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2021

GUIDE INSIDE

VOLUM E 2 5 / I S S UE 0 8 / FEBRUA RY 2 5 , 2 0 2 1

PLUS

n w o t d i M Rising SAVE THE BUTTERFLIES ABCS OF PLANTING MILKWEED

IN THE HEART OF BEND, THE REVITALIZATION HAS ONLY JUST BEGUN Plus: THE NEIGHBORHOODS OF CENTRAL OREGON! GETTING TO KNOW THE QUIRKY CORNERS OF BEND, REDMOND, SISTERS

MARIE KONDO THAT SH*T! A PRO ORGANIZER SHARES HER SECRETS

BEST NEW BREWERY?

A LOCAL SPOT LANDS ON A TOP 10 LIST


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE 2


EDITOR’S NOTE: The Source Weekly 704 NW Georgia Ave., Bend, OR 97703 t. 541-383-0800 f. 541-383-0088 bendsource.com info@bendsource.com

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On the Cover: Artist's Statement: Katie Daisy was raised by the birds and warm breezes of small-town Lindenwood, Illinois, brought up among the other wildflowers with roots planted deeply in the natural world. She found her voice and honed her skills at the renowned Minneapolis College of Art and Design, graduating in 2009 and subsequently beginning a career as a freelance illustrator. Working in watercolor and acrylic paint as well as mixed media materials, her work captures the essence of life lived in harmony with nature and in active pursuit of dreams. Katie currently lives and works in a sunny farmhouse just north of Bend. -View more of Daisy's work at thewheatfield.etsy.com and katiedaisy.com

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 4 - Opinion 5 - Mailbox 6 - News 8 - Feature Midtown Rising – In honor of our neighborhoods issue, we’re focusing on one neighborhood that’s seeing a lot of change: Midtown Bend. See what’s happening right before our very eyes. 10 - Sound 11 - Source Picks 12 - Calendar 13 - Neighborhoods The Neighborhoods of Central Oregon – New here? Thinking of moving? Get the flavor of the ‘hoods of Bend, plus some special inside info on outlying areas, too. 27 - Real Estate 31 - Culture 33 - Screen 35 - Outside Monarch butterflies need your green thumb – Monarch butterfly habitat has been devastated by over 99%. Learn how to plant milkweed to help restore some of that lost habitat.

Call for Artists: If you're interested in being a SW featured artist, email: darris@bendsource.com.

36 - Astrology EDITOR Nicole Vulcan - editor@bendsource.com REPORTER / CALENDAR EDITOR Megan Burton - calendar@bendsource.com COPY EDITOR Richard Sitts

37 - Puzzles Fun shot of the Edison Sno-Park shelter, from @iamerica4! Tag us on Instagram @sourceweekly for a chance to be featured here, and in the Instagram of the Week in our Cascades Reader newsletter!

FREELANCERS Isaac Biehl, K.M. Collins, Damian Fagan, Heidi Howard,  Sarah Mowry, Jared Rasic, David Sword SYNDICATED CONTENT Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsney, Brendan Emmett Quigley,  Jen Sorensen, Pearl Stark, Tom Tomorrow, Matt Wuerker PRODUCTION MANAGER / ART DIRECTOR Darris Hurst - darris@bendsource.com 

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38 - Craft Best New Brewery? – A local brewery has landed on a Top 10 list for Best New Brewery and is vying for the top spot. Beer lover Heidi Howard shares more. 39 - Advice

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3 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Last year, just days after Oregon got its first reported cases of COVID-19, I put an offer on a house in the Orchard District. As a first-time homebuyer, it felt crazy to do so at that time—and people tried to talk me out of it—but as we’ve seen over this past year, 2020 did not bring a real estate crash like other calamities have wrought on Bend in recent memory. Now, seeing homes get snapped up sight unseen or for much more than they were a year ago, I feel like one of the lucky ones, to the extreme. This week we’ve set aside an entire section focused on the neighborhoods of Bend (with info on Sisters and Redmond, too). With Bend not relinquishing its “Zoom Town” status anytime soon, finding a home has become like a gladiator race, with the spoils being a roof and four walls. With it, the already-dire inequities our region experiences will only get worse—and it’s only in our vigilance as citizens of this community that we will be able to advocate for those struggling hardest for the most basic of human needs. Meanwhile, since we're on the topic of neighborhoods, we’ve taken some time also to highlight some of the changes found right in the heart of Bend, in the midtown area. As restrictions ease somewhat, we hope it gives you some inspiration for a new local business to support right now. Have a great week!


CELEBRATING CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION AT COCC WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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OPINION

In Pandemic Response, Embrace the Gray

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February is Career & Technical Education (CTE) Month for Oregon community colleges. At COCC, Central Oregonians can learn in-demand skills to become employable in the region’s many industries, from aviation to forest resource technology, computer information systems to health sciences — and more. Career & Technical Education prepares Oregonians to return to work as our economy recovers from COVID-19 & wildfire devastation.

It’s time to start thinking Outside of Expected.

Learn more: http://bit.ly/CTEatCOCC COCC is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.

Healthy Adventures Await!

Open Daily for You and Your Pets DOCTORS BYRON MAAS, LAUREN STAYER, ERIN MILLER, bendveterinaryclinic.com TABITHA JOHNSTON AND 360 NE QUIMBY AVE 382-0741 LAUREN HOFFMAN

RIMROCK GALLERY “CELEBRATING OUR GALLERY ARTISTS”

ith cases falling sharply across the country and our own county having moved from the most extreme risk category into a lower one that allows for more interaction among people, it’s obvious that we’re moving into a “middle territory” as it pertains to the pandemic. While public health experts warn that it’s too soon to set aside all manner of precaution around the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel. Still, all these many months of lockdowns, and the stress and fear of experiencing the worst outcomes from this virus have changed most of us, and during this middle territory—this time before normalcy begins, it’s important for each of us to keep in mind how we carry ourselves, and to remember that what we say and what we do can have lasting impacts on our relationships and our community. A fair share of us have been in an awkward place where we’ve lost a friend or had uncomfortable conversations with a family member who did not share our exact views about staying locked down, when kids should go back to school and who should get the COVID vaccines first. In many cases, those friends or relatives with whom we don’t agree are finding it uncomfortable that we don’t want to get into the same political or social boxes with them. Despite the efforts of many to make us think otherwise, how one feels about the pandemic response does not neatly fall along the red-blue political lines, or our former social identity. We paused for reflection on this topic after the reaction to the news that a group of Summit High School students, prior to their return to classrooms, gathered together for a Super Bowl party that resulted in dozens of infections. Obviously, this is not a situation that anyone wanted—but it is in how we react that shows our character as a community. SOURCE AD FEB It is ironic that one community member, who herself did not want to make her identity known, went on TV to demand,

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“there need to be consequences.” She, who would not even share her own identity, was trying to become the arbiter of justice and accountability around this incident involving a group of teenagers— not entirely the most accountable demographic of people in our community. Media outlets sometimes earn a reputation for conflating divides in order to gain followers and ratings. In this case, it was a call for a form of vigilante justice from a person who wanted “justice” that went beyond the natural consequences of seeing an entire school shut down and the entire student body flying about in rumor and suspicion about who was at the party and who wasn’t. We currently live under the threat of incurring fines for not wearing masks in mandated places and we continue the hygiene theatre of cleaning and disinfecting every surface in any public place—but we have not yet, as Oregonians, been subject to the mob justice that requires harsher consequences than we would normally mete out. What are we hoping for from a group of teens doing what teens are wont to do, which is hang out with their peers? Do we really want a new crowd-sourced justice system? As we have seen at the highest levels of our government this year, public policy is not helped by mob rule. It is not moved forward by anonymous commenters. People—and especially teenagers—are not perfect. They’re human. They make mistakes, and hopefully, they learn. During this middle time, between total lockdown and relative societal freedom, mutual respect and learning to embrace the many shades of gray that color these times is essential. The consequences of absolutism— of believing in your “side” regardless of the details, has borne itself out in countless ways this year, and it delays the process of resolving how to move forward together. We will one day be able to put the nightmare of this pandemic behind us—but in the meantime, let’s embrace the grays.


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HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?

Letters

BETTER DAYS AHEAD

limits on donations from lobbyists and increase the power of campaign contributions from everyday Americans by creating a small-dollar donor matching program. These changes would open up new opportunities for different kinds of candidates to run for office—candidates that come directly from our communities and understand the problems we face. Instead of being beholden to the donors and lobbyists with the fattest wallets, our elected officials will be working for the people. Without this type of bold democracy reform, our political system will never be truly democratic or fully representative and our government will continue to work only for the privileged few. It’s past time to build a better system for all Americans -- which is why I’m urging Congress to pass the For the People Act. —Linda Mutch

BRING SALMON AND ORCAS BACK BY REMOVING DAMS

IT’S TIME TO END THE INEQUITIES IN OUR DEMOCRACY

For generations, we’ve been told that money is power. It’s an axiom that continues to drive our politics. Despite being able to vote for our elected officials, once they reach public office, they’re all too often swayed by lobbyists and big money interests. Instead of representing the people, lawmakers spend the majority of their time fundraising, relying on large donors and holding court with corporations.   That can change, but only if Congress passes the For the People Act. The For the People Act is a bold anti-corruption and democracy reform bill that would strengthen our democracy by reducing the influence of big money in our politics. It would enact

Representative Mike Simpson and his staff are taking action on the science from biologists, who, for over decades, have explained the need to restore the lower Snake River by removing the four dams in the lower Snake River. By removing these four dams, we will restore 140 miles of significant river habitat and reconnect salmon to 5,500+ miles of pristine, protected rivers and streams in the wildlands of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Restoring the lower Snake River will ensure the return of more than one million adult Snake River chinook each year to Northwest coastal waters to help feed starving orcas and help struggling fishing communities. Restoring this historic river will result in the largest salmon recovery project in the continental U.S. I

applaud Representative Mike Simpson for taking critical steps that benefit salmon and steelhead restoration extend far and wide: from the communities who depend on them for food and livelihoods, to the 130 different species that rely on them and their nutrients to thrive. I ask for Senators Murray, Cantwell, Wyden and Merkley to refine the framework and advance it as legislation that improve our water quality and infrastructure; restores the lower Snake River and its salmon and endangered orca; invests in our regional economy and communities; fulfills our federal treaty and trust responsibilities to Northwest Native American Tribes and honors their livelihoods and cultural values; and ensures a reliable, affordable and clean power system for the Northwest!  —Kyle Alhart

RE: FOCUS ON YOUR HEALTH, LETTERS, 2/18

To somewhat paraphrase Christian Baresic’s thoughts: “I can’t help but wonder what this pandemic would’ve looked like . . . if we had maintained sustainable levels of public health funding over the decades, if we had had intelligent, competent, and compassionate national leadership, and if we had an equitable economic system not premised on pushing vulnerable populations into harm’s way.” Nice letter, but borderline elitist (blaming victims of the pandemic) and prematurely anti-vax.

On the latter, it’s not (as C.B. asserts) that “experts have openly admitted the vaccines will not likely prevent transmission.” Rather, the data simply isn’t in yet to support this contention. We will know in several months if the new vaccines do as good a job at preventing virus transmission as they currently seem to be doing in blocking or mitigating the effects of the illness in those who get COVID-19. The CDC now promises it “will keep the public informed as new evidence becomes available” on vaccine-produced immunity. —Foster Fell, via bendsource.com

Letter of the Week:

Foster, thanks for that counterpoint. Come on by for your gift card to Palate! —Nicole Vulcan

EXCLUSIVE THIS WEEK IN:

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5 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Recently a food cart and beer station opened in my neighborhood (shout out to the Yacht Club). A spot that I enjoyed visiting on occasion. Maybe more than “on occasion,” but that’s a different story. I digress, as I walked down to the food carts I would pass a house that flies three flags (from lowest to highest): The American flag, M.I.A./ P.O.W. flag, and then flying the highest was the Confederate flag. This anti-American, racist, offensive display really bothers me. But here’s the point. I walked by two weeks ago, and the Confederate flag was replaced by one of those American flags with the blue stripe. I don’t know the resident’s heart or motivation, but I do know how it impacted me. To me it’s an incremental step toward civility and for that I’m eternally optimistic for our community and our nation.   —Brian Marlowe

Send your thoughts to editor@bendsource.com. Letters must be received by noon Friday for inclusion in the following week’s paper. Please limit letters to 250 words. Submission does not guarantee publication. Opinions printed here do not constitute an editorial endorsement of said opinions. Letter of the week receives $5 to Palate!


NEWS

Climate Change Takes a Toll on Oregon WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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According to the fiſth Oregon Climate Assessment by the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, climate change will continue to impact daily life in Oregon. More than 30 collaborators affiliated with OCCRI worked on the latest biennial report. Here are some of the highlights of their findings:

Temperature If greenhouse gas emissions continue at current levels, temperature in Oregon is then projected to increase on average by 5°F by the 2050s and 8.2°F by the 2080s, with the greatest seasonal increases in summer.

“New evidence is consistent with observations about temperature and precipitation that were reported in previous assessments. Average annual temperature in Oregon is increasing and is likely to continue increasing, especially in summer. And the intensity of major storms is likely to increase, which may lead to more flooding.” —Erica Fleishman, director of the OCCRI

Wildfires

Snowpack

The total area burned in Oregon during summer and autumn 2020 was among the largest in recorded history—five wildfires over 100,000 acres.

Oregon’s snow cover and snowpack are likely to decrease further as the climate becomes warmer, which will cause a greater proportion of precipitation to fall as rain than as snow. At most SNOTEL stations in the Oregon Cascade Range the number of wet days that are snow days will decrease from 50% during the late twentieth to early twenty-first centuries to fewer than 25% by the mid-21st Century.

Models consistently project that the area burned in Oregon will increase. For example, with a 3.6°F (2°C) average temperature increase, the area

From 1982–2017, snowpack sufficient for recreation appeared by early to mid-November in Oregon’s mountains and by mid-December at lower elevations. The timing has shiſted later by 3-8 days per decade.

burned in Oregon will roughly triple in 2010–2039 compared to 1961–2004.

Rivers & Streams Stream temperature generally is projected to increase across Oregon. August average stream temperatures are projected to increase by about 4°F (2.2°C) in most parts of Oregon.

OCEA

E K A L

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Marine and Coastal Change

Off the Northwest coast, the open-ocean surface temperature increased by more than 0.7 to 1.7°F since the year 1900 and is projected to increase by about another 3.9 to 6.1°F by the year 2080. Temperature increase can reduce dissolved oxygen in the water and increase the toxicity of harmful algal blooms. Ocean acidity is projected to change by about 100–150%, resulting in a drop in open-ocean acidity from 8.1 to 7.8. Ocean acidity will probably affect shell formation in diverse species of commercial, recreational and cultural value.

Learn more

The OSU “Science Pub” will present “Climate Change Impacts Around (the) Bend” to discuss how the changes in climate will directly affect the people living here in Bend. Register and join this free online lecture by climatologist Larry O’Neill, associate professor in the OSU College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences and member of the OCCRI. Wednesday, March 17, 6-7:30pm. Register online at: sciencepub-climatechange.eventbrite.com


NEWS Deschutes Land Trust

Noticias en Español Las mariposas monarcas necesitan su talento natural para crecer plantas Por Sarah Mowry Traducido por Jéssica Sánchez-Millar

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medida que se acerca la primavera, muchas personas en la zona centro de Oregon comienzan a estar deseosas para que reinicie el clima cálido y los hábitos de la primavera. Para algunos, la jardinería está al principio de la lista y comienzan la temporada plantando semillas en su jardín interno. Los jitomates y otras verduras son los habituales, pero este año ¿porque no agregar unas cuantas semillas de algodoncillo nativo para ayudar a nuestra población local de mariposas monarcas? Hay dos tipos de algodoncillo nativo en la zona centro de Oregon: algodoncillo ostentoso (Asclepias speciosa) y algodoncillo llantén menor (Asclepias fascicularis). Ambos tipos

fueron históricamente encontrados a lo largo de la zona centro de Oregon pero ahora su rango es muy limitado. Plantar más algodoncillo nativo en la zona centro de Oregon puede ayudar a la emblemática mariposa monarca occidental a sobrevivir a futuro. El centro de Oregon está dentro del rango migratorio de la mariposa monarca occidental. Muchos conocen esta radiante mariposa de color anaranjado y negro por su maravillosa migración desde el sur de Norte America a México. Nuestras monarcas, realmente, son especies distintas a las que migran a México. Solo viven en el oeste de los Estados Unidos y migran desde el noroeste para pasar el invierno en California. Las mariposas monarcas, como muchas mariposas, dependen de ciertas plantas hospederas como fuente de alimento y para colocar huevecillos y la crianza. El algodoncillo es la planta huésped que las mariposas monarca utilizan para depositar huevecillos y para luego proporcionar el alimento

THE LEVISON GROUP EXPERIENCE YOU CAN TRUST

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sus plantas de algodoncillo a finales de esta primavera en un vivero de plantas nativas tal como Wintercreek Nursery. 1. Plante de tres a seis plantas de algodoncillo juntas—preferiblemente una combinación del ostentoso y el llantén menor para ayudar a proporcionar suficiente espacio para el depósito de huevecillos y alimento para las orugas recién emergidas. 2. Aprenda más sobre lo que necesita el algodoncillo para florecer. Al algodoncillo ostentoso le gusta el pleno sol y el agua media. Al llantén menor también le gusta el pleno sol pero prefiere tierra seca y es más tolerante a la sequía. Ambas especies se propagan por medio de rizomas- ¡así hay que plantarlos donde tengan espacio para que puedan extenderse! 

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VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Nota del editor: Esta semana, nos estamos enfocando menos en las noticias de última hora y más en las cosas que hacen que la zona centro de Oregon sea maravillosa. Al decir esto, aquí esta un está un elemento útil para ayudar a los polinizadores de la naturaleza a prosperar.

que las mariposas jóvenes necesitan una vez que se emergen como orugas. Lamentablemente, la población de la mariposa monarca occidental ha visto un alto descenso en los últimos años. Este año pasado, de acuerdo con la Sociedad Xerces, solamente 1,900 mariposas fueron vistas en las zonas de hibernación en California-comparado con las 192,000 en el 2017— y una disminución del 99% desde la década de 1980. ¿La razón principal? Pérdida del hábitat en las zonas de hibernación y a lo largo de sus rutas migratorias en donde el algodoncillo fue más abundante. ¡La buena noticia es que la gente puede ayudar a la mariposa monarca occidental con tan solo plantar algodoncillo en sus patios, jardines o hasta macetas en sus patios! Y ahora es el momento de plantar esas semillas. Aquí están algunos consejos para ayudar a cultivar y plantar con éxito el algodoncillo: Plante y cultive SOLAMENTE algodoncillo nativo (las dos variedades mencionadas anteriormente). El algodoncillo no nativo algunas veces lo venden en viveros locales y de hecho puede dañar nuestras especies de mariposas monarcas. Obtenga sus semillas de algodoncillo y consejos para el cultivo de semillas departe de Deschutes Land Trust y compre


FEATURE

Midtown Rising

8 WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

With Bend’s “Zoom Town” status and its ongoing population boom, its scene needed room to grow. Enter Midtown, rising slowly but surely—and with a vision By Nicole Vulcan

Ryan Prouty

Under a bright moon, visitors and locals gather around the firepit at the Campfire Hotel in the heart of Midtown.

