__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CENTRAL OREGON A BETTER

PLACE TO LIVE BRIGHT IDEAS FOR A CHANGING COMMUNITY

Plus ’S POST-PANDEMIC REALITY FOMO YOLO SOLO: A BOOMER , BAD, UGLY OLD BEND PARKING: THE GOOD OARDS GERRY LOPEZ MAKES SKATEB

VOLUM E 25 / I S S UE 2 5 / J UN E 2 4 , 2 0 2 1

MAKING


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

2

A celebration of live music and local bands, modeled after The Grammy Awards, but better! Join us for 3 days of music ,food, and fun! A night of awards and recognition hosted by Silver Moon B rewing.Winners are chosen by YOU, the music fans of Central Oregon. Visit BackYardBend.com to vote on your favorite nominees!

Thursday & Friday - Free Saturday - $5 tix in advance on BendTicket.com, $10 at the door. Limited capacity, and ALL proceeds go to artists! Oh, and did we mention this summer is our 21st Anniversary as a local Craft B rewery? Artist Erik Hoogen is back with us this summer to complete one of the most incredible murals you’ll ever come across, “SMB Mixtape”! As if 53 of the very best musicians of all time isn’t already enough, Erik is back to add a few more favorites. Come on by and cheer him on, buy him a beer, and talk shop. And best of all, the piece that he calls “The Bend Oregon Feeling” that graces our patio has been made into a very special 16oz beer label, and will help us fund the project!

in partnership with:

Thursday, June 24th JuJu Eyeball - 6pm Friday, June 25th Company Grand - 6pm Saturday, June 26th Awards - 5pm

4 0 O z. t o F r e e d o m - 8 p m


EDITOR’S NOTE: The Source Weekly 704 NW Georgia Ave., Bend, OR 97703 t. 541-383-0800 f. 541-383-0088 bendsource.com info@bendsource.com

LIGHTMETER: PRESENTED BY HARVEST MOON WOODWORKS

@flycascade / Instagram

3

Shopping Local Made Easy A place to shop local businesses, find a restaurant, seek out an event, explore your community.

On the Cover: Cover photo & design by Darris Hurst. Call for Artists: If you're interested in being a SW featured artist, email: darris@bendsource.com.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 4 - Opinion 5 - Mailbox 6 - News 12 - Feature 18 - Sound 19 - Source Picks 23 - Calendar 31 - Culture

SUPPORT LOCAL

Keep it Local!

33 - Chow 35 - Screen 37 - Outside 38 - Craft 39 - Puzzles 40 - Astrology 41 - Real Estate 42 - Advice

POWERED BY

JUMP IN!

BECOME A SOURCE WEEKLY EDITOR Nicole Vulcan - editor@bendsource.com REPORTER Jack Harvel- reporter@bendsource.com REPORTER / CALENDAR EDITOR Megan Burton - calendar@bendsource.com

Holy whoa, @flycascades! Happy summer solstice to you all—let’s try not to light Oregon on fire this summer, K? Tag us @sourceweekly for a chance to be featured here and as the Instagram of the Week in the Cascades Reader. The winner also gets a free print from High Desert Frameworks!

Your one-time or recurring donation helps support local journalism

COPY EDITOR Richard Sitts FREELANCERS Isaac Biehl, Ari LeVaux, Jared Rasic, Ellen Waterston, Brian Yaeger SYNDICATED CONTENT Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsney, Brendan Emmett Quigley, Jen Sorensen, Pearl Stark, Tom Tomorrow, Matt Wuerker

HARVESTMOONWOODWORKS.COM

PRODUCTION MANAGER / ART DIRECTOR Darris Hurst - darris@bendsource.com

CUSTOM. CABINETS.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Shannon Corey - shannon@bendsource.com

bendsource.com/insider

INTERN Isa Hammons ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Timm Collins, Ashley Sarvis, Ban Tat advertise@bendsource.com DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Sean Switzer CONTROLLER Angela Switzer - angela@bendsource.com

Guests Headed Your Way?

Since 1993

PUBLISHER Aaron Switzer - aaron@bendsource.com WILD CARD Paul Butler

Stylish space and Sanity-saving sleep solution

NATIONAL ADVERTISING Alternative Weekly Network 916-551-1770

Sales Deadline: 5pm, Mondays Editorial Deadline: 5pm, Mondays Calendar Deadline: 10am, Mondays Classified Deadline: 4pm, Mondays Deadlines may shift for special/holiday issues.

The Source Weekly is published every Thursday. The contents of this issue are copyright ©2021 by Lay It Out Inc., and may not be reprinted in part or in whole without consent from the publisher. Cartoons printed in the Source Weekly are copyright ©2021 by their respective artists. The Source Weekly is available free of charge at over 350 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the Source Weekly may be purchased for $1.00, payable in advance. Anyone removing papers in bulk will be prosecuted on theft charges to the fullest extent of the law. Writers’ Guidelines: We accept unsolicited manuscripts and comics. Visit our ‘Contact Us’ webpage for freelancer guidelines.

SAVE $400

Guaranteed Lowest Prices in Central Oregon!

Hwy 20 East across from Pilot Butte • Locally Owned • FurnitureOutletBend.com

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Fires are already burning across the West. Record-setting temperatures are anticipated over the weekend. Festivals are starting to pop up around the region. Seems like a pretty average summer week in Central Oregon, right? As much as we’d rather not see “summer season” become ever known as “smoke season,” this year’s dry conditions don’t seem to promise much else. This week, some of Central Oregon’s thought leaders weigh in on fires, droughts, affordable housing, homelessness and so much more in our feature on Making Central Oregon a Better Place to Live. We hope you enjoy their perspectives and insights as we move through the first week of what could be an eventful summer.


OPINION

Support the Local Journalism Sustainability Act

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

4

FREE FOUNDATION OR PILLOWS WITH SOUTHERLAND MATTRESS PURCHASE

FREE DELIVERY AND SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE* *SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS.

Next to Olive Garden

Since 1962

Wilson’s of Redmond Still the Oldest & Largest Furniture Store in Central Oregon! 2071 S. Hwy 97, Redmond 541-548-2066

www.WilsonsOfRedmond.net

I

f you’re reading this sentence, it’s probably because you value local news. So you may be surprised to hear that local news is collapsing around the country. The number of journalists has dropped 60% since 2000, and thousands of communities have either no newspaper or ghost newspapers that provide barely any local coverage. We at the Source Weekly are trying to fill these gaps. But the collapse of the traditional advertising business models has made it far more difficult for local news outlets to provide the depth of coverage that you deserve. Less local news coverage of course means less important information for you about matters in this community—schools, clean water, housing and homelessness and natural resources conservation, to name just a few. And it’s more than that. Local news helps us know each other, and fights against polarization and conspiracy theories. It’s essential for communities to stick together and solve their own problems. If this were a normal industry, we’d have advocated for government intervention a long time ago. But we in the press really don’t like taking money from the government. How can we hold politicians accountable if they’re giving us money? Fortunately, some members of Congress have come with an extremely clever solution—a series of tax credits that amplifies the power of consumers and businesses. One

provision would provide a tax credit to you, the consumer, to purchase a subscription to a local newspaper or make a donation to a nonprofit news organization. A second provision would give a payroll tax credit to news organizations if they maintain or grow the number of journalists. And the third provision would provide a $5,000 tax credit to small businesses here in Oregon to advertise with local news. We still need to earn your support. But at least it will increase your buying power if you decide that we’re worthy of your help. This proposal could be a huge help to us—and therefore to the quality of the news. Democracy needs this help. The Local Journalism Sustainability Act would address the catastrophic collapse of local news, in a way that will build a better local news system for the future. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR3) of the House Ways and Means Committee, and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), chair of the Senate Finance Committee, need to hear your voices in support of the Local Journalism Sustainability Act. We encourage you to write them in support of this important bill that benefits us all. —The Source Weekly is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia, an association that is a member of the Rebuild Local News Coalition, which supports this bill.


O

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? Send your thoughts to editor@bendsource.com.

Letters

An op-ed in the Source (27 May) recounted the woeful tale of Mirror Pond. It described the recent convening of a Fish Passage Committee as part of an endless trail of bread crumbs through a thicket of debate, delay and indecision. It is true that the Mirror Pond puzzle is complicated. But here are some thoughts from an experienced scientist. The Newport Dam made power for early Bend and it made a scenic pond for lucky homeowners. The 100+ year old dam originally had a fish ladder which became inoperative in the 1960s. The dam has blocked fish migration for the six decades since then. Pacific Power promised to restore passage, but never did. Seen in this light, fish passage is not a new issue. Fish passage is a “cross-cutting” topic. Everyone likes fish. Everyone wants a healthy ecosystem. Fish passage means a healthy river and a healthy tourist economy. In recent years, millions of public dollars have been spent for habitat and flow restoration in the Deschutes River including passage at North Unit’s dam and other locations, and additional publicly financed projects are planned. When one considers further steps to restore and sustain the once-worldclass upper Deschutes fishery, our attention turns immediately to the dam: its health, finances and future. And most importantly the dam needs to accommodate fish passage. The 100-year-old dam has been patched and repatched many times. It has many engineering and safety issues. The tiny amount of electricity produced is minuscule by today’s standards. The dam is an obvious financial burden. Pacific Power said they would remove it in 2014 but changed their minds in 2016. They can change their minds again tomorrow.

Two large hydropower dams on the Elwha River in Olympic National Park were removed in 2011. Like our dam in Bend, those dams were 100 years old and didn’t have the fish passage required by law. When dam removal was proposed, 30 years of debate, technical reports, public meetings and legislation ensued. I was Park Service Research Coordinator at Olympic for the last 13 of those years. In the end, when all was said and done, the dams were removed because no one was willing to pay the millions it would have cost to refit these 100-year-old structures. The lesson of the Elwha applies directly to our situation in Bend. Here, commercial interests have muddied the waters. Pacific Power seems to hold public interests hostage because they own the dam and can decide what to do with it. Good citizens... Focus on fish passage! The Fish Passage Committee was created by the City and Bend Parks to consider options. But any option will cost money and all of those costs center on the dam. It is my bet, that in the end, when all is said and done, no one will be willing to pay those millions. The Fish Passage Committee is not another bread crumb... it is the sword to cut the Gordian Knot. — Dr. Jerry Freilich is an aquatic ecologist recently retired from a 25-year career as a scientist in six national parks.

DECRIMINALIZATION OF SEX WORK My name is Katherine. I’m writing in partnership with the Oregon Sex, Workers Human Rights Commission (oregonsexworkers.com) and in preparation for the July 15 event re: Decriminalization of Sex Work. I’m a Portland, Oregon sex worker. More specifically, I’m a dominatrix. And I love my job. I started working as a dominatrix in 2012, after years of practice in the craft of BDSM, and after exploring what I

consider to be true bodily autonomy and true sexual freedom. It turned out that expelling internalized hetero-normativity wasn’t only healing and enlightening for me, it was also very sexy. Unfortunately, because of criminalization, sex workers experience an increased risk of violence from clients, law enforcement, abusive partners and fanatics. We need to decriminalize. Sex work paid for my undergraduate work in psychology. It paid for my house, and for me to return my property back to natural habitat. It pays for me to volunteer in mental health activism and education. Most importantly, it pays for me to be with my 4-year-old daughter. My attachment to her is the most important thing in this world. We cannot afford to pander to ignorance and fear. For the health of individuals and our community, sex work needs to respected and appreciated. A first step is decriminalization. I ask you to support us in our efforts to decriminalize sex work, and I ask our lawmakers to do the same. —Katherine (last name omitted at the discretion of the editor)

to buy one, where people could create a real home. But most city officials and many homeowners look down their noses at people who live in trailers. Maybe that’s why there is an acute shortage of trailer spaces to rent in Redmond, where I live. If you own property and want to let a friend or family member park an RV on your land and live in it, then you are violating the city code. This activity is classified as a nuisance, along with having trash or abandoned vehicles on your property. If we truly want to house people, then we need to change these laws. —Denise Holley

Letter of the Week:

Denise: Code changes can and do make a difference for those needing housing in our region. Thanks for bringing this to the attention of our readers. Come on by for your gift card to Palate! —Nicole Vulcan

UNHOUSED PEOPLE Every city should set up an urban campground for people living in tents or RVs, a place with bathrooms and garbage service. A longer-term solution is to construct legal trailer parks for those who own an RV or could afford

EXCLUSIVE THIS WEEK IN: THE SOURCE WEEKLY'S E-NEWSLETTER

“It’s our local Bible for everything Bend.” What’s your favorite part of the Source Weekly? We wanna know! This week’s online survey asks locals to let us know what they love most about picking up the paper. Vote now at bendsource.com, and see the results in Saturday’s Cascades Reader! Hint: Reader Jane L. weighed in with her own comment about the Source being her family’s Bible for Bend. Be like Jane and share your thoughts!

Start your day with Central Oregon's best source for news & local events.

SIGN UP AT: BENDSOURCE.COM/NEWSLETTERS

@sourceweekly

 



Keep in the know of what's going on in Central Oregon, follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

5 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

GUEST OPINION: ABOUT THOSE MIRROR POND BREAD CRUMBS

Letters must be received by noon Friday for inclusion in the following week’s paper. Please limit letters to 250 words. Submission does not guarantee publication. Opinions printed here do not constitute an editorial endorsement of said opinions. Letter of the week receives $5 to Palate!


NEWS

Parking Pains

The Old Bend Pilot Parking District will soon face the biggest challenge since it started: Summer By Jack Harvel

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

6

S

ince the start of the year, the City of Bend has been testing a residential parking permit program in a section of the Old Bend neighborhood. The intent behind the pilot program was to give the residents of the neighborhood parking spaces that wouldn’t have to compete with river floaters, downtown shoppers and event crowds. After six months, survey results show little change in residents’ attitudes, but the program’s biggest challenge lies ahead with summer events and an influx of tourists. The specific area of the pilot program, which includes all the streets east of the Deschutes River between Drake Park and Miller’s Landing Park and ending at NW Broadway to the east, was selected because preliminary surveys from the City showed a high degree of support—around 70%—for it in the area. Recommendations from the neighborhood would shape any permanent

“This resolution is selling part of the public right of way to a small number of our citizens,” she said during the September 2020 meeting. Neighbors have complained about paying for parking in front of their own homes, the computer-based permit tracking system and the difficulty of inputting visitor passes into the system – which requires entering visiting cars’ makes, models and license plate numbers on the City’s website. “Because it’s all in a computer system it’s a lot more difficult to get somebody a pass. I understand that they started giving out physical passes, but it’s case by case,” said Steve Lillegren, who lives in the pilot program parking district. “And it’s because the computer system doesn’t know how to handle the manual passes.” More communication is needed, Marx said, saying that the two types of visitors parking managers need to comJack Harvel

Cars are lined up by Drake Park, where time-limited parking is still available to the public.

program if one is put in place, parking officials say. A second round of surveys taken during the pilot program showed little change in attitudes of residents. “The support was very similar still, we were at about 70% in support of the district, generally with very great feedback on what we should improve,” said Tobias Marx, parking services division manager at the City of Bend. “I think the biggest lessons learned so far are to improve some of the signage to make it easier to understand for people, and that we had to communicate a little bit better about the visitor process.” Concerns about aspects of the program have come from both residents and city leaders. At the Bend City Council meeting adopting the program, Councilor Barb Campbell was the lone dissenting voice.

municate with are those who are visiting households in the area and those who aren’t. To accommodate these different groups, everyone who has gotten a residential permit will be sent two visitor passes for visiting friends. The City is also promoting the Bend Park and Recreation shuttle to floaters and coordinating with people attending events to inform them of the best parking practices. Temporary permits for non-residents can be obtained through a portal on the City’s website. Some parts of the neighborhood offer free two-hour and four-hour parking, as well. The City maintains a map of available parking for visitors, with additional designations for “hybrid areas” where people can park during events like Munch and Music— the weekly free music event set to start again in Drake Park July 8.

Jack Harvel

A sign showing that only residents can park in the Old Bend District are displayed throughout. Bend Parking Services Manager Tobias Marx said that more clear signage was one of the most frequent recommendations given in parking surveys of the area.

“Munch and Music, Theater in the Park, Summerfest, all those are coming back. And I think that will be a great test to see if those hybrid areas that we created for events will work the way we wanted,” Marx said. To test how the program works, an extensive parking study will track what’s happening on the street throughout the day for two weeks in August. “We need that because we’re going to have a baseline in the summer times, when we have events, when we have other things going on, and more tourists, etc. What’s the baseline here in the summer, then we’ll do the same thing again, probably in October or November,” Marx said. The study will be followed up with a third and final survey of the district to show what residents think of the program after a year of having it in place. That survey will influence what happens next—but people who live outside of the neighborhood can still chime in by writing to the City or speaking during the public comment

period when City Council next discusses it. “We’re actually including some of the performance metrics that we’re looking for to really bring this back to Council and to say, ‘Look, this is what we have observed. This is what we have learned over the year, this is the feedback we have received, this is the public opinion about it in the district and these are the evaluation metrics we had set,” Marx said. “Now we need to determine if we want to continue it or not.” The City Council won’t revisit the district until after the program finishes at the end of the year. If approved it could provide a roadmap for other areas experiencing parking congestion. Other parts of Old Bend that weren’t included in the pilot could be a candidate for a parking district if the people living there want it. “It should be something that comes from the people living there, and if this pilot works well, then out of that we can create a tool kit,” Marx said. “It’s really up to the neighbors and the parking committee to decide that.” Jack Harvel

Some areas in the parking district will be made available for event parking.


NEWS

Noticias en Español Por Jack Harvel / Traducido por Jéssica Sánchez-Millar

U

n proyecto de ley que devolvería los impuestos recabados de la marihuana en el Condado de Deschutes ha sido aprobado por la Cámara de Representantes de Oregon y está en espera de la votación del senado. El condado anuló su capacidad de recabar el 10% los impuestos aplicados a las ventas de la marihuana al poner los comisionados una moratoria sobre el permiso para los nuevos establecimientos de producción de marihuana en agosto de 2019, una decisión que los votantes hicieron permanente con una medida de propuesta de ley en noviembre del 2020. Los impuestos a nivel condado se gastaron en los programas de prevención del uso de drogas y en la investigación de operaciones de cultivo ilegal. Cuando el condado estaba recaudando impuestos por primera vez, recibió entre $4-$500,000 al año, pero después de ser aprobada la medida 110 de Oregon, el proyecto de ley que despenalizó la mayor parte del uso de drogas recreativas en el estado y redirigió los impuestos sobre la marihuana para

financiar los programas de tratamiento para las adicciones a nivel estatal, el condado recibiría alrededor de $200,000 al año. “Teníamos cientos de miles de dólares cultivando marihuana en el condado, vendiendo marihuana en el condado, recibiendo impuestos por las actividades en el condado y no enviamos ingresos al condado,” dijo el comisionado del condado de Deschutes Tony DeBone. El proyecto de ley fue respaldado por el representante Jason Kropf de Bend y por Jack Zika de Redmond. Ninguno de los dos estuvo en la cámara de representantes durante la aprobación de las pautas de legalización y tributación de la marihuana, pero Kropf dijo que el tema de una renuncia voluntaria de un condado no se exploró. “En el momento de propuesta de ley o legislatura original, nadie había anticipado lo que pasaría”, dijo Kropf a the Source. Era algo anticipado, ya que se tendría al condado completamente dentro o fuera y luego lo que sucedió en el condado de Deschutes no se había contemplado”. En ese momento dijeron los comisionados que Deschutes optó por abandonar lo relacionado a los nuevos establecimientos de marihuana en gran parte debido al conflicto entre los productores de cannabis y sus vecinos.

A

principios de 2021, un programa piloto en el vecindario histórico de Bend estableció un sistema de permisos de estacionamiento para los habitantes que algunas veces tienen que competir con las personas que van a flotar el río, que van de compras al centro y que asisten a los eventos para así poder estacionarse fuera de sus casas. Después de 6 meses, los resultados de la encuesta muestran pocos cambios en las actitudes de los habitantes, pero el reto más grande del programa está por venir con los eventos de verano y la llegada de turistas. “Acabamos de hacer una encuesta en el vecindario histórico de Bend. De hecho, tuvimos una mejor respuesta comparado con la encuesta inicial,” dijo Tobias Marx, gerente de la división de servicios de estacionamiento de la ciudad de Bend. “Estábamos cerca del 70% a favor de la región, generalmente con una estupenda retroalimentación en relación a lo que deberíamos mejorar.” La zona específica del programa piloto, la cual incluye todas las calles al este del río Deschutes entre Drake Park y el parque de desembarque Miller, que termina al este de NW Broadway, fue seleccionada porque las encuestas preliminares de la ciudad mostraron un alto nivel de apoyo.

“Creo que el aprendizaje más importante, ha sido hasta ahora, el mejorar algunos de los letreros para que la gente pueda entender mejor lo que está pasando y comunicarnos un poco mejor con relación a el proceso de visitas,” dijo Marx. A todos los que han recibido un permiso residencial se les enviará dos pases para las visitas. La ciudad está adoptando un enfoque específico para los visitantes durante el día, como el promover el uso del transbordador de Bend Park and Rec para las personas que flotan el río o coordinarse con las personas encargadas de eventos para informarles cuál es la mejor forma para estacionarse. Los visitantes que asisten a la zona para presenciar eventos tendrán espacio limitado en las calles para estacionarse, junto con un tiempo límite de estacionamiento de hasta 4 horas. “Much and Music, Theatre en el Parque y el Festival de Verano, vienen en camino y creo que será la mejor prueba para ver si esas zonas híbridas que creamos para los eventos funcionaran de la manera deseada,” dijo Marx. El consejo municipal de Bend evaluará la zona a final de año, y si se aprueba, podría proporcionar una guía para otras áreas que estén pasando por congestión de estacionamiento. Otras partes de la zona histórica de Bend que no se incluyeron en el programa piloto podrían ser candidatas para la zona de estacionamiento si la gente que vive allí lo desea.

7 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Una moratoria sobre los nuevos establecimientos de marihuana hizo que el condado de Deschutes no pudiera recabar impuestos sobre la marihuana. Un nuevo proyecto de ley podría cambiar eso.

El programa piloto de la región histórica de Bend implica que el estacionarse en esa zona durante eventos sea más complicado este año


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

8

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

STAGE SPONSOR

ADDITIONALLY SPONSORED BY

PRESENTED BY


NEWS

Where’s That Weed Money?

