different in 2020.  First, the good news. With the first 10 days of the holiday season behind us, American consumers have increased their spending by 21% from last year, according to data compiled by Adobe Analytics, which monitors online sales. The day before the U.S. election, American consumers spent a whopping $2.2 billion—a 31% increase from the year before—and spent $2 billion on Election Day, which was a 27% jump from the 2016 election.  Good, right? This increased spending? Not so fast. A whopping $21.7 billion, nearly 81%, of this consumer spending has taken place online — likely stemming from the fact that a reported 63% of consumers cite health concerns and are avoiding brick-and-mortar stores.  As small local businesses go, many are dependent on in-person foot traffic, a bulk of which come from an already shortened tourist season. With the now impending holiday season at risk, what slice of the proverbial holiday pie do local businesses get? The reality of how companies are dealing with the COVID crisis and preparing for recovery is a very different story from the rosier national narrative. It’s a story


FEATURE

Which to tackle first? Instagram? Shopify TikTok? The second instantaneous shutdown triggered last week was, as most retailers quipped, expected since the summer. So too is the expectation that this will last much longer than the two weeks Gov. Kate Brown has stated. “This lockdown is a test, you know? A trial for everyone to see how we do with Thanksgiving and see if infections skyrocket,” said Alicia Renner, owner of three local businesses including Northwest Trading Post, Howl Attire and Mud Lake Studios—the latter, a community ceramics art studio space located in the Old Ironworks Building. Renner echoes the statements of most other small business owners the Source Weekly spoke with, who are bracing for a longer and stricter lockdown ahead of the Christmas holidays. “I feel like it’s getting people used to the idea again and then we will have a lockdown for the rest of winter,” Renner says, which she adds, “is understandable, considering COVID is very real.” Renner says she’s tried to embrace the slowdown by using the time to connect with local artists inside Mud Lake and to take time out for herself. Yet she knows that she’s one of the lucky ones in that her co-operative business

model—in which member artists rent studio space located inside the building—offsets her rental costs in a way that takes the pressure off when things like a global pandemic shut you down. She’s also had her brand, Howl Attire, for nine years and has an established online consumer base. “I’m always amazed at the lengths people will go to find my work and wait for my product.” It’s a scenario newer makers might not yet have had to face. She notes that for her hand-sewn garments, a disrupted supply chain has meant her custom pieces can take much longer to produce. “My canvas comes from Scotland and the distributor shut down back in the spring, so it was a whole big process trying to figure out how I can still buy from them without having to spend money on a big wholesale shipment.” Bracing for the worst but hoping for the best is the motto for 2020, and that’s what this upcoming holiday season will be. Renner speaks of the two upcoming holiday markets that are usually a big moneymaker for the artists the studio supports. “At this point, we are going ahead with a modified version of Small Business Saturday (this Saturday, Nov. 28) where shoppers can socially distance shop for $20 or under gifts such as handmade ornaments.” Craft-O, a collaborative event spread out across the IronWorks facility, featuring more than 50 designers and makers, though, may be a different story, considering the mid-December timeline. “We’ll see,” she says, noting that many artists bank on short time frames to support themselves during the longer, quieter periods. “If that holiday income is gone, then I’m not sure what will happen.” Pivoting to an online shop seems like the go-to reality, but navigating and integrating a new platform into your existing business model can be a daunting, time-consuming effort. Shopify, one of the largest online platforms, is one of the biggest beneficiaries of COVID-19, Gwen Shoemaker

Somewhere That's Green owner John Kish is using Instagram to boost local makers and designers.

Magdelena Bokowa

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of a pivot to business models conducive to short-term survival as well as longterm resilience and growth. Since American consumers have shown just what they prefer —the ease of one-click, twoday delivery—many within the Central Oregon small business community are sounding the alarm as we head into the holiday season. Go online, but shop locally, they say. It might be more difficult, more costly and take more time, but the innovative and vibrant community for which Bend is known and celebrated may severely dampen if we lose the small businesses that can’t weather this impending storm.

Abraham and Kirsten Gilreath's approach to surviving a tough retail environment? Stay nimble, keep it simple and innovate.

with a stock price up 143% this year. Its revenue almost doubled in the third quarter to $767 million alone, and its president, Harley Finkelstein, said the

“I'm lucky to be in an industry that is successful during this time, which is why I always try to give back and try to help all my makers” - John Kish

coronavirus pandemic has accelerated the online transition by a decade. “I think you’re going to see a massive paradigm shift,” he said in an interview with CNBC. “My grandparents are now going to buy groceries online for the rest of their lives, which is something that never would’ve happened.” At a first glance, an online shop is an answer. Yet it takes time, energy and large upfront costs to stay on top of constantly shifting inventory, supported by the need for high-quality photos, snappy captions and adjusted pricing. Not

to mention facing the lines at the postal office. “My struggle is trying to figure out how to continue to sell everyone’s work, when I don’t have an online store, and I don’t really have the time or money to set one up,” says Renner. “That’s one of the details I’m having a hard time with right now is figuring out how to sell everyone’s work, and keep everyone sustained and happy.” Instagram success story, shared Many small retailers find a happy medium between an online shop and cultivating an online presence in Instagram stories. It’s a way to easily distribute bite-sized pieces of daily content while gently reminding customers that they are still there.  One such example is the Somewhere That’s Green Instagram—a newly opened plant “shoppe” in the Old Mill. Owner John Kish expanded in the summertime, a seemingly counterintuitive approach if not for the fact that newly quarantined folks are flocking to “greenify” their spaces. “We haven’t seen a plant boom this big since the ‘70s,” he told me. Kish posts daily Instagram stories and makes a big push to incorporate local designers, who he says are struggling because of the lack of seasonal markets.  “I’m lucky to be in an industry that is successful during this time, which is why I always try to give back and try to help all my makers,” says Kish, who has 20 local designers in his store. He notes he’s seen an uptick in local makers receiving custom orders when he tags them in a post. “I think Bend is very local-centric, and so I think driving that unique angle with cross-promotion is really important.” Continued on p. 11


This holiday season, make a charitable donation through the Source Weekly’s Central Oregon Gives

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FEATURE Magdelena Bokowa

Continued from p. 9

Central Oregon restaurants: The struggle is real Bend restaurants are by far the most at risk during the ongoing lockdowns, with many facing high rents, zero liquor and beer revenues and threats of closures with increased risk of COVID exposures. “We need to rally around these guys,” says Gilreath. “They struggle so hard to reopen and have to jump through so many hoops to stay open safely. And now, right at the peak of what would be a huge part of their annual money-making part of the year, it’s going to be difficult for them to try to weather this storm during another closure.” A recent survey released by the National Restaurant Association found that one in six restaurants closed either

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Downtown shops “stay nimble” Adaptation is key and as noted by Kish and others, Bend is an ideal community to support the switch to online, local consumerism. “It’s a constant reminder to stay nimble, keep it simple and to innovate,” says Abraham Gilreath, the owner of two downtown retail boutiques, Ju-bee-lee and Jack and Millie. Gilreath and his wife, Kirsten, also post daily stories of items in the store as a way to maintain visibility and promote a sense of community when consumers are perhaps hesitant to come in. They’ve tried their hand at virtual shopping for clients with mixed results, so he’s gotten creative wading into an online marketing strategy that was once reserved for larger brands: giveaways.  Seeing the increasing struggle for local restaurants to stay afloat, Gilreath and his wife came up with a marketing idea that has participants dress up and take a snap outside of their favorite local Bend eatery as they’re grabbing take-out. The top three creative, bestdressed winners will win a $100 gift certificate to that eatery. Asked how they came up with the idea, Gilreath laughs, “A few too many whiskies around the coffee table.”

permanently or long-term, nearly 3 million workers were out of work and the industry was on track to lose $240 billion in sales by the end of 2020. “They’re a really important part of a vibrant community and culture. Our restaurants, bars and coffee shops are where we gather, where we’re social, where we see one another, talk, celebrate and grieve," Gilreath said. "Above all, we need to make sure they stay alive. So that’s why we’re like, what can we do as a business to help a couple of guys on our block?” Cross-promotion of other local brands is the backbone of many of the online strategies these local businesses employ. Tagging vendors and sharing promotions “What’s really awesome is that I’m seeing in our community people helping one another, just through social media, tagging local makers and designers,” says Shasta Ashford, owner of Revival Vintage— a boutique vintage retailer that has been open for just under one year. “I’m just encouraging our community, our local crafters and sellers to break the algorithm and to get in front of people.” Ashford says she does this by tagging the vendors with which she works. She recently did a social media

If it ain't one thing, it's another: Local business owner Alicia Renner counts herself lucky thanks to a strong online presence, but has struggled with pandemic-related supply chain slowdowns.

She also cross-promotes with her nextdoor neighbor and competitor, another vintage retailer, Luck of the Draw.

tional A recent survey released by the Na one in six Restaurant Association found that ently or restaurants closed either perman rs were out long-term, nearly 3 million worke ck to lose of work and the industry was on tra 2020. $240 billion in sales by the end of

post listing the small Venmo payments she recently wired to her vendors in an effort to be transparent as to where the money is going in the local community. “For some, that $20 to $50 could honestly make a difference,” she said. Magdelena Bokowa

Getting through the pandemic is going to require community, mutual support and, yep, social media, says Shasta Ashford, owner of new shop Revival Vintage.

“I feel like if we all just continue to support each other locally and keep our money away from the big box stores and in our community, that’s the best way to get through this... that will help them pay their bills, which is already helping me pay my bills.” Ashford has been investing in sponsored Instagram posts showcasing weekly sales. She’ll foot the bill for a retailer or maker because the way that she looks at it, it gets people into her shop and supports her and the retailer. Ashford is trying to find the time to embrace social media and as she puts it, “not biting the hand that feeds.” She’s also toying with the idea of TikTok so she can reach a broader demographic with short, punchy videos. “How do you get amongst the masses though? How do you compete? It’s so saturated. It can be a lot for a one-woman show.” For now, however, perseverance, ingenuity and most importantly, support from the community to shop locally, whether that’s in-store,

curbside, or online, is what will help these small businesses endure the impending holiday season.

By the Numbers: Reasons to Shop Local 2 out of 3

Number of new jobs created by small businesses in the U.S. Source: Michigan State University Center for Community and Economic Development

250%

Small businesses donate 250% more than larger businesses to locally based nonprofits

1.6X

1.6X more capital stays in the local community when buying from a local business compared to a chain. 6X more stays in the community when buying local versus buying on online megastores like Amazon. Source: EntryPointMI

10%

A study of the impact of 15 local businesses compared with a SuperTarget in New Orleans found that if locals and visitors shifted 10% of their spending from chains to local business, it would generate an additional $235 million a year in local economic activity. Source: Civic Economics Counties with vibrant small-business sectors have lower rates of mortality and a lower prevalence of obesity and diabetes, compared to places dominated by big firms. Source: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy, and Society 


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FEATURE

Shopping Local, While Buying Great Books

American Booksellers Association

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By Tom Beans, Dudley’s Bookshop Café

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iven its size and population, Central Oregon is fortunate to have so many great Indie bookstores at people’s disposal: Paulina Springs Books in Sisters, Herringbone Books in Redmond, Roundabout Books and my shop, Dudley’s Bookshop Café in Bend, and Sunriver Books & Music in Sunriver. All of these bookstores are owned and staffed by members of our community. If you’ve stopped in any of them, you know they all have their own flavor and they’re great at what they do. One of the reasons we’re so lucky to have all these bookstores is that Central Oregon has a strong “Shop Local” ethic. Sure, the tourist dollars are great, but we wouldn’t be here without the support of local readers. What’s the biggest threat to our stores? No surprise to say that it continues to be Amazon, the online 800-pound gorilla. The pandemic has only increased its sales to insane new heights and hey, I get it. Convenience, price, pretty fast delivery—it’s hard to say no.

What if I told you could just as easily order your books online from any of these local bookshops and keep your money right here in the community? Each and every one of us has a robust online sales platform that can deliver books right to your doorstep or anywhere else in the country. Your selection is not limited to only what we have in the store, either. If we don’t have it on the shelf, it’ll come directly from one of our partner warehouses, in many cases just as quickly as Amazon can deliver it—and sometimes even faster. Here are a few stats to consider: • Jeff Bezos makes approximately $2,489 per second—more than twice what the median U.S. worker makes in a week. • Bezos is so rich that an average American spending $1 is similar to Bezos spending $1.2 million. • In 2018 alone, Amazon’s retail sales displaced 62,410 storefronts—a

42% increase from 2016. Even considering Amazon’s massive distribution network, the net result is a loss of 703,537 jobs nationwide. Given that, I’ll ask the question: would you rather give money to your neighbors, the ones running the local bookstores, trying like hell to weather the pandemic so we can be here for years to come? Or would you still prefer to give it to… him? Where you spend your money matters more than ever in 2020. No matter where you choose to shop online this year, please do it early, Like now early. The pandemic has stressed

the publishing supply chain in multiple ways. Many books are likely to go out of stock by the end of the month, and independent booksellers—and even Amazon—may not get them back until after the holidays. So, whether you’re shopping online or in our stores, if you see something you want, now is the time to grab it before it’s too late. Your bookstores of Central Oregon thank you! To shop online with Dudley’s, please visit bookshop.org/shop/dudleysbookshopcafe. To shop online with other local shops, please visit their respective websites. 