S

ome call it The Moat. Others, The Tracks. Others have less-flattering names for the act of moving from west Bend to east, doing so via only the handful of arterials that cross the city, over or under its railroad bridges, and under the Bend Parkway. Whatever you call it, the reasons to cross that moat keep stacking up, as midtown Bend—roughly defined as the area hugging Highway 97 on either side, and also known as the Bend Central District, picks up steam. In other words, there are more and more reasons to visit midtown these days. That is, of course, unless you’re one of the lucky ones who already lives nearby. For you, reaping the rewards of a growing food and cultural scene is only getting better. A revitalization effort The idea to revitalize areas closest to downtown Bend is a long time coming. The City of Bend includes the area just east and west of the railroad tracks near downtown in its Core Area Project, a series of projects that could include, “streetscape improvements, public spaces, gateways, affordable housing, or art and beautification programs,” according to the City’s web page for the project. In total, the City’s Core Area is defined as the Bend Central District, East Downtown, Inner Highway 20 / Greenwood, and KorPine— the area roughly between Arizona Avenue and the Old Mill. In 2020, the City Council approved a Tax Increment Financing Plan for the Core Area Project, allowing the City to set aside the tax dollars that accrue

from increases in assessed property value, and to put those dollars into a fund for improvements for these areas. To meet demands from the state for more infill, the BCD was rezoned during the Urban Growth Boundary process in 2016, to allow for increased building heights and reduced parking requirements. The Bend City Council also set up the Bend Urban Renewal Advisory Board, a 13-member volunteer committee tasked with creating a common vision and plan. For Central Oregon LandWatch, which advocates for sustainable growth both in urban and rural spaces, the Bend Central District/Core Area Project represents not just an opportunity to improve the area, but to ensure those improvements foster equity and inclusion and help solve the city’s housing crisis—which has only gotten more acute as Bend has become a “Zoom town” with a high percentage of remote workers. Even before the pandemic and its resulting urban flight, in 2019, Bend was leading the U.S. in the percentage of remote workers, with over 12% of people in the city working remote, according to U.S. Census data. An area so close to downtown, with existing sewer lines, electricity and other infrastructure, is ripe for helping fill the gaps in housing and other services. “Right across from downtown, there’s only about 100 people who live in that 200 acres, so there is a ton of potential for more housing where people can live near their jobs, near the grocery store, walk out their front door and go next door to their favorite coffee

shop,” Moey Newbold, director of urban planning for COLW told the Source. “But the conditions just haven’t been in place to have that kind of development—so the Bend Central District plan is a way to move that vision forward.” Avoiding the G word: Gentrification And while there’s opportunity, Newbold and COLW also hope to avoid common pitfalls that come with redevelopment—namely, the gentrification that can lead to displacement. “We’ve seen this play out in cities across the United States, is that when change like this happens, things will improve for the people who already live here—streets will get safer for biking and walking and people have more access to amenities, but the challenge can be that people get displaced who might live nearby, or the rents go up or businesses who rent might have their building redeveloped,” Newbold said. “So, what we’re really hoping is that together we can all re-envision a new type of community redevelopment that’s actually building on the community’s wealth.” To support that vision, Newbold and COLW created a Bend Central District Visionary Board, made up of community stakeholders consisting of residents— including renters, social service agencies and houseless people who live in the area, working in tandem with developers. Newbold has high hopes that not only will new businesses come in and attract more interest in the area, but that existing ones will thrive, too.

“I’m not sure if a lot of people realize that this part of town is actually the most diverse— which is super exciting,” Newbold said. “The Orchard district neighborhood really embraces diversity and wants to be a welcoming neighborhood, so what’s really important is that we honor and listen to people from Latinx origins, BIPOC communities, and try to figure out ways that they can lead the effort,” she said. “I would like to see a place like Colima Market, that’s really a mainstay for the Latinx community, be able to work towards owning their building—and that’s something that the Tax Increment Financing District that was just passed by City Council could help with,” she said. “But it needs the input of the community to say, ‘you know, we want these dollars to go toward supporting women minority-owned businesses and affordable housing. We want all of that investment to be directed by the community and have really deep engagement and participation.’” Thus far, much of the redevelopment and revitalization has come in the way of commercial activity, though Newbold has hopes for more housing in the future, too. In addition, projects including the City’s Neighborhood Greenways and Low Stress Network for bikes are aimed at making getting around the area easier for those not in cars. Neighborhood Greenways For years, people in the Orchard neighborhood—just east of the Bend Central District—have been pushing to make the


FEATURE

Midtown Yacht Club Food cart lots are all the rage in Bend these days, and it was only a matter of time before midtown Bend got its own version. Carved from an empty lot on NE Fourth Street and Quimby—and within spitting distance of The Last Blockbuster, the Midtown Yacht Club food cart pod is home to a handful of carts, including the new Shimshom food truck, the brainchild of Steven Draheim, owner of Barrio, which also has a cart at Midtown. The Israeli street food cart started when Drahaim began “pulling recipes from Michael Solomonov’s cookbook,  ‘Zahav,’” Draheim wrote in a note to followers on the Barrio website in December. He also grabbed even more recipes from his wife’s grandmother, he wrote. Midtown Yacht Club offers a hearty dose of fire pits and a giant tent for these COVID times—and an easily bikeable place for a beverage or meetup for residents of the east side (or anyone willing to cross The Moat). “This is a great example of a new mixed-use development that’s already been embraced by the neighborhood,” said Newbold of COLW. “There’s actually offices above the tap room, so this is the kind of thing that makes good use of the space, and also creates a community gathering space and offers something that the neighborhood really didn’t have before.” Ironically, the additional street parking added near the space did away with the existing bike lanes along that portion of Fourth Street—something that

upset advocates of multi-modal transportation. Now, “sharrows,” rather than the dedicated bike lane found elsewhere on the street, encourage drivers to share the road with cyclists. Sunlight Solar “Another thing that is really exciting is the new Sunlight Solar headquarters on Hawthorne, across from Oregon Spirit Distillers,” Newbold of COLW said. “They also built in commercial space—so that’s another mixed-use building that’s going to be all net-zero energy efficient and powered by its own solar power.” Owner Paul Israel told the Source in February 2020 that he was excited to be a pioneer in the BCD, believing the area will one day transform into a thriving neighborhood bringing together the east and west sides of Bend.

there’s no word yet when that will open, Katie Watkins, the Jupiter’s marketing, PR and brand manager, told the Source. Smaller events, however, are starting to happen. “We have a beer tasting happy hour at the Pit (“Tasting Nights by the Fire”) coming up on March 20 from 4-6:30pm with Cascade Lakes Brewing,” Watkins wrote in an email. Signature Bend As the Source detailed in an August 2020 story, Signature Bend is yet another midtown hotel that’s gotten a facelift in recent times. In January 2018, Third Street Ventures bought the now-former Red Lion Inn and spent $3.1 million renovating the lobby, exterior and fire pit, with more guest-room renovations to folNicole Vulcan

Warm clothing and firepits are a comfy combination at the Midtown Yacht Club.

Lucy’s Taco Shop Long a staple of downtown Redmond and a frequent winner in the Source’s Best of Central Oreogon readers’ poll, Bendites got their own version of Lucy’s Taco Shop this summer, when a drive-thru Lucy's opened on Third Street, in the former Baja Fresh location near Greenwood Avenue. While Third Street still contains the majority of Bend’s fast-food and chain locations, Lucy’s adds another locally owned option to the thoroughfare. This writer has a weakness for this spot’s tortas. Campfire Hotel Those familiar with the music scene in Portland will likely know the Doug Fir Lounge—a hip venue along East Burnside Street, surrounded by the equally-hip Jupiter Hotel. Bend saw its own iteration of the brand open in late summer 2020, when the Campfire Hotel opened as a rebranded version of the former Three Sisters Inn along Third Street. It’s complete with a giant outdoor fire pit and twinkling lights in the trees—which, in late summer, looked eerily like the real fires burning in the nearby forests. The Campfire folks plan to open a restaurant and bar in a building on the property that most recently served as a used car dealership, though

low. Beyond the option for an affordable staycation, locals can check out South Yo Mouth, a food cart with “Carolina roots” located near the hotel lobby. The Camp Back in the 1950s, one of Bend’s first RV parks went up along Third Street, where today, The Camp now stands. Located at the corner of Bend’s Burnside Avenue, The Camp offers RV spots—but patrons can also stay in hip vintage trailers or tiny cottages. “Our new model and brand created a new opportunity to provide a beautiful and inviting community, brand new utilities, and better pads for everyone to come experience Bend on their terms,” The Camp describes on its website. Element Bend Just west of the Parkway, larger developments have also gone forward in recent years. Element Bend, in the Marriott family, opened its doors to the public in mid-February, offering rooms and suites with a complement of extras, including an indoor pool. The fresh new hotel is comfortable and accommodating, offering free bikes and an expansive outdoor space with a firepit for in-house lounging. While more of the

per-night variety of stay, the various suites (with full kitchens) are also billed as an extended stay option with pets allowed—an option often taken advantage of by those new to town and looking for that elusive housing. The Brew Shop becomes a Drive-thru Of course, some developments have come with controversy—as the rubble that was once the site of the Brew Shop and Playtpus Pub reminds. Jake Ertle, co-owner of the property where a drive-thru retail space and several other retail spaces will soon go in, was the target of much scrutiny for his initial plan to put two drive-thru restaurants in the space—a plan he later scrapped for the current version. “We broke ground on our project in early December and it should be completed in June,” Ertle told the Source. “Starbucks will occupy the southern end-cap of the building with a drive thru. We have received multiple offers for the remainder of the building and are in the process of responding to those offers now.” In 2019, Ertle told the Source that shortly after purchasing the property in 2016, he explored building a mixed-use building on that property, but costs associated with developing it made that plan impossible, and at the time, the BCD code didn’t allow for that type of building. More opportunities Other new activity in the area includes a new restaurant, Lori’s Grill, that opened in the former Kayo’s Dinner House location on Third Street. Newbold of COLW is also working with members of the Latinx community to create a second mural in the Franklin Avenue underpass, opposite from the late Kaycee Anseth’s “Two for Joy.” Adjacent to the site, Newbold is hoping for big things for the Les Schwab Tire Center location, a 3-acre parcel that will soon be vacated when the existing store moves to the city block it cleared on Third Street. “It’s less than a quarter-mile from the heart of downtown Bend,” Newbold said. “So really all that needs to happen with that site is for the city to partner with whoever buys it and improve Franklin to be able to connect more easily for people walking and biking.” Still, what’s glaringly missing from all of this talk of new developments in midtown: more new housing. Around that, Newbold talked about one bright spot. “There’s been a partnership formed between two developers—they’re working on an apartment complex that’s just a couple of blocks away from here [from the Midtown Yacht Club, where we conducted our interview] that’s going to have 40 units in a pretty small space, so making really good use of the space that we have and providing housing for people who really need it right now.” Based on the City’s proposed BCD Micro-Unit Development code, the project would offer studio apartments with common kitchens, to be located on Fourth and Penn Avenue. 

9 VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

area more pedestrian and bike friendly. Many streets, even a block or two from commercial zones, don’t have sidewalks, and crossing the railroad tracks and Third Street to go into downtown via existing streets can be intimidating for some. The City of Bend’s Neighborhood Greenways project has been part of the solution. Orchard’s NE Sixth Street was one of the first streets in the city to be named a Greenway, where speed humps, signage and crosswalks encourage walking or biking rather than vehicle traffic. Still, neighbors see gaps. A promised safe crossing over Greenwood Avenue at Sixth Street, which would improve access to Juniper Swim and Fitness Center, is still not completed. That crossing is managed by the Oregon Department of Transportation, not the City of Bend. In Phase 4, more Greenways are planned surrounding Juniper Park and on Franklin and Hawthorne avenues, from the Orchard District into downtown. “The budget for Phase 4 becomes available July 1st so we anticipate starting design and public outreach the second half of this year and continuing into the first half of 2022,” Rory Rowan, project engineer for the City of Bend, told the Source. “Construction is anticipated in 2022.” Voters in Bend also approved Measure-135, Bend’s Transportation Bond, in November, which brings $190 million in bond funding to the city for major traffic improvements, as well as improvements to biking and walking infrastructure.


S WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

10

SOUND

Local and regional highlights from music in February

This week, Daft Punk announced its split/retirement in a short film where one of the famed robots-in-disguise blows up in a desert. I question if their retirement is real or even permanent, but only time can answer that. If it is a forever split, then the duo will surely be missed and the imprint they left behind will always be remembered. But, much like life, music continues to go on. And while Daft Punk’s end will most likely be the biggest music-industry-related story to break this week, there’s still plenty of new music that deserves to be listened to and appreciated. Enjoy the February installment of Source Material, highlighting two new releases from Bend artists and one from our neighbor to the north.

Sourc e Mat erial

By Isaac

Biehl

LOCALS' BIN

“Bonespur” from Dylan Lipke Dylan Lipke moved to Bend from Denver last year, and after listening to “Bonespur” I can already tell he’ll make a great addition to the music community here. The album is 10 tracks of mellow and folky psych-rock that highlight Lipke’s ability to craft both interesting and catchy tunes that fall outside of the box. On the album you’ll find enjoyment in Lipke’s fuzzy guitar, an array of synths and Courtesy Dylan Lipke some calming bass as his voice peeks out from behind the music. One of the most memorable moments on the album is the fantastic harmonica-play by Lipke on “Better Days.” What’s truly fun about the album is that “Bonespur” is able to be a little country and a little punk at the same time, while always playing out as this groovy collection of tunes. It’s an early favorite from 2021.

LOCALS' BIN

“Illustrious Expanse” from j.r.j featuring Indigo Hush

The latest from Bend’s Jordan Russell features the smooth and hypnotic vocals of Scott Roberts (Indigo Hush). “Illustrious Expanse” is a dreamy down-tempo song that winds up to be super calming. You can hear traditional elements of boom-bap beats backing the track, combined with these swirling pop and electronic pieces that make the song lush with layers. sell Rus Courtesy Jordan You find yourself drifting off into space while listening, as the song moves at a slow but fluttery pace. Definitely add this one to your zone-out playlist or chill nights mix.

REGIONAL GEM

“River Running By” from Jeffrey Silverstein Portland’s Jeffrey Silverstein is back to cooking up sweet music, following up last year’s LP, “You Become The Mountain,” with the announcement of his “ToriiGates” EP. The lead track for the project, titled “River Running By,” is out now and is as good as you’d expect. Silverstein sings of moving through life like a running river, realizing you might be missing out on things or choosing to let others go. “River Running By” is an ambient-folk song that truly makes you feel adrift. In an Instagram post, Silverstein said the song was inspired by the concept of “blue mind,” which is the calming and meditative state we fall into when near or in water. Kudos to Silverstein for taking that idea on, because he nailed it. “River Running By” makes you feel like you’re floating through a dreamscape and searching for peace. Pre-order the rest of Silverstein’s EP on Bandcamp (it releases in full on April 16), and find “River Running By” on Spotify or Apple Music.

RECYCLE : FACTS & FIGURES

Rethink about it! Did you know clamshells, cups of any kind, plastic bags, and milk, juice, and soup boxes can’t be recycled curbside in Deschutes County? Don’t toss it in hoping it gets recycled: know what goes in and what stays out. Check out our website for recycling tips and more!

RethinkWasteProject.org an environmental center program

Design by Sunny Eckerle


SOURCE PICKS THURSDAY 2/25

FRIDAY-MONDAY 2/26-3/1

2/25 – 3/3

SATURDAY 2/27

Live outdoor music is a staple these days and Bunk + Brew continues to bring the good times. Original songs from Manuel Bair pair perfectly with bonfires, delicious eats from the food tricks and ice-cold brews. Sat., Feb. 27, 5-7pm. Bunk + Brew Historic Lucas House, 42 NW Hawthorne Ave., Bend. No cover.

SATURDAY 2/27

Submitted

TRAMPLED BY TURTLES BENEFITING PERFORMING ARTS IN CENTRAL OREGON Get ready for an evening of jamming and fun with a livestreamed performance that will include four unique sets. Ticket holders also get exclusive behind-the-scenes access and a look into the band’s songwriting process. Thu., Feb. 25, 6-9pm. towerthetare.org/tickets-and-events. $15.

WEDNESDAY 2/24

OREGON’S BLACK EXCLUSION LAWS: HOW THIS HISTORY IMPACTS DIVERSITY IN OREGON TODAY A LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR VIRTUAL FORUM

In honor of Black History Month, join community members and experts on a discussion about race in Oregon. The talk will focus on a series of laws that discouraged Black Americans from living in Oregon that remained in effect until 1926. How have these laws impacted Oregon today? Wed., Feb. 24, 6-8pm. Eventbrite.com/e/love-your-neighbor-virtual-forum-tickets-142008901447. Free.

Courtesy MountainFilm on Tour

MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR: FIRST WEEKEND VIRTUAL ADVENTURE FILMS

Mountainfilm brings the adventure into your home, with its virtual 2021 showing. Join in for stories about overcoming odds, forging new paths and the importance of stewardship. Each program will be available for three days, so view whenever you can! Fri., Feb. 26- Mon., March 1.envirocenter.org/tec-events/mountainfilm-on-tour. $10-$50.

SATURDAY 2/27

Unsplash

SLEIGHT OF HAND VIRTUAL TASTING WITH TREY BUSCH WITH GOOD DROP WINE SHOP

Pick up your tasting kit and maybe some tasty snacks for an evening of virtual wine tasting with Trey Busch from Sleight of Hand Cellars. Fee includes five different tasting samples and access to the online event. Sat., Feb. 27, 1-2:30pm. Register by emailing beckie@ gooddropwineshop.com or call 541-410-1470. $20.