A moratorium on new marijuana facilities made Deschutes County unable to collect its share of taxes. A new bill could change that. By Jack Harvel Pixabay

If a new bill is not approved, the County's share of cannabis tax revenues will continue to go up in smoke.

establishing smell mitigation, required setbacks for greenhouses from property lines and distance requirements from “youth activity centers.” “We put reasonable regulations in place, and we said we’ll re-review it a year later, and sure enough, those reg-

“We had hundreds of thousands of dollars growing marijuana in the county, selling marijuana in the county, taxes being received by the activities in the county, and no revenue being sent back to the County.” —Tony DeBone Deschutes opted out of new marijuana facilities in large part due to conflict between cannabis farmers and their neighbors, commissioners said at the time. The County’s first moratorium was lifted after it placed some regulations on growing cannabis to ease the tension between these two groups,

ulations couldn’t even get settled in because they started to get appealed,” DeBone said. “There was a point where we’re like, ‘OK, well, this isn’t working, how about we ask the people to give us clarity?” When the ballot measure passed it froze the number of county active

marijuana processors in time, not allowing any new permits to be awarded, though a few facilities were approved by the county before the moratorium and are still seeking state permits. Currently Deschutes County has fewer than 20 marijuana processing facilities on land under the jurisdiction of the county. If the bill is passed by the Senate and signed by the governor it would get the county back to receiving its funds, but would require the creation of an advisory committee made of stakeholders in the marijuana industry. “The bill says the advisory committee shall give guidance to the commission about finding out how these dollars should be spent is my understanding,” DeBone said. The group would also make recommendations on public safety measures related to marijuana and on how to solve issues that apply to marijuana businesses. Deschutes County Commissioner Patty Adair said the group could be valuable in coordinating things like irrigation, especially those

in irrigation districts that will struggle to meet demand like Tumalo and North Unit. “With wells going down and the Tumalo area, their water is on rationing seven days on seven days off, I’ve heard from some hay ranchers that that are having a hard time. So you know, all those things, I’m sure could come up,” Adair said. The clock is ticking on this legislative session and as of press time, there’s one week until legislators adjourn. “We’re on a time crunch. We basically only have a week left this session, so part of the reality is if we have enough time to get this passed, that’s what I’m working through,” Kropf said. “If not this session, I’ll continue to push on it. We have a robust cannabis industry here in this county and I think it’s appropriate that we have a share of the revenue that we helped generate for the state.” If not approved in time the bill would have to wait until the next legislative session in February 2022 before it would have the possibility of becoming a reality.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

A

bill that would bring back taxes gathered from marijuana sales in Deschutes County has passed the Oregon state house and is awaiting a vote from the Senate. The County voided its ability to collect 10% of the taxes levied on marijuana sales when commissioners placed a moratorium on permitting new marijuana production facilities in August of 2019—a decision voters made permanent with a ballot measure in November 2020. The county-level taxes were spent on drug prevention programs and toward investigating illegal growing operations. When the County was first collecting taxes it received between $4-$500,000 a year, but after Oregon Measure 110, the bill that decriminalized most recreational drug use in the state and redirected marijuana taxes to fund statewide addiction treatment programs, the county would receive around $200,000 annually. “We had hundreds of thousands of dollars growing marijuana in the county, selling marijuana in the county, taxes being received by the activities in the county, and no revenue being sent back to the County,” Deschutes County Commissioner Tony DeBone said. The bill was sponsored by Representatives Jason Kropf of Bend and Jack Zika of Redmond. Neither were in the House during the passage of marijuana legalization and taxation guidelines, but Kropf said the issue of a county opting out simply wasn’t explored. “Nobody had at the time of the original bill, or in the original legislature, anticipated what would happen,” Kropf told the Source. “This was sort of anticipated as you’d have county either fully in or fully out, and then what happened to Deschutes County just hadn’t been contemplated.”

9


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

10

More Choices Than Ever! With many affordable in-person and online classes, now is the perfect time to pursue your academic and career goals at Central Oregon Community College! Whether you thrive in a classroom or need the flexibility of an online schedule, COCC lets you choose how you’ll achieve your dreams. In-person services resume August 23. Fall term begins September 20.

Get started at COCC: cocc.edu | 541.383.7705 | In advance of College events, persons needing accommodation or transportation because of a physical or mobility disability, contact Joe

♿ Viola at 541.383.7775. For accommodation because of other disability such as hearing impairment, contact Disability Services at 541.383.7583.

Healthy Adventures Await! Open Daily for You and Your Pets DOCTORS BYRON MAAS, LAUREN STAYER, ERIN MILLER, TABITHA JOHNSTON, LAUREN HOFFMAN AND LAURA ACEVEDO

bendveterinaryclinic.com 360 NE QUIMBY AVE 382-0741


NEWS

Fire in Warm Springs

A fire on the Warm Springs reservation reached over 6,000 acres; crews called in for backup during a hot weekend By Jack Harvel Courtesy InciWeb

threaten residences in Pine Grove in Wasco County. On Sunday evacuation notices were lowered from Level 3 (go now) to Level 2 (get ready). There have already been two spot fires since the start of the blaze, one that reached about 42 acres near a fish hatchery that is 50% contained and one that was just under an acre that was secured and is now being patrolled. “Predicted afternoon winds and potential thunderstorms may test the eastern flank today. Initial attack activity is expected to increase as lightning activity moves through the area,” the statement said. The Warm Springs fire was just 10% contained in the latest release from the Forestry Service, but a video released by Warm Springs Fire Management reported it hoped to get the perimeter secured Tuesday—but with thunderstorms in the forecast, crews expected the eastern flank of the fire to be further tested. Calling for backup The mix of drought, heat and lightning is severe enough that the Oregon State Fire Marshal deployed two task

Doin our Bestg “Bee” Sa to fe!

541-383-3722 eastsidegardensinc.com

61780 SE 27th Bend

forces to Central Oregon on Tuesday to relieve some of the pressure off of local crews. Over 300 local firefighters had been working on the Warm Springs fire since the blaze started. “We know the conditions across the state are dry, and with thunderstorms in the forecast, even the smallest spark could trigger a wildfire, that is why we are prepositioning these resources,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said in a press release. “We can’t control the weather, but we can plan for what we can control, and that is strategically placing resources ahead of this weather event.” The teams weren’t sent to deal with a specific fire, but to bolster local forces in preparation for potential incidents. The two teams hail from Marion County and Washington County, and will remain in Central Oregon for at least three days to assist local teams if any wildfire eruptions threaten structures, and could stay longer if needed. The OSFM hasn’t deployed any of its Incident Management Teams, who provide support for severe fires, but at least

Retardant is dropped on the S-503 fire on June 20.

one of the state’s three teams could be sent if a fire gets out of hand. The current fire has impacted the air quality around Warm Springs, but not to an unhealthy level at press time. The Warm Springs Air Quality Report for Tuesday showed there are 53 micrograms of pollution per cubic meter, up from the average of 13. This is considered a moderate amount of pollution that’s acceptable to most people, but could pose some health concern for people who are particularly sensitive to air pollution.

11 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

A

fire on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation spread to an estimated 6,200 acres at the start of the week. The S-503 fire was first spotted on Friday, June 18; by Saturday morning it had spread to an estimated 250 acres and grew rapidly over the hot and windy day. By the end of Saturday Warm Springs Fire Management said the blaze had grown to 4,300 acres and threatened 250 homes and structures in the area. The cause of the fire is unknown at this time, according to Inciweb, the interagency incident information management system. On Monday Incident Commander Kevin Stock of the U.S. Forest Service assumed management of the fire. “Firefighters are focused on securing areas of concern including structures, residences and values at risk. Night shift continued line construction on the southern portion of the fire tying into a large meadow,” a statement from the Oregon Department of Forestry said. On Tuesday the firefighters focused largely on the fire’s northern and eastern flanks, as well as the heel of the northwest corner, where further spread would


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

12

WE CAN BE E T A N O I S S A P COM

LANDLORDS

GET BACK TO

FEWER CARS

PROTECTING OU

R ENVIRONMENT

DOES NOT HAVE TO MEAN

KEEPING THINGS NU RT U RE LANDSCAPES THAT

NURTURE YOU

TRAILS, RIVERS AND FORESTS

BELONG TO YOU MAKING

CENTRAL OREGON A BETTER

PLACE TO LIVE BRIGHT IDEAS FOR A CHANGING COMMUNITY

DROUGHTS AND MOR E SEVERE WILDFIRE SEA SONS

ARE CREATING A TOUGHER

WORLD FOR OUR CHILDREN Prioritize Housing Options for People Living and Working in Our Community By Allison Platt As a Bend City Planner, I’m keenly aware of COVID-19’s impacts to increase demand on our housing market that has raised costs for both renters and homebuyers. In the last year, the median home price increased by over 35%. We hear from our friends and neighbors about their rejected housing offer, increased rent or the house that sold in three days to a cash offer for significantly over the asking price. My hope is that we prioritize housing options for people living and working in our community in balance with our own personal interests. What can we do to help our community? It would help working-class Bendites get into our housing market if home sellers accepted offers that require a loan instead of an all-cash offer. I encourage you to accept the offer from the first-time homebuyer or the person who submits a letter highlighting their commitment to this community over someone making an “investment property” purchase. Courtesy Allison Platt We can be compassionate landlords so people can continue to live here investing in our community or saving toward a down payment. Please rent your home for a reasonable price versus the maximum rent you possibly can. Please support and advocate for (versus protest against) new residential development, especially of units that will be affordable at various income levels, to help ease pressure on our housing market. Bend will continue to grow and change as it always has, but we can continue to put our community’s interest ahead of our own. — Allison Platt is a senior planner with the City of Bend and works on a variety of issues such as housing, growth and transportation planning.


FEATURE

Better Planning Delivers More Transportation Options

Protecting Our Natural Environment is One of the Most Important Things We Can Do

By Ariel Mendez, PhD

By Cassie Lacy

Remember how nice it was when there were fewer cars on the road? As restrictions are lifted and new residents and visitors arrive in Bend, we are poised to experience the opposite: a tsunami of traffic, fumes and frustration as we flood our streets with cars. The best way to address this is to get back to fewer cars. Bend’s summer crush of congestion is driven by about 15% more people on our streets. If a similar number of people—not everybody, just 10 to 15%—felt comfortable not driving, that summer crush would be greatly diminished. As a board member of the Bend Park and Recreation District, I will continue to support providing outstanding parks, trails, and recreation opportunities close to your home. Just as important, I support working with other local governments to address community-wide issues such as affordability and transportation. A good illustration of this commitCourtesy Ariel Mendez ment is Alpenglow, the 37-acre community park in southeast Bend currently under construction. Packed with amenities including a sprayground and event stage, my favorite aspect of Alpenglow is the planning that went into how people will get there. District staff have described Alpenglow as a “hub for trails” and have worked with other districts to share parking, provide transit, build foot bridges across the railroad tracks and canal and provide a network of trails so that kids, families and all community members can access not just the park itself, but the new Caldera High School and surrounding neighborhoods without a car. — Ariel Méndez, PhD is vice chair of the Bend Park and Recreation District board and teaches political science at OSU-Cascades.

I am one of many people who believe the natural environment and access to public lands are some of Central Oregon’s greatest assets, and protecting our natural environment is one of the most important things we can do to ensure our region remains this amazing place to live for generations to come. We must address the climate crisis by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to keep our winters snowy, our forests healthy, our air fresh and clear, and our rivers plentiful and wild. Governments and partner organizations can help, but so can individuals. Governments, for example, can work to improve alternative transportation infrastructure or create incentives for energy-efficient homes. But as individuals, we need to ride the bus or install new, high-efficiency heaters in our homes, or purchase renewable electricity through our utility. We can get involved professionally or politically, or volunteer for a good cause like a river cleanup. As a community, we can simultaneously reduce our impact on the environment while addressing some other urgent community challenges, such as affordable housing, by supporting denser housing and expanded transit options. Protecting our environment does not have to mean keeping things, including our natural spaces, exactly the same. It can be hard to see more people than we are used to on a favorite trail, and it’s understandable to feel that the only way to protect the natural environment is to stop all the change. But let’s try not to turn to negativity and fear. Let’s try more open-mindedness and flexibility about what our prosperous future looks like and how humans and nature intersect. I hope we can remain appreciative for the beautiful segment of earth that we have and that we’re all willing to roll up our sleeves and do the work to keep it that way. — Cassie Lacy is a senior management analyst working in the city manager’s office for the City of Bend.

ENVIRONMENT DOES NOT HAVE TO MEAN KEEPING THINGS,

INCLUDING OUR NATURAL SPACES, EXACTLY THE SAME. —CASSIE LACY

Alex Jordan

Harness a Little Bit of Your Stoke to Make Central Oregon a Better Place to Live By Ryan Houston Making. /’mākiNG/ (noun): The act of causing or doing. Do you enjoy the vast expanse of public lands just beyond the edge of town? Whether your roots extend back generations or you are part of the pandemic-driven Zoom Town migration, living within minutes of such incredible public lands brings a rich quality of life to many in Central Oregon. But as science writer Ethan Linck described in his 2018 High Country News essay, “Your Stoke Won’t Save Us,” one’s passion for outdoor recreation—be it hunting, hiking, mountain biking, mushroom gathering or Christmas tree chasing—does not always predict their level of engagement in protecting those very same deserts, forest, rivers or mountains that feed their passion. So, how do we make Central Oregon a better place? Harness a little bit of your stoke. Use some of that energy or a smidge of that inspiration drawn from your favorite canyon, creek or crag and put it to work making sure you nurture the very same landscapes that nurture you. Make sure these rivers, forests, canyons and deserts, complete with their biological diversity, clean water and cultural importance, persist forever. Pause for a moment to hand-write a heartfelt letter to your Senator or Representative advocating for conservation. Share your thoughts and values with those who manage public lands, waters and wildlife. Join a conservation organization. Whatever you do, contribute. Participate. Make Central Oregon a better place by being a force for good in conserving the public lands that help make this community so extraordinary. —Ryan Houston is Oregon Natural Desert Association’s executive director. He has 20 years of experience working in conservation, and at least as much experience exploring the desert streams and wide-open landscapes of Central and Eastern Oregon.

13 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

PROTECTING OUR

Courtesy Cassie Lacy


FEATURE

Work to Keep Central Oregon an Incredible Place to Live By Serena Gordon

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

14

Opportunities for Elevating Our Collective Aesthetic IQ are on the Horizon Katie Sox

When asked to write about making Central Oregon a better place to live, I pushed back. Central Oregon is an amazing place to live. The characteristics which drew me here more than a decade and a half ago remain. We don’t need to make this place a better place to live; we must work to keep it an incredible place to live. The identifying aspects of this place, gracing the cover of Outside magazine and showcased in glossy airport ads, deserve nurturing and respect. Visitors will not stop coming here; our population will not stop growing. The pressures on our public lands, our urban growth boundary, our restaurants and our parking lots are not going to cease. But we can do something about it. We need to take care of the places that take care of us. We need to smile at passersby, pick up our dog’s poop, yield to the uphill rider and slow down as we navigate through roundabouts—or better yet, leave the car at home and ride a bike. And we can support the organizations that work tirelessly to make Central Oregon a place that we are grateful to call home. Our outdoor experiences are possible because of these nonprofits. Learn, donate, and get involved! Central Oregon Trail Alliance - cotamtb.com/ Meissner Nordic - meissnernordic.org/ Central Oregon LandWatch - centraloregonlandwatch.org/ Oregon Natural Desert Association - onda.org/ — Serena lives in Bend with her husband, Ben, and medium-sized pup, Piper, and loves her morning coffee almost as much as she loves riding her bike. Serena is a professional cyclist with Liv Racing Collective, an avid Nordic skier (occasional racer), cycling coach and writer. She also works as the sustainability manager for Visit Bend, striving to develop and implement sustainable solutions for our recreation tourism industry.

By Cate O’Hagan

Courtesy Cate O'Hagan

Creativity patched many of us through the pandemic. If we were among those who accomplished nothing, we were, quite possibly, gestating ideas. Meanwhile, the thrum of maker and artisan industry continued on. Our very vibrant maker and performer scene here is in no danger of diminishing any time soon, as long as there are places for artists to live and work. Keep an ear tuned to proposed discussions about the formation of a cultural district that might offer part of a remedy. Some day. Meanwhile, buy local art. Tip your musician. From a regional cultural development perspective, opportunities for elevating our collective aesthetic IQ are on the horizon. Our new main branch library will be built to embrace performance and visual arts, just as the library will continue to do throughout its extensive branch library system (which will, by the way, remain intact). Congratulations are in order to the High Desert Museum for recently receiving the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries that make significant and exceptional contributions to their communities. And pay very close attention to this: The Oregon-based Roundhouse Foundation gave the museum $6 million for exhibit and program upgrades, including providing the eastern side of the state with its first dedicated art museum. Having spent about a decade as a department head in art museums, I can tell you that running an art museum is a very different animal than operating a changing exhibit gallery. It is in fact a daunting undertaking that will require the informed pursuit of the best expertise the art museum field has to offer. —After serving for 20 years in senior staff positions in art museums in Portland, Oregon and Washington, D.C. for the Oregon Symphony, Oregon Ballet and others, Cate saddled up and headed to Central Oregon where she worked for the Museum at War Springs, then as executive director for Arts Central, where she founded the region's first nonprofit art school, the Art Stations.

is Back!

AT CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE

J U LY 2 3 - 2 5

BALLOON LAUNCHES AT HIGH DESERT MIDDLE SCHOOL

NIGHT GLOWS

BALLOON BLAST KIDS RACE

GET TICKETS AT BENDTICKET.COM

FULL DETAILS AT BALLOONSOVERBEND.COM


FEATURE

Climate Change Puts Regions like Ours in Jeopardy, Impacting All of Us

Ready to Meet Community Challenges, Together

By Rep. Jason Kropf

By Tammy Baney

I’ve been proud to call Bend home for nearly two decades, and my wife and I are thrilled to be raising our daughter here. In Bend, we know that clean air, water and land are more than a perk of living in this magnificent part of Oregon. They’re a bedrock of our local economy and our well-being. We also know that climate change puts regions like ours in jeopardy, impacting all of us, and disproportionately harming communities of color and low-income families. Droughts and more severe wildfire seasons are creating a tougher world for our children. For some, climate change may feel too big to solve, but I’m confident we can take steps in the right direction. As I write this on Father’s Day, I am thinking about how we can help pass down a sustainable planet to my daughter’s generation—and beyond. This was one of the driving forces behind my desire to serve our community in the legislature, and why I’m proud to support critical legislation for a sustainable future for Oregon. House Bill 2021 sets Oregon on the path to 100% clean elecCourtesy Jason Kropf tricity by 2040, and House Bill 2842 creates a Healthy Homes program to make it easier for low-income families and other environmental justice communities to retrofit their homes for sustainability. Together, these bills will boost our economy and reduce our state’s energy utilization. I am proud to sponsor both bills. We aren’t going to solve the climate crisis overnight. But together, we can set Oregon on a path to a greener, more sustainable future. In our final week of our legislative session, I’m committed to seizing the opportunity to act on climate change. I hope you’re willing to join me. —Jason Kropf represents Bend’s House District 54 in the Oregon State legislature, and also serves on the Bend Park and Recreation District board of directors.

Important issues in Central Oregon such as affordable housing, traffic congestion, employment, public health and natural resource conservation require strategic planning and benefit from a coordinated and inclusive approach. Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council is the region’s council of governments, which works collaboratively with cities, counties and citizens to identify common needs, leverage resources and develop solutions to create more vibrant and resilient communities. Since 1972, COIC has contributed to making Central Oregon a better place to live by offering programs and services that improve quality of life. During the pandemic, our departments guided a number of local initiatives, often operating as a silent partner and getting things done. COIC’s Community and Economic Development Department worked with state and local governments to provide over 1,000 small businesses with $7.6 million in grant dollars for COVID-19 recovery efforts. This department is also working with regional partners to expand options for our unhoused community members and find affordable housing solutions to ensure that Central Oregonians have a place to call home. COIC’s Adult Employment and Training WorkSource staff supported over 1,200 businesses with rapid response services and placed 46 individuals in on-the-job training programs. During the 2019-2020 school year, the Youth Education Program helped 103 at-risk students graduate and another 69 students earn their GED. The Youth Work Program placed 52 youth into paid work experiences and internships. Since the beginning of the pandemic, Cascades East Transit, operated by COIC, has provided free bus service to help people get to work, school, medical appointments and shopping destinations. COIC’s role in the region is to support our communities and local governments, helping to seek solutions to pressing issues, while also exploring and implementing innovative programs that contribute to economic vitality and sustainability and enhance the community cohesion among our unique and diverse region. We stand ready to meet community challenges, together. —Tammy Baney is the executive director of the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council.

Courtesy Tammy Barney

A TOUGHER WORLD FOR OUR CHILDREN.