Shop Local at Central Oregon Artisan Marketplaces Looking for a way to get lots of local shopping done, all in one place? Look to these upcoming events By Megan Burton

2020 NCOB Artisan Showcase Through Dec. 20! Local makers have been working all year to bring you unique and handcrafted gifts. Browse art, jewelry, foods, drinks and décor! There is sure to be something for everyone on your list. Shop the online event at newcomersclubofbend.org. Plaid Friday Online Sales Fri., Nov. 27, 11am-6pm Stay home, stay warm and stay safe while still getting great deal on local

Submitted

wellness and small businesses. Stay in your PJs and browse the sales at bendhealthguide.com/2020/10/20/plaid-Friday-bend. Cider Monday Mon., Nov. 30, 10am-6pm Choose local small businesses this Cyber Monday. Roundabout Books is celebrating those who choose to shop small this Monday with a complimentary cup of spiced hot apple cider! Also, shop online and receive 15% off your purchase. Browse the online selection at roundaboutbookshop.com/event/cider-Monday-o.

Campfire Winter Market.

Submitted

Campfire Winter Market Fri., Feb. 12- Sat., Feb. 13, 11am-6pm (postponed from an earlier date) The three-day event will feature Central Oregon makers and creatives. Celebrate and support local while sipping drinks, listening to live music and more! More details at campfirewintermarket.com.

Plaid Friday Online Sales.

10th Annual Craft-O! Holiday Bazaar Sat., Dec.12 9am-5:30pm Shop in person safely at this holiday event. There will be over 50 vendors

featuring makers, art, and more gifts. Tacos, cocktails and more food and drinks available during your shopping session. Get your ticket to reserve your time slot at bendticket.com. $5. Locavore Holiday Gift Faire Shop Online Through Dec. 8 Support local makers and shop online this season! Find one-of-a kind gifts from art, local treats and jewelry. Shop the faire online at centraloregonlocavore.localfoodmarketplace.com. 

VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Buying books from Central Oregon booksellers, while also shopping online


GIFT GUIDES & HOLIDAY IS ARE COMING SSUES OON!

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The Source Weekly’s Gift Guide is the best place to let our readers know you have the perfect gift section for the holidays.

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SOURCE PICKS MONDAY-SUNDAY 11/23-11/29

THURSDAY 11/26

11/23 – 12/5

TUESDAY-SATURDAY 12/1-12/5 15

HOSPICE OF REDMOND: TOUR OF TREES ONLINE AND IN PERSON Submitted

Unsplash

I LIKE PIE THANKSGIVING RUN/WALK RUN, WALK, EAT PIE

Get your Thanksgiving run in early this year with this all-week-long virtual event. Take pictures and get in the spirit to win prizes for costumes, creative pies and more! Cascaderelays.com/events/i-like-pie. $25-$30.

REDMOND TURKEY TROT VIRTUAL 5K OR 10K

Get moving before digging in this turkey day. Run where and when you want this season with a virtual event. Join in the fun at redmondturkeytrot.com. $25.

Beautifully decorated trees are on display throughout Central Oregon! Bid on the trees at the end of the week to support Hospice of Redmond. View the trees online from home or socially distanced in person at locations throughout the community. Tue., Dec. 1-Sat., Dec. 5. hospiceofredmond.org/tour-of-trees-2020.

TUESDAY 12/1

TUESDAY 12/1

MONDAY-TUESDAY 11/23-12/1

2020 SAGE: STORIES OF RESILIENCE BEND CHAMBER CELEBRATES LOCAL

Pixabay

NORTHWEST CROSSING HOLIDAY TOUR OF LIGHTS SOCIALLY DISTANCED SCAVENGER HUNT!

BUSINESSES

The Bend business community has celebrated the achievements of local businesses and nonprofits for over 30 years. This year share your business’ story of resilience and innovation for a chance to be featured all season long in a shareable video format. Submit your story at bendchamber.org/bend-event/ sage-stories-of-resilience/

See the lights at NorthWest Crossing this year while keeping your distance. Join in a scavenger hunt style challenge to find all the holiday-themed fun throughout the community! Share your photos for a chance to win prizes and support your community by dropping off non-perishable food items. Opens on Tue., Dec. 1, through Sun., Dec. 20. visitnw.com/nwx-tour-of-lights. Free.

THURSDAY 11/26

TURKEY BURNER GRATITUDE DONATION CLASS THANKFUL FOR VIRTUAL YOGA

Thanksgiving may look different this year, but you can still get your yoga on with this online donation-based event. Create community, cultivate gratitude and work up a sweat before your big dinner. namaspa.com/classes-workshops. $10-$15 suggested donation.

Unsplash

KNOW FELIZ: LOST OREGON SKI AREAS EXPLORING THE HISTORY OF OR SKIING

Dive into the forgotten ski areas in our area that used to be locals’ favorites. Steve Stenkamp will highlight a collection of more than 30 forgotten ski hills. Tue., Dec. 1, 3-4pm. Deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/ event/60683. Free.

OUR FUTURE RESILIENCE

TowerTheatre.org

TUESDAY-SATURDAY 12/1-12/5

SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL ONLINE WINTER JAM FUNDRAISER FREE LIVESTREAM CELEBRATION

Support local music, venues and more during this online fundraiser. Listen to live music and choose from a collection of packages that are sure to brighten your winter. Tue., Dec. 1- Sat., Dec. 5. Sistersfolkfestival. org/jam-fundraiser. No cover.

depends on you! Text “Tower” to 44321 to give a gift today.

VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Pixabay


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SOUND

Highlights from Oregon artists in November: featuring Chandler P, Masinformation and Adam Selzer

For those in Central Oregon looking to keep it low-key this Thanksgiving, you can never have a bad time when there are some good tunes in the background. Here are a few local and regional recommendations on November releases you truly don’t want to miss out on.

Sourc e Mat erial

By Isaac

Biehl

LOCAL’S BIN

Welcome To The Rage - Chandler P Chandler P (P for Price) dropped “Welcome To The Rage” earlier this year, but in November the Bend native re-released it on Bandcamp with two new bonus tracks and 50 CDs for sale. Now with 10 songs, “Welcome To The Rage” is a strong collection of poppunk and hip-hop cuts that definitely bring the right energy to rage, filling your ears with angst, anxiety and plenty of attitude. Courtesy Chandler P The opening track, “Quarantine Spirit,” sets the tone by highlighting Price’s melodic vocals, and songs like “Stop Throwing Stones” touch on the stress-induced life of living in a pandemic. My personal favorite is the Zach Nance-assisted “Don’t Tell Me.” Overall, “Welcome To The Rage” is an exciting listen to run through. CDs are still available on Price’s Bandcamp page for $15 (or more if you so choose).

LOCAL’S BIN

“Just Noon” - Masinformation

When he’s not playing bass in Night Channels, Bend’s Mason Coats is playing tunes under his solo project, Masinformation. His most recent release is a lo-fi folk track called “Just Noon.” The song is really just Coats and a guitar, with some slight percussion in the back. He croons about another day of being alone with no certainty whether his day will get better or worse from here. He doesn’t ts Coa Courtesy Mason even know where he’ll end up. “Just Noon” is a breeze to listen to, and I highly recommend it for anyone who likes Bright Eyes or even Alex G. It’s one of the best Masinformation songs yet.

REGIONAL GEM

Slow Decay - Adam Selzer Adam Selzer is a Portland-based musician and producer who has worked with artists such as the Fleet Floxes and The Decemberists, while also founding two bands of his own, including Norfolk & Western and Alialujah Choir. Now, Selzer is here with his solo debut record “Slow Decay.” While it feels like the folk music of old, the album has carved out a place to fit within the landscape of 2020 as well. With intricate string arrangements, delicate harmonies and Selzer’s thoughtful lyrics placed throughout, “Slow Decay” really doesn’t have any shortcomings. There’s even variety in sound—“Better Than You Know” sounds more like an alt-rock song you’d hear in 2020 with its psychedelic effects while the album standout, “I’ll Be Around,” could be an Americana song from 50 years ago. Wrapped together “Slow Decay,” makes for the perfect sound for the upcoming winter. 

Courtesy Adam Selzer

We invite you to become a member of the HDMC Community! We open for appointments only. We are following new regulations and rules, please sign the waivers when you book an appointment. Thank you to everyone for your patience and loyalty during this time. 550 S.W. Industrial Way Suite 152

GOODLIFE BEERS ON TAP!

BOOK ONLINE AT BENDBARBER.COM

• Providing weekly opportunities to experience local live music • Support local with access to local business discounts • Special events, giveaways, behind the scenes with musicians, and much more!

Visit us online, or contact us for more information! www.highdesertmusiccollective.com


LIVE MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

CALENDAR

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Tickets Available on Bendticket.com Courtesy Unsplash

MUSIC

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The Ultimate Oldies Show A locally-pro-

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duced, syndicated, weekly, thematic two-hour radio show highlighting the music, artists, producers, musicians and cultural touchstones of the late 1940s through the late 1960s. Stories, anecdotes, chart information, interview clips and trivia complement the recognized, the long forgotten and the seldom heard rock’n’soul records of that memorable period. Fridays, 6-8pm. KPOV, 501 NW Bond St., Bend. Contact: mikeficher@gmail.com. Free.

Sisters Folk Festival Online Winter Jam Fundraider Don’t miss our

FREE live stream celebration featuring performances from Judith Hill, Thunderstorm Artis, AJ Lee & Blue Summit, John Craigie, Kristen Grainger & True North, Jenner Fox and more! A collection of fun-filled packages to brighten your winter while providing critical mission support to Sisters Folk Festival! It’s no secret that 2020 has been a rough year for festivals, musicians and venues due to COVID-19. We’ve made it this far and have continued to offer — and even expand — many of our programs during this time when they’re needed more than ever. Dec. 1-5. sistersfolkfestival.org/ jam-fundraiser. Free.

ARTS & CRAFTS 2020 NCOB Artisan Showcase Artisans

have been hard at work all year creating unique items and are now ready for your shopping pleasure. Please visit the online shopping brochure to find a special item that is perfect for your home or for gifting this Holiday Season. Jewelry, Artwork, Food Products, Décor, etc. newcomersclubofbend.org Nov. 16-Dec. 20. Contact: ncob.president@gmail.com.

Call to Artists A unique opportunity to join

the Artists’ Gallery in Sunriver Village. Looking for fine art and crafts, 3D art, 2D oil watercolor, encaustic and woodwork. We are a coop gallery of 30 local artists, and we’ve been around for 10 years! Through Dec. 9. Artists’ Gallery Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Dr. Suite 19, Sunriver. Contact: 541-593-4382. info@artistsgallerysunriver.com.

Call to Artists The award winning Red Chair

Gallery is looking for an artist who makes wearable art or accessories in fiber or leather. We are a membership gallery. If interested, pick up an application at the gallery, located at the corner of Bond St. and Oregon Ave. in downtown Bend. Through Jan. 31. Red Chair Gallery, 103 NW Oregon Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-410-6813. thewayweart229@gmail.com.

Central Oregon Locavore Holiday Gift Faire The Locavore Holiday Gift Faire is one of

the best ways to find perfectly unique gifts for your special people made right here in Central Oregon. Will you buy them art, local honey or vinegar, or a beautiful piece of jewelry? Your contribution will support a vibrant, local arts scene. The 11th Annual Locavore Gift Faire will open for ordering on November 23rd and close on December 8th. Contactless pickup will be at the Agricultural Connections warehouse on December 12th from 9am – 4pm. Contact: 541633-7388. info@centraloregonlocavore.org.

A Christmas Carol A Christmas Carol was first published in 1843 and has become a timeless holiday classic that families and audiences have enjoyed for almost two centuries. Countless adaptions have been made of this timeless story and we are proud to present this family-friendly holiday favorite with a new twist. Sundays, 2-4pm and Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30-9:30pm. Through Dec. 19. Cascades Theatrical Company, 148 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-389-0803. ctcinfo@cascadestheatrical.org. Adult- $27 Senior/Student- $23.

Support local restaurants and give your kitchen a break this year. Check out all the Thanksgiving meals to-go from local business and get ready to eat!

PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBITS Know Feliz - Lost Oregon Ski Ar-

eas Explore the history of organized ski areas in Oregon that are no longer, including places like the Little Alps, Tomahawk Ski Bowl, High Desert, Taft Mountain. Steve Stenkamp will highlight a collection of more than 30 forgotten ski hills. Dec. 1, 3-4pm. Contact: 541-312-1029. laurelw@ deschuteslibrary.org. Free. Know Feliz - Train Man The beloved tra-

dition of the Train Man at the Library continues - virtually. Dec. 2, 6-7pm. Contact: 541-312-1032. lizg@deschuteslibrary.org. Free.

A Year in Oregon’s High Desert Feeling stressed? A dose of natural beauty could help. If you could use some healthy distraction, plan to check out “A Year in Oregon’s High Desert,” a virtual exhibition. This show features 24 stunning images from public lands in Eastern Oregon, including both grand landscapes and close-ups of the plants and wildlife that give Oregon’s sagebrush steppe its pulse. Coordinated by Oregon Natural Desert Association to showcase the high desert’s natural beauty, this exhibition will take viewers through some of the most scenic, remote and awe- inspiring wild places in Oregon’s high desert, including the Owyhee Canyonlands, John Day River Basin, Steens Mountain Wilderness and the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The exhibition also captures some beautiful, ephemeral moments from the high desert, such as an encounter with the threatened Greater Sage-Grouse during its elaborate mating ritual for which it is best known. Nov. 16-Jan. 8, 5:30pm. Free. Rise Up for Climate Justice: A Giving Tuesday Celebration Join Beyond Toxics

on Tuesday, December 1st at 6:30 pm for an uplifting virtual membership party to learn about their exciting new opportunities to lead Oregon on a path to climate justice. The event, Rise Up for Climate Justice: A Giving Tuesday Celebration, includes the premiere of a new short video, introductions of new staff members and live music. Tue., Dec. 1, 6:30pm.Online. Free.

WORDS Cider Monday Cyber Monday? We prefer

Cider Monday! Opt out of large online retailer promos and enjoy a complimentary cup of spiced hot apple cider as a thank you for shopping small this holiday season. Also, shop online and receive 15% off your purchase! Nov. 30, 10am-6pm. Roundabout Books, 900 NW Mount Washington Drive, #110, Bend. Contact: 541-306-6564. sara@roundaboutbookshop.com.

Current Fiction Book Club On December

2nd we will discuss Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones. Please visit www.roundaboutbookshop. com for Zoom info. Dec. 2, 6-7pm. Contact: 541306-6564. sara@roundaboutbookshop.com. Free.

Small Business Saturday Thank you for

supporting small businesses! Spend $25 and receive a complimentary 12oz. hot beverage from our cafe! Nov. 28, 10am-6pm. Roundabout Books, 900 NW Mount Washington Drive, #110, Bend. Contact: 541-306-6564. sara@roundaboutbookshop.com.

ETC. Mommy and Me: Breastfeeding Support Group in Bend Calling all new

moms and babies! Come visit “Mommy and Me” for social hour and breastfeeding support. An International Breastfeeding Certified Lactation Consultant from St Charles will be there, as well as a myriad of volunteers and guest speakers. We have two locations: Redmond - Tuesdays, 122pm at the Center for Women’s Health and Bend - Thursdays, 1-3pm at Central Oregon Locavore. See Facebook for details! Free.

Preventative Walk-In Pet Wellness Clinic The Bend Spay and Neuter Project offers

vaccinations, deworming and microchips at our walk-in wellness clinic. No appointments necessary, first come first served. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Bend Spay & Neuter Project, 910 SE Wilson, Suite A1, Bend. $10-$30.

Shop Small 2020 in Downtown Bend!

Normally, Shop Small Saturday takes place on a single day as a big shopping event in Downtown Bend. Due to the current global pandemic, this

year we’ll be giving participants three full weeks to fill their passports. This will help everyone spread out and stay safe, and allow us to follow all state guidelines. PLUS - This year you can participate in the Shop Small Passport Event online! Nov. 7-28.

CLOSED: Thanksgiving Day The High Desert Museum will be closed for the Thanksgiving holiday on Thursday, November 26. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4754. bburda@ highdesertmuseum.org. Women’s Share Healing Circle We all

experience challenges on our journey of life. Together We uplift and encourage as we connect and share. Saturdays, 9am. Through Jan. 9. eventbrite.com/e/123090999493. Free.

VOLUNTEER Call for Volunteers - Play with Parrots! Volunteers needed at Second Chance

Bird Rescue! Friendly people needed to help socialize birds to ready for adoption, make toys, clean cages and make some new feathered friends! Do you play a musical instrument? Come and practice for the birds! Located past Cascade Lakes Distillery, call for hours and location. Contact: 916-956-2153.

General Volunteer Opportunities

For information on volunteer opportunities at Bethlehem Inn please contact Courtney, Community Engagement Coordinator, at volunteer@bethleheminn.org. Fourth Thursday of every month. Bethlehem Inn, 3705 N Hwy 97, Bend. Contact: 541-322-8768 x11. volunteer@ bethleheminn.org. Free.

Tower Theatre Giving Tuesday The

nonprofit Tower Theatre Foundation joins the #GivingTuesday movement - a global day of unity to unleash grassroots generosity and inspire citizen engagement. Our one-day goal is to raise $20,000. To contribute to the Tower’s efforts text “Popcorn” to 44321 or visit the link below. Our resilience depends on you! Nov. 30. Contact: 541-317-0700. lisa@towertheatre.org.


CALENDAR Volunteer Opportunity Are you a Jack/Jill of

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all trades? There’s everything from small engine, fencing, troubleshooting in a barn/rescue facility that require TLC repairs. Seize this opportunity; volunteer at Mustangs To The Rescue. Please call and leave a message. Mondays-Sundays, 9am-6pm. Mustangs to the Rescue, 21670 McGilvray Road, Bend. Contact: 541-330-8943. volunteer@MustangstotheRescue.org.

Volunteer with Salvation Army The

Salvation Army has a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for almost every age. We have an emergency food pantry, we visit residents of assisted living centers and we make up gifts for veterans and the homeless. Ongoing. Contact: 541-389-8888.

GROUPS & MEETUPS First Day of Grooming Our grooming agreement with the Forest Service runs December through March so 12/1/2020 will be the first day of grooming for the next ski season. Dec. 1. Virginia Meissner SnoPark, Century Drive, Bend. Whole Soul Sister Circle (sometimes men too) Join me, Julie Tartak, once a month

for circle time. We will have a series of specific topics for our personal growth to deepen our self love Mon, Nov. 30, 6:45pm and Mon, Dec. 21, 6:45pm. The Sanctuary, 339 SW Century Dr. #203, Bend. $30.

FAMILY & KIDS Camp Fire Afterschool Camp Fire Afterschool is a flexible and fun option for families looking to balance afterschool care with enrichment opportunities and social-emotional skill development. This year in particular, we will really be leaning into the aspects of CFA that get kids outside, away from screens, and socializing. Mondays-Tuesdays-Thursdays, 1:30-5:30pm. Through Dec. 18. Sons of Norway Hall, 549 NW Harmon Blvd., Bend. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@campfireco.org. $120 per 7 week session. Camp Fire Nature Days Camp Fire Nature Days are an all-day enrichment program with nature-based themes to support family and youth during current distance learning. Activities are focused on getting kids outside, away from screens, and socializing. Wednesdays, 9am3:30pm. Through Dec. 16. Sons of Norway Hall, 549 NW Harmon Blvd., Bend. Contact: 541-3824682. info@campfireco.org. $55 per day.

EVENTS Equipo de Robótica Bilingüe ¡Únete al Equipo de Robótica LEGO y aprende a construir y programar con robots LEGO! Nuestros clubs extraescolares de robótica para jóvenes en 4º y 5º grado están enfocados a la resolución de problemas, la creatividad, la exploración de nuevas ideas, ¡y la diversión! *Bilingüe English/ Spanish programa Mondays-Wednesdays, 5-7pm. Through Feb. 10. BendTECH, 1001 SW Emkay Dr, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@ campfireco.org. $80/month. Hospice of Redmond Presents Tour of Trees 2020 Beautifully decorated

trees are on display throughout Central Oregon. These trees have been donated to be auctioned off to support programs at Hospice of Redmond. Trees can be viewed online or at their host location. Nov. 22-Dec. 5.

How to Have Conversations about Race with Young Children with Madeleine Rogin Why is it important to initiate

conversations about race and racism with our children? What is developmentally appropriate for children to know as they age? How can we talk about these topics in a way that empowers all children to act toward greater justice and equity? Grounded in personal story and current research, this workshop offers concrete strategies, resources, and an opportunity for questions and discussion. Online. Dec. 2, 12-1:15pm. Free.

LEGO Robotics Join Camp Fire’s First LEGO League Robotics club for 4th-5th graders. We will be exploring FLL’s new competition “Gamechangers” using LEGO EV3 Mindstorms robots. This club is all about problem solving, getting creative, exploring new ideas, and having fun! Mondays-Wednesdays, 3:30-5:30pm. Through Feb. 10. BendTECH, 1001 SW Emkay Dr, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@campfireco.org. $80/month. NorthWest Crossing Holiday Tour of Lights NorthWest Crossing Com-

munity businesses and residents have teamed up to create a socially distanced way for us to celebrate the holiday season together. See the lights! Visit our website to download addresses or pick up a printed flyer at Roundabout Books. Take on the scavenger hunt challenge by seeking out some merry features spread throughout the tour! Win prizes – Share any tour photos by tagging #nwxtouroflights in an Instagram post by Dec 20th. Win fabulous NW gift baskets! Drop non-perishable food items for Salvation Army at participating businesses. Dec. 1-20.

Online Art Activities for Kids Join Camp Fire for virtual art activities every Tuesday at 4pm. Designed for K-5th graders but open to all! No registration required. Tuesdays, 4-4:30pm. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@campfireco.org. Free.

that your Feast is helping us keep kids healthy, safe, and active in Central Oregon! All proceeds from your purchase support our high school sports medicine program - helping us keep kids safe in sports. Nov. 18-Dec. 5. $400-$550.

Online STEM Activities for Kids Join

Sunriver Resort Thanksgiving Dinner To-Go This holiday season, leave the cooking

Camp Fire for virtual STEM activities every Thursday at 4pm. Designed for K-5th graders but open to all! No registration required. Thursdays, 4-4:30pm. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@campfireco.org. Free.

Sunriver Lodge Holiday Light Show

Grab a Hot Toddy or Hot Cocoa at The Merchant Trader Cafe and join us in the Backyard for our Holiday Light Show, happening three times every evening. Enjoy your favorite holiday songs as thousands of lights dance to the beat. Shows will be 15 to 20 minutes long and will rotate through a selection of songs with a mix of kids and adult favorites. Nov. 25-Jan. 3, 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30pm. Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Dr., Sunriver. Free.

Writing the Songs Only You Can Write: A Six-Week Virtual Workshop An online

songwriting workshop series via Zoom held on Mondays, November 9, 16, 23, 30, December 7, 14 from 7:00-8:30 pm PST Mondays, 7pm. Through Dec. 14. $150.

FOOD EVENTS Bleu Bite Catering Thanksgiving Menu

Let us do the cooking for you! Pick up a full Thanksgiving spread for up to six people. Mix and match from our wide menu offerings for the perfect meal for just you or your whole crew. Nov. 21-25. Bleu Bite Catering, 63060 Nels Anderson Rd, Bend. $55-$150.

Christmas Marketplace: Sip and Shop

Come join us for a fun day of Christmas shopping, wine and pizza. Sip while you shop. Advance ticket purchase is necessary due to managing the amount of people for COVID compliance. Time slots available: 10am to 12pm, 12pm to 2pm, 2pm to 4pm. Nov. 29. Faith, Hope and Charity Vineyards and Events, 70450 NW Lower Valley Dr., Terrebonne. $5.

Feast for a Cause Craftfully prepared by

Bowtie Catering, our elegant and festive dinner packages take the prep-time out of your holidays - allowing you more time to celebrate! Feasts for four people, delivered to your door or available for pick up. Pour a glass of fine wine included in your package, cook following the detailed instructions, and toast the season! Plus, you feel good knowing Courtesy Bevel Craft Brewing

to us! We are offering our delicious, Thanksgiving Dinner To-Go. Dinners can be ordered for parties of 4, 8 or 12 and can be picked up at The Great Hall. Thanksgiving To-Go is available to the general public and Resort guests *Please note, this meal is NOT hot and ready to eat, it is to be taken home and heated up at your convenience! Heating instructions provided. Nov. 18-26. Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Dr., Sunriver. Call 541-593-1000 for reservations. $49/person.