OUR FUTURE RESILIENCE

TowerTheatre.org

Join Stephen Harris for this free introductory class to beekeeping! Learn the basics for getting your own beekeeping started and get an overview of the entire Tumalo Bee Academy program. If you like what you see, sign up for the full year-long program. Sat., Feb. 27, 1-3pm. Schilling’s Garden Market, 64640 Old Bend Redmond Hwy., Tumalo. Free.

Access to the natural world can be taken for granted for those who regularly utilize public lands, but equal access is not a reality for many yet. This talk will look into the movement that seeks to address racial and ethnic inequities in public lands access and beyond. Mon., March. 1, 6-7pm. highdesertmusuem.org/natural-history-pub-march. Free.

An acoustic set with an Austin transplant that will take you away just for a few minutes. Expect everything from deep ballads to upbeat fun covers and care-free originals. Thu., Feb. 25, 6-6:30pm. deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar/event/61438. Free.

A series of talks with local and visiting artists to get deeper into their process and creativity. The fourth season kicks off with Daniela Repas. An animation and media-based artist, Daniela will discuss her strategy for storytelling through her work. Thu., Feb. 25, 6-7pm. scalehouse2021.eventive.org/schedule. Free.

BEEKEEPER

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND THE MOVEMENT TO DIVERSIFY PUBLIC LANDS VIRTUAL NATURAL HISTORY PUB

CHRIS BARBORKA ORIGINAL GUITAR PERFORMANCE MUSIC FOR RELAXING AFTER A LONG WEEK

DANIELA REPAS: THE STILL LINE OF A MOVEMENT PRESENTED BY SCALEHOUSE VOICES

INTRO TO BEEKEEPING WITH TUMALO BEE ACADEMY’S MASTER

MONDAY 3/1

THURSDAY 2/25

THURSDAY 2/25

Unsplash

WEDNESDAY 3/3

PASSION, DRIVE, BRAVERY: THE LIFE OF JESSI COMBS DEFYING THE ODDS

Jessi Combs set a new land speed record in 2019, right here in the Oregon Alvord Desert. She overcame stereotypes and more to reach this goal and tragically lost her life while meeting her goal. This virtual panel will include reflections and chats with Jessi’s friends and members of the foundation started in her honor. Wed., March 3, 6-7pm. highdesertmuseum.org/jessi-combs. Free.

depends on you! Text “Tower” to 44321 to give a gift today.

11 VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

SATURDAYS IN THE YARD WITH MANUEL BAIR PRESENTED BY BUNK + BREW


LIVE MUSIC & NIGHTLIFE

CALENDAR WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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>

Tickets Available on Bendticket.com

MUSIC

24 Wed. Feb 24 Worthy Brewing Star Bar Sessions With Eric Leadbetter and Friends Eric Leadbetter will be hosting this cozy event and inviting some friends each week to join him. 5:30pm. No cover.

Know Flow: Overcoming Pandemic Procrasination to Make 2021 Awesome Join us for a

Chris Barborka Original Guitar Performance A relaxing, melodic acoustic set

with singer/songwriter and Austin transplant, Chris Barborka. Feb. 25, 6-6:30pm. Contact: (541) 3121063. paigef@deschuteslibrary.org. Free.

The Ultimate Oldies Show A locally-pro-

25 Thu. Feb 25 Tower Theatre Trampled By Turtles Join the jam band for a series of four unique sets “live” from their favorite venue. 6-9pm. $15. Bridge 99 Brewery Thursday Trivia Night at

Bridge 99 Bundle up and join us for trivia outdoors at Bridge 99. 6-8pm. Free.

Silver Moon Brewing Trivia on the Moon

Trivia will be held on our socially distanced patio. 7-9pm.

26 Fri. Feb 26

duced, syndicated, weekly, thematic two-hour radio show highlighting the music, artists, producers, musicians and cultural touchstones of the late 1940s through the late 1960s. Fridays, 6-8pm. KPOV, 501 NW Bond St., Bend. Contact: mikeficher@gmail.com. Free.

FILM EVENTS Mountainfilm on Tour-Bend: First Show Check out Mountainfilm’s inspiring

program from the comfort of your own home — wherever you are, at a time that works best for you! Fri, Feb. 26 - Mon, March 1. Contact: 541-385-6908. priscilla@envirocenter.org. $10-$50.

Vintage Ski Film in the Alley Join us outside

Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House High

Desert Nights @ Bunk+Brew - Live Music with Mari Auna & Third Seven! Join us this week for the Mari Auna & Third Seven! 5-7pm.

27 Sat. Feb 27 Bunk+Brew Historic Lucas House

Bunk+Brew Presents: Saturdays in the Yard with Manuel Bair - Live Music! Live music originals by Manuel Bair! Heated and covered igloos, bonfires, and heaters available for you to enjoy the night in comfort! 5-7pm.

28 Sun. Feb 28 River’s Place Trivia Brunch Edition! Free to play and prizes to win! Noon-1:30pm.

2 Tue. Mar 2 Initiative Brewing Tuesday Night Trivia in Redmond It’s UKB Trivia outdoors on the partially sheltered patio with gas fire pits. It’s free to play with prize cards to win! Free.

in the alley for a fun evening of vintage ski films! Thursdays-Fridays, 6:30pm. Through April 1. Tin Pan Alley, Off Minnesota, between Thump and the Wine Shop, Bend. $15-$30.

Virtual: Backcountry Film Festival

The sixteenth annual Winter Wildlands Alliance Backcountry Film Festival will be available to watch in our first-ever virtual screening experience. All proceeds will go to support the efforts of Discover Your Forest. Feb. 20-March 13. Contact: 503-8408170. amy.jensen@discovernw.org. $20-$60.

PRESENTATIONS & EXHIBITS Electrify for Healthier Homes Learn why

switching from fossil gas, AKA natural gas, to electric is better for your health, wallet, and the environment. Go to 350deschutes.org for registration and more information. March 2, 3-4:15pm. Contact: lharrer@350deschutes.org. Free.

Fire in the Forest: A Natural Process and Unnatural Changes Learn about the

natural role that fires play in forested landscapes and ecosystems in the region, and how climate change and human management has altered those roles, from the use of fire by indigenous people, to systematic fire suppression. March 2, 6-7:30pm. Free. Courtesy High Desert Museum

one-hour presentation to get your mojo flowing, ideas bubbling, and motivation recharged propelling you forward. Feb. 24, 6:30-7:30pm. Contact: 541-312-1063. paigef@deschuteslibrary.org. Free.

Love Your Neighbor: Oregon’s Black Exclusion Laws: How this History Impacts Diversity in Oregon Today Join

supposition that makes this series of poems about the end of love possible and the poems become evidence for the supposition. Visit roundaboutbookshop. com for Zoom info. Feb. 25, 6-7pm. Contact: 541306-6564. sara@roundaboutbookshop.com. Free.

ETC.

Observatory Nighttime Visit One-hour

si Combs, who is included in the exhibit Daredevils, set a new land speed record in Oregon’s Alvord Desert. The Jessi Combs Foundation has gone on to honor her legacy. March 3, 6-7pm. Contact: 541382-4754. info@highdesertmuseum.org. Free.

sessions include night sky viewing through various telescopes with staff astronomers, a guided constellation tour, meteorite displays, and an educational presentation. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 7-8pm and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8:30-9:30pm. Through March 13. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver, Sunriver. $20.

Oregon Unemployment Insurance Overview Lawyers from Legal Aid Services of Oregon

will explain the basics of how Unemployment Insurance works, who can get these benefits, and what to do if you’re denied benefits. Hosted by Deschutes Public Library. March 2, 5:30-7pm. Contact: 541617-7089. jenniferp@deschuteslibrary.org. Free.

Resilient You! An 8 Week Class; Ignite Your 12 Spiritual Powers and Create a Radiant Life! Learn how to harness the 12

Powers of wisdom, love, strength, faith, imagination, order, understanding, will, power, zeal, release, and life itself in order to free yourself from suffering and to thrive in this world! Mondays, 5:307pm. Through March 29. Contact: 541-390-8244. janeyhiatt@gmail.com. $75.

Return of the Trumpeter Swan: Bringing a Species Back from the Brink of Extinction Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory hosts

Margaret Smith, Executive Director of The Trumpeter Swan Society, as she shares the amazing story of the return of Trumpeter Swans to North America and the key players in their return. Feb. 24, 6pm. Contact: 541-593-4442. programs@snco.org. $5.

Scalehouse Voices presents Daniela Repas: The Still Line of a Movement

Join us for an inspiring conversation with Daniela as she discusses process, strategy and storytelling as modular units of her work. Feb. 25, 6-7pm. Free.

Virtual Lecture: Einstein, Eddington, and the Challenges of Observational Astronomy During this lecture Paul will

share his experience preparing for the Eddington experiment, traveling to Chile, and future plans for this experiment. Feb. 25, 7pm. Contact: office@ sunrivernaturecenter.org. $5. Zach Filkins will display his artwork in our Box Factory Breezeway. A percentage of proceeds will go towards The Giving Plate. Feb. 1-March 26. Box Factory, 550 SW industrial way, Bend.

WORDS Current Fiction Book Club We will discuss

A Traveler at the Gates of Wisdom by John Boyne. Please visit roundaboutbookshop.com for Zoom info. March 3, 6-7pm. Contact: 541-306-6564. sara@roundaboutbookshop.com. Free.

Zoom Author Event: Suppose the Room Just Got Brighter by Jenna Goldsmith The

Erika McCalpine, director of the OSU-Cascades Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Laboratory when she hosts a discussion with OSU experts to explore the historical, sociological and personal impact of Oregon’s Black exclusion laws. Feb. 24, 6-8pm. Free.

Zach Filkins at Box Factory Local artist

Learn more about the record-setting Daredevil, Jessi Combs, with the virtual event from the High Desert Museum Wed., March 3 from 6-7pm.

6-7pm. Contact: 541-306-6564. sara@roundaboutbookshop.com. Free.

Rediscovered Reads Book Club We will discuss My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman. Please visit roundaboutbookshop.com for Zoom info. Feb. 24,

Passion, Drive, Bravery: The Life of Jessi Combs In 2019, professional racer Jes-

Preventative Walk-In Pet Wellness Clinic The Bend Spay and Neuter Project offers

vaccinations, deworming and microchips at our walk-in wellness clinic. Saturdays, 9am-2pm. Bend Spay & Neuter Project, 910 SE Wilson, Suite A1, Bend. $10-$30.

Virtual Natural History Pub: Environmental Justice and the Movement to Diversify Public Lands Since the turn

of the 21st century, a movement has emerged to address racial and ethnic inequities in public lands access, recreational use and employment. March 1, 6-7pm. Contact: 541-382-4754. info@ highdesertmuseum.org. Free.

VOLUNTEER Call for Volunteers - Play with Parrots!

Volunteers needed at Second Chance Bird Rescue! Located past Cascade Lakes Distillery, call for hours and location. Contact: 916-956-2153.

General Volunteer Opportunities Please

contact Courtney, Community Engagement Coordinator, at volunteer@bethleheminn.org. Bethlehem Inn, 3705 N Hwy 97, Bend.

Robotics Mentors/Volunteers Needed

Like robots and legos?! Come share your passion and experience with our 4th-7th grade teams. Teams meet weekly and will compete in the February First Lego League Tournament! Feb. 26-Noon. BendTECH, 1001 SW Emkay Dr, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@campfireco.org.

Volunteer Opportunity Seize this opportunity;

volunteer at Mustangs To The Rescue. Please call and leave a message. Mustangs to the Rescue, 21670 McGilvray Road, Bend. Contact: 541-330-8943. volunteer@MustangstotheRescue.org.

Volunteer with Salvation Army We have an

emergency food pantry, we visit residents of assisted living centers and we make up gifts for veterans and the homeless. Contact: 541-389-8888.

GROUPS & MEETUPS CASA Information: Be A Voice for Kids in Foster Care Join us at one of our weekly one

hour free Zoom informational sessions where you can learn more about advocating for children in foster care in Central Oregon. Thursdays, Noon1pm. Through March 18. Contact: 541-389-1619. training@casaofcentraloregon.org. Free.

Community Dance Break!....just 10 minutes Move, connect, have a fun break....wherever

you are with whomever you are with. Feb. 24, 12:3012:40pm & March 3, 12:30-12:40pm. Contact: 541948-7015. soulinmotionbend@gmail.com. free.

Submitting an event is free and easy.  Add your event to our calendar at bendsource.com/submitevent


13 VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

THE NEIGHBORHOODS OF CENTRAL OREGON Living, working & playing in Oregon's outdoor wonderland


wy

Rd Jo hn so n

Deschutes Market Rd

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Rd

Cooley Rd

Boyd Acres

Yeoman Rd

NE

M arket Rd tler Bu

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River West NW 14th St

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NE 8th St

NW Newport Ave

NE Neff Rd

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Orchard District NE Revere Ave

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Boyd Acres Rd

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Bend Neighborhoods

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WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

To Redmond

Old Bend R

To Sisters

edmond H

Tumalo


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Larkspur Kyle Switzer

NEIGHBORHOOD:

SE Bend, Larkspur, Old Farm neighborhoods

WHO LIVES HERE:

15 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Families & young professionals. (Dominant demographic is health care workers, social assistance workers, retail workers and construction workers).

HOUSING STOCK:

Primarily single-family homes, townhomes, multifamily and apartments. Mobile home parks prevalent as well.

MEDIAN SALES PRICE:

Old Farm District $550,000, SE Bend to Knott Road $450,000 and Larkspur District $463,000

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Proximity to employment, golf, shopping, schools. Many established neighborhoods with larger lots.

PARKS:

Stone Creek, Foxborough, Sun Meadow and High Desert, Larkspur Park, Ponderosa Park, Kiwanis, Vince Genna Stadium and Bend Senior Center. It should be noted that 37-acre Alpenglow Community Park is currently under construction.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Larkspur's Ponderosa Skate Park is a big draw for youth—and adults alike... snow notwithstanding.

K.

K.M. Collins

s

PONDEROSA SKATE PARK

in

Christin J Hunter, Broker, Duke Warner Realty

oll

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY :

Above: 9th Street Village is a haven for food carts and beer in Larkspur. Left, the start of the author's jaunt, at the north end of the 'hood.

M. C

Bear Creek, Juniper, Silver Rail and R.E. Jewell Elementaries, High Desert and Pilot Butte Middle Schools and Bend High primarily with a small portion of the Larkspur District at Mountain View High School. It should be noted that the high school boundaries will be changing for 2021-2022 and the new Caldera High School is slated to be completed for Fall of 2021.

East Side Promenade

A bike route through the Larkspur neighborhood offers hidden adventure By K.M. Collins

F

rom my front door on NE Lotus Drive, adjacent to Pilot Butte, there’s a paved bikeable foot path that tracks all the way to Reed Market Road, straight through the heart of the Larkspur neighborhood—no stop lights and very few street crossings. Its two variations are known as Larkspur and Coyner Trails, however, I informally refer to the network as the Eastside Promenade (Prom). “The Coyner Trail extends between Juniper Park and Ponderosa Park,” describes Bend Park and Recreation District on its website. “Paved and off-street, it gently rolls along the west of Bear Creek Elementary School from park to park.” The Larkspur Trail, meanwhile, “runs through the heart of east Bend,” BPRD describes. Heading north, what I call the Prom terminates on Neff Road at Pilot Butte Middle School. Heading south, it passes through the park at the base of Pilot Butte. It has a jungle gym, an extensive grassy knoll and a quarter-mile jogging track (which I like to use for roller skating and cross country skiing a couple times a year when the snow is deep enough). From this park, multiple trails to hike Pilot Butte’s circumference or summit are accessible.  One of my favorite features of the Prom is the carless underpass just southeast of Pilot Butte. Passing under Highway 20 in a huge, corrugated metal tube is one of the most urban experiences I’ve had in Central Oregon. I always like to call out from my bike and listen back for the tunneled echo. Popping out of the

underpass at the Lava Lanes bowling alley never fails to put a smile on my face, with the signature ‘500 Club’ plastered on the karaoke bar windows. Eventually the path crosses Bear Creek Road with a small traverse to reconnect. From there it travels down a friendly high desert scrub neighborhood alley. The vibe is cheery as families, gangs of elementary kids and the odd lonesome jogger—denizens typical of Larkspur—pass. Toward the southern terminus, before you reach Reed Market Road, there are plenty of sneaky off-road dusty mountain bike exploration opportunities.  Tracing back to Bear Creek Road, if you were to have headed west a small piece instead of connecting on the trail to the east, you would have caught the Coyner Trail fork of the Prom, just past Bear Creek Elementary. This trail’s terminus in Ponderosa Park—and it isn’t a stretch to say this—offers something for every inner-city outdoor recreationalist. Organized teams love this park for its stacked fields; pet goers enjoy the fenced dog park and it’s a skateboarder’s paradise with two separate skate parks to maneuver through.  Hot tip: There’s even some sweet Black Lives Matter graffiti visible from the dog park.  Although the mountains often call and epic bucket-list adventures are only an hour or two from Bend, mini daily adventures, literally in your backyard, are also critical for those moments when you have a limited time slot. In these moments, I’m stoked to live near the Eastside Prom.


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE 16


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Southern Crossing Damian Fagan

NEIGHBORHOOD:

Southern Crossing/ SW Bend

WHO LIVES HERE:

17 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Majority of the population is ages 0-14 and 22-54 years of age. A lot of families, young professionals and also retirees of 65+. Over 50% of the demographic has a median income of over $100k. 70% of the population has BA/BS/Graduate degrees.

HOUSING STOCK:

The large majority of the homes are detached single-family homes. The remaining stock comprises attached single-family homes (townhomes, condos) as well as some mobile/ manufactured homes and multi-unit properties (duplexes/ triplexes). The majority are under .25 acre lots. Over 80% of homes are 3-4-bedroom homes. Approximately 75% are owner occupied.

MEDIAN SALE PRICE: $555,000

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Abbie + Rick Sams, Team Sams Real Estate

RIVERBEND PARK Damian Fagan

Bend's ironwork sculptures, including this one in Riverbend Park, are an homage to the city's lumber-mill history.

n

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY:

D

Pine Ridge Elementary, Elk Meadow Elementary, Cascade Middle School, Bend Senior High (Mostly Southern Crossing neighborhood) and with the new boundaries for 2021-22, most and rest of SW Bend will be zoned for the new high school, Caldera.