— REP. JASON KROPF

Courtesy Latino Community Association

Reflect Attitudes and Behaviors Founded on Respect, Tolerance and Inclusivity By Oscar Jesus González In February, the City Club of Central Oregon led a panel discussion on whether Central Oregon was as “welcoming” as many believe. No one mentioned that Bend became a “Welcoming City” in 2017 when it joined Welcoming America, a nationwide alliance of cities. Bend stood out from other cities in our region with a proclamation based on the principles of diversity, equity and inclusion. Each September, the city showcases a week of presentations, discussion groups, and other activities to celebrate our region’s distinct cultures and traditions, called “Welcoming Week.” Unfortunately, other cities in Central Oregon failed to follow suit. Some folk confused Welcoming America with the notion of becoming a “sanctuary city.” If Redmond, Madras and Prineville would join organizations such as Welcoming America, they would be recognized for their devotion to inclusivity, respect, mutual understanding and collaboration. It is essential that all our community members feel welcomed and valued. Former Bend-La Pine Schools Superintendent Shay Mikalson led his administration, faculty and staff to participate in workshops on “educational equity” and “cultural humility.” As our demographics continue to shift, local educators must become more culturally responsive, so our children develop a deeper understanding of each other’s differences. Then they will develop empathy and respect for each other and realize that despite any differences, we have so much more in common.  I remain hopeful our youth can model and set the tone for the rest of us by reflecting attitudes and behaviors founded on respect, tolerance and inclusivity. This can make Central Oregon a better place for us all. —Oscar Jesus González is the empowerment programs manager and an OLAP-accredited representative in immigration law for the Latino Community Association.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

DROUGHTS AND MORE SEVERE WILDFIRE SEASONS ARE CREATING

15


FEATURE

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

16

Cultivating Empathy to Make Central Oregon a Better Place to Live

Using Technology to Further Expand Access to Education for Urban and Rural Communities

By Zavier Borja

By Jeremy Green

Eduardo Romero

As told to Editor Nicole Vulcan via phone: I think that I live in this naive notion in my head of empathy and understanding of differences, and that doesn’t mean you have to agree, or change someone’s opinion, but actively listening, and what that concept in itself means, and what it looks like—just to have a greater threshold for when we talk about different communities, or someone who is just different from you in whatever facet. Because when we’re talking about welcoming, the contrast to that would be unwelcoming, or non-inclusive. So, to me, where does that derive from? I think that comes from a place of trying to, or wanting to understand. Not trying to change your ideas, or your ideology, but it’s just to have empathy. I think it’s a combination of exposure and self-discovery, or understanding the willingness to do that. Like for me, in my work, I try to do that within the outdoors; using the outdoors as an environment to set the stage to try to cultivate that. At the same time, when we talk about Central Oregon at large, I think it’s that combination of the individual self. Be curious and/or set up an environment with that intention of bringing together people with differences, whether it’s left or right, or how you identify in any facet, like race and gender. Also, set a safe place to—I don’t know if that’s even possible—but setting an environment for that, so you could just learn from each other, not trying to change everybody’s opinion in either direction. I think there is a big disconnect, as well. We don’t like to be told, and it’s kind of what we’re doing—setting up an environment where differences are able to be expressed and understood. — Zavier Borja is a newly elected member of the Bend Park and Recreation District Board of Directors and the founder of Vamanos Outside, a group formed to connect, engage & inspire Latinx families & community into the outdoors.

Courtesy COCC

There’s no doubt that COVID-19 has created innumerable challenges, especially in education. However, these struggles have also offered institutions like Central Oregon Community College opportunities to innovate and expand access to education. If you visit COCC’s branch campuses in Redmond, Madras and Prineville, you’ll see this pandemic-spurred transformation in action. One of COCC’s primary goals for our branch campuses over the past 18 months has been to increase access to higher education for both students and the community. With help from the COCC Foundation, state and federal relief funds, and local supporters like the Roundhouse Foundation, COCC’s branch campuses have not only created access to learning during the pandemic, but have also carved out new and innovative ways to deliver courses long into the future. We now offer expanded wi-fi across our campuses, and lend free personal computers, tablets, hotspots and web cams to students who need them. COCC students are no longer confined to the use of on-campus computer labs and can access services and courses from wherever is most convenient. All four COCC campuses are equipped to livestream courses between campuses as well as directly to students’ personal computers, regardless of their location. We’re working hard to eliminate the need for Jefferson County, Crook County and even Redmond-area residents to commute to Bend in order to take specific courses required to complete their goals. Barriers to higher education that once existed for many Central Oregonians due to unreliable internet connectivity, access to technologies, or impossible commutes for place-bound students are fading because of our collective response to the coronavirus. How might Central Oregon continue to move forward—using the technological advances we have all come to love and loath during the pandemic—to further expand access to education for our urban and rural communities? —Jeremy Green is the director of the Redmond and Madras campuses of Central Oregon Community College.

thank you for making dr. jolly’s

PREMIUM CRAFT CANNABIS

Flower • Extracts • Cartridges • Edibles • RSO • Tinctures 541-508-2708 • @Dr.Jollys.Bend • JollyBend.com Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug For use only by adults twenty-one.years of age and older. Keep out reach of children.


FEATURE

Grow into a Community Where We’ve Bridged the Gap Between “Us” and “Them” Make Space for All People to Be Themselves in Our Outdoor Spaces By LeeAnn O’Neill

By Rika Ayotte

Where are you from? But where are you really from? We are perpetual foreigners in our own community. Our skin, eyes, and hair are always just enough out of place that Central Oregon could never be our home no matter how long we have been here. Long story short, we came together because we couldn’t find our groceries, so we co-created a virtual space to celebrate our food and myriad cultures, share stories, and crowdsource where to find shaoxing wine, gochugaru, or our favorite noodle. It grew to be a space to share experiences of exclusion, isolation and fear in the wake of anti-Asian violence. And it became one of belonging. The wishful conversations we’ve heard in the community is to create a physical space to nurture this sense of belonging—a visible Cultural Community Center to celebrate the diversity of our communiSteve T. Martin Photography ty. It could be a place for groups like ours to host potlucks. It could have a library for youth and adults with books and movies. There could be language, cooking or dance classes that we could invite the whole community to share with us. The possibilities are endless. And then maybe, one day, we will grow into a community where we’ve bridged the gap between “us” and “them” and we can all call Central Oregon home. —LeeAnn O’Neill is a founding partner of Allyship in Action, a Central Oregon- based equity and social justice consulting company, and helped co-create the group Asians and Pacific Islanders of Central Oregon.

Recreating outdoors in Central Oregon is a part of our way of life. No matter who you are, what you look like, who you love or what you believe, there are trails, rivers and forests that belong to you. Isn’t it amazing that we all have the opportunity to enjoy so much natural beauty?   I think so, and I think most people would agree.  But do you still feel this way when the campers next to you play music that you hate?  When people use your favorite secret beach as an Instagram backdrop? When a toddler is loudly splashing next to your fishing spot? Do you find yourself wishing that people acted more like you? If we want to make Central Oregon a better place to live, we need to make space for all people to be themselves in our outdoor spaces.  When we “other” those who don’t recreate like we do, we deepen the racial, socioeconomic and political divides that prevent our region from thriving. We also alienate people from the lands we so desperately need them to care for and support. Unless an activity is illegal, unsafe or damaging, there is no wrong way to recreate.   Next time you bristle over someone talking on their phone on the trail or revving their engines on forest roads…take a deep breath and remember that these places really are for all of us.  If you have to work a bit harder to find places where you can recreate your way, it’s a small price to pay for the long-term future of our community and our lands. —Rika Ayotte is the new executive director of the Deschutes Land Trust and chair of the Deschutes Trails Coalition. In her free time, you can find her camping and hiking with her husband, dog and energetic toddler.

FEEL THAT THEY CAN SUCCEED AND THAT THEY

DO BELONG IS IMPORTANT FOR ACCESS.

— ANDREW KETSDEVER

Rob Kerr

The “Delta” in Higher Education By Andrew Ketsdever Throughout my career I’ve seen how a college degree gives a graduate the kind of agency over a future that was otherwise uncertain. In mathematics, “delta” represents a change in some quantity. For higher education, a measure of student success is the delta from the time a student enters college to the time they graduate with a degree. The more the delta, the more the change in the student’s skill sets related to critical thinking, communication and commitment to lifelong learning, among other skills. The trouble with higher education is that this delta is not available to everyone. Barriers come from many places. Certainly, financial barriers are a common theme throughout higher education. However, there are many other barriers, and some are even more challenging than financial. Location of educational opportunities is also a major factor. Having opportunities in Central Oregon is critical for access to those who live here. Locally, however, access is also affected by the lack of available child care and affordable housing. In a recent study (“Public Viewpoints,” Strada Education Network), more respondents identified self-doubt as a barrier than the cost of higher education. Helping students feel that they can succeed and that they do belong is important for access. Part of the delta that higher education provides is a feeling of accomplishment, self-actualization and the confidence that comes from both. However, higher education cannot reach students who do not seek these opportunities because they do not see a successful path for themselves. It is incumbent upon each of us to show all students at a young age that they can succeed in college and that the delta that they secure for themselves can be life-changing. —An aerospace engineer and researcher by training, Andrew Ketsdever joined OSU-Cascades in 2018 as an associate dean and was promoted to dean of academic affairs before being named interim vice president this spring.

17 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

HELPING STUDENTS

Courtesy Rika Ayotte


S

SOUND

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

18

A Q&A with Left Vessel

Nick Byron Campbell details the music behind his new album, ‘One (and Driftless)’ By Isaac Biehl

“C

Don’ t t miss our! this yea

First Interstate Bank

Bend Summer Festival IS BACK TO DOWNTOWN BEND

JULY 10-11

featuring a whole new artistic focus for 2021! Celebrate regional artists, makers, growers and distillers as you soak up the sweet vibes of Summer Fest! Cruise along and indulge the senses with delicious bites, enticing spirits and the fresh foods of summer. Thank you to our incredible sponsors who make Summerfest come alive and help bring the community together!

alming” and “thoughtful” are two of the first words that come to mind when I listen to the new Left Vessel album. It runs organically like a list of thoughts and feelings Nick Byron Campbell (Faded Rituals, Arizona) needed to get off of his chest. But the Bend-based musician doesn’t alienate others in his songwriting, as the LP (Campbell’s first solo work) can be interpreted on multiple levels. It also embodies the sound and spirit of nature throughout. Thanks to Scalehouse, an arts-focused nonprofit in Bend, Campbell was able to receive an artist grant that made the upcoming release possible. This boost also led to the album getting picked up by GiftShop Records. “Their help (Scalehouse) was incredibly gracious and motivating. It’s inspiring to be in a community that prizes creativity and ensures that it’s supported in times of need,” says Campbell. Read our Q&A with Campbell to learn what went into the record, why nature is at the backbone of its sound, and even how Campbell played the tree as an instrument. Source Weekly: What were some of the driving forces of inspiration behind the album’s music and songwriting? Nick Byron Campbell: This whole album ended up being about connection, either to other people or nature. Specifically, the “Driftless” tracks were written and recorded in one extended session in the woods of Minnesota’s Driftless Region while I was undertaking a residency there as the Crystal Creek Canyon Lodge Citizen-Artist in Residence. I was literally recording among the trees and with them, and that deeply influenced the meanings of those pieces of music as I reflected on climate change and humanity’s relationship with the world around us that we are irrevocably a part of, despite the common but absurd belief that somehow we are separate from nature. SW: You mentioned that this album is a more mellow approach than some of your other works. What was it like for you to play more into that acoustic world? I personally really enjoyed how you incorporated sounds of the natural world into the music. NBC: Thank you. I’ve always written music very quietly. Even the louder stuff I’ve made would start out quietly in a room. I think this is a reaction to

Courtesy Nick Byron Campbell

The natural world is Nick Byron Campbell's recording studio.

often writing with people around that I don’t want to bother too much—first my parents, then roommates, now my small child and wife. These were and are always supportive people, but they don’t need to hear me work on 10 seconds of a chorus for 45 minutes. So in a way, actually releasing music like this is sort of like sharing the natural starting point of music that I would often expand upon or make louder/bigger with a band. Regarding the natural sounds, I’ve been tinkering a lot with recording in unique environments lately, and leaving the natural sounds in was a fun outgrowth of that. Some of the tracks were recorded out in the woods, not in a studio, and I found that I loved the noise floor you get—a bit of wind rustling leaves, some birds singing, a bug zipping past. That’s something I think I’ll be doing a lot more of in all of my music. SW: The first single you dropped for the record was “Your Winter,” and it touches on the timing and power of connection between people. Can you elaborate a bit on what that song means to you and the idea of paths crossing? NBC: This could be taken in so many contexts, and I purposely kept the lyrics vague enough that anyone could apply it to some time in their life, but in this instance it was written about something incredibly specific. My grandmother went through a rough breakup right at the end of her life as I was also going through a disruptive breakup, and we bonded during this time in a way we never had in the rest of our lives. It was an interesting situation, because she was not well and clearly headed towards the end of her life, but was also going through this romantic breakup that feels like something we only experience in younger years, and I was also going through something similar but felt like I was actually getting a chance to start life fresh and live anew—which ended up being very true and wonderful.


SOURCE PICKS WEDNESDAY

6/23

FRIDAY

6/23 – 6/30

6/25

SUNDAY

6/27

FREDDY & FRANCINE WITH SIERRA FERRELL KICKING OFF SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL’S

19

An outdoor summer concert series benefiting the SFF’s programs begins with Freddy & Francine and Sierra Ferrell. Enjoy live music alongside food, drinks and the summer sun. Fri., June 25, 7-10pm. Sisters Art Works, 204 West Adams Ave., Sisters. $30-$50. Submitted

SATURDAY

6/26

DIVING INTO BIG MILE AND MULTI-DAY PADDLEBOARDING ON WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS

Unsplash

WILDLIFE WATERCOLOR CLASS CAPTURING THE MAGIC OF THE WILD

If you think you need a raft or kayak to explore the wild rivers of Oregon, think again! Source contributor and athlete ambassador Krystal Marie Collins gives a virtual rundown on how to train and pack for ultra-paddleboard missions. Wed., June 23, 6-7pm. oregonwild.org/events/diving-big-mile-and-multiday-paddleboarding-wild-scenic-rivers. Free.

THURSDAY

An outdoor guided painting class designed to help you connect and capture the beauty of nature! Supplies, drinks and treats are included in the ticket price! Sun., June 27, 3pm. Think Wild, 62410 Erickson Road, Bend. $50.

6/24

SLEEPLESS TRUCKERS OUTLAW COUNTRY LIVE

Americana meets southern rock in this down-toearth band, bringing soulful songs about good times and bad to the vineyard. Thu., June 24, 5-8pm. Faith, Hope and Charity Vineyards, 70450 NW Lower Valley Dr., Terrebonne. $25.

FRIDAY

6/25

THE OREGON I AM BEER HAPPY HOUR RELEASE PARTY! TRY A SPECIAL RELEASE BEER FROM CRUX!

Eight Oregon breweries created special release brews inspired by the land of Oregon. This virtual event will introduce you to the brewers, the beers and Oregon I Am project. ted Submit Head down to Crux Fermentation Project after to try its new brew inspired by the Deschutes Land Trust’s Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Fri., June 25, 4:30-6pm. deschuteslandtrust.org/hikes-events/ hikes/Oregon-i-am-launch. Free.

Submitted

6/27

ANNUAL WILDFLOWER SHOW &PRESENTED POLLINATOR FESTIVAL BY SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER

Celebrate the diversity of flowers in Oregon at a family-friendly festival! Wildflower displays, garden tours, demos and talks designed to educate and plenty of fun activities. Sat., June 26, 9am. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver. $10.

SATURDAY

6/26

THE MOONY AWARDS FEATURING 40 OZ TO FREEDOM!

Head down to Silver Moon this weekend for a local version of the Grammy Awards, but better! Live music acts lined up all weekend long, ending in this award show that celebrates all things music in Central Oregon with a live show from Sublime tribute band, 40 Oz to Freedom! Sat., June 26, 6-11pm. Silver Moon Brewing, 24 NW Greenwood., Bend. $5.

SUNDAY

6/27

PRINEVILLE PRIDE PRESENTED BY PRIDEVILLE AND OUT CENTRAL OREGON

Community events scheduled throughout the month have led up to this final celebration at Pioneer Park. Celebrate community with a fun day featuring LGBTQ+ vendors, resource booths and plenty of pride! Sun., June 27, 11am-5pm. Pioneer Park in Prineville, 450 NE Third St., Prineville. Free.

OUR FUTURE RESILIENCE

TowerTheatre.org

SUNDAY

Submitted

HONEY DON’T LIVE MUSIC AT RIVER’S PLACE

Americana country soul from the heart of the Colorado Rockies. End your weekend with live music on the lawn at River’s Place. Sun., June 27, 6-8pm. River’s Place, 787 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend. No cover.

WEDNESDAY

6/30

MUSIC ON THE GREEN: OLIVIA KNOX SUMMER CONCERT SERIES IN REDMOND Redmond’s Music on the Green returns this summer! Olivia Knox and her band will perform some original tunes and cover songs that will ignite your heart. Wed., June 30, 6-7:30pm. Sam Johnson Park, 15th & Evergreen, Redmond. No cover.

depends on you! Text “Tower” to 44321 to give a gift today.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

SUMMER OF MUSIC!


BEND’S WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

20

CENTRAL OREGON’S GUIDE TO OUTDOOR DINING

2735 NW CROSSING DR, SUITE 105 OPEN M-SAT 11-8 SUN 12-7 (541) 306-6796

mmer Sun w u S ith he t Us y o a nj

t

E

WWW.POKEROW.COM

The Perfect Stop to & from Your River Adventures

a unique outdoor dining experience DOWNTOWN BEND’S BEST HIDDEN GEM

Join us for

Sustainable, scratch cooking in our lush courtyard featuring

Westside 541.647.2198 | 845 NW Delaware Ave Eastside temporarily closed Follow us! @jacksonscornerbend | jacksonscornerbend.com

vertical gardens, shelter from the sun

Reserve your table at jackalopegrill.com Open Wednesday - Saturday evenings at 5pm. 750 NW Lava Rd - Downtown Bend (541) 318-8435

and relaxing music

Truly unwind with a signature craft cocktail!


YES, WE’RE OPEN!

FRESH NEW PATIO! 661 NE Greenwood Ave RockinDaves.com • 541-318-8177

Rockin’ Dave’s

ENJOY SANDWICHES, SALADS, SOUP, BEER, CIDER & COCKTAILS ON OUR PATIO – LOCATED IN THE BOX FACTORY BROWNOWLBEND.COM 541-797-6581

Coffee – Cocktails – Beers on Tap & Vintage Motos Inside

Great Selection of Food Trucks Outside

Live music on the patio Thursday & Friday nights

SUN-THURS-OPEN TIL 8 FRI-SAT- OPEN TIL 9

821 NW WALL, SUITE 100 (541) 323-2328 BACKDOOR PATIO OPEN 4PM TO CLOSE WWW.5FUSION.COM

BISTRO

TM

UNGE BACKSTAGE LO

Authentic Thai Food Happy Hour 2:30 - 6:00

Everyday in the Lounge or Outside

Open for Lunch and Dinner See our website for current hours.

CATERING

Entrance on Bond Street

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

SAME RIGHTEOUS FOOD SERVED ON A

GET IN HERE!

21


BEND’S

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

22

YES, WE’RE OPEN!

Come relax in our outdoor space, listen to music and sip on award-winning cider

COME DINE AND DRINK IN OUR GARDEN OASIS

Stop by

Th. 1–7 Fri. 1–8 Sat. 1–8 Sun. 1–6

1004 NW Newport Avenue in Bend kebaba.com 541.318.6224

AW E S O M

AW E S O M E O E F O O D UTDOOR DIN ING

63455 N Hwy 97 #23

(in Cascade Village across from the Fountain Plaza)

541.312.2022

dinewithdiablo.com

C A S C A D E V I L L AG E S H O P P I N G C E N T E R

(541) 797-6820 | LCBCBEND.COM

Hand-tossed artesian pizza, 18 on-tap craft beers, big screen TVs, indoor and patio seating (541) 382-2007

900 Wall

1082 SW YATES DRIVE

Happy Hour

8PM TO CLOSE

Downtown Bend 900wall.com


Summer is Back!

NEW EVENT FOR 2021! at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds

JUNE 25-27

bbq

brews

whisKey

outdoor Adventure

Marketplace & BUSINESS SHOWCASE

WINDERMERE CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE


Our family of brokers lead the industry in every way. Our agents have the experience and passion to take care of your every need and make your dreams a reality. Let us join you in your search for your own special place here in Central Oregon!

Featured Homes in Central Oergon TERREBONNE

BEND

8295 NE 33RD STREET Great views of Smith Rock! 5 bed/4 bath, 4,090 sq ft, 4.29 acres, shop & RV hook ups

61518 TAM MCARTHUR LOOP Stunning Single Level in Broken Top! 3 bed/4 bath, 2,903 sq ft, .38 acre lot & 3 car garage

OFFERED AT $1,000,000

OFFERED AT $1,210,000

Come join our Windermere brokers as we sponsor the first ever Central Oregon BBQ, Brews & Whiskey Festival, June 25-27, at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds! Stop by our booth and enjoy our putting green, Wheel of Fortune, and dunk tank with chances to win drink tickets and prizes! centraloregonbbq.com

WINDERMERE CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE 807 SW INDUSTRIAL WAY, BEND 541-388-0404

windermerecentraloregon.com


welcome first annual central oregon bbq, brews & whiskey festival

june 25-27, 2021 This all-new event is bringing the traditional art of BBQ to Central Oregon. In addition to beer,

whiskey and BBQ bites from local restaurants, there will also be an Adventure Marketplace

Dry Canyon Stampede Trio

packed with outdoor adventure businesses to inspire your next expedition. Don’t miss the newest BBQ

Competition in the region, highlighting some of the best competitors in the Pacific Northwest. BBQ Bites

Enjoy a sunny summer weekend full of BBQ bites, live music and ice-cold drinks.

Outdoor Adventure

My adventure. My spirit.

PROUDLY SUPPORTING CENTRAL OREGON SINCE 1955

INTERNET | TV | PHONE bendbroadband.com 541-803-8093

BendBroadband® is a registered trademark of Telephone and Data Systems, Inc. Copyright © 2021, TDS Telecommunications Corporation, All Rights Reserved. 205411/6-21/12444


Thanks Twinsters for 25 Years!

Leslie James

Middays, 28 Years

D Shaw

Afternoons, 24 Years

      

THE OREGON ARMY NATIONAL GUARD REPRESENTS SOME OF OUR STATE'S FINEST TRADITIONS. NOT JUST IN OUR VALUES, BUT OUR COMMUNITIES AND THE INDIVIDUALS THAT CHOOSE TO SERVE.

  

                          

WE ARE PROUD TO WORK WITH CENTRAL OREGON BBQ BREW’S & WHISKEY FESTIVAL AND THE LOCAL BUSINESSES THAT PARTICIPATE. THESE CONNECTIONS ARE VALUABLE AND LONG LASTING AS WE ALL WORK TOGETHER DURING OUR PRESENT TIMES.