Thanksgiving at 10below Join us for an abundant Thanksgiving to-go dinner on Thanksgiving Day, including some of your favorite holiday dishes. Dinner will be available for curbside pickup and take-out only, from 12:00 pm to 3:00 pm. The cost for the dinner is $22 per person. Call 541.382.1010 to order today! View the complete menu on our website. 10 Below, 10 NW Minnesota Ave., Bend. $19-$52. The Suttle Lodge: 5th Annual Turkey Meatball Thanksgiving Dinner’s will be for

guests staying at the lodge only this year and will be to go. Kicking off holiday season, we’re hosting a bountiful Thanksgiving dinner in the main lodge, with a menu crafted by our Chef. If you’ve joined us for the Holidays before, you know it’s going to be an occasion! Nov. 26, 3-10pm. The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse, 13300 Hwy 20, Sisters. Contact: info@thesuttlelodge.com. $385-$950.

BEER & DRINK POSTPONED: First Sip Friday with Worthy Brewing We are doing our best to

mitigate any safety concerns due to Covid 19. Due to the Governor mandated 2-week freeze, both the Eastside Pub and Downtown Taps and Tacos locations will be closed temporarily. We will be selling beer-to-go as well as new winter merchandise and gift cards online. Worthy Brewing, 495 NE Bellevue Dr., Bend.

Growler Discount Night! Enjoy all growler

fills $2 off through the freeze! So, come fill it up with any one of the 9 handcrafted beers we have on tap! And, yes, you can bring your own growlers in and we'll rinse and sanitize each one before we fill it. Bevel Craft Brewing, 911 SE Armour Rd. Suite B, Bend. Contact: 831-245-1922. holla@bevelbeer.com.

Local’s Day Wednesday November 18 - De-

cember two our tap houses will be open 1-7pm daily for TO-GO beer ONLY. Growlers, pints & cans TO-GO! Food trucks will also be operating under limited hours for takeout! MASKS MUST BE WORN IN TAP HOUSE. On Tap, 1424 NE Cushing Drive, Bend.

Locals’ Night at Porter Brewing! We will be operating on a to-go basis until further notice. Our modified hours are Tuesdays and Fridays from 4-7pm. Porter Brewing, 611 NE Jackpine Ct #2, Redmond. Free.

ATHLETIC EVENTS POSTPONED: Bend Area Running Fraternity POSTPONED until after the two week

freeze. The group will run, maintaining social distance, along the Deschutes River and then receive discounted drinks from the cidery after the run! Mondays, 5pm. AVID Cider Co. Taproom, 550 SW Industrial Way, Bend. Contact: bendarearunningfraternity@gmail.com. Free.

Many beloved bars and dining spots remain closed but you can still support local favorites with to-go beer and drinks! Check out the calendar listings for updated hours and to-go options.

Bend Pilates Bend Pilates is now offering a full schedule of classes through Zoom! Sign up for your class on Mindbody.com and download Zoom. Prior to start you will receive an email invitation to join class. Be ready with mat, weights, roller, and/or band and login five minutes prior to class time. Ongoing. For more information visit http://bendpilates.net/classes/.


TOP SHOPS

SHOP SMALL THIS HOLIDAY SEASON AND GET MORE!

More variety, more personal service, more style, more money in our community! It’s more important than ever to shop local and help sustain the businesses that make our community vibrant. You will find everything from high-end fashion, jewelry and home decor to the most knowledgeable gear shops and unique boutiques in town. Check out the profiles below from some of Central Oregon’s most loved shops. From the hand-crafted to the carefully curated, you may just find your new favorite store in Top Shops.

Happy Shopping!

Leapin’ Lizards

Crater Lake Spirits

953 NW Wall St., Downtown Bend 541-382-8326 leapinlizardstoys.com

Downtown Bend 1024 NW Bond Street, Suite 102 Mon-Sat 12pm–8pm | Sun 12pm–7pm Tumalo Distillery 19330 Pinehurst Road, Bend Mon-Sat 11am–5pm | Sun 11am–4pm

Leapin’ Lizards is an independently-owned, specialty toy store in Downtown Bend, Oregon. We carry a wide range of hand chosen, educational and fun toys and gifts. By providing a cheerful and welcoming space with many interactive displays, we hope you have an enjoyable and memorable experience.

craterlakespirits.com

Leapin Lizards Toy Co. is your friendly neighborhood toy store in downtown Bend.

offerare curbside pickup and free gift wrap. We strongly believe that play is important for all ages.WeWe looking forward to seeing We’re open Monday through Sunday from 10 AM to 2 PM. you in our store! 953 NW WALL STREET, DOWNTOWN BEND 541-382-8326 • www.leapinlizardstoys.com

We crafted our Downtown Tasting Room to reflect an appreciation for quality spirits and the Bend lifestyle. Enjoy a laid-back atmosphere with refreshing pours and good company. Conveniently located next to our friends at Deschutes Brewery Pub, kick back and enjoy a selection of tasters and mini cocktails before heading to one of many nearby restaurants. Stay awhile, or buy a bottle to enjoy at home. Our Tumalo Distillery is where the magic happens. Located just east of the Cascade Mountains, the distillery pays homage to our early beginnings and kinship with place. Join us for a taste and tour the award-winning small-batch distillery that started the craft liquor revolution back in 1996. Plus, browse our full selection of spirits and merchandise.

Root Adorned 2748 NW Crossing Dr #130, Bend, OR 97703 541-241-8014 rootadorned.com Nestled in Bend’s NW Crossing neighborhood, you’ll find an inviting oasis that beckons you to linger and take in the beauty that surrounds you. Filled with light, love, plants, artwork from artists around the world, crystals and vintage tapestries; you’re sure to find something to adorn your home.

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Bedouin

The Blissful Boutique

143 E Hood Avenue, Sisters, OR Open daily 10-5 (541) 549-3079 www.shopbedouin.com

45 NW Greeley Ave, Bend 541-595-3288 www.blissful-heart.com

Since 1986 Bedouin has been a local favorite for clothing, jewelry, home goods and stationery. We pride ourselves on our atmosphere and the unique character of the store. A good combination of finds from around the world and locally created goods. Looking forward to seeing you over the holiday season. —the Bedouin team.

Cascade Campers

As the gateway to the Blissful Heart Wellness Center, The Blissful Boutique is a unique space that offer many sacred, metaphysical tools to raise your vibration and enhance your practice. Whether you are seeking tools to expand your knowledge, strengthen and build your meditation practice, relax and restore with crystals, or looking for a rare gift for someone special, we can accommodate you. New to crystals, oracle/tarot cards, or other metaphysical tools? We will gladly help you during your visit! The Blissful Heart Wellness Center houses 30 wellness practitioners, Holistic Hair Salon, Raw Vegan grub and go, 2 classrooms for workshop/events plus a very special magical gardens.

Central Oregon Locavore Non Profit

530-648-0590 www.cascadecampers.com/ Cascade Campers specializes in camper van conversions based on the RAM ProMaster City van. We take your van and turn it into your adventure machine. The Cascade Camper is small enough to park anywhere and big enough for two adults and a furry friend to call home. Our little camper comfortably sleeps two and features handy doo-dads like a real refrigerator, a sink, a single burner stove, solar charging panels, and more. Make your RAM ProMaster City van a Cascade Camper and camp anywhere!

The Workhouse

1841 NE 3rd St, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 633-7388 centraloregonlocavore.org Give the gift of local and support your local food non profit. Locavore Year Round Indoor Farmers Market boasts over 150 local farmers, ranchers, and artisans wares. Browse the merry shelves abundant with gifts for everyone on your list. Local honey, jams, oils, jerky, chocolates, coffee, tea, soaps, lotions, candles, ceramics, plastic alternatives, & cutting boards to name just a few. Curated DIY kitchen kits for kombucha, sauerkraut, tortillas & more! Gift certificates available. Check out the 11th Annual Locavore Holiday Gift Faire (Online 2020 version)

Ju-bee-lee

50 SE Scott St #6, Bend 541-241-2754 theworkhousebend.com There’s never been a better time to support small businesses and keep your Holiday Gift Shopping local! At The Workhouse Gift Shop & Studios you will find excellent gifts and one of a kind handmade items from over 70 Central Oregon Local and Oregon based artisans and makers. From journals & jewelry to apothecary, fine art prints and pottery, there is no better place in Bend to purchase the gifts you’ll want to give this Holiday Season. Shop in person 7 days a week from 9-5 or anytime online with curbside pickup and shipping options available.

903 NW Wall St Bend, OR 97703 541-678-5651 www.ju-bee-lee.com Located in the heart of downtown Bend for over eight years, Ju-bee-lee has become the destination for all things whimsical. Best known for offering pure magic and joy, we sell happiness in the form of unique gifts. Highlighting locally made jewelry, assorted apothecaries, clothing, and other special sundries, Ju-bee-lee is the known namesake to brighten someone’s day. Earning “Best Gift Shop in Bend” for six consecutive years, Ju-bee-lee has proven to be the go to for spreading love and cheer.

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TOP SHOPS

Fancywork Yarn Shop

Gairdin 50 SE Scott St. #2, Bend (in the Historic Ironworks) 541-385-9434 gairdin.com

Treat the fiber artist on your list to cozy, warm yarn, swoon-worthy accessories, and fabulous fiber arts gifts. Shop locally-crafted artisan goods for knitters, crocheters, weavers, needle felters and more. Discover hand-dyed, independent and American yarns as well as carefully curated selections from abroad. Celebrating Women-Led Wednesday with a 4-Day Sale, Wednesday, Nov. 25 to Small Business Saturday, Nov. 28, in-store and online at www.fancywork.com. Curbside pickup available, plus free shipping over $50.

Your destination for Holiday florals, ornaments, accents, and decorating services. Gairdin specializes in permanent (faux) florals and botanicals, dried and preserved florals and custom designs. Find unique home decor items and gifts. You will find floral artistry and inspiration that changes with the seasons.

Flipped! Consignment Boutique

Holm Made Toffee Co. 1234 NE 1st St Bend, OR 97701 (541) 610-3173 www.holmmadetoffee.com

738 NW Columbia St, Bend 541-647-2510 flippedboutique.com

Holm Made Toffee Co. is a family-owned artisan confectioner based in Bend. We craft our candy in traditional handmade batches, utilizing Oregon grown hazelnuts and ingredients from around the Pacific Northwest. We put a little bit of happiness into every box of Holm Made Toffee. That’s our promise. And with no gluten, soy, or corn syrup…it’s “Happiness. Plain and Simple.” Available at local retailers and online.

Flipped! is a fabulous, locally-owned consignment boutique located on the Westside off Galveston. Bring a friend and shop our hand-curated, pre-loved women’s fashion. Our boutique proudly supports local artisans, where you’ll discover handcrafted jewelry, soy candles, knit beanies and more! Shop our holiday sale and pick up a little something for yourself or perhaps a gift for a special someone (gift certificates available!)

SOURCE20 for 20% off our toffee products online.

Thank you for shopping small and keeping it local.

Cosa Cura 2735 NW Crossing Dr #101 Bend, OR 97703 541-312-2279 www.cosacura.com Since 2006 Cosa Cura has been providing Central Oregon with a one-stopshop for locally made goods and sustainable resale fashion. Shop local this holiday season and by supporting local artists you support your community. We are loaded with clothing and gifts for Women, kids, and men too! Locally made jewelry, beauty, baby, home decor, cards, gifts, and more. Join us this holiday season, we are open Tue-Fri 12-4 pm and Sat 10-3 pm.

Jack + Millie 929 NW Wall St, Bend, OR 97703 (541) 797-6741 www.jackandmillie.com Born out of the desire to offer Bend a thoughtfully curated men and women’s lifestyle boutique, Jack + Millie opened in the Fall of 2019. Selling apparel from iconic lines to new emerging designers, you’ll find beautiful and versatile essentials that will serve as the anchor pieces in your wardrobe for many years to come. In addition to offering a wide selection of clothing, we also showcase hand selected jewelry from independent artisans, accessories, apothecary, and lifestyle pieces. Specializing in good taste, quality, and confidence, Jack + Millie has become a staple for the contemporary wardrobe.

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

21 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

200 NE Greenwood Avenue in Bend’s Makers District 541-323-8686 www.fancywork.com @fancyworkyarnshop on Instagram


TOP SHOPS

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Somewhere That’s Green Plant Shoppe

Mountain Supply

661 SW Powerhouse Dr Suite 1301, Bend, OR 97702 (541) 330-4086 www.somewheregreen.com

Located at the end of Bends historic Old Mill District.

Since 1980, Mountain Supply has been Bend’s local independent outdoor retailer. Our mission has remained the same since we opened the store, and that is to serve the outdoor community by providing the best outdoor gear in the industry and the knowledge to use it. We offer a wide variety of outdoor footwear, equipment, and apparel from climbing and mountaineering to backpacking and back- country skiing. From the street to the summit, we’re your one-stop shop!