Above: Once a workplace for loggers and lumbermen, the Old Mill is now the centerpiece of all of Bend. Right: Basking in the snow on skis, right in town.

a

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Fa g

Southern Crossing: Farewell Bend Park, Woodriver (small neighborhood park), Blakely Park. SW Bend: Pine Ridge Park, Renaissance Ridge Central Park, River Canyon Park, Deschutes River Access, Wildflower Park, Hollygrape Park.

an

PARKS:

am i

Neighborhood demographics, proximity to downtown and Old Mill District, walkability within neighborhood (sidewalks), HOA Amenities ie: pool and maintained neighborhoods, proximity to schools and parks, home prices.

Southwest Bend and Southern Crossing Neighborhoods connect to the heart of Bend By Damian Fagan

H

owdy, Neighbor! If I was to define the Southwest Bend neighborhood, I’d have to say that it’s a friendly place to be. Why? Bounded by the Deschutes River, Highway 97, Deschutes River Woods and the Old Mill District, Southwest Bend is known for its beautiful homes, quiet nature and plethora of parks. Predominantly a residential area, the neighborhood’s sidewalks and walking paths invite dog walkers, runners, cyclists and park goers to mix and mingle while enjoying the outdoors. Wildflower Park, Pine Ridge Park and Hollygrape Park are three of the many Bend Park & Rec sites in this ‘hood, which have playgrounds for the kids and open spaces for a summer picnic or a winter snowman construction site. The Cinder Cone Natural Area is a little more “walk on the wild side” and a great spot to watch the sunset. But kids will often be the judges and, in winter, most of them prefer The Pit. No, The Pit isn’t some toxic waste site, but a saucer-shaped depression that offers some slippery winter slopes for sledders. The runs may be short, but it pegs the fun-meter. Parental units often perch on the rim in their folding chairs, watching the action and, of all things, talking with their neighbors! Other Bend Park & Rec sites in this area, such as River Canyon Park and River Rim Park, provide access to the Deschutes River. For those wanting to walk to the Old Mill District, there’s the Deschutes River Trail. Though a more residential than commercial neighborhood, C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market is a full-service grocery store located in the Brookswood Meadow Plaza. Convenient to the neighborhood, the store offers senior and military discount days (celoyjoys.com) and, depending upon how the pandemic goes, hopefully their outdoor summer

music series will return! Bordered by southwest Bend and Highway 97, the Southern Crossing neighborhood covers central Bend and straddles the Deschutes River. This neighborhood is a mix of residential, businesses and commercial sites, layered with Bend history and outdoor beauty. “The definition of Southern Crossing is central, local, quick access to town, touristy, great views, and a short drive to Bachelor, the Cascade Scenic Highway, and 20-plus lakes,” said Karen Bergsvik, chair of the Southern Crossing Neighborhood Association. Perhaps the one defining spot in this ‘hood is the Old Mill District, a hub of shops, restaurants, music venues, theaters, salons, tap rooms and much more. Previously, the region’s two main lumber companies which put Bend on the map, Brooks-Scanlon and Shevlin-Hixon, had mills situated on opposite sides of the Deschutes. Before the timber-industry era, this location was the site of the pioneering Farewell Bend Ranch which eventually led to the town’s name: Bend. Like spokes on a wheel, numerous trails for dog walkers, hikers, and runners radiate from the Old Mill into various portions of town. The Deschutes River trail is widely used by locals and visitors alike and interpretive panels along the trail in the Old Mill District describe the history of the area. It’s pretty cool to be able to walk from a nearby neighborhood to this center of activity and leave the car at home. In winter, you might encounter a bird watcher scoping out the various waterfowl in the river or catch a river otter or beaver swimming in the river. Of course, this being Bend, you might encounter some skiers taking advantage of fresh snowfall in town – which begs the bigger question: Why would I want to go on vacation when I live in Bend!?


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Visit coar.com to find a REALTOR, search for properties and learn more about how the Central Oregon Association of REALTORS and our 2500+ members are helping our community


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Boyd Acres

NEIGHBORHOOD: Boyd Acres

WHO LIVES HERE:

HOUSING STOCK:

Primarily single-family homes, townhomes, multifamily and apartments. $506,000

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Proximity to Highway 97, employment, shopping and schools.

PARKS:

Empire Crossing, Boyd, Rockridge, Pine Nursery and Canal Row Parks.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Ponderosa, Lava Ridge and North Star Elementaries, Skyview Middle School, Mountain View High School.

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY:

Christin J Hunter, Broker, Duke Warner Realty

W

hile some others squabble over coveted westside neighborhoods, we’ll let you in on a little secret: Some of the best views in all of Bend aren’t found on the west side—they’re found in Boyd Acres, the northeast-most neighborhood in the city. Largely consisting of homes built within the past 20 years, many homes’ builders attempt to capitalize on the location by scoring that second-floor peekaboo of the Three Sisters, or even a clutch view of Mt. Jefferson to the northwest. Boyd Acres has a suburban feel, but there’s still plenty to do close at hand. 10 Barrel’s east side brewery opened in the neighborhood several years back, with indoor pickleball and trampoline parks going in not long after. For those new to Bend who’ve recently paid the city’s de facto “gear tax” and invested in a new mountain bike, Rockridge Park should be on your

Just getting started on a mountain bike? Boyd Acres' Rockridge Park has awesome skills trails for beginner and intermediate riders.

radar as a place to up your skills at its bike skills trails. Rockridge also has an awesome skate park that’s a big draw for the neighborhood. With close access to the shopping centers along Highway 97, Boyd Acres has everything you need for a comfy and relatively quiet Bend lifestyle. And with the area west of Highway 97, Juniper Ridge, recently being annexed into the city’s Urban Growth Boundary, expect even more housing and development to crop up in this area in the years to come.

Old Bend / River West

NEIGHBORHOOD:

River West, Old Bend

WHO LIVES HERE:

Currently about 72% of the residents have lived here less than 10 years. Lots of vacation rentals and short-term rental properties, plus families, young professionals and retirees. 

HOUSING STOCK:

Classic Bend homes from yesteryear, including a historic district. Small cottages, modernly renovated homes, with some old timey duplexes and multifamily homes.

MEDIAN SALE PRICE:

River West $760,348, Old Bend $894,948

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

This neighborhood is what people think of when they think Bend. Close to the Deschutes River and Drake Park, easy access to downtown.

PARKS:

Drake Park, McKay/Whitewater park, Columbia Park, Harmon Park, Pageant Park, Brooks Park... certainly no shortage of parks in River West!

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Highland/Kenwood, Amity Creek and Westside Village magnets. Cascade Middle School, Pacific Crest, Bend Senior High School, Summit High School.

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY: The Levison Group

Proximity to shopping and awesome mountain vistas By Nicole Vulcan

MEDIAN SALES PRICE:

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

19

Bend’s Highlight Reel: Old Bend and River West

Ian Poellet / Wikimedia Commons

Living in the center of town puts residents at the heart of it all By Nicole Vulcan

T

he neighborhoods of Old Bend and River West contain a highlight reel of sorts of what people who don’t live in Bend come to the city to do—floating the river, cruising the Old Mill, sipping beer at the OG breweries and grabbing an Ocean Roll from the OG Sparrow Bakery. Comprised largely of historic homes, many of them cottages cobbled together by lumber-mill workers doing it like the protagonist in Johnny Cash’s “One Piece at a Time” song, Old Bend gives residents a glimpse of what life was like before the mills were replaced by a mall; before people-watching the scantily clad river floaters became a prime afternoon pastime any day of the week. These days, living in River West and Old Bend puts one at the heart of all the action—for better or worse. Want a cool coffee shop to while away an afternoon? There are dozens. Want to grab takeout or dine on a patio at a locally owned restaurant? Unique options definitely outnumber the chains. Like live music? Just open your ears, because in a normal year, it’s very likely coming at you from Les Schwab Amphitheater or from one of the many other outdoor concerts Bend has in spades.

The classic shot: The Three Sisters mountains from the shores of Mirror Pond.

And when the day’s over, you can go home to your unique cottage, and wonder, for perhaps the hundreth time, why that mill worker who hand-built your one-of-a-kind home decided to build the ceilings so low. They clearly brought the shiplap home one piece at a time.

VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Families, young professionals and retirees. (Dominant demographic is health care workers, social assistance workers)

Boyd Acres: Great Views and an Easy Lifestyle

Nicole Vulcan


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

20

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OFFICIAL GUIDE

MUSE

UNCONFERENCE 2021

MARCH 4-7

BREAKING IT DOWN MUSE UNCONFERENCE 2021

1


MUSE UNCONFERENCE MARCH 4-7 2021

WELCOME

Welcome to our annual gathering. For the past nine years, World MUSE has brought together local and visiting artists, activists, change-

makers and thought-leaders. In 2021, we will be hosting our first virtual MUSE UnConference. The term "unconference" has been applied to a wide range

WORLD MUSE believes individuals can change the world. Our year-round

of gatherings that try to break down hierarchical aspects of conventional conferences. Before we move forward, we need to acknowledge the ways we have perpetuated harm, exclusion, and trauma through our past actions including prohibitive ticket pricing and content that far too often centered whiteness

programming includes

and viewed diversity through the lens of white saviorism, ableism, and

MUSE UnConference, MUSE

to learn and do better. Acknowledgement of our own complicity is an

Clubs, and MUSE Maker Program which provides

cisgender privilege. As an organization, and as individuals, we are working important part of breaking down where white supremacy lives in us and in our actions. To that end, World MUSE has worked closely with Community Partners to

small seed grants to those

provide content that is more representative of our community as a whole,

who are working to inspire

pay what they can, and an online platform that provides greater overall

positive social change. Throughout the year, we also offer special MUSE Events to encourage community connection, support, and inspiration.

an equity-based fee structure that allows anyone who wishes to attend to accessibility. We are grateful to those in our community who have called us up to do better. We look forward to gathering together virtually to begin breaking down barriers through listening, learning, practice, and action. We will be breaking down issues including Youth Mental Health, Indigenous Food Sovereignty, Transgender Representation, Mutual Aid, Transforming Philanthropy, and Radical Self-Love. We hope MUSE UnConference will provide time and space to break down issues, break down barriers, break down resistance, break down old ways of thinking, doing, being so that we can all ultimately begin the process of

theworldmuse.org

acknowledging, healing, and rebuilding.

Muse On.

WORLD MUSE

BREAKING IT DOWN 2

OFFICIAL GUIDE


PROGRAM & HIGHLIGHTS

THURSDAY, MARCH 4 MUSE YOUTH SUMMIT 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

We will be screening a short documentary film produced by World MUSE and Unlocked Films exploring the impacts of COVID-19 on young people in our community. The film features local youth and mental health providers, including YouthLine and Better Together. Following the film will be a panel discussion and audience Q&A.

MUSE SPOTLIGHT

DAREN TODD

Daren Todd (he, him) will be joining MUSE UnConference for a performance and a conversation around why representation matters in the Arts. Todd coopened the Downstairs Gallery in Portland amidst the COVID-19 pandemic to showcase works from BIPOC, LGBTQ+ and disabled artists. Under Todd’s direction, The Downstairs Gallery prioritizes the work and perspectives of artists from historically underserved populations, including Black, Indigenous and people of color and members of the disabled and LGBTQ+ communities.

FRIDAY, MARCH 5 MUSE UnConference

9:00 am - 4:00 pm

9:00 am-10:00 am Daily Practice facilitated by Jessica Amascual of Healing Justice Collective 10:30 am-12:00 pm Morning Listen & Learn Session Performance + Interview: Artist, Musician, Activist Daren Todd Panel: Producer Mona Sinha and Director Sam Feder of film Disclosure 12:30 pm-1:00 pm

Lunch & Learn Session: Special Guest with Emily Cureton of OPB 1:30 pm -4:00 pm Afternoon Listen & Learn Session Panel: Local BIPOC Leaders Janet Sarai Llerandi Gonzalez, Kerstin Arias, Jessica Amascual Keynote Segment: Special Keynote Guest with

Kerri Kelly of CTZNWELL

MUSE UNCONFERENCE 2021

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MUSE SPOTLIGHT

TWILA CASSADORE, Arizona-based forager, food educator, advocate for indigenous food sovereignty, and member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe

Twila Cassodore has been working with San Carlos Apache,

White Mountain Apache, and Yavapai peoples for the past 25 years, conducting interviews with elders to bring information back into the community to address health and social problems. With the Western Apache Diet Project,

Twila has documented the importance of foods like grass seeds and acorn seeds to the diets of Apaches before

people were moved onto reservations and became reliant on rations, and later, commodities. Her work is featured in the documentary Gather.

GATHER Film

Twila will be joining us for a panel discussion on Saturday to break down the need for Indigenous Food Sovereignty. Attendees will be invited to watch the film Gather Friday evening to prepare for the conversation.

GATHER is the story of the rebuilding of

Native food systems. This feature film is

an intimate portrait tracing the intentional destruction of Native American foodways our renaissance and resilience, our inherit right, to reclaim it.

MUSE SPOTLIGHT

LOCAL BIPOC ARTISANS

This year, many of our guests and attendees will receive special gifts created by local BIPOC artisans Spring Alaska Olson of Sakari Botanicals and Kerstin Arias of K. Arias Creatives who are also both being featured in panel discussions over the course of MUSE UnConference. We are grateful for the opportunity to support our local community in this way.

MUSE SPOTLIGHT

JANET SARAI LLERANDI GONZALEZ

Founder of Mecca Bend

"Mecca Bend was born from the desire to see my friends,

who are my second family, integrate into the community

of Central Oregon. As a Latina woman, and mother of two, my pride is in the work ethic my parents showed me from

a young age. And never disregarding the challenges they faced as foreigners in this country.

Today, in my work with the Latinx community, I serve as the

voice for our friends and family who sometimes feel forgotten. And I do it with Latina pride!"

Janet will be joining other BIPOC leaders for a panel titled: We are not a monolith - Honoring the differences that help build solidarity in our movements

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OFFICIAL GUIDE


SATURDAY, MARCH 6 MUSE UnConference

MILCK

9:00 am - 4:00 pm

9:00 am-10:00 am Daily Practice facilitated by Acosia Red Elk of Pendleton Yoga 10:30 am-12:00 pm Morning Listen & Learn Session Performance + Interview: Artist, Activist MILCK Panel: Oregon-based Activists

Acosia Red Elk, Erika McCalpine, Morgan Schmidt, Kina Condit-Chadwick 12:30 pm-1:00 pm Lunch & Learn Session: Interview with MRG Foundation Director Se-Ah-Dom Edmo 1:30 pm-4:00 pm Afternoon Listen & Learn Session Panel: Indigenous Activists Spring Alaska Olson,

Brigette McConville, Twila Cassadore

Keynote Segment: Sonya Renee Taylor Special Dance Party HOSTED BY CTZNWELL

MUSE SPOTLIGHT

MILCK MILCK’s life took a 180 degree turn after

a cell phone video of her performing her song “Quiet”

with a choir of 25 strangers at the 2017 Women’s March went viral. “Quiet” was named Billboard’s #1 protest song of the year and earned distinction as part of

NPR’s “American Anthem” series. And in 2018, it brought MILCK to the March’s main stage in New York City, where she performed alongside the legendary Yoko Ono.

​Having “​cemented her status as one of music’s voices for the women’s movement​,” MILCK continues to

use music as a means to work towards social justice.

Written amidst protests for Black Lives Matter, MILCK’s

new song “Somebody’s Beloved” (Ft. Bipolar Sunshine) honors those we have lost too soon to causes fueled by systemic racism.

IN CELEBRATION OF WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH, BendFilm, Scalehouse + World Muse are partnering to bring you a weekend of creativity, conversation, and connection through the art form of film.

MUSE SPOTLIGHT

ACOSIA RED ELK Acosia Red Elk is an Enrolled

Member of the Umatilla Reservation in Northeastern Oregon. She is a 10x World Champion Jingle Dancer, Indige-

nous Yoga Teacher and Facilitator. Acosia travels the world sharing cultural knowledge and movement, and is known for her unique style of dance, indigenous approach to

MARCH 11TH - 14TH, 2021 TINPANTHEATER.COM/INDIEWOMXN PRESENTED BY

yoga, public speaking and storytelling.

MUSE UNCONFERENCE 2021

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We will not go back to normal. Normal

never was. Our pre-corona existence was

never normal other than we normalized greed, inequity, exhaustion, depletion, extraction, disconnection, confusion, rage, hoarding, hate and lack. We should not long to return, my friends. We are being given the opportunity to stitch a new garment. One that fits all of humanity and nature."

- Sonya Renee

Artist, Activist & Founder of The Body is Not an Apology

MUSE SPOTLIGHT

SONYA RENEE TAYLOR Sonya Renee Taylor is the Founder and Radical Executive Officer of The Body is Not An Apology, a digital media and education company promoting radical self-love and body empowerment as the foundational tool for social justice and global transformation. Sonya’s work as a highly sought-after award-winning Performance Poet, activist, and transformational leader continues to have global reach. Sonya is a former National and International poetry slam champion, author of two books, including The Body is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love (Berrett-Koehler Feb 2018), educator and thought leader who has enlightened and inspired organizations, audiences and individuals from board rooms to prisons, universities to homeless shelters, elementary schools to some of the biggest stages in the world. Believing in the power of art as a vehicle for social change, Sonya has been widely recognized for her work as a change agent. She was named one of Planned Parenthood's 99 Dream Keepers in 2015 as well as a Planned Parenthood Generation Action's 2015 Outstanding Partner awardee. Bustle

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OFFICIAL GUIDE

Magazine named her one of the 12 Women Who Paved the Way for Body Positivity and in September 2015, she was honored as a YBCA 100, an annual compilation of creative minds, makers, and pioneers who are asking the questions and making the provocations that will shape the future of American culture; an honor she shared alongside author Ta'Nahesi Coates, artist Kara Walker, filmmaker Ava DuVernay and many more. In 2016, she was named a Champion of Women’s Health by Planned Parenthood and commissioned to write the official poem for Planned Parenthood’s 100-year centennial celebration. In the same year, Sonya was also invited to the Obama White House to speak at their forum on the intersection of LGBTQIAA and Disability issues. In 2017, Sonya was awarded the Quixote Foundation’s “Thank You Note, a $25,000 award for leaders and artists working in the field of reproductive justice. In the fall of 2017, Sonya was named one of 28 global changemakers selected into the inaugural cohort of the Edmund Hilary Fellowship, a 3-year international fellowship of world-leading entrepreneurs and investors, innovating purpose-driven global impact projects from New Zealand.