VE ETITIA GES COMP G W ER N I T R STA EMPLOY D & IDIZE SUBSIT PLANS F BENE

WE OFFER UNIQUE BENEFITS SUCH AS: 1. CREDENTIALING ASSISTANCE TO PAY FOR CERTIFICATIONS IN MANUFACTURING AND TRADES. 2. 100% TUITION ASSISTANCE FOR YOU TO OBTAIN A COLLEGE DEGREE. 3. OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE YOUR COUNTRY, STATE, AND LOCAL COMMUNITY. 4. LIVE AND SERVE CLOSE TO HOME, PART TIME, WHILE LIVING YOUR BEST LIVES WITH FAMILY, FRIENDS, AND CAREER. 5. WE PROVIDE GREAT JOB TRAINING. 6. YOUR TIME WITH US WILL GENERATE THE GREATEST EXPERIENCES OF YOUR LIFE. TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR VALUES AND SERVICE TO YOUR STATE CONTACT STAFF SERGEANT SHAFFER AT 971-284-6125 -6125 OR GO TO WWW.OREGONARMYGUARD.COM

      

REDMOND CAMPUS LOCATED AT 2999 SW 6TH ST

CONSUMERCELLULAR.COM/ABOUT/CAREERS


music lineup

Thomas T & The Blue Chips

Loose Platoon

Friday

Saturday

Redwood Son

5-6pm – After a coming out of the gates

Pete K Groove Grass

6:30-8pm – Pete is an award winning singer-songwriter, flat picker, and cutting-edge musician’s musician, No stranger to life out on the road, Pete has spent over two decades bringing his voice and guitar to stages all over the world. After 19 years submerged in the Colorado bluegrass scene sharing the stage with bands such as Leftover Salmon, Greensky Bluegrass and Yonder Mountain String Band, Pete now resides in Bend, OR spending most of his days writing, recording, teaching guitar, song schools, doing photography/ videography, touring as a solo act and performing with others in small group gatherings under Covid-19 guidelines.

SUNDAY Austin Lindstrom

12-1pm: Catch night two of this origi-

Austin Lindstrom

nal country artist!

12-1pm –

Austin is an original country artist who grew up in Pendleton, Oregon and is currently based out of Redmond, Oregon. He has opened up for Craig Morgan, James Otto, Jason Michael Carol, and Sunny Ledford. In July, 2019 he opened the entire LRS Country Music festival, which had over 3,500 attendees. Some venues he has played at are Ponderosa Lounge in Portland, OR, Three Rivers Casino in Florence, OR, and Blue Lake Casino in Blue Lake, CA. Austin has a special ability for engaging with crowds and gains new fans everywhere he goes. He is a talented songwriter and provides a special experience for his audience.

Joseph Balsamo 1:30 – 2:30pm – Joseph Balsamo

Loose Platoon

is a Chicago born singer songwriter, who’s style weaves turn of the century blues with old country, and mid century folk to create his own unique acoustic brand of American music. He has lived and worked in Central Oregon since 2003, and serves as the front man for the throwback rock and roll trio, Boxcar Stringband. An avid fan of blues music and old cars, Joseph will be heading into the studio this spring/summer to record his latest collection of songs.

8:30–10pm – Loose Platoon front man

Juniper & Gin Duo

Ben Dufendach translates his version of the truth & Delta Blues with his infectious slide guitar and red-blooded vocal energy. Locked in step are Spencer Snyder on drums, Darin Gentry on stand-up bass and Humble Will on lead guitar.

to Blues Festivals and playing at Jam nights at legendary Clubs like the Kingston Mines and Rosa’s Checkerboard Lounge, jamming with Sugar Blue, Joanna Connors and many other artists. Joined by a Cascade Blues Association Hall of Famer, Stu Kinzel on Guitar and Vocals, this is the Real Blues at its best!

Eric Leadbetter Bobby Lindstrom & Ed The Whistler 4:30–6pm – Born in a small timber town on the Oregon Coast, Bobby's passion for music began in the early 60’s with his first guitar and a pile of Beatles and blues records. He was just 10 years old. Bobby developed into a high energy, soulful, blues influenced rock 'n roller with 9 records under his belt and is heading for his 10th in 2020. His experienced guitar skills, stories and personality create his style. His friends and fans know the intensity and love of music that pours through him while performing, and can be truly justified watching a live show.

LeftSLide 6:30–8pm – 4 piece Rock band built

from the bones of good ol’ party timeHeavy Rock n’ Roll, rhythm & blues, swampy southern rock, country twang, metal rhythms that have swagger & bounce complete with greasy slick & gritty fresh beats.

Thomas T & The Blue Chips 8:30 – 10pm – Thomas T and The Blue Chips are based in Bend, Oregon and have been playing Clubs, Festivals and Private Events for 6 years now. They play authentic Chicago and Texas style Blues that are fun and funky!

3–4pm – Original Oregon folkgrass

comes as close to describing Juniper and Gin as any genre can. Juniper and

Thomas T fell in love with the Blues after discovering that so many Rock Guitar players were all inspired by Blues giants like Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and BB King. He started going

1:30 – 30pm – Eric Leadbetter was born in the town of Bozeman, MT. He spent his youth hanging at his families ranch in Ennis MT, and snowboarding at Bridger bowl.

His musical career started in 2003 when he recorded his first solo album, Eric’s cosmic kitchen. He then moved to Boulder, CO in 2004 when he started playing out in local coffee shops and small bars. In 2006 he established the rock n roll band, Jive Coulis with some good friends from high school. They traveled to over 20 states performing in the veggie oil powered school bus Sharleena.

Dry Canyon Stampede Trio 3:30–4:30pm – County Classics to

contemporary with a blend of rockin’ rhythms and moving ballads. We are a friendly, professional, and courteous group that enjoys entertaining and making great music!

Centr alOregonBBQ.com

hot in late 2008, Redwood Son found himself almost completely lost in the fall of 2009, when original drummer and long time Friend Kipp Crawford was tragically killed. It was a long road back, and on the heels of that tragedy, Redwood Son was named “Best New Artist” of the 2010 Portland Music Awards. In June 2011, he followed with a Double Album titled “The Lion’s Inside” which showcased some prolific songwriting prowess, and a lofty Debut effort.

Gin delivers finely crafted songs with excellent musicianship, harmonies and real soul. The sound encompasses bluegrass, folk and old country, melding them into a good ol’ pot of musical stew. His songs touch on themes of life’s ups and downs with honesty and superb storytelling. Juniper and Gin is one of Oregon’s most exciting up-andcoming string bands. You are guaranteed to have a foot-stompin’ good time and you may even find yourself singing along to these catchy original tunes

Leftslide


Your Truck and SUV Superstore.

We work hard every day to earn your business for life.

PROUD SPONSOR

IN-STOCK NOW! COME TEST DRIVE THE

2021 SILVERADO 1500 TRAIL BOSS

CHEVROLET CADILLAC OF BEND 345 NE 3rd Street, Bend, Oregon

(541) 408-9394

BendChevrolet.com


event map HWY 97

REDMOND

TO BEND SE

Y WA AI T R RPO

PA HE RK RE

DDR HOO MT

MTJEFFERSONDR

EVENT

O N

DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR & EXPO CENTER

BBQITION

DR

ET P M O C WHISKEY & BEER

SHADE PAVILLION RESTROOMS

SPONSOR ROW

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

WCASE SS S H O

ENTRANCE & EXIT

FESTIVAL STAGE

BUSINE

FOOD COURT

BBQ JUDGES TABLE

Centr alOregonBBQ.com

EG OR AL CENTR

EVENT

ENTRANCE


outdoor adventure marketplace The Outdoor Adventure Marketplace specializes in bringing fun and a sense of adventure into our daily lives including RV & motorcycle, camping, climbing, metal arts,

survival, axe throwing, hunting & fishing, meat packing, and hot sauces just to name a few — From the backyard to the outback!

featuring Wild Horse Harley-Davidson

Pepper Prepper

Spencer Aircraft

Manski Media

Free Spirit Recreation

Redpoint Climbers Supply TruNorthwest Exchange

Centr alOregonBBQ.com

Norwex Independent Consultant CBD Fountain Bend Sauce

Cinder Butte Meat Co.

Central Oregon Psychic Bushcraft Northwest Quickfire

Hoss Soss

Bahko Eyewear

Metolius Hemp Company Bella-Nuova Bend Axe

Farmers Insurance-Pat Kirby

Smile-A-Mile Painting Bunk & Brew

Sticks & Stones

Bend Laser Lipo CD Originals

Hardenbrook Hardwoods Bend Axe Throwing Dirt Road Garage Oregonizm

National Solar Fred Sauce

JLB Investments/Tru-Wave Renewal by Anderson Local Knits

Salagy Sauce

Smokey Bag Jerkey


bbq

BBQ Competition

A new regional BBQ competition sanctioned by the Pacific Northwest BBQ Association. Watch BBQ pit masters from around the region as they battle for the best ribs, chicken, brisket and pork, and maybe try a sample or two! Thanks to Sisters Meat & Smokehouse for supporting the sport of BBQ competitions. Join us on Saturday, June 26 as we kick off the cooking or head down on Sunday, June 27 as the judging begins! Awards will be given on Sunday to the winners in each category and the coveted top spots.

From local BBQ enthusiasts sharing their BBQ tradition to regional favorites

Bad Boys BBQ – BBQ that’s bad to the bone. Grab a plate of brisket, pork or ribs smothered in sauce and served with classic sides.

spreading sweet funnel

Bigfoot BBQ Co. – Wood

Fired BBQ served off of our custom cooker. Brisket and pulled pork on a bun. A walking taco menu! Plus, traditional sides, homemade pickles and four eclectic sauces.

The Pizza Cart – Get some

BBQ pie!! Featuring a tangy molasses brisket pie, a mango chicken Habanero pie, classic Carolina pulled pork BBQ pie, all made fresh and baked to order in their 800-degree oven.

cake joy, there will be plenty snack on as you stroll through the festival and take in the music, competition and outdoor adventure!

Northwest Wing Shop –

Southern style wings. Northwest mindset. Wings in every style and every flavor.

Craft Kitchen and Brewery – Munch on a Brisket sand with Napa slaw or pickles served with chips or grab a side of mouthwatering burnt ends.

High Altitude Dogs -

Sausage dogs smoked at Sisters Smoke House and served off of grill with macaroni and cheese.

Funnel Cakez – Mini cupcake-size funnel cakes served with Carmel or chocolate and whipped cream.

Pop’s Southern BBQ –

True Texas style BBQ! Featuring spareribs, sliced brisket and pulled pork served classic sides including poblano coleslaw and potato salad.

Centr alOregonBBQ.com

BBQ Bites


110 S. SPRUCE ST.

541-719-1186

Sisters Oregon

Everyday

9AM-6PM

Premier Sponsor Please join us for giveaways and a chance to win our event T-shirt!

WWW.SISTERSMEAT.COM

VISIT US AT OUR BEND, NEWPORT OR LAKEVIEW LOCATION

815 NE GREENWOOD AVE OPEN MON - SUN 541.389.1043

Top Shelf Medicine.co


wh i s k e y & b r e w Whiskey & Spirits

Crater Lake Rock & Rye -

Classic drink with Rye Whiskey, dark cherry, blood orange and bitters. Ready to drink, great for camping and tailgating.

Golden Road Mango Cart Wheat Ale - A series inspired by

the iconic fruit cart vendors of Los Angeles. A light, refreshing wheat ale with lots of fresh mango and a pleasant, slightly tart finish.

Crater Lake Rye Whiskey -

Oregon- Crater Lake Reserve Rye has rich notes of toffee and a distinct peppery finish. The higher proof and pronounced rye flavor are perfect for complex cocktails for the serious whiskey enthusiast.

truly small-batch bourbon starts with traditionally grown corn, rye and malted barley. Prior to being coopered, the barrel wood is seasoned in open air, rain, wind, sun, and snow for eighteen months, softening the wood’s harsh tannins. The barrels are then slowly toasted and heavily charred to further enrich the wood’s desirable flavors. This meticulous process yields a truly hand-crafted spirit with aromas of crème brûlée and spice cabinet, as well as notes of rich caramel, dark chocolate, and vanilla bean on the palate with a sweet, lingering finish.

Noble Oak Double Oak Bourbon - Noble Oak Double

Oak Bourbon is a unique awardwinning bourbon finished with sherry oak sourced by the Master of Wood at Edrington, producers of the world’s finest single malts. With notes of honey and ripe cherries.

Dry Fly Straight Washington Wheat Whiskey - The first whiskey that

dry fly ever created. With its 100% wheat mash bill, this is the perfect whiskey for someone looking for a light, smooth, easy drinker. Made completely from local grains, it truly is a wonderful offering.

Buffalo Trace Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey - Ancient buffalo carved paths

through the wilderness that led American pioneers and explorers to new frontiers. One such trail led to the banks of the Kentucky River where Buffalo Trace Distillery has been making bourbon whiskey the same way for more than 200 years.

Oregon Spirit Distillers Straight American Bourbon Whiskey - Oregon

Spirit Distillers Bourbon Whiskey is a four-grain bourbon made with corn, rye, wheat, and malted barley. This whiskey is made and aged for four years on site in Bend, Oregon. After four years of maturation in new American white oak barrels, the barrels are married and a touch of water is added to bring our whiskey to 94 proof. Oregon Spirit Distillers Bourbon stays true the sweet corn-on-the-cob nature of bourbon with a spicy cinnamon twist from the rye grain.

Brews Widmer Hefeweizen - Meet the

beer that started it all. Our naturally cloudy flagship brew starts with the highest quality wheat. It’s bold, clean flavor and pronounced citrus and floral aromas are what define American style hefeweizen.

10 Barrel Reel Good Summer Ale - Brewed using

traditional methods and subtle Champagne-like fermentation, this Kolsch-style summer ale is clean, crisp, balanced and almost as light as a dry fly. These cans fit conveniently in the front pocket of your Simms waders, and pairs well with your favorite backcountry fishing spot. Fish It Well and Drink Beer Outside!

Kona Big Wave Golden Ale - Big Wave is a lighter-

bodied golden ale with a tropical hop aroma and flavor—smooth, easy drinking, and refreshing. The use of caramel malt contributes to the golden hue of this beer, and our special blend of hops provides a bright, quenching finish that makes it a struggle to not grab another one.

Elysian Dragonstooth Stout - Pours a deep, midnight black with

a light tan head. Smells of coffee and dark chocolate and the mouthfeel is velvety smooth with flavors of roasted malts, oatmeal and warm bread. Dragonstooth is a very drinkable stoutsatisfying but not heavy.

Mountain IPA? It’s the merger of two prominent IPA styles: a West Coast IPA and an East Coast Hazy IPA. Delivering a smooth profile that consists of mango, tangerine, and grapefruit, we’ve mixed the tropical fruitiness of a hazy with the piney, juicy, citrus of a traditional IPA. This Mountain IPA was brewed for hitting the outdoors because nothing beats this combo when you’re chilling around the fire.

Elysian Contact Haze IPA - Brewed in Washington, Elysian

Contact Haze IPA uses a quirky mix of ingredients for a special flavor. A blend of punchy hops like El Dorado®, Mosaic® and Southern Passion give this beverage bright, fruity notes. Juicy and succulent, Elysian Hazy IPA is brimming with bursts of raspberry, citrus, guava and passion fruit.

Cacti Agave Spiked Seltzer: Pineapple – From the mind of Travis

Scott and made with 100% blue agave, the pineapple flavor pairs perfectly with summer

Bud Light Lemonade Seltzers - The bubbly

refreshment of seltzer meets the taste of sweet lemonade!

Bud Light Mango Seltzer -

For those anytime easy drinking occasions. We'd put it up against any other seltzer out there! Made with pure cane sugar, sparkling water, and a hint of natural fruit flavors.

LIMITED AVAILABILITY: 10 Barrel X Taps: Tropical Lullaby – Coconut Lime Sour. For some reason it's hard to get coconut flavor infused in a sour beer. In typical 10 Barrel fashion, we threw in more coconut than we had ever used in a beer up to this point. We added a touch of lime to brighten and bring together the flavors. Yum!

10 Barrel X Taps: Unbridled Spirit – The Kentucky Common style

is a throwback to a popular beer during the prohibition era. Designed to be brewed and consumed quickly to avoid prosecution, the Kentucky common is a simple beer yet truly refreshing. A base of 6row Barley Malt and flaked corn is given just a hint of color by Chocolate Rye Malt, and balanced with Crystal and Saaz hops. Crisp, yet slightly creamy, bright, clean and sessionable.

Centr alOregonBBQ.com

Woodinville Straight Bourbon Whiskey - This

10 Barrel Nature Calls IPA -


YOUR LOCAL MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS HELPING CLIENTS SINCE 1998

ACHIEVE THEIR REAL ESTATE GOALS We offer solutions for:  First-Time Buyers

 Veterans

 Move-Up Buyers

 Investors

 Reverse Mortgage (62+)

 New Construction

 Rural & Hobby Farms

 Everything in Between

Do you have questions? Contact one of your local Bend Mortgage Specialists Today!

Scan Here!

RANDY VANCE

SEAN DUNN

NMLS - 1455628

NMLS - 1254960

Producing Branch Manager

Mortgage Specialist

541.280.8294

541.632.3545

541.385.6112 | links.directorsmortgage.com/bend

This advertisement is intended for informational purposes only. Pre-Approval Advantage Certificate is based on information received from the borrower and it should not be construed as a formal loan approval; nor does it acknowledge a full commitment to lend by Directors Mortgage. Information deemed reliable but subject to change without notice. Qualified Borrowers only, subject to credit approval. This is not a commitment to lend. Call for Details. Directors Mortgage, Inc. NMLS-3240. Arizona Mortgage Banker License BK-0942517. ©️2021 Directors Mortgage


LIVE MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

CALENDAR

>

Tickets Available on Bendticket.com Courtesy Fox and Bones

23 Wednesday

23 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Craft Kitchen & Brewery Comedy Open Mic A chance to people to test out their stand-up comedy chops! See ipockpro.com for rules and sign up procedures. 8-10pm. Free. Worthy Brewing The Brothers Reed at Worthy

Brewing Co. The Brothers Reed are on tour from Southern Oregon! Folk/Bluegrass/Americana with edgy sibling banter, The Brothers Reed are guaranteed to entertain. 7-9pm. No cover.

24 Thursday 10 Barrel Brewing Co. Pub & Brewing Facility Sunset Sessions & Farmers Market: Coyote Willow Join us on the Eastside brewery lawn beer garden for our weekly farmers market and live music with Coyote Willow! 5-8pm. No cover.

Bridge 99 Brewery Thursday Trivia Night at Bridge 99 Join us each Thursday for UKB Trivia. Free to play, win Bridge 99 gift cards! 6pm. Free.

Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House Amateur Karaoke League The Yard @ Bunk+Brew Presents: Amateur Karaoke League ! Exactly what it sounds like. Amateurs singing their favorite tunes. No one has talent, but everyone has fun. Come grab a pint and sing those jams! 6-10pm. Free. Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House Full Moon Fusion Night Love and Healing in the Yard for the first full moon of summer! Come dance and listen to the soothing vibes of DJ Jah Yogi and Jhana Sounds. Their set will encompass live art, choreographed dancing, and themes of technology and healing modalities to strengthen your soul for the summer. 6-10pm. Faith, Hope and Charity Vineyards

Sleepless Truckers The Sleepless Truckers bring Outlaw Country, Americana, Southern Rock and Red Dirt to the West throwing in a Central Oregon Smokey twist for a redneck tilt-a-whirl. 5-8pm. $25 for adults, childern 12 and under $15.

Open Space Event Studios Comedy at Open Space: Carl Lee Headliner: Carl LeeCarl Lee has toured all over the U.S performing in major comedy clubs, casinos, colleges and comedy festivals. 7-9pm. $40. River’s Place Loose Platoon Loose Platoon

frontman Ben Dufendach translates his version of the truth & Delta Blues with his infectious slide guitar and red-blooded vocal energy. Locked in step are Spencer Snyder on drums, Darin Gentry on stand-up bass and Humble Will on lead guitar. 6-8pm. No cover.

Silver Moon Brewery Juju Eyeball Beatle

People Assemble! Your fav Beatles cover band rocks all the hits and then some. Party on, Jojo. 6-8pm. No cover.

Silver Moon Brewing Trivia on the Moon!

Come play trivia with us at Silver Moon Brewing every Thursday night. Bring your friends, test your knowledge and compete for Silver Moon gift cards and prizes. 7-9pm. Free.

The Brown Owl Responsible Punks Catch this talented young band from Arizona. 6-8pm. No cover. Volcanic Theatre Pub Milo & DJPK at

Volcanic One Time Show for MILO MATTHEWS in collaboration with Local artist DJPK. For a special night of awesome grooves, landscapes, and funkaliscious prosperity! 8-11:30pm. $15.

Portland-based Fox and Bones is coming to 10 Barrel's Eastside location. Check out this dynamic duo on Sun., June 27, from 2-4pm.

25 Friday 10 Barrel Brewing Co. Pub & Brewing Facility Sunset Sessions: Bobby Lindstrom &

Friends Join us on the Eastside brewery lawn beer garden for live music with Bobby Lindstrom & Friends! 6-8pm. No cover.

Bo’s Falafel Bar Pride on the Lanai - at Bo’s

Join us for little soirees being hosted by the mother of The Cult of Tuck, Deb Auchery! Join Deb and friends for a night of queer joy, community and togetherness! 8pm. No cover.

Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House High Desert Music Nights High Desert Night Featuring Arizona’s own Responsible Punks and special guests. 6-9pm. No cover. Cascade Theatrical Theatre A Uniquely

Offensive Comedy Showcase: Sister Ethel and Friends Join Sister Ethel’s irreverent carnival church where the audience picks out the sermon topic while Sister Ethel and Reverend Woodmansee preach the funny word. For Mature Audiences. 7:30pm. $15 in advance $20 at the door.

Faith, Hope and Charity Vineyards Live

at the Vineyard: The Parnells Lead singer of the band Precious Byrd, Corey Parnell and his wife Whitney have been singing together since they met. But when their voices mesh together, it's magic and with the recent release of their debut album, The Parnells are destined for greatness. 6-9pm. $15.

General Duffy’s Waterhole Nate Botsford Portland-based artist Nate Botsford’s country rock hybrid style is a lifetime in the making. 6:30-9:30pm. $10.

High Desert Music Hall Comedy at HDMC: Carl Lee We are bringing comedy to Redmond and The High Desert Music Hall! Headliner: Carl LeeHosted by: Katy Ipock. 7-9pm. $30-$50. Horseshoe Tavern Austin Lindstrom at The Horseshoe Great food, live music and an awesome outdoor atmosphere! 7-10pm. No cover.