Nature’s Bling

SOLE Footbar

133 SW Century Dr., Suite 202, Bend 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters 541-640-0888 naturesbling.com

1354 NW Galveston Avenue Bend, OR 97703 (541) 797-7944 www.solefootbar.com

Nature’s Bling is Central Oregon’s premier crystal, rock, gemstone, mineral, fossil, metaphysical and jewelry store. We offer all types of mineral specimens, from common crystals to museum quality collector pieces. Our gifted practitioners are available at our Bend location during the weekends offering holistic services, ranging from reiki sessions to oracle readings. We also offer various workshops on the weekends. Mention this ad and receive a free crystal intuitively selected for you. Come visit one of our 2 Central Oregon locations.

Sole is Bend’s only foot sanctuary - a space to holistically restore your health through signature foot soaks, therapeutic foot massage, full body massage, rejuvenating aromatherapy, specialty teas, and locally crafted spa products.

834 NW Colorado Ave., Bend 541-388-0688 mountainsupplybend.com

Carlee Caster

Come experience the magic of Bend’s biggest indoor jungle: Somewhere That’s Green plant shoppe! Offering Bend’s most diverse selection of indoor plants, pots, and numerous local made goods. Come shop for great gifts like terrarium kits, 2021 monthly plant subscriptions, gift cards, and more! Space in the shop may be limited during peak hours, so schedule an appointment to skip the wait. “Let us fulfill your greenest plantasies!”

The experience is open to individuals, couples, or a group of friends. Our nurturing treatments are comprehensive, therapeutic, and performed by licensed massage therapists. All you need to do is lay back, soak, sip, and revel in the stillness. angelina organic skincare

retail + wellness spa

John Paul Designs

aos skincare 838 NW Bond Street #1 Bend, OR 97703 541.647.1655 aosskincare.com

1006 NW Bond St., Downtown Bend 541-318-5645 johnpauldesigns.com For nearly 20 years, studio jeweler John Paul has been creating original objects of wearable art . . . made naturally from the earths offerings. Precious metals and rare gemstones blended together in raw, elegance. Each piece is made one at a time with hammer & anvil, file & saw like artisans of old . . . every blow revealing textures that can only come from hand forging metals into perfect imperfection. Super sweet gifts of love for your special someone this holiday season. Find us a few doors down from Deschutes Brewery in the heart of downtown Bend.

Bend’s first and only “Farm to Face” store and spa, aos is family owned and women run since 2001. We blend ancient plant wisdom and cutting-edge science to formulate and handcraft a wide range of resultsdriven skin and body care products right on site. Our spa provides including a variety of massages, facials, body treatments and waxing. We specialize in bringing sensitive, problematic and aging skin into healthy, glowing radiance. Our Full Circle Beauty Mission: We work to create beauty from the ground up- from the origins of our ingredients to our Bottle Take Back program.

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

CALENDAR Courtesy Monica Stefanac

COCC’s “Turkey Trot” 5k/10k Our 21st

Annual remote “Turkey Trot” is Nov 27-29, right after Thanksgiving - and just like the Jungle Run and Storm The Stairs, we will be running “from home.” #TogetherBobcats. (COCC Campus is still closed - please do NOT run on campus). Nov. 27-29. Free.

23 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

ON HOLD: CORK Thursday Run Join

us for a run from 3-5 miles. Stay afterward for a drink and food. All ability levels welcome along with friendly on leash dogs. Thursdays, 6-7:30pm. Zpizza Tap Room, 1082 SW Yates Drive, Bend. Free.

I Like Pie Thanksgiving Run/ Walk The tradition continues virtually this

Thanksgiving with the iconic “I Like Pie” Run/ Walk with all proceeds benefiting Girls on the Run and NeighborImpact. The goal of this year’s event is to create a platform for the same family and friend connections and traditions to continue with socially distancing protocols in place. Participants choose their own small group, route and distance, and complete their run/walk on any date between November 23 and 29. Prizes will be awarded for the most creative group pictures, best costume, most creative pie and more! The best part, if you’re unable to travel this year to Bend you can participate in I Like Pie from wherever you safely reside. Nov. 23-29. $25-$30.

InMotion Weekly Workout InMotion Training Studio in Bend is offering free weekly workouts via their Facebook page, Facebook. com/inmotionbend. Additionally, those that register will receive daily education and the ability to check-in and stay accountable. www.landpage. co/inmotionfreeworkouts. Free. Planet Fitness Home Work-Ins Planet Fitness is offering free daily workouts via livestream! The best part? No equipment needed. Get your sweat on at least four times a day. Valid even for those without memberships! Sorry, #vanlifers cannot virtually take advantage of facility showers. Visit the Planet Fitness Facebook page for more details. Free. Redmond Running Group Run All levels

welcome. Find the Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook for weekly run details. Thursdays, 6:15pm. City of Redmond, Redmond, Or., Redmond. Contact: rundanorun1985@gmail.com.

Redmond Turkey Trot 5K & 10K (Virtual) Run at a place and time of your choice!

Running kits will be shipped right to your door. Includes T-shirts, Hoodoo Ski Area coupons, digitable bib and more. Check website for details. Proceeds benefit Bright Eyes Bright Future. Nov. 26. Contact: redmondturkeytrot@gmail.com. $25.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Ashtanga Full Primary Online Sunday

Morning led Primary class. We will have many chances to modify the postures and adjust to meet the needs of all that attend. Please email ahead of time so that I can get you a waiver and take care of payment. Sundays, 7-9am. Through Dec. 18. Contact: cclauren.cruz@gmail.com. $20.

Capoeira: Martial Art with Music This ongoing beginner session welcomes new students on the first Wednesday of each month. Acrobatics, kicks, and rhythm. Wednesdays,

Get bendy and stay grounded this holiday weekend with online yoga classes. Find peace through movement with Yoga for Cultivating Inner Stillness on Wed., 7-8pm.

6pm. Contact: 541-678-3460. ucabend@gmail. com. $30 intro month includes Fitness 1440 3 day trial..

Namaspa Giving Tuesday This Black

Friday & Cyber Monday GIVE YOURSELF THE GIFT OF YOGA. Choose from 8 CLASSES - all will be DONATION based with proceeds benefitting Namaspa Foundation: Empowerment & Access to yoga as a life skill. Dec. 1, 6am-8pm. Namaspa Yoga Studio, 1135 NW Galveston Ave., Bend. Contact: 5415508550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. $15 suggested.

Guided Evening Classes Take some time af-

ter a long day to reconnect with the breath and get settled for some yogic sleep. This class is great for all levels and experiences. We will work within the Ashtanga Primary Series format with modifications made to meet your needs. Check website to sign up ! Tuesdays-Thursdays, 6-7:15pm. Through Dec. 1. Contact: 662-302-1877. cclauren.cruz@ gmail.com. $20.

Intuitive Life Coaching Discover exactly

what is blocking you from feeling peace, happiness, and satisfaction in your life and relationships. Wed, Nov. 25, 3pm, Wed, Dec. 2, 3pm, Wed, Dec. 9, 3pm, Wed, Dec. 16, 3pm, Wed, Dec. 23, 3pm, Wed, Dec. 30, 3pm, Wed, Jan. 6, 3pm, Wed, Jan. 13, 3pm, Wed, Jan. 20, 3pm, Wed, Jan. 27, 3pm and Wed, Feb. 3, 3pm. RSVP for address, Bend. Free.

Livestream Advancing your Yoga Practice Have you felt ready to take your

yoga practice to the next level? Join studio owner Rachel Augustine as you deepen your understanding of asana with an emphasis on safe alignment, breath-work and yogic ener-

getic principles including learning about the Chakras, Vayus and Nadis. Check the website for more information! Sundays, 9-10:15am. Through Dec. 13. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-241-3919. info@freespiritbend.com. $55 pre-registration $16 drop-in.

Livestreamed Meditation Class Free online meditation classes led by Cathleen Hylton of Blissful Heart Wellness Center. Take a break from the current climate and get your zen on in this free meditation class. Join class via https:// zoom.us/j/596079985. Thursdays, 6-7pm. Free. Namaspa Winter Challenge LET IT

FLOW, LET IT FLOW, LET IT FLOW! Want to start yoga or need to return to your mat? Choose from 40+ classes pr week: Power Vinyasa Flow, Healing Flow, Vin/Yin, Evoke Energy Yin, Yoga Nidra, Restorative. Practice 30+ times = receive $20 credit We’re here to support you Nov. 27, 7:30am. Namaspa Yoga Studio, 1135 NW Galveston Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-550-8550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. $39 new students, 1 month unlimited.

Plaid Friday Online Sales to support Local Small Businesses Supporting

local, small businesses in Bend this Shopping Season is more important than ever. Find lots of amazing Sales on our Plaid Friday Sale, ONLINE & shop safely from home, in your pajamas while eating pie! Nov. 27, 11:11am-5:55pm. Contact: 541-241-2458. bendhealthguide@gmail.com.

Sunday Morning Celebration Services (8:30, 9:30,10:30, and 11:30) at PBCC

FOUR Sunday Services to choose from: 8:30am and10:30am (in the Worship Center), & 9:30am

SAT & SUN • DEC 12-13 9am-5:30pm

and 11:30am (in the Historic Chapel) Nov. 29, 11:30am. Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 SW Hwy 126, Bend. Free.

The Vance Stance/Structural Reprogramming Tired of being in Pain? Get to the

root of why you are tight & suffering. In this series of 2-hour classes in posture and flexibility. Classes begin Weds, Nov. 21st. Mondays-Thursdays, Noon-2pm and Mondays-Wednesdays, 6-8pm. Through Feb. 11. EastSide Home Studio, 21173 Sunburst Ct., Bend. Contact: 541-330-9070. vancebonner@juno.com. x12 classes = $180.

Turkey Burner Gratitude Donation Class Although, Thanksgiving may look

different this year, our ANNUAL TRADITION continues with PETIT DAVINA grounding us in familiarity of movement & breath. Create community as we twist & turn before we Gobble Gobble the bounty before us. Accessible to all. LIVE via ZOOM benefits Namaspa Foundation. Nov. 26, 9:30-10:45am. Contact: 541-550-8550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. $10 - $15 minimum suggested donation.

Online: Yoga for Cultivating Inner Stillness Through a moving meditation you

will embark on a spiritual journey designed to awaken awareness of Self. This hour long practice builds strength, balance and flexibility while inviting in tools that aid in managing life’s stresses. In this classical and holistic Hatha Yoga class you will stretch and tone the whole body in a therapeutic and mindful space. This low-impact practice integrates chanting, meditation, breathing and Asana (postures). blissful-heart.com. Wednesdays, 7-8pm. Through Dec. 30. $7-$10.

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C

CULTURE

A Local Marketplace, Online

Shop-Local platform allows locals to browse dozens of area retailers, all from one place By Nicole Vulcan

25

Think globally, act locally: Support-Local is a virtual one-stop shop for all things Bend, from art to eateries.

Support-Local platform could benefit communities around the country. We dug in, did some outreach and now there are 10 marketplaces up and running, a handful in development and conversations happening with numerous communities.” Bend’s Support-Local marketplace is populated with everything from local

Courtesy Sara Green

jewelry, art and clothing to outdoor products such as wake surf and river boards, as well as recreation options and classes. In a sea of online options, the site helps the locally focused shopper find lots of items without having to hop around to various sites. Thus far, dozens of Central Oregon businesses have signed on—42 as of this writing, to be exact.

getting one going, as the pandemic continues to stymie in-person shopping— has been a big challenge this year. Jak Green said that’s another way Support-Local platform can assist. “One of the cool things about this is, whether somebody’s got a really robust website where they’re selling tons of stuff, or somebody has no digital presence at

“One of the cool things about this is, whether somebody’s got a really robust website where they’re selling tons of stuff, or somebody has no digital presence at all, the Support-Local platform levels that playing field.” —Jak Green With COVID-19 cases rising over the month of November in Oregon, and more restrictions on Oregon businesses currently in place, the platform provides yet another way to get the word out during what is usually a bustling holiday shopping season. “With the new restrictions… we’re definitely seeing more businesses sign up each day,” Jak Green said. “But people are also realizing, this could happen again—even if we get a vaccine and things go back to normal, another pandemic could hit down the road. You just never know, and so the more people can have a digital presence for their local community to shop, the better.” Local businesses we talked to for this Shop Local issue told us that maintaining an online marketplace—or even

all, the Support-Local platform levels that playing field, because everybody can post up to 10 of their products—they can cherry pick key products that tell the story of what their business is, and it allows somebody that has no web presence to be right there next to somebody that has a ton of web strength.” Future plans for the platform include moving to one-click shopping, he said. Right now, the platform allows customers to buy products from the various retailers—but the customer has to start a new transaction for each business they buy from. The Bend version is available at bendmarketplace.com. Those looking to add a listing can look at the bottom of the site for a link to reach out. 

VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Courtesy Sara Green

T

he economic benefits of shopping local and supporting businesses in the place one lives are widely known. In this week’s Feature story, we outline how some Central Oregon business owners are using Instagram and other social media platforms to sell and promote not just their own products, but those of other local businesses, too. Instagram can be a place to find a random assortment of gift options—though if your feed is like many people’s, it’s a mix of local and non-local accounts. So what do you do if you want to browse only locally made and produced gifts? Wouldn’t it be great if there was a place to check out an array of products and options, all in one place? That was the problem Sara and Jak Green of Bend set out to solve. Sara Green’s creative firm initially launched a platform called Support-Local for the community in and around Ballard, Washington, offering a place for people to browse items from local businesses from one centralized online marketplace. Since the couple lives in Central Oregon, it was only natural for them to launch a version for the local community, called the Bend Marketplace. “Our goal is simply connecting local merchants with local customers in a way that is fun and effective, so less dollars will be spent on Amazon,” Jak Green told the Source. “We quickly realized that this


Noi will be

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CH

CHOW

LITTLE BITES

Local U-Pick Farm Experiences Monster Tomato Crop

By Nicole Vulcan

Unsplash

27 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

A Tumalo farm shares the struggles of selling produce during the pandemic By Jess McComb

T

hroughout the pandemic, many businesses have suffered—but there was at least one bright spot in the culinary scene: tomatoes. If you grew them, chances are they grew. And grew. And kept growing. In Central Oregon, tomato crops defied all odds and had a booming year—a blessing and a curse for at least one local farm. Well Rooted, a U-pick farm in Tumalo, experienced an abundant crop of about 11,000 tomatoes this year, but had few businesses to distribute to. The farm ended up selling or donating just 10 to 15% of its crop. “We had the idea that if we grew a lot, we would sell a lot,” said Well Rooted owner Janelle Maricle. “We had two big businesses on board to buy a bunch of our product, but when COVID hit, restaurants, schools and stores were struggling and there was no longer a high demand for produce.” In addition to local businesses, Well Rooted had hoped to tap into the commercial industry. The farm had been discouraged by commercial brokers who told them that smaller farms could rarely generate large enough crops to distribute in larger markets. While Well Rooted’s booming crop proved sufficient at meeting the industry’s demands, there were unexpected challenges that hindered success, its owners said. “We still have a lot to learn about picking, packaging and varieties of tomatoes to get into the commercial market,” said Well Rooted Lead Grower Scott Maricle. “When people go to the grocery store and pay $3-4 a pound for tomatoes, they expect perfect-looking tomatoes. To put out those types of tomatoes, you have to pick them green and plant the right variety that can survive shipping.” Scott Maricle’s struggle was not unpredictable. Tapping into the wholesale industry is a common challenge for small farms. At Oregon State University’s Extension service, Clare Sullivan, Small Farms and Specialty Crops Extension Agent for Central Oregon, admits that wholesale is a risky business. “It is a big struggle to try to get into the wholesale market. It’s sort of a chicken-and-egg thing. If you haven’t been supplying products in the area, a grocery store will be hesitant to buy from you because they’ve never seen your product,” said Sullivan. “The advice we give is to try to get contacts

Gary Bruce

Thanksgiving Day Takeout A sampling of Well Rooted’s abundant tomato crop—which included roughly 11,000 tomatoes.

and make some sort of arrangement ahead of time before going whole hog into the commercial industry. Sellers should find out what the buyer is looking for in regards to quality and price point before you plant.” Well Rooted hopes to eventually adapt to these challenges and penetrate the commercial market, but they aren’t about to sacrifice quality. “Grocery stores sell perfect looking tomatoes that taste like cardboard; I’m about growing high-nutrient-dense food that tastes wonderful. The consumer is conditioned to the commercial experience, so it isn’t easy to break into that market, be different and succeed,” said Scott Maricle. Despite failed business ventures on the commercial scale, the abundant crop paid off in areas of good will hunting. Thanks to a decrease in demand and increase in supply, Well Rooted was able to be generous with customers. “People would come to the farm with $20 or $30 to spend on tomatoes and leave with a bit extra product,” said Scott Maricle. “I don’t think that it hurt the business. I had such a large crop that I could afford to be generous. It actually built our sales because customers spread the word of our crop.” Janelle Maricle hypothesized that although there was a decline in demand, the pandemic ultimately helped the U-pick business. “In some ways, COVID was more of a friend to people that sold produce. People feel safer going to an outdoor garden rather than an enclosed store

for their produce, so U-pick farms were a super-profitable business this year,” she said. In addition to customer turnout, the crop provided incredible opportunities for donations. The crew sent tomatoes to food shelters, churches, families who lost their homes to wildfires and High Desert Food and Farm Alliance— though the process was hindered a bit by a shortage of helpers. “We only donated about 700 pounds because the organizations that were going to pick them didn’t have the capacity or enough pickers. They came in for a day and picked what they could,” said Scott Maricle. U-Pick and donation measures combined were no match for the monster crop at Well Rooted farm. Sullivan of OSU Extension hypothesizes that this was largely due to lack of customer diversity. “The farm wasn’t selling to farmers markets, they weren’t doing CSA (community supported agriculture)— so their customer base was skewed in one direction, which unfortunately was the least reliable with COVID,” said Sullivan. “I don’t feel like the crop went to waste because it was a huge learning experience,” Janelle Maricle said. “Thanks to this year’s crop, we have leads to companies that will buy tomatoes next season, and customers from this year who are looking to purchase more next year. We’re not going to plant as much next year but we’re definitely going to keep our product at a high number.” 

Cooking an elaborate meal for everyone and their mother is so 2019

C

ooking turkey and all the fixins for you and your entire family is one thing. Cooking all that stuff for yourself and your cat? Another story. For those looking to get a last-minute assist in getting turkey dinner on the table, here are some places you may still be able to get takeout for Thanksgiving dinner. We have included locations we know are open—though it’s always a good idea to call and check in before you center your plans on it. -Pine Tavern is offering a select menu of takeout entrees, including a roasted turkey meal with the classic sides, as well as prime rib, wild King Salmon and Butternut Squash Ravioli. The restaurant recommends you reserve your meal in advance, as they can’t guarantee availability on Thanksgiving Day. -Black Bear Diner will be open from 7am to 8pm on Thanksgiving Day. -Brasada Ranch’s Range Restaurant & Bar is serving up a variety of a la carte holiday specials that include everything you need to sample, share, or build a custom three-course meal. -Joolz is offering a non-traditional, Middle-Eastern inspired menu for Thanksgiving. -900 Wall’s Thanksgiving at Home includes roasted turkey, wild mushroom herb stuffing and all the works. 


JOIN US!

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Loves Company SCREEN Misery Sarah Paulson portrays a sublime new monster By Jared Rasic

I

Photo courtesy Lionsgate

29 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

’m not sure we as a nation, let alone the entire planet, truly appreciate the utter magnificence of Sarah Paulson. We don’t deserve her, but that’s OK because we’ve never deserved her. She takes every single project she’s a part of and makes it better by grounding her performance in believable human emotions. Her newest film, “Run,” launched on Hulu last week, and she once again proves that she’s the absolute best. The first thing I remember ever seeing one Sarah Catherine Paulson in was “Deadwood,” where she played the small role of the duplicitous and evil tutor Miss Isringhausen. She only lasted a few episodes before Swearengen got rid of her, so the impression she made was very small. It wasn’t until her lead role on Aaron Sorkin’s “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip” that she had a chance to spend some time in a character and really show what she could do if given the time. It was Ryan Murphy bringing her into his troupe of actors for “American Horror Story” that made her explode into the pop culture consciousness. Some of the roles she’s played on “AHS” are incredibly and stupidly ridiculous, but she always finds a way to grace them with humanity. She even managed to give Susan Atkins, a reallife Manson girl, some semblance of a soul. Paulson gave her best performance so far in “The People vs. O.J. Simpson” as the embattled prosecutor Marcia Clark, somehow managing to make Clark a heroic figure without ever resorting to caricature. After winning every award possible for that, she tried to add some soul to the profoundly evil Nurse Ratched with, in my opinion, mixed results. Don’t get me wrong, that show's lush production

Sarah Paulson is gonna love you to death.

design and eye-melting cinematography look amazing, but we’ve never needed Ratched to be human. As good as Paulson is in the role, she’s just adding shades of grey to the boogeyman without letting us ever really understand her. All of this is to say that even the flattest of Murphy's writing is improved by Paulson. The worst season of “American Horror Story,” (“Cult” by a long shot) was made better by her presence. I don’t think Paulson has , come close to doing the best work of her career yet, but if she can successfully transition from TV into movies, I think we might get there. Her new film, “Run,” would have had

a theatrical release in any other year, but in 2020 it quietly launched on Hulu, instead. She plays Diane, mother to Chloe, a teenage girl with diabetes, asthma, paralysis and a host of other medical issues. When Chloe finds a bottle of pills designed to cause numbness in the legs, she starts to think her mother might be gaslighting her about being sick at all. Basically, the movie is a modern remake of “Misery,” but dressed up as a cat and mouse thriller. It’s sinfully entertaining even as the director seems satisfied to fill you with empty cinematic calories, hoping the audience just giggles at the insanity instead of thinking about any of it for too

long. It’s another in a long list of projects that don’t quite live up to the talents of Sarah Paulson, but she creates such a memorable movie monster that it’s hard not to be impressed by the film anyway. Her name is Sarah Paulson. She’s luminous and we don’t deserve her, but since we have her, let’s not take her for granted. She needs better projects staffed with brilliant writers and visionary filmmakers. Let’s make this happen, people.  Run

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A homegrown local ski professional has put the brakes on traveling during the pandemic, focusing on local snow… and baking

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By David Sword

B

end is home to a number of high-caliber athletes with expertise ranging from cycling to running to climbing, kayaking and skiing. The life of a professional athlete may seem like easy street to some—traveling the world, starring in movies, with all the glitz and glamour associated—but the realities of being successful and having longevity are as challenging as the sports in which those athletes engage. Lucas Wachs is one such athlete. Born and raised under the stars of the High Desert, Lucas is one of professional free-ride skiing’s up-and-coming stars. As a true local, Wachs started his mountain forays at an early age. “My mom and dad are keen skiers, so they were dragging me up the hill in a backpack when I was 2,” he said. It didn’t take him long to get on his own sticks and begin to explore the varied terrain at Mt. Bachelor.

Courtesy Lucas Wachs

Plake, from the Greg Stump ski films. “The Greg Stump films really got me psyched on what was possible in skiing, and when I turned pro, I looked to guys like CR Johnson and Tanner Hall, but especially Sammy Carlson and Eric Pollard, one because they are also Oregon boys and also because they have such great vision and style,” he said. Taking movement and clues from snowboarding and surfing, Wachs’ style developed as a mix of buttery smooth flow, high intensity athleticism and innovative creativity. “I skate, surf and snowboard too, which definitely helps me see things from a different perspective,” Wachs said. Taking his terrain park-inspired skills and applying them to the big mountains of the world is his focus in life—always with a calm demeanor and unassuming nature. Courtesy Lucas Wachs

World travel on hold, pro skier Lucas Wachs is hunkering down at home with a new puppy.

especially baking. I love the science of baking. I have made some pretty bad stuff, but when I get it right, it’s awesome.” Wachs said his nomadic and vagabond lifestyle has also kept him from having pets, but he recently began a new chapter when his girlfriend came home with a Golden Retriever puppy. “This thing is pretty psycho, and it’s probably one of the hardest things I’ve done in a while, but it’s really great finally having a solid enough foundation that we can have a pet.” More down-time has also allowed him to look at his future. “I am working on a couple new projects here close to home that I’m excited about,” says Wachs. “I think it’s vitally important that each of us do our part during the pandemic, and not traveling seems like the right choice.”

When asked what legacy he would like to leave, or what influence would he like to have on sport, Wachs said, “I think about the guys who were were cool to me when I was a kid. I am lucky and very fortunate to live this life, so I try to do the same.” Pro File Deets: Instagram: wachstavision Specialty: All-Mountain Slayer. Jack of all trades. Sponsors: Mt. Bachelor, DaKine, 10 Barrel Brewing, Dragon, Lib Tech Currently reading: Edward Abbey Never travels without: Foam roller, neck pillow and headphones Watch him: “Sammy C Project,” by Teton Gravity Research, “Huck Yeah” by Matchstick Productions, “Ring the Alarm,” by Tanner Hall  Courtesy Lucas Wachs

Lucas Wachs likes to see things from a different perspective.

Like many who came before him, Wachs was drawn to the terrain park, where he could grind rails, jump, spin and flip from the first chair in the morning to the last, exhaustingly developing his skills and style. “I was definitely a ‘park rat’ from the beginning, but I was always super excited to get out and explore the mountain as well. Mt. Bachelor has so much varied terrain; I loved going out, finding new lines to ride, especially the secret stashes in the trees,” says Wachs. Wachs’ road to success began to take shape by combining the proximity and variety of the local hill with early influence from pros Scott Schmidt and Glen

Since COVID-19 hit in March, Wachs has been reinventing. A recent Instagram post shows him working out, reading, making coffee, cleaning the garage (then skating the garage) and baking. Like many, Wachs is taking the time to rest, recharge and refocus. “I find it super important to take time out for myself. I really like to sleep, and it’s good for me,” he said gleefully. “I’m lucky that my sponsors haven’t asked much of me during this time, and it’s given me time to evaluate where I am and which direction to go. I am reading more books and working on my baking skills,” he said. “I really enjoy cooking and

A man of many talents: Wachs' love of skating, surfing and snowboarding lends a creativity to his athleticism.

VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

OUTSIDE

Pro File: Lucas Wachs Loves Pillows, Puppies and Powder Stashes


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N A T U R A L

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W O R L D

The Cleanup Crew

Carrion beetles perform a much-needed service in the natural world By Jim Anderson 33 Kris Kristovich

VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Did ya’ ever think When the hearse goes by That some sweet day you’re gonna die? They’ll put you in a neat pine box And cover you over with soil and rocks Well, all goes well for about a week And then the pine box begins to creak The bugs crawl in, the bugs crawl out Into your stomach and out of your mouth And the worms play pinochle on your chin… —Harley Poe (Edited by Jim Anderson)

B

ack when I was a kid, that’s a poem my uncles turned into silly song we sang while stuffing hay into the back of the barn, shoveling cow manure, cleaning the outhouse, picking corn or apples and other doing chores on the farm in West Haven, Connecticut. Unfortunately, when I left the farm, went into the Navy, began flying, and in my later years began studying the whys and wherefores of Nature, the tune just faded away. My grandparents, parents and uncles have gone out among the stars, but memories still linger. When my dear pals from Sisters, Brent McGregor and his sidekick, Kara Mickaelson, built my beautiful pine coffin, they were careful to make sure the lid wouldn’t come down tight, and when I saw that feature, out came that old song… If you happen to be at the Fort Rock cemetery when they put me under the soil with my old buckeroo pals, Reub Long and Shorty Gustafson, you may like to sing along with me, “Did ya’ ever think…” Death is a process of renewal. Just think how crowded this beautiful old earth would be if everything that is born or hatched lived forever. Forget it! The Master Plan for Life is laid out in such a way that renewal is a vital part of the setup. So, when that spectacular picture included in this piece arrived in my email from my friend Kris Kristovich of Sisters, I about jumped out of my chair…which I really can’t do anymore… Everything in that picture speaks of death and renewal. Whoever left all the gopher guts (hawk? weasel?) lying around led to Kristovich’s discovery. That small pile of offal began to decay—and guess who smelled it? Yep, that multi-colored carrion beetle. “Oh boy,” she must have said, beginning to drool. And you can see her laying an egg on the awful offal while she’s dining on it, and—of all things—there are mites dining on her. What a collection! Carrion beetles perform a much-needed service in the natural world by recycling dead animals.

Carrion beetle doing her (or its) thing.

Now, if that carrion beetle hadn’t got there and it all took place in June, the other busy clean-up creatures, such as turkey vultures, would probably have arrived first and beat the beetles to it.

In addition to being a wonderful clean-up crew, there’s no getting around the fact that carrion beetles, in close proximity put off a powerful stink. That’s why taxidermists who use them to clean up tro-

Death is a process of renewal. Just think how crowded this beautiful old earth would be if everything that is born or hatched lived forever. Turkey vultures are said to be the only bird with a sense of smell… but I’m not so sure. I’ve seen robins eating worms and wondered if they smell them before they see them. I’ve also watched ravens suddenly make a swing while patrolling a snow-covered Santiam Pass drop down to dig something out of the snow and gobble it down.

phy skulls and such refer to them as “stink beetles.” Kristovich can tell you that as well; he had to get pretty close to the whole scene to get that remarkable photo. You can even buy these beetles if you’d like to. They’re called “Buffalo Beetles” by some sellers. You can get about 1,000 of them for $22.60 from one outfit.

Another supplier that sells carrion beetles even gives instructions to potential buyers: “Cleaning a small skull with dermestid (carrion) beetles requires 2500 beetles to clean it. To clean a beaver skull, use 6-7,000 beetles.  Cleaning an average deer requires 12-15,000 beetles.  Consequently, for cleaning a large skull, like a bear, use 25-35,000 beetles.” So, death, in some areas, is big business. But to me it’s far more than that. It’s the story of Life. I’m a strong believer of ongoing life in the Great Bye-and-Bye. And further evidence comes from frequent personal experiences I’m having as I approach my time — like the other night just as I was going to sleep. Suddenly a tiny pinpoint of light opened my eyes and I thought I heard my mom calling my name… So, when you come upon a carrion beetle pig-out, think of all the good they’re doing, recycling life in all the wonderful ways nature does it. 


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By Christin J Hunter Broker, Windermere Real Estate

Things to Think About When Negotiating Repairs After a Home Inspection

Five tips for consideration before the negotiation begins more often than not, the seller isn’t aware of the issues. With the inspection complete, the buyer can request mitigation of the issues—and this is where the negotiations for repairs begin. Here are five tips to consider when negotiating the repairs: Determine what needs repairing: Keep in mind that no home is perfect and nearly all homes will have some issues that stem from age, care, weather exposure and general wear and tear. Determine what the most important repairs are: Put the repairs into three categories. 1.) Major repairs as well as, fire, life, safety and structural issues. 2.) Potentially costly repairs, for example, replacing motors in a furnace or windows with blown seals. 3.) Minor and inexpensive repairs, like paint touch ups or cracked caulking. Get bids for the repairs from a licensed professional contractor/ tradesman: It is important to gather accurate real-market pricing by licensed professionals for the repair. This is crucial, as it provides accurate pricing for the repairs and also provides clarification for both buyer and seller as to the scope of work, possible permitting expenses, material and labor costs. Determine one’s preference of a monetary credit or repairs: In most cases it is advantageous for both the buyer and seller to negotiate a credit for the repairs, in lieu of completion of repairs prior to closing. A credit allows the buyer to work with their preferred vendors, avoids a contractual

of the sale? Are the repair costs manageable? Are the repairs one is expecting to be mitigated reasonable? A mentor once gave me some of the best advice that I now give to my clients. When addressing the repairs on a resale property, think fire, life, safety and structural. Generally speaking, fire, life, safety and structural issues are reasonable repair requests. For a successful repair negotiation, the key is to understand the perspective of the party on the other side of the negotiation. A seller may feel as though the home is in great condition and had no idea that there were major electrical issues or a plumbing leak in the crawlspace. A buyer may feel that they shouldn’t be responsible for the improperly terminated wiring or double lug breakers in the breaker panel. Consider where the other party is coming from. This consideration, coupled with realistic expectations, will more often than not result in a successful conclusion to the repair negotiation. 

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35 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

I

t is a common belief that once an offer is accepted, the negotiation phase of the sale process is over. It’s easy to get that impression, with all of the real estate shows on cable TV and streaming services these days. They make look so easy, right? Unfortunately, those shows typically do not involve the entirety of the purchasing process and what’s commonly a second round of negotiations: Repairs. Once an offer is accepted, the next phase of the sales process is the home inspection contingency period. This is where the buyer hires a professional home inspector to assess the property’s condition. The inspector is looking under the home, in the attic and at the interior and exterior systems, mechanics, structural integrity, appliances, plumbing and electrical. In addition, the inspector is also looking at fire, life and safety hazards. The inspection and report help the buyer to know what repairs or potential issues exist so that they don’t run into costly problems once the purchase is complete. For example, an inspection can help a buyer know the age of the roof and if it requires replacement, whether the HVAC system is working properly or if the foundation is sound or at risk of failing. It’s not uncommon to see that a seller didn’t know that the insulation and HVAC ducting in the crawl space is sagging, or that the grounding rod in the crawlspace is corroded. Maybe the cadet heater is part of a safety recall or the fan motor isn’t working correctly. These are common items on an inspection, and

deadline for completion of repairs and eliminates potential for miscommunication of expectations. The timing is especially critical in today’s market, as many vendors are booked out three weeks or more and are not compelled by the deadlines of completion of the sales contract like the buyer and seller are. In addition, some repairs require permitting or involve a lengthy process to complete, again, creating potential issues with staying on par with the terms of the purchase contract. Be realistic with repair expectations: First, unless specifically outlined in the initial purchase agreement or by state law, the seller is not required to make any repairs. However, the seller generally discloses prior to offer acceptance or in the initial listing that the property is to be sold and accepted in “As Is” condition. As a buyer it’s important to be clear and realistic with the repairs. Are these things one is willing to take on and be capable of completing after the closing


REAL ESTATE

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SCIENCE ADVICE GODDESS Getting my boyfriend to talk to me about his feelings seems impossible. I know guys tend not to be super emotive, but trying to get a read on what he’s feeling is like trying to understand a foreign language. How can I get him to open up to me? —Distressed If only the Rosetta stone had included a fourth language: Heterosexual Male. The Rosetta stone, for those who ditched history class to smoke pot behind the dumpster, was a tabletlike rock fragment that turned out to have the same message in three languages: Egyptian hieroglyphics (long considered undecipherable), another equally mysterious form of Egyptian writing, and ancient Greek. The Greek words were the key, finally allowing scholars to translate hieroglyphics (the ancient Egyptian version of texting somebody a slew of emojis). Getting back to your own translation issues, it’s understandable you’re frustrated by the language barrier, or rather, the lack-of-language barrier in your man’s continuing adherence to Mute Boyfriend-ese. Shouldn’t two adults in a relationship be able to engage in open discussions about their feelings? Unfortunately, if they’re male and female, maybe not. Men and women have some major differences in what I’d call “emotional literacy”: the ability to read emotions, both in oneself and others. Men are not the unfeeling louts they’re too often made out to be. However, women tend to show more emotion than men and be better at guessing others’ feelings. (Compared with most men, they’re practically emotional psychics.) Research by psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen suggests that women are the emotional specialists of our species, driven from childhood on to identify others’ emotions “and to respond with the appropriate emotion.” Men, in contrast, basically “major” in engineering from childhood on. Baron-Cohen explains that they’re driven to decode the workings of machines, math, objects in motion, and other “rule-governed” (and thus relatively predictable) systems. A boy will take a screwdriver to a radio to see how it generates sound; a girl will mentally take apart her cousin to figure out why she’s suddenly gone all Bummerella. These differences come not from “the patriarchy” or Disney princess movies but from millions of years of evolution. Differences in male and female physiology carved out differences in psychology and divisions of labor along male-female lines. Women, whose bodies are baby food dispensaries and who are children’s primary

caretakers, evolved the emotional makeup to suss out the needs of infants, who lack the spoken-word skills to yell, “Hey, Ma, gimme a beer!” Men, who evolved to be the warriors of our species, benefit in combat situations from being less in touch with their emotions -- especially fear and sadness -- explains psychologist Joyce Benenson. This would allow a man to storm into battle and get up close and spear-y with the enemy instead of doing what I, as an emotionally aware woman, would probably do: freeze, cry, and wet my pants. Of course, many individual men and women don’t fit neatly into the “men tend to”/“women tend to” boxes. For example, I’m not Amy Alkon surprised by a recent archeological finding suggesting ancestral women (and not just men) were hunters. (Of course, a hunter-gatherer lady would’ve spent much of her life pregnant or breastfeeding, and it’s hard to spear a wild boar while clutching a hungry baby drinking his lunch.) I’m likewise not surprised to encounter men who can lay their feelings out like cold cuts on a platter. As for men who can’t, there’s this notion that people who have trouble identifying and thus expressing their emotions can improve through study and practice. One tool for this is a poster with cartoon faces showing various emotions, each labeled with the particular emotion. (Google “how you feel today poster.”) Realistically, however, the person best equipped to put names to your boyfriend’s feelings is probably you. Consider that men tend to express their emotions through their actions: slamming cupboard doors (mad), sulking (bummed), etc. In keeping with that, ask him not about his feelings but about events -- “What happened when you talked to your boss?” “Did that jerk or that jerk of a mountain lion show up on your hike?” -- and you might notice some feelings slipping out. Ultimately, though, you should consider whether your being happy with this man is contingent on his expressing himself like a woman. If you stay together, you’ll probably need to meet him more than halfway, meaning rely way more on guessing his emotions than his putting them into words. Meanwhile, focusing on how men communicate through action should help you see the beauty in, say, your being startled by clanging metal and yelled profanities some Saturday afternoon. You go out to your garage and discover your boyfriend rotating your tires unasked. It’s not exactly how Hugh Grant communicates in chick flicks, but if you understand real-life manspeak, you’ll respond perfectly: “You had me at #$&%*! worthless tire jack!”

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave. Suite 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (advicegoddess.com).

© 2020, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “You live

Capricorn author E. M. Forster (1879–1970) said, “Passion does not blind. No. Passion is sanity.” That’s the opposite of what many poets and novelists have asserted down through the ages, which is that passion isn’t truly passion unless it renders you half-crazy, driven by obsession, and subject to delusion and irrationality. But in offering you counsel in this horoscope, I’m aligning myself with Forster’s view. For you in the coming weeks, Capricon, passion will help you see clearly and keep you mentally healthy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Alpine swifts

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): There’s substantial evidence that when people talk to themselves out loud in the midst of doing a task, they improve their chances of succeeding at the task. Have you ever heard athletes giving themselves verbal encouragement during their games and matches? They’re using a trick to heighten their performance. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to experiment with this strategy in the coming weeks. Increase your brainpower by regularly offering yourself encouraging, supportive instructions. It’s fine if you just sort of whisper them, but I’d love it if now and then you also bellowed them. ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A little too much is just enough for me,” joked poet and filmmaker Jean Cocteau. I suspect that when he said that, he was in a phase similar to the one you’re in now. I bet he was experiencing a flood of creative ideas, pleasurable self-expressions, and loving breakthroughs. He was probably right to risk going a bit too far, because he was learning so much from surpassing his previous limitations and exploring the frontiers outside his comfort zone. Now here’s your homework, Aries: Identify two actions you could take that fit the profile I’ve described here.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Biologists believe that no tree can grow more than 436 feet tall. As much as an individual redwood or spruce or mountain ash might like to sprout so high that it doesn’t have to compete with other trees for sunlight, gravity is simply too strong for it to pump enough water up from the ground to its highest branches. Keep that in mind as a useful metaphor during the next ten months, Taurus. Your assignment is to grow bigger and taller and stronger than you ever have before—and know when you have reached a healthy level of being bigger and stronger and taller.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I haven’t felt the savory jolt of bacon in my mouth since I was 15,

rian author Norman Cousins had been struck with two debilitating diseases. His physicians gave him a one in 500 chance of recovery. He embarked on a series of unconventional attempts to cure himself, including “laugh therapy” and positive selftalk, among others. They worked. He lived lustily for another 26 years, and wrote several books about health and healing. So perhaps we should pay attention to his belief that “each patient carries his own doctor inside him”—that at least some of our power to cure ourselves resides in inner sources that are not understood or accredited by traditional medicine. This would be a valuable hypothesis for you to consider and test in the coming weeks, Cancerian. (Caveat: But don’t stop drawing on traditional medicine that has been helping you.)

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are small birds that breed in Europe during the summer and then migrate long distance to Africa for the winter. Ornithologists were shocked when they discovered that at least some of these creatures fly for more than 200 days without ever once landing on the ground. They’re not always flapping their wings—sometimes they glide—but they manage to do all their eating and drinking and sleeping and mating in mid-air. Metaphorically speaking, I think it’s important for you to not act like the alpine swifts in the coming months, dear Aquarius. Please plan to come all the way down to earth on a regular basis.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): By age 49, Cance-

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In accordance with astrological rhythms, I’m giving you permission to be extra regal and majestic in the coming weeks. You have a poetic license to be a supremely royal version of yourself, even to the point of wearing a jeweled crown and purple silk robe. Would you prefer a gold scepter with pearls or a silver scepter with rubies? Please keep in mind, though, that all of us non-Leos are hoping you will be a noble and benevolent sovereign who provides enlightened leadership and bestows generous blessings. That kind of behavior will earn you the right to enjoy more of these lofty interludes in the future.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the coming weeks, I will refer to you as The Rememberer. Your task will be to deepen and refine your relationship with the old days and old ways—both your own past and the pasts of people you care about most. I hope you will take advantage of the cosmic rhythms to reinvigorate your love for the important stories that have defined you and yours. I trust you will devote treasured time to reviewing in detail the various historical threads that give such rich meaning to your web of life. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Those who build walls are their own prisoners,” wrote Libran author Ursula K. Le Guin. She continued, “I’m going to fulfill my proper function in the social organism. I’m going to unbuild walls.” I hope that sounds appealing to you, Libra. Unbuilding walls is my first choice for your prime assignment in the coming weeks. I’d love to see you create extra spaciousness and forge fertile connections. I’ll be ecstatic if you foster a rich interplay of diverse influences. If you’re feeling super-plucky, you might even help unbuild walls that your allies have used to halftrap themselves.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If you can’t help me grow, there’s no point with you being in my life.” Singer and actress Jill Scott said that. In my view, Scorpios may be the only sign of the zodiac that can assert such a sentiment with total sincerity and authority. For many of the other tribes, it might seem harsh or unenforceable, but for you it’s exactly right—a robust and courageous truth. In addition to its general rightness, it’s also an especially apt principle for you to wield right now. The coming weeks will be a potent time to catalyze deep learning and interesting transformations in concert with your hearty allies.

Homework: Imagine it’s 30 years from now and you’re telling God the worst things and best things you ever did. What would they be? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

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37 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Sensible

when I forever stopped eating pigs. I still remember that flavor with great fondness, however. I’ve always said I’d love to find a loophole that would allow me to enjoy it again. And then today I found out about a kind of seaweed that researchers at Oregon State University say tastes like bacon and is healthier than kale. It’s a new strain of a red marine algae called dulse. If I can track it down online, I’ll have it for breakfast soon. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that you, too, are primed to discover a fine new substitute— something to replace a pleasure or resource that is gone or taboo or impossible. What could it be?

ADVERTISE IN OUR WELLNESS SECTION

best as an appreciator of horizons, whether you reach them or not.” Those words from poet David Whyte would be a perfect motto for you to write out on a piece of paper and tape to your bathroom mirror or your nightstand for the next 30 years. Of all the tribes in the zodiac, you Sagittarians are most likely to thrive by regularly focusing on the big picture. Your ability to achieve small day-byday successes depends on how well you keep the long-range view in mind. How have you been doing lately with that assignment? In the coming weeks, I suspect you could benefit from hiking to the top of a mountain—or the metaphorical equivalent— so you can enjoy seeing as far as you can see.

WELLNESS

ASTROLOGY  By Rob Brezsny


Even Amid Closures, New CRAFT Drink Spots Open CH

www.tokyostarfish.com

38 WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / NOVEMBER 26, 2020 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

More Oregon wine, whiskey offerings for Bend By Jess McComb

Jess McComb

GET YOUR

FERM & Fare recently opened in downtown Bend.

W

hile the current two-week freeze is putting mingling on pause for the moment, several places in Bend have opened—or soon will—for lovers of wine and whiskey. New Wine Shop for downtown Bend FERM & Fare boutique wine shop has arrived in downtown Bend. The cozy shop, complimented by a rustic brick facade and modern industrial interior, is the new hidden gem of Brooks Promenade, the “alley” facing Mirror Pond. FERM & Fare boasts a selective array of responsibly farmed wines with opportunities for tastings and bottle purchases. Spicing up the weekdays, the shop is now offering Wine Class Wednesdays and Blind Flight Thursdays. Events are accessible by registration for limited participants to follow safety precautions. For a more intimate experience, private rentals can be booked for groups of up to ten people.

Tokyo Pro Shred Nora Beck

FERM & Fare

924 NW Brooks St., Ste. 102, Bend 503-930-2722 fermandfare.com

Willamette Valley vineyard to open Bend location

Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For use by adults 21 years of age and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

This fall has been a bleak one, but hope is returning for wine lovers who live in Central Oregon. Domaine Serene Wine Lounge announced it will open a location in Bend come fall of 2021. Domaine Serene, the world’s

most awarded winery, according to its owners, and winner of the 2020 Decanter World Wine awards, is opening up shop in the historic D.H. Spheir building on the corner of Bond St. and Minnesota Ave. The lounge will offer a food, beer and cocktail menu to accompany its extensive wine list. The relaxed, rustic setting of the lounge will complement the downtown Bend scene. The three-story space provides fireplace seating in the colder months and outdoor seating come summer. “The Lounge will bring a comfortable, convivial and wine-centric experience to Bend, providing a new avenue for locals to taste our rare and collectible wines typically only available at our Clubhouse in the Dundee Hills,” said Ryan Harris, president of Domaine Serene. Whiskey Club at McMenamins For whiskey lovers of Central Oregon, McMenamins has announced its Whiskey Club as an addition to its extensive list of beer, wine and other offerings. Members will enjoy a broad array of boozy perks with access to exclusive McMenamins bottle releases and the “Whiskey in the Shed” members-only menu. Also, a welcome kit and discounts on merchandise will be provided upon registration. In the holiday spirit, memberships are being offered at the 25% discount price of $75 a year when code INTRO is used at the checkout. Register at shopmcmenamins.com/ whiskey-club/  


THE REC ROOM Crossword

“FOOD COMA”

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

Pearl’s Puzzle

Difficulty Level

★★

We’re Local!

© Pearl Stark mathpuzzlesgames.com/quodoku

Fill in every row, column, and 3x3 box with each of the letters exactly once.

G I R L

N O S E D

The highlighted letters read left to right and top to bottom will complete the quote:

“I approximated the Black Friday experience at home by hurling myself into a wall a number of times and then ________.” —Kumail Nanjian

ANSWER TO LAST WEEK'S PUZZLES

ACROSS 1. ___ young age 4. Golfer Creamer nicknamed “The Pink Panther” 9. Sly guy? 14. Oily deposit 15. Double-___ (like some eggs with a little extra) 16. More authentic 17. Thing that makes you go boom 18. Hors d’oeuvre: cheese that puts you in a food coma? 20. Prot. denomination 22. Yucky sludge 23. Delivery men? 24. Soup course: Irish delicacy that puts you in a food coma? 28. Future music 30. “Stick around!” 31. Post someone’s home address on social media, e.g. 32. Deviate from a course 34. Nursery school attendee 35. Slanted 38. Yellowish colour 40. Entrée: sausage that puts you in a food coma? 44. Sound that comes from a food coma 45. Three-horse sleigh 46. Out of the box 47. Hefty Cinch ___ 50. Christmas character 51. Thundercat’s instrument 55. Necklaces with petals 57. Side dish: vegetable that puts you in a food coma? 60. “While we’re on the topic,” briefly 61. Brian who coined the term “ambient music” 62. Really weird 63. Dessert: pastries that ... wait, you’re already in a food coma? 68. Panhandle st. 69. Where a sock might stop 70. Pope with a vowel-heavy name and number 71. Conclusion 72. J. ___ Band 73. A pyramid has six 74. Tofurkey ingredient

DOWN 1. Tenochtitlan residents 2. Like some dictators 3. 1971 prison riot locale 4. Luau bowlful 5. Swiss peak 6. Luau entertainment, for short 7. Cliffhanger spot? 8. Words on a campaign 9. Line on Strava: Abbr. 10. Passion 11. Smelly spa treatments 12. “Go along with me” 13. Only airman to successfully escape in “Catch-22” 15. Rec. center that would be hard to do the hand gestures had the Village People did this song instead 19. Georgetown hoopster 21. Candy with four different pieces 25. Badlands National Park st. 26. Come up short 27. Put forth 29. Office park abbr. 33. Herman who won the Pulitzer for “The Caine Mutiny” 36. Finishes, as a cake 37. “Dancing With the Stars” judge Hough 39. Goyle’s buddy in the Potterverse 40. Patella 41. First European to win the NBA MVP 42. Sugar substitute 43. Woman with a ring 44. Show that has banned Rage Against the Machine, briefly 48. Take down ___ 49. E-book reader 52. Tern’s homes 53. Rejected 54. Cool, calm, and collected 56. Hog’s slop 58. Made bird noises 59. Like some Indian culture 63. Statesman Hammarskjöld 64. Castlevania platform, for short 65. Drink that’s in season starting tomorrow 66. Wrong turn correction maneuver 67. “Aye”

“Donald Trump — one-term president and tenant from hell — is still going through all the stages of grief: denial, rage-tweeting, undermining democracy, and back to denial,” —Trevor Noah

39 VOLUME 24  ISSUE 41  /  NOVEMBER 26, 2020  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

©2020 Brendan Emmett Quigley (www.brendanemmettquigley.com)

Questions, comments or suggestions for our local puzzle guru? Email Pearl Stark at pearl@bendsource.com


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Source Weekly November 26, 2020 - Shop Local  

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