SPECIAL THANKS We’d like to extend a special thank you to our

Resource Partner High Desert Law for providing funds to support local BIPOC Artisans.

SUNDAY, MARCH 7 MUSE UnConference 9:00 am - 12:30 pm

9:00 am -10:00 am Daily Practice facilitated by Halie Devlin of Healing Justice Collective. 10:30 am -12:30 am

Performance: Infinity’s Song Break It Down Session: a workshop session to

break down all that we heard and learned over the course of the unconference and create individual and collection action steps to move forward.

INFINITY'S SONG MUSE SPOTLIGHT

INFINITY'S SONG

Since its formation Infinity’s Song has consistently performed around NYC, cultivating a grassroots fanbase through pop up street performances in Central Park and the NYC subway stations. Singing on stages both small and great, the group has toured the U.S., been featured on NBC’s The Today Show and ABC’s The View, and frequently collaborates with other musical acts, most recently Kanye West, Jon Batiste, Tori Kelly and more. In the summer of 2015, the group released their first EP and in the fall of 2016 were officially signed to Roc Nation Records by Jay Z.

MUSE UNCONFERENCE 2021

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THANK YOU PARTNERS

RESOURCE PARTNERS businesses and foundations that support

MUSE with financial and promotional resources.

SE-AH-DOM EDMO MUSE SPOTLIGHT

SE-AH-DOM EDMO

COMMUNITY PARTNERS individuals and organizations that support MUSE with content development.

Mecca Bend

Love Your Neighbor

Healing Justice Collective

K. Arias Creatives

Embrace Bend CTZNWELL

Salmon King Fisheries Out Central Oregon

Se-ah-dom (Shoshone-

Bannock, Nez Perce and Yakama) is currently the executive director of MRG Foundation and a founder of the Northwest Justice Funders Collective. Se-ah-dom comes from a

background of advocacy and organizing work on behalf

of tribes and LGBTQ justice. She is the co-editor of the Tribal Equity Toolkit 3.0: Tribal Resolutions and Codes for Two

PRODUCTION TEAM Liz Allore Shurmur, Abby June Becker of Ideal Solutions SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Jasmine Wilder of Honeybeast Digital EVENT GUIDES Rita Schenkelberg, Pixie Lighthorse, Shanan Kelley GRAPHIC DESIGN Euijin Gray

Spirit and LGBTQ Justice in Indian Country and American Indian Identity: Citizenship, Membership & Blood.

PROGAM SPOTLIGHT

MUSE Clubs

Our MUSE Clubs encourage and support youth to become social change leaders in their school and community.

Our clubs reach youth in elementary, middle and high schools across Central Oregon.

Please consider becoming a MUSE Member today to help support our efforts to provide free, accessible youth programming in local schools.

VISIT: WWW.THEWORLDMUSE.ORG

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OFFICIAL GUIDE

Love Your Neighbor

A community conversation project in Central Oregon

Founded with a mission to allow Central Oregonians to get to know people of color in the community, the Love Your Neighbor project is a series of community forums and conversations that foster an open exchange of ideas and stories. Learn more about us, support our work or attend one of our upcoming forums by visiting our Facebook page, Love Your Neighbor Bend, OR, or by emailing us at loveyourneighborbend@gmail.com.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Orchard District Nicole Vulcan

NEIGHBORHOOD:

Orchard/Mountain View

WHO LIVES HERE:

21 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Mixture of families, businesses, schools, apartments

HOUSING STOCK:

Some of most affordable and best valued houses in Bend. Houses close to downtown and amenities, larger lots and competitive pricing.

MEDIAN SALES PRICE:

Orchard: $412,000 Mountain View: $476,700

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Affordability, proximity to shopping and restaurants.

li n ol

.C M

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Orchard: Juniper Elementary, Ensworth Elementary, Pilot Butte Middle School, Bend Senior High School, Mountain View High School, Marshall High School. Mountain View: Ponderosa Elementary, Sky View Middle, Mountain View High School.

K.

Pilot Butte State Park, Hollinshead Park, Al Moody Park, Juniper Park, Orchard Park, Stover Park, Mountain View Park, Providence Park, Big Sky Park.

s

PARKS:

Technically right on the border of the Mountain View and Boyd Acres neighborhoods, Pine Nursery is a fun park for skates, bikes and dogs—and kids wearing kitty helmets.

Borderlands: Adventures Between Orchard & Mountain View

From desirable close-in locations and parks to views and food carts, life is good on the east side

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY: Andy Stearns, My Lucky House

MIDTOWN YACHT CLUB

By K.M. Collins Nicole Vulcan

O

n the boundary flanking two east side Bend neighborhoods lies a myriad of all-ages playgrounds— and more importantly, post activity food. With a mix of mid-century homes circling Pilot Butte and newer construction stretching out east, the two neighborhoods still offer some of the most affordable homes in the city. Here’s a rundown of my favorite haunts in the Orchard and Mountain View neighborhoods. Pine Nursery This park’s sculpted and well-maintained recreation spaces are on par with Ponderosa Park in the Larkspur neighborhood. Fantastic expansive soccer and organized sports field complexes, a spacious and fenced off-leash dog park and a nearly 2-mile paved loop that meanders through a juniper forest and 158-acre community park comprise this can’t-miss tour stop. The trail offers vistas of the Three Sisters mountain peaks, Pilot Butte and Mt. Bachelor. What special features does this park have that others don’t? An 18-hole disc golf course and a stocked pond where many youngsters have learned to fish. 

The Midtown Yacht Club offers an easily accessible set of food carts and beverages—a welcome addition to the Orchard scene.

Pilot Butte Either driving or trekking up Pilot Butte is a great in-town adventure for any time of day. While the hike seems steep during the ascent, in a quick half-hour you’ll be to the top. Once at the summit, a permanent orientation compass installation will set you straight on the names of mountains (you can see all the way to Washington’s Mt. Adams somedays) and interpretive plaques will inform you on local history. Bring a snack, picnic or hot beverage and enjoy the cheapest

and most spectacular view in town. It’s the Empire State Building of Bend. Ensworth Elementary tri-park cluster Near Ensworth Elementary lies a notable cluster of parks. Al Moody Park sports a loop footpath, grassy knoll and at the north end a sweet micro mountain bike pump track in the making, with a few stellar kickers. To the west, Stover Park provides a baseball diamond. Even further west is Hollinshead Park, with a restored barn and farm house (complete with creepy period mannequins—look inside the windows!) pastures and an unfenced off-leash dog park to explore. River’s Place Food Cart Yard and Tap House The self-proclaimed indoor and outdoor eating and drinking food headquarters of Bend’s east side, River’s Place has a sweet 9-foot gas fire pit, four picnic tables with heat umbrellas, three fire pit tables and cozy indoor tap house seating. Try a delicious meal from one of the five onsite food carts that include Bluma’s Chicken & Waffles, Sunny’s Carrello, Nik’ Snacks Classic American, SOPA modern Mexican cuisine and Hogan’s Hoagies.  On Tap With over 30 tap handles, including a variety of craft beer, cider, wine and kombucha and six food trucks to satisfy every palate, this food cart pod is hopping. Voted Best Food Truck Lot by Source readers in 2020, this is an east side can’t-miss. Constantly offering live music, bingo and trivia—and dogs are also welcome. Who’s serving? CURBBQ, Barrio, Himalayan Bites, The Blue Rooster, PHILLYSTYLE and Duda’s Aussie Pies. 


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Sisters Submitted

NEIGHBORHOOD: Sisters

WHO LIVES HERE:

Families, artists, working professionals and retirees.

HOUSING STOCK:

Detached single family and townhomes.

MEDIAN SALES PRICE: $517,746

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Small town, Western feel, art scene and proximity to nature.

Sub

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PARKS:

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WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

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Village Green Park, Creekside Park and Fir Street Park.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Sisters School District.

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY:

Central Oregon Association of REALTORS

It's not hard to have a good day in Sisters, but starting at Angeline's is a sure way to have a great one. Below, rocking out during the "beforetimes" at The Belfry.

Sisters: Great Views, Awesome People An active and creative community with plenty of charm to be found By K.M. Collins

NEIGHBORHOOD:

F

Redmond

WHO LIVES HERE:

Young families, working professionals and retirees.

HOUSING STOCK:

Mostly single family detached.

MEDIAN SALES PRICE: $381,474

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Lower housing costs, small town feel, great restaurants and proximity to nature.

PARKS:

Redmond Area Park and Recreation District.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

Redmond School District

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY:

Central Oregon Association of REALTORS

SCP HOTEL REDMOND

or those looking for a quieter life than Bend affords, Sisters’ small-town charm combined with its cultural wealth make it an amazing place to live. Home to the Sisters Folk Fest and the Sisters Quilt Show, the town attracts creatives, retirees, cowpokes and those looking to escape city life for something far more serene. An itinerary for a typical Saturday shows just how attractive the town can be. A dreamy day in Sisters starts with a stop at Angelina’s Bakery and Cafe on Main Avenue. There you will find innumerable tasty morsels, many gluten free, vegan and sweetened with agave. Soups, salads, curry and more served for lunch, plus, exquisite coffee or tea. My personal favorite order is the jam-jam and a non-dairy chai. What’s a jam-jam you ask? Lemon poppy seed crumbly scone molded with a slightly concave glazed base and a pool of raspberry tart in the middle. So good. From a leisurely breakfast, walk a block to the main drag. Saunter through town and check out everything from organic produce and quilts to tourist kitsch for gifts and beyond. Nature’s Bling, a curated collection of rocks, gems and other fun trinkets, is my favorite post on the Sisters esplanade.  Not up for shopping? Looking for adventure? Stroll up to Three Creeks or around the Metolius River, both a 30-minute drive. A little closer in, check out Whychus

Creek from Creekside Park or enjoy the playground and Veteran’s Memorial Garden at Village Green City Park. Between Sisters and the even smaller hamlet of Terrebonne, you’ll find an unmatched lunch stop, Rainshadow Organics. From a gourmet chef in the farm kitchen, to locally grown, organic, farm-to-table ingredients, lunch never tasted so good. With a seasonal, constantly changing menu, one delicious treat is the oven-fired pizza made to order in a custom outdoor brick oven adjacent to the farm stand and kitchen. While you’re at the farm, be sure to peruse the fields and say hi to the turkey, chickens, guinea hens and other creatures inhabiting the farm.   Nearby, Faith Hope and Charity Vineyard also makes for a lovely mid-day excursion.  For the especially adventurous, on the route from Sisters to Terrebonne, where you’ll find the farm and vineyard, you’ll also find a well-established scenic bikeway.  As the sun begins to set, dinner and a show should be in the cards. You won’t want to miss out on the burger at Sister’s Saloon and Ranch Grill, or the fires, for that matter. If you’re feeling lucky, sidle up to the bar adjacent to the restaurant and sample some of the local brews on tap.  To top off your day exploring Sisters, cross your fingers for a concert at The Belfry. A rustic old church gone music venue, The Belfry overflows with the charm of an old town restored—as does the rest of Sisters.  Submitted

Darris Hurst

SCP Hotel Redmond offers amazing views from its rooftop bar.


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Summit West Jared Moss

NEIGHBORHOOD:

Century West and Summit West

WHO LIVES HERE:

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Most of the homes are single-family primary residences and townhomes, but the neighborhoods are becoming more diverse, with some cottage clusters, condos, work/live lofts, new apartment buildings and short term rental/vacation homes. Lots range from .03 to just over an acre, but are mostly in the .14 acre to .5 acre size range.

d or

HOUSING STOCK:

vi

$840,000

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Great location with convenient access to the Deschutes National Forest, the road to Mt Bachelor and the Cascade Lakes, and access to the trails of Shevlin Park & the Deschutes River; golf courses, restaurants, and businesses in Northwest Crossing; close to good schools and the OSU Cascade campus, the Old Mill District and downtown Bend!

PARKS:

Shevlin Park, Three Pines Park, Quail Park, Lewis & Clark Park, Discovery Park, Compass Park, the NW Crossing Dog Park, Overturf Park, Skyline Sports Complex & Alpine Park. Many subdivisions also have community parks & playgrounds.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

High Lakes Elementary, William E. Miller Elementary, Pacific Crest Middle School, Cascade Middle School, & Summit High.

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY:

John and Sandy Kohlmoos, Brokers, Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty

WEST BEND TRAIL David Sword

Da

MEDIAN SALES PRICE:

Phil's Trailhead is Bend's well-known bike network and the start of over 300 miles of single track mountain biking winding throughout the Deschutes National Forest. Below, Three Pines Park offers spectacular views, just above the equally stunning Shevlin Park.

Summit and Century West: Navigating the Way, West Side

With gorgeous new homes, new parks and a vibrant commercial zone, Summit West is the epitome of desirable By David Sword

S

ummit West—filled with high-end homes, many of “comfortable” size—is the fastest-growing zone on Bend’s west side, or as some reference it, The Way Westside. Even though the blank spots are filling in with new homes and businesses, the area once considered the “west side wilderness” has many great features to explore. Bend is a bike town, and Summit West and the adjacent Century West neighborhoods are both very bicycle friendly. Paved pathways along the West Bend Trail make for smooth rolling without the hazards of vehicular traffic and are popular with families and walkers alike. Crossing the intersection of Skyliners Road and Mt. Washington, cyclists can head into Northwest Crossing via the bike lane or continue up the paved West Bend Trail paralleling Skyliners Road. The popular Twin Bridges ride, a 34-mile loop, is one of the state’s Oregon Scenic Bikeway routes, slicing its way through Summit West on its way to Shevlin Park, Tumalo and back toward downtown Bend, and is a “must ride” route for anyone who pedals a bike. Of

course, the neighborhood also offers access to a "little-known area" called Phil’s Trailhead, the beginning of the over 300 miles of single-track mountain biking trails, for which Bend is famous. The people- and dog-friendly parks of Discovery and Overturf are two other gems in the area. Discovery Park is relatively new but gained instant popularity due to its location in Northwest Crossing and its open-space layout. Overturf Park takes a bit of sleuthing to find, but the search is well worth the effort. The Overturf Dog Park is one of Bend’s “off-leash” dog parks, popular with Summit West inhabitants. Both the Cascade Highlands (paved) and Overturf Butte Trail serpentine up and around the Butte. Don’t miss the Overturf Lookout, the site of a fire lookout from the 1940s. All the exploration may lead you to quenching a thirst or filling an empty tummy, so don’t miss Sparrow Bakery, Portello Wine Bar, Bend Pizza Kitchen, Nam Tok, Broken Top Bottle Shop or Washington, all located in the Northwest Crossing commercial zone. Bend Park and Recreation District

Urban bikers, rejoice! The West Bend Trail offers plenty of off-road, safe cycling.

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Most of the homes in the neighborhoods are single-family residences occupied by a wide variety of family units. There are quite a few “empty-nesters” and active retirees, as well as families with children.


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

24

Colleen Dillingham BRoKeR

Helping You Make the Right Move

I

n this fast paced ever-changing real estate market, now more than ever, you need a Broker with a proven “results-driven” track record. Originally from the midwest, Colleen has been loving Bend for 33 years—watched it grow from a small town of 12,000 to now over 100,000—giving her a unique perspective and extensive knowledge of Bend, its resources, and neighborhoods.

As a dedicated professional Colleen is diligent in providing you with exceptional service, smooth transactions and positive results. Representing clients with the highest level of service, communication, negotiation skills and innovative marketing is how Colleen has become a popular choice for both buyers and sellers!

What My Clients Are Saying… “You were organized, had a “can do” attitude and put my parent’s needs in your plans when selling their home. Most importantly your value system was important to my family. You had qualities they would like in a friend and realtor. Thank you Colleen.” — Mike C. “We were overwhelmed, and through the chaos and stress, Colleen was a source of calm and focus. Often she went above and beyond, pitching in with our estate sale, assisting with paperwork, and using her creativity to present the house in the best possible light.” — Wendy M.

Central Oregon Market Trends When January of 2021 sales are compared with January 2020 for Bend single family home sales on less than one acre, the following data can be noted: Average sales price UP 28.2% to $666, 293* Median sales price UP 31.5% to $577,500

“Initially I contacted Colleen when I was looking for a new home. She really did her homework and showed me a variety of homes and areas in Bend. Colleen is almost always available and very flexible with her schedule. A few months later, I decided to sell my home of 11 years and she helped with every aspect of the sale. Colleen helped stage my home, even providing accessories and small pieces of furniture. She held multiple open houses and advertised frequently. I would definitely recommend her to others. —Tracy L.. “Charlie and I feel so fortunate to have listed our home with Colleen. She worked tirelessly to market it and was always organized, calm and professional. Her creative eye helped us stage and arrange the house to show it in its best light. Colleen is an excellent communicator and kept us continually updated throughout. We recommend her without reservation and would not hesitate to work with her again. Five stars!!” — Ginger & Charlie A.

Number of new listings DOWN 12.3% to 135 Homes for sale DOWN 84.1% to 89 Pending sales UP 104.4% to 280 Sold homes UP 12.4% to 154 Months of supply DOWN 86.2% to 12 days Average price per square foot UP 26.7% to $332

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET in January for Single-Family Homes in BEND IS ONLY 4 (from list date to accepted contract.) With the extreme shortage of inventory, buyers are experiencing intense competition. Sellers have a great advantage in negotiating the best terms in the current market. NOW MAY BE THE BEST TIME TO SELL as more homes are predicted to be coming on the market later in the year.

Considering making a move? Call me for a complimentary price evaluation of your home.

Colleen Dillingham, BROKER 541-788-9991 | colleendillingham@gmail.com 550 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 108, Bend Stats taken from MLS deemed reliable but not guaranteed


IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Awbrey Butte Darris Hurst

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The Allure of Awbrey Butte

NEIGHBORHOOD: Awbrey Butte

WHO LIVES HERE:

Families, longtime residents, retirees.

HOUSING STOCK:

Predominantly single-family homes.

MEDIAN SALE PRICE: $1,075,000

REASONS WHY PEOPLE MOVE HERE:

Views, close to downtown, large lot size, two golf courses nearby, parks and walking trails.

PARKS:

Sylvan Park, Summit Park.

PUBLIC SCHOOLS:

North Star Elementary, High Lakes Elementary, Pacific Crest Middle, Summit High School, Highland Magnet.

REPORT SUMMARY PROVIDED BY:

Colleen Dillingham, Bend Premier Real Estate

A RESPITE FOR WILDLIFE Courtesy Colleen Dillingham

With plenty of space and lots of trees, wildlife like these deer find respite in the Awbrey Butte neighborhood.

Stunning sunsets, panoramic mountain views, twinkling city lights By Colleen Dillingham, Bend Premier Real Estate

A

wbrey Butte evokes images of stunning sunsets, panoramic mountain views, twinkling city lights, colorful sunrises, towering ponderosas and roaming deer, to name a few. Living there feels more about the environment and the surroundings rather than the actual house. Nature surrounds you, creating a sense of peace and allowing one some solitude if needed. It seldom feels crowded. It is hard not to love this neighborhood, and if you happen to move here, there’s a good chance you’ll stay for a long time. Awbrey Butte, once known as Awbrey Heights, was named after a legendary Bend pioneer named Marshall Clay Awbrey. Awbrey was a Missourian who fought in the Mexican War and who settled in Bend around 1870. He farmed the areas where Harmon Park and Kenwood School are located today before moving to the Tumalo area. It was said he would kiss a 5- or 10-piece coin goodbye before handing it to a clerk. Many landmarks and streets in Bend are named after this early settler. Mike Hollern of Brooks Resources had the vision to create and develop Awbrey Butte, or “the hill,” as it was sometimes referred to. Brooks Resources purchased 1,800 acres in 1970 from Robert Coats and West Hills Inc. In 1984 development began with the very first lots selling for around $25,000 near Glassow and Tower Rock. An early challenge for Brooks Resources, after getting approval from the City, was obtaining a water source. Upon building a reservoir on the Butte, work then began on creating roads. Working through a slow economy and the recession of the 1980s were other challenges in the beginning. Great care was taken to preserve mature trees, the natural landscaping and to minimize environmental impacts. Homes were often built in a stair-step way to ensure each homeowner’s views, and roads were constructed in a concentric fashion so that they could not be easily seen from below. Twenty years later, development was completed in 2005, which culminated in a premier neighborhood of 782 homesites. Although there are now many other neighborhoods with luxury homes to choose from

in Bend, Awbrey Butte is timeless and retains its premier stature for buyers. It continues to be desired for its location, space and beautiful views. Buyers who choose Awbrey Butte select it for the beautiful views, large lot size that gives a sense of breathing room, the parks, walking trails and NW location. “We love the sense of community here, the friendliness of people living in the neighborhood or the walkers passing by. It feels safe,” said residents Linda, Rich and Matthew Gross. “Our kids roamed from house to house when they were young just like I did when I was little. And we love feeling like we live outside of town in a forest yet in reality live only a few minutes away from downtown.” Other Awbrey Butte neighbors, Char and Rich Anderson, had this to say: "When we decided to downsize we looked all over Bend for nearly a year but ultimately decided once again that we loved Awbrey Butte and wanted to stay right here. This is where we want to be! We walk everywhere up here; it's a walkers paradise with 360 degree views. We have met many new walker friends here and everyone says they love the neighborhood." Information from MLS , Brooks Resources, and the Deschutes Historical Society. Courtesy Colleen Dillingham

VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

C ou

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Visible from many parts of Bend, Awbrey Butte offers a taste of the good life in Bend.


REAL ESTATE

21330 STEVENS ROAD, BEND • $650,000 One of a kind property within 5 minutes of everything that Bend has to offer. Costco, Safeway, Hospital, great restaurants and pubs and so much more. 5 acres with a1800 sqft shop with a full bathroom and options of building your new home on the property. Mountain views are amazing and the property is prepped and ready for asphalt as well. Don’t miss your opportunity on the only 5 acre parcel this close to town.

ADVERTISE IN OUR REAL ESTATE SECTION ADVERTISE@BENDSOURCE.COM

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

26

christin@dukewarner.com

1033 NW Newport Ave. Bend, OR 97703 Office: 541-382-8262 Mobile: 541-306-0479

62691 HAWKVIEW ROAD, BEND • $549,000 4 bed 2.5 bath, 2077 sqft home on .09 acre lot. First level has an open floor plan with gas fireplace, hardwood floors, functional kitchen with stainless steel appliances, half bath, and laundry. Second level opens to 3 bedrooms, including master bed/bath, large family room/loft are. Third level has 4th bedroom with skylight and closet. Home has alley access to garage, off street parking, covered front porch and a deck off the back door from kitchen. Sprinkler system and fenced back yard.

Geoff Groener Licensed Broker

ATTENTION!

541.390.4488 geoff.groener@cascadesir.com cascadesothebysrealty.com

WE HAVE BUYERS FOR THE SADDLEBACK NEIGHBORHOOD AND THE TUMALO AREA

6650 Neptune Ave. | Gleneden Beach $465,000 3 BD 2.5 BA 1,620 SF

Across street from ocean 1/2 block to beach access

541.639.2081 | Levisongroupinfo@gmail.com 695 SW MILL VIEW WAY SUITE 100 • BEND, OR • WWW.ALEVISON.WITHWRE.COM

UNBELIEVABLE CASCADE VIEWS 69544 Sisters View, Sisters

Private retreat on 36+ acres. Charming 1,844 SF home with full western view facing deck! Vaulted great room, 3 beds, 2 baths, wood stove + central heat/air.

$995,000

IMMACULATE RETREAT 61183 Fircrest Knoll

Exceptionally well cared for 1,356 SF home on a private cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. Large .42 acre lot with fenced back yard.

$565,000

PENDING

MAGNIFICENT VIEWS, 58 NW Skyliner Summit

Unparalleled views from this 4,843 SF, 4 bed, 3.5 bath home with updated kitchen, baths. Expansive deck, 2nd living area, theater & workout rooms, 3 car gar.

$1,450,000

Terry Skjersaa

Principal Broker, CRS

Jason Boone

Principal Broker, CRIS

WESTSIDE VIEW LOT 1738 SW Troon Avenue

This 1/4 acre lot awaits your dream home! Build to capture city & easterly butte views. On the edge of Overturf Butte. Easy access to parks, trails & $410,000 downtown Bend.

MLS# 21-90

Equal Housing Opportunity. Each office is independently owned and operated.

The Only Company You Need to Achieve Your Real Estate Goals

PRICE REDUCED

EXQUISITE MID-CENTURY 3206 NW Celilo Lane

New Greg Welch Mid-Century Modern home in Discovery West. Vaulted great room, dining & kitchen, 3 bed, 2 bath, 1,619 SF. Corner lot with patio, landscaped & fenced.

$915,000

Mollie Hogan

Principal Broker, CRS

VERSATILE COMMERCIAL 1929 NE Neff Road

Single story building located in the Opportunity Zone & Medical District Overlay. Great exposure, excellent parking, close to St. Charles. Triplex & commercial/office remodel drawings $1,150,000 included.

Cole Billings Broker

Skjersaa Group | Duke Warner Realty 1033 NW Newport Ave. Bend, OR 97703

Andy Stearns

541.383.1426

Principal Broker Licensed in the State of Oregon

www.SkjersaaGroup.com Oregon Real Estate Licensees

541-508-6859

MyLuckyHouse.com 1293 NE 3rd St, Bend 541-815-8200

Shari Ballard Principal Broker Licensed in the State of Oregon

541-815-8200


TAKE ME HOME

REAL ESTATE

By Abbie + Rick Sams Licensed brokers, Team Sams at Fred Real Estate Group

Home Improvements and Rate of Return Where to invest your dollars

Maintenance It’s always suggested to take care of the basics first. Through our experience, we can truly say that maintaining your home will pay off, big time. Make sure paint is touched up, doors and windows are functioning properly, heating and cooling systems have been professionally serviced, necessary caulking is done, lightbulbs are working and anything broken is repaired or replaced. Curb Appeal First impressions are everything. Buyers do shop online first, but when they do a drive-by the home needs to look visually appealing from the street. Spend the extra money to tidy up landscaping, add a new front door with an exciting color and style or install

new garage doors. If the siding needs replaced and updated, this continuously is one of the best returns on investments and should be considered essential. Upgrades in Key Rooms The biggest return, and usually the costliest, will be seen with an updated kitchen and bathrooms. When doing a remodel, it’s OK to spend less when possible, but don’t cut corners. Instead of installing fancy steam showers or ultrahigh-end appliances and skimping in another area, balance it out and complete all necessary projects with reasonably priced materials. Buyers will primarily be focused on flooring, countertops, appliances, sinks, hardware and light fixtures.  Reduce Hassles Replacing essential items that are past their average lifespan, including roofing, siding, HVAC and water heaters will have a great return on investment and set the home apart from other less-maintained homes. Savvy buyers will be inquiring about the condition of the roof, siding, foundation, heating and cooling systems. These items are expensive and may not leave a budget to complete other renovations, but they’re highly important and will help assure the buyer the home’s been taken care of.  Efficiency Upgrades Install low-water-use toilets and plumbing fixtures. Adding insulation to walls, attics and floors can help the home feel more comfortable, while using less energy and will reduce outside noise pollution. Highly efficient Energy Star-certified appliances, smart thermostats and wifi-controlled home devices help give homeowners control from afar and can reduce energy consumption.

HOME PRICE ROUNDUP

t/c- 541-312-3641 marciahilber2@gmail.com | marciahilber.com COVID SPECIALS

Through March 2021 Buyers Call for Current Offers

UP TO

2% OFF LISTING COMMISSION

219 NW 6TH ST., STE 1, REDMOND Licensed in the State of Oregon Lic #200608229

Thinking about buying a new home or refinancing? If so, let’s chat. Tracia Larimer MORTGAGE BROKER

NMLS#1507306

Azara Mortgage, LLC

NMLS#1577943

(541) 241-8344

Otis Craig Broker, CRS

FIND YOUR PLACE IN BEND

www.otiscraig.com

& 541.771.4824 ) otis@otiscraig.com

Richard Sams, Broker ABR, GREEN, EA BROKER

541.948.2311 rick@teamsams.com

Abbie Kephart Sams, Broker

503.812.2025 abbie@teamsams.com

Photos and listing info from Central Oregon Multiple Listing Service

Licensed in the State of Oregon

<< LOW

21291 Keyte Road, Bend, OR 97701 3 beds, 2 bath, 1,488 square feet, .15 acres lot Built in 1999 $449,000 Listed by Preferred Residential.

www.teamsams.com

MID >>

2580 NE Brandon Court, Bend, OR 97701 4 beds, 2.5 bath, 1,758 square feet, .15 acres lot Built in 1998 $515,000. Listed by Cascade Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

<< HIGH

3458 NE Fieldstone Court, Bend, OR 97701 4 beds, 4 baths, 4,168 square feet, .28 acres lot Built in 2004 $895,000 Listed by John L Scott Bend.

Get Noticed in our Real Estate Section contact advertise@bendsource.com

27 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

T

he easiest way to receive top dollar for your home is to make it shine in the buyer’s eyes and appear as flawless as possible. Renovating a home with the intention of selling requires a different perspective than remodeling to meet the current homeowner’s needs and wants. In order to receive the maximum sales price, one must look through the lens of prospective buyers and understand which projects will provide the biggest return on investment. Buyers want to be wowed when they first lay eyes on the home and continue to be impressed once inside the home—but they also want security in a well maintained and properly functioning home. If you’re not familiar with the overall condition of the home’s systems and components, consider hiring a professional home inspector or consult a trusted general contractor. Their findings and information would be helpful for planning and budgeting your projects. 

Marcia Hilber Principal Broker


ON STANDS MARCH 4 AD DEADLINE FEB 26

The 2021

WOMEN’S ISSUE WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

28

Advertise in the Women’s Issue and let Central Oregon know how

THE APPLICATION PROCESS FOR OUR NEXT FIVE LAND TRUST HOMES WILL OPEN MID-2021 For more information and to sign up for our newsletter, visit our website at korlandtrust.org/projects/crescita Crescita is a Kôr Community Land Trust attainable homeownership project developed in partnership with and Housing Works of Central Oregon.

korlandtrust.org 541-797-4418 info@korlandtrust.org

you connect and reach the modern woman and her community. Contact us and reserve your space in the 2021 Women’s Issue today!

advertise@bendsource.com | 541.383.0800


EVENTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

Intro to Beekeeping with Tumalo Bee Academy’s Master Beekeeper-Stephen Harris This is a free introductory session

Moms Demand Action and Students Demand Action Advocacy Day Join our

local friendly group to learn how to talk with your legislator and help pass bills that will protect us and those we love. March 2, 9am-1pm. Contact: Centralormoms@gmail.com.

Sunriver Area Chamber of Commerce hosts Social Media Spring Checkup The

Sunriver Chamber of Commerce has invited three communications experts to assist you in making certain your social media and website are in tiptop shape. Join the Zoom Meeting at: us02web.zoom. us/j/83934418551?pwd=NEdQUlhCUVd3V01aalMyZ3JPV0IzQT09 March 2, Noon. Free.

Teen Girls’ Empowerment Group Ages

13-18. Join us as we connect with each other and build mind-body-heart strength during these challenging times! Wednesdays, 3:30-5:30pm. Through April 14. Blissful Heart ~ Yoga Barn, 29 NW Greeley Ave., Bend. Contact: 928-864-7166. onalee@unfurlbecome.com. Sliding scale $220$420 for 8 weeks. community by identifying a cause they care about and planning a service project to help address it. Sundays, 4-6pm. Through May 30. BendTECH, 1001 SW Emkay Dr, Bend. Contact: 541-382-4682. info@ campfireco.org. Sliding scale pricing $200-325.

BEER & DRINK

Locals' Day at Bevel is your chance for great deals on beer and good times with the crew, Tuesdays all day.

Apres Ski Special at Zpizza Tap Room

FAMILY & KIDS Amelia’s World Puppet Show Join Amelia

Cross Cut Warming Hut: Locals’ Day!

Baby Ninja + Me Cuties (10 months-24

months) plus adult will bond and have a blast during this unique yoga and ninja warrior class! Wednesdays, 11-11:45am. Through June 2. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-241-3919. info@freespiritbend.com. $99 per Child.

Kids Ninja Warrior Class Unique to Bend, your kids (age 6-10) will gain amazing abilities through obstacle course training, climbing and fitness conditioning, and team motivation in our Kids Ninja Warrior classes. Tuesdays, 3:30-4:30pm, Wednesdays, 6:15-7:15pm and Thursdays, 5-6pm. Through May 27. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541241-3919. info@freespiritbend.com. $99 per child. Kids Ninja Warrior Half-Day Camp Dropoff the kids (age 6 - 12) on Wednesday afternoon’s after school for Half-Day Ninja Warrior Camps, they’ll get their energy out and their exercise in! Wednesdays, 1:30-4:30pm. Through May 26. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-241-3919. info@freespiritbend.com. $99 per child.

Nano-Ninja Class Kids (age 4-5) will love

making ninja warrior buddies as they develop fundamental coordination skills through obstacle-based gymnastics and climbing challenges in this 6-week series. Wednesdays, 5-5:50pm and Thursdays, 3:30-4:20pm. Through May 27. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-241-3919. info@freespiritbend.com. $99 per child.

Ninja Elite Class Kids (age 8 - 12) come

increase your athletic performance through the exciting sport of Ninja Warrior! Tuesdays, 5-6pm. Through May 25. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness +

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Teen Volunteer Club Teens give back to their

Slice of premium pizza & beer- only $5! Happy Hour with 18 taps and big -screen TVs. Thur-Sun, 4-6pm. Zpizza Tap Room, 1082 SW Yates Drive, Bend. Contact: 541-382-2007. bendsales@peppertreeinns.com. $5.

Airheart Monkey & Miss Hannah for a fun & uplifting interactive zoom puppet show! Message ACORN School of Art & Nature on Facebook to request the zoom link. Fridays, 4-4:15pm. Contact: facebook.com/acornartandnature/. Free.

Courtesy Bevel Brewing

Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-241-3919. info@freespiritbend.com. $99 per child.

Every Tuesday enjoy $1 off regular size draft beverages. Tuesdays. Cross Cut Warming Hut No 5, 566 SW Mill View Way, Bend.

Growler Discount Night! Enjoy $2 off growler

fills every Wednesday at Bevel! Wednesdays. Bevel Craft Brewing, 911 SE Armour Rd. Suite B, Bend. Contact: 831-245-1922. holla@bevelbeer.com. Free.

Locals’ Night We offer $3 Pints of our core line

up beers and $4 pours of our barrel aged beers all day. Mondays. Silver Moon Brewing, 24 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend.

Locals’ Day Come on down to Bevel Craft Brewing for $4 beers and cider and $1 off wine all day. Tuesdays. Bevel Craft Brewing, 911 SE Armour Rd. Suite B, Bend. Contact: holla@bevelbeer.com. Free. Sleight of Hand Virtual Tasting with Trey Busch Tasting kits will be ready Friday,

Feb 26 by 4pm. Tasting kits are $20 and include 5 wines. call or email to sign up for the event. beckie@gooddropwineshop.com 541-410-1470   Feb. 27, 1-2:30pm. $20.

ATHLETIC EVENTS Bend Area Running Fraternity The group will run, maintaining social distance, along the Deschutes River and then receive discounted drinks from the cidery after the run! Mondays, 5pm. AVID Cider Co. Taproom, 550 SW Industrial Way, Bend. Contact: bendarearunningfraternity@ gmail.com. Free. Planet Fitness Home Work-Ins Planet Fit-

ness is offering free daily workouts via livestream! Visit the Planet Fitness Facebook page for more details. Free.

Redmond Running Group Run All levels

welcome. Find the Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook for weekly run details. Thursdays, 6:15pm. City of Redmond, Redmond, Or., Redmond. Contact: rundanorun1985@gmail.com.

OUTDOOR EVENTS Family Birding Adventure Join a naturalist as we explore the botanic garden, nature trail, and shore of Lake Aspen in search of Sunriver’s winter birds. Saturdays, 10am. Through Feb. 27. Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Rd., Sunriver. $25 per family. Freezing February: Virtual Polar Plunge

Join us for the most inclusive Plunge in SOOR’s history – it’s virtual so geography is no barrier to having fun and raising funds for our athletes. Feb. 1-27.

Moonlight Ski & Bite Come and enjoy an evening

of cross-country skiing, good food, and lots of memories! Tue, Dec. 29, 4-9:30pm, Thu, Jan. 28, 4-9:30pm, Mon, March 1, 4-9:30pm and Sun, March 28, 4-9:30pm. Elk Lake Resort, 60000 SW Century Dr., Bend. Free.

HEALTH & WELLNESS 40 Days To Personal Revolution 40 Days to Personal Revolution, a relevant and practical program, that will lead you home to mental clarity and lightness of body. Tuesdays, 7-8:15pm. Through March 16. Contact: 541-550-8550. namaspayoga@gmail.com. $40.