Silver Moon Brewing Production Facility Trivia On The Moon Redmond Trivia On the Moon! Now in Redmond! 7-9pm. Free.

Sisters Art Works Freddy & Francine + Sierra Ferrell SFF’s Summer of Festival series begins in style with a co-bill concert featuring Freddy & Francine and Sierra Ferrell! Outdoors on the lawn at the Sisters Art Works with food, beer, wine, cider and non-alcoholic beverages available to purchase. 7-10pm. $30-$50. Spoken Moto The Kronk Men Doom surf chaos from the high desert of central Oregon. 6-8pm. No cover. Volcanic Theatre Pub The Shining Dimes w/ Deep Dirt Band at Volcanic The popular and Oh-So-Good Country/Alt-Country outfit The Shining Dimes LIVE at Volcanic Theatre Pub. Come enjoy a delicious night of music and dancing. The Deep Dirt band Opens. 8-11:30pm. $10.

26 Saturday 10 Barrel Brewing Co. Pub & Brewing Facility Sunset Sessions: Dead Lee Join us on

the Eastside brewery lawn beer garden for live music with Dead Lee from 6-8pm! 6-8pm. No cover.

Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House Saturdays in The Yard with Mike Wayock Mike Wayock is a guitarist and vocalist who has played sets all over Nashville and Bend. The yard will be stocked up with food trucks and a vivacious beer garden all just for you! 6-9pm. No cover. Cascade Theatrical Theatre A Uniquely Offensive Comedy Showcase: Sister Ethel and Friends Join Sister Ethel’s irreverent carnival church where the audience picks out the sermon topic while Sister Ethel and Reverend Woodmansee preach the funny word. 7:30pm. $15 in advance $20 at the door. Craft Kitchen and Brewery Comedy at Craft: Carl Lee Saturday Nights are made for laughter at Craft. Headliner: Carl Lee. Featuring: Katy Ipock. Hosted by: Courtney Stevens, Co-Owner of Craft Kitchen & Brewery. 8-10pm. $30-$50.

Submitting an event is free and easy.

Crux Fermentation Project Magical Mystery Four @ Cruxapalooza Come celebrate nine years of community and craft beer with us! We’ll have 25 beers on tap, live bands playing all day, and a tie dye t-shirt station. 4:30pm. No cover. Elk Lake Resort 8th Annual Music on the Water Join us for our 2021 Music on the Water Summer Series sponsored by Boneyard Beer and Crater Lake Spirits and enjoy free great music by our extremely talented local and regional bands! Schedule: June 26 - Joanna Lee. 5pm. No cover. General Duffy’s Waterhole Union Road

Union Road has assembled a team of award-winning Nashville songwriters to assist in crafting a top-shelf musical catalog that is already garnering the attention of industry leaders and fans across North America. Tickets available at eventbrite. com/e/153707640691 6:30pm. $15.

On Tap Juju Eyeball Plenty of Beatles on tap

tonight with local favorite Juju Eyeball. All the hits, all the fun. 6-8pm.

Silver Moon Brewing Silver Moon Brewing Presents... The Moony Awards! A celebration of live music and local bands and musicians in Central Oregon, modeled after The Grammy Awards, but better! A night of awards and recognition that ends several days of live music and events at Silver Moon Brewing. 6-11pm. $5. Sisters Art Works Jenner Fox + Anna Tivel

SFF’s Summer of Festival series continues its first weekend with a co-bill concert featuring Jenner Fox and Anna Tivel! Outdoors on the lawn at the Sisters Art Works with food, beer, wine, cider and non-alcoholic beverages available to purchase. 7-10pm. $30-$50.

Sisters Depot Steve and Margot at Sisters

Depot Road trippin’! We’re heading to the beautiful town of Sisters for a fun night of music-making! 6pm. No cover.

The Horseshoe Tavern Braving The Fall Outdoor stage 21+ 7-10pm. No cover. Volcanic Theater Pub Revenge of the Tuck Your favorite drag crew, The Cult of Tuck is back for revenge! It’s been over a year since we’ve had the opportunity to grace you with our beauty and honey, we are READY! 8-11pm. $20.

Add your event to our calendar at bendsource.com/submitevent


Have a burrowing rodent problem? Who you gonna call?

Residental • Commercial • Farm & Public Lands Office

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

24

541-205-5764 cell 541-331-2404 gopherbusters@live.com

Moles, Voles, Gophers and Squirrels

TRAPPING • GASSING • RESULTS

FEATURED PERK

BEND PINE

NURSERY

25% OFF $100 GIFT CERTIFICATE $100 for $75

Purchase discount gift certificates online at

perks.bendsource.com

Cheers to 21 Years

Swimsuits and River ck F loaties in sto es Bikinis & one piec

Central Oregon’s Only Sexual Health Resource Center

Your One Stop Adult Fun Shop!

ONLINE SHOPPING & CURBSIDE PICKUP AVAILABLE OPEN MON - SAT 11AM-7PM & SUN 12-7PM

visit www.prettypussycat.com 1341 NE 3rd Street, Bend 541-317-3566


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

Worthy Brewing Summer Sessions: Black-

strap Bluegrass Hope to see you on the outside stage at Worthy Brewing for some tasty licks and even tastier beer! 7-9pm. No cover.

27 Sunday on the Eastside brewery lawn beer garden for live music with Fox & Bones. 2-4pm. No cover.

10 Barrel Brewing Co. Beats On The Bricks: The ABluestics Join us for live music on the Westside patio with The ABluestics! 4-6pm. No cover. Faith, Hope and Charity Vineyards Live at the Vineyard: Union Road Excellent country music band! 6-9pm. $15.

River’s Place Honey Don’t Americana country soul from the heart of the Colorado Rockies 6-8pm. No cover. River’s Place Sunday Brunch & Trivia Grab

Courtesy Responsible Punks

30 Wednesday Craft Kitchen & Brewery Comedy Open Mic A chance to people to test out their stand-up comedy chops! See ipockpro.com for rules and sign up procedures. 8-10pm. Free. Sam Johnson Park Music on the Green: Olivia Knox Olivia is excited to be joined on stage for this concert with the beat master drummer Nole Kennedy and Mr smooth on the keys James Knox, also known as “dad.” 6-7:30pm. Sisters Depot Sisters Depot Music and Spo-

ken Word Sisters Depot Music and Spoken Word allows local artists to share and connect with a live audience on our beautiful outdoor stage. Email amyterebesi@gmail.com if you have any questions. 6pm.

Worthy Brewing Summer Sessions: DJPK oin

us on the patio for live music with DJPK! Otherwise known as singer-songwriter Pete Kartsounes, DJPK is fresh, funky and all about the moment. 7-9pm. No cover.

your team and join us for this fun competition of the mind. Free to play and prizes to win! Noon-2pm. Free

MUSIC

Silver Moon Brewing Not Cho’ Grandma’s

The Ultimate Oldies Show A locally-pro-

Bingo We host our famous bingo event every Sunday morning for good times and a chance to win some cold hard cash! 10am-1pm. Free.

Sisters Saloon & Ranch Grill Summer

Sunday Nights: Superball Greetings time travelers and bell bottom wearers – the 70s are back! And Superball is ready to rock. Featuring guitarist Kye Kennedy, bassist Dan Larsson, and drummer Paul Eddy - all from the wildly popular Beatles cover band, Juju Eyeball. 6-9pm. No cover.

28 Monday Bridge 99 Brewery Monday Night Trivia Now playing Mondays (Thursdays too!), it’s live UKB Trivia at Bridge 99. Free to play, win Bridge 99 gift cards! 6-8pm. Free.

29 Tuesday The Commons Cafe & Taproom StoryTell-

duced, syndicated, weekly, thematic two-hour radio show highlighting the music, artists, producers, musicians and cultural touchstones of the late 1940s through the late 1960s. Fridays, 6-8pm. KPOV, 501 NW Bond St., Bend. Contact: mikeficher@gmail.com. Free.

Ukulele Meet Ups Do you play ukulele ? Want

Redmond It’s UKB Trivia outdoors on the partially sheltered patio with gas fire pits. It’s free to play with prize cards to win! 6pm. Free.

B E N D T I C K.CEO MT

Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts, Prints from the Permanent Collection

Sisters Arts Association’s Fourth Friday Artwalk Visitors can leisurely stroll through town

Lindy Hop Swing Dancing! Come alone or

with a partner but either way, you are guaranteed to move and groove. Sundays, 7-8pm. Through June 27. The Space, 2570 NE Twin Knolls Drive, Suite 110, Bend. Contact: info@bendlindyhop.com. $10.

Seksé Summer Showcase Bend's premiere dance, pole and sculpt fitniss boutique is having its Annual Summer Showcase. Join us for live performances, raffles, drinks and morez! All ages. Performances start at 4:30 PM! June 26, 4-8pm. Box Factory, 550 SW industrial way, Bend. Free.

Retro Japanese Monster Movies Every ma-

Initiative Brewing Tuesday Night Trivia in

ARTS / CRAFTS

DANCE

Craft Kitchen & Brewery The Workout - Free

Bingo with Beulah’s Place Tuesday Night Bingo is Redmond’s Best FUNdraiser & home to “The Give Back,” giving back to our community while giving more to our guests! 6pm. $5.

away to a magical land of Oz. Bring the whole family + All Ages. June 30, 8pm. Tin Pan Alley, Off Minnesota, between Thump and the Wine Shop, Bend. $15-$30. Contact: info@outcentraloregon.com.

to learn? Bunk+Brew is hosting weekly Ukulele Meets Ups for all skill levels with songbooks and light instruction from skilled players. Tuesdays, 7-9pm. Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House, 42 NW Hawthorne Ave, Bend. Free.

FILM EVENTS

General Duffy’s Waterhole Tuesday Night

Responsible Punks is playing two shows at two venues while they are in town. Find them at The Brown Owl on Thu., June 24 and at Bunk + Brew on Fri., June 25.

Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts provides a creative conduit for educational, social, and economic opportunities for Native Americans through artistic development. Wednesdays-Saturdays. Through June 26. Scalehouse Gallery, 550 NW Franklin Ave, Bend.

er’s Open Mic Come to play or come to listen, you won’t be disappointed either way. Hosted by local musician Bill Powers, sign-ups start at 5pm sharp, mic goes live at 6. Outdoors with plenty of room and views. Sponsored by Bend Cider Co. Free.

Comedy Show Watch some of your favorite local comics work out new jokes. Enjoy Craft’s great beer and delicious food! 8-10pm. Free.

25

jor blockbuster with a city-destroying climax would not exist without one genre that started it all: the Kaiju movie. Thursdays. Tin Pan Alley, Off Minnesota, between Thump and the Wine Shop, Bend. $30.

Takeout Tuesday w/ Classic B Horror Films! That's right, bring your takeout and we’ll

bring the rest! Tuesdays, 7:30pm. Through June 29. Tin Pan Alley, Off Minnesota, between Thump and the Wine Shop, Bend. $30.

Wizard of Oz - OUT in Focus with BendFilm Join BendFilm in Tin Pan Ally to celebrate

Central Oregon Pride. Watch Dorothy get swept

during regular gallery hours, engaging with galleries, artists and the wide variety of methods that they use to make art. Fourth Friday of every month. Through Sept. 3. Downtown Sisters.

Wildlife Watercolor Class Join Think

Wild and our volunteer artist Carolyn Parker for a wildlife watercolor class outdoors at the wildlife hospital. June 27, 3pm. Think Wild, 62410 Erickson Road, Bend. $50.

PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBITS Annual Wildflower Show & Pollinator Festival Celebrate the diversity of

wildflowers in Oregon and the pollinators who love them. Pre-purchase tickets online and save $2! June 26, 9am. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver. $10.

Diving into Big Mile and Multiday Paddleboarding on Wild & Scenic Rivers Join writer + athlete ambassador

Krystal Marie Collins for a rundown on how to train and pack for ultra paddleboard missions! oregonwild.org/events/diving-big-mile-andmulti-day-paddleboarding-wild-scenic-rivers. June 23, 6-7pm. Free.

In Time’s Hum: The Art and Science of Pollination In Time’s Hum dives into the world of pollinators, with a focus on the flowers essential to their survival. May 22-Oct. 24. High Desert Museum, 59800 S. Highway 97, Bend.

The Woods Withstand: The Fierce Battles for Oregon’s Forests In this virtual event, we’ll look at the ecological role of Oregon’s forests and the fight for their conservation that continues today. June 23, 6-7pm. Free.

WORDS In Person Event: Ask Emily - A Writing & Fortune Telling Salon Explore the generative aspects of poetry and fortune-telling at this salon and poetry reading. June 26, 10am-Noon. Sisters Library, 110 North Cedar Street, Sisters. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/event/61982. Free.

Language Exchange Ever want to learn a

second language? Already know one? Come share your language or learn a new one! June 30, 6-8pm. Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House, 42 NW Hawthorne Ave, Bend. Free.

The Adventure Guide to Living a Kickass Life Book Launch The event will

include: book signing (people will be able to purchase a book there or order one on Amazon prior for me to sign), a reading and a meet and greet time. June 25, 6-9pm. Thump Coffee NW Crossing, 549 NW York Dr., Bend.

Rediscovered Reads Book Club We will discuss The Art of Hearing Heartbeats by Jan Philipp-Sendker. Please visit roundaboutbookshop. com for Zoom info. June 23, 6-7pm. Free. Zoom Author Event: Legends of the North Cascades by Jonathan Evison Dave

Cartwright used to be good at a lot of things: good with his hands, good at solving problems, good at staying calm in a crisis. But on the heels of his third tour in Iraq, the fabric of Dave’s life has begun to unravel. Visit roundaboutbookshop.com for event information. June 24, 6-7pm.

THURSDAY JUNE 24 AT 7PM

FRIDAY JUNE 25

SATURDAY JUNE 26

COMEDIAN CARL LEE

CENTRAL OREGON BBQ, BREWS & WHISKEY FESTIVAL

2021 BEND BEER RUN

at Open Space Event Studios

at Deschutes County Fairgrounds

at The Commons

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

10 Barrel Brewing Co. Pub & Brewing Facility Sunset Sessions: Fox & Bones Join us

CALENDAR


WooHoo!

The BEER run is back! WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

26

FIND DEALS HERE

Saturday

JUNE 26 SAVE 20%-50%

on your favorite loca l businesses

5K with beer Stops SIGN UP at bendraces.com/bend-beer-run

Purchase discount gift certificates online at perks.bendsource.com

WALL FLOWER Huge Selection • Great Prices

Good herb from good people. theherbcenter.co/hello

Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug For use only by adults twenty-one.years of age and older. Keep out reach of children.


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

CALENDAR Courtesy Lay It Out Events

ETC. Preventative Walk-In Pet Wellness Clinic The Bend Spay and Neuter Project offers

vaccinations, deworming and microchips at our walk-in wellness clinic. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Bend Spay & Neuter Project, 910 SE Wilson, Suite A1, Bend. $10-$30.

27 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

VOLUNTEER Call for Volunteers - Play with Parrots! Friendly people needed to help socialize birds to ready for adoption, make toys, clean cages and make some new feathered friends! Located past Cascade Lakes Distillery, call for hours and location. Contact: 916-956-2153.

General Volunteer Opportunities For in-

formation on volunteer opportunities at Bethlehem Inn please contact Courtney, Community Engagement Coordinator, at volunteer@bethleheminn.org. Bethlehem Inn, 3705 N Hwy 97, Bend.

Humane Society Thrift Store - Volunteers Needed Do you love animals and

discovering “new” treasures? Then volunteering at the HSCO Thrift Store Donation Door is the perfect place to combine your passions. For information contact: rebecca@hsco.org. Humane Society Thrift Shop, 61220 S. Highway 97, Bend.

Volunteer Opportunity Volunteer at Mustangs

To The Rescue. Please call and leave a message. Mondays-Sundays, 9am-6pm. Mustangs to the Rescue, 21670 McGilvray Road, Bend. Contact: 541330-8943. volunteer@MustangstotheRescue.org.

Volunteer with Salvation Army The Salva-

tion Army has a wide variety of volunteer opportunities for almost every age. Contact: 541-389-8888.

Volunteers needed! New Volunteer Orien-

tations every Sunday at 10 am. Please come and meet the herd and learn ways you can help out! Sundays, 10-11am. Through Dec. 26. Equine Outreach Horse Rescue, 60335 Arnold Market Rd, Bend. Contact: 541-729-8803.

GROUPS & MEETUPS A Course in Miracles This is a course in mind training. We practice together seeing through the eyes of love rather than fear. If you are interested please call me or email me at 760-208-9097 lmhauge4@gmail.com Saturdays, 10:30am. Free.

Altius Pride Night Open House & Play

Come bring yourself, friends and family to play in, check out and dance in our studio and to celebrate the community. Door prizes and raffle will be available to win including a six month membership, t-shirts, swag and more! June 26, 6-9pm. Altius Pole Studio, 20370 Empire Ave suite C3, Bend. Free.

Bend Chamber Toastmasters Improve your

public speaking and leadership skills in a fun, relaxed environment. Check our site at bendchamber. toastmastersclubs.org for the link. Wednesdays, Noon-1pm. Through July 7.

June 2021 Central Oregon PubTalk Join us in-person for this month’s PubTalk, as we hear from local companies and business leaders from the area! June 24, 5pm. McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 NW Bond St., Bend. $26-$36. Prineville Pride Show up and Show OUT: It’s Prineville Pride Engaging & empowering activities in line with Pride Month. June 27, Noon5pm. Pioneer Park, Prineville, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville. Free. River Neighbor River Walks Learn more

about our Riverhood and River Neighbor ecology in this one-hour walk guided by Think Wild experts. Fourth Sunday of every month, 8-10am. Through Sept. 26. Old Mill District, 450 SW Powerhouse Dr. Suite 422, Bend. Free.

Soul in Motion Online Gathering Trust

your body to move with what moves within, inspired by the music & other dancers, with support

Wacky costumes are encouraged at the Bend Beer Run; join the fun this Sat., June 26 at Noon in Downtown Bend.

to guide you to tune in to you. June 23, 4:155:30pm. Contact: soulinmotionbend@gmail.com. First class is free.

Soul in Motion Outdoor Gathering

Everyone welcome, location will be shared with those who register. Facilitated to guide you to connect more deeply with yourself and the world around you. June 30, 6-7:15pm. soulinmotionbend@gmail.com. First class is free.

FAMILY & KIDS Amelia’s World Puppet Show Join Amelia

Airheart Monkey & Miss Hannah for a fun & uplifting interactive zoom puppet show! Message ACORN School of Art & Nature on Facebook to request the zoom link. Fridays, 4-4:15pm. Contact: facebook.com/acornartandnature. Free.

Aviation Summer Camp Explore the

career opportunities in the industry. Tour maintenance and factory facilities. Take flight in our Robinson 44 and Cessna 172 aircraft. Mon, June 28, 9am-2pm, Tue, June 29, 9am-2pm, Wed, June 30, 9am-2pm. Leading Edge Flight Academy, 63048 Powell Butte Hwy, Bend. Contact: launch@flybend.com. $995.

Junior Shredder Four Week Camp The

goal is to work on skills and get out for fun rides each week! All skill levels are welcome. Wednesdays, 3pm. Through Sept. 1. Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 SW Century Dr., Bend. Contact: cierra@ ladiesallride.com. $175.

Kids Ninja Warrior Summer Camp This

summer, drop off the kids (age 6 - 12) for our Kids Ninja Warrior Summer Camp! We’ll be having fun both inside and outside. June 28-July 2, 9am3:30pm. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. $285.

Nano Ninja Summer Camp Drop off your

Summer Math Enrichment Camps & Tutoring Join master teacher Debbi Mason,

founder of Flourish Bend, for engaging and fun explorations with mathematical content this summer, 2021. Wednesdays, 9am-3pm. Through Sept. 8. Flourish Bend, 361 NE Franklin Ave, Bend. Contact: 541-848-2804. flourishbend@aol. com. $50-$80.

The Youth Choir of Central Oregon Auditions YCCO is recruiting talented, enthu-

siastic singers, grades 5-8 for the Debut Choir and highly motivated singers grades 8-12 for the Premiere Choir. To schedule a ZOOM audition, or for more information, call the YCCO office 541385-0470 or visit ycco.org. Through June 30.

FOOD EVENTS Madras Farm-to-Table Market A new

opportunity for Jefferson County farmers and ranchers to sell their products directly to consumers with the City providing a high-visibility location, free vending spots and marketing assistance. Fridays, 2-6pm. Through Sept. 3. Madras City Hall, 125 SW E St., Madras.

BBQ Beet Salad Fire up the grill to make this summery BBQ roasted beet salad on a bed of arugula & goat cheese with a charred citrus vinaigrette. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar/ event/61896. June 24, 3-4pm. Free. Redmond Street Festival Arts, Crafts, Food Free to the Public Covid regulations in place June 26, 10am-5pm and June 27, 10am-4pm. Downtown Redmond, 6th Street & Evergreen, Redmond. Saturday Market Come down for some

shopping and a Mimosa. Saturdays, 11am-3pm. Through July 31. General Duffy’s Waterhole, 404 SW Forest Avenue, Redmond. Free.

kids (age 4 - 6) this summer at Free Spirit! June 21-25, 12:30-3:30pm. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. $155.

Sisters Farmers Market We’re happy to announce that we’ll be able to enjoy live music at the market this year! Sundays, 11am-2pm. Through Oct. 3. Fir Street Park, Sisters.

Ninja Elite Kids (age 8 - 12) increase your athletic performance through the exciting sport of Ninja Warrior! Tue, June 22, 4 and 5:15pm. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. $72.

The Central Oregon BBQ, Brews & Whiskey Festival The first event of its

Ninja Night It’s Parents' Night Out - that’s right come drop off your kids (age 6 - 12) for 3 hours of fun in our super-rad indoor Ninja Warrior play space! Fridays, 5-8pm and Saturdays, 6-9pm. Through July 3. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend.

kind, The Central Oregon BBQ, Brews & Whiskey Festival + Marketplace will feature beer and whiskey tastings alongside several food vendors offering BBQ options from around the world. June 25-27, 4pm. Deschutes County Faigrounds, 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond. $10.

The Suttle Lodge: Wednesday Cookouts Find us in the rustic village bbqing on our Traeger every Wednesday alongside a special

guest brewery with some live local tunes, too. Wednesdays, 5-7pm. Through Sept. 1. The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse, 13300 Hwy 20, Sisters.

BEER & DRINK

2021 Bend Beer Run Make the Bite of Bend Beer Run an annual June tradition! The Bite of Bend Beer Run sends participants along a 5K race loop enjoying the fine beer from local breweries along the way. This is a 21 & over event. Noon-5pm. $35.

Cross Cut Warming Hut: Locals’ Day!

Every Tuesday enjoy $1 off regular size draft beverages. Tuesdays. Cross Cut Warming Hut No 5, 566 SW Mill View Way, Bend.

Growler Discount Night! Enjoy $2 off growler fills every Wednesday at Bevel! Wednesdays. Bevel Craft Brewing, 911 SE Armour Rd. Suite B, Bend. Hope for Littles Happy Hour We invite you to join us for a Happy Hour to support our mission of hope and empowerment for youth and community in Central Oregon. June 29, 5:30-7:30pm. Bend Golf & Country Club, 61045 Country Club Dr., Bend. Contact: events@bbbsco.org. $35. Locals’ Night We offer $3 Pints of our core

line up beers and $4 pours of our barrel aged beers all day. Mondays. Silver Moon Brewing, 24 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend.

Locals’ Day Come on down to Bevel Craft Brewing for $4 beers and cider and $1 off wine all day. Tuesdays. Bevel Craft Brewing, 911 SE Armour Rd. Suite B, Bend. The Oregon I Am Beer Happy Hour Release Party! Join brewers and land

trusts for a free, statewide virtual happy hour celebrating the Oregon landscape through the lens of beer. June 25, 4:30-6pm.

Pub Run Join us at Cascade Lakes every Wednesday for a 3-5 mile loop run, starting and ending at the Bend Brewpub! June 23, 6-8pm. Cascade Lakes Brewpub, 1441 SW Chandler Ave., Bend. Wine on the Deck Come sit, relax and learn from the different Willamette Valley wineries featured on our year-round wine list. Reservations required. Tuesdays, 2-6pm. Through Aug. 31. The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse, 13300 Hwy 20, Sisters.


ALWAYS HERE FOR YOU

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

28

Mary Ann Ahmed, MD

James Carlson, DO

Cheryl Czapla, MD

No matter the challenges our community faces, we’re here for you Our mission is the same as it has been for over 40 years — to provide the best healthcare possible to the women in our community. Since the

Regan Gage, MD

Jane Howell, MD

Janelle Strom, MD

Julie Wheir, MD

beginning, compassionate support has been the spirit that has united our providers as they’ve built trusted

PROVIDING IN-PERSON AND VIRTUAL VISITS TO KEEP PATIENTS SAFE AND HEALTHY.

relationships with patients. Today, this spirit unites us all. Ciara Thomson-Barnett, CNM, WHNP

Emily Harris-Deutch, FNP

CARING FOR WOMEN SINCE 1980 Katie Farnsworth, CNM

Bree Herndon, DNP, CNM, ARNP

OReilly_20180116_15_50026_a_BW.jpg

Celebrating over 40 years of supporting Central Oregon families! Christina Davis, PA-C

OReilly_20180116_15_50026_a_Color-Background.j...

OReilly_20180116_15_50026_a.jpg

eastcascadewomensgroup.com | (541) 389-3300

Import Performance Auto Repair

* FREE Loaner cars * FREE Courtesy Shuttle Text-only line * for appointments (541) 378-4920 Van * Sprinter Specialists

541-382-9599 • Importperformanceusa.com


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

ATHLETIC EVENTS 10 Barrel Riding Solo Series - Week 3: Giddy Up! An essential Bend ride around Horse

10 Barrel Riding Solo Series - Week 4: Funner’er The final week’s course is “Funner’er.”

One of THE best courses around Bend. June 27July 3. Wanoga Sno Park, Cascade Lakes Highway, Bend. $25.

more efficiently, and how rowing can get you in the best shape of your life. June 26, 8:30-11:30am. Fortitude Fitness Training, 63222 Service Road, Bend. Contact: info@fortitudefitnesstraining.com. $99.

Lookout Mountain Trail #804 Join edu-

5K run/walk course and great, local beer! June 26, 11am. Crux Fermentation Project, 50 SW Division St., Bend. $15-$30.

Bend Area Running Fraternity The group

Mountain Bike Ride, Metolius Preserve

will run, maintaining social distance, along the Deschutes River and then receive discounted drinks from the cidery after the run! Mondays, 5pm. AVID Cider Co. Taproom, 550 SW Industrial Way, Bend.

CORK Saturday Run at Thump Coffee

We will head out for a long run then meet back at Thump for a coffee. Saturdays, 9-11am. Through Aug. 28. Thump Coffee - NW Crossing, 549 NW York Dr., Bend.

CORK Thursday Run Join us for a 3-5 mile

run along the river trail. Meet at Zpizza Bend at 5:50; run at 6pm. Thursdays, 6pm. Through Aug. 28. Zpizza Tap Room, 1082 SW Yates Drive, Bend.

Redmond Running Group Run All levels

welcome. Find the Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook for weekly run details. Thursdays, 6:15pm. Redmond.

OUTDOOR EVENTS Bend Photo Tours - Crater Lake Photo Workshop Want to get the most out of a photog-

raphy workshop with sunset, night photography, sunrise and day shooting tips and techniques in one of the Wonders of Oregon? June 26-27. Box Factory, 550 SW industrial way, Bend. Contact: toni@bendphototours.com. $749.

Girls AllRide Junior Shredder Four Week Camp The goal is to work on skills and

get out for fun rides each week. Through June 30. Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 SW Century Dr., Bend. $175.

Grit Clinics: Beginner/Intermediate Skills We’ll begin by dialing in our bike setup and

body position, then work on skills throughout the afternoon. Saturdays, 1:30-3:30pm. Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 SW Century Dr., Bend. Contact: info@gritclinics.com. $75.

Grit Clinics: Cornering & Switchbacks OR Jumping* Cornering/Switchbacks (odd

dates): We’ll practice bermed corners, flat loose corners and switchbacks until we’re all dizzy with progression! Jumping (even dates): We’ll start by practicing fundamental skills in grass that lead to jumping, (like body position, wheel lifts, level lifts and bunny hops) then take it to small jumps. Saturdays, 11am-1pm. Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 SW Century Dr., Bend. Contact: info@gritclinics.com. $75.

Grit Clinics: Happy Hour Trail Ride ‘N Skills Join Grit Clinics at a new trail each

week to work on specific skills needed for the features you will encounter. Fridays, 4-6pm. Phil’s Trailhead, Skyliner Rd, Bend. Contact: info@gritclinics.com. $75.

Grit Clinics: Skills & Ride Join us for three

hours of skill-building fun while you take your riding to the next level! Sundays, 10am-1pm. Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 SW Century Dr., Bend. Contact: info@gritclinics.com. $99.

Grit Clinics: Women’s Foundational Mountain Bike Skills Calling all ladies new

29

Indoor Rowing Fundamentals Workshop Learn how to get faster, techniques to row

cator and naturalist David Vick to learn how to teach yourself to identify wildflowers using the Peterson method. June 30, 9am. Lookout Mountain, Meetup will be at the US Forest Service Building in Prineville, 3160 NE Third St. (Hwy26), Prineville. Free.

Beer Run - Crux Fermentation | 2021 OR Brewery Running Series Join us for a

Courtesy Free Spirit Yoga

to mountain biking! In just two hours, you’ll feel more confident setting up your bike, shifting, braking, and navigating small trail obstacles after instruction from the skilled coaches at Grit Clinics. Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30pm. Seventh Mountain Resort, 18575 SW Century Dr., Bend. Contact: info@ gritclinics.com. $75.

Join the Deschutes Land Trust for a 6-8 mile mellow, beginner/intermediate mountain bike ride at the Metolius Preserve. June 30, 4-7pm. Metolius Preserve, near Camp Sherman, Sisters. Contact: event@deschuteslandtrust.org. Free.

Pollinator Plant Giveaway The Deschutes Land Trust and Bend Pollinator Pathway have teamed up and are giving away free milkweed and native pollinator-friendly plants! June 27, 11am. Wild Birds Unlimited, 2680 NE Highway 20, Bend. Free.

HEALTH & WELLNESS Anti-Racist Book Club & Social Justice Series, supports Namaspa Foundation

June: “My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies” by Resmaa Menakem, PJ Fritchman July: “Caste The Origins of Our Discontents by Isabel Wilkerson, Marisa Funk Meets via Zoom. Tuesdays, 7-8pm. Through Sept. 7. $25 per book / $60 for series.

Balance, Strength & Mobility Program

Bend Council on Aging is sponsoring Fallproof™ Balance and Mobility training. An evidence-based multi-dimensional and multi-sensory balance, strength, and mobility training program. Tuesdays-Fridays, 10:30am. Through July 6. SNAP FITNESS, 1310 SE Reed Market Rd #130, Bend, OR 97702, Bend. Free.

Bend Pilates Bend Pilates is now offering a full

schedule of classes through Zoom! Sign up for your class on Mindbody.com and download Zoom. Prior to start you will receive an email invitation to join class. Be ready with mat, weights, roller, and/or band and login five minutes prior to class time. For more information visit bendpilates.net/classes/.

Capoeira: A Perfect Adventure Become your own hero. The Brazilian art form of Capoeira presents opportunities to develop personal insights, strength, balance, flexibility, musicality, voice, rhythm, and language by tapping the energy of this rich cultural expression and global community. Text 541-678-3460 for location and times. Mondays-Wednesdays-Fridays, 6pm. $30 intro month. Coaching Group Build your dream life while connecting to a supportive, motivating community. Clarify your goals - internal or external, immediate or long-term, self or other focused. Learn new skills, techniques, and insights to make it happen! Led by Diana Lee, Meadowlark Coaching. Mondays, 6-7:30pm. Contact: meadowlarkcoaching@yahoo.com. $15-25. Free Biofield Tuning Join me, Tami Zenoble,

at the Blissful Heart for a free one-hour, group, Biofield Tuning Session. Biofield Tuning is an energy balancing technique using specialized tuning forks. For more information on Biofield tuning, go to phoenixmoonretreats.com. Message me to sign up. Limit eight people. One free session per person, please. Wed, June 23, 7-8pm. The Studio at Blissful Heart, 29 NW Greeley Ave., Bend. Free.

Outdoor Prenatal Yoga gives moms-to-be a chance to relax, stretch and get social on Sat., June 26 at 10:30am.

Friday Morning Creekside Yoga Join Annie for an all-levels vinyasa class on the creekside lawn. This class will weave yoga and nature together, and some hit tracks from her vinyl collection. Regardless of your level, some deep stretches, steady breathing, and good music outside will be a great start to the weekend. Annie Wilson is an experienced yoga instructor, outdoor fitness enthusiast, personal trainer, and lover of all things nature. For more information or to sign up in advance for class, DM @ yogawithannie Fridays, 10-11am. Through Sept. 3. The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse, 13300 Hwy 20, Sisters. $15. Guided Ashtanga Beginner Class w/ Loving Kindness Meditation Class will

follow Primary Series of Ashtanga and include an introduction to pranayama, ending with a short guided meditation. No experience needed, modifications /adjustments will be made. Come As You Are Practice As You Wish To Be June 25, 7-9am. Terpsichorean Dance Studio, 1601 NW Newport Ave, Bend. Contact: 662-302-1877. cclauren.cruz@gmail.com. $20.

In-Person Yoga at LOFT Wellness & Day Spa In-person yoga classes at Bend’s newest

yoga studio! Tuesdays: Vinyasa with instructor Kelly Jenkins. 5-6pm. Limited to five participants. Thursdays: Foundation Flow with instructor Kelly Jenkins. 5-6pm. Limited to five participants. Schedule online or give us a call to reserve your spot! Tuesdays-Thursdays, 5-6pm. Loft Wellness & Day Spa, 339 SW Century Drive Ste 203, Bend. Contact: 541-690-5100. info@loftbend.com. $20.

Movement & Meditation with Live Cello

A sweet cello serenade with Third Seven to inspire your ritual of movement and breath gently guided by Petit Davina. Please join us to celebrate the sun, healing, abundance, growth, and life! June 26, 5:30-7pm. Namaspa Yoga Studio, 1135 NW Galveston Ave., Bend. Contact: 541- 550-8550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. $20.

Outdoor Prenatal Yoga Picnic Rejuvenate, relax and recharge as you practice yoga outside and then mingle with expectant moms during this special outdoor yoga and picnic event! Refuel your energy and bring more joy to your day by moving the body and socializing with other pregnant mamas! Sat, June 26, 10:30am-Noon and Sat, July 17, 11am-12:30pm. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: info@freespiritbend.com. $18. Overeaters Anonymous (OA) Meeting

Zoom meeting Password: 301247 For more information: centraloregonoa.org/ For assistance, call Terri at 541-390-1097 Sundays, 3-4pm.

Sexual Abuse Support Group Confidential

support group for women survivors of sexual abuse. The primary focus of the group is to develop a support system to share and work through issues related to sexual abuse. Call or text Veronica at 503856-4874. Tuesdays, 6-8pm. Through June 29. Free.

Sundays with The Yoga Lab Wind down your summer weekends with playful grounding outdoor yoga classes steps away from the lodge. Yoga classes are taught by Ulla Lundgren owner of the Yoga Lab in Bend. She has more than 26 years experience as a yoga teacher, yoga teacher training facilitator and studio owner. Yoga classes are accessible and fun for all ages and abilities. RSVP below to guarantee a spot in class. Sundays, 4:30-6pm. Through Sept. 5. The Suttle Lodge & Boathouse, 13300 Hwy 20, Sisters. $15. Sunset Yoga Event This special outdoor

summer yoga event has the benefits of a Vinyasa flow class as well as a restorative and introspective quality of a yin practice. Enjoy the view of the river and mountains and the fresh air around you as you quiet the mind through this balanced evening yoga. Sat, June 26, 7-8:30pm. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: info@freespiritbend.com. $18.

TransParent - Central Oregon Support Meeting TransParent Central Oregon Chapter

hosts its first virtual meeting; with ongoing meetings every Last Thursday of the month - 6-8pm! Transparent strives to provide an environment that encourages parents and caregivers to speak openly about their own experience in raising a transgender or non-binary loved one. June 24, 6-8pm. Contact: central.or@transparentusa.org. Free.

Yoga for Health Care Workers Health care

is a very rewarding line of work, yet often very draining with a high burnout rate. Health care providers, tend to take great care of others yet forget to care for themselves. Join other health care providers for physical yoga practice, meditation, breathwork, and inquiry or self-reflection. Live via Zoom. Tuesdays, 7-8pm. Through June 29. Contact: 541-550-8550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. Free.

Yoga Sculpt 4-Week Series Challenge

your mind and body in this fun, upbeat series sure to take your yoga practice up a notch. Set to fun, upbeat music, Yoga Sculpt fuses the mindful approach of yoga with the physical benefits of strength training! Thursdays, 5:30-6:30pm. Through June 24. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 5412413919. info@freespiritbend.com. $72.

Yoga Teacher Training Open House Join

us to get all your questions answered and get a taste of the training & stay for a free livestream class from 5:30-6:30pm & the Teacher Feedback Session after from 6:30-6:45pm. Register to get the access link. June 27, 3:30-5pm. Contact: 541-5508550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. Free.

Yoga to Calm The Nervous System Rebalance and renew with gentle flow and restorative yoga in this new series. Bring your journal along as an additional access point for reconnecting mind, body, and spirit. Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30pm. Through June 30. Namaspa Yoga Studio, 1135 NW Galveston Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-550-8550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. Free by donation to Namaspa Foundation.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Butte. Riding Solo enables you to race how you want, when you want, against real racers on real courses for position and over $25,000 in awesome prizes and unlockable perks. June 20-26. Horse Butte, Billadeau Rd, Bend. $25.

CALENDAR


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

30

BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN BEND DESIGN Design insights + conversations for curious creators, designers and changemakers

in-person + virtual October 22, 2021

benddesign.org

Friends of the Children Central Oregon is a non-profit who provides 1:1 mentorship for 12+ years, No Matter What. We amplify our youths voices as they write their own stories of hope and resilience.

Follow our journey and donate today at friendscentraloregon.org P.O. Box 6028 Bend, OR 97708 541.668.6836


THE THIRD ACT FOMO YOLO SOLO

C

when we are part of a social context. Older and alone is not anyone’s number-one choice. Maybe you’re living in the same too-big house you and your now-deceased partner shared. (Think about Airbnb-ing one of those extra rooms.) Maybe you retired just before losing a spouse and now have no travel partner, no one to share the news of the day with. (Check out trips for older travelers such as Roads Scholar, read Kent Haruf ’s “Our Souls at Night,” or form a caravan of camper vans and head out!) Maybe you’re fearful after a divorce but living alone isn’t cutting it. (Close to 15% of the population over 65 use dating sites. The opera’s not over…) Maybe dancing was your favorite activity. Maybe your grandchildren are far away. Maybe you realize that most of the world population is far worse off than you and want to do something about it. According to a May 2021 “Sixty Minutes” episode anchored by Leslie Stahl, babies born today will live until 104. The number over 65 in 2020? 56 million. That number will be 80 million in 2040 and 95 million in 2060 as Boomers hit the ageing threshold, a thinly veiled way of saying a candidate for dying. Forty-two percent of those over 65 currently live alone. That climbs to 58% for those 80 and over. Boomers are of interest, socially, politically and economically, but to whom and why? Let’s make certain we drive the discussion about policies that affect us, rather than those who see us as in the way. There’s power in oldster numbers. Boomers are a force for change, not merely an obstacle to younger generations’ progress, as many would have you believe. Just when you thought all you had to think about was putting your feet up, it might be time to put your foot down, to shape the conversation about this demographic you are part of, and while you’re at it, to shape the conversation about all kinds of pressing problems that your life experience can inform. The Central Oregon region has many different nonprofit organizations supporting arts, science, environment, families, education…and they all need you. It’s well documented that isolation is, quite literally, bad for your health—so whatever you do, don’t do nothing and remember, you’re not alone. Us old folks, we’re in this together. —Poet and author Ellen Waterston is a woman of a certain age who resides in Bend. “The Third Act” is a series of columns on ageing and ageism.

31

An intimate series of concerts set in three beautiful Central Oregon locations. Join us this Summer 2021 for these live performances equally unique to the settings in which they occur. Seating is limited to 300 tickets. Reserve now.

JULY 31

Honey Don’t, Joel Chadd Trio, Horse Feathers @ LAPINE STATE PARK

SEPTEMBER 9

Sera Cahoone, Aaron Meyer @ HIGH DESERT MUSEUM

OCTOBER 16

Charlie Porter, Eric Leadbetter @ FORT ROCK STATE NATURAL AREA FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT

wanderlusttours.com/art-in-nature-series

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

OVID leveled the playing field when it came to Fear of Missing Out. After all, no one was having soirees or headed out on a camping trip or meeting at a brewery without you. No one was going to the symphony or theater or floating the river without you. During COVID there was nothing to feel left out about. Now that restrictions are lifting many see the folly and insecurity of their pre-COVID FOMO ways: the unnecessary anxiety and social frenzy it caused, and are resolved not to succumb now that fun is back. We’ll see. Feeling invited, seen, wanted, appreciated, up to date and up to snuff is human nature. We need validation through companionship. As to YOLO, regardless of age, all are charging out of lockdown waving the You Only Live Once banner, determined to make up for lost time. Forget the cost, work is overrated. After a year of having our wings clipped, “Go!” is the clarion call. Ride horses across Mongolia. Don that squirrel suit and leap off the Alps. Get that camper van, cost be damned. Thanks to COVID, we have to accomplish two years-worth of our bucket lists in one. And then there’s SOLO. Unlike FOMO and YOLO, it’s not a hip acronym. It’s a condition. We now all have first-hand experience of SOLO. COVID gave everyone a taste of the one-hand-clapping concept, isolated from our friends, quarantined in our houses or apartments. The poignant image of the young African American boy staring down from the window of a New York City tenement building at a world he wasn’t allowed to access, to experience—he was all of us. The adult child blowing kisses to her elderly parent from outside the assisted living facility—she was all of us. Now, taking the first, unmasked steps toward a longed-for hug after months of distancing, we are startled to discover how emotional these reunions are. COVID created a monotone and monochrome world, a life stripped of color, sound, motion, energy and each other. Through it, we did our best. But still, isolated and alone was, well, lonely. The older among us didn’t require a worldwide pandemic to learn about solitary confinement. In 2020 the death of a partner or a divorce left 28% of Boomers stranded on solo island. I say stranded because, with few exceptions, that’s how people describe living alone. Remember, we’re social animals. We live in a relative sense, know better who we are

By Ellen Waterston


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

32

Trail runs

Redmond THE CITY OF

A SMALL CITY WITH A BIG IMPACT!

back on the trail!

AUG 7

What’s new, what’s changed?

2021 Full marathon Half Marathon 6.5 Mile HaLf as

m/haulin-asp register: bendraces.co

The Redmond issue will explore the changing scene scape.

Discover the culture, people and charm of Redmond in this special issue of the Source Weekly.

en

AD DEADLINE

JULY 9 ON STANDS

JULY 15

For more information about the Redmond Issue and to schedule your ad, call or email

541.383.0800

advertise@bendsource.com


CH

CHOW

Lettuce, Before and After Solstice

LITTLE BITES By Nicole Vulcan

Constanze Riechert-Kurtze / Pixabay

Now’s your last chance to sow quick-growing, heat-tolerant plants, as well as cold-loving crops

33

Ari LeVaux

Sample the Goods Catch these sampler plates from some of the competitors at this weekend’s Central Oregon BBQ Brews & Whiskey Festival

On the heel of the summer solstice, the salad days of summer are upon us.