Bend Pilates Bend Pilates is now offering a full

schedule of classes through Zoom! For more information visit bendpilates.net/classes/. $20.

Capoeira: A Perfect Adventure The Brazilian art form of Capoeira presents opportunities to develop personal insights, strength, balance, flexibility, musicality, voice, rhythm, and language by tapping the energy of this rich cultural expression and global community. Text 541-678-3460 for location and times. Mondays-Wednesdays-Fridays, 6pm. Contact: 541-678-3460. ucabend@gmail.com. $30 intro month. Dream Interpretation Group Your inner consciousness is trying to communicate with your conscious mind all the time. It speaks to us in dreams and waking life in the language of symbolism. Every other Tuesday, 6-7:30pm. Contact: 541-6396246. michael@naturalwayofbeing.com. Free. Free Coaching: Six Human Needs Join this free class and gain the superpowers of a happier and more fulfilling life! Mondays, 6-7:30pm.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

B E N D T I C K.CEO MT

Through April 5. Contact: 914-980-2644. meadowlarkcoaching@yahoo.com. Free.

In-Person Yoga at LOFT Wellness & Day Spa Tuesdays: Vinyasa with instructor

Kelly Jenkins. 5-6pm. Limited to five participants. Thursdays: Foundation Flow with instructor Kelly Jenkins. 5-6pm. Limited to five participants. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 5-6pm. Loft Wellness & Day Spa, 339 SW Century Drive Ste 203, Bend. Contact: 541-690-5100. info@loftbend.com. $20.

Livestream Pre + Postnatal Yoga Classes

This class is designed to help pregnant ladies and recently postpartum moms (6 weeks - 1 year) safely strengthen and stretch their bodies, relax the mind, reduce discomfort, and improve postpartum recovery. Sundays, 10:30am. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-797-3404. info@freespiritbend.com. $9.

Livestream Yoga Flow Classes This all levels livestream yoga flow class is built around sun salutations and creative sequencing to build heat, endurance, flexibility and strength. Tuesdays-Thursdays-Saturdays, 9:15-10:15am. Free Spirit Yoga + Fitness + Play, 320 SW Powerhouse Drive, Suite 150, Bend. Contact: 541-797-3404. info@freespiritbend.com. $9. Motivation and Goal Setting Workshop

Make use of your time at home by setting and reaching goals in a free Zoom Workshop. Certified Life Coach, Jacquie Elliott is hosting a motivation and accountability workshop on the first Monday of the each month. First Monday of every month, 5:307pm. Contact: coach@jacquieelliottclc.com. Free.

The Vance Stance/Structural Reprogramming Tired of being in pain? Get to the root

of why you are tight & suffering. In this series of two-hour classes in posture and flexibility. Wed, Feb. 24, 6pm, Thu, Feb. 25, Noon, Mon, March 1, 12 and 6pm, Wed, March 3, 6pm. EastSide Home Studio, 21173 Sunburst Ct., Bend. Contact: 541-3309070. vancebonner@juno.com. 12 classes/$180.

Yoga Strong For Women 4-Week Series (Livestream) Shed the habits that are holding you back through Vinyasa yoga practices that will progressively strengthen your body, develop your stamina and enhance your flexibility. Sundays, 9:15-10:45am. Through Feb. 28. Contact: 541-2413919. info@freespiritbend.com. $70.

FRI - SUN JUNE 25-27, 2021

S AT U R D AY JUNE 26, 2021

CENTRAL OREGON BBQ, BREWS & WHISKEY FESTIVAL + MARKETPLACE

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

at Deschutes County Fairgrounds

2021 BEND BEER RUN at The Commons

VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

that will provide an overview of the entire Tumalo Bee Academy program. Please register on our website. Sat, Feb. 27, 1-3pm. Schilling’s Garden Market, 64640 Old Bend Redmond Highway, Bend. Contact: 541-323-0160. BreannaS@schillingsgardenmarket.com. Free.

CALENDAR


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE 30


C

CULTURE

Cutting the Clutter, with Joy

Oregon’s first KonMari consultant is based in Central Oregon, offering clients the chance to be more intentional about their homes and lives

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elissa Jean, of Tidy + Flourish, is the first certified KonMari Consultant in Oregon. She coaches people through the KonMari Method™ to tidy their home and live their ideal life with intention and gratitude. As we roll out our issue focused on the neighborhoods and the homes of Central Oregon, we sat down with her. Source Weekly: Briefly describe what you do and what the Marie Kondo method is (for those who may have been living under a rock in recent years). Melissa Jean: I am certified by Marie Kondo as a Platinum KonMari Consultant where I teach people how to create a home and life that is in alignment with their values and vision. I specialize in guiding people through whole home transformations as well as tidying particular categories using the KonMari Method™. I offer in-home organizing sessions for half-day or full-day appointments for residents of Bend, Sisters and Redmond (COVID safety procedures followed). I also offer virtual sessions for those who are in need of do-it-yourself support or live outside our local area. My business, Tidy + Flourish, offers complimentary video or phone consultations to discuss organizing obstacles and determine solutions. The KonMari Method™ teaches you how to tidy by category—not by room or location— beginning with clothes, then books, papers, miscellaneous items and lastly sentimental items. The basis of this work is that you solely focus on keeping items that speak to your heart and let go of belongings that no longer spark joy with gratitude. It is as much of a self-discovery and intentional practice as it is a home organizing method. The results are life-changing and profound. SW: What are some of the biggest problem areas in homes?

MJ: Garages tend to be the most common and biggest problem area in homes. This space serves multiple functions and often contains all of the KonMari categories, which makes this area a challenge to stay organized for many people. The garage also tends to be a makeshift storage space where it houses items that people are not emotionally ready to address. Commonly garages will store unused wedding gifts, inherited items, childhood memorabilia and furniture to “deal with someday.” I assist people by making that “someday” today, taking care of it once and for all. I ask them detailed questions that lead to insights and aha moments. The collection and management of paper is another problem in most homes, along with clothing. Both categories tend to accumulate throughout the whole house which creates clutter. Paper and clothing are overwhelming and are often tied to past experiences and emotions. With my support, I keep clients focused on the task (as distractions are one of the main obstacles to organizing), I create a safe and compassionate space for them to make a decision and I teach them how to listen to their body’s response as they choose joy. SW: How might you approach a project in a mid-century home, for example, versus a grand new home? MJ: In a mid-century home, there is often considerably less storage space since the homes were designed for a different era where the closets and cabinets are much smaller. The consideration for an older home is to be creative with how items are stored within the home and coming up with unique solutions to store items with care. Whereas with newer homes, the key is to embrace empty space and to resist the temptation to fill in every available storage area. Oftentimes people keep Melissa Jean

Jean helped clear a client’s craft room, allowing the client to stop using the room as a dumping ground and to actually get creative in the space.

Melissa Jean

items that are not truly joyful to them just because they have extra room to store it. SW: But seriously, do people tend to stick to the program when they go back to their busy day to day lives? Also — do people ever get overzealous and find out that while they didn’t get joy from something, they actually needed it and wish they hadn’t gotten rid of something? MJ: Yes, people do maintain a tidy home, even after years since we last worked together! What is different about the KonMari Method™ of decluttering is that well beyond learning organizing skills you are completely altering your relationship to your belongings. Instead of it being just another program that you have to Melissa Jean of Tidy + Flourish is Oregon’s first certified Kon-Mari consultant. maintain in order to stay organized, it is a complete shift in perspec- process by having a vision for their space tive of how you relate to your home. When and how they plan to enjoy it. Since we you intentionally choose to keep only joy- are spending so much time at home, the ful items and lovingly care for them, it question to ponder is, “How do I want becomes a new way of living that is easy to feel in this space?” Most people sense to maintain, even during chaotic times of that their house is cluttered, especially life. I can also confidently proclaim, once in winter during a pandemic. What typyou have tidied your home, you reclaim ically happens is that people will get fed valuable time and are not nearly as busy as up and quickly tear through the house you once were. purging everything that is unnecessary Absolutely, people have gotten rid of into a bag to be donated. It provides something they wish they hadn’t and it is quick relief but is not a sustainable praca natural part of the process. When you tice. You also end up focusing on what are first learning to tidy, it is a brand- has to go, instead of what you want to new way of making decisions which are keep. I advise that instead, you take a based on your personal joy, not practical- little more time, determine a vision that ity or “what if” scenarios. It is common works for you and your family, tidy by that mistakes are made when learning category and only keep items that supthis process. The great news is that in port your passions in life. The result is the KonMari Method™, these lessons are feeling immense gratitude and apprecialearned on items that are easier to repur- tion for what you own instead of burden chase, such as with a pair of socks or a and overwhelm. book, instead of during the sentimental SW: Anything else you’d like to add?  category where items are irreplaceable. MJ: When in doubt, always start by SW: What general advice do you recognizing what you love and brings have for those whose homes aren’t you joy FIRST before you decide what hoarder level, but who may be con- you want to let go with gratitude. It is sidering tackling home organization a subtle difference that is the key to more seriously during this time of so everything! You will learn more about much being at home? yourself and your preferences and it MJ: My advice for everyone, regard- will inform all of your future purchasing less of the amount of belongings they decisions, which will save you time and have, is to begin the home organization money in the long run. 

VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

By Nicole Vulcan


WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE 32

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SCREEN The Lonesome, Crowded West McDormand and Zhao take us to "Nomadland" By Jared Rasic

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T

that keeps her feeling free, helpful and needed by others. That’s it. That’s the movie: 100 minutes of Fern working in an Amazon boxing factory, selling rocks out in the badlands and meeting other nomads who tell her their stories. Zhao brilliantly fills the film out with mostly non-actors, reallife nomads that lend the film an authenticity that we haven’t seen since the last time neorealist cinema died the death of a thousand cuts. In a way, Zhao completely has her cake and eats it too: “Nomadland” is almost a documentary when it focuses on the nomads telling about the

This is a film about the American ideal of freedom and how that feels different to every living soul. This is a look at the American Dream for those who don’t sleep much anymore. It’s also a tender and achingly honest poem about community and connection, a deep dive into the frayed edges of society and a modern day “Grapes of Wrath” where the Great Depression isn’t just economic, but spiritual and psychological as well. “Nomadland” follows the finest actress of my lifetime, Frances McDormand, as Fern, a woman who lost everything during the recession, including her town, her husband and any sense of purpose she once had. Now she lives in a van, driving around the country working at any temporary job she can find

economic disparity that led them to the life, but it’s also centered around a movie-star performance from McDormand, who carries the movie effortlessly and with quiet and understated grace. “Nomadland” has so much on its mind, yet it never feels preachy or false. This is a film about the American ideal

Watch Frances McDormand win another Oscar in “Nomadland.” She’s perfect.

of freedom and how that feels different to every living soul. This is a look at the American Dream for those who don’t sleep much anymore. It’s also a tender and achingly honest poem about community and connection, a deep dive into the frayed edges of society and a modern-day “Grapes of Wrath” where the Great Depression isn’t just economic, but spiritual and psychological as well. When I was watching “Nomadland,” I was surprised by its unassuming nature. Zhao (who not only writes, directs, edits and produces, but is working on a Marvel movie next!) has made something so unsentimental that it’s hard to know whether she expects her audience to pity or envy Fern. We see and understand her restless spirit, but she has many other options available to her. She doesn’t have to travel in the van; she chooses to.

She’s a nomadic shark, terrified that the moment she quits moving, she’ll die. Earlier I called “Nomadland” a poem and that’s really just the best way I can describe it. It’s a film that almost borders on experimental with its impressionistic brush strokes painting America as a brutal wilderness of wideopen spaces while also acknowledging the intimate humanity we find from strangers. As I watched the movie I felt like it was a searing examination of the things life takes from us while we’re living, but once it ended I realized that it just as desperately wants to remind us what we give each other before we go.

Nomadland

Dir. Chloé Zhao Grade: AAt Odem Theater Pub and available on Hulu

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VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

Courtesy of Searchlight

here’s so much Oscar hype surrounding Chloé Zhao and Frances McDormand’s new film “Nomadland” that I’m curious whether the film’s quiet and contemplative simplicity will wow audiences trained to think hyperbolic over-reliance on big emotion is what makes modern movies “dramatic.” “Nomadland” is the antithesis of movies like “Green Book” and “Crash,” which seem offended by the very idea of subtlety and instead use the brick of manufactured prestige to bash the head open of anyone looking for serious and meaningful ideas built around nuanced filmmaking.


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N A T U R A L

O

OUTSIDE

W O R L D

Monarch butterflies need your green thumb

GO HERE By Megan Burton

Courtesy Bend Trail Series

Growing and planting milkweed can help

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Deschutes Land Trust

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s spring draws nearer by the day, many people in Central Oregon start to get eager for the resumption of warm weather and springtime habits. For some, gardening tops that list, and they jump the season by starting garden seeds indoors. Tomatoes and other vegetables are the usual suspects, but this year, why not add in a few native milkweed seeds to help out our local monarch butterfly population? There are two kinds of milkweed native to Central Oregon: showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa) and narrowleaf milkweed (Asclepias fascicularis). Both kinds were historically found throughout Central Oregon, but are now very limited in their range. Planting more native milkweed in Central Oregon can help the iconic Western monarch butterfly survive into the future. What?! We have monarch butterflies in Central Oregon? Yep! Central Oregon is within the migratory range of the Western monarch butterfly. Many know this bright orange-and-black butterfly because of its amazing migration from North America south to Mexico. Our monarchs, however, are a separate species from the ones that migrate to Mexico. They live only in the Western U.S. and make their migration from the Northwest to overwinter in California. Monarch butterflies, like many butterflies, rely on certain host plants as food sources and for egg laying and rearing. Milkweed is the host plant that monarch butterflies use for egg laying and then for providing the food young butterflies need once they emerge as caterpillars. Sadly, the Western monarch butterfly population has seen a steep decline in recent years. This past year, according to the Xerces Society, only 1,900 butterflies were spotted at overwintering grounds in California—down from 192,000 in

Catch some views while racking up the miles with the Bend Trail Race Series, coming this summer.

Hit the Trail Running with Bend Trail Race Series Registration opens this week for the annual trail running event

Native showy milkweed in full bloom.

2017—and a 99.9% decline since the 1980s! The primary reason? Loss of habitat at overwintering grounds and along their migratory pathways where milkweed was once more abundant. The good news is that people can help the struggling Western monarch butterfly by simply planting milkweed in their yards, gardens, or even in pots on their patios! And now it the time to get those seeds started. Here are a few tips to help grow and plant milkweed successfully: Plant and grow ONLY native milkweed (the two varieties above). Non-native milkweed is sometimes sold at local garden stores and it can actually harm our species of monarch butterflies. Get your milkweed seeds and seed growing tips from the Deschutes Land Trust and buy your milkweed plants later this spring at a native plant nursery like Wintercreek Nursery. Plant three to six milkweed plants together—preferably a combination of Deschutes Land Trust

A Western monarch butterfly on native showy milkweed.

showy and narrowleaf to help provide enough egg-laying space and food for newly emerged caterpillars. Learn more about what milkweed needs to thrive. Showy milkweed likes full sun and medium water. Narrowleaf also likes full sun but prefers well-drained soil and is more drought tolerant. Both species spread via rhizomes—so plant them where they have the room to spread! Tend your milkweed once it is planted. Native plants (even drought-tolerant ones) will need regular watering in order to establish their roots. This can sometimes take a couple of years. Once their roots are established, they won’t need as much water and should thrive in our Central Oregon climate. Milkweed also doesn’t like competition (from weeds or other plants), so make sure you give it enough space to thrive. Bonus: Plant other pollinator-friendly native plants with your milkweed! Create a monarch garden by adding other plants to your milkweed that provide nectar for monarchs and bees and other butterflies. Choose a variety of blooms that stretch from early spring through fall and use only native plants that haven’t been treated with neonicotinoids (an insecticide often found on nursery plants and extremely harmful to pollinators). Spring is coming! Seed starting offers a great window into the season and planting milkweed is one of those little steps we can all take to make the world a little better for monarch butterflies. Happy planting! -Sarah Mowry is the Deschutes Land Trust’s Outreach Director. She has worked for the Land Trust since 2005 and leads its communications and community engagement efforts. 

It’s no secret that Central Oregon is packed with outdoor adventure and activities. From downhill freestyle skiing, bouldering at Smith Rock and hiking some of the most impressive mountains around, locals and visitors alike are sure to get their heart racing. For those looking to loosen up while keeping it moving, the Bend Trail Race Series has just the thing for you. Four chill Thursday evening trail runs await those who decide to tackle this racing series. Registration opens March 1, but the races won’t be held until late summer and early fall with distances and courses set only the week before you get out there. Runners can expect each course to be between 4-7 miles in distance with varying terrain and plenty of those spectacular Central Oregon views. In addition to a quick trail run on a cool summer evening, runners are also entered to win all kinds of prizes and gear from the series sponsors. Complete at least three of the runs to be included in their overall Series standings. Plus, there will hopefully be a celebration immediately after the final run at 10 Barrel’s Eastside location. The post-series festivities will include raffle prizes, awards to winners and plenty of well-justified beer and pizza. The Bend Trail Race Series is placing all registrants on a waitlist until confirmation of COVID-19 protocols. You won’t be charged for the race series until they confirm your spot.  Bend Trail Series

Aug. 12- Sep. 23 gobeyondracing.com/races/bend-trail-series $70 for all four races

VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

By Sarah Mowry


WELLNESS

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ASTROLOGY By Rob Brezsny PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):  Piscean  author  Anais  Nin  was  a  maestro  of  metamorphosis,  a  virtuoso  of  variation,  an  adept  at  alteration.  She  regarded  her  ceaseless  evolution  as  a  privilege  and  luxury,  not  an  oppressive  inconvenience.  “I  take pleasure in my transformations,” she wrote.  “I  look  quiet  and  consistent,  but  few  know  how  many women there are in me.” Her approach is a  healthy model for most of you Pisceans—and will  be especially worth adopting in the coming weeks.  I invite you to be a Change Specialist whose nickname is Flux Mojo.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I invite you to think  about one or two types of physical discomforts and  symptoms that your body seems most susceptible  to. Meditate on the possibility that there are specifi c moods or feelings associated with those discomforts  and  symptoms—perhaps  either  caused  by them or the cause of them. The next step is to  formulate an intention to monitor any interactions  that might transpire between the bodily states and  emotional  states.  Then  make  a  plan  for  how  you  will address them both with your own healing power whenever they visit you in the future.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Poet Billy Collins  describes  “standing  on  the  edge  of  a  lake  on  a  moonlit night and the light of the moon is always  pointing straight at you.”  I  have  high  hopes  that  your  entire  life  will  be  like  that  in  the  coming  weeks: that you’ll feel as  if the world is alive with  special  messages  just  for  you;  that  every  situation  you’re  in  will  feel  like  you  belong  there;  that  every  intuition  welling  up  from  your  subconscious  mind  into  your  conscious  awareness  will  be  specifi cally  what  you  need  at  the  moment it arrives. GEMINI (May 21-June 20):  You’re  entering  a 

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potentially  heroic  phase  of  your  astrological  cycle. The coming weeks will be a time when I hope  you  will  be  motivated  to  raise  your  integrity  and  impeccability  to  record  levels.  To  inspire  you,  I’ve  grabbed a few affi rmations from a moral code reputed to be written by a 14th-century Samurai warrior. Try saying them, and see if they rouse you to  make your good character even better. 1. “I have no  divine power; I make honesty my divine power.” 2. “I  have no miracles; I make right action my miracle.”  3. “I have no enemy; I make carelessness my enemy.” 4. “I have no designs; I make ‘seizing opportunity’ my design.” 5. “I have no magic secrets; I make  character my magic secret.” 6. “I have no armor; I  make benevolence and righteousness my armor.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The  only  way  to  live  is  by  accepting  each  minute  as  an  unrepeatable miracle,” writes Cancerian author and Buddhist teacher Jack Kornfi eld. I disagree with him.  There  are  many  other  modes  of  awareness  that  can be useful as we navigate our labyrinthine path  through this crazy world. Regarding each minute  as  an  opportunity  to  learn  something  new,  for  instance:  That’s  an  excellent  way  to  live.  Or,  for  another example, treating each minute as another chance to creatively express our love. But I do  acknowledge that Kornfi eld’s approach is sublime  and appealing. And I think it will be especially apropos for you during the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):  The  coming  weeks  will  be a poignant and healing time for you to remember  the  people  in  your  life  who  have  died—as  well  as  ancestors whom you never met or didn’t know well.  They have clues to offer you, rich feelings to nourish  you  with,  course  corrections  to  suggest.  Get  in touch with them through your dreams, meditations, and reminiscences. Now read this inspiration  from  poet  Rainer  Maria  Rilke:  “They,  who  passed  away  long  ago,  still  exist  in  us,  as  predisposition,  as burden upon our fate, as murmuring blood, and  as gesture that rises up from the depths of time.”  (Translation from the German by Stephen Mitchell.) VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):  I’m  fond  of  18th-century  Virgo  painter  Quentin  de  La  Tour. 

Why?  1.  He  specialized  in  creating  portraits  that  brought out his subjects’ charm and intelligence.  2. As he grew wealthier, he became a philanthropist  who  specialized  in  helping  poor  women  and  artists with disabilities. 3. While most painters of  his era did self-portraits that were solemn, even  ponderous,  de  La  Tour’s  self-portraits  showed  him  smiling  and  good-humored.  4.  Later  in  his  life, when being entirely reasonable was no longer  a top priority, de La Tour enjoyed conversing with  trees. In accordance with the astrological omens,  I propose that we make him your patron saint for  now. I hope you’ll be inspired to tap into your inner  Quentin de la Tour.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I’m not saying there’s  anything  wrong  with  your  overall  health,  Libra.  In fact, I expect it’s probably quite adequate. But  from an astrological point of view, now is the right  time  to  schedule  an  appointment  for  a  consultation with your favorite healer, even if just by Zoom.  In addition, I urge you to consult a soul doctor for  a  complete  metaphysical  check-up.  Chances  are  that  your  mental  health  is  in  fair  shape,  too.  But  right now it’s not enough for your body and soul to  be merely adequate; they need to receive intense  doses  of  well-wrought  love  and  nurturing.  So  I  urge you to ask for omens and signs and dreams  about what precisely you can do to treat yourself  with exquisite care.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23Nov. 21):  “Love  commands  a  vast  army  of  moods,”  writes  author  Diane  Ackerman.  “Frantic  and  serene,  vigilant  and  calm,  wrung-out and fortifi ed,  explosive  and  sedate.”  This  fact  of  life  will  be  prominently  featured  in  your  life  during  the  coming  weeks.  Now  is  a  fertile  time  to  expand  your  understanding  of  how  eros  and  romance  work  when  they’re  at  their  best—and  to  expand  your  repertoire  of  responses  to  love’s  rich  challenges. Don’t think of it as a tough test; imagine it as an interesting research project.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):  Sagittarian  poet  and  visual  artist  William  Blake  (1757–1827)  cultivated a close relationship with lofty thoughts  and mystical visions. He lived with his wife Catherine  for  the  last  45  years  of  his  life,  but  there  were times when he was so preoccupied with his  amazing creations that he neglected his bond with  her. Catherine once said, “I have very little of Mr.  Blake’s company. He is always in Paradise.” I hope  that  you  won’t  be  like  that  in  the  coming  weeks.  Practical  matters  and  intimate  alliances  need  more  of  your  attention  than  usual.  Consider  the  possibility, at least for now, of spending less time  in paradise and more on earth.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):  Poet  Robert  Graves regarded the ambiguity of poetry as a virtue,  not  a  problem.  In  his  view,  poetry’s  inscrutability  refl  ects  life’s  true  nature.  As  we  read  its  enigmatic ideas and feelings, we may be inspired  to understand that experience is too complex to be  reduced  to  simplistic  descriptions  and  overgeneralized  beliefs.  In  fact,  it’s  quite  possible  that  if  we invite poetry to retrain our perceptions, we will  develop a more tolerant and inclusive perspective  toward everything. I’m telling you this, Capricorn,  because whether or not you read a lot of poetry in  the coming weeks, it will be wise and healthy for  you to celebrate, not just tolerate, how paradoxical and mysterious the world is. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):  The  coming  weeks will be a favorable time to shed old habits  that  waste  your  energy,  and  create  constructive  new habits that will serve you well for months and  years to come. To inspire and guide your efforts,  I offer these thoughts from author and naturalist  Henry David Thoreau: “As a single footstep will not  make a path on the earth, so a single thought will  not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep  physical path, we walk again and again. To make a  deep mental path, we must think over and over the  kind of thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.”

Homework: Complete this sentence: “Sooner or later the pandemic will lose its power to limit us. When it does, I will _______________.” FreeWillAstrology.com


THE REC ROOM Crossword “TAKE FIVE”

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

Pearl’s Puzzle

Difficulty Level

★★

We’re Local!

© Pearl Stark mathpuzzlesgames.com/quodoku

Fill in every row, column, and 3x3 box with each of the letters exactly once.

E M I T

S C O R N

The highlighted letters read left to right and top to bottom will complete the quote:

“I think ______ ought to stop biting the _______ that feed it.” —Ogden Nash

ANSWER TO LAST WEEK'S PUZZLES

ACROSS 1. Like some cabaret acts 5. Cartoony robot noise 10. Honors for Eric Church, briefly 14. Has second thoughts about 15. Swordplay maneuver 16. “Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering” speaker 17. “Dat so?” 18. Say 19. Ship’s can 20. Situation in which a desired solution is impossible to attain 23. Made man’s job 24. ___ cloud (comet’s home) 25. In disarray 31. NBA big man: Abbr. 32. Dalek fighter 33. Sends packing 35. Eye bank? 37. Parking spots? 39. Character 40. All fired up 42. NMSQTs by another name 44. Furthest point out 45. BOGO deal 48. Pacific salmon 49. Tibetan Freedom Concert co-founder 50. It generates interest for only a short amount of time 57. “Well shee-it!” 58. Mouth piece? 59. Fancy bean 60. Prince in “The Little Mermaid” 61. Less significant 62. Don Juan’s mom 63. Singer Peniston 64. Remix’s home, maybe 65. Walking stick

DOWN 1. Shoe with holes 2. Glow from a big star 3. Messy sandwich 4. Total nutjob 5. Acts the bully 6. Madrigal instrument 7. Being broadcast 8. Curve in architecture 9. Absinthe-like drink 10. It can spread viruses fast 11. “Oh, we’re not done yet” 12. Server’s edge 13. Lose intensity 21. Female deer 22. Tater bites 25. First-stringers 26. Sad, but kinda funny at the same time 27. Won all the games in the series 28. Make ___ of (do poorly) 29. Vape pen claim 30. Broadway composer Matthew who scored “The Prom” and “The Wedding Singer” 31. Jost’s “Weekend Update” co-host 34. Charles Bukowski described it as “kicking death in the ass while singing” 36. Condemn publicly 38. Collection of flutes 41. Coal-mining region of North Rhine-Westphalia 43. Like dry Spanish wine 46. #smdh 47. Amateur stories set in Hogwarts, e.g., for short 50. Going cost? 51. The red properties in Monopoly, e.g.: Abbr. 52. Nuclear physicist Oganessian with an element named after him 53. Blizzard toy 54. Crime author Stabenow 55. “Do you ___ lift, bro?” 56. Level the room 57. Pretend to Be a Time Traveler Day mo.

“Winter is the sleazy pal who you let crash on your couch for ‘just one night’. Now he won’t leave despite such broad hints as you slapping a For Sale sign on the couch and dragging it out to the curb.” —Jerry Nelson

37 VOLUME 25 ISSUE 08 / FEBRUARY 25, 2021 / THE SOURCE WEEKLY

©2021 Brendan Emmett Quigley (www.brendanemmettquigley.com)

Questions, comments or suggestions for our local puzzle guru? Email Pearl Stark at pearl@bendsource.com


CH www.tokyostarfish.com

WWW.BENDSOURCE.COM / FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  BEND’S INDEPENDENT VOICE

38

CRAFT

10 Best New Breweries A Central Oregon brewery gets nominated By Heidi Howard Heidi Howard

GET YOUR

Pre-Pandemic photo of Bro Brah at Boss Rambler.

G

Tokyo Pro Shred Nora Beck

Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For use by adults 21 years of age and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

uess who’s been nominated for USA Today’s 10Best Readers’ Choice Travel Award for best new brewery? None other than Central Oregon’s Boss Rambler Beer Club. Matt Molletta, co-owner of Boss Rambler, said, “We’re blown away and now it’s up to the public to vote on the winners/top 10”. Not only is Boss Rambler a nominee, but it’s the only Oregon brewery to make the list of 20 nominees. Nominees were selected by a panel of beer experts. Nominated breweries must have been open within the last three years. Boss Rambler impresses me. It’s obvious that they had done their homework before opening up the Beer Club on Galveston. I recall when they seemed to be testing the waters. They had a few beers on tap that they were pouring for folks to walk up and enjoy their beer out on the patio before they remodeled their location. I had heard rumors that they were only going to brew “old school” IPAs. Thankfully, that turned out to be a rumor. In fact, I really enjoy their ingenuity and that they don’t seem to be scared to try new ingredients and techniques. For instance, Boss Rambler was the first brewery I had a beer that had Kviek yeast as the star (a Norwegian yeast that has some light Belgian qualities). So good. They even make their own sparkling water. This nomination is well deserved, for sure. When I had a chance to speak with Molletta just before they opened, I got a sneak peek of their new digs. It was and still is nothing like any other

brewery in Central Oregon, with its lack of industrial stylings, its bright and inviting décor and the feeling of being on vacation when you’re kicking back and enjoying a delicious beer. From beer, to beer names to the brew pub, there is nothing typical about Boss Rambler Beer Club. Even its logo and name are fresh and feel somehow clean and refined. Everything speaks to innovation. I believe this is what sets them apart from any other brewery in Central Oregon. Voting is open now through March 16, and people can vote for Boss Rambler (or any other nominee) once a day until then. The winner will be announced March 26. As of this writing, Boss Rambler currently holds the 5th spot. Let’s get them in 1st! Go to https://www.10best.com/ awards/travel/best-new-brewery-2021/ to cast your vote, or you can visit bossrambler.com and use the link on the website. While on their site check out their new beer selections! I’m telling you, the Dos Shakas is killer. You need to go grab a pint. I am planning to stop by for a “Bend’s Most Wanted” this week, which, according to the website, includes “Falconers” hops. What the heck are those?! Maybe I will write a review on it! Cheers!  USA Today’s 2021 10Best Readers’ Choice Travel Awards for Best New Brewery Now through March 16 at 8 am 10best.com/awards/travel/best-new-brewery-2021/


SCIENCE ADVICE GODDESS Old Is The New Black

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave. Suite 280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (advicegoddess.com).

© 2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.

39

, N.D. Blending Nature with Medicine Insurance Accepted

Follow us on Instagram @sourceweekly A special section dedicated to our

Look for this special publication inside the Source weekly on March 18 Ad deadline: March 12

541.383.0800 | advertise@bendsource.com

VOLUME 25  ISSUE 08  /  FEBRUARY 25, 2021  /  THE SOURCE WEEKLY

What are your thoughts on women who are involved with much younger men? A friend who’s my age, 58, is dating a 23-year-old guy. She started seeing him when he was 18 and refers to him as her “husband.” I went on a day trip with the two of them, and it honestly felt like we had a child in tow. He whines and pouts to get his way, feels a need to one-up everybody in conversation, and says and does weirdly inappropriate things (like skipping through a graveyard and talking openly about his sexual prowess). They profess their love to each other often, and I guess if it’s working, it’s fine, but I just don’t get it. —Baffled Dating somebody 40 years younger can make for awkward silences at dinner parties, like when somebody asks one’s boyfriend, “What were you doing on 9/11?” and he says, “Um, teething?” Of course, there are some constants in life, and one of them is how men, no matter how old and geezery, are most attracted to women in their early 20s. (Think Hooters hiring pool and 70-something grandpas with self-inflicted whiplash.) Women, on the other hand, tend to go for slightly older men throughout their lives, until they’re in their 70s, when they dip down a bit -though typically a handful of years, not four decades. However, within every “men tend to” or “women tend to,” there are individual differences; for example, a woman bumping up against 60 who’s dating a guy who probably remembers preschool like it was yesterday -- because it kinda pretty much was. Older women who date downward in age eight or more years (or try to) get called “cougars,” sneering slang for sexually hungry older women hunting for younger man prey. The term is said to trace back to the Vancouver Canucks hockey team in the ‘80s: the players’ label for older, single, hetero female groupies who frequented their games and tried to score sex with them. However, “cougar” didn’t go wide till 2003, when Demi Moore, at 40, started dating the 15-yearsher-junior Ashton Kutcher, then 25, whom she later married and divorced. There are now cougar reality shows, dating sites, blogs, and books, and there have even been cougar beauty pageants. This makes it sound like there are hungry cougar-inas lurking around every corner. However, an analysis of

census data by public policy researchers Zoe Lawton and Paul Callister in 2010 suggests the extent of this is “exaggerated by the media.” They likewise suspect (and more recent survey data bears out) that the number of these older woman/much-younger man couplings that turn into longterm relationships is “considerably smaller” than those that wind up as short-term flings. Younger men are sometimes a workaround for older women experiencing a man famine: a shortage of men close to their age, who tend to date younger women. But a younger man can be (or turn into) a preference -- maybe because he’s Amy Alkon more fun and makes an older woman feel young again and probably because he’s a sex machine that does not require pharmaceuticals or batteries. A much-younger boyfriend is also a status symbol of sorts, showily breaking the mold of being a sexually ignored aging woman. And maybe, just maybe, there’s sometimes a connection that makes the guy’s age and any related incompatibilities unimportant -- sometimes because an older woman is secure and happy enough on her own that she doesn’t require a man to be a human Costco to fill her every need. Though people point and laugh at older woman/younger man couples, the joke might be on the jokers. Social psychologist Justin Lehmiller surveyed around 200 heterosexual women in relationships: women with male partners close to their age, women significantly younger than their male partners, and women significantly older than their male partners (22 years older on average). He found that women 10 or more years older than their male mate were the happiest: the most satisfied with their relationships and committed to their partners. The fact that your friend’s been with this guy for five years suggests this is more than a Boytoys R Us phase. Ask her what she sees in him, and listen with an open mind. You might find your way to a little more compassion and understanding. That said, it’s probably best to avoid being around the two of them and instead see her alone, because, well, adulthood can be overrated -- except when you want to have a conversation. Even if you never quite get what the attraction is, you might just resolve to be happy that she’s happy. She’s having fun; she’s in love at nearly age 60; and sex for her is smokin’ -- and not because her partner’s pacemaker catches fire midway through.


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$650,000 | MLS# 20596550 Brightwood, Oregon

$645,000 | MLS# 220114559 Prineville, Oregon

Incredible lake views make this gated community property spectacular for a vacation or full-time home with two levels. 2,146 square feet, 3 bed, 2 bath, wrap around deck, separate 24X40 pole barn and solar system updated in 2020. Full basement with kitchenette, full bath, and great room. Main floor offers an open concept with laundry room, dining room, kitchen, and entertaining areas inside and out. Community amenties include a private airstrip, marina, sand beach with swim area, boat ramps and rec hall.

Beautiful craftsmanship throughout this home! Almost a 6 acre site consisting of 2 separate tax lots on Mount Hood. Incredible private setting nestled between the overarching trees. Beautifully remodeled manufactured home, 2 garages, a shop, a music room, and outdoor entertaining and living spaces. Stunning wooden porch and large wood stove transports you to a mountain getaway. Easy access to the mountain, hiking, skiing, and biking are possible outside your front door in this private Mount Hood oasis.

Escape the city hustle in this newly renovated Prineville property. All new kitchen and laundry room cabinets, new vanity, counter tops, sinks, flooring, and more in this 1,800+ square foot home. Situated on roughly 12 acres, this property is a rural dream. Outside you will find several out buildings for storage, a greenhouse, a barn, garage/workshop, cold room with meat hooks, and a smoke house. Pasture is irrigated with hand line. This single-family home is a Prineville gem located just minutes from town.

Kristen Kohnstamm Principal Broker 503.709.4518

Rachel Rhoden Principal Broker 541.771.6251

Meg Cummings Principal Broker 541.419.3036

Kim Anderson Broker 503.791.0383

Jered Rhoden Broker 541.771.6251

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541.383.7600 | CascadeSothebysRealty.com Scan here to Explore Properties For Sale

BEND • REDMOND • SISTERS • SUNRIVER PORTLAND • SW WASHINGTON • OREGON COAST • SOUTHERN OREGON Each office is independently owned and operated. All brokers listed are licensed in the state of Oregon. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Source Weekly February 25, 2021  

Source Weekly February 25, 2021  

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