T

he summer solstice is in the rearview mirror. Even though the hottest days are before us, the longest days are past. If you haven’t planted your tomatoes or melons yet, you might not bother. The plants will grow like steroid abusers, but there isn’t time for the fruit to ripen. Or maybe you’ll get one small melon. Trust me, I’ve been there. But there is a silver lining to the inevitable cooling. This is the beginning of the fall gardening season. It’s your last chance to sow quick-growing, heat-tolerant plants like peas, beans and cucumbers, and time to start sowing your cold-loving crops like lettuce, spinach, beets, broccoli, mustard, cabbage, collards, carrots, kale and radishes, which can live well into winter. So if you’re willing to cover your greens with blankets and even build cold frames around them, you can coax a four-season harvest out of most planting zones. For more details on four season farming, consult the books of Eliot Coleman, of Four Season Farm in Maine, who eats local salad all year long and has written several books, including Four Season Harvest. And if you think you want to give it a shot, by all means plant now and read later! For newbie gardeners who may or may not want to try the winter gardening thing, a fall garden is a final shot at redemption. If your corn isn’t going to be knee high by the 4th of July, or your tomatoes will still be green when the frost hits, or if you haven’t even gotten

around to digging up your garden, or you’re otherwise behind the ball, you might be ready to try again this fall. Starting now, I think I mentioned? For experienced gardeners, planting the fall garden is a second spring’s worth of work, with all of the excitement that goes with it. Yes, it’s another garden chore to add to the weeding, watering and harvesting of summer. But this is also the beginning of a whole new, cold weather garden that could be babied long after the winter solstice, and into the lengthening days. It’s cause for celebration. The reason to wait until summer solstice before planting winter greens is that the pre-solstice lengthening days can cause many leafy plants to bolt, which is something like when a human hits puberty. Changes happen. Irreversible changes, not all of them good. Changes in size, shape and flavor. The plant essentially becomes a long, central flowering stalk, and the leaves get pointy and develop extra-bitter flavor. Now that solstice has passed, you can sow your fall greens, either by direct seed or by planting little starts, without risk of them bolting. Every seven years, the summer solstice falls on Father’s Day, and both days make me think of lettuce. Solstice, of course, because it divides the spring and fall seasons of lettuce, and Father’s Day because my dad used to make the most amazing lettuce salad. We would go into a meditative state as he prepared it, patting down each leaf with a paper towel. He’d store

leftover washed leaves wrapped in paper towels too. He’d serve his salad in these beautiful wooden bowls. It was super garlicky and everybody loved it. It’s perfect as a salad and also quite handy as a condiment of sorts. If you happen to be chewing a glorious morsel of food, perhaps fatty, perhaps meaty, a bite of marinated onions, lettuce and tomato can, and usually does, add to the experience. Dad’s Salad This is the salad I grew up eating, and the ultimate side salad. Serves 2-4, depending on one’s salad intake 1 head romaine lettuce, washed and chopped 1/2 medium onion, minced 1 clove of garlic, minced or pressed 1 teaspoon salt 2 tomatoes, sliced for salad Olives and feta to taste For the dressing 1/4 cup cider vinegar 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 3/4 cup olive oil Toss the chopped lettuce, tomatoes and onions with the garlic and salt. Let sit for 20 minutes. Mix the dressing vigorously and dress, tossing as lightly as possible. Garnish with olives and feta.

Barbecue is kind of a big deal. Whether it’s Texas-style brisket or Korean-style galbi, most cultures have some type of tradition of cooking meat over an open fire—and they all spell deliciousness. All that deliciousness comes together this weekend for the Central Oregon BBQ Brews & Whiskey Festival—a new event debuting at the Deschutes County Fair and Expo Center this year. On top of food trucks, vendors, beer and whiskey, a highlight of the event is the competition, in which at least 16 teams will compete for glory in this Pacific Northwest Barbecue Association-sanctioned event. Competitors will compete in categories that include pork, brisket, chicken and pork ribs. That’s cool and all—but I know you’re wondering how you can get some of those goods. Lucky for you, four of the competitors will offer sampler platters of their goods—and chances are there are some you haven’t yet tried. Competitors offering barbecue samplers include The Original Northwest BBQ Company from Buckley, Washington; BBQ Aloha from Renton, Washington; Fat Dad’s Barbecue from Klamath Falls and The Tipsy Pigs from La Pine. Check ‘em out. Some local favorites will be there as well. While they’re not competing, locals can also look out for barbecue delights from Bend businesses that include Craft Kitchen & Brewery, Pop’s Southern BBQ, Northwest Wing Shop, Bigfoot Barbecue Co. and Bad Boys BBQ, along with other local vendors. If you’re into barbecue, they may have to roll you out of this event. —Central Oregon BBQ is put on by Lay It Out Events, the sister company to the Source Weekly. Central Oregon BBQ Brews & Whiskey Festival Fri., June 25-Sun., June 27 Fri. 4-10pm, Sat. 11am-10pm, Sun. 11am-5pm Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center centraloregonbbq.com $10 admisssion Tickets at bendticket.com

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

By Ari LeVaux


NEW YORK CITY SUB SHOP

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

34

Local Journalism in Your Pocket. Let’s get digital. From social media updates and daily

DOWNLOAD OUR

MOBILE APP

digital newsletters -- we are constantly making sure

Call ahead for Take Out and Curbside pickup. Doordash available for delivery.

your access to local news

that you get the latest, even when you are on the go. Support our mission to expand

Redmond / Bend

740 NE 3RD ST - BEND

541-330-0444

and events by becoming a Source Insider today.

946 SW VETERANS WAY #103 - REDMOND

Sign up on BendSource.com

541-548-4400

Mon-Sat 11:30a-8pm Sun 4-8pm A Truly Thai Experience is here in Bend.

This is it! The issue you’ve all been asking about. The Best Of Ballot Issue

contains the actual ballot our readers use to vote for the winners of the highly coveted Best of Central Oregon Reader Poll! Don’t miss your opportunity to campaign for votes by advertising in this one of a kind edition!

Catering Available A Delivery Available on ordertakeouttoday.com 550 NW Franklin A Ave Suite 148 (Entrance on Bond St.) | 541-647-6904

RESERVE YOUR AD SPACE TODAY! 541.383.0800 | advertise@bendsource.com


SCREEN Personal Journals

SC

Bo Burnham is alone inside By Jared Rasic

35

“I

Bo Burnham: “Inside” Bo Burnham is a genius. I’m just gonna say it right up front so you know where I’m coming from. I was never a big fan of his early YouTube work because it felt like a crass remixing of Jon Lajoie and Weird Al, but after 2016’s comedy special “Make Happy,” Burnham transcended the singing jokester routine and became something entirely different. With his new (I won’t call it a comedy) special, “Inside,” Burnham looks at about a hundred million different things and deconstructs them to the point of absurdity. See, Burnham recorded the entirety of “Inside” while quarantined at his house, shooting basically the entire film in his guest house over the course of a year. All alone. No crew, no camera operator, just Burnham himself, a bunch of cameras, lighting equipment and a staggering amount of anxiety.

For me, the most important thing that “Inside” does is ask a very simple question about 50 different ways so that no one watching can miss it. How are you coping? That’s it. During the filming of “Make Happy,” Burnham started having crippling panic attacks while onstage, leading him to stop performing live for five years. He spent all that time working on his own mental health and just trying to get better. In January of 2020 he decided he was well enough to start performing live shows again and right as he was about to begin, COVID landed and sent him back inside with only his thoughts for company. And sure, many people had it much, much worse than Burnham did, with his rich, white anxiety and ability to reach out to millions of people if he wanted to, but Burnham is also smart enough to know that his privilege definitely cushioned his landing and that he would make a large chunk of money recording himself in quarantine. There’s even a song or two about it. Setting the entire film in one room gives the entire special a claustrophobic feeling that acts as a visual representation of Burnham’s mental health. Throughout “Inside’s” 87 minutes, Burnham’s hair and beard become longer, wilder and more unkempt. His songs become less guarded and the jokes become almost defensive, like he knows he’s supposed to be making a comedy special but doesn’t feel like laughing is very important at the moment. There’s even a song or two about it.

Turning Your Fantasies into Reality 24/7! LINGERIE, NOVELTIES, ADULT TOYS, AND SO MUCH MORE! SALES • RENTALS • VIEWING

20% Off

Entire Purchase

ATM

312-8100

197 NE THIRD ST, BEND

• IN THE OLD TRAX BUILDING NEXT TO STARS CABARET

The messiness of Bo Burnham comes to the forefront in “Inside.”

Burnham isn’t coping well. He spent a year in a small house feeling desperate to get back out in the world and be a part of everything again. But as things start going back to normal, the sun is brighter than he remembered, and the sky is so much bigger than he thought. Maybe he’s not as ready to go back out into the world as he imagined. To me, that’s the biggest message that “Inside” imparts— that it’s OK if you’re not ready to rip the mask off. That even as you’re inside your house or your room or even yourself, that you’re not really alone. Bo Burnham isn’t a genius because of his writing or his singing. He’s a genius

because he knows he has a giant audience and made a 90-minute movie of himself being ugly and scared and stupid and vulnerable and beautiful. Every minute of “Inside” is him trying to heal in a very public and messy way. Maybe being a genius is just being emotionally fearless and giving everyone else permission to be the same. That’s good enough for me. Inside

Dir. Bo Burnham Grade: A Now Streaming on Netflix

A

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Courtesy Netflix

don’t know about you guys, but, um, you know, I’ve been thinking recently that…that you know, maybe, um, allowing giant digital media corporations to exploit the neurochemical drama of our children for profit …you know, maybe that was, uh…a bad call by us. Maybe…maybe the…the flattening of the entire subjective human experience into a…lifeless exchange of value that benefits nobody, except for, um, you know, a handful of bug-eyed salamanders in Silicon Valley…maybe that as a… as a way of life forever…maybe that’s, um, not good. I’m…horny.”


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

36

550

706

1052

NW

NE

NW

1075 SE

Franklin Ave.

Greenwood

Newport

15th St.

3 1 s t A nnua l

Wildflower Show and Pollinator Festival

Saturday, June 26 | 9am - 3pm

Wildflower display ~ Botanic garden tours ~ Educational talks and demonstrations ~ Children’s activities ~ Native plants for sale ~ Educational stations and resources ~ Local vendors and food trucks $

10/adult, $7/child

Reserve your tickets online.

www.snco.org/wildflower


O

OUTSIDE

Riding for the Environment

GO HERE By Megan Burton

Courtesy Museum at Warm Springs

SnoPlanks collaborates with surf legend Gery Lopez on a line of skateboards aimed at supporting natural spaces

37

Courtesy SnoPlanks

S

tarted in 2012 by James Nicol, SnoPlanks has since become a fixture of the extreme sports world in Bend and beyond, with its handmade skateboards and snowboards. So it makes sense that its latest collab is with legendary surfer Gerry Lopez, aka Mr. Pipeline. The new line of boards is called Street Surfer. Designed by Lopez and SnoPlanks, the duo is also teaming up with The Conservation Alliance this year, donating 100% of proceeds from the Street Surfer boards to The Alliance’s summer grant cycle from June through September. Based in Bend, The Conservation Alliance works to “harness the collective power of business and outdoor communities to fund and advocate for the protection of North America’s wild places.” “When we started SnoPlanks, we knew that we wanted to do more with our brand than simply sell a consumer product,” said Nicol, SnoPlanks’ founder, in a press release. “It’s our responsibility as ambassadors for our planet to do whatever we can to protect these wild places and that’s what this collaboration with Gerry and The Conservation Alliance is all about.”

The Museum at Warm Springs.

Celebrate & Support Oregon’s Indigenous Heritage The Museum at Warm Springs kicks off its annual membership drive

Don't try this at home, though these skateboards have the power to set you free.

The Street Surfer line includes three different styles of boards: The Flatwater, a hybrid shape with medium flex and is concave, and “something that lives between a longboard and a popsicle stick.” Then there’s The Cheater, styled as a “classic longboard shape with full camber and slight concave throughout,” that features a fish tail on the rear as a callback to its surfer roots. Lastly, there’s The Popsticle—more of your classic deck style, which SnoPlanks describes as “Perfect for curbs, parks, pools, back roads, and beer runs.” Each Courtesy SnoPlanks

These boards were made for riding; from left, the Flatwater, the Cheater and the Popsticle.

board also features the laser-etched Gerry Lopez signature on top. In layman’s terms? All of the boards look super sick. But what else would you expect when outdoor world powerhouses collide for the greater good? SnoPlanks officially joined The Conservation Alliance in January of this year and is already looking to make a difference through its gear. The money raised for grants given out by The Alliance will be sent out to different wildlife organizations working toward protecting North America’s natural areas and landscapes. If you work for a nonprofit organization or know someone who does, more information on these grants is online at conservationalliance.com. “We’re both excited and humbled by the commitment that SnoPlanks has made with their Street Surfer line,” said Conor McElyea, program manager at The Conservation Alliance. “We appreciate the commitment brands make when becoming members of the Alliance, but 100% of proceeds for the only products they sell for an entire summer is an outstanding vote of confidence in our work, and it will have a very real impact on the amount of support we can provide our grantees in our summer grant cycle.” “There is no right way to do the wrong thing. We start out in business to do the right thing—build the best product or offer the best service, and deal with the endless problems that come with trying to do that. But suddenly we have a much bigger problem on our hands. Our planet is in crisis and our business is about saving our world. This is a problem that all of us need to incorporate into our everyday lives. The wrong thing is not doing anything,” said Lopez. You can find the Street Surfer collection online at snoplanks.com.

Just an hour north of Bend lies a striking structure that houses The Museum at Warm Springs. The museum is a cultural hub that has been preserving and sharing the traditions of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs since 1993. The annual membership drive is an effort to raise awareness about its mission and to grow the membership base. This year’s drive is in honor of Board of Directors member and ancestor Kenneth Smith. Smith passed away in May of 2020 and was well known for his devotion to the Warm Springs community and the museum. Bill Flood, part of the museum’s Community Development team, remembers Smith as a “gentle, collaborative and super, super smart guy.” In addition, The Roundhouse Foundation is matching any funds from new museum memberships during this drive. Nearly 30 years after its opening, the team behind the museum works to provide unique events and exhibits that highlight indigenous history and culture. Flood notes that upcoming events include fundraisers centered around indigenous literature from the past, present and future. On Friday, Aug. 27 and Saturday, Aug. 28 the Museum will host its annual Honor Dinner and Celebration in Portland. U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo and author and Warm Springs elder George W. Aguilar, Sr. will be honored at this year’s event with a chance for indigenous youth to tell their own stories. Members are asked to make a financial contribution and receive free access to museum exhibits, special event invites and join a community of those designed to support the museum and its mission. “The Museum at Warm Springs is about educating the world about preservation, advancement, and sharing of Indigenous cultures throughout the Northwest and beyond,” says Museum Director Elizabeth A. Woody.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

By Isaac Biehl


CH WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

38

CRAFT

Beer for the Mountains, Rivers, Lakes and Forests

Crux is one of eight Oregon breweries taking part in a collaboration aimed at supporting the state’s land trusts By Brian Yaeger

M

ountains, rivers, lakes and forests have long been tools to promote beer brands. Now beer is being used to promote them. Eight Oregon breweries including Bend’s own Crux Fermentation Project have each created beers called The Oregon I Am in support of the Coalition of Oregon Land Trusts. A land trust is a nonprofit organization that takes authority over—or in some cases ownership of—property at the behest of the private owner. They’re often the places you drink beeron-the-go while hiking, floating, birding or simply admiring. The reasons craft breweries switched from glass bottles to aluminum cans are many, but one of them certainly was that lightweight cans can easily be packed in to, well, mountains, rivers, lakes and forests. COLT is the statewide association consisting of some 30 nonprofit land trusts and conservation organizations, and it’d love nothing more than for you to drink any or all of the eight Oregon I Am beers at the 80-plus locales the beers are designed to promote. A map of said land trusts can be found at TheOregonIAm.org. Bend’s Crux Fermentation Project went the extra mile by not just brewing a beer for the great outdoors; brewmaster Larry Sidor and his team brewed their beer in the great outdoors. Brewhouses are sanitized for good reason; to keep the bugs (microfauna and other bacteria) out of the finished product. But Crux’s The Oregon I Am is an “experimental IPA,” made at the Deschutes Land Trust’s Camp Polk Meadow Preserve along Whychus Creek. (A portion of the sales go to the DLT.) The part that makes it an IPA isn’t all that experimental; it’s hopped with Oregon-grown Sterling, Mosaic and Centennial hops. But instead of the usual tanks you may have spied on a brewery tour or behind a brewpub’s windows, Crux brought out a massive pan called a coolship. Coolships allow for spontaneous fermentation, inviting in ambient yeast. Such beers generally end up on the funky, “sour” side, and many months from now it’ll show up as the fourth installment of its Gypsy Coolship series. But the batch was split so part of it could be fermented faster using a yeast strain called Kveik, and that beer debuts this week. Visit the Crux pub on June 25—or other participating breweries if you find yourself in Portland or Enterprise or Eugene—for a toast during happy hour from 4:30-6 pm. A virtual happy

Courtesy Crux Fementation Project

The Crux of it all—support public lands!

hour with introductions to the project and beers will take place online by registering at OregonLandTrusts.org. The other breweries are Von Ebert and Little Beast from Portland, Wolves & People in Newberg, Terminal Gravity in Enterprise, Eugene’s Ninkasi and Oakshire, and Ferment Brewing in Hood River. Oregonian touches abound, from Ferment partnering with Friends of the Columbia River Gorge to Little Beast’s first-ever sour beer focusing on Oregon’s native fruit, the mighty marionberry. “I’m looking forward to trying all of them,” said Von Ebert owner Tom Cook. “I continue to be impressed with these types of projects, with the time and effort breweries put into them. Ten times out of 10, these one-off projects yield some fabulous beer.” Again, the purpose of all this is to inspire people to get involved with protection and conservation efforts to ensure not just that the land trusts survive, but the lands themselves. If it takes an eight-pack of terroir-driven beers to get Oregonians to care about something they should already care about, then bottoms up. Truth be told, COLT would like you to do more than just drink beer, but as Oregonians, you’re sort of pegged as being local craft beer drinkers. It’s one of our things. We also really love the outdoors, so getting you to drink a tasty brew while romping in or dreaming about ponds, waterfalls, high deserts or the coast isn’t that big of an ask. But furtively, the land trusts need more user involvement, specifically in the form of volunteers or financial gifts. COLT Executive Director Kelley Beamer is aware that most Oregonians who actively support their local land trusts skew toward older generations. And not that Boomers and the like don’t love beer, too, but this campaign is aimed at citizens who’ve yet to contribute their time or ducats.


THE REC ROOM Crossword “IS NOT”

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

Pearl’s Puzzle

Difficulty Level

★★

We’re Local!

© Pearl Stark mathpuzzlesgames.com/quodoku

Fill in every row, column, and 3x3 box with each of the letters exactly once.

S C A L P

R E N T

The highlighted letters read left to right and top to bottom will complete the quote:

“Gardens are simultaneously _______ and _______tions. They bring together, in one place, nature and our ideas about nature.” —Michael Pollan

ANSWER TO LAST WEEK'S PUZZLES

ACROSS 1. Left each other’s company 7. “Amtrak Joe,” now: Abbr. 11. Coach K’s crew for one more season 15. “Guilty of grammatical purity as charged!” 16. River of the Basque Country 17. Server’s operating system 18. Moves effortlessly out of the way of danger? 20. Best Supporting Actor of 2019 21. Crime fighters named after Renaissance painters, briefly 22. See 4-Down 23. Series opener 25. Platter’s flip 27. Uses a stopwatch during “Take Me Home Tonight” singer’s set? 30. Phoebe of “Gremlins” 32. Moon unit?: Abbr. 33. Going either way, politically: Abbr. 34. Material 38. Slimes 40. Sign above the SCOTUS bar? 43. “La Vita Nuova” author 44. Diplomat’s dream 45. TV show with the video game tie-ins subtitled “Unsolved!” and “Fatal Conspiracy” 46. Digital form of communication 48. Gangster Gambino 51. Can’t get enough of a window treatment? 56. South American savannah 58. Where Heracles fought the lion 59. Does a landscaper’s job 61. Drinks served in a flight 62. Collective bargaining govt. group 63. Uses a vibrator on the ultrawealthy? 66. “___ Whore” (Cheap Trick song) 67. 1,000 baiza 68. Dreaded strains? 69. Unkind look 70. Ancient, quaintly 71. Mark in the World Golf Hall of Fame

DOWN 1. Ancient Scots 2. ___ clock 3. Country bordered by Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo 4. 22-Across face-off 5. Christmas in D.C. setting 6. Ultimate prop 7. They often take a bow 8. Construction piece similar to an H bar 9. Org. that sponsors competitive shooting programs 10. Non-moving character 11. Brick name 12. Organize employees, in a way 13. Created a litter 14. Nos. entered during a phone tree message 19. Guest’s sleeping spot 24. God-like 26. Achieve Zen 28. Model Sewell or Knowles 29. PGA units 31. Hindu sir 35. Immune system element 36. One who sits on a nest egg 37. D-Day craft 39. Like baggy clothes 40. He played Earl in “My Name Is Earl” 41. You are here 42. Citation at the bottom of a business letter: Abbr. 43. Number of the beast minus XVI 47. Pizza chain 49. Home to FC Barcelona and Real Madrid 50. Modest, as a garage 52. Confine to jail 53. Bit of braggadocio 54. Duchess or baron 55. Swerving crime, briefly 57. ___ Jackson Jr. (Ice Cube’s acting son) 60. Sign-stealing ballplayer, casually 62. Prince of Wales Trophy league 64. Need a sick day 65. Rice unit: Abbr.

“I have found the best way to give advice to your children is to find out what they want and then advise them to do it.” —Harry Truman

39 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

©2021 Brendan Emmett Quigley (www.brendanemmettquigley.com)

Questions, comments or suggestions for our local puzzle guru? Email Pearl Stark at pearl@bendsource.com


REAL ESTATE 20676 CARMEN LOOP, BEND • $4.2M COMING SOON

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

40

COMING SOON! Commercial Space in Bend Cap rate: 6% Square feet: 25,766 Acres: 1.32 acres Built in: 2005 Fully leased

ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I was so flood-

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Trailblazing

ed with yearning I thought it would drown me,” wrote Cancerian author Denis Johnson. I don’t expect that will be a problem for you anytime soon. You’re not in danger of getting swept away by a tsunami of insatiable desire. However, you may get caught in a current of sweet, hot passion. You could be carried for a while by waves of aroused fascination. You might find yourself rushing along in a fast-moving stream of riled-up craving. But none of that will be a problem as long as you don’t think you have something better to do. In fact, your time in the cascading fl ow may prove to be quite intriguing—and ultimately useful.

Capricorn psychoanalyst Ernest Jones (1879–1958) said, “There is no sense of contradiction within the unconscious; opposite ideas exist happily side by side.” In other words, it’s normal and natural to harbor paradoxical attitudes; it’s healthy and sane to be awash in seemingly incongruous blends. I hope you will use this astrologically propitious time to celebrate your own inner dichotomies, dear Capricorn. If you welcome them as a robust aspect of your deepest, truest nature, they will serve you well. They’ll make you extra curious, expansive, and non-dogmatic. (PS: Here’s an example, courtesy of psychologically savvy author Stephen Levine: “For as long as I can remember the alternate antics of the wounded child and the investigations of the ageless Universal played through me.”)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In my opinion, psycholo-

60661 THUNDERBIRD CT, BEND • $949,900 JUST LISTED

Beautifully updated home in Mtn High gated community! This property is nestled at the end of a cul de sac, surrounded by mature pine trees, on just under half an acre! This home boasts 3 bedrooms, master on the main with private deck space. Enjoy a wrap around, covered porch with rear deck space for entertaining. Lots of living space at 3250 square feet, 2.5 bathrooms as well as a 3 car garage! Lots of natural light throughout with expansive windows in every room! The home is adjacent to the Old Back nine golf course and is situated off the 12th fairway.

2370 SW HELMHOLTZ WAY, REDMOND • $875,000 Mid Century Modern Earth Advantage Home built by award winning builder JD NEEL Construction. Large 2,100 sq ft Single level home featuring open floor plan, high end finishes and RV garage. Located on an oversized 1.56 acre city lot in Southwest Redmond with numerous mountain views. Room to build a shop and or ADU.

2552 NW MAJESTIC RIDGE, BEND • $1,195,000 Beautiful light and bright Pahlisch Home Located on an oversized lot In Rivers Edge Village. Open floor plan great for entertaining. The kitchen has quartz countertops, SS JennAir appliances, tiled backsplash, and oversized walk-in pantry. The primary room is on the main floor with an oversized bathroom complete with shower, soaking tub, and walk-in closet. This home has 3 bedrooms, an office and a large bonus room upstairs along with a 3-car garage! Amazing, covered outdoor spaces to take in all four seasons.

52260 NATIONAL ROAD, LA PINE • $599,000 This charming fully fenced horse property features a large horse corral, a 30x40 shop with drive-through access, 2 carport areas and RV hook up. The 3 bed 3 bath single level home offers open floor plan, with many kitchen upgrades including granite countertops, bamboo flooring, and crown molds throughout. The home is situated on a larger corner lot with parklike settings and fully equipped with solar power.

gy innovator Carl Jung, born under the sign of Leo, was one of the 20th century’s greatest intellects. His original ideas about human nature are central to my philosophy. One of my favorite things about him is his appreciation for feelings. He wrote, “We should not pretend to understand the world only by the intellect; we apprehend it just as much by feeling. Therefore, the judgment of the intellect is, at best, only half of the truth, and must, if it be honest, also come to an understanding of its inadequacy.” I bring this to your attention, Leo, because the coming weeks will be a favorable time to upgrade your own appreciation for the power of your feelings to help you understand the world.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): For the indigenous Ojibway people, the word Adizokan means both “story” and “spirit.” In fact, story and spirit are the same thing. Everything has a spirit and everything has a story, including people, animals, trees, lakes, rivers, and rocks. Inspired by these thoughts, and in accordance with cosmic omens, I invite you to meditate on how your life stories are central elements of your spirit. I further encourage you to spend some tender, luxurious time telling yourself the stories from your past that you love best. For extra delightful bonus fun, dream up two prospective stories about your future that you would like to create. (Info about Adizokan comes from Ann and John Mahan at SweetWaterVisions.com.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Author Aslı ErdoÐan writes, “It had been explained to me from my earliest childhood that I would know love—or that thing called ‘love’—as long as I was smart and academically brilliant. But no one ever taught me how to get that knowledge.” I’m sorry to say that what was true for her has been true for most of us: No one ever showed us how to find and create and cultivate love. We may have received haphazard clues now and then from our parents and books and movies. But we never got a single day of formal instruction in school about the subject that is at the heart of our quest to live meaningful lives. That’s the bad news, Libra. The good news is that the rest of 2021 will be one of the best times ever for you to learn important truths about love.

695 SW MILL VIEW WAY SUITE 100 • BEND, OR WWW.ALEVISON.WITHWRE.COM

tarist Django Reinhardt was a celebrated jazz musician in occupied France during World War II. Amazingly, he was able to earn good money by performing frequently—even though he fi t descriptions that the rampaging Germans regarded as abhorrent. Nazis persecuted the Romani people, of which he was one. They didn’t ban jazz music, but they severely disapproved of it. And the Nazis hated Jews and Blacks, with whom Reinhardt loved to hang out. The obstacles you’re facing aren’t anywhere near as great as his, but I propose we make him your role model for the next four weeks. May he inspire you to persist and even thrive in the face of challenges!

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean author Richard Matheson believed we’ve become too tame and mild. “We’ve forgotten,” he wrote, about “how to rise to dizzy heights.” He mourned that we’re too eager to live inside narrow boundaries. “The full gamut of life is a shadowy continuum,” he continued, “that runs from gray to more gray. The rainbow is bleached.” If any sign of the zodiac has the power to escape blandness and averageness, it’s you Pisceans—especially in the coming weeks. I invite you to restore the rainbow to its full vivid swath: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Maybe even add a few colors.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Author Albert Camus advised everyone to “steal some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self.” That’s excellent advice for you to heed in the coming days. The cosmos has authorized you to put yourself first and grab all the renewal you need. So please don’t scrimp as you shower blessings on yourself. One possible way to accomplish this goal is to go on a long stroll or two. Camus says, “It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter.” But I think you are indeed likely to be visited by major epiphanies and fantastic new meanings.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Before he journeyed

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Robert Mugabe

in a spaceship to the moon in 1971, Scorpio astronaut Alan Shepard didn’t think he’d get carried away with a momentous thrill once he arrive at his destination. He was a manly man not given to outward displays of emotion. But when he landed on the lunar surface and gazed upon the majestic sight of his home planet hanging in the sky, he broke into tears. I’m thinking you may have similar experiences in the coming weeks. Mind-opening, heart-awakening experiences may arrive. Your views of the Very Big Picture could bring healing upheavals.

was Zimbabwe’s leader for 37 years. In the eyes of some, he was a revolutionary hero. To others he was an oppressive dictator. He was also the chancellor of the University of Zimbabwe, where his wife Grace received her PhD just two months after she started classes. I suspect that you, too, will have an expansive capacity to advance your education in the coming weeks—although maybe not quite as much as Grace seems to have had. You’re entering a phase of super-learning.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian au-

James Keane 541.207.2270 | Levisongroupinfo@gmail.com

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian gui-

thor Clarice Lispector observed, “In a state of grace, one sometimes perceives the deep beauty, hitherto unattainable, of another person.” I suspect that this state of grace will visit you soon, Sagittarius—and probably more than once. I hope you will capitalize on it! Take your time as you tune in to the luminescent souls of the people you value. Become more deeply attuned to their uniquely gorgeous genius.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “We were clever enough to turn a laundry list into poetry,” wrote author Umberto Eco. Judging from astrological omens, I suspect you’re now capable of accomplishing comparable feats in your own sphere. Converting a chance encounter into a useful new business connection? Repurposing a seeming liability into an asset? Capitalizing on a minor blessing or breakthrough to transform it into a substantial blessing or breakthrough? All these and more are possible.

Homework: Describe what you’re doing to heal the world. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com


TAKE ME HOME

REAL ESTATE

By Abbie + Rick Sams Licensed brokers, Team Sams at Fred Real Estate Group

Geoff Groener Licensed Broker

Water Conservation at Home Simple steps for everyone

www.SkjersaaGroup.com

541.383.1426

1846 NE 13th REMODELED MIDTOWN

NEW

400 NW Columbia RIVERFRONT DREAMS

NEW

61644 Summer Shade Dr MOUNTAIN & RIVER VIEWS

PRICE REDUCED

daniellezollmanhomes@gmail.com

419-618-8575

Danielle Zollman

Your Coastal Connection

Geoff Groener

REAL ESTATE

Your Coastal Connection the water meter over a short time period. If no water has been used, the water meter should not have moved. Leaks can amount to gallons of wasted water per day. Make sure the toilet isn’t leaking by adding food coloring to the tank. If it appears in the bowl, there’s a leak. These leaks are easily remedied and will save many gallons of water. When buying new appliances, make sure they’re Energy-Star certified. A full-sized Energy-Star-certified clothes washer uses 13 gallons of water per load, compared to the 23 gallons used by a standard machine. That’s more than 3,000 gallons of water saved per year. As a country, households use an estimated 29 billion gallons of water a day. Almost 30% of that, about 9 billion gallons, is used for outdoor water use. In hot summer months, or in dry climates, a household’s outdoor water use is considerably higher. Use xeriscaping or a water-wise landscaping plan to reduce water use and still provide beautiful curb appeal. Hire an irrigation tech to tune up the sprinkler system and make sure the proper amount of water is being used at the right times and without leaks, further reducing water usage. Applying a few basic steps to your routine like washing full laundry loads, taking shorter showers or turning off the faucet while brushing teeth will help sustain our water resources in Central Oregon. Look for more tips at epa.gov/watersense/start-saving.

          

Danielle Zollman

Licensed Broker in the state of Oregon

419-618-8575 daniellezollmanhomes@gmail.com

PRICE REDUCED

MOUNTAIN & RIVER VIEWS 61644 Summer Shade Dr

Two private tax lots with sweeping views of the Cascade Mountains, Deschutes River, Pilot Butte and Old Mill! One story home with 3 beds, 3 baths. OFFERED AT $1,150,000

HOME PRICE ROUNDUP

Photos and listing info from Central Oregon Multiple Listing Service

<< LOW

1323 SW 33rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756 4 beds, 2.5 bath, 2,016 square feet, .14 acres lot Built in 1999 $449,900 Listed by John L Scott Bend-Redmond

41

NEW

RIVERFRONT DREAMS 400 NW Columbia

2011 Earth Advantage Platinum certified home built by Duey Brothers with Deschutes river frontage, solar electric, 4 beds, 3.5 baths & 3,535 SF. OFFERED AT $3,200,000

NEW

REMODELED MIDTOWN 1846 NE 13th

Open & bright Midtown home features a stunning remodel with 2,344SF, 4 beds, 2.5 baths, office and huge fenced yard. Next to Hollingshead Park. OFFERED AT $949,900

MID >>

2265 NE Scarlet Court, Bend, OR 97701 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,772 square feet, .22 acres lot Built in 1995 $599,900. Listed by Tim Davis Group Central Oregon Terry Skjersaa

Principal Broker, CRS

Jason Boone

Principal Broker, CRIS

Mollie Hogan

Principal Broker, CRS

Cole Billings Broker

<< HIGH

63090 Casey Place, Bend, OR 97703 4 beds, 2 baths, 2,341 square feet, .29 acres lot Built in 1997 $799,000 Listed by Stellar Realty Northwest

Skjersaa Group | Duke Warner Realty 1033 NW Newport Ave. Bend, OR 97703

541.383.1426

www.SkjersaaGroup.com

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

T

he vast open skies and long, beautiful days of playing in the sunshine are top reasons many live in and simply love Central Oregon. Everyone has heard that Bend has 300 days of sunshine a year—maybe a slight exaggeration, but not far from the truth. The Bend Visitor Center says that, on average, Bend has the highest number of sunny days in the state with around 158 sunny days and 105 mostly sunny days. This seems like a fantastic situation. However, with a little further thought someone might ask, with all of that sunshine, where does the water come from? After all, this is the high desert, and there is very little precipitation here. Typically, Central Oregonians enjoy sparkling drinking water that began as snowmelt in the Cascades. Irrigation water is delivered to Bend residents and farmers via canals from the Deschutes River. Gov. Kate Brown signed a pair of executive orders declaring drought emergencies in seven Central and Eastern Oregon counties due to lack of precipitation and unusually low snowpack and streamflow. It’s time to reduce our water consumption, and one area that can become more water efficient is in our homes. Here are some tips to help use water more efficiently and reduce heavy water consumption. A first step is to make sure there are no leaks in the plumbing system. This can be tested by a plumber, or turn off all water to the home and watch

541.390.4488 geoff.groener@cascadesir.com cascadesothebysrealty.com


REAL ESTATE Otis Craig Broker, CRS

FIND YOUR PLACE IN BEND

www.otiscraig.com

Abbie Kephart Sams, Broker

503.812.2025 abbie@teamsams.com Licensed in the State of Oregon

Get Noticed in our Real Estate Section www.teamsams.com

contact advertise@bendsource.com

Shopping Local Made Easy. Bend Marketplace is your one stop shop for unique finds from your local favorites, now with the power of discounts and upcoming events.

My ex cheated on me and conned me financially, but before I realized this, I had really fallen for him. I miss him and keep thinking about him every day, and I can’t seem to stop. A friend suggested I get a spell from a witchcraft store. She insists this helped her have closure after her bad breakup. I’m a rational person, and this sounds completely ridiculous, but nothing I’ve tried (from meditation to venting to total strangers to dating other people) has helped. Please tell me this is completely stupid. —Plagued It’s a tempting idea, the notion that you can solve your lingering emotional issues via retail, a la “Curses: Today only, two for $19.99!” In fact, a ritual—such as casting a spell or hockey player Stephan Lebeau always chewing 20 to 25 pieces of gum and spitting them out two minutes before faceoff—can have a positive effect. I know this sounds rather cuckoopants; however, it isn’t because the ritual works in any supernatural way. A ritual, explains Harvard Business School professor Francesca Gino, is some “symbolic activity” you perform in hopes of making something happen. Gino finds that performing rituals leads to “increased feelings of control.” This can help the ritual-doer calm down and be more in control. Amazingly, even those who think the ritual they’re doing is total hooey experience this benefit—what I’d call the abracadabra placebo effect. Our psychology seems tuned to figure if we’re taking some action, it’s for a reason: to make things better. You might create an eviction ritual to get the guy out of your head. I suggest writing the story of your relationship, including what you learned that will help you avoid entanglements with future Mr. Rottens. Psychologist James Pennebaker finds that “expressive writing”—even 15 minutes spent describing the emotional impact of a bad experience—helps us reinterpret and make sense of what happened so we can go forward instead of endlessly rechewing the past. Invite a friend over (or dress up your cat) to bear witness, and then say a few words, light the story on fire, and flush the ashes. This should help you accept it’s over, though, admittedly, without the finality of the day of celebration you probably think the guy deserves: Casual Human Sacrifice Friday. n

ABR, GREEN, EA BROKER

541.948.2311 rick@teamsams.com

Hex And The City

lko

Richard Sams, Broker

A guy I know grates on me because he only has female friends. He apparently tried to get involved with each of them at some point but got rejected. Why doesn’t he find male friends instead of preying on women (under the guise of friendship) who probably trust him not to hit on them? —Disgusted This guy probably lives in eternal hope about each female friend, dreaming of the day he can be of service when she drops something on his floor—like her panties. Though you don’t mention him trying to roofie his dreams into reality, his behavior probably “grates” on you because you take a less sexually opportunistic approach to your friendships with men. We humans “are disposed... to imagine that other minds are much like our own,” explains anthropologist Donald Symons, and they often are. However, we’re prone to assume they should be like our own, so when someone thinks differently, we tend to see them as wrong (and maybe kind of awful) and not just different. Men and women (and male and female minds) are more alike than different. However, our differing physiologies—like which sex gets pregnant and needs to guard against having to raise a kid solo—led to the evolution of psychological differences, like women’s greater choosiness in whom they’ll have sex with. Though both men and women sometimes tumble into bed with their opposite-sex friends, for many men, the friendship zone seems to double as a “well, try your best to turn her into a sexfriend!” zone. Evolutionary psychologist April Bleske-Rechek, researching sex differences in how people perceive their opposite-sex friends, finds that a man is more likely to define a female friend as someone he’s attracted to “and would pursue given the opportunity,” while a woman is more likely to define a male friend simply as “a friend of the opposite sex.” Maybe you think friendship should be a “safe space,” guaranteed to remain endlessly platonic. And maybe that’s unrealistic—unless you avoid having friends who might hit on you. You could try to view this guy’s behavior in a more compassionate light. Chances are he’s a beta male who can’t compete with the alphas in the normal mating sphere, like on Tinder or at parties. He’s probably doing the best he can with the one edge he has, the scheme-y smarts to surround himself with a bunch of pretty ladies. (Living in a dude-filled monastery only works for a guy whose pet name for his beloved is “The Almighty.”)

yA

& 541.771.4824 ) otis@otiscraig.com

Platonic Bomb

Am

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / JUNE 24, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

42

SCIENCE ADVICE GODDESS

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave. Suite 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (advicegoddess.com).

© 2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.


REAL ESTATE 43

4 Bedrooms, 3 baths - 2,704 square feet

I NDULGE Y OUR F ARMHOUSE D REAMS This West side Bend home is a stunning modern interpretation by award-winning Structure Development NW, featuring upstairs peek-a-boo views of Central Oregon’s beloved Cascades Range. Just a stone’s throw (literally!) from Discovery Park lake in sought-after North West Crossing, this custom home spares no detail with its immaculate and evocative craftsmanship: Roughhewn beams, oiled plank floors on the main floor, along with an eye-popping, professional-grade gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry, solid surface counters and pastoral farmhouse sink. Appealing main level master suite includes decadent walk-in shower and closet, radiant heat floors and soaking tub, plus a main-level guest suite! Upstairs, two bedrooms and a bonus room to catch those views from; as your office, home gym or reading library for cozy winter nights. 2-car garage, laundry and mud room manage your day-to-day life in the high desert. Bring your porch swing for those sunsets!

rickandbeth@melnergroup.com www.melnerproperties.com

Call us today! 541-678-2169

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 25 / JUNE 24, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Offered at $1,600,000

ADVERTISE IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION ADVERTISE@BENDSOURCE.COM

1460 NW DISCOVERY PARK DRIVE, BEND


MLS# 220115644

MLS# 220123801

BEND | 20240 ROCK CANYON

SISTERS | GEARHEAD’S DREAM SHOP

Rare opportunity in Deschutes River Ranch Single level living with master & 2 en-suites Barn, shop, and guest quarters Att. 3-car and det. 4-car with sprinter garage Neighborhood access to BLM and Deschutes

• • • • •

Jordan Grandlund | Principal Broker | 541.948.5196 Stephanie Ruiz |Broker | ruizgrandlund@cascadesir.com

Property is fully fenced & treed w/ lush lawns 3 beds, 2 baths all on the main level 2,304 sq ft. dream shop w/ 3 bays & car lift Storage for 40 ft. motorhome Only minutes from downtown Sisters

• • • • •

Bend’s West Side Lodges at Bachelor View Upgraded appliances & hardwood flooring Quartz countertops & soft close cabinetry Detached 1 bedroom ADU Just 5 minutes to downtown Bend

Jordan Grandlund | Principal Broker | 541.948.5196 Stephanie Ruiz |Broker | ruizgrandlund@cascadesir.com

Sandy & John Kohlmoos | Brokers | 541.408.4309 sandy.kohlmoos@cascadesir.com

NOW PENDING

Beautiful updated single level home .19 acre corner lot in Mountain High Very private and beautiful landscaped Views from Master and Living Room Move in ready! Sonja Porter | Broker | 541.678.3951 sonja.porter@cascadesir.com

MLS# 220125161

PRINEVILLE | 1463 NE HUDSPETH

BEND | 19270 APACHE ROAD

$379,500 | 3 BD | 2 BA | 1,305 SF

$580,000 | 2 BD | 2 BA | 1,808 SF | 0.19 AC

• • • • •

Enjoy country living on 9.49 acres! Remodeled kitchen, family & master bath Great outdoor living areas Fenced pasture & small barn Close to schools, shopping & Downtown

MLS# 220124071

BEND | 60760 BRECKENRIDGE

Park-like setting by Bend Golf & Country Club Master and study on the main Quality finishes, new construction Attached 2-car garage www.1925townhomes.com

• • • • •

NOW PENDING

MLS# 220124712

$877,750 | 4 BD | 4 BA | 2,931 SF

• • • • •

$1,050,000 | 4 BD | 3.5 BA | 3,201 SF

Jake Moorhead | Broker | 541.480.6790 jake.moorhead@cascadesir.com

PRICE REDUCTION

BEND | 20323 SE JACK BENNY LOOP

BEND | VIEWS & ACREAGE IN NW

$1,100,000 | 4 BD | 4 BA | 1,814 SF

Arends Realty Group | Brokers | 541.420.9997 phil.arends@cascadesir.com

MLS# 220122767

MLS# 220125403

BEND | 19302 SW MARSHMALLOW PL

$1,495,000 | 3 BD | 2 BA | 2,201 SF | 5.58 AC

$3,495,000 | 4 BD | 5.5 BA | 4,891 SF

• • • • •

MLS# 220125270

• • • • •

Lovely craftsman home in Iron Horse Views of Barnes Butte Beautifully landscaped front & back yard Immaculate neighborhood Large 2-car garage w/ custom shelving

$350,000 | 2 BD | 2 BA | 1,242 SF | 0.86 AC

• • • • •

Frank Wood & Stephanie Marshall | Brokers 541.788.1095 | marshallandwood@cascadesir.com

Beautiful home nestled in the woods .86 Acres Fully Fenced and Gated 2,304 sq ft. dream shop w/ 3 bays & car lift Artfully landscaped w/ mature plantings Oversized vaulted great room Sonja Porter & Annette Yundt | Brokers 541.678.3951 | annette.yundt@cascadesir.com

Summer Look Books Now Available CENTRAL OREGON

S U M M E R 2 0 2 1 LO O K B O O K

Scan the code below to check out some of the most exceptional properties in Central Oregon. We also have additional lookbooks that showcase properties in the Portland area as well as one dedicated to our farm, ranch and vineyard offerings.

541.383.7600 CascadeSothebysRealty.com BEND • REDMOND • SISTERS • SUNRIVER PORTLAND • SW WASHINGTON • OREGON COAST • SOUTHERN OREGON Each office is independently owned and operated. All brokers listed are licensed in the state of Oregon. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Profile for The Source Weekly

Source Weekly June 24, 2021  

Advertisement
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded