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ISSUE 48•SEPTEMBER 2009• • FREE

THE TWILIGHT SAD SCOTTISH INDIE BACK ON THE WORLD STAGE

PLUS

ANTI-POP CONSORTIUM ANDREA ARNOLD PART CHIMP TORI AMOS MEW AND LOADS MORE MUSIC | FILM | CLUBS | THEATRE | GAMES | BOOKS | FESTIVALS | ART | FASHION | LISTINGS


Editorial

NEKO CASE

GLASGOW ORAN MOR MON 7TH SEPTEMBER EDINBURGH VOODOO ROOMS FRIDAY 11TH SEPTEMBER

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Plus Special Guests Delta Mainline

Edinburgh Sneaky Petes

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KATE WALSH Glasgow Oran Mor

DEVON SPROULE MANTLER PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

O2 ABC2 GLASGOW

Friday 16th October

Edinburgh Voodoo Rooms

WED 14 OCT

Sunday 18th October

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Plus Vijay Kishore

SUNDAY 8TH NOVEMBER

EDINBURGH QUEENS HALL

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ROACHFORD SUN 25 OCT

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LAST night I saw a band called The Olympic Village play. It was their first gig. They have no plans for future gigs. Proper underground attitude. They were brilliant too: a combination of the psychedelic grooves of The Doors and the aggressively personal ramblings of The Fall, with lyrics about, among other things, how Roger Federer is ‘really fucking good at tennis’. The members of The Olympic Village have been around on the Edinburgh scene for a while, having played in various previous bands associated with a non-commercially oriented generation of ECA graduates and their pals. A key word there is ‘generation’ (referring to the sort-of half generation that tend to make up the strata of a fast-evolving scene), because of late it has become clear to me that one of the key elements in a healthy local music scene – the subject of this editorial – is the influence that comes over time. This is an often overlooked phenomenon. The local-ness of a ‘local music scene’ implies that the acts in question are only of a certain size (while Primal Scream might be a Glasgow band, they’re not really a part of the Glasgow scene), particularly with so much of the UK industry based in London, so it is natural that local music and new music are often rolled into one. New bands, it is often assumed, just haven’t had the time to get big yet. But the truth of the matter is that the inspiration of a bit of history makes all the difference. The influence of the bands put out by Postcard Records in the 80s (Josef K, Orange Juice, Aztec Camera), on current Scottish music, is well documented, but more specific examples of this taking place can be found in this issue. Our cover stars, The Twilight Sad, benefitted hugely from the patronage of Mogwai, particularly the opportunity to support the older post-rockers on a European tour. The association suits both parties: the younger band find new fans, and learn through exposure some of the ways to success; the older band – if they manage to be sufficiently discerning in choosing who they favour, are seen to be aware, involved, and encouraging. Come In Tokyo, interviewed on page 42, are one of the younger bands – along with Found – to have been taken on to the Fence Records collective-style roster. Fence is a

THE SKINNY September 2009 Issue 48, September 2009 © Radge Media Ltd.

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Let us know what you think: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk T: 0131 467 4630 P: The Skinny, The Drill Hall, 30-38 Dalmeny St, Edinburgh, EH6 8RG

Editorial

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All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the explicit permission of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within this publication do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the printer or the publisher. CORRECTION: We would like to point out that Stephen Mcleod Blythe took the pic in the Cathouse advert last month, and apologise if the picture credit was misleading.

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4 THE SKINNY AUGUST 2009

folk-centered, mainstream-phobic outfit, yet by working together to an implicit aesthetic, they have built up a considerable following, to the point that being involved is a significant step-up for an artist. Come In Tokyo are playing the first anniversary of The Mill, the now regular night that represents one of the few examples of a big brand demonstrating a good grasp of what makes local music tick. Again, time is of the essence, and it is good to see the programmers of this beer-supported event making long-term plans for the future: you don’t make a real impact until you’ve genuinely stuck with something. So long may their work continue, and a happy first birthday to the project. To return to the power of influence, in Rosie Davies’ piece on the new trend for ‘boutique’ style clubbing in Glasgow (page 58), the floor-filling leadership of no-policy-is-policy veterans Optimo is denied by none. We have a further interview with one of the protagonists in that scene-that-isn’ta-scene, Teamy of the ever inventive night Wrong Island, on page 56. In terms of this accumulated culture, the old business cliché – time is money – applies here. Because you don’t get that generational effect without people – lots of people – putting in the hours, often for little money or glory. So when we rightly celebrate the strength of the Scottish scene right now, and the exciting new names making an impact, it’s worth remembering the credit due to the people who established the culture, from the legends to the veteran foot-soldiers to the kids in the year above. It is in this context that we bid a sad farewell to Benbecula Records, the Edinburgh electronica label who are bowing out after ten years of putting out first-rate releases from the likes of Christ, Frog Pocket, and Araya. We interview founder Steven McConnell on page 49. Good work, we salute you. As for us here at The Skinny, we’re putting our money where our mouth is on this theme this month, with a line-up for The Skinny Dip that demonstrates how this effect works, with former Arab Strap frontman Aidan Moffat headlining, in what will be his first solo show in the capital (the event is at the Bongo Club, Edinburgh, on 3 September), Phantom Band frontman Rick Redbeard playing a rare solo show in support, with the excellent Over the Wall bringing the bill to a rounded whole. If you want a lo-fi survey of the best of the last ten years of Scottish music, as well as a fine night out, you could hardly do better. Details and tickets are on theskinny. co.uk. rupert@theskinny.co.uk

Editor Online & Music editor Clubs editor Deviance editor Theatre editor Film editor DVD editor Comedy editor Reading editor Digital editor Games editor Art & Showcase editor Food & Drink editor Heads Up editor Aberdeen editor

Production

Creative director Production editor Designer Chief subeditor Subeditors

Sales/Accounts

Enterprise manager Sales Executive Accounts Administrator

Research

Listings editor Clubs listings

Cover Image

Sophie Kyle Rupert Thomson Dave Kerr Chris Duncan Nine Gareth K. Vile Gail Tolley Michael Gillespie Lizzie Cass-Maran Keir Hind Alex Cole Josh Wilson Rosamund West Ruth Marsh Jenny Wallace Jaco Justice

Matt MacLeod David Lemm Mike Sterry Rosamund West Euan Ferguson Michael Gillespie Paul Mitchell Gillian Watson Lara Moloney Steven Scott Erin McElhinney

Becca Pottinger Andrew Cooke

Photo: Jack Waddington www.kdy-side.com (Jack also took our sexy new editorial pics, so big thanks to you for that sir!)


Contents

DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…

+ LOS CAMPESINOS! (EDINBURGH ONLY)

EDINBURGH CORN EXCHANGE

SUNDAY 6TH DECEMBER

COVER FEATURE

Franz Ferdinand Scotland's biggest band talks to Scotland's biggest magazine about the big things they have planned for the future.

6 14 16 20 22 24 26 28 30 33 34 36 52 61

GLASGOW BARROWLAND T D OU OL SUNDAY S11TH OCTOBER

»8 Heads Up

The best of the month ahead. Now you've no excuse for sitting on your arse and crying with boredom throughout October.

Food and Drink

www.thecribs.com www.myspace.com/thecribs

GLASGOW ABC

GLASGOW SECC

Recession-bucking young businesses blossom, plus fine dining at The Ivy and Amarone.

SUNDAY 4TH OCTOBER

Fashion

SEATING AVAILABLE

An exclusive peak at the latest Norwegian Wood line. Which has nothing to do with crowded Oslo saunas, apparently.

Tuesday 6th October

+ Sons and Daughters

DEBUT ALBUM ‘MADE UP STORIES’ OUT NOW! INCLUDES THE SINGLES ‘MADE UP STORIES’, ‘SHE LEFT ME’ & ‘DRIVE TO THE CITY’. STANDARD AND DELUXE VERSIONS AVAILABLE DIGITALLY AND ON CD.

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

SUNDAY 1ST NOVEMBER + DINOSAUR PILE UP + STAGE BLOOD

+ TRIPS

GLASGOW CLASSIC GRAND

SATURDAY 24TH OCTOBER

‘Minotaur’, the definitive Pixies boxset collection, available to pre-order now via www.ainr.com

Deviance

Is monogamy deviant? Based on what I caught my parents doing that one time with our border collie: very yes.

GLASGOW QMU

Showcase

Winner of the Skinny Showcase Award at RSA New Contemporaries 2009 Euan Taylor shows us his goods.

Digital

More dick-waggling from Microsoft and Apple, plus we delve into the spaces of Edinburgh's InSpace.

Reading

THURSDAY 15TH OCTOBER www.frank-turner.com www.myspace.com/frankturner

GLASGOW ABC2

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

GLASGOW O2 ACADEMY MONDAY 19th OCTOBER

EDINBURGH HMV PICTURE HOUSE TUESDAY 20th OCTOBER Album 'Two Suns' out now www.batforlashes.com

+ SUCIOPERRO + BLACK ALLEY SCREENS

ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN + EXIT CALM

Glasgow Barrowland

We talk to the red pens behind new Scottish literary rag Gutter Magazine. Think you're good enough for submission?

WedNESDAY 14th October

Film

You've gotta be tough to tap dance, or so lo-fi biopic White Lightnin' would have you believe.

Theatre

We get to grips with Glasgay! Festival's theatre line-up, plus a preview of Scottish Ballet's autumn schedule.

Comedy Glasgay! swings, Tim Michin sings.

THURSDAY 29th OCTOBER

The new album ‘The Fountain’ released on the 12th October www.bunnymen.com

+ ELLIE GOULDING + FAN DEATH

EDINBURGH HMV PICTURE HOUSE

IN ASSOCIATION WITH PCL PRESENTS

SUNDAY 25TH OCTOBER

www.myspace.com/littlebootsmusic www.littlebootsmusic.co.uk The Debut Album ‘Hands’ out now

+ Magic Arm

GLASGOW BARROWLAND

Art

THURSDAY 29th OCTOBER

Edinburgh HMV Picture House Wednesday 9th December

What happens when the kid the year below you in art school makes it big? One writer finds out.

Music

We exchange spit with Thavius Beck, Mudhoney, Yeasayer, The Big Pink, The Mountain Goats, St Deluxe, Citizens, and The Low Miffs.

Clubs

It's filthier than a Falkirk takeaway in Clubs this month, with Torture Garden, Confusion is Sex and our own Twisted Kids Birthday Party.

Listings

In case we've not mentioned it enough: come to our Twisted Kids Birthday Party 10 Oct. There's cake! And nightmarish clowns!

+ THE PHANTOM BAND

GLASGOW ABC

Glasgow ABC

THURSDAY 15TH OCTOBER

Thursday 22nd October

‘Mind Blowing…a must see’ The Sunday Times : ‘Top 5 bands to see live in 2009’ The Observer : ‘I cannot get enough of these guys, they soothe the soul’ US President, Barack Obama

GLASGOW ORAN MOR MONDAY 19TH OCTOBER

TICKETS 24HRS 08444 999 990 • www.ticketmaster.co.uk • www.gigsinscotland.com

IN PERSON GLASGOW Tickets Scotland, EDINBURGH Tickets Scotland, Ripping, DUNDEE Grouchos & all Ticketmaster Ticket Centres.

OCTOBER 2009

THE SKINNY 5


LIFESTYLE

HEADS YOUR

UP MONTH AHEAD Jenny Wallace

Vladimir McTavish WED, 30 SEP

TUE, 29 SEP

THE WIZARD OF OZ-TOBER I’VE had a stint of living in Kansas, and the refrain from The Wizard of Oz of "Lions and tigers and bears - oh my!" always runs through my head when looking at what’s coming up in Scotland for the next month (except instead of the wild animals of Oz version, it goes more along the lines of "Clubs! And launches! And films! Oh My!"). If the 1930s musical reference is lost on you, let’s put it this way: Scotland is pretty damn good on the going-out scene. There are literally hundreds of interesting things to do, and it’s easy to miss some cracking options purely because you haven’t had your ears in the right place at the right time. But fear not! We’re here to do it for you. A whole 'best of' month of Scottish frivolity has been investigated, mused and presented here so that never again will you have to say ‘I’m just going to have a quiet night in’. Your understanding of the Hollyoaks plot line might suffer, but otherwise you only stand to gain. Shoes on, off you go!

With themes of beauty, pleasure, darkness and corruption running through this blistering dance performance, DORIAN GRAY (Theatre Royal, Glasgow) is set to seduce audiences until 30 Oct, kicking off today. It’s previously been one of the most successful dance performances ever staged at the Edinburgh Festival.

Get ye to The Stand for and Irish/Scottish comedy face off. Glasgow has a crack at the craic with The BEST OF IRISH Comedy whilst Edinburgh consecutively showcases the BEST OF SCOTTISH (The Stand, Glasgow/Edinburgh, 7.30pm for 8.30pm start).

MON-TUE, 5-6 OCT

WED, 7 OCT

Leeds rockers SKY LARKIN flutter down to Scotland (5 Oct - Café Drummond Aberdeen, 6 Oct – Classic Grand Glasgow, 8pm, £7) as part of a two month long tour. Check out the smashing cocktail recipe on their myspace if you fancy a pre-gig tipple.

MON, 12 OCT

SUN, 11 OCT

WHOSE LUNCH IS IT ANYWAY? (The Stand, Edinburgh, 1pm, Free) Offers a hearty serving of improvised comedy when you don’t have the energy to come out with a witty one.

There’s no better way to start the week than with a cold pint, a hot pie and some wonderfully titled theatre. With this in mind, ‘cheery suicide comedy’ THE GLIMMERING NYMPH (Òran Mór, Glasgow, 12pm doors for 1pm start, £12.50) should tick all the start-of-week boxes.

FRI, 16 OCT

GFT launches their monthly LATE NIGHT CULT CLASSICS series with FERRIS BUELLER'S DAY OFF (GFT, Fri 16 Oct, 10.45pm, £3.50-5) www.gft.org.uk

E CK I PO' THNTH O M

We’ve all had them; this one is a tad more involving and thought provoking - and doesn’t require any residual grovelling to your other half. AN ARGUMENT ABOUT SEX (Tramway, Glasgow, from Thur 1 to Sat 17 Oct. £5-£14).

TUES, 13 OCT

NICK CAVE hits Edinburgh tonight. (HMV Picture House, Edinburgh, 7pm). Tickets scarce, anticipation abundant.

SAT, 17 OCT

Electronic beats and, if you come to the café beforehand, some nice vegan scran to line your stomach. NUMBERS (Stereo, Glasgow, 11pm – 3am) features Hudson Mohawke Live with the Butter album launch.

SUN, 18 OCT

After an inspiring Sunday jaunt? THE GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART STAFF SHOW features a selection of work from the people that shape the future stars of the art world. Starts Friday 16 Oct, runs till 6 November.

H u d Mo FRI, 23 OCT

The Recoat Gallery in Glasgow presents its first book launch with the LOST AND FOUND STRUCTURES (7pm-10pm) exhibition.

6 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2009

WED, 14 OCT

Most commonly known as the drummer for Babyshambles, it’s not widely known that musician and DJ Adam Ficek is a talent in his own right. ROSES KINGS CASTLES (The Admiral, Glasgow, 7pm) teeters between Belle and Sebastian and the hallucinatory invocations of Syd Barrett. Beautiful and bizarre. Unmissable.

SAT, 24 OCT

Ken Kesey's story of rebellion in the psychiatric ward, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, is transformed by street-dance theatre company Bounce into hip-hop dance extravaganza INSANE IN THE BRAIN (Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 7.30pm, tickets from £12-20).

T ill 15 Nov


LIFESTYLE

e,

Fre d MacAulay THU, 1 OCT

FRI, 2 OCT

THE SCOTTISH MENTAL HEALTH ARTS & FILM FESTIVAL OPENING CONCERT (The Old Fruitmarket, Glasgow, 7pm, £5) showcases home grown, intimate musical delights.

THU, 8 OCT

FRE E!

Sombre subject matter, yes. Great exhibition, yes again. Tonight previews SHADOWS FADE (The Arches, Glasgow. 6pm, free) Exhibition runs from Friday 9th Oct – Tue 3rd October.

Joining The Skinny with an October birthday bash, FEST N FURIOUS (Dundee, various venues, Fri 2 Oct – Sun 4 Oct) turns five in October, with a packed weekend line up of concerts, films, and cracking acts including the Peatbog Faeries, Saltfishforty and The Hot Seats.

SAT, 3 OCT

Four solid hours of dancefloor joy from everyone’s favourite gingermaestro BOOM MONK BEN (Mixed Bizness, The Reading Rooms, Dundee, 10pm-2.30am, £5)

SUN, 4 OCT

Raise some cash and STAND UP FOR MYELOMA in the excellent company of Fred MacAulay, Miles Jupp, John Gavin and other good comedy souls. You’ll feel all warm inside, what with the funny people and do-gooding. (The Jam House, Edinburgh, 8pm, £15-35).

IN TICW K ET SEE PAG S! E5

SAT, 10 OCT

FRI, 9 OCT

It’s THE SKINNY’S 4TH BIRTHDAY and we’re going to act like complete juveniles… The Arches, Sat 10 Oct, 10pm. £7 theskinny.co.uk/birthday

Edinburgh's METALTECH (playing Cabaret Voltaire, Oct 9, 7pm, £4) bring a tasty hybrid of dance music, hard rock and scary ass masks to the Capital. myspace.com/metaltech

4

THU, 15 OCT

A triple bill of contemporary choreography mixes the old with the new as part of SCOTTISH BALLET’S 40TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR (Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 7.30pm). Runs Thu 15-Sat 17 Oct.

Attic lights MON, 19 OCT

BALANCE (Eastwood Park Theatre, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £8/6) combines breakdance, gymnastics and contemporary techniques to echo the control that can be taken when mental health tips out of sync. Part of the Mental Health Festival 2009.

SUN-MON, 25-26 OCT

Arrow Video teams up with Cult Fiction Movies (www.cultfictionmovies.com) to celebrate the Blu-Ray launch of Dawn of the Dead with a double whammy of DAWN OF THE DEAD and DAY OF THE DEAD in all its big screen glory (25 Oct, Cameo Picturehouse; 26 Oct, Glasgow Film Theatre). Followed by a Q&A with horror icon Ken Foree.

TUE, 20 OCT

Exuberant troubadour JACK PEÑATE hits Glasgow (The Arches, 7pm, £12).

WED,21 OCT

Idlewild’s Rod Jones pulls together some top Scottish acts for MUSIC LIKE A VITAMIN (HMV Picture House, Edinburgh, 7pm, £5) for a ridiculously cheap bonanza of a gig.

THU, 22 OCT

The Africa in Motion Film Festival is back and opens with the UK Premiere of IZULU LAMI (The Filmhouse, Edinburgh, 8.15pm) .The Film Festival runs until 1 Nov.

TUE, 27 OCT

NOVEMBER ISSUE OUT!

OCTOBER 2009

THE SKINNY 7


IT WAS AL

8 THE SKINNY September 2009


LL WHIRLWIND... Since blindsiding us with their showstopping debut in 2007, The Twilight Sad have enjoyed a steady ascent that few bands can hope to achieve on both sides of the Atlantic. The Skinny swigs warm Grolsch with frontman James Graham and guitarist Andy MacFarlane to ask: Can they make the double? Interview Dave Kerr Photography Jack Waddington “What’s the cheapest bottle you’ve got?” James Graham rattles loose change around in his fist as he surveys the selection behind a Sauchiehall Street bar before plumping for a dubious Dutch favourite. This is the reality for the mild-mannered frontman, who, though having found relative success with The Twilight Sad since 2007’s acclaimed Fourteen Autumns and Fifteen Winters, still can’t quite call this a living. Finding a quiet corner to sit down and talk, Graham and guitarist Andy MacFarlane make easy company; their good humour reveals itself quickly, a direct contrast to the way the band are represented by the austerity of their promotional photography and indeed their music. Such perceived moodiness is not the only misconception. “People say ‘You must be making a mint’, but we’ve not made anything out of this,” Graham shrugs. Like most bands of their stature, where regular touring in foreign lands renders a part-time job impossible, you suspect that longevity depends on financial sustainability. “On one level it’s great,” says Graham. “Two years of our lives have been spent touring, getting to meet bands we respect, playing music – it’s amazing. We’ll do this for as long as we can; we’ll never compromise the music to make a living, but we’re going to have to make money out of this or we’re not going to be able to do it as much as we want. It’s depressing to think about that, but it’s a full-time job. If we can make this work, we will. So long as we don’t kill each other.” MacFarlane interjects: “We’ve only got till we’re 27 anyway, because everybody cool dies when they’re 27.” The remark lingers for a second before the laughter ensues. “Two more years to go.” And two years can yield so much. The Twilight Sad’s story is not a common one, although monetary fortune has thus far eluded them, the Kilsyth quartet – sometime quintet, including the addition of Aereogramme refugee Martin ‘Dok’ Doherty – has proven that a lot can go right overnight: from humble beginnings experimenting with Daniel Johnston covers and tape-loops of Jimmy Rodgers songs in the basement of Glasgow’s 13th Note Cafe, all the way up to high profile support slots for the likes of Smashing Pumpkins (where Corgan’s troupe were outshone) and Beirut, not to mention tours of the US and Europe with cult post-rock favourites Mogwai which bookended the sessions for the Sad’s forthcoming second LP. Without any great career masterplan to speak of, the band found little appeal in going down the well-worn path of paying-to-play and returning to the same cities bi-weekly, lest their ubiquity came back to haunt them. “We made a conscious decision never to play the same place every two weeks, because it’s just a load of shite,” Graham deadpans. “We thought, ‘well, we’ll just keep on writing songs and send them away to get the name about.’” “We’d been messing about for a couple of years before we said ‘Do you want to make a go of it?’” MacFarlane remembers. “We were working in Safeway, call centres and places like that. It was like ‘This is

"Some website called us and frightened Rabbit ‘the Beatles and the Stones of Emo’, we’re definitely the Stones." Andy MacFarlane

piss, we need a label. Let’s get an album out and go on tour.” Their first and only approach was to Brighton based FatCat Records, who expressed immediate interest in The Twilight Sad’s demo by return and signed the band after witnessing their third show. “That was a weird gig,” Graham recalls. “There was a four band bill at the Barfly and it was packed. The other bands playing were all quite upbeat and poppy, then we came on and he [nods at MacFarlane] was like ’VVVVVWWWWWZZZZWWWZZZ’ with his tape loops and guitar effects. People were going ‘Uh?’” “We were just lucky as fuck,” nods MacFarlane. “But that’s the first step, getting signed.” Thrown across the pond, the band had no time to drink in the scale of the rollercoaster they’d boarded. “We did three gigs in Glasgow in the space of three years, and then we were playing East Coast shows in New York, Chicago and Boston,” MacFarlane adds. “It was straight over for a tour in America without really even dipping our toe in the water. I mean, we hadnae even made it to Edinburgh yet!” Having achieved their initial goals, it seems time spent on the road since has served the band variably. “I like playing the gigs, the travelling about isn’t my favourite thing,” says Graham. “But we’ll do it, and we’ll be away for a year if we need to be, to promote the album and get as far as we can.” “I love it…” starts MacFarlane, shaking his head

September 2009

THE SKINNY 9


and waving a finger in Graham’s face. “He’s making it sound shite! Right, see a tour for me, it’s like going on holiday, it’s amazing. You only need to play a gig for an hour every night, and apart from that you just go out, you go to parties and hit the pub. He sits in his hotel room on the Skype and we all go out partying!” With an expectant label and swelling fanbase patiently awaiting new material, the band appeased both with an album of live oddities entitled (The Twilight Sad) Killed My Parents and Hit the Road before embarking on a European tour with Mogwai late last year. A spoof and homage to Sonic Youth’s Goo in cover and title, the band never expected to encounter the album’s maker. “I just did it for a laugh on MySpace,” says MacFarlane of the illustration. “But FatCat wanted to use it for a release, then Thurston Moore turned up at one of the Mogwai gigs. The cover was on all the tee-shirts as well, we were trying to hide the merchandise.” Graham elaborates: “Stuart [Braithwaite] came backstage and said ‘Guess who’s coming to the gig tonight? It’s somebody you’ll love…’’’ MacFarlane: “…and I was actually thinking ‘Bret Hart?’” “Then he said ‘Thurston Moore,’” continues Graham. “We thought, ‘Well that’s cool, then walked over to the merch desk and went ‘oh, shit!’” Lawsuit dodging notwithstanding, the Mogwai tours helped provide focus and a welcome distraction from recording the new album. “We needed more time to do everything,” admits Graham. “The best thing about those tours, for me, is that it showed me where I’d like our band to go. If we could get to that level it’d be great. It was also a great head start for us in Europe and America; I’m pretty sure we gained a few fans. We’ve been lucky with everybody we’ve been on tour with; it’s happened because they like the band and not because somebody’s waving a big cheque in their face going ‘can you take this band on tour?’” Having mixed their debut with Peter Katis (The National), the band returned to the Glasgow studio - Chem19 – where they’d originally recorded, to craft what would become Forget the Night Ahead without what Graham terms “tour heid.” “You need to come home and do things right,” says MacFarlane. Having given fans a taste of what was to come by offering the ominous Reflection of the Television as a free download in June, lead single proper I

Became a Prostitute posed a problem for the censors. MacFarlane named the track after a line from Jean-Luc Godard’s My Life to Live, and didn’t predict that it would present such a “pain in the arse”. The band had no intention of pandering to prudish radio stations when writing, nor was the intention to self-sabotage. “There are no sexual connotations,” Graham affirms. “It’s just a metaphor for becoming somebody you really don’t want to be. ‘Prostitute’ is politically correct, that’s from the dictionary - none of your shite - but people can’t bring themselves to say it. If it gets on radio, it gets on radio. If it doesn’t, so... fuck.” Broaching the subject of the new album, the pair are initially reticent to discuss the ground it covers. It seems a less is more approach has served the band well. At its droning, reverb-drenched best, Forget the Night Ahead does, by Graham’s own admission, sacrifice its predecessor’s warmth for a darker ambience. This is modern, emotive rock at its most gripping, which poses a problem when listeners attempt to typify what it is that The Twilight Sad do. Although My Bloody Valentine have slowly become an obvious touchstone to align with bands capable of harnessing white noise effectively, I tell MacFarlane I hear chilling echoes of Loveless amongst some of the most outstanding moments on their new record. Surely that’s no bad thing? “Right, this might come out the wrong way,” he declares “I don’t think Loveless is amazing. It’s a good album, but I prefer Isn’t Anything. I’m not knocking My Bloody Valentine at all; I think they’re a great band. But I’d never put them on a pedestal, they’re not our kind of inspiration.” So when a journalist drops the dreaded ‘Nu-gaze’ bomb, it’s a surefire stinker in the band’s book? “I liked that better than ‘Scottish emo,’” Graham shudders. “Thanks Pitchfork. These days, if anybody shows a little emotion in a song it’ll be labelled ‘Emo’, just like that. We’re obviously not like Taking Back Sunday [throws thumb in the direction of the ABC] who are playing up the road tonight, that’s fucking ‘Emo’. I understand the term and I show emotion in what I do, but that word instantly puts people off.” “Some website called us and the Rabbits ‘the Beatles and the Stones of Emo’,” laughs MacFarlane. “We’re definitely the Stones.” Next for the Twilight Sad comes a US trek with the aforementioned Frightened Rabbit and fellow label

mates We Were Promised Jetpacks, before returning for a lap of the UK and Europe in their own right. But it’s the promise of one forthcoming show in particular that sticks out in Graham’s mind as a landmark achievement. ”We’re playing the Bowery Ballroom,” he beams. “That’s our gig and it’s quite a big thing for us.” All of the above, yet the band are only now coming to grips with the medium of music video. With one in the can (see Prostitute) and two more underway, that’s all about to change. Y’all Is Fantasy Island frontman and sometime filmmaker Adam Stafford is currently crafting the treatment for next single Seven Years of Letters. Hot on the heels of Stafford’s video comes another by Nicola Collins, director of recent controversial East End London gangster documentary The End. “She’s working with David Lynch’s daughter in her new film,” reveals Graham. “So she’s calling in a favour and getting his granddaughter in on this.” Notorious for their onstage shyness, I ask whether that extends to appearing in their own videos. “I don’t really see that you have to,” MacFarlane ponders. “But I think we’re going to be in the next couple coming up. It’ll be me walking past with a wee Hitchcock cameo in there,” he laughs. “No, I think we’re just playing, because if we go in acting it’ll just be ridiculous.” And so The Twilight Sad hunch under a glass ceiling until the world takes notice. Having recorded one of the gutsiest independent rock albums of the year, the band may find themselves at the mercy of fleeting tastes and a fragmented media both at home and abroad upon its release next month. Graham is up for the challenge, with no desire to achieve also-ran status. “We never want to be the nearly men in that sense of ‘oh, remember that band, they were good.’ We want people to be saying ‘let’s go and see them again’. If people get the chance to hear our music I’m sure it’ll have broad appeal. I hope so anyway. But this is by no means a commercial record; you won’t see us on Top of the Pops anytime soon, even if they do bring it back.” For an exclusive acoustic session featuring the band, see theskinny.co.uk/offthebeatentracks Forget the Night Ahead is released via FatCat on 5 October. www.myspace.com/thetwilightsad

The Twilight Sad’s Forget the Night Ahead, Track-by-Track By Andy MacFarlane Reflection of the Television We weren’t really sure if this one was going to be on the album; we had the chords and vocal line, and thought we’d give it a go when we were in the studio so we had something else to record. It was more of an idea to try to see if it would work. I wanted to have The Cure/Nine Inch Nails kind of drums and repetitive bass line going all the way through, holding it together, and have noise drones sitting over the top of it, so James could sing without having to follow anything. It’s a more sparse sound than what was on the first album, which works well as an introduction. The title is from Notes Toward a Mental Breakdown by J. G. Ballard. I Became a Prostitute Firstly, this song is not about being a whore, it’s a line from the Jean-Luc Godard film Vivre sa Vie (My Life to Live) that seemed to fit with the concept of the lyrics. I’m not sure if we shot ourselves in the foot with that title, seeing as it was the first single. For radio, it had to be called “I Became a ........” because the word ‘prostitute’ is apparently offensive. This one came together quite easily when writing it and always stood out to be a single. Seven Years of Letters This is the second proper single from the album. We didn’t ever intend to have the first three songs in the order that they were released, that’s just a coincidence. This one has a guitar solo and a creaky piano seat. We call this one ‘Mooth’ when we play live, we never write down the real names of songs on setlists ‘cause we normally can’t remember what the real names are, so it’s easier for us to make up fake ones. Scissors This is an instrumental, I can’t really remember much about writing this. It’s another one that was pieced together in the studio making loops of noise. When I was Googling to find out where the title came from, I noticed Slipknot have a song called Scissors. Good one. Might get some accidental MCPS money, if I’d thought of that idea earlier I could’ve called it Billie Jean. The Room There was an acoustic version of this called ‘Untitled #27’ on our tour EP (The Twilight Sad) Killed My Parents and Hit the Road (that EP was going to be called ‘The Twilight Sad Shagged Yr Maw ‘n’ Fucked Off’, but we thought that might’ve been inappropriate). This is another one that has a more sparse arrangement with piano, bass and toms being the main instruments throughout. Laura from My Latest Novel plays violin on this. The title is from The Room by Hubert Selby Jr. That Birthday Present This is probably the fastest song we have; we were told our songs were all slow, so at least we have a faster one to play now. I didn’t think we were going to do anything with it, we recorded a rough demo of it quite a while before writing songs for this album and it’s always just been kicking about. Someone also tried to tell me it sounded like a Pavement song, I really like Pavement, but I can’t see that one. Laura plays on this one too, you can’t really hear it but it’s in the mix. The Neighbours Can’t Breathe I normally write music with films on ‘cause the television annoys me, I can’t remember what any of the other songs were written to, but I remember having Dead Man’s Shoes on when this was done. This was another one that was on the tour EP, as ‘Untitled #28’. Full article available on theskinny.co.uk Forget the Night Ahead is released via FatCat on 5 Oct. www.myspace.com/thetwilightsad

10 THE SKINNY September 2009


September 2009

THE SKINNY 11


Lifestyle

FoodPOSH NOSH AND CHEAP EATS

& Drink

Local Hero

With the 7th annual Scottish Food Fortnight creeping up on us, we pose the question: just how easy is it to go all day eating local?

The Skinny Whisky Guide By Ruth Marsh THIS MONTH:

Aberlour 10 Year Old Single Malt

Where’s It From? Aberlour sits in the heart of the Speyside malt region – an area that is home to over 50% of all Scottish single malt distilleries – and is in a prime position to benefit from the peat-filtered Lour springwater which runs down the granite slopes of Ben Rines and moist, riverside air.

What Does It Look Like?

Text Ruth Marsh This month sees the 7th annual Scottish Food & Drink Fortnight relaunched under the tartan auspices of Homecoming and surfing the ethical and financial zeitgeist of eating locally and sustainably from familyrun businesses. Aiming to engage local consumers, producers and eateries in equal measure, one glance at the organisation’s website is enough to make you lay down your Whopper Meal and reach for the tablet. Here, Scottish scran translates as images of hedonistic, loch-side piles of oysters and lobsters (next to what looks suspiciously like a we’ll-overlook-it-this-time large glass of Chablis), attractive young ladies holding trays of fresh ravioli almost certainly stuffed with wild mountain hare, organic blue cheese and free-range watercress (I’m projecting here) and jovial ruddy-faced men downing dram after dram of Talisker in an heroic, utterly selfless bid to reduce food miles. If this is what it takes to support the native food chain, call me Bear Grylls (don’t) and count me in. So, in a completely scientific, balanced piece of research, I decided to see if I could survive one day on a purely Caledonian diet. Breakfast Wake up realising that trying a niche diet whilst working 16 hour days at the World’s largest arts festival is the worst idea ever. My culinary highlight of the past fortnight has been blowing on searingly hot stringy strips of greasy crepe whilst simultaneously attempting to fling them into my mouth and make like Usain Bolt running from Udderbelly to The Stand in 40.12 seconds. Ask anyone who works in Edinburgh during August what their staple diet consists of and they’ll just mouth the word ‘falafelfalafelfalafel’ at you, whilst blankly wiping garlic sauce from their hair. Whither my relaxing sun-drenched picnic of Black Isle Ale and Orkney crab sandwiches?!

12 THE SKINNY September 2009

Also have to grudgingly acknowledge that I’ve fallen at the first hurdle and that, although Scottish Blend sounds like it is geographically spot-on, those leaves didn’t come from a plantation outside Drumnadrochit. Still, its saltire-inspired packaging sets me on my way - Patriotism 1 Food Miles 0. Sink to my knees in relief at the sight of a Stoats Porridge Oats Bar in my local health food shop- nicer, quicker and cheaper than Ready Brek- and I thematically eschew goji berry and flax seeds in exchange for a classic Scottish combo of raspberry and honey. Game on! Lunch Decide to take advantage of those temporary, upscale food huts that spring up across the city in August, offering spiced bacon butties and authentic Nurembergstyle hot dogs, as if Waitrose were running a funfair. The Well Hung & Tender van has a queue round the block for its Aberdeen Angus steak rolls and burgers, topped off with massive wodges of caramelised onions. This is some seriously tasty cow and I manage to choke down both the hellish pun of a name and the fact that their farm is in Berwick-Upon-Tweed which, at time of writing, is outwith Scottish governance. Still, the cows themselves have a stronger Celtic lineage than Sean Connery so I’m chalking this up as another win. Dinner Eat in or eat out is the big choice. Edinburgh certainly has no shortage of restaurants that subscribe to the SFADF’s fortnight’s ethos of discovering and championing goodies from Scotland’s larder. You can roll down to Leith and blow £30+ on turbot from Scrabster or lamb from Dornoch at Tom Kitchin’s place, or drop into an outlet of Yummy Mummy haven Urban Angel to try their pioneering 50 mile menu, where everything will have travelled a maximum of 50 miles (like a lazy Proclaimer)

to fall down on your plate. But it’s clear that the people behind the fortnight movement want it to move beyond preaching to the choir and involve everyone, so I decide to prowl the supermarket aisles and fend for myself. SFADF patron Lady Claire MacDonald has donated some pretty tasty recipes to the cause like Arbroath Smokie Pate, but as this involves such frivolities as a food processor and ramekins, this will have to wait- we’re into serious one-frying-pan meal territory. A cursory browse at a fairly generic ‘big shop’ plus a late-night deli threw up a surprising range of goodies from our doorstep and I happily chowed down on some veggie haggis (celebrating its 25th birthday this year, which absolutely makes it traditional), crispy discs of waxy Ayrshire potatoes and a free range egg of ostrich proportions. I’m not necessarily condoning supermarket dependency as I know this ultimately defeats the object of trying to spend within your own community, but it’s good to know that the best Scottish ingredients—those that were once exported across the sea before we’d even got a sniff—are finally finding a mainstream following on their home turf. Grilled with some Really Garlicky butter (courtesy of the Allingham family farm at the foot of Cawdor Hills, the UK’s only growers of extra-pungent, in no way first date-friendly Porcelein garlic), these nippy sweeties were cheap, easy to find and tastier than a cottony, bland tiger prawn any day. Rounding off my day with perhaps Scotland’s most enduring contribution to the culinary world- a 40% proof nightcap that helps you take the sleepy train to oblivion- I’m pretty sure a fortnight would be no trouble at all.

Scottish Food & Drink Fortnight runs 5 Sat - 20 Sun September, with events across the country www.scottishfoodanddrinkfortnight.co.uk

Aberlour has a classic golden shine to it, like a New England forest bathed in an Autumn sunset (I may already have drunk too much of it).

How Does It Taste? Pop it open and you’ll get hit by a super-crisp and dry aroma. Matured in a combination of bourbon and sherry barrels, the taste is extra-smooth and creamy, but also cleanly vital and perky. The distillery certainly seems proud of the complex explosion of flavours in its signature malt – Aberlour’s very helpful and detailed website offers up tasting notes from a host of whisky afficionados who pick up notes of everything from bubblegum to custard, spearmint to biscuit

Where Can I Get It? You can buy 70cl Aberlour 10 Year Old at Aberlour’s online store for £23. If you’re feeling flash, you can fork out £40 for undiluted, straight-from-the-cask A’bunadh, which will knock your socks off at 59.6%. [Ruth Marsh] www.aberlour.com

THE SKINNY WHISKY GUIDE IS SPONSORED BY:


Lifestyle

No. Sixteen

Cail Bruich

16 Byres Road, Glasgow G11 5JY Tel: 0141 339 2544

725 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12 8QX Tel: 0141 334 6265

Whereas once upon a time, pre-economic downturn, No. Sixteen enjoyed a thoroughly enviable locale in the bustling West End, it now sits on a rather sad and quiet end of Byres Road. The enthusiastic, shiny-eyed restaurants and bars that once surronded it are now empty shells and whitewashed windows, stark reminders of how hard it is to make dreams a viable reality. Fortunately, No Sixteen has not only weathered the storm but is in apparent rude health, with its bright interior, smiling faces and menu that rides the seasonal, locally sourced zeitgeist. The slow-cooked ox cheek for starter came resting atop a herb mash, trying not to melt into its own rich, red wine sauce – fantastically simple but excellently realised. Main course was a fillet of coley with clams and mussels in a chorizo cassoulet. Fish and baked beans? Not quite – very reasonably sized portions, well cooked beans, and snappingly-fresh shellfish with a nice tomato punch. The coley was a tad overdone considering the wait but it certainly didn’t compromise the dish. Dessert produced the only bum note of the meal: a berry and black cherry risotto failed to lift itself above cold school rice pudding with jam stirred through despite its best intentions. All told, considering the price, No. Sixteen provides very reasonable fare and its heart is very definitely in the right place. Look for everyone’s favourite, regular go-to restaurant in the same little nook long after the next recession. [Chris Coulter]

A pleasant, convivial buzz hangs over Cail Bruich, with every table occupied by bread, wine and garrulous Glasgow chat even on an early Tuesday night. A couple of doors down from food-drink-theatregig-wedding polymath Oran Mor, Cail Bruich is helping turn this area into a wee Scotch corner, thanks to a menu that jazzes up traditional local staples with a 21st century flourish- we’re in ham hock and pistachio terrine territory here. Taking the lead, a starter of slow cooked rabbit stuffed into tortellini and paired with blue cheese sauce and a sweet, moreish chutney made from tomatoes grown down the Clyde valley was a punchy, complex statement of intent, whilst three translucently-perfect scallops (with toothsome roes still attached) were a dream match with their crisp parmesan and crab crust. For mains, committed carnivores can tear into a

rare roasted rib of beef for two, but we declined this temptation this time round, plumping instead for a hefty (and again immaculately cooked) piece of Tarbert-landed halibut with asparagus, broad beans and a light saffron nage that united the whole dish in a floral-salty broth. Pudding saw the pair of us descend into brazen, embarrassing gluttony as we tackled the nine dessert tasting platter, featuring a smorgasbord of miniature brulees, brownies and crumbles that shouldn’t really have been polished off by two people quite so quickly. Cail Bruich translates as ‘eat well’- if you splash out, no doubt you will. [Ruth Marsh] Three Course Dinner (without wine) around £28 pp. www.cailbruich.co.uk

Dinner around £22 per person, excluding drinks No. Sixteen, www.number16.co.uk

The Skinny is four years old this month and Ten Tracks is one. Join us, clowns, freaks and enemies on the dark side of the ‘kids’ birthday party theme for a mash up of cake, cabaret and wicked music. Let’s celebrate! Tickets from the Arches box office, Tickets Scotland, or www.theskinny.co.uk/birthday. Strictly over 18s. Strictly no good behaviour.

September 2009

THE SKINNY 13


LIFESTYLE

FOODPOSH NOSH AND CHEAP EATS

& DRINK

Tonight We’re Going To Party Like It’s 1979

The Skinny hits Glasgow's charity shops to take inspiration from food guides past. Those of a sensative disposition should look away during 'Beef Spice Boats'

THE SKINNY WHISKY GUIDE By Ruth Marsh THIS MONTH:

Benromach 10 Year Old Highland Malt

Text Chris Coulter 1979 – what a year! The year that Margaret Thatcher became Prime Minister, the Happy Meal was introduced and the first British nudist beach was given the go ahead in Brighton. More importantly, it was also the birth year of a good friend of mine. A thirtieth birthday is a momentous occasion and demands celebration in a suitably debauched but, conversely, also reserved fashion. Everyone knows that after the ripe old age of 25 hangovers become a true force to be reckoned with. So it falls to the humble dinner party to bridge that gap between ‘bacchanalian MySpace house party’ and ‘in bed by ten with a mug of warm milk’. The theme was simple: I would trawl the myriad of second hand book shops around Glasgow hunting out suitably old/old-fashioned books relating to the gastronomic arts and then prepare a sumptuous feast in honour of my friend celebrating the very best of ‘retro cooking’. My first port of call was the Salvation Army on the Dumbarton Road, a huge shop which fulfills all of one’s used furniture and second hand, chipped crockery needs. They also do a nice line in assorted books so it was here that I picked up book number one, Vogue Body and Beauty Book. Not strictly a cookery book, granted, but it has an entire section devoted to nutrition and diets including the marvellous and ingenious ‘wine and cheese’ and ‘egg and hamburger’ crash diets. My undertaking also saw me take in the various, musty delights of Oxfam, Voltaire and Rousseau, Caledonia Books and some smaller, but no less significant, charity shops. If it sold old books related to cookery it was fair game. I had to wade through some serious tat (sorry, Anthony ‘Wibble’ Thompson and his Snickers pie has no place in my kitchen) but ended up with a choice few. As well as my Vogue book I also found; Cooking Through The Year by Audrey Ellis, Vegetable Cookery by Nika Hazelton, and La Belle France by Garith Windsor et al. I went home feeling decidedly peckish but with a head full of ideas and a suspected dust allergy. It was time to sort out my menu for the party. So the Mateus, having been suitably chilled, was cracked open, seats were taken around the grand dining table, decoratively strewn with leaves and assorted autumnal adornments and the revelry began. Starters came courtesy of Vegetable Cookery: Curried Parsnip And Apple Soup. This fruity and seasonal little number managed the enviable feat of tasting worse than it actually sounds. With the colour, texture and possibly also taste of wallpaper paste the name alone caused looks of consternation from my fellow diners around the table. Napkins politely dabbed at mouths as spoons were left gingerly in barely-touched bowls of the foul broth. Fingers crossed that the mains would prove more of a hit. Cooking Through The Year provided me with the inspiration for dish number two, the whimsically titled Beef Spice Boats. Admittedly I chose to serve this recipe based more on the name than anything else. But I thought, if nothing else, it might at least provide a few chuckles from those guests already drunk enough to appreciate such base humour. The dish called for a stew of sorts made from pumpkin and

14 THE SKINNY NOVEMBER 2009

WHERE’S IT FROM? Speyside’s smallest distillery, Benromach specializes in imaginative, smallscale bottlings like the first ever fully organic single malt and its Origins range , deliberately crafted to show how slight differences in the distilling process can deliver a wildly varied final product. Its ten year old single malt is the latest Benromach experiment to hit the shelves, launched to celebrate the re-opening of the near-derelict distillery back in 1998.

WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE? A toasted, golden malt with a sweet, sticky nose that smacks of maple syrup, rich fruit cake and cocoa.

HOW DOES IT TASTE? You’ll get the tiniest hint of peat and the lingering taste is dry and slightly briny, surprising given that treacle-drenched aroma that hits you when you uncork. Dubbed ‘a big taste from a tiny distillery’, this Benromach certainly delivers with mouth-coating layers of tropical fruit and aniseed.

WHERE CAN I GET IT? A 70cl bottle hits the shelves at an introductory rate of £24.99. Available from specialist shops such as Royal Mile Whiskies (Edinburgh) and Peckham’s (Edinburgh & Glasgow). WWW.BENROMACH.COM

onions cooked in dripping, orange juice and vinegar with a bouquet garni comprising cinnamon, cloves and ginger. It was all topped off with a massive, bloody slab of beef like some sort of obscene meat frigate sailing upon a savoury ocean of deliciousness. I adapted the recipe a tad so my steaks had their own individual sails made from parma ham hoisted high atop a cocktail stick cum mast. Top marks for presentation were unanimous however the taste test generally left everyone cold. Roll on dessert and Crepes Flambees Grand Marnier lifted directly from La Belle France. Nothing puts the party into dinner party like a stack of flaming blue pancakes doused in liquor. It couldn’t fail really and at last everyone finished the dish put in front of them. Despite being some sort of aesthetic bible to the lady

in the know in the seventies, Vogue Body and Beauty Book certainly didn’t shy away from recommending the odd glass or twelve in the pursuit of perfection. So comes the digestif, Rosemary Bordeaux, a perfect way to soothe the stomach after the vigors of such a mammoth feast. Simply a fine Bordeaux infused with fresh rosemary. Although the book didn’t specifically state that it should be swigged straight from the bottle, this was the way that things were going at the time. To conclude, age old recipes may not always be that popular with our cynical twenty-first century palates, but dinner parties based around recipes found in second hand books will never fail to provide entertainment and a warm, fuzzy sense of nostalgia in a special way that only food can provide.

THE SKINNY WHISKY GUIDE IS SPONSORED BY:


Lifestyle

Great beers, Great burGers

Sapporo 2-6 Ingram St, Glasgow G1 1HA Tel: 0141 553 4060

Let’s be clear, Sapporo is catagorically not a first date restaurant. By sitting down at one of the communal teppanyaki tables at this vast new Japanese joint in the heart of the Merchant City, you’re complicit in having slices of potato flung at your head (you’re supposed to catch them in your mouth, stop ducking!), admiring a (genuinely pretty impressive) juggling show of cooking utensils and eggs and screeching as faux ketchup is sprayed at the best-dressed girl in your group. By the time the lights are dimmed and a seven-foot streak of flame bursts up in front of you, you’ll know you’re in a very Disneyfied version of Japan. The menu is suitably epic - starters include a light prawn tempura and a vast sushi choice taking in everything from giant clam nigiri to the signature ‘Glasgow’ roll (smoked haddock and tempura asparagus

wrapped in flying fish roe). You’ll be pleased to know that the teppanyaki grill isn’t just for making comedy shapes in fried rice- it sizzles up everything a treat, from rare fillet steak to lobster, aubergine to scallops. Those watching their sodium intake might want to turn away when the salt shaker appears to do a prolonged dance across your still-cooking dinner, but go to Sapporo with a group and you’ll have a blast- we were fortunate to be joined by a cheery bunch of BMI cabin crew. Sapporo has sister restaurants down in Liverpool and Manchester and there’s no doubt its mix of bawdy fun and vast spreads of protein and carbs will kick off countless nights on the tiles up here, too.[Ruth Marsh] Dinner for two (exc drinks) £55 Sapporo, www.sapporo.co.uk

An epic and ever-changing selection of craft beers, premium lagers and real ales from around the world and beyond. Unbeatable gourmet burgers made with love & locally sourced produce.

2 beers, 2 burgers for £15. All day, every day. (mention Skinny when you order)

“Generosity lies less in giving much than in giving at the right moment” Jean De La Bruyère

Open 10am for breakfast ‘til late 9a Holyrood Road: Telephone: 0131 556 5044: www.theholyrood.co.uk

56North 2 West Crosscauseway, Edinburgh EH8 9JP Tel: 0131 662 8860

56North has all the air of one of Edinburgh’s latest fashionable bars: there’s the sleek décor, an extensive cocktail menu and a clientele that encompasses the more smartly dressed student and the professional after-work crowd. But what might not be so evident from the outside is that it also has an great menu of hearty dishes which will tempt those looking for a comforting eating experience as the evenings draw in. You can take your pick from the gourmet burgers, nachos or fish and chips as well as some more sophisticated selections. Exploring the lavish list of cocktails (some on offer for the tempting price of £3.50) I opt for the Hemingway Daiquiri, a fruity number perfect for those with a sweet tooth. Onto the food and I choose the Italian crostini to start: crisp white bread loaded with mozzarella balls, chopped tomato and onion and green leaves. It’s an

honest ensemble, with a focus on the flavours of the fresh and simple ingredients. For main course I go for the peppered duck which is without doubt the highlight, served on a bed of light mashed potato with a rich creamy sauce, it’s a perfect piece of indulgence. My companion’s choice of lightly seasoned potato wedges to start and the sirloin steak for main course were also solid choices and characterise the menu’s focus on hearty dishes made with top ingredients. Desserts (we opted for sticky toffee pudding and chocolate fondue) were also wellpresented versions of well-loved favourites. This seems to be the success of this busy establishment: familiar, feel-good food in a young and lively setting. [Gail Tolley] 3 course dinner for around £25 per person excluding drinks. www.fiftysixnorth.co.uk

Serving for over 100 years, welcome to the loveliest bar in Leith

Delicious bar food from local suppliers, wines & spirits from the rest of the world. Take your seat by the fire & settle in. Spend £20 per table on Nobles food menu and we’ll throw in a bottle of our favourite white or red. All day, every day. (mention Skinny when you order)

Music Nights TUESDAY/ROOTS, 9PM THURSDAY/ACOUSTIC, 9PM SUNDAY SOUNDS BRUNCH BRUNCH FROM 10AM ALL DAY, MUSIC FROM 4PM. 44a Constitution Street, Leith, Edinburgh EH6 6RS Telephone: 0131 561 8219

November 2009

THE SKINNY 15


LIFESTYLE

FASHION

COUTURE FOR THE FUTURE

T-SHIRT COMPETITION WINNER! DRUM roll please... And the winner is...Euan Gallacher After beating off stiff competition Euan Gallacher has scooped first prize, and will now have his design printed courtesy of Edinburgh’s first rate T-shirt printing shop Fabrick. The judging panel felt that Euan’s bold use of line and intricate pattern work translated his Skinny inspired stream of consciousness perfectly; music, film, fashion, games and art are all represented, hidden within the design. You could even go so far as to say that the repeat patterns represent the listing pages! Euan is currently based in Dundee where he is studying for a degree in Graphics. You can see more of his design work, buy t-shirts/hoodies and generally see what he is up to by checking out his website - Iameuangallacher.co.uk Initially there will be an edition of forty made, which will be available at various Skinny events in the coming months. Thank you to all those who submitted a design, and a big congratulations to Euan Gallacher! [Alexandra Fiddes]

Commended: Nigel Young, nypdscotland.co.uk

IAMEUANGALLACHER.CO.UK WWW.FABICKTSHIRTS.CO.UK Winner: Euan Gallacher

16 THE SKINNY SEPTEMBER 2009

Commended: Andrew Denholm, andrewdenholm.com


LIFESTYLE

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The Trongate 103 launch programme runs throughout September and includes three weekends of specially programmed activity. exhibitions | performances | workshops | artist talks | building tours For more information please visit www.trongate103.com Trongate 103,103 Trongate, Glasgow, G1 5HD

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SEPTEMBER 2009

THE SKINNY 17


Lifestyle

DEVIANCE

SEX, TRUTH AND POLITICS

The Adderall Diaries² Stephen Elliott's latest book blurs the boundaries between true crime and memoir, and in doing so raises questions about objectivity and personal detachment Text Nine Photo Katherine Emery Stephen Elliott is hooked on Adderall. It’s basically speed in a capsule, prescribed by his psychiatrist. He takes too much; sometimes he opens up the capsules and snorts the powder. Sometimes he feels suicidal. He lives in San Francisco and has a string of often undefined, blurry relationships with women. Sometimes they tie him up, beat him, cut him. He thinks back to his youth as a runaway and tries to make sense of his adversarial relationship with his father. And he goes to Oakland every day for months to watch the trial of Hans Reiser, a Linux programmer accused of murdering his estranged wife. The Adderall Diaries was meant to be a true crime book but it turned into a memoir. True crime authors don’t usually let their own lives into the story, do they? But

His life has been unorthodox, shall we say, from the start, but he doesn't seek to present himself as special. the end result here is truth, it’s honesty. Every writer has a personal reaction to what he or she documents; the difference is that Elliott acknowledges his, and allows it to take centre stage if it needs to. It’s refreshing that he abandons the pretence of keeping his subject matter at arm’s length. Hans Reiser’s story links in with his own story, with his father’s story, with other people’s stories: ex-girlfriends who’ve moved on to more conventional lives, childhood friends who overdosed on heroin or got sent to jail for murder. Hans Reiser may have been the starting point of the book, he may be its unifying thread, but in the end it’s not exactly about him. I’m on a short trip to York. I stay somewhere different every night. I get abuse for being American, even though I’m not, and a stranger gives me a lift in his car. One day I trek round the city aimlessly for hours, try to sleep on a park bench. I get off with a boy and it’s awkward and he feels weird and I do too, and then it’s too late to know what to say. I act like it isn’t the fourth anniversary of my mother’s death. And I read The Adderall Diaries and Elliott’s voice echoes and I see parts of myself, only parts, because just as there are places where Hans Reiser’s story connects with his,

18 THE SKINNY September 2009

there are those where Elliott’s story connects with mine. One passage in particular remains with me long after reading it. Elliott is trying to have a ‘normal’ relationship: “reassuringly mundane”, he describes it. An ex-lover tells him about a man whose desires are so masochistic he’s had to accept that he will probably never have a real partner; he must get used to being alone. Elliott excuses himself, bursts into tears in a supermarket. His relationship does not last. I discuss the book with a sex worker. She says, “Some of my clients are into such specific things. If they were queer, they’d have no problem being accepted. They’d find enough people who were okay with their desires. They’re good people and it makes me sad that it’s so hard for them.” I think about how statistically so many more people are straight, and yet there’s a better chance of acceptance, broadly speaking, within queer circles. I think about how hard it must be for straight people who don’t have access to a supportive community. After my encounter in York I feel like I’ve just messed with someone’s boundaries but I’m not entirely sure what I’ve done wrong, or whether I’m imagining it to be worse than it really is. I wonder if it’s cost me what could have been a good friendship. All the conversation flowed so easily and then suddenly it slowed down and became unrecognisable, like a familiar tape being chewed up by a cassette player. Sometimes when that happens it feels like I have to gamble, say something or don’t, and no words I can come up with will fill the space adequately. It’ll always be either too much or too little. I’m not particularly looking for a meaningful relationship, or a future with someone; I’m content with the path I’m already on, which is full of surprises. My stories usually involve undefined relationships, people who are more than friends, and I have learned not to need to name whatever’s going on between us. Yet all the same, I can taste Elliott’s despair when he considers that maybe he won’t find someone who’s really compatible with him. These are the things I think about while I’m in York, and reading The Adderall Diaries amplifies them. Elliott’s writing is raw, confessional, and addictive. It draws you in. He flits between the present and the past, but his timeline is sufficiently clear to avoid confusion. His life has been unorthodox, shall we say, from the start, but he doesn’t seek to present himself as special, doesn’t romanticise it, though he acknowledges the adolescent bravado that made it tolerable. I think about my own teenage years. I drank, but I didn’t get into trouble and I didn’t take any real risks. But I was sixteen the first time somebody told me they’d killed someone, when I felt something shift away from my comfortable middle-class upbringing, my drama-free home. I learned to just observe, to not ask awkward questions. If I’d asked those questions, would I still have been safe? There are many differences between Elliott and I. But I have complications going on too, and it’s a learning process, figuring out what I’m okay with, what it’s safe to express. Sometimes I feel disconnected. I’m looking at an uncertain future and I’m trying to be upbeat about it, to see it all as an exciting adventure. This is where I’m at, drifting, reading a book by someone who’s drifting too. Published in September by Graywolf Press; $23 hardcover from www.graywolfpress.org www.stephenelliott.com

The Adderall Diaries author Stephen Elliot.

Nine

On over-sharing

I

recently had the pleasure of meeting the pseudonymous Phoebe Henderson. She blogs about sex; I blog about everyone I’ve ever kissed. "You’ll find me, I’m the one with the neck that looks like I’ve been mauled by a vampire," I advised. "Grand," she responded, "I’ll be the one pretending she didn’t just tell loads of people she squirts." We were both already identifying ourselves by the things we write about, and it was nice to meet up with someone who has a vaguely similar project to mine. People usually have one of two

responses to this kind of stuff: "Ooh, that’s interesting", or "Wow, talk about self-indulgent". There are various excuses I could give for what I do, but the bottom line is that I write the sorts of things that I like to read. I’m interested in real life and what happens in it, and I’m particularly fond of tragic crushes, embarrassing encounters, and drunken bad ideas. Do I really want to tell all about my stupidest, most ridiculous moments? Well, not exactly. But sometimes for the sake of a good story, it might be worth sacrificing the dignity of one of the characters, and sometimes

that character’s going to be me. Zines and blogs aren’t the same as a listings magazine, though, so I got hit with a heavy dose of self-consciousness every time I thought about publishing the above piece on The Adderall Diaries. But finally, I reached the incredibly sophisticated conclusion of "You know what? Fuck it." And here we are. Also, be sure to check the Film section this month for a review of rent boy docu-drama Greek Pete - we've got an interview with its director Andrew Haigh on the website too.


IS MONOGAMY

Sex Acting

DEVIANT? A FREE DISCUSSION

For her latest challenge, our sex columnist Phoebe Henderson delves into the world of fantasy and role play.

5.30PM, 15 OCTOBER TRAMWAY, GLASGOW In association with the run of Pamela Carter's new play An Argument About Sex at Tramway in October, The Skinny are teaming up with ESRC Genomics Forum to present a fascinating discussion about our deepest drives... Illustration Alasdair Boyce I’VE never engaged in any kind of role play before - mainly because I saw it as something that bored married couples did - except for a really dodgy French maid’s outfit I once bought over the Internet, which looked très fucking ridiculous and soon found its way into the bin. Plus the bloke I was seeing actually let me clean his bedroom before we had sex, and I refuse to believe it was to “help me stay in character”. My friend Oliver had agreed to help me in this particular challenge, and it didn’t take us long to agree on a scenario. Our first role play was based on the pretty common university student/lecturer scenario; Mr Smith and Miss Henderson having a one-to-one tutorial which inevitably ends up in some serious and slightly illicit shagging. And so, a no-nonsense, slightly prim and proper student arrived at Oliver’s flat, complete with folder full of essays (actually a couple of magazines I was reading on the train) and dressed casually in jeans but with suitably provocative underwear hidden beneath. “Hello Phoebe. Are you ready for our tutorial?” were the first words ‘Mr Smith’ uttered as he opened his door, dressed in a suit with his hair slightly dishevelled. Fuck me, Oliver had made the effort. We sat at his kitchen table and as we stared at each other, I realised something important - I hadn’t planned this part. Shit. I had been so excited about playing out this fantasy that I’d overlooked a crucial detail: how the hell do we actually act this out? My improv skills are dodgy to say the least and I could almost hear “ooh matron” being heckled as I racked my brains trying to avoid anything that could sound like a Robin Askwith or Sid James line. Oliver had obviously put some thought into it, however, and reached for something under the table. “I’ve got some material for you to look over, Miss Henderson. You can let me know if you need anything explained in more detail.”

He handed me three porn magazines and sat back. I started to browse through them, pleased that they weren’t ‘barely legal’ or ‘gammy granny’ mags, and felt my cheeks go a little red - not because I was embarrassed but because this was starting to be the hottest thing I’d ever done in my life. I undid some buttons on my cardigan, showing a little of the red balcony bra I’d bought. He’d told me previously that red underwear gets him instantly hard and I intended to test him on that. I made him wait for a few minutes, studying the magazines, licking my lips and feeling his gaze fixed upon my mouth. “I don’t understand this,” I said, sliding the magazine across the table. “Maybe you can explain how exactly this works?” He put on his glasses to look at the page I’d turned to, and I immediately started to ache. A handsome man in glasses has the equivalent effect on me as red underwear on a woman does on Oliver. As he stood up to walk behind my chair, the bulge in his trousers told me everything I needed to know and I undid another couple of buttons. He leant in and his breath on my neck made me instantly wet. “This is a complex position, Miss Henderson,” he whispered in my ear. “I could explain it to you, or I could show you.” He slid one hand inside my bra and I could hear him undoing his belt with the other. I was so turned on I forgot about the no-nonsense approach, gave in and turned around, pulling him in towards the kitchen table. He had my jeans off in record time but I made him keep his shirt and tie on. Oh, and his glasses. My suspicion that role play was perhaps only for couples who’d become bored with their sex life has been revised somewhat and even as I stood in the shower afterwards, I was still horny, so to say it was a success would be an understatement. It’s Oliver’s choice next and I get to dress as a hooker. If any money changes hands, I’m fucking keeping it. PHOEBEHENDERSON.BLOGSPOT.COM

Taking in scientific, social and creative perspectives, an expert panel will look to get the most up-to-date insight into whether we are in fact programmed to be unfaithful, and if so, what we can or should do about it.

An Argument About Sex is a modern adaptation of the classic play The Dispute by Pierre de Marivaux, that explores a failing relationship while also asking who is more faithful in love, men or women? We will be joined by the adaptation's writer Pamela Carter, the play's Director Stewart Laing, evolutionary psychologist helena cronin, with another leading speaking to be announced. genomics forum

This is a free, ticketed event. For tickets please contact the Tramway box office directly. BO: 0845 330 3501. Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

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Lifestyle

DEVIANCE

SEX, TRUTH AND POLITICS

Monogamy In the Dock

Monogamy is something many of us take for granted. All the more reason to expose it to scrutiny, we say, ahead of a Skinny-promoted discussion that will approach the subject from scientific, social, and creative points of view Text Gareth K Vile Illustration Kate Hazell When the LGBT section transformed into Deviance over a year ago, it was controversial. Voices within the LGBT community were concerned that it threatened a marginalisation of non-heterosexual behaviour, and the word suggested condemnation. Yet it reflects a broader trend within The Skinny’s intentions: to cover ‘gay’ events across the magazine while focusing intelligently on provocative areas of sexuality. Now 'Deviance' is leaping off the page and into the theatre. In tandem with the Tramway production of An Argument about Sex, written by Pamela Carter and directed by the evermarvellous Stewart Laing, The Skinny is hosting a pre-show discussion: 'Is Monogamy Deviant?' Challenging prejudices about the naturalness of sexual relationships, this debate hopes to shed light on the play’s themes with the added insight of a scientific perspective, as well as some of the ideas informing the Deviance section. In addition to Laing himself, we’re very pleased to be bringing to the panel the distinguished evolutionary biologist Dr Helena Cronin, who is a co-director of the Darwin Centre at the London School of Economics, as well as a widely published and opinionated writer. The event is being co-promoted with ESRC Genomics Forum - our second collaboration with the organisation, which seeks to involve the public with ideas relating to genetics - and will look at the evolutionary factors (both genetic and social) behind our approach to relationships. Since the play also deals with questions of gender difference, the panel strikes out for

difficult territory, examining the gap between public tolerance and private morality, and will probably be redefining monogamy and deviance every couple of minutes. Laing sees the panel as an extention of the performance. “We’re trying to do something different: we’re hoping it’s the ideas that will be debated, rather than the show itself.” The presence of Cronin promises a scientific perspective, and Laing is clear on the relevance of this: “if we accept that evolution plays a part in what we are physically, it seems a small step to believe our brains are part of the same development.” Monogamy has been the standard sexual relationship of western morality for some time, and despite its associations with male domination retains high status. The recent reforms to allow same-sex unions reflect the belief that monogamy is an important social bond. Yet this is hardly universal: a glance at classical Athens, a foundation of western culture, reveals a subtle relationship between marriage and what we now term homosexuality. And for sure, monogamy has never been purely a heterosexual phenomenon: the early Christian church blessed same-sex marriages; the idea of a ‘life-partner’ long preceded modern civil partnership. Whether it can be claimed as deviant in a modern, liberal climate, or remains accepted as ‘normal’, monogamy is certainly subject to challenge and personal adaptation. [Gareth K Vile] Is monogomy deviant? 5:30pm Tramway, Thursday 15 October 2009 Free, but ticketed. Tickets available from Tramway box office.

Nine

Filament lights up Recently launched in London by Suraya Singh, Filament magazine is aimed at female readers and offers "stimulating reading, saucy fiction and beautiful men". And it does this well: it presents pictures and writing that are genuinely both hot and diverse, without dumbing things down. It was predictably dogged by controversy from the start. My favourite was the Daily Mail author who all but dabbed at her forehead with a lace handkerchief and reached for the smelling salts, whilst protesting that Filament's images

couldn't possibly be sexy. She apparently thought Filament's readers incapable of deciding for themselves – a position shared by distributors. The most common reason given for not distributing Filament is that you can't have a women's magazine with a man on the cover. Another popular one is that there simply isn't a market for women's erotica. This is, of course, a surprise to many of us. Filament's original printers were concerned that if images of erections appeared in the second issue, their clients from

20 THE SKINNY October 2009

the religious and women's sectors would mind. As a result, the Erotica Cover Watch blog set up a campaign calling for people to buy enough copies of the first issue so that Filament could afford to switch printers. The campaign was successful. "It's a hard business model to sell entirely through the internet," says Suraya, "but demand exists - we just need to convince the people in power." As a consumer, I’m already convinced by the sneak preview on the website. www.filamentmagazine.com


IS MONOGAMY

The Watcher

DEVIANT? A FREE DISCUSSION

This month sex columnist Phoebe Henderson discovers her natural voyeuristic tendencies

5.30PM, 15 OCTOBER TRAMWAY, GLASGOW In association with the run of Pamela Carter's new play An Argument About Sex at Tramway in October, The Skinny are teaming up with ESRC Genomics Forum to present a fascinating discussion about our deepest drives... Illustration Thomas Marshall I’M A GIRL who likes porn. Yes, the sight of two slightly vacant, hairless people shagging each other senseless can turn me on. Sex excites me and the thought of another couple having filthy sex excites me - but would I actually get turned on watching a real-life couple have sex right in front of me? I placed an advert for a couple who’d help me find out. I got a lot of replies, and duly sifted through various maniacs, old-timers and people who composed their emails in textspeak. “Prof cpl who have done this b4 but would love 2 do again lol” Why are you laughing? Stop pretending to text me. I finally spoke with Jamie and Lisa, who seemed to fit the bill: attractive, mid 30’s, and as new to this as I was. We arranged to meet that week. They booked the hotel and I began to get a little nervous. The evening arrived and we met in the hotel bar for a drink. Although the conversation wasn’t in any way awkward, I felt a bit odd. Was I going to witness something which would give me nightmares rather than the horn? Once upstairs, Jamie closed the curtains and they both sat on the bed. I sat on a great big chair like Ronnie fucking Corbett, wishing that I’d worn my contacts instead of my glasses to make it less obvious I wanted perfect vision for this. As they started kissing I immediately felt like a big old pervert and wondered what the hell I was doing. Would it be rude to run away screaming? I was very aware of my presence, as were they, and I had a million questions popping into my head. “What should I do with my hands?” “Is this a smoking room?” “If I can’t get a good enough look should I stand up, or is that just taking the piss?” At one point I did almost laugh out loud, but purely because my mind was in overdrive and from a certain angle Jamie’s cock looked a bit like a root vegetable. I started saying “one potato, two potato ...” in my head over and over. Thankfully, biting my

"I SAT ON A GREAT BIG CHAIR LIKE RONNIE FUCKING CORBETT, WISHING THAT I’D WORN MY CONTACTS INSTEAD OF MY GLASSES" lip until it hurt stifled any giggles. I must admit that as they got more into it, so did I. I don’t know how much of the act was for my benefit but they fucked like pros and most importantly genuinely seemed to be enjoying it. I didn’t touch myself, stand up or even speak, but I was transfixed, and my initial embarrassment was quickly replaced by complete fascination and a desire to join in. Not wanting to turn it into another threesome adventure, I sat on my hands and watched quietly until they finished. They lay back in bed, she lit a cigarette (it was a smoking room – bugger) and, not wanting to kill the buzz, I asked them to keep in touch and left rather sheepishly. This is something I’d definitely explore further, either by joining in or by having a partner with me and seeing what develops. I will, however, never look at a potato again in the same light. PHOEBEHENDERSON.BLOGSPOT.COM

Taking in scientific, social and creative perspectives, an expert panel will look to get the most up-to-date insight into whether we are in fact programmed to be unfaithful, and if so, what we can or should do about it.

An Argument About Sex is a modern adaptation of the classic play The Dispute by Pierre de Marivaux, that explores a failing relationship while also asking who is more faithful in love, men or women? We will be joined by the adaptation's writer Pamela Carter, the play's Director Stewart Laing, evolutionary biologist helena cronin, with another leading speaking to be announced. genomics forum

This is a free, ticketed event. For tickets please contact the Tramway box office directly. BO: 0845 330 3501. Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow G41 2PE

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Digital

upload: tv on the smaller screen

download: twinge the night away Text Alex Cole The party was set, the act booked, and while the first few jokes came fast and furious, no one heard a thing. Even worse, the crowd was heckling back, though, thankfully, the comics never heard them either. “#twingeparty Yesterday played French cricket, which is like normal cricket but with tongues,” Tweeted one of the Gimps, a comedy act booked for the Twinge Party at Appleton Tower this past August 14th. Fringe performers, staff, and curious onlookers all gathered for a night of drinking, eating, comedy acts, and, of course, relentless messages on the wall courtesy of Twitter. Early ticket buyers had to register a Twitter name (which led me to reluctantly sign up for the microblogging site for the first time), and throughout the night, anyone could jump on to one of the many computers available and tweet whatever they pleased – jokes, running commentary, and especially complaints about the bar closing early. Projectors set up around the room displayed any Tweets including the hashtag #twingeparty. While new technology ventures are no stranger to the Fringe, this event had the unique distinction of

Text Alex Cole The debate shouldn’t even happen. In a world where nearly all television content is available on-demand, for free, anywhere you can pick up a wi-fi signal, you would think getting content shared over something as insignificant as the Atlantic Ocean wouldn’t be such an issue. US networks are relentless in dragging their feet about online content, and now that Hulu has risen to such prominence in archiving and distributing decades’ worth of old episodes of the A-Team, they are all the more touchy about just who gets to see those episodes in the first place. Comparable to the BBC’s iPlayer, Hulu digitizes TV episodes a few hours after they air and allows anyone willing to sit through a commercial or two watch them whenever they please, but only if their computer is connected to an IP address in the States. This means the UK and the rest of the world are barred from the third season of Burn Notice, just as no one in the US can get sucked into Eastenders. All that may change, however, as rumours are flying

the feed

being able to experience it without ever attending. A competition for best joke scrolled down one wall, but anyone could search twitter.com by that hashtag and read all the entries, along with who was performing, who was Tweeting next to them, and a very silent, very tech-savvy auction. The show was hosted by Infomatics Ventures, a Scottish IT promotional organization. In what was thought to be the first live Twitter comedy show in the UK, four Fringe acts brought a short set and a lot of patience as their crowd divided attention between what was on the wall, and what was right in front of them. The Oxford Imps even worked it into their improv set, riffing on what was in the Twitter feed rather than audience suggestions. For all its bleeding-edge technical integration, however, the party definitely had a distracted air, as though all the attendees were trying to be in two places at once. The very principle of it meant that it might be more interesting to follow online than actually being in the room. Still, that didn’t stop me from throwing in a few riffs of my own. Check the one about American beer and a canoe – I got a whole sketch based around it, so it couldn’t be all bad.

that Hulu may soon be able to swap content with UK providers and at last allow both countries to see what the other was watching during the 80’s (which may not be such a good idea, in the end). Johannes Larcher, a senior vice-president at Hulu, said “The UK is our number one priority in terms of international expansion,” but The Telegraph reported recently that the original September launch date may not hold as network and British internet providers are hung up on everything from intricate licensing agreements to just how much bandwidth is taken up by iPlayer and Channel 4 OnDemand already. All this hearkens back to the days when the BBC, Channel 4 and iTV were all negotiating Project Kangaroo, their own online content swap site, which had a metric tonne of legal bricks dropped on it by the Competition Commission. All parties concerned are being conspicuously tight-lipped recently about future plans, but whether that’s intended to make the impending launch a surprise to everyone, or to manage expectations when 30 Rock doesn’t make it over, is impossible to say. hulu.com

by Alex Cole

-First video ad in print magazines goes on sale this month, eerily like the Daily Prophet -Orange gets exclusive UK rights to first mobile phone in watch form -Apple may release tablet computer, may not. Microsoft may have to stop selling Word, may not -Wireless charging for phones and music players will ditch the charging cable -Windows 7 goes on sale next month, UK customers pay only half the US price -PlayStation launching slimmer PS3, still can’t justify crazy cost and lack of Tetris

reviews Future Racer out now on iphone, 59p

r Recently, the iPhone got the brilliant Real Racer and Playstation 3 got the unbelievable WipEout Fury. Now, along comes a game that seeks to blend these two things into a futuristic racing game for iPhone. With six tracks and six anti-grav vehicles in total there isn’t a massive selection for you to play with. The ‘cars’ vary only slightly and look incredibly bizarre (the fastest being

22 THE SKINNY September 2009

the least aerodynamic - bizarrely). The game runs quite smoothly, though this is because the graphics are largely unimpressive. Lots of stuff pops into existence in front of you and everything looks quite muddy. Future Racer seems to have skimmed over a lot of features which should be standard; do the best times get synchronised online so you can compete with friends? Nope. So the urge to improve lap times is killed before you’ve finished the six tracks, especially since you earn nothing for achieving gold that you can’t get for bronze.  [Michael Black]

Trials HD Out now Xbox 360, 700 MS Points

rrr Racing and puzzle games aren’t the likeliest of bedfellows, but in Trials HD the two get up close and personal. On the surface, this is an extreme motorbike racing game but look a little closer and you will start to see the underlying puzzle elements amid this orgy of destruction and pain. There is no steering mechanic in Trials HD, meaning you can only accelerate, brake and reverse along a pre-determined path. This may sound linear but this is far from the reality. You shift your rider’s weight, which can be used to ollie off the top of ramps, gain leverage when riding up steep inclines and to stop your rider from flipping over when going down slopes at breakneck speeds. The subtle balance between speed and balancing take this far beyond the realm of the simple circuit racer. It’s all very tense, pinpoint stuff and while this intricacy may appeal to puzzle and driving fans, those looking for a straightforward racing title may find themselves in an uncomfortable place. To obtain good times and gold medals on each stage, you will really need to map out the layout of each level in your mind by having several stabs at the harder sections. If this sounds like a chore then the game most definitely

isn’t for you. However, determined players will enjoy 50 tracks of pure mayhem, brain teasing and reflex testing that can provide hours of fun. [Dave Cook] Sourced from www.square-go.com


Digital

New media scotland

3D Returns to Glasgow This month New Media Scotland's Director Mark Daniels steps into the third dimension

At the end of the 20th century in the UK, every year was a year of something in the arts. Most famously in 1999, Glasgow was City of Architecture & Design, a remarkable catalyst. The year before it was the turn of photography, and Yorkshire gave us Photo '98. I produced a body of work entitled Pleasure, Leisure & Distraction for one of their exhibitions. For the shear hell of it I tried something new. My usual black & white portfolio became a riot of colour and eye popping 3D courtesy of a lenticular camera. Lenticular photographs are the kind that often wink at you from a cereal box or magazine cover. The plastic ridged pictures change dependent on your viewing angle, giving you the illusion of depth or movement. You gotta love 'em, they have a certain charm. Our desire to capture our view of world in 3D has stretched back to the mid-19th century. As a technology, 3D has always moved around the burners, poking us in the eye before receding back into the shadows. It’s been over fifty years since the last golden era, when the Creature from the Black Lagoon first emerged from the depths of the backlot. The survival of each competing system was dependent on the practicalities for both studios and cinemas.

3D had a tendency be hard on the audience, motion sickness being one unpleasant side effect. In the fifties the threat was from TV, today it's illegal movie downloads. So those smart cookies in Hollywood have ensured that the digital 3D techniques currently being deployed in cinemas cannot be duplicated at home. Throw in a large format IMAX presentation and it?s a real plasma screen killer. Those last twenty minutes of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix on IMAX were the most perfect 3D I ever did see. Up wowed them at Cannes. Monsters v Aliens took more money in 3D than in 2D. Trouble is I soon forgot I was watching a 3D movie, the effect became commonplace. So what can we do? Let's go back to Glasgow. The GFT is opening its doors for an experiment in 3D scratch cinema on Sunday 20th September from 11am to 2pm. The cinema is the set. Twitter will be the autocue. Tweet us favourite movie quotes using the hashtag #twitchy and stage direction (or distraction) using #scratchy. Get ready to stick your cosmic nose out. 3D in Glasgow, Glasgow Film Theatre, 20 Sep

September 2009

THE SKINNY 23


REading

"Creating Pandaemonium" Christopher Brookmyre talks about his new book, Pandaemonium, demons, quantum physics and the nature of reality Interview Keir Hind Christopher Brookmyre’s new book, Pandaemonium, is something of a departure for him. One part of his tale is about Glaswegian school kids on a trip to a retreat, to help them recover from the death of a classmate. The other is the tale of an army funded science experiment that has (apparently) opened a gate to hell and let demons in to our reality. The latter part is, as you may have guessed, the more unusual for Brookmyre. ”I’d always toyed with the idea of doing something in the science fiction genre, but not really the shiny space suits and spaceships end of it,” he says. And so he came up with the idea of science-summoned demons. “I don’t read a lot of sci-fi or fantasy – I am a fan of Iain M Banks, and I’ve seen a lot of it on TV and in films, but that’s about all” he says when I ask about possible influences. “It wasn’t a problem because I was writing a book with only some science fiction elements in it – a lot of the elements are pretty familiar”. This is true, and that’s a good thing. The school kids of St Peter’s (the name deliberately suggests

There are few novels where the word ‘fudnut’ has been used so appropriately a gatekeeper) are a recognisable bunch, and it quickly becomes clear that their story will inevitably converge with that of the demons. The real achievement of this book is in the portrayal of these kids – you swiftly get to know them all, and sympathise with the majority of them too. Particularly impressive is their accurate language use - there are few novels where the word ‘fudnut’ has been used so appropriately. And as we get to know them all, the feeling of dread increases at what will happen… “What I wanted” Brookmyre says, “was for readers to engage with the teenage characters, and to create something of a slow burn effect, so that when the different strands engage, we really know the teenagers, and can worry more about them.” But, he adds, “And then, of course, your expectations for the characters are subverted.” The book subverts genre too. As the author says, for him “the book calls into question what denotes science fiction, what denotes horror, what denotes the supernatural. In a way, it’s a scientific, empiricist take on the supernatural genre.” As such, the author includes a great deal of dialogue devoted to explaining theories about the nature of reality. “I consciously included a lot of debate in the book, because the theme is really about science versus religion, and the implications of what might be the structures of the Universe.” This dialogue is often simplified versions of complicated ideas, such as the ‘many worlds’ theory. Even if that’s not your thing, stick with it. “There’s a lot of really out-there hypotheses, and the many worlds theory is one of

24 THE SKINNY September 2009

the more plausible,” says Brookmyre “But that just serves to make the book more exciting.” It is exciting. And when the two strands of this book converge, things get very exciting. It also allows for a lot of gallows humour – it’s hard not to laugh when someone describes a demon that “has horns, and a face like he’s been dooking for chips”. The book is a good laugh, and Brookmyre has wrought a great story from the strange premise. His next book might

be different again though. “I’ve been talking to my editor a bit about whether I’ve taken satirical crime fiction as far as I can right now. I’ve been planning a book that’s – I hesitate to say serious, but one that’s a bit more down to earth than what I usually write” he says. A departure again maybe, but this book proves that that’s no bad thing. Brookmyre will be giving a number of readings from the book in various parts of the country (check

listings for details) and will be teaming up with Billy Franks again too after last year’s successful events. “The Glasgow event in particular had a cabaret feel to it” says the author, “which made for a different atmosphere than the usual author reading. It was good fun, and the audience seemed to respond to it.” Get your tickets while you can. Pandaemonium is out now, published by Little, Brown, cover price £17.99.


WHEN THE SUN TURNS GREEN

FOR RICHER FOR POORER

BY JANE MCKIE

BY VICTORIA COREN

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Edinburgh’s

Jane McKie’s collection is largely about nature, and the poems here certainly seem charged with meaning. But in many of these poems McKie seems to be more intuitive than instructive – they certainly hold all kinds of hidden depths, but the reader is kept distant from these, and it’s hard to engage. The feeling of inaccessibility isn’t helped by some odd word choices – words like ‘gnomic’ or ‘tranche’, ‘effluvium’ or ‘deliquesces’ appear regularly, almost familiar but used in odd constructions that dilute their significance. There’s actually a glossary at the back of the book explaining some of the most obscure terms, and it’s a great help when it’s available. Vagueness is another problem – a poem called Sleight ends “pocketed / without anyone noticing, / least of all me.” which is less intriguing than it is bewildering. This is not to say the whole collection is like this – there is an early poem, Grandmother Ikons which describes types of grandmother, possibly all parts of the same person, and a descriptive poem, Sheep’s Skull and Weir, which are accessible works with enduring interest. But as a whole, this collection seems too personal to relate to. [Jane Emmett]

This is a poker memoir, a genre that has grown unexpectedly in recent years with the general boom in gambling. The classics of this genre are Al Alvarez’s The Biggest Game in Town and Tony Holden’s Big Deal, which was followed by a more glum follow up, Bigger Deal, about poker’s growth from disreputable backroom game into multinational industry. Coren’s book covers the same period, only she’s less glum – the explosion in poker playing is exciting to her, and she’s pretty successful too. She becomes addicted early on, just before the game expands, and soon she’s playing on ‘Celebrity Late Night Poker’ with the likes of Stephen Fry and Martin Amis, but also Alvarez and Holden. Like Holden, she bemoans the way that internet-born maths introverts have largely replaced the characters who used to play the game. But hers is a more balanced view, finding contemporary players she has great affection for, and scrutinising those old ‘characters’ to find them less fascinating than previously thought. As far as poker books go, this isn’t quite the all time champ, but it can certainly sit a table with Alvarez and Holden without embarrassment. Shut up and deal! [Nat Smith]

OUT NOW. PUBLISHED BY POLYGON. COVER PRICE £8.99

RELEASED 17 SEP BY CANONGATE. COVER PRICE £16.99

AGNES OWENS: THE COMPLETE NOVELLAS BY AGNES OWENS

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THE DEATH OF BUNNY MUNRO

Music and Audio Library a musical education … Answer the following and you could win an exclusive goody-bag from Chemikal Underground: 1. Schools out for summer – sure it’s a guy? 2. We rule the school, says a fantastic Scottish Band? 3. What sort of jam rifles?

BY NICK CAVE

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4. A group that didn’t like Mondays?

Yes, that Nick Cave, musician extraordinaire. This isn’t his first foray into fiction – he scripted a well-received film, the Australian Western (or bushman flick) The Proposition some years back, and wrote his first book some twenty years ago now. This second novel is actually quite good too – sickening, isn’t it? The Death of Bunny Munro follows womanising travelling salesman Bunny, as he slowly breaks down after his wife’s suicide. He packs his son, Bunny Jr, into the car and over-zealously drags him on his rounds, trying to sell beauty products as his mind slips away. Bunny progressively erodes any sympathy we might have for him, and yet he’s somehow still fascinating. The book follows him through all kinds of squalor, which resembles early Martin Amis at times, in the best possible way. As the book progresses, Bunny’s sanity collapses, and it becomes harder to tell what he’s actually experiencing – it’s a convincing portrait of a breakdown. His son’s perspective gradually changes too, as he realizes just what’s happing to his father. A good read, if you can take it, and one that makes you wish Cave would write fiction more often. [David Agnew]

OUT NOW. PUBLISHED BY POLYGON, COVER PRICE £14.99 PAPERBACK.

OUT NOW. PUBLISHED BY CANONGATE, COVER PRICE £16.99 HARDBACK. PHOTO: KERRI ANIELLO

Agnes Owens’ novellas are finally collected in the one place – and a good thing too, because they’re brilliant. The novella is an odd form: it’s usually about 50 to 150 pages, although it’s hard to separate either end of that scale from short stories or novels. Nonetheless, it’s a form that isn’t often seen – because it’s highly uncommercial. In a way, this is a recommendation of the book, because rather than convert these novellas into short stories or novels, Agnes Owens must have preferred to leave them as they were. This indicates that they are exactly the length their stories demanded to be, and it’s true: there’s a structural integrity to these tales that is rarely seen anywhere else. It helps, of course, that Owens is very talented. Owens has long held the title of best-neglected author in Scotland, and you’d hope that this collection would change that. Of the stories collected here, a favourite is A Working Mother, but picking one is unfair – they’re all great. If you haven’t experienced Owens’ apparently simple, but actually complicated prose, and her dark (and often extremely dark) humour, then the release of this collection may be your cue. [Nat Smith]

5. I love you. I’m going to blow up your school. More Scottish talent? Answers are available on our blog at: http://talesofonecity.wordpress.com or pop into the Music and Audio Library and ask the staff! E-mail answers and contact details to: central.music.library@edinburgh.gov.uk by 24 September. Edinburgh Music and Audio Library 9 George IV Bridge Edinburgh www.edinburgh.gov.uk/libraries Check out brochures for details of music-related and other Adult Education classes, Open Studies courses and Access to Industry initiatives, available in all Edinburgh City Libraries.

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Bunny boiler: Nick Cave

SEPTEMBER 2009

THE SKINNY 25

READING

REVIEWS


REading

Looking at the Stars The newly launched Gutter Magazine already looks like being a promising step for new Scottish writing. Here's why. Interview Keir Hind Gutter is a magazine for new Scottish writing, launched this past August. Issue 02 will be launched in February, but the submission deadline for this next issue is at the end of this month – 30th October, to be exact. It’s a prestigious affair – the Editorial board includes writers Kirsty Gunn and Alan Warner, poet Kathleen Jamie and agent Maggie McKernan. Get a hold of a copy if you can – it’s full of cracking stories and poems, by emerging and established writers, for whom it aims to provide a platform. The editorial of the inaugural issue mentions that “The need for a new magazine is further exacerbated by the demise of Cencrastus and Cutting Teeth, the infrequency of some titles and dominance of criticism in others”. Is it, therefore a noble undertaking? Maybe. I asked editors Adrian Searle and Colin Begg how the magazine came about. Adrian said “Colin heard a certain Scottish literary critic who’ll remain nameless complain that there were no ‘young literary turks’ out there and we knew for a fact that the new writing scene in Scotland is bouncing”. With this in mind, they’re “particularly keen to give space to fiction and poetry that challenges the status quo, whether that’s personal or collective, real or imagined” says Adrian. “We also want to reflect Scotland now, not 10, 20 or 30 years ago. These days we Scots, whether by birth or by association, are an incredibly diverse and international bunch.” The first issue of the magazine is stuffed with all kinds of new writing from (at my count) 42 different contributors. One is the established writer Ewan Morrison, who has previously written novels such as Swung and Distance. He reckons Gutter “has potential to be a bit like McSweeneys”, a very positive assertion. He also says “At the moment there is a very tiny self appointed elite who determine what is acceptable literature in this country, I’m talking about people who’ve got themselves into positions of power, and who may be able to determine who and what gets published in future. With so few people determining the arena of criticism and appraisal within Scot lit, this will ultimately lead to conformism and stagnation.” This being his assessment, he sees the magazine as a positive thing: “This is why I’m grateful for the existence of Gutter. It’s a breath of very fresh air in what are now looking like some very stale corridors of power lined by the same portraits of the same old faces.” On which note, two new faces who feature in the magazine are Patricia Ace and Fiona Rintoul. Ace, who has three poems in the first issue, says “It feels great and especially exciting to have work featured in the very first issue of a new magazine.” Rintoul, who contributes an extract from her novel Leipzig, expresses a similar sentiment “I’m delighted to have my work in the first issue of Gutter. It’s a great-looking magazine and a fantastic read. And - crucially - it isn’t pretentious.” The magazine does seem to have been set up with writers like Patricia and Fiona in mind. When I asked Adrian Searle about the aims of the magazine, he said “Gutter aims to provide a platform for the best established and new writers to publish their work side by side.” Patricia Ace seems to approve of this: “There was definitely a need for a new Scottish lit mag. and I’m impressed by Gutter’s ambition to remain outward-looking and challenge the status quo.” Fiona Rintoul seems impressed too. “Gutter really is filling a gap in the market. There isn’t another literary magazine in Scotland of this calibre. With so much good new writing around, Gutter is an exciting and much-needed new outlet. I expect it to have a very bright future.” Speaking of the market, doesn’t the fact that Cencrastus and Cutting Teeth have expired suggest the magazine is a risky venture? Adrian is confident it’s not. “I think it’s more about readership than market. Nobody ever got rich publishing a literary magazine… but there’s certainly an audience out

26 THE SKINNY October 2009

"Nobody ever got rich publishing a literary magazine… but there’s certainly an audience out there, UK-wide and internationally, ready to read high quality Scottish writing."

Alan Warner

there, UK-wide and internationally, ready to read high quality Scottish writing.” But how can he maintain that high quality? “Hopefully we will get into a ‘virtuous cycle’, whereby publishing good writing means that we get sent good writing. We will also be spreading the word as widely as possible to solicit submissions, reading everything we are sent, keeping our editorial policy tight and, as Gutter develops, directly commissioning more and more work.” His co-editor Colin Begg expresses a similar sentiment regarding the quality of poetry in the magazine “In our reading, we set a minimum quality level, as well as an indefinable ‘Gutter Factor’, so in the unlikely event of there being a limited number of suitable poems we’ll simply publish fewer. I don’t think that will happen though, as the very presence of magazines such as ours will hopefully serve as an engine to drive standards higher.” Those standards are very high already. A personal highlight in the first issue was Karen Campbell’s ‘Baccalaureate Ecosse’. This work is an essay purported to have been written in an exam in 2028, about Scotland’s ‘recent history’, including a King Alexander Salmond and President William Connolly, and it’s fantastically inventive and humorous. It’s worth grabbing a copy just for that story – though it should be said that the others are really very good too. To get an idea of who they’re looking for, I asked Colin and Adrian who their dream contributors would be.

Colin replied that “In terms of Scottish writers alive today, and if I’d any money to pay them, I’d love James Kelman, Agnes Owens, or Kevin MacNeil to contribute a new story, and Tom Leonard or Douglas Dunn a new poem.” Adrian took a more fantastic tack by answering “Financially, JD Salinger (although I don’t think he’s got any connection to Scotland!). Emotionally, Iain Macpherson who wrote Wild Harbour in the 1930s, a greatly under-rated Scottish novel.” Something for everyone there – it seems the only common factor is just damned good writing. Things are going well for Colin and Adrian then, with Colin telling me “I’m very pleased. We received a phenomenal response in terms of submissions, which enabled us to select excellent work”. Adrian adds. “I’ve been delighted at the quality of work we’ve been able to publish and the feedback we’ve had across the board.” So, if you’re interested in contributing, what message does Gutter have? Adrian says: “Please send us your work! We read everything. If you’re unsure then subscribe - you’ll get an idea of the style and tone of the magazine and see what we’ve published before, which will up the chance of your own work being accepted.” If you’ve any ambitions as a writer at all, Gutter could be just the place to exhibit your work. Get writing! The Submission deadline for the second issue of Gutter is 30 Oct. www.guttermag.co.uk


ALASDAIR GRAY: A SECRETARY’S BIOGRAPHY BY RODGE GLASS

GRANDVILLE BY BRYAN TALBOT

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Bryan Talbot’s last graphic novel (if it should be called that) was the phenomenal Alice in Sunderland, a multi-layered exploration of the history of Sunderland and the lives of Lewis Carroll and Alice Liddell, the model for Alice in Wonderland. Grandville is a complete change of pace, an action-adventure comic featuring talking animals, set in an alternate history where France won the Napoleonic Wars. There is a reason for this – Talbot is paying homage to JJ Grandville, a French illustrator who drew anthropomorphic animals representing French society figures in the 19th Century, when this book is set. When an otter (Raymond Leigh-Otter by name – groan if you want) is killed in the sleepy village of Nutwood (get the reference?), it’s investigated by our hero, Detective Inspector LeBrock, a brawling working class badger, and his upper class sidekick, Detective Ratzi. Yes, he’s a rat. And a rattling good yarn follows as the investigation uncovers dark secrets being kept by the fascist French Government, led by a rabbit called JeanMarie Lapin (Geddit?). Corny puns abound, but this is a stunningly well drawn book with a compelling mystery, and a great detective team at it’s heart. Great stuff. [Ryan Agee]

OUT NOW. COVER PRICE £9.99. PUBLISHED BY BLOOMSBURY.

RELEASE DATE 15 OCT. PUBLISHED BY JONATHAN CAPE. COVER PRICE £16.99

TRANSITION

SIMON’S CAT

BY IAIN BANKS

BY SIMON TOFIELD

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Edinburgh’s

Music and Audio Library Celebrating women and music Answer the following and you could win an all inclusive dinner for two at The Grain Store. 1 Marion Cotillard became her in La Vie en Rose? 2 Coming soon to Edinburgh with Diamonds and Rust? 3 Who’s that girl (from Aberdeen)? 4 Greatest soul singer of all time – Respect! 5 Strange fruit from Lady Day?

Iain Banks’ new book is of a sort that Iain M Banks could have put his name to – because this book, though it has a (sort of) contemporary setting, is loaded with sci-fi concepts. The main one is that we all live in a multiverse, which is to say there are a (possibly infinite) number of parallel earths, all different to some degree, existing beside one another. Then there’s The Concern, an organization dedicated to influencing events across worlds, possibly for the better, but possibly for its own gain. It takes a while to work out what’s going on - the book is a challenging read. Exposition is kept to a minimum at first, with readers left to keep up with events over a growing number of apparently unconnected narratives. This could be alienating, but each story is absorbing enough to carry the reader onwards towards finding out how they connect. Key to the story is that some characters can make transitions, which is to say they move from one body to another across universes – and one of these transitionaries is planning rebellion. What is initially a complicated book, quickly bceomes a fascinating one. [Nat Smith]

Simon’s Cat started off life as an internet animation that developed a cult following. The short films featuring a hungry cat on YouTube gained enough viewers to interest Canongate publishing, who’ve made it into a book. This would seem to reverse the norm, but it works well enough. For those who haven’t seen them, the short films were black and white line drawings of a cat pestering its line drawing owner (who we’ll presume is called Simon), usually for food. The book is much the same, and as the films were dialogue free, so is the boaok. The main difference is duration; the stories in the book never take more than a page, sometimes with around six pictures, but usually just one. The book does build up a world for this Cat – he lives in a suburban home, with plenty of gardens and open space to roam around in, and there are recurring characters other than cat and owner, like a dog, a hedgehog and some birds – but it’s not really what you’d call taxing reading, nor is it meant to be. Extremely amiable, this is a book to dip into occasionally. [David Agnew]

OUT NOW. COVER PRICE £18.99. PUBLISHED BY LITTLE, BROWN.

RELEASE DATE: 1 OCT. PUBLISHED BY CANONGATE. COVER PRICE £12.99

Answers are available on our blog at: http:// talesofonecity.wordpress.com or pop into the Music and Audio Library and ask the staff! E-mail answers and contact details to: central. music.library@edinburgh.gov.uk by 23rd October. Edinburgh Music and Audio Library 9 George IV Bridge Edinburgh www.edinburgh.gov.uk/libraries October sees the Centenary March for Women’s Suffrage in Edinburgh. We will be celebrating with songs and recitals as well as displaying press cuttings and pictures from the original procession in the Music Library all month. Largest music library in Scotland • Order and collect music via any library • Diverse • Specialist • Knowledgeable staff

Power to the pussy: Simon's Cat

OCTOBER 2009

THE SKINNY 27

READING

REVIEWS


Film

The Dancing Outlaw Stylish and intense, White Lightnin' is a recreation of the life of an unlikely cult figure: Appalachian dancer Jesco White. The Skinny spoke to director Dominic Murphy and actor Edward Hogg about the making of the film and meeting the man himself. Interview Becky Bartlett After a directorial career spanning twenty years, filmmaker Dominic Murphy has finally made his first feature: White Lightnin’. The director has the air of a seasoned professional - a slightly intimidating, shaven headed man with two of his fingers taped together (the cause remains a mystery). He is just the kind of person one imagines directing this film; a semi-biographical tale of Appalachian dancer Jesco White. Born and raised in rural West Virginia, the real Jesco has led an extreme life filled with drugs, poverty, depression and loss. Scriptwriter Shane Smith’s version of the documentary Dancing Outlaw shares this past, while turning his future into a twisted revenge fantasy loaded with religious subtext and self-sacrifice. “I met Shane about ten years ago and we became friends” recalls Murphy, “He was a writer, I was a director, and we decided we wanted to make a movie together. Years later he sent me a short story that was a kind of dialect narration of this guy’s life. I didn’t know anything about Jesco at that point; it was just a mad story, told in a way I’d never seen before.” Visually, Murphy’s film is a low-budget, muted piece of cinema. It verges on monochrome, jumps violently and mixes hellfire and brimstone preaching with black pauses and quiet narration. It portrays hick life in an uncompromising manner, while its violence is suggested more frequently than shown, and all the more brutal for it. “I wanted it to be very cinematic, but not Hollywood”, states Murphy. “I wanted it gritty, with a sort of trash, dated, kind of kitsch, slightly crude flavour, because that made sense to me. That would fit with the material and the people. I wanted to be true to Jesco, to capture the spirit of him. Jesco has a kind of naivety. He sees himself as weak, and I could imagine myself in his shoes, as it were. I didn’t want to be judgemental and portray him as a nasty character”, says Murphy. Make no mistake, White Lightnin’ is a violent film, and onscreen Jesco is a violent man. He spends his childhood being shunted around asylums, lashing out and jacking up, consumed by anger at the murder of his father, D Ray White. Portraying this man - even on a semi-fictional level - in a non-judgmental way, is a delicate affair. Enter Edward Hogg, the man chosen to portray the cult figure. Having spent the majority of his career on stage, this is Hogg’s first leading role in a feature film, and what a role to choose. Jesco, in Murphy’s words, is a combination of “childlike innocence on one level, and psycho on another”. Hogg, in his own words, is “green”. In person he is a quiet, unassuming man. The effeminate hillbilly twang is replaced with

his natural Yorkshire tones, the tightly-wound, barely restrained insanity on screen gives way to a humble, genuine and unavoidably likeable character. Watching White Lightnin’, it is very difficult to imagine anyone other than Hogg portraying Jesco. A lanky man with delicate features, his onscreen persona is very much one that only a person with diminished capacity would consider challenging. This contrast between the external image and the internal anger is what makes Jesco an intimidating, yet empathetic character. As Hogg reiterates, “He’s a very sweet man. He’s not an evil person, but he’s got that side of him”. Jesco has not seen the completed film, but he’s fully aware of its existence. He allowed Hogg a meeting, during which much alcohol was consumed. “We got very drunk and then shot his guns in the woods, which made me very

this is where Hogg went to learn the moves. He had a choreographer on occasion, but both Murphy and Hogg felt there was more to the dancing than perfect timing. As Hogg says, “In the end we were less worried about getting the steps right, and more about capturing the showmanship of it. He’s putting on a show. It’s his rock ’n’ roll moment.” This is what White Lightnin’ is all about. It’s not important to capture every second of Jesco’s life accurately, or to make distinctions between the real and the fictionalised moments. Jesco once said, “My past is coming up into my future and messing with my good life”, and this complements both his life and Murphy’s reinvention of his life. If the aim of White Lightnin’ is to capture something of the essence of Jesco as a person, it appears to have succeeded. White Lightnin’ is out now.

preview

Gail Tolley

aim higher A few weeks ago I was sent one of those Facebook challenges asking me to list 15 films which had had the most impact on me in 15 minutes. It seemed a pretty pointless exercise, as with most things on Facebook; a narcissistic act to inflict your taste on your (no doubt uninterested) virtual buddies. The task did, however, make me slightly curious as to what films I would rate as having had a lasting impression on me.

nervous”, admits Hogg. “I shot his gun once and felt very powerful. I had to phone my mother and tell her I’d shot Jesco’s gun! He shot it maybe twenty times - he obviously feels good with power”. The latter half of Murphy’s film may be fictionalised, but Jesco’s past needs little exaggeration. “He told me stories about his life”, says Hogg, “and he danced a bit for me in his living room. His sister came around with her friends and they all took their clothes off and danced in their bras and pants. There’s things in the film he hasn’t done, but there are bits of his life more extreme than the film. He’s kind of wonderful”. Following in his father’s footsteps, Jesco’s dancing is a therapeutic, spiritual event, without which he would not be the cult figure he is. Typing his name into Youtube provides a few hundred clips of him, and

The few that immediately came to mind were almost all (and perhaps I should be a little ashamed of this) from the UK, America or Europe. I’m guessing part of the reason for this is because in the UK, our exposure to films from these countries is far greater than the exposure to films from Asia, Africa and South America. Having said that, the regular themed seasons at the Filmhouse and GFT provide a chance to correct

africa in motion 2009 Filmhouse, 22 Oct - 1 Nov

the balance a little. This month the Africa in Motion film festival is particularly impressive. It’s the biggest African film festival in the UK with more than 60 different films and events. Even if you don’t have a specific interest in African film, the festival gives you the chance to see work which you’d really struggle to get hold of anywhere else. It really is an opportunity worth grabbing hold of.

The UK’s largest African Film Festival is now in its 4th year. It launches to life on the 22 Oct with My Secret Sky, a beautifully shot tale of two South African orphans who embark on a trip to the city in order to fulfil their dead mother’s dream. It’s a heart-warming story with memorable performances from the two young leads who themselves are from impoverished backgrounds. Also recommended is La Maison Jaune about a family living in the remote Aures Mountains in Algeria. This award-winning film will be shown on the 27 Oct and followed by a Q&A with its director Amor Hakkar. And if you missed Johnny Mad Dog at this year’s Glasgow Film Festival you can see it again here, applauded for its powerful depiction of Liberian child soldiers. [Gail Tolley] Full programme details are available at www.africa-in-motion.org.uk

28 THE SKINNY October 2009

Johnny Mad Dog


FILM

FILM REVIEWS THE BEACHES OF AGNES DIRECTOR: AGNES VARDA STARRING: AGNES VARDA, JACQUES DEMY, CHRIS MARKER, JEAN-LUC GODARD RELEASED: 2 OCT 2009 CERTIFICATE: 18

PONTYPOOL DIRECTOR: BRUCE MCDONALD STARRING: STEPHEN MCHATTIE RELEASED: 16 OCT 2009 CERTIFICATE: TBC

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rrrr Pontypool may be disguised as a zombie film, but it in fact offers a whole new take on the concept. More in keeping with the plague-ridden undead in 28 Days Later, the menace here is infected people, all seen - or more accurately, heard - by Grant Mazzy (Stephen McHattie), a wizened, grizzly radio DJ in the small town of Pontypool, Canada. Almost nothing is seen outside the radio station, instead the tension rises as increasingly hysterical reports of riots and bizarre swarms of people are phoned in. Relying heavily on casting, director Bruce McDonald (who some may recognise as the director of ultra-low-budget Canadian horror Roadkill) has found the perfect actor in McHattie, whose disgruntled performance and sleazy, growling voice are ideal for the role. With the abundance of special effects in cinema today, Pontypool is a refreshing reminder that clever shooting and a smart concept can be equally (if not more) intense than the big reveal. [Becky Bartlett] WWW.PONTYPOOLMOVIE.COM

A delightful and idiosyncratic autobiographical documentary from one of cinema’s greatest directors: Agnes Varda. The Beaches of Agnes combines clips from the director’s own films with imaginative recreations of moments from her life to create a patterned collage of memories and anecdotes (in one instance we see Varda with a cardboard cut-out of a car, recalling how in one of her homes she would have to do a 13-point turn to get her car out each day). The film is also a fascinating insight into the

filmmaking community Varda was a part of: from working with Alain Resnais and Jean-Luc Godard during the French New Wave to her marriage with director Jacques Demy which lasted until his death in 1990. It is during the moments when Varda reflects on the relationship with her late husband that the documentary reaches real poignancy. Sincere, intelligent and wonderfully eccentric The Beaches of Agnes is one of the most life-affirming documentaries of recent years. [Gail Tolley]

THIRST DIRECTOR: PARK CHAN-WOOK STARRING: SONG KANG-HO, KIM OK-VIN RELEASED: 16 OCT 2009 CERTIFICATE: 18

rrr There have been several vampire flicks in recent months but Park Chan-wook is definitely not jumping on the band wagon; his latest gorefest, Thirst, has been more than 10 years in the making. It tells the story of a village priest who offers himself up for an experiment that is hoping to find a cure to a mysterious virus. After becoming infected and almost dying he makes an unexpected recovery only to find that he is left with an unquenchable ‘thirst’. The film starts off strongly and displays all the strengths the Korean director has become known for, in particular his eye for striking images. However the story rapidly begins to run away with itself, becoming increasingly bizarre and morphing into quite a different beast by the end: a comedy, vampire romance. If you make your mind up to go along for the ride you’ll find this entertaining enough but fans of Old Boy may be left wishing for a tighter execution. [Gail Tolley]

DVD REVIEWS HERE COME THE GIRLS

LUCK, TRUST & KETCHUP

IP MAN

DIRECTOR: VARIOUS STARRING: GUINEVERE TURNER, LUCY LIEMANN, ROBERTA MUNROE RELEASED: OCTOBER 12 2009 CERTIFICATE: 18

DIRECTOR: JOHN DORR, MIKE E. KAPLAN STARRING: ROBERT ALTMAN, ROBERT DOWNEY JR., TOM WAITS RELEASED: OCTOBER 19 2009 CERTIFICATE: 12

DIRECTOR: WILSON YIP STARRING: DONNIE YEN, SIMON YAM, SIU-WONG FAN RELEASED: OCTOBER 26 2009 CERTIFICATE: 15

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rrrr A DVD showcase for lesbian short films: about fucking time! Here Come The Girls would be a welcome release regardless of content, and, despite a few false notes, it’s definitely worth sifting through. The less ambitious efforts cover cheating heterosexual wives (A Soft Place), coming out angst (Below the Belt), growing old (Congratulations Daisy Graham) and bedroom politics (Happy Birthday) – these all suffer from being just a bit, well, dull. But then Abbe Robinson’s Private Life, is, if you overlook rather cheesecakey production values, a feisty and imaginative take on gender reversal in repressed 50s England, while Dani and Alice urgently tackles issues of stereotyping and domestic violence. The stand-outs include: Wicked Desire (a Texan mother gets a shock revelation); (the star of the disk) Guinevere Turner’s mysterious Late; and Fem, a performance art montage celebrating femininity and sexuality throughout the ages, from empowerment and submissiveness to defiance against the witch-hunters. Take that Lars von Trier! [Lisa Bourke]

You may not have seen Robert Altman’s genuinely ground-breaking 1993 drama Short Cuts. But you probably have seen Magnolia, Crash or Syriana, in which case you will have unconsciously appreciated its daring and sublime approach to ensemble storytelling. This documentary provides an invaluable record of the Raymond Carver inspired production, but its also an intimate and candid insight into the methods and attitudes of one of American cinema’s true mavericks. The cast interviews are refreshingly honest and insightful (Downey’s wired presence has a poignancy given his subsequent tribulations) and the on-set footage is intimate and fascinating. But Altman is undeniably the star. Always erudite, the director never loses his cool as he describes his attraction to the material, fights his corner over the controversial nudity, gauges performances from disinterested children, gives directions like “Start the pissing!” or receives a touching gift from Carver’s widow, Tess Gallagher. As she says, it all makes you think about “the thingness” of life. [Michael Gillespie]

Grandmaster Ip Man trained Bruce Lee. Frankly, he could have done nothing else and died a proud and happy man. But he also survived the Japanese invasion of China, publicly defeated their martial artists and escaped to Hong Kong as WWII raged around him. Well, according to Ip Man he did, anyway. This action biopic plays as fast and loose with historical fact as a beating from Iron Monkey and Hero star Donnie Yen, but it scores points for asserting the master’s Confucian life philosophies and the defiance of the Chinese under occupation (thankfully without sliding into full-on jingoism). The conventional narrative eschews the slapstick humour and structural tangents of many Hong Kong films, its focus never deviating from Ip Man, his family and his frankly astonishing ability to mete out a severe doin’. Yes, the fights are brilliant, Sammo Hung’s choreography junking high wire hi-jinks in favour of ground level scrapping with real emotional gravitas. Bruce would be proud. [Michael Gillespie]

VINYAN

JACK SAID

TIME BANDITS

DIRECTOR: FABRICE DU WELZ STARRING: EMMANUELLE BÉART, RUFUS SEWELL, JULIE DREYFUS RELEASED: OCTOBER 5 2009 CERTIFICATE: 18

DIRECTOR: LEE BASANNAVAR, MICHAEL TCHOUBOUROFF STARRING: SIMON PHILIPS, DANNY DYER, DAVID O’HARA RELEASED: OCTOBER 5 2009 CERTIFICATE: 18

DIRECTOR: TERRY GILLIAM STARRING: JOHN CLEESE, SEAN CONNERY, MICHAEL PALIN RELEASED: OCTOBER 5 2009 CERTIFICATE: PG

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As the loss of their child overwhelms them with grief, a successful couple (Béart and Sewell, both on good form) retreat to a mysterious place where they hope for reconciliation, but instead find… Well, that would be giving it away. But if this synopsis sounds familiar, that’s probably because it is. After gleefully subverting every convention of the backwoods horror with Calvaire, Belgian director Fabrice Du Welz’s second feature is a much more straightforward affair, doing little to confound our expectations of how a story like this will pan out. Aesthetically owing much to the transgressive ordeal pictures of Gaspar Noé, Michael Haneke and Bruno Dumont, Vinyan skilfully establishes an uncomfortable atmosphere, as our protagonists head into a Conradian post-tsunami Burma. But the flat characterisation and cold direction mean that by the time the ho-hum climax arrives, we’ve lost interest. The film has some interesting ideas, but nothing to match the melancholy of Don’t Look Now or the naked urgency of Antichrist. [Steven Dalziel]

In a surreal cameo, snooker star Jimmy White has his fingers cut off by undercover cop Jack (Simon Phillips). Worryingly, The Whirlwind has more acting ability in his remaining pinky finger than Phillips’ entire tubby frame. The lead is snookered from the start, though, as the script for this film noir/crime thriller feels like The Bill’s writing team have gotten their talons on a new Harry Palmer film – clutching at every cliché of the respective genres along the way. Jack’s mission is to take down a London gang headed by the ‘Guv’nor’ (bizarrely played posthumously by a CGI’d Mike Reid) and his Nuts magazine model daughters. Jack must also find friend and former gang member, Nathan (played by a rather sheepish Danny Dyer), who’s forced to go underground after robbing from the stereotypical cockney gangsters. Respective stars for Jimmy White’s efforts and the cinematography, which at least make this mental torture easy on the eye. [Alastair Roy]

rrrr When Going Live Live’s Trevor and Simon constituted TV entertainment for a generation of kids, Terry Gilliam’s tour-de-force Time Bandits burst onto the screen. Dwarf burglars smash through young boy Kevin’s closet, taking him on a thieving adventure through time: escaping predicaments with a map swiped from The Supreme Being. Meeting and stealing from Napoleon (Ian Holm), Robin Hood (Cleese) and Big Tam’s Agamemnon along the way, the ramshackle troupe face a final showdown with the map obsessed Evil Genius (David Warner). As we prepare for the much anticipated CGI fest Doctor Parnassus, this nostalgic nod back to a time of painstaking set design and optical illusions reveals Gilliam’s artistry still submerges the audience in his nightmarish, surreal and hilarious take on history and fairytales. Though revisiting childhood favourites can be a demystifying experience, Time Bandits still stands on its stop-motion legs. As Gilliam says in the accompanying interview to this re-release, it is “intelligent enough for children, exciting enough for adults”. [Alastair Roy]

OCTOBER 2009

THE SKINNY 29


Theatre

Bursting with Pride Glasgay! Festival is controversial, dynamic and taboo-busting, and this year's theatre line-up is no exception Text Lesley Dickson Illustration Edward McGowan

O’Connor describes the play as an “exploration of those on the fringes of society” – a humorous dabble in social realism but with a modern Big Brother twist. O’Connor is quickly becoming one to watch and Playing Houses is set to be a sure-fire hit of Glasgay 2009. Ginge, Ginger Nut, Carrot Heed, Fire Balls – sound familiar? Hair I Am (4-5 Nov) forms part of the festival’s boutique programme at the CCA. Following on from her show The Hair on my Head is Dead we’ve got to ask:

It has been branded cutting-edge, political and controversial. Certainly, even in its 16th year, Glasgay!, still has the radical energy that has made the festival worth talking about since its advent. Yet 2009 allows the festival to boast of its maturity. Initially attracting audiences from the LGBT community, Glasgay! is now defining itself as an epicenter for fearless social and political discourse reaching a wildly eclectic audience. And this year we’re talking Family and Femininity: ginger liberation, harridan mammies, transsexual deity, and some quintessential gender politics for good measure. A focus on the twin themes of Family and Feminine is typical of Glasgay’s fearless attempt to debunk stereotypes. Hot on the agenda this year is the question of what feminine actually means. Is femininity inner or outer strength? Can a profanity-spitting harlot be feminine? Is an indoctrinated female oppressed by a predatory male the definition of feminine? And will we remain nailed to the medieval damsel in distress scenario? Let’s hope not! The Feminine is a multi-dimensional notion and Steven Thompson and the Glasgay team are ready to give some vanguard depictions of every flavour of the feminine identity, as revealed in the wide range of performance styles and stories in the festival’s theatrical programme. The debate kicks off at the Theatre Royal with Matthew Bourne’s 21st Century androgynous depiction of Oscar Wilde’s Dorian Gray (2-3 Oct) bringing decadent dance to Glasgow. Visually scrumptious, this is a modern Ugly-Betty take on Wilde’s canon. Memory Cells at The Arches (20-24 Oct) is the darkest offering on the programme. Writer Louise Walsh plunges audiences into the misogynistic world of Barry as he preys on a woman locked in a chamber. It’s a study of body abstraction “inspired by recent cases of young women being kidnapped and held captive by predatory men,” as Director Sam Rowe explains. The intensity of compressed violence revives the unimaginable horrors of cases such as Elizabeth Fritzel and Natascha Kampush. The question is: how much power does the oppressed have over the oppressor? Provocative stuff to say the very least. Another female, another crisis, well a mid-life crisis. Maggie Kinloch‘s The Maw Broon Monologues (3-8 Nov) sees Scotland’s most notorious matriarch take to the Tron stage to delve deep into her past. A hilarious and sinister treat, Maw Broon meets Gordon Broon, reads Tolstoy and goes for colonic irrigation – let’s hope some things are left between the lines! On the family tip, Martin O’Connor returns to Glasgay with his first full length play, Playing Houses (13-17 Oct). Set in the gritty cavern of The Arches it displays pure Glasgow humour infused with gender conflict and identity struggles a la Pinter.

this year we’re talking ginger liberation, harridan mammies and a transsexual deity. what is it with writer/performer Helen Cuinn and her hair? “Well now!” retorts the zealous recipient of the Arts Trust Scotland Funding, “Ah’ve actually got a bee in ma bunnet aboot that!” Cuinn doesn’t want public hanging of barnet bigots, but she’s damn sure she’s unearthing the attitudes to red hair on stage. Exploring the roots of anti-ginger, this play ruptures our deep-rooted prejudices, Cuinn states: “I see the theme of ginger hair and its treatment in Scotland as a metaphor for how we deal with difference.” And there’s more. Bette/Cavett (6-10 Oct) at the Tron is directed by Alan Bennett of Glasgay’s 06/07 hit Talking Heads. At the same venue, A Child Made of Love (2024 Oct) explores the issue of paternal longing, followed by Jesus Queen of Heaven (3-7 Nov) which asks, what if God were a transsexual woman on a mission to promote sexual egalitarianism? At the King’s Theatre we see Roxy Hart razzle dazzle us in Chicago (5-10 Oct), while over at the Tramway Queen Elizabeth I visits Glasgow in Regina (23-24 Oct), a multi-media dance extravanganza. Glasgay 2009 promises to be a thoughtprovoking expose of cliché and a meticulous vivisection of social norms. And there’s something for everyone. Weep, laugh and ponder. Let the exploration begin! www.glasgay.com

Gareth K Vile

The personal is the theatrical By the time you read this, I shall have continued my experimental stage-invasion by performing my party-killing monologue, Mentioned in Passing, from the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square. Either a brave confusion of live art, stand-up tragedy and critical analysis, or an hour long exploration of stage-fright to be tagged as “guy making fool of himself” on YouTube, I am hoping to present some of the reasons why I write to a London audience before they escape to The National Gallery. Theatre is really bursting out of the section this month:

I found myself muscling in on Deviance and the Clubs sections, wondering if Confusion is Sex should be under Theatre and worrying whether my advocacy of queer diversity will surprise my mother. With The Creative Martyrs wandering around The Merchant City Festival, and storytellers offering a strong claim to a dramatic tradition – not to mention increased discussion on the website – performance seems to be rambling like an old-school blues man. A strong theme seems to be emerging – like my mash-up

30 THE SKINNY October 2009

bastard monologue article, theatre is acting the hybrid. Tours this month include The Red Room, a live art and dance collision that is previewed online, and Bounce’s hip-hop vision of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, while the Traverse introduces Friday lunchtime dramas where eating meets acting. While there is always space for old classics and their advocates, I am excited by companies willing to get busy with the new – to co-create and copulate; to seek out possibilities in times of change and technology.

Top Five october Theatre Events The Dough is Rising Traverse, Fridays, 12.30 Soup, Sandwich, a short play from top writers including Torben Betts and Ursula Sarma. www.traverse.co.uk A Play, A Pie and A Pint Oran Mor, Monday to Friday, 12.30 Popular grub'n'drama season still running with new scripted work. Antipode Lemon Tree, Aberdeen, 25 October, 7.30 Platform, Glasgow, 27 October, 7.30 Brunton Theatre, Edinburgh, 30 October, 7.30 Male dancers and a live double bass from Retina dance company. They come from Belgium.

The YelloWing Scottish Storytelling Centre 3 October 7.30; Eden Court, Inverness 4 October 7.30; CCA, Glasgow 13-16 October 7.30 Physical theatre and feminist musings on mental illness, based on Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s novel, The Yellow Wallpaper. The Elephant Man Dundee Rep, 20-31 October, 7.30 From the screen to Broadway, a rare chance to see an award-winning adaptation.


THEATRE

VENUE OF THE MONTH

Traverse Theatre The Traverse proudly boasts that it is the home of new writing. However, even more lurks behind the elegant foyer...

By James Hogg

Adapted by Mark Thomson

FAITH FANATICISM MURDER MADNESS

16 October – 7 November 2009

www.lyceum.org.uk/sinner BOX OFFICE 0131 248 4848 GROUPS 8+ 0131 248 4949 TEXT RELAY 18001 0131 248 4848

Company No. SCO62065 Scottish Charity Registered No. SCO10509

LYC0100009 Sinner Skinny Mag Ad 155x126.indd 1

Text Michael Cox Photography Alastair Wight “SO MUCH of theatre, for me, is about the experience for the audience, and I’m very keen we offer as many different experiences as possible: not in just the sort of plays but in the way that we present them.” So says Dominic Hill, the artistic director of the Traverse Theatre, one of Scotland’s flagship theatre companies. In describing the Traverse, Hill says that it is “possibly the only presenter and producer of new work in Scotland. It’s a place to go to if you want to see the latest that’s going on in Scottish performing arts. So, it’s about the new. New work.” The Traverse is home to two theatre spaces. “Traverse 1 is very flexible. It can operate as a proscenium theatre, but it can be reduced to something intimate but still remain grand,” explains Hill. “Traverse 2 is a great limited space. What’s good is that between the two you can present all kinds of work on whatever scale you want.” Hill has now been in the post for just over a year, coming in from Dundee Rep. “Now I’m developing new plays, working with writers and presenting new companies. Before, it was about working with old texts with a particular group of people. It’s a much wider, more open remit.” In speaking about the past year, Hill is obviously pleased. “Lots of really exciting things have happened. One of the things that I was really keen to do when I started was to increase the amount of activity in the building. We’ve done that massively. We have lots of different things, whether it’s lunchtime drama or theatre in the

21/9/09 16:23:09

bar, introducing new kinds of music or scratch performances. We’ve presented a season of debut plays with the NTS. Those have all been very exciting.” And the work continues. Hill is in rehearsal for a new play: The Dark Things. Written by Ursula Rani Sarma, it follows a group of survivors from a serious road accident. “It’s about guilt and loss and survival. And it’s an extraordinary and wonderful play.” Hill initially read a draft and knew he wanted to do it. “Sarma is a poet, and it’s a very haunting, poetic piece full of imagery. It’s wonderfully funny. It has a strange, quirky David Lynch-esque quality to it, which I really enjoy.” Future work at the Traverse includes an eclectic mixture of companies and styles. Vox Motus returns with Bright Black before heading out on a Scottish tour. A partnership with Tramway brings An Argument about Sex, a production that will use both theatre spaces. And Visible Fictions bring their Christmas show Zorro, which Hill calls “a mad enough idea for me to go with.” “What really excites me,’ concludes Hill, “is that, for Scotland, the Traverse is unique. We are the only theatre that develops and commissions work and puts it on. But something that excites me, particularly this autumn, is that we’re producing such a range of work. We’re doing new music. We’re doing contemporary dance. We’re doing a new opera. And that’s what makes the place so exciting: the huge variety of work that’s going on year round.” 10 CAMBRIDGE STREET EDINBURGH, EH1 2ED 0131 228 1404 WWW.TRAVERSE.CO.UK

OCTOBER 2009

THE SKINNY 31


Theatre

Previews Vox Motus

Alternatives 12 Sep, GRV, Edinburgh. £5

“Hopefully, the audience won’t know how difficult it all is.” So says Jamie Harrison about the production he is currently working on, Bright Black. Loosely inspired by the Greek tale of Orpheus, the action follows recently bereaved Claire as she goes on a treacherous journey into the underworld, a journey Harrison describes as “macabre”. This journey poses great challenges to Claire as she struggles to come to terms with both her loss and with reality. Harrison has entered rehearsal with a script but has since been developing it with the company, devising the action around the central idea. The production marks the return of acclaimed theatre company Vox Motus, which Harrison co-founded with Candice Edmunds, who is also directing. Using innovative and imaginative approaches, Motus have a knack for telling unconventional stories in creative and theatrical ways. Their recent acclaimed production, Slick, used award-winning puppetry. This production sees the use of other high-concept theatrical tools, including an art form that seems to be making a bit of a comeback: Black Art. Black Art originated in India and allows people to manipulate things onstage without being seen. To work effectively, Harrison knows that the lighting design has to be perfect. “With the use of black art and other magical effects, we hope to create some surprising effects.” With a Scottish tour that begins at the Traverse, audiences will soon see if Harrison and the Vox Motus team will be able to pull off another technical marvel. [Michael Cox]

It’s official: It’s no longer alternative to be “alternative”. It’s cool to be into variety, cabaret and performance art. If you had somehow failed to notice the variety revival of late, be it in the Glasgow Cabaret Festival or the strong presence at this year’s Fringe, then let us awaken your sensibilities with the first birthday bash of Itsy’s Kabarett and the Cocoon Counter Culture Festival. With an impressive first year under their belts, the coming year holds great things for their “twisted variety” evening. They’ve played host to an impressive bill of guest stars including Ryan Styles, Frayed Knot and Miss Behave, and have drastically expanded their core fanbase. Dee Itsy says that “the earliest outings of Itsy’s Kabarett attracted underground audiences from the vintage, gothic and arts scenes in the city, but from as early as our third show we were attracting a larger and more diverse audience than we could ever have imagined, although our underground ethic has always remained”. Dee thinks “that variety can really capture the imagination and our line-ups are so eclectic that they have both underground and mainstream appeal. I personally love that we attract such a diverse audience and hope this continues”. And long may it continue, particularly with its part in the Cocoon Counter Culture Festival, which Itsy says aims to “fuse counter-culturally focused musical and art forms together with an intelligently curated line up of both international and local artists and musicians.” The Itsy’s collective have indeed come up with a truly eclectic line-up, with something surely to please even the fussiest of audiences. Jesu (creation of underground music pioneer Justin K Broadrick) headline the Saturday evening in their first ever Edinburgh performance. Similiarly, Sunday night headliners Crippled Black Phoenix also pop their ‘Burgh cherry and the group (featuring members of Mogwai and Esoteric) create “endtime ballads within cinematic soundscapes with music hall and poetic sea shanty interludes”. The coming year looks bright for Itsy’s Kabarett but as always, with a “hint of the twisted and macabre at least.” [Clare Sinclair]

Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh 15 - 19 Sep, 8pm www.traverse.co.uk Lemon Tree, Aberdeen 25–26Sep, 7pm www.boxoffice aberdeen.com Box Eden Court Theatre, Inverness 29–30 Sep, 8pm www.eden-court.co.uk Eastwood Park Theatre, Giffnock 2 Oct 7.30pm www.eastwoodparktheatre.co.uk Tron Theatre, Glasgow 27 Sep–1 Oct 8pm www.tron.co.uk www.voxmotus.co.uk

Merchant City Festival

White Tea

24-27 Sep, Various venues, various times

15- 26 Sep, tron, glasgow , 7.45pm.

It may only be a weekend, but the Merchant City Festival is stepping up as the first reply to the Fringe. With a few acts fresh from Edinburgh - Ian Smith and David Leddy both triumphed in August - a couple of nights unique to the West Coast and plenty of wandering street theatre antics, this brief blast of Indian summer drama will keep the aesthetic wolf from the door. The performance is taking to the streets, leaping off the stage and refusing to charge the audience. Smith will be strolling about as the Hurty-Gurty Man, a typical piece of comic Live Art that is part of his ongoing celebration of his fiftieth year. Seagulls will be dropping in and out, amusing passers-by with their cheek and the church of steppology will be kicking it live with some sort of

Motherland

32 THE SKINNY September 2009

exercise-cum-messianic cult. There are also a pair of rival politicians who threaten to kick off with each other somewhere in the town. The Britannia Panopticon presents an old time music hall at regular intervals across the weekend - another free event - in the place where Stan Laurel got his first break. And the Tron weighs in with a pair of plays: Leddy’s White Tea and Motherland, the latter stories of survival and hope from the women of Afghanistan and Iraq. Finally, there is Wildwork’s Memory Projector, part funfair, part story-telling machine. Live Art, quality drama and a bit of techno-trickery. Glasgow’s challenge to Edinburgh begins here. [Phil Gata] www.merchantcityfestival.com

Although David Leddy is known as one of Scotland’s strongest authors, his scripts are not the most interesting part of his productions. White Tea, which is crammed with juicy themes from maternal love to the impact of nuclear bombs on Japanese culture, is most engaging when the words fall away and the subtle atmosphere dictates the pace. The play is encased in a white box, the audience in kimonos and the two performers in plain white. The uneven drama, characterisation and gradual revelations of guilt and need are framed beautifully. Fortunately, two solid performances and the design itself manage to support the heavy themes. A daughter, called to her adoptive mother’s sick bed by a sweet-natured nurse, slowly discovers the shame behind the mother’s anti-nuclear campaigning, and

a friendship grows between the two women. Selections from The Book of Tea are read out, with fragments of videos displayed on the walls. Despite the shadow of Hiroshima, the clash of European and Japanese culture is resolved in a final merging of funeral rituals. Leddy unfolds the story slowly, with the jarring of personalities eventually leading to an argument and then completion. Dealing with such serious themes, the structure feels slightly self-conscious and forced, with little space for the emotions to be developed. In the final, closing image - and in the sudden outbreaks of Live Art activity in homage to Yoko Ono - Leddy’s gift is revealed. Striking and moving, they have the resonance that the script reaches towards, and project an ethereal symbolism. [Gareth K Vile]


Comedy

PreviewS Tim Minchin: Ready for This? Various venues in Scotland, 8-12 Oct

Whilst I admit to a soft spot for both the Gingers and the Aussies, I come around slowly to Tim Minchin not least because most musical comedy leaves me cold. I’ve seen too many good cabaret musicians who just aren’t funny or side-splitting comics who make Alanis Morrisette look sophisticated. And I’ve seen far too many bad musicians who couldn’t instill laughter from a crowd of three year olds on a cocktail of nitrous oxide and Sunny Delight, but that’s another story. Minchin, however, delights and

surprises by having both brilliant comic insight and undeniable musical talent. I first saw Ready for This? at last year’s Fringe and thought it was great, the song If I Didn’t Have You being a personal favourite. Some of the tunes were a little self-derivative, but now it’s been toured right round the world at least once, I’d expect Minchin is showing his very polished best. [Lizzie Cass-Maran] www.timminchin.com

Glasgay’s Swinging Sunday Sparkler

T H E

The Stand, Glasgow, 18 Oct

Glasgay! has already been running since 3 September, so if you’ve not seen anything yet, we're tempted to ask where you've been. Fortunately, the UK’s leading LGBT festival runs until 8 November and the diary is filled with theatre, film, dance and visual art, all tuned around this year’s theme of ‘family and feminine’. With just five comedy nights spaced over its two months, make sure you plan ahead if you want to catch some of the homosexual humorists in their element. The Swinging Sunday Sparkler is a glitzy mix of comedians, including The Skinny’s own bloggers Elaine Malcolmson and Stephen Callaghan, alongside magician Mandy Muden, and the irrepressible Scott Agnew. All this held together with the fine sticky tape of host Jonathan Mayor - a “self obsessed glittery queen” according to the Manchester Post. Gay nights at the Stand can lead to all kinds of sparkly chaos, so to find the uncontrollable comic heart of Glasgay!, be sure to stop by. [Edward Whelan] www.thestand.co.uk

COMEDY CLUB LIVE COMEDY

7 NIGHTS A WEEK

www.glasgay.co.uk

Correction

In our September preview of Improv Wars, we told you all it was replacing the fabulous Dance Monkey Boy Dance. We were wrong. Apologies to Raymond Mearns and co for our mistake. The good news is that Dance Monkey Boy is going nowhere and you can see both shows at the Glasgow Stand this October - upstart newcomer Improv Wars on the 5th and stalwart old hand Dance Monkey Boy Dance on the 12th. So everyone’s a winner.

333 Woodlands Road, Glasgow

0870 600 6055 5 York Place, Edinburgh

0131 558 7272 www.thestand.co.uk

Sparkling wit: host Jonathan Mayor

October 2009

THE SKINNY 33


Art

Winner Takes All

A solo show in the Modern Institute at only 24? We take a tour around Alex Dordoy's new exhibition, barely concealing our envy. Text Andrew Cattanach I first got to know Alex Dordoy as a student at The Glasgow School of Art. He was in the year below me and about to go on exchange to the same university in California I went to the previous year. Friendly, cheerful and too nice to ever come to anything, he wore a silly bobbled hat and a foppish curly fringe. It was clear he lacked the required edginess to ever make it in the art world. This is when I thought that every successful artist was cagey and elusive and art school where you went to cultivate that attitude. Over three years have passed and I’m on a bus from London to Scotland reading the latest copy of Frieze magazine when I come upon a full page advert for Alex’s solo show at The Modern Institute, Glasgow. Soiling myself, I frantically text expletives to everyone I know in that mixture of excitement and jealousy that comes from finding, much to your ambivalent horror, that your peers are getting ahead in life. I later insist on meeting up with him at the gallery for a chat and a sneak preview of the show. He’s still the friendly and enthusiastic guy I remember (minus

the hat and fringe), and his work is similarly vibrant. Most of it lies around the floor in that transitional stage between studio and gallery. One huge painting in particular dominates the space. Lying on the floor, a sheet of blue tarpaulin is awash with abstract painterly marks from an indiscriminate, lively palette. Recognisable forms and figures loom out from the surface –particularly a bearded man in half profile. The man, it turns out, is the American painter and film director, Julian Schnabel, best known for his large-scale portraits painted on canvases strewn with broken dinner plates. Along with Jasper Johns, Schnabel is a significant influence on Alex’s art. He describes to me a “lyrical quality” that underpins Schnabel’s otherwise bombastic work. There’s something quite bombastic about Alex’s work too: the unashamed celebration of everything painterly, the combination of found objects and artistic gesture. I almost gasp when he tells me that he’s cast his own face in plaster and given it the Jackson Pollock treatment. He picks off the floor and gently holds in his hands a grubby, paint-streaked face. Sleeping and dead, endearing and morbid, he hangs

it on the wall for us to have a better look – his very own death mask, filling the space with its weary melancholia. In the middle of the room stands a metal shelving unit that looks like it’s been hit by a car. It’s the kind of unit you might have seen in the art department at high school, only this one’s been assaulted by a disruptive student. It embodies a certain tension, perhaps inherent in all the works, between the violence it implies and its ostensible elegance. This very ambivalence, between the pathos of grim degradation and the optimism of an against-allodds courageousness, seems to be reflected in the show’s title, Winner. The advert shows a rabbit-like creature with what can only be described as a feather headdress, stained with yellow and blue paint, holding a cable-tie. Is this poor creature what winning looks like? The title, he explains, is named after a model of bicycle he used to own – a Raleigh Winner. The name appeared in some of his earlier paintings as a kind of motif and it just seemed natural to continue this pattern in the show’s title. “I wanted it to be provocative and bold,” he goes on, “but also to set up a situation

Rosamund West

on puffins and kelvingrove This month I have mainly been being a tourist in my own country. While this is oh-so-very 2009, staycationing, recessionista, and whatever other newly coined soundbytes you would like to throw at it, it’s not been particularly great for my contemporary art knowledge. Unfortunately I didn’t decide to head towards Inverness for its ReImagining the Centre weekend of urban art (including some rather insane knitting on lampposts, my sources tell me), or Aberdeen’s North East Open Studios event, offering extended open access to

the shady environs of the area’s art practitioners. Instead I went to Oban and Mull, to be treated to the sight of some rather shoddy watercolours of puffins. Ah, the Highlands. Unashamedly living up to stereotype, on the West coast at least. There was an interesting-looking exhibition in Antobar, the Tobermory arts centre, entitled In the Footsteps of Isabella Bird, a photographic recreation of the journeys of a Victorian female author and traveller. I didn’t manage to see it, as I went on the Sabbath and it was of course closed.

34 THE SKINNY October 2009

Back to reality, and I’ve paid my first visit (yes, very belatedly) to the refurbished Kelvingrove, and thought it was amazing. I left feeling very proud of coming from Glasgow, amazed at the drawings of great exhibition pavilions of the 19th century, and at the level of consideration that has gone into re-presenting the existing collection as something that will provide both information and a genuine enjoyment of learning, without being self-consciously worthy or preachy. If you haven’t been yet, go. I’m embarrassed it took me so long.

that, like the bike, the work simply can’t live up to.” I suddenly get an insight into the edgy artist beneath the jovial front. And despite his successes – gallery representation and solo shows – he seems acutely aware of the contingency of it all, that there is always an alternative, more grubby existence waiting in the wings. But despite the underlying pessimism he’s getting on better than most of us lowly art graduates, especially seeing as he’s only 24. I ask him if he’s got any advice for current art students and he offers a suitably tongue-in-cheek answer. “As a wise man once said,” he begins a little mockingly, “there are three elements to success: talent, luck, and determination. Only the latter is in your hands, so work hard.” It’s apparent that Alex has all three of these qualities in some abundance, and with a prestigious, two-year residency in Amsterdam coming up, it seems there is little getting in the way of his success. And if his current trajectory is anything to go by, Alex’s future career can only be a testament to the winner taking all. 5 Sep - 17 Oct 09 www.themoderninstitute.com

Top Five october art Events NEW WORK SCOTLAND 2009

COLLECTIVE, EDINBURGH 10 OCT – 31 JAN It’s back, and it’s bigger than ever. This year’s emerging artists are Katharina Kiebacher, Anna Tanner, Michael White, Rachel Adams and Jennifer Grant. A must see. FRIEZE ART FAIR

REGENT’S PARK, LONDON 15 – 18 OCT The focal point of Britain’s art money calendar, featuring Scottish galleries in the form of doggerfisher, Mary Mary, Sorcha Dallas and the Modern Institute. Likely to be filled with expensive suits and hysterical gallerists.

IT’S BURNING EVERYWHERE THOMAS HIRSCHHORN

DCA, DUNDEE, UNTIL 29 NOV Spectacular installation and the first UK solo show by the internationally acclaimed artist. THE DISCOVERY OF SPAIN

NATIONAL GALLERIES, UNTIL 11 OCT Last chance to catch this year’s blockbuster show on the mound. STUDIO PROJECT 19: LEDE RECKMAN

MARKET GALLERY, GLASGOW, UNTIL 24 OCT The culmination of a full ten weeks of residencies undertaken by the Dutch artist between the Glasgow gallery and Lumsden’s Scottish Sculpture Workshop.

[Rosamund West]


Sometimes it Makes Me Wonder What I Fought For: Katri Walker

It’s Burning Everywhere: Thomas Hirschhorn

SWG3

rrr

dundee contemporary arts

rrrr Upon entering the dark warehouse, Katri Walker’s video triptych dominates the far wall. The three projections side by side create an atmosphere while building a fuller picture of the life of the piece’s subject, Jimmy, a veteran Black Watch Paratrooper. Walker’s film presents the viewer with a portrait of a man, often emphasising his at times painfully apparent loneliness through her juxtaposing of images. An image that stands out for me in the film is that of Jimmy sitting on his own in his regular café while on the other side of the frame another elderly man sits with (probably) his grandchild, illustrating Jimmy’s lack of even a family for company. This becomes apparent in the shots of his home, dirty and squalid, indicative of someone who has given up on life, as the

Art

reviews

title of the piece suggests. Walker’s videoed still lives are also worth a particular mention. They are keenly observed stills of the café counter tops and of the surfaces of Jimmy’s home. The lack of human presence in these shots again continues the thread of loneliness that runs throughout the piece and the natural lighting and apparently spontaneous composition give the shots an ordinary beauty. Walker deals with her subject in a sympathetic manner and doesn’t shy away from the hard fact that this is a forgotten man, a man who once fought for a country that ignores him, as its inhabitants walk past him on the street. As Jimmy himself says, “It’s a mug’s game, you never win.” [Suzanne Neilson]

In the supplementary notes to Thomas Hirschhorn’s show It’s Burning Everywhere, there’s a telling quote from Dostoyevsky’s The Possessed: “I really don’t know if it’s possible to watch a fire without some enjoyment”. For the huge, immersive installation that fills Gallery 2 of the DCA, it’s impossible not to feel a shiver of pleasure when confronted by the sheer spectacle of all this chaos of stuff. The room is filled almost floor to ceiling with painted cardboard, dismembered mannequins, strip lights, wooden objects and masses of jerry cans, much of it held together by miles of parcel tape. Some mannequins (termed “subjecters” by the artist) stand mutilated behind glass in an improvised shop window display, while others have come in wedding regalia bearing silent witness to the carnage before them. The middle of the room is dominated by a vast fallen tree sculpture diagonally intersecting the area, and slogans have been spraypainted around the place: WAR shouts one. It’s very clear indeed that bad things have happened here. The experience is one of overload, overkill, a deliberate assault on the viewer with text and image used as the artist’s weapons of choice. There’s no chance of escape from the barrage of visual information that assaults the eye from all angles. Elsewhere, in the gallery’s ancillary space, works from Hirschhorn’s<> series pair fashion magazine adverts with war photography to create, in the artist’s words, “a new worldview”. These works are utterly consistent with the defiantly unsubtle tone of the whole show, a (lack of) feeling inherent in twenty-four hour rolling news channels being just a channel flick away from fashion week catwalks. Supermodels share newspaper space with disasters of war, a state of affairs that may strike as jarring and discomfiting... but then that’s entertainment. [Ben Robinson] Until 29 Nov www.dca.org.uk

open day Friday 30 October 2009 9.30am - 4.30pm information, talks and tours

Ojos de Brujo

edinburgh college of art

A world of music Joan Baez 12 Oct Christy Moore 21 Oct Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club 28 Oct Ladysmith Black Mambazo 14 Nov

register online at www.eca.ac.uk/openday

Staff Benda Bilili 17 Nov Ojos de Brujo 30 Nov

0131 228 1155 www.usherhall.co.uk ECA Open day Ad_V1.indd 3

22/9/09 11:19:41

October 2009

THE SKINNY 35


Music

Reclaiming Sin Interview Paul Mitchell

of the right-wing and puritanical aspects of Christianity that tries to control the masses by getting people to buy in to their definition of sin. That’s basically the core of what I’ve been dealing with and it’s about constantly redefining that.” Amos’ views on feminism are not restricted to interpretation from a religious/personal perspective. She notes wryly that her new home Britain “is an anomaly in that the class structure is such an issue for people. The primary issues in Britain would appear to be that you are less as a woman if you don’t come from a certain kind of family. This applies to guys too. But what I have noticed is that a lot of women that I meet in Britain feel as though

“The shock is that there’s nothing shocking,” says Tori Amos of her forthcoming as yet untitled collection of solstice/winter songs due out in November. “It’s not a typical kind of seasonal record, where you’re just playing covers of old songs. It’s about reworking them.” She explains further that this reworking process is as old as the songs themselves: “When these songs came to America, a lot of the lyrics to old carols would get changed here and there. Some of them were taken from old pagan songs. So it’s really about finding the best bits and building on them from there. Of course Amos is a singular songwriter in her own right, and it was unlikely this aspect of her creativity would be entirely displaced. “There are also some original compositions. There are tubular bells, concert bass drums, timpani, harpsichord, piano, full strings full brass. Yet it’s all surprisingly straightforward. There’s no, ‘She’s a Hussy, Merry Christmas’ on it, not this time.” Amos has just returned from a gruelling 29 date trip around North America, and despite (at the time of speaking) there being a two week gap to the first of her UK shows on the Sinful Attractions tour, she finds herself immediately immersed in the production of this next release. Acknowledging her arduous schedule, Amos delightfully intercepts a nascent, rather clumsy cliché by playfully suggesting that there is “no rest for the very wicked!” A more suitable segue could not be found for discussion of the album that is being promoted by the upcoming live dates. Abnormally Attracted to Sin, released this past May, is Amos’ tenth studio album and treads familiar territories, those of religion, sin (of course), and specifically the dynamics of women’s relationships with these concepts. As ever, it’s hugely autobiographical, the American composer has yet to shy away from the often-anguished, deeply personal baring of the soul that is almost her trademark. Discussion of one song in particular, I’m Not Dying Today, with allusions to a bout of severe depression, prompts a deep pause in the conversation. “I think that record came out during very troubled times. And so, when you have a minister’s daughter talking about sin, there are going to be many levels and layers to it.” When asked if, after fifteen years of exploring the aforementioned themes in her work, whether aspects of her perspective have altered over time, she is oblique yet simultaneously forthright. “Don’t you think women have been dealing with these issues for hundreds of years, since the patriarchal authority decided what was sinful and that anything natural for women, giving birth for example, the sexual act, couldn’t be spiritual? There’s a segregation within the female psyche between the sexual and the spiritual… we’ve been splintered since our forefathers hijacked Jesus’ teachings and formed the early Christian church. I’ve seen how powerful the church is, particularly in the States. There is a real effort on the part

"There are some songwriters where there’s really no subject matter to talk about, and I’m not one of those.” it is very difficult to rise to the top here. I find that curious and I think that goes back to how the class system works; in a lot of ways society seems very male-driven and that’s where the power is held. So, it’s a different kind of patriarchal authority but it exists nonetheless”. Given Amos’ record as an outspoken, actively engaged feminist, does she sometimes wonder if the intense scrutiny to which the lyrical content of her work is subjected might be eclipsing her talent as a composer, musician and vocalist? “Sometimes maybe the conversations about the subjects can overshadow the compositional structure itself. But think about it, there are some songwriters where there’s really no subject matter to talk about, and I’m not one of those.” So, a tacit appreciation of the privileged position she enjoys as an artist who is taken seriously in an intellectual capacity? “Yes, it is, but I’ve worked hard for that position, dealing honestly and openly with my emotions whilst trying not to expose the people I love. It’s a thin line to walk; I’m not going to lie about that. My father once asked ‘Look, if I’d been a dentist, what would you have written about?’ and I just said ‘That doesn’t excuse your behaviour!" Playing Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow on 8 Sep, 7pm. £32.50/30 www.toriamos.com

Dave Kerr

With or without booze

A

s the big players of the music festival season return to their mansions and the coast clears for Okkervil River to begin their regular autumn shift, I think about the summer past and – oh yes – wonder how the smell from a grill could spark up nostalgia. Swingball was cancelled on account of the unpredictable weather, so I found myself revisiting a few of the first bands I ever

saw live (this time without the moshing and the cider). Faith No More? Jaw was on the floor. Nine Inch Nails? Sometimes you can go back home. Trips to see Oasis and U2 felt more like covert operations, though, like it was a dirty little secret. Telling people they were worth seeing “for the spectacle” was easier than saying “I quite fancy sparking up a lighter for

Tori Amos' glittering career has been a personal crusade, one which shows no sign of abating

Slide Away.” But the rain came down on both occasions, the brothers Gallagher looked bored shitless and the site of U2 yawning their way through a song about trying to log on to a computer from underneath the arse of a giant alien claw beggared belief. Pomp and stadium rock have always gone hand in hand, but couldn’t they make the beer a bit cheaper so there's always a way to enjoy it?

A Muso's Top 10

strike the colours The next Strike The Colours album is called Seven Roads. I called it that because some of the songs seemed to take on a travelling theme, or be about belonging. We recorded it last summer in Chem 19 with Paul Savage but the songs are really autumn/winter songs because that’s when we put the ideas together. I’m really happy with how it turned out, everyone involved worked hard and now we’re looking forward to playing the songs live to people when we go on tour! Then I guess we start the next one... – Jenny Reeve, August 2009 Photo Sarah Roberts

1. The National – Ada 2. Bell Orchestre – Icicles/Bicycles 3. Wilco – One Wing 4. The Smiths – Death Of A Disco Dancer 5. Deerhunter – Nothing Ever Happened 6. Fleetwood Mac – Go Your Own Way 7. Andrew Bird – Fitz And The Dizzy Spells 8. Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds – Stagger Lee 9. Nina Simone – Sugar In My Bowl 10. Bonnie Prince Billy – Ease Down The Road Playing: Electric Circus, Edinburgh (27 Sep); Stereo, Glasgow (2 Oct); Snafu, Aberdeen (3 Oct); Hootenanny’s, Inverness (4 Oct). Seven Roads is released via Deadlinght Records on 28 September. www.strikethecolours.com

36 THE SKINNY September 2009


It really will be a Thriller night for Part Chimp when they release their third album this month. Three quarters of the London foursome tell all about its jokey origins, orgasmic delights and that all-important Jacko connection Interview Darren Carle Illustration Paul Milne You’ve no doubt heard of the infinite monkey theorem, where a monkey, a typewriter and a length of time spanning the age of the universe could conceivably produce the complete works of William Shakespeare. With the flakiest of simian connections, The Skinny undertook the slightly more modest project of punting some probing questions to London noiseniks Part Chimp ahead of the release of their third album, ambitiously titled Thriller, and awaiting their replies. Thankfully this took days rather than millennia, yet the quality was impeded not one bit. In the current musical climate, the first question inevitably references the recently deceased ‘King of Pop’. “I do feel it’s a bit hot to be releasing this record right now,” admits frontman Tim Cedar on the topic of whether he has any qualms of the album’s title. “Hopefully come September it will have cooled down a bit and we can crack on with things in a bit more of a comfortable atmosphere.” Drummer Jon Hamilton is less diplomatic, however. “Qualms? Fuck ‘em if they can’t take a joke!” However, guitarist Ian Hinchliffe takes a more mathematical approach. “I worked this out. I reckon we will sell somewhere around 0.00005% of what MJ’s Thriller sold. We of course don’t have the Faberge Egg habit to support that he did.” Thriller as an album itself, though, seems a fair bet to swell the ranks of the Chimp army, if not quite to the stratospheric proportions enjoyed by Jacko. Opening gambit Trad reveals a more classic rock template and though you may have heard the riff a dozen times before, it’s somehow still as fresh and incisive as a newly unpackaged scalpel. “Trad is about as classic as we could get it, hence the title,” admits Cedar. “It was a bit of a piss-take on a lot of the ‘stoner’ bands around at the moment... but it turned out great.” “Classic heavy rock is cool with me,” says Hinchliffe of the description. “Genres or suchlike don’t usually come up during the writing process. Things just end up the way they end up depending on mood or how knackered everyone is at practice after work.” Cedar sums up the general feeling: “The guy that recorded us, Heironymous, is an extremely classic rock kind of guy. And so are we.” However, when probed about their move away from the occasional post-rock moments of their previous work, the chat turns hairy. “Umm... get fucked!” responds Hamilton to the accusation. “You’re gonna have to convince me on the other records having post-rock bits... unless you’re referring to our ten minute drone epic on Cup? I guess that might pass as post-rock. The working title for that one was ‘helpwe’returningintomogwai’.” Joining the male Chimps on album three is female bassist Tracy Bellaries. “It’s been fairly stable bar bass players,” says Hamilton, suggesting that Bellaries’ transition to the tribe has been a smooth one: “I think we’re settled at the moment. Tracy’s a good addition to the Chimp – we were all comfortable with her really quickly.” However, Cedar suggests he’ll be keeping her on her toes. “Bass players are unpredictable beasts, but that’s their charm,” he says. “I think it is very important to have a different bass player for each album.” With that we can assume that Part Chimp are not likely to rest on their laurels, and there will be no doubt of their skill when Thriller lands in September. A UK tour will coincide with the release, providing the opportunity to find out just how loud these mothers can crank it in the live arena. Cedar is nevertheless playfully ambiguous about their decibel level, claiming they are “not loud enough, maybe too loud.” Thankfully Hinchliffe is a little more descriptive. “The volume is part of the Part Chimp experience,” he states matter-of-factly. “We’ve had exploded

eardrums, people blacking out, someone being sick, and one lady claiming a ‘special’ moment due to the volume. That makes me fairly satisfied.” Cedar goes on to explain the band’s blueprint in the studio, and it seems crooning is still overrated at camp Chimp. “Vocals have never been that high in the mix on any of our albums,” he says. “Part Chimp have always been more of a sonic element than a vocal statement. It’s the same live.” Hamilton embellishes things further: “Tim doesn’t like singing and is rather self-conscious about his lyrics. I fully sympathise with

“We've had exploded eardrums, people blacking out, someone being sick, and one lady claiming a 'special' moment due to the volume. That makes me fairly satisfied.” Ian Hinchliffe this. I don’t want to write lyrics or sing them either.” It’s a somewhat similar, guarded approach to vocals that Mogwai – whose Rock Action label Part Chimp have been with since their first 12” – have also conceded. True to claims, Cedar reveals that the label is a rather casual affair. “I don’t actually remember signing anything,” he claims when asked about the comfort of being with a record label in these times. “It was more of a gentleman’s ‘argument’.” “There ain’t no signing to it,” concurs Hamilton. “We want to record something and they make it happen money-wise. It’s nice that somebody cares enough to want other people to hear us.” However, it seems modesty runs a streak through the diligent label’s masters. “Compared to the way we run Part Chimp, it’s a well-oiled machine. I have no qualms,” says Cedar. “I did hear that they actually use real monkeys as interns though.” They’re everywhere, those damn dirty apes, and from where we’re sitting it looks like Part Chimp are leading the revolution. Playing Stereo, Glasgow on 25 Sep. Thriller is released via Rock Action on 21 Sep.   www.partchimp.com

September 2009

THE SKINNY 37

Music

Monkey Business


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Music

Get Born Again 17 years to the day that Dirt propelled Alice in Chains skywards, the Seattle survivors prepare to release their first studio album since the loss of frontman Layne Staley in 2002. Sean Kinney and William DuVall explain how they picked up the pieces

Interview Dave Kerr Photo James Minchin Having earned their place in the great alternative rock pantheon as one of the big four alongside Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden, Alice in Chains reached admirable heights with their harmonious and dynamic blend of blues and modern metal in the early 90s. “We had been around before that and had some success,” drummer Sean Kinney points out. “[Debut album] Facelift did well. It wasn’t like the Guns ‘n’ Roses thing where there was that one record and then there’s nowhere to go but down. We were just trying to make music and have a career. Our lives were manageable except what we chose to do to ourselves.” The band’s late singer Layne Staley infamously battled with heroin addiction until he died at the age of 33 in April 2002, by which point Alice in Chains had long since withdrawn from the public limelight. “They weren’t reviewing our record; they were reviewing our fucking personal life,” Kinney recalls of the popular music press’s agenda at the time of their last studio album [Rolling Stone would run a cover story which catalogued the band’s woes at a time it was trying to look up]. “We didn’t want anything to do with that. We’re well aware we put our personal lives on those records, but that’s all it became. So we refused to talk to anybody. I remember Eddie Vedder being on the cover of Time magazine and talking to him back then about how fucked up that was. He didn’t see that coming; you make one record and suddenly you’re the spokesperson for a generation? That’s a lot to put on some guy who’s just singing songs. It damn near tore that band apart, I saw that.” Reconvening in 2005 for a Hurricane Katrina charity concert, then again at the behest of the sisters Wilson from 80s power balladeers Heart, the band recruited William DuVall – a touring associate of guitarist Jerry Cantrell – to handle vocal duties for a new incarnation of the band that would play one date at a time for as long as it felt right. Ultimately Alice in Chains toured a full year, encompassing a revolving cast of celebrated

guest frontmen – as far reaching as Billy Corgan, James Hetfield, Maynard James Keenan, Scott Weiland and Phil Anselmo – who would pay tribute to Staley by singing his parts. “We got in a room and thought we’d jam on a bunch of new stuff with Will,” says Kinney. “We did that and we were digging it, then some offers came in – asking if we’d play here or there – we discussed that and went ‘OK, let’s go play a few shows’, but we didn’t look forward far, because then you’re standing onstage at Rock Am Ring in front of 100,000 people and you’re like ‘oh, wow, I didn’t really think this through.’ But it really gelled on the road. It was a very crucial, necessary step.” By Kinney’s admission, the band had no preconceptions about what it might achieve or how long the reunion could last, but DuVall suggests new material became inevitable. “You put four musicians together for that long at such close quarters with instruments lying around and stuff kind of happens. It all took place very organically. So by the time we got off the road we had this pile of ideas, at that point it was a case of ‘well, what are we going to do with all this stuff? We’ve got something to say, so let’s just say it. The record was a self-funded, very self-directed thing, at any point we could’ve pulled the plug on the project. We could’ve shut it down. We weren’t contractually obligated to anyone and there was no deadline, there was nobody lording over us.” The result, Black Gives Way to Blue is a testimony to the songwriting skill of Jerry Cantrell and the enduring appeal of Alice in Chains. Brutal and tender, the record avoids the pro-tooled trappings of much contemporary rock by going back to basics. “We used the technology, the technology didn’t use us,” says DuVall. “Most of those amps and microphones we used are older than we are,” elaborates Kinney. “We didn’t do any of this shit of mixing and mastering it so it’ll sound good on a computer.” Resolutely old school, the production nevertheless feels like a step up, with Foo Fighters / Rush producer Nick Raskulinecz documenting the sessions. “Nick came in with a lot of enthusiasm, “ says DuVall. “He was gung ho from the first rehearsal,

"I remember Eddie Vedder being on the cover of Time magazine, he didn’t see that coming. You make one record and suddenly you’re the spokesperson for a generation? That’s a lot to put on some guy who’s just singing songs" Sean Kinney

air-guitaring and getting in my face. The guy’s a ball of energy and he brought a lot of commitment, light and humour to what is in some ways a very emotionally fraught process.” With touring plans imminent and dates being firmed up at time of going to press, Kinney looks forward to a long-awaited return to Scottish shores soon, having previously played dates in Glasgow in years gone by (as documented by the band’s Live release some years ago). “We played the Barrowlands a couple of times, where they strap the PA down because the floor’s on springs. That’s a crazy fucking joint; the people go off in there.” DuVall, too, has his own memories, having bonded with Cantrell whilst playing in his backing band during a tour that hit the Garage in 2002. “That was a good one, man. I remember after that gig, I had a bottle of beer but no opener for it and this cat just took it from me and opened it with his eye socket. You Scots don’t fuck around.” Nor do Alice in Chains – although they might value their ocular cavities more – so when it came to enlisting a pianist to play on the ode to Staley which ends the album, they took it to the gods and tracked down Elton John. “A guy that’s been with us for 20 years or so, the Baldie, actually worked for Elton for awhile and we’ve had a few other people that used to work with Alice that worked in the Elton machine,” Kinney explains. “So Jerry wrote him an e-mail asking if he’d be interested in hearing it, he got back and said ‘yeah’, so we sent him the tune and he really got what the song’s about. So we all went up to Vegas and watched him record his tracks just to take part in that. It was a really amazing, surreal moment, because Elton’s singly the guy that turned Jerry into wanting to be a songwriter and it connected with him. And Layne’s first concert he ever went to was Elton John, plus I’m a huge fan, as I’m sure we all are. You never know what life’s going to hand you unless you try.” Black Gives Way to Blue is released via EMI on 28 Sep. www.aliceinchains.com

September 2009

THE SKINNY 39


MUSIC

ADVERTISMENT

RELENTLESS SHOTS LOUNGE OPENING IN GLASGOW The popular energy drink Relentless will be celebrating the launch of its new variety Relentless Energy Shots in a dedicated Lounge at 158 Ingram Street, Glasgow. Open from 3 September to 16 September, the Lounge will offer caffeine and vitamins-filled Energy Shots in an exciting audio-visual environment. Drop by for competitions to win a case of Relentless Energy Shots, and tickets to catch the rather excellent post-hardcore mongers Gallows on their nationwide Warped tour in Aberdeen (Moshulu, 29 Nov) and Dundee (Fat Sams, 30 Nov).

40 THE SKINNY SEPTEMBER 2009

ABERDEENSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BRAND NEW MUSIC VENUE & NIGHTCLUB COMING TO YOU IN SEPTEMBER 2009


Interview Paul Mitchell Photo Marco Poulos Five minutes of conversation with Mew guitarist Bo Madsen and some insight is given into why the Danish art rockers (and pretentious ones at that – in their own deadpan words) have exceeded the standard word count for the title of their new album*. Put simply, the guy doesn’t shut up; it wasn’t conversation, more passionate monologue. Taking a lyric from one of the tracks to name a record is hardly a new trick, but it’s a safe bet that Madsen came along and said “Why use just three words, when we can use the whole verse?” It seems to be his way. However, possessed of charm, eloquence and a real passion for what he does, Madsen makes for a dream interviewee; an enjoyable way to spend half an hour. It’s been almost four years since the release of their last studio album. 2005’s And The Glass Handed Kites (and the accompanying, visual-heavy live tour) was critically well-received, but wouldn’t it have made sense to capitalise on that positive momentum earlier than now? “Well, we did want to attend to our own personal lives. Growing up and getting a little bit older takes time y’know!” laughs Madsen, before confirming the suspicion that the creation of multi-layered, ambient soundscapes generally involves personalities given to meticulous dedication. “We tend to be quite perfectionistic about things. When you spend a long

time writing it you want to spend a long time recording it, just to get things right. The list goes on. Every step is like ‘Well, we spent so much time doing that, we want to make sure we don’t fuck it up by getting it all wrong at this point’. Labels ask for about three or four months because of you guys, the press. They ask that they’re given time to promote it in advance. So the big machine goes into operation and together with the creative process it just all combines into one lethal, somewhat delayed, cocktail.” Madsen only becomes reticent when discussing the new album, in the sense that talking about it seems to him a pointless exercise. “I don’t think I want to come up with a list saying ‘This is what it means’. We provide a lot of different impressions and layers in our music and people can combine them and make out of them what they want. I think it should be up to each individual listening to and discovering new things. We can’t go around being pissed off when people describe the band in a certain way or try and put it in a box when the thing we’re trying to do is take it out of the box. The way of communicating what this band is can only be done by listening to the music rather than trying to explain with words.” Naturally, this memo was duly passed to our reviewer. The band are currently touring with Nine Inch Nails, in the past having played with REM and Jane’s Addiction. Madsen is emphatic when he suggests it’s preferable to be headlining their own shows,

Music

The Shock of the Mew

Back this month with their first album in four years, Mew's Bo Madsen talks to us about great artists, Madonna (not in that category it seems) and, eh, blowjobs

but support slots are a valuable opportunity. “Going out with another band like NIN, Elbow or REM is an odd experience at times but it’s always going to be that way with other bands because I don’t think we fit in with any category. But then, these bands have fans who are interested in challenging themselves a little bit when listening to music. That’s all we need really, people who enjoy experiencing the new.” So, has anything been challenging the Mew protagonists recently then? “There are a million levels to this. You could be someone like Stanley Kubrick and reinvent the medium every time you make a film, but you can also do it in certain areas by using new techniques which haven’t been used before and break new ground. The really big changers come around very rarely. Someone like Prince, say. He and Kubrick are both immensely popular; doing pop yet breaking ground rules and being very experimental at the same time. That’s what we try to do. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think we’ve hit that place yet but we really try to do the same thing.” Whilst that sounds ambitious, Madsen is realistic to suggest it’s not likely by pointing out the obvious; the best art doesn’t necessarily become the most popular. “A lot of indie bands get dismissed as just that, indie. But they have great pop songs, much better than Britney Spears except they may not be wearing a g-string live. People always want to call it something so I take the piss by saying we’re the world’s only indie

stadium band, but we have songs that are way more pop and way more catchy than a lot of mainstream stuff like Madonna.” Is there any particular reason he’s singled out auld Madge? “Nothing personal, but if you’re Madonna, you can make a record and it will be played anyway, just because it’s Madonna. It doesn’t have to be anything that’s good. People seem to want to hear the same people saying the same thing. It’s kind of a comfort blanket. It feels safe to see Madonna on the cover of a magazine so you can go ‘Oh, I’m still living in the world, Madonna is still here’. I guess maybe it reminds you of all the great blowjobs you got while Spanish Lullaby [or La Isla Bonita maybe] was playing in the background so saying goodbye to her would be like saying goodbye to yourself or something strange like that. I don’t get it. So you keep these people around, but they take up a lot of space, which should be used for great new music, or great new art, or whatever the fuck it is.” And Prince doesn’t take up the same space? “Well, I stopped listening really after the Lovesexy Tour in 1988. That’s when he climaxed!” No More Stories/Are Told Today/I’m Sorry/ They Washed Away//No More Stories/The World Is Grey/I’m Tired/Let’s Wash Away is released via Sony BMG on 8 Sep. Mew play ABC, Glasgow on 5 Nov, 7pm, £13.50. www.myspace.com/mew

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MUSIC

The Dynamic Duo If the rock gods say keep it simple, who are we to question? Come In Tokyo prove you need little else than drums and guitar to move a crowd Interview Jason Morton IN MANY areas of life, great things come in pairs: for your dinner, you’ve got fish and chips; for an evening drink, maybe a gin and tonic; for the late hours, there’s always rock and roll. In those dark hours, permeating a sweaty, dancing crowd, you can find another great pair, one which forms the core of rock and roll – beats and riffs. And it’s in utilising these two essential elements that Come In Tokyo forge their simple yet visceral sound. The band combines Alan Oates’ cutting guitar work and vocals and Anna Duffield’s time-keeping on the trap kit, and this tandem has been gaining in momentum since their unassuming inception in May 2006. “I was writing stuff for [solo alias] Little Pebble, and asked Anna to play on a couple of my songs,” Oates says. “She came out and we recorded it, then had this idea of ‘Yeah – do you wanna play more songs? – I got this Fender… I don’t really know what to do with it.’" Duffield responded by putting him through a crashcourse in the music she was looking to produce. “She gave me a CD of stuff – like Pixies, Sonic Youth and The Fall on it – and I went ‘OK, you wanna create music like that? … I don’t know if I can do that.’” Oates’s apprehension was short-lived, however, to the benefit of the Edinburgh rock scene. As he recounts, “I dropped both E strings to D and just started playing around with it… And had the idea to take it live.” The twosome took it to Henry’s Cellar Bar in December 2006, and mere months later were whisked away on

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tour with The Aliens – “a proper tour of venues in each city” – none too shabby for a band in its infancy. Doubtlessly helpful in warming the crowds up on tour, and filling large spaces with the sounds of just two musicians, are Come In Tokyo’s technical practices. “I guessed as a two-piece, that might be needed – make a louder sound, keep it more interesting,” Oates says, explaining that the band beefs up its sound by splitting guitar and vocal signals, and adding additional amplifiers. The result

09:57:06

"AS A TWO-PIECE, YOU HAVE TO MAKE A LOUDER SOUND TO KEEP IT INTERESTING"

is a fuller experience of the band’s unpretentious style, a classic sound that has served rock well over the years. In the years since forming, Come In Tokyo has spread that sound to various venues and bobbing heads across Scotland, releasing a handful of vinyl records and performing at the Fence Collective’s Home Game, and Edinburgh staples Limbo and The Mill. It’s at the former where the band were recently handpicked by Edinburgh’s Found to help usher in the second year of gigs. Entitled ‘A Year of The Mill’, the organisers have invited back fan favourites, encouraging them to bring other artists they feel are the best of local music. Aside from this already sold out showcase at Cab Vol and a cheeky date at the City Café, the band has chosen to postpone heavy gigging until the release of their album. In the works for nearly a year, Oakes says a copy has been sent to their label, but awaits a green light. “We’ve given it to Fence Records to listen to, and it’s really whether they say, ‘That’s sounding good,’ or they may say, ‘Can you remix it?’ But until the album’s there, we’re not really wanting to go on tour or play away.” When the full-length comes – and if it builds on the band’s raucous live gigs – it promises to be a winner, documenting a sound as classic to auditory canals as tea and toast is to palates. Only with Come In Tokyo, it won’t be going stale in a week’s time. PLAYING CLUB VIVA VINYL AT CITY CAFÉ, EDINBURGH ON 3 OCT. WWW.COMEINTOKYO.CO.UK


MUSIC

The Great Northern Trendkill Dundee's Popolo are four childhood friends reunited in pursuit of "instrumental rock with personality". A contradiction in terms? They certainly don't think so Interview Lauren Mayberry Photo Stuart Cameron

impressionable years. Since then, the tunes have taken a more artful turn, the four piece producing what they describe as ‘instrumental rock with personality’. “I think the fact each one of our songs has its own individual, usually playful feeling is the most positive facet of the band, given that many instrumental bands are straightfaced, ten-minute, serious jams,” says Ogden, aiming instead to cut the gratuity back to an essence. “I don’t know what that says about us as songwriters but it’s an extremely satisfying way of working, economising every riff and not tiring them to the point of boredom.” Indeed, this concerted effort to move the gaze

away from the naval pays off for the audience too: “To date, I haven’t noticed a significant crowd depletion during our set,” the guitarist asserts. Given the lack of vocal presence, the band accept the inevitable Battles comparisons, the instrumentation leaning towards Deerhoof or Foals, though Ogden is keen to stress that Popolo’s efforts are too early in their evolution to seriously accept such claims. Now, it seems, Popolo are starting to find their feet, making plans for new releases and still finding time to light a fag for Tricky. “Friendship Injection is a demo we did with Nick Roan in February intended as a guide track for more recordings,” Ogden explains,

adding that an EP is definitely in their imminent plans. “The aim is to write and record the new songs, above anything else. There are of course bands we’d love to support like Young Fathers or No Age, but at the moment playing live isn’t a priority - if the songs aren’t good enough I don’t think any of us are keen on presenting them as a fair reflection of Popolo.” So, guitars slung high, Popolo set to work to produce something worthy of themselves, which shouldn’t be too hard if their progress thus far is an indicator. And they do hail from the City of Discovery, after all. CAPTAIN'S REST, GLASGOW ON 19 SEPTEMBER. POPOLOUK.BLOGSPOT.COM

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COME on now, admit it: for too long there has existed an unspoken elitism which decrees that any act hailing from much further north than Kilsyth can’t possibly be worth the bus fare. But scores of stellar bands from those cities have pricked The Skinny's ears in years gone by, from the burgeoning Copy Haho through fly-by-night victory rockers Laeto to the sadly defunct Avast! and Alamos. While the Glasgow/Edinburgh unsigned music power dichotomy may still have the better access to labels and venues, it seems having a finger in the proverbial pie, regionally speaking, is not always necessary. See Exhibit A: Popolo. The Dundee natives have commenced their ascent nicely, supporting Dananananaykroyd and 65 Days of Static, and playing with Frightened Rabbit at Lofi Studios’s Christmas party last year. Such bragging rights are usually reserved for those who’ve been around the block a few times, learning the ropes after years of soul-crushing toilet gigs. The interesting thing about Popolo is that they’ve only been in existence for a hair’s breadth over a year, with no former musical projects on the CV to boost the contact list. “The band was born out of a rekindled high school friendship between myself, Robbie and Glen when we were reunited for Glen’s nineteenth birthday outing, having met no one at uni we felt we could make music with,” explains guitarist Thomas Ogden. Drummer Matthew was recruited via similar school day connections, recollecting the bedroom recording of comedy Eastenders themed anti-war songs in more

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Sure we play boybands. (Aerosmith, The Stones, The Who.)

On air: Glasgow on 96.3fm, Scotland on DAB Listen Online: www.rockradio.co.uk


Music

Iconoclastic Space Rap for 3009 The extraordinary return of hip-hop futurists Anti-Pop Consortium

Interview Bram Gieben Anti-Pop Consortium have always broken boundaries – in 2002 they signed with legendary electronic label Warp, releasing the seminal LP Arrhythmia to critical and popular acclaim. They were the first hip-hop act to be signed by Warp, and the wonky, bass-heavy beats of Earl Blaize quickly popularised the group with fans of the laughablynamed IDM (Intelligent Dance Music) genre. Hip-hop heads got it too – the group’s double-time raps fit perfectly with the UK hip-hop scene’s emergent grime stylings; while the band’s esoteric subject matter – name-checking Larry Levan and Alfred Hitchcock - appealed to those fans who liked their hip-hop literate and non-commercial. Even the name was perfect – Anti-Pop Consortium. This was a band that united their fans in opposition to the blandness of the mainstream – a band that this writer can recall getting played in all the Edinburgh clubs, from Scratch to Dogma and everywhere in between. Fast-forward to 2009 – 12 years since APC formed in New York, after meeting each other in and around the city’s legendary performance poetry scene. The band are now veterans of the rap game. After a split (post Arrhythmia) which saw Beans release an excellent solo LP, and saw M. Sayyid and High Priest collaborate as Airborn Audio, the band decided to reform. They toured, supporting Public Enemy, and pretty soon they had started to talk about recording some new material. The result, the eagerly anticipated Flourescent Black, will be released on Big Dada this month. The Skinny caught up with the three emcees of the group as they hit London to promote the release of the album’s first single, the sinister electro-funk of Apparently. What was behind the decision to record the new album? M. Sayyid: It was incidental. We were all together in a club, and it came up, and we were like, ‘yo, we wanna try and hit the studio and see what’s good’. Enough time had elapsed that we were able to do it. Was it hard to get back into the groove of writing together again? M. Sayyid: It wasn’t any problem. It was actually even better. Obviously, over the course of the years,

Electronic music was a huge part of Arrhythmia – is the same true of Flourescent Black? Beans: I would say the vision of making art… Art coming first… It comes from having the skills to make hot joints on a production level. It’s stepped up from 2002, from the last album. The most interesting thing is, if you take songs from Arrhythmia and compare them to those from Fluorescent Black – you can hear that the production has been stepped up. You may be nostalgic about Arrhythmia - but if you play any of these new instrumentals out in a club, you will see the reaction. People are gonna respond to the new stuff. Because we put in work in the studio!

you step up your game if you work hard. We had all stepped up our game separately, so when we were able to bring it to the table, we were able to step to it in a better way, I think. How has your subject matter and your lyrical flow changed since Arrythmia? M. Sayyid: The way that we spit changes, because time changes. I wouldn’t be spitting the same way as back in 2002. You’ve got to have a different swagger. Did you happen to enjoy each others’ solo projects? M. Sayyid: Absolutely. We continue to support each other on a solo tip. For sure. It’s a beautiful thing.

Is it a larger, heavier sound than before? Beans: Yeah! Because, the fact is the greatest thing about growing as an artist is you can actually see the muscular development. Then you’re like, ‘Yo!’ You gain confidence. Once you have confidence and humility it’s a deadly combination. That’s how the Samurais work, that’s how African warriors work. That’s how everybody in life works – you have to have humility as well as confidence. I stay with that because it works for me. It works in my favour for me to be humble – I feel more comfortable. That’s how I roll out. But I’ve got the confidence too.

Given that hip-hop has so thoroughly colonised the mainstream pop market, do you think it still has a valid underground movement? High Priest: You’re talking to people who have a lot of different tastes… like, I used to do a lot of mixtapes… it’s hard for me to say that I was listening to a lot of stuff that was quote-unquote ‘underground backpack rap’ in 2002, and it isn’t necessarily what I would listen to right now. There are people in that scene who I listen to. Beans: One of the things I came to find is that ‘underground’ is a relative term, because if you talk to some major-label artists like Jay-Z, he might still consider himself to have come from the underground. If you talk to some independent artists, it might not necessarily be their intention to be ‘underground’ – it’s just a matter of exposure. Their vision might still be commercial. At the end of the day it’s about finding a good balance between the two terms ‘commercial’ and ‘artist,’ because the two do sometimes seem to be diametrically opposed. What was behind the move from Warp to Big Dada – was it because of the Ninja connection via Airborn Audio? M. Sayyid: Yeah, it was definitely. We’re absolutely going back in to do more Airborn Audio stuff. Beans has a solo album coming called End It All – he’s starting on that pretty soon, he’s got some tracks he’s working on.

"Once you have confidence and humility it’s a deadly combination. That’s how the Samurais work, that’s how African warriors work." beans

You’re listed as an influence and namechecked by a great many rappers these days – Cadence Weapon and K-the-i?? talk of you as a large influence on their flows and careers. How do you feel about this? High Priest: It’s great, man. We were inspired by other artists, and we put something new in the game with the intention of adding on, and sharing the experience – pushing the envelope, taking things further. Then somebody else can hear that and be influenced, we can hear it… it’s a cultural exchange. We’re happy to push the envelope further – and we hope that there’s someone on the horizon who can take it in another direction. We’ll be looking for them! Flourescent Black is released via Big Dada on 7 Sep. www.myspace.com/antipopny

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Music

Brighter than White Forget the White Isle. Petrcane evokes the true Mediterranean party spirit without ruining your budget. Text Jaco Justice Photography Aurelie Desmas Croatian Clubbing: Brighter Than White It’s been thirteen years since I, and three other freshly teased house-devotees, spent a summer on Ibiza. We’ve always talked about revisiting the colossal clubbing experiences of the ‘White Isle’, but we haven’t gone back. Along with many other UK clubbing tourists, cheaper connections to Barcelona and Berlin have swayed us in the direction of these buzzing major cities. Plus affordable Euro festivals such as Exit (Serbia) and Benicassim (Spain) have proved a more reliable weather source than their UK equivalents. Ibiza continues as a party force - good stories are still coming back - but when you think of the typical rates for club entry and drinks (up to €60 for club entry and €15 for a drink!), it gnaws at your sense of value-for-money. And now, with the pound’s lingering low comparison rates, and the hippies truly outnumbered by the euphoria-seeking hipsters that Radio One DJs will suck out from suburbia for the summer, I doubt I will ever return. The nail in the coffin for me was Manumission (once a unique venue for sexual epiphanies, flamboyant dwarves and breathtaking dance music) evolving into a kind of branded Skins playground for emotional guitar types with ‘Ibiza Rocks’: their new trademark indie-based event. If this is evolution then I’m ready to cut off the Balearic bloodline right here. Promoters, DJs, agents and the purist club faithful have noticed the need for a new, cost effective destination around the Mediterranean for underground music lovers to converge for the summer. While Barcelona’s Sonar festival is a week of good times and high quality music, it takes place in a

city that, in my opinion, struggles to understand electronica the other fifty one weeks of the year. And Barcelona isn’t a location to offer the seaside and non-metropolitan lifestyle we enjoy so much on a holiday. And so it has happened, simply enough, thanks to two blokes from Birmingham, and a bit of imaginative entrepreneurship in Croatia. After holidaying around Zadar on the Adriatic coast - an area boasting vistas over an uncountable archipelago of islands - the Brummie pair, both coming from a music and promotion background in the UK, took the plunge in opening The Garden Zadar: a lounge bar set upon the city walls, offering the same laid-back environment as the famous sunrise beach bars prevalent on Ibiza. Just a few years later, by 2005, their capabilities in hosting music-led Zadar events had been noted by nearby open-minded holiday resorts. And so twelve kilometres northwest in the quaint, and near millennium-old, fishing village of Petrcane, the owners of a large hotel showed them a dormant site on a stunning nearby peninsular. The 70s complex, overshadowed by swaying pine trees, boasted sculpted concrete walls that flowed into terrace and bar areas, plus easy beach access - albeit with rock rather than sand under your toes. If this wasn’t enough, the icing on the disco-cake came from the old circular nightclub, Barbarella’s: the location reeked of old-school flannel suits, 70s bikinis, and cocktail quaffing playboys and girls getting down to the sounds of italo disco, back-in-the-day. In 2006 The Garden Festival was born. With underground house and nu-disco firmly at its core it has put the pleasurable side of summer holiday partying back into the punters’ hands. Crazy P, Henrik Schwarz, Prins Thomas, Lindstrom and Âme have all

Promoters, DJs, agents and the purist club faithful have noticed the need for a new, cost effective destination around the Mediterranean for underground music lovers to converge for the summer. 46 THE SKINNY September 2009

played to the two thousand capacity get-together. Furthermore the Petrcane site was Garden’s to use for the four month summer season and, as The Skinny found at first hand in July, a range of other UK and Irish promoters have taken hold for four-day ‘weekend’ line-ups. While the two Garden Festival weekends are the location’s foundation, Soundwave (£60 four day ticket) have brought their leftfield antics to the Croatian fray with an electro, funk and jazz beat fusion to their late July spot. The Bays delivered an awesome, and entirely one-off, performance under the rustling trees to a super friendly mixture of UK, European and local revelers. Scotland was well represented too by the truly inventive dubstep, grime and somewhat archaic arcade skills of Glasgow’s rude-boy Rustie (LuckyMe), plus the Trouble DJs got in on the act making sure the sea-side dancefloor lapped up more crescendos than just the breaking waves on your bare toes. Speaking of waves, you can ride them too. Twicedaily Argonaut boat parties set sail with a rotation of artists from the various festivals. The boat launches and returns from a stretch of restaurants barbecuegrills and bars, where a generous dinner won’t set you back more than ten pounds. With cheap air carriers offering daily services from Scotland’s Central Belt direct to Zadar, and plenty of ‘techno-taxis’ at your call throughout your stay, you have the chance to explore a beautiful part of the world where it hasn’t gone all Pete Tong, thank fuck. [Jaco Justice] Need an end of summer sun / fun hit? There are two remaining festivals at The Garden Petrcane this summer: Disco 3000, 4-6 Sep (feat. Chateau Flight, Trus’Me, I:Cube, Dolskabeat) Exodus, 11-13 Sep (feat. Benga, Loefah, Plastician)  www.watchthegardengrow.eu www.soundwavecroatia.com


Music

Holy Trinity Ahead of their debut performance in Glasgow this month, Moderat's Gernot Bronsert talks about the musical project that could just have easily been called Appelektor Interview Chris Duncan Photo Melissa Hostetler Moderat’s debut album finally arrived this year, six years after the release of their first EP Auf Kosten der Gesundheit (At The Cost Of Health) on the pioneering BPitchControl label. Consisting of Gernot Bronsert and Sebastian Szary of Modeselektor along with Sasha Ring of Apparat, the three piece spent a considerable amount of time apart following the creation of their appropriately titled EP. “(We were) a ‘just for fun’ project without any big plans. And now, six years later, we decided all of sudden to do something ‘real’ together, something that’s more of a concert show than a club act, something with audio and visuals combined. Well, and this we did!” says Gernot.  This goal was certainly achieved, with all three members being joined on stage by artist Pfadfinderei who creates the visuals for what is fast becoming one of the most talked about live acts of the year. “It’s a lot of fun to play as Moderat. The visuals and the light show became very important aspects of this show and Moderat wouldn’t be Moderat without them. The audience reacts differently to Moderat than to Modeselektor or Apparat shows, the visuals are pretty much in the foreground and the set in total is more like a concert show than a rave.” The results have proven to be amazing and well received by fans the world over, but how was the process of creating the album considering the different

sounds of the acts involved? “We didn’t have any idea about how to work together, we just had a concept of sound in common that we wanted to realize. It took more than six months to find the right way to work together, we are pretty particular, each of us, and have our very own way of working. We just ended up being in the studio for long, long hours and days. It was almost like a social experiment, in total (including Pfadfinderei) there were ten people involved. Apparat’s music is rather epic and more song orientated, Modeselektor puts more emphasis on beats, bass, champagne and rave. But both acts always have room for nice melodic lines. We didn’t really have a master plan before starting the production. All collaborations happened accidentally almost. Except the song with Paul St. Hilaire – Slow Match. This one was supposed to be released on the Modeselektor album Happy Birthday, but has been finished only with the help of Apparat. So we put it on the Moderat album instead.” The album slowly took form within Hansa Studios in Berlin, the same space where David Bowie recorded Heroes. The record’s unique sound owes a great deal to both an old emi console from 1972, which was restored especially for Moderat and software designer Joshua Kit Clayton. Joshua programmed a reverb algorithm specifically for the recording of the Moderat album. “A lot of people have been surprised by this album, but most of them have really liked it. We’re pleased.” Numbers present Moderat live @ ABC, 4 Sept. Moderat take to the stage 9.30pm sharp.

Forest friends: The merry men of Moderat

September 2009

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RECORDS

THE DIRTY DOZEN

This month a rock star's nephew gets in on the act, a historically named new Scottish band emerges, and Nick Mitchell gets an education from Ian Brown IT’S an added bonus when a song expands your vocabulary. Stellify (**, 21 Sep) is the new single by unlikely wordsmith Ian Brown, but it’s also a verb meaning ‘to become a star’. Brown’s celebrity may be secure for now, but if he keeps cranking out forgettable tunes like this he may find himself burning out before long. With two rappers in the September sack, Speech Debelle’s victory in the Single of the Month stakes for August has not gone unnoticed. First up is First Lesson (***, 7 Sep) by Big Dada artist Juice Aleem. His rhymes are fast and furious, but the Evil Nine remix here is better than the original. Lethal Bizzle has followed in Dizzee’s footsteps by crossing over to a mainstream audience, and Going Out Tonight (**, 21 Sep) will soon be all over the radio like rash, thanks to its beefy electro kick and no-brainer lyrics. More synthetic sounds can be heard from frYars, the musical moniker of 19-year-old Londoner Ben Garrett. Olive Eyes (**, 7 Sep) is more than a little reminiscent of the throbbing electro employed by The Knife, but without that duo’s subversive chill this is just a bit too vacuous. It seems France can produce decent bands after all. Following Phoenix’s rather good recent album, Fat Cat endorsed Get Back Guinozzi! release debut double A-side Low Files Tropical / Police & Thieves (***, 14 Sep). With dub-drenched beats, doubled-up vocals and twangy guitars, it sounds bizarrely brilliant, but they’d benefit from stronger songwriting. Suffering from a similar predicament are Wildbirds & Peacedrums. My Heart (**, 7 Sep) isn’t a bad song, but it’s as if the Swedish band feel they have to make it as sonically quirky as possible, undermining their own sincerity with childlike steel drums and marimba.

London trio Phantom stick to more conventional instrumentation on Great Pretender (***, 28 Sep). Elsie Martins’ crystalline voice slinks between the shadows cast by gothic guitars and scratchy, echoed FX on this alluring debut single. There’s nothing dark about San Franciscan duo Girls’ second single Lust For Life (****, 21 Sep). Despite the title, Iggy Pop had no hand in this song: whereas his effort is laced with the dark stuff, this is sweetly naive, from the opening line of ‘I wish I had a boyfriend’ to the jingle-jangle garage-rock guitars. Coming to an indie film near you. It would be easy to be cynical about Stardeath and White Dwarfs. Firstly, the name. Secondly, the fact that singer Dennis Coyne is the nephew of Flaming Lips frontman Wayne. But don’t write them off as mystic musical beneficiaries, because New Heat (***, 6 Sep) is actually very good, in an MGMT meets Late of the Pier kinda way. Swapping trippy stargazing for careening blues rock, New York-based Alberta Cross are set to

unveil their debut album this month. Before that comes ATX (**, 14 Sep), a single that reveals the band as 70s worshipping anachronisms. Sure, they know how to rock, but so do a million other bands. Which brings us to the paradox of Twin Atlantic. On their new single You’re Turning Into John Wayne (*, 7 Sep) the Glasgow band bemoan the Americanization of our culture. Granted, the vocals are unmistakably Scottish, but in every other way they sound like any punk-pop band from across the pond you care to mention. A perfect antidote to such generic fodder is the orchestral indie-rock of The Seventeenth Century (the Glasgow band, not the historical era). Roses in the Park (****, 14 Sep) is a swelling, gorgeous composition centred on a Fleet Foxes-like vocal tableau, embellished with strident horns and subtle glock. A worthy Single of the Month. MYSPACE.COM/THESEVENTEENTHCENTURY

The Seventeenth Century

SINGLE REVIEWS THE HORNBLOWER BROTHERS

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ADVENTURES IN THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC EP

rrrr The Hornblower Brothers are cursed before they’ve even started: they come with the recommendation of patron saint of borecore Steve Lamacq. But as this debut EP’s title suggests, there’s plenty excitement to be found in the humdrum. These five mild-mannered Englishmen have produced an engagingly quirky critique of modern British apathy, in thrall to Half Man Half Biscuit’s scuffed and sarky indie pop, with dogged cheerfulness and humour to boot. What’s striking about the Brothers, however, is their wistfulness: imagine the C86 minnows if they’d eschewed ‘60s nostalgia for 21st-century disillusionment. What’s funny is that Lamacq calls them “uplifting”. He’s almost right. The Hornblower Brothers offer us the opposite of escapism - exactly what we need right now. [Gillian Watson]

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Corpses feral mixture of Converge and Cancer Bats is a furious spectacle in the flesh and comes highly recommended. Understandably, given most young bands limited budgets, this record doesn’t entirely communicate the sheer intimidation factor of a Corpses gig, but it does convey the Glaswegian quartet’s knack for writing a good song and a great riff. Only on track three, Basement Blues - almost certainly intended to provide a breather amidst the surrounding maelstrom - does this EP drop below a consistently high standard. If these guys can get some money behind them, they have the potential to produce something pretty special. [Austin Tasseltine]

Over a jaunty, early Depeche Mode-style synth track, 50-year-old “electronic poet” Mr Irvine explores paranoia and bourgeois sensibilities. It’s an intriguing idea, one certainly worth a listen for the unexpected novelty alone. The poppy, looped simplicity of the music is no doubt intended as a modish backdrop to allow the insightful lyrics to shine through – but Irvine’s delivery is often too distorted to hear them. It’s a shame – having looked up the lyrics online - his droll couplets (“You stole my motor, man, and that ain’t nice. You scared my family, now you’re paying the price”) deserve better. [Euan Ferguson]

PLAYING IVORY BLACK’S, GLASGOW ON 20 SEP AND BANNERMAN’S, EDINBURGH ON 2 OCT.

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MISTERIRVINE

NESPRESCO

DEADMAU5

SOUNDS LIKE LOVE

OCCAM’S RAZOR

GHOSTS 'N' STUFF

21 SEP, DELICIOUS VINYL

OUT NOW, SELF-RELEASED

21 SEP , MINISTRY OF SOUND

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There’s plenty mileage in dearly departed rappers, evidenced amply by the Tupac/BIG commercial vehicles which have rumbled along for the last few years. And when esteemed producer/rhymer J Dilla packed up his record box in 2006, it was inevitable his prolific output would translate into a longrunning legacy. Here, his little brother combines with soulstress Nova over an unmistakable JayDee joint – bumpy beats, rolling bass and ethereal samples abound. As the name suggests, it’s a full-on, hand-on-heart love ballad, served up between satin sheets with extra syrup. It rhymes “hips” with “lips” – all you need to know. [Euan Ferguson]

Piano-led rock has rarely flourished of late in Scotland. With their debut EP, Glasgow’s Nespresco go against the grain, doggedly and sometimes successfully. Occam’s Razor is a mix of introspective bass heavy blues and singalong pop songs that remain enjoyable without ever encroaching on unchartered territory. It’s all very pleasant and heartfelt, and lead singer David Campbell’s honeyed voice proves the perfect accompaniment to the ivories on occasion. But even over four tracks, there’s an element of repetition. If anything, Occam’s Razor shows that UK bands can tackle the genre sans cringe (I’m looking at you, Toploader), whilst ensuring ears will be perked up in anticipation of a long player. Whether their formula is sustainable over that distance remains to be seen. [Finbarr Bermingham]

Autotune is evidently the bastard child of Connor Macleod and Genghis Khan, such is the longevity with which it wages war on the ears. Having claimed pitch-perfect dominion over ex-rapper Kanye West, it now sees fit to put the creative sensibilities of Deadmau5 to the sword. Ghosts ‘N’ Stuff should best be understood as a white flag to the inexorable rise of this formidable studio gadget. Thus, Pendulum’s Rob Swires does his level best to ruin an otherwise acceptable slab of mid-tempo electro, supplemented by a euphoric church organ riff. A respectable offering, but not one that you’ll find yourself completely willing to surrender to. [Ray Philp]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ILLAJMUSIC

SUPPORTING CHARLOTTE HATHERLEY AT KING TUT’S ON 18 SEP.

WWW.DEADMAU5.COM

THE BIG PINK

REBELLIOUS JUKEBOX

ON HISTORIES OF ROSENBERG

DOMINOS

ANOTHER PRECIOUS DAY

ON HISTORIES OF ROSENBERG EP

7 SEP, 4AD

7 SEP, EBONY RED

7 SEP, FUNCTION RECORDS

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Until now, The Big Pink’s creepy crawly atmospherics seemed an unlikely target for industry hype: too weird, too esoteric and too light on direct pop thrills (though Disintegration-era Cure mixed with spaced-out shoegaze has plentiful appeal in itself). To make the expected jump they needed their own Time To Pretend – a song so instant that blogging tastemakers and mainstream masses alike would take firm notice. Dominos is that song –its lushly shimmering glitch-pop underbelly belies the laddish sentiments of the lyrics, and if its crunchy chorus chant isn’t already bouncing around your cranium it will be in the near future. [Chris Buckle]

Beck tried and failed to recreate the spirit of Odelay when he reunited with the Dust Brothers for 2003’s Guero. Judging by this rollicking effort, Mr Hansen might have been better teaming up with Lincolnshire’s own Steve Eyre. Despite his relative obscurity, Eyre’s time as a jobbing DJ saw him develop an egalitarian musical worldview not a million miles from that of his lauded Los Angeles counterparts. A snaking salvo of steel guitar kicks things off before the song itself unfolds in an avalanche of driving bass and acoustic guitar, thumping drums and reedy psychedelic keyboards. As parodies go, it’s a good ‘un. [Duncan Forgan]

With Am I Awake’s echoing guitar and plaintive cymbal ripples, On Histories Of Rosenberg waste no time establishing their serious-but-conventional intentions. Danger Danger tightens the tempest, but it’s too mono-dimensional for its howls to register as anything other than iffy Biffy. Overall, the closest comparison is Sparta, i.e. the plain tofu to Mars Volta’s intergalactic, Blumenthalian space-banquet - which sounds overly harsh till you add the caveat that Sparta were pretty good at what they did, just not exactly eyebrow-raising. Rosenberg are sporadically thrilling, and the (very) occasional surprise – the glockenspiel on Leave Us Here for example – proves they’re not coasting. But they’re also derivative and lacking definition; luckily, two elements that should improve over time. [Chris Buckle]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/REBELLIOUSJUKE

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/OFROSENBERG

PLAYING KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 14 OCT. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MUSICFROMTHEBIGPINK

48 THE SKINNY SEPTEMBER 2009


With a record that’s dividing fans before it's even released, The Dodos’ future is precariously balanced. Eager to discover whether the pressure’s getting too much, The Skinny spoke to drummer Logan Kroeber

Benbecula Records: 1999-2009 Benbecula Records are closing their doors after ten years of experimental electronica, and for a sad reason: The scene just doesn't turn them on anymore. Label founder Steven McConnell vents his dismay...

Best of Benbecula: (Clockwise from top left) Araya, christ., frog pocket, plum.

Interview Billy Hamilton Riding through London in the back of a black cab, The Dodos’ Logan Kroeber has to get to yet another meeting. With album number three Time to Die just about to drop and a full scale European tour to be organised, it’s hardly surprising the skins-man from one of last year’s buzz bands is hurtling around like a decapitated fowl. After all, it was only twelve months ago the San Francisco outfit released their Visiter LP to rapturous acclaim. “Our approach was a little bit different because we’d toured Visiter for so long,” says Kroeber as he explains Time to Die’s swift turnaround. “We were obviously aware that we had to write the next record and we knew there was a certain amount of pressure but I think we succeeded in being able to create a record that doesn’t sound rushed. We had an awesome opportunity to just be home and write music for two months and not let it affect the sound.” Despite Kroeber’s assurances, the shift in The Dodos’ sonic persuasion has been high on the minds of fans. Composed entirely by Kroeber and long-time confrere Meric Long, Visiter was a gauzy trickle of barefaced folk-pop that struck a chord with the more psychedelically attuned. Compared to Visiter’s strained out ingredients, Time to Die is as thick as pea soup; a thrusting burst of peeling harmonies and forceful melodies finished off with glossy production. “It’s interesting hearing peoples’ perceptions of Time to Die,” says Kroeber. “Some people think of it as a step away and some people see it as similar. I guess I was in too much of an insular position to really consider it. We’d recorded a lot of Time to Die before Visiter had actually been released so it all made sense to me, but now that the record’s being shown to people I’m starting to realise that people can view it very differently.” One of the most distinguised changes since Visiter has been the full-time addition of vibraphonist Keaton Snyder. But before fans blame the band’s directional shunt solely on their newest recruit, Kroeber’s eager to explain that Snyder’s role in the creation

and recording of Time to Die was only fleeting. “I think we’re only just beginning to tap into what the actual new band dynamic will be,” says Kroeber with a hint of excitement. “Meric and I had the batch of songs when we met Keaton and we were looking to finalise the vibraphone parts. It was a learning experience working with him and seeing what the instrument is capable of. Now we’re finished Time to Die, we’re working on new songs to see where we can go with these and maybe change the structures a little and push forward.”

"I think we’ve reached a weird little plateau of maturity." Technically cute and rhythmically slow-burning, Time to Die undoubtedly lacks its predecessor’s earth-toned immediacy. Yet, given a little nurturing, the record’s gnarly guitars and pounding drum entwine to reveal a band intent on hitting its creative zenith. Rather than a step-back, Time to Die could be the record that finally puts hairs on The Dodos’ furless chest. “I think we’ve reached a weird little plateau of maturity,” says Kroeber. “With the new material we’re going to explore a territory that’s more rhythmically weird. Musically, I think there’s a lot more that can be done and I’m really excited by what we think we can achieve. Any motherfucker can get lucky out there – I guess the question is can you keep it up?”

Interview Rosie Davies Photo Sonia Mallan “Music, from pop right through to completely underground, is for the most part shit or a tiring derivative. Art is shit. TV is shit. Movies are shit.  Fashion is shit. Western attitudes and values are shit. It seems that we have so little innovation or imagination that we are constantly rehashing and regurgitating the past four or five decades until they have been through our collective bowels at least a dozen times.”  When I first ask Steven McConnell why he has decided to retire Benbecula Records, he appears tight-lipped. He gives a neat and tidy reason. “Ten years to the day seemed a good point to quit while we are somewhat ahead.” The label will continue to promote tracks through Benbecula Music Publishing, he assures me, and the back catalogue will remain available to buy.    When Benbecula was founded in 1999, the Scottish electronica scene was as underground and disparate as it is now. “There wasn’t a great deal happening in Scotland,” laments McConnell. “There still isn’t to some degree.” But there was definitely excitement. Edinburgh artists Phase 6 and Beluga sought to provide their peers with the infrastructure to push their music worldwide. Acting as an open-minded sounding board, the label was shaped by the diverse sound of the innovative artists who sought it out. When asked what the best part of running a label has been, McConnell is clear: “Hearing a new demo that caught my attention for the first time was always a good feeling.” But quality control is paramount to the survival of any label worth its sand, and the Benbecula founder alludes to an increasing difficulty in sustaining that. “I have broad enough taste to appreciate all forms and genres,” says McConnell. “We never sat down and said ‘this is an

electronica label’ – if we were sent music that was innovative we put it out, it’s that simple. But the problem with the genre was it was so easy to make it, but usually very badly. There is now so much of it out there that the signal to noise ratio is tiny, and the gems are hard to track down, if at all.” Besides enjoying one of its most prolific years in 2009 - with well-received releases from the likes of Wouned Knee and The Flowers of Hell, and more to follow - one of Benbecula’s most notable high points occurred in 2003 when Christ., one of the label’s most revered acts, received an encore request from John Peel whilst performing on his Sessions. Indeed, Peel was a fan of the label, and his open-minded, determined search for the innovative and enjoyable has been echoed by the weight of the label’s output. Having celebrated its 10 years with ‘The Final Vinyl’ show last month - featuring sets from label mainstays Araya, Christ. and Frog Pocket as well as newcomer Plum (see inset) - Benbecula will launch a Ten Tracks channel to coincide with its closing in November. Speaking about the collaboration, McConnell promises “something old, something new, something previously unavailable.” Addressing those concerns about the state of music, art and film whilst considering new platforms like Ten Tracks, McConnell anticipates a break in the clouds. “I commend everyone who tries new angles. Like everything in the industry at the moment it’s hard out there. But when the backlash against (un)reality shows and social websites eventually happens, popular musicians will be empowered to actually sit down and listen to the music they are creating and evaluate it objectively. It could be five years, it could be 20, but it will happen. Fingers crossed.” Distance Lends Enchantment to the View by Christ. is released via Benbecula on 21 Sep.

Time to Die is released via Wichita on 14 Sep. Playing King Tut’s, Glasgow on 4 Sep.

September 2009

THE SKINNY 49

Records

Fly or Die

www.tentracks.co.uk


RECORDS

ALBUM OF THE MONTH: ANTI-POP CONSORTIUM

FLUORESCENT BLACK 28 SEP, BIG DADA

rrrr Fluorescent Black opens with a tumult of punk guitars and drums, coalescing into the electro-inflected bounce of Lay Me Down. From the offset, it’s clear that the time the band spent apart has seen a marked evolution in their flow and production. The rappers display a muscular use of double-time - something played with on their seminal Arrythmia LP, but perfected and reinvented here. Cuts squarely aimed for the dancefloor like C Thru You effortlessly equal and surpass the bass weight and pace of the recent crop of BMore and electro-led rap: this is an album to play loud to sweaty crowds. The more experimental tracks, such as the

stripped Timpani (which explodes into oddly-quantized techno); the G-Funk-inspired Volcano, and the space-crunk of The Solution are the highlights lyrically and sonically. The sheer weight of Get Lite, Capricorn One and the Roots Manuva-assisted NY To Tokyo mean this album is bound for a much broader appeal than its predecessor. The return of APC is triumphant: pitch-dark electro, evil bass, and scientific rapping – everything latter day hip-hop has been crying out for. [Bram Gieben] MYSPACE.COM/ANTIPOPNY

ALBUM REVIEWS TIMES NEW VIKING

PART CHIMP

ALICE IN CHAINS

BORN AGAIN REVISITED

THRILLER

BLACK GIVES WAY TO BLUE

21 SEP, MATADOR

21 SEP, ROCK ACTION

28 SEP, EMI

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Times New Viking may joke that their fourth effort boasts “25% higher fidelity”, but they’re fooling no one: the set is slathered in fuzz and tape hiss, as ever. Its stripped-down racket has the same dazzling quality as hot afternoon sun – you’ll marvel at its brilliance, but too much of it can overpower. Dissonance has become as integral to the trio’s sonic identity as their exuberant boy-girl back-and-forth and buried indie-pop hooks, but there’s real development here, as the band’s Flying Nun fetish blossoms into Clean-worship with beetling keys, rushing guitars and welcome temporal shifts. Overall, listening to Born Again Revisited provokes a sense of hard-won joy, like pulling away heaps of corrugated iron to find your loved ones alive beneath the rubble. Speculation about what they could do with better production values is missing the point. Joking aside, Times New Viking are wise to the fact that without noise, there’s nothing.[Gillian Watson]

Part Chimp vocalist and guitarist Tim Cedar claims that Thriller’s opening track Trad is a stoner rock piss-take that happily came up trumps. If so, it proves the old maxim that you really have to love something in order to successfully mock it. Trad is the blueprint par excellence on the Chimp’s third album for the aptly-named Glasgow label Rock Action. The obvious post-rock influences that once tethered the fluid four-piece have been, on the whole, cut in favour of gigantic sludge riffs that drag everyone from Black Sabbath to Mudhoney to Trail of Dead in their wake. At times, Thriller is as ambitious as its title suggests, particularly its closing triumvirate of piecemeal epics which fleet between all manner of perennial rock touchstones. But it remains a concise statement from a band taking a confident stride forwards with no, oh humour me, monkeying around. [Darren Carle]

They said a tribute tour would be the extent of their reunion under the Alice in Chains banner, yet these seminal grunge-metallers have found a road back to the studio without the late Layne Staley. Whereas Staley and Jerry Cantrell often dealt in spine-chilling harmonies that placed a candid lens on the brutal truths of a man coming undone, the vocal alliance between Cantrell and the gently-introduced William DuVall is comparably understated. But there’s a sense of survival in their couplets, where bluesy shards of metal like Last of My Kind etch a picture of a battle-hardened band plunging their tattered flag deeper into the dirt. From a punishing lead riff that rips like a hornet’s nest being poked with a chainsaw on Check My Brain to the all-too-brief eponymous piano-led eulogy featuring Elton John on the ivories, AIC go vintage as often as they surprise with this fourth LP. Against some odds, it’s a compelling start to a second act.[Dave Kerr]

PLAYING STEREO, GLASGOW ON 25 SEP WWW.MYSPACE.COM/TIMESNEWVIKING

PASTELS/TENNISCOATS

WWW.PARTCHIMP.COM

CHUCK PROPHET

WWW.ALICEINCHAINS.COM

ANDREW W.K.

TWO SUNSETS

LET FREEDOM RING

55 CADILLAC

7 SEP, GEOGRAPHIC

7 SEP, COOKING VINYL

7 SEP, SKYSCRAPER MUSIC MAKER

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The evocative title of this collaboration between Glasgow’s The Pastels and Tokyo’s Tenniscoats neatly summarises its scope, cleanly articulating the twin creative impetuses and their distant origins on the banks of the Clyde and the Sumida. These titular skies cast their shimmering reflections in the music’s deep pools of willowy sighs and gentle swells, with opening instrumental Tokyo Glasgow making the record’s duality unmistakable. There’s no abrasive clash of cultures here, only harmony. Tenniscoats singer Saya’s vocals on the title track prove that those not fluent in Japanese don’t need to understand the lyrics to be moved by the sentiment, and Song For A Friend floats on an intensely pretty melody, while Start Slowly So We Sound Like A Loch makes floating in icy waters sound positively lush. Two Sunsets, then, is a tale of two cities: an enveloping delight both familiar and unusual, gentle in its tempo yet invigorating in its possibilities.[Chris Buckle]

A four-letter acronym – SSPI – adorns the cover of Andrew W.K’s latest. Super-Sweaty Party Initiator? Swell Solo Party Incubator? There are a few possibilities, but the P’s got to stand for Party, right? Wrong. Mr WilkesKrier instead humbly presents his Spontaneous Solo Piano Improvisations. That’s right – a man known for aural testosterone like Party Hard, Party Till You Puke and Party (You Shout) and, more recently, a kid’s television show entitled Destroy! Build! Destroy! (in which children are given – I shit you not – rocket launchers), has decided his new venture should consist of eight unstructured, unembellished piano ad-libs with nary a bloody nose or chugging guitar in sight. If you’ve previously dismissed him as a lunk-headed rock-gonk then you might be surprised by his piano proficiency, but novelty chutzpah aside, it’s difficult to recommend such an anachronistic project to even the most avid acolyte.[Chris Buckle]

PLAYING STEREO, GLASGOW ON 2 SEP

Cult longevity can often be as much a curse as it is a blessing. While the existence of an audience means an artist can continue to make his or her presence felt, opportunities for gleaning new listeners tend to be scant. That doesn’t mean that the product has to be irrelevant – something former Green on Red man Chuck Prophet proves to mighty effect on this incendiary new offering. Recorded with luminaries such as Kelley Stoltz and former E Street Band drummer Ernest ‘Boom’ Carter in Mexico City at the height of the swine-flu panic, Let Freedom Ring is an energised shot across the bows of the American dream. Prophet’s playing and singing burns with righteous ire throughout from the Clash-like Telecaster thrusts of opener Sonny Liston’s Blues to the disgusted denouement of the title track where he laments the fact that ‘the hawk always cripples the dove’. Lovers of unfettered rock and roll and impassioned and politicised songwriting chops will find much to cherish.[Duncan Forgan]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/THEPASTELS

PLAYING KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 25 SEP

WWW.ANDREWWK.COM

VIVAN GIRLS

GARY WAR

TRASHCAN SINATRAS

EVERYTHING GOES WRONG

NEW RAYTHEONPORT

IN THE MUSIC

7 SEP, IN THE RED

7 SEP, SHDWPLY

14 SEP, LO-FIVE RECORDS

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The second full-length from Brooklyn’s Vivian Girls is a bit like a Woody Allen film: the plot has moved on, but the main ingredients remain resolutely the same. There are Ritalin-fuelled riffs kicked out with reckless abandon, machine-gun snare hits and shimmering harmonies embedded in their grungy soundscape - and the one-take production style is apparent throughout. Of the highlights, On Desert’s high-pitched repetitive guitar lines quickly distinguish it from other songs on the album. I’m Not Asleep reaffirms the vocals’ prettiness; the call-and-response singing shows the band off at its shambolic best. Moodier than its predecessor, Everything Goes Wrong may not hold quite the same instant appeal as their 2008 debut, though the lyrical content still dwells almost exclusively on matters of the heart. Yet this is unselfconscious bashbash guitar pop, and though the Vivian Girls continue to divide opinion, their latest pile of playful punk may prove hard to resist.[Lauren Mayberry] WWW.MYSPACE.COM/VIVIANGIRLSNYC

50 THE SKINNY SEPTEMBER 2009

Psychedelic music may have hit its commercial peak around the time of Sgt Pepper’s, but that hasn’t stopped a succession of space cadets from setting off on mind-altering journeys since. On this fantastically spooky offering, Brooklyn’s Gary War takes his cues from psychotic former Jefferson Airplane and Moby Grape singer Skip Spence’s fractured masterpiece Oar to produce something disquieting yet beautiful. With Clouds Went That Way War starts as he means to go on – the prettiness of the melody undermined by his treated multi-tracked vocals and a washed-out instrumental backdrop that sounds as though it is on the verge of dropping into a black hole. The album carries on in much the same swooshing Spacemen Three meets Suicide vein throughout before ending on a two note keyboard instrumental entitled Hope for the Future. If it sounds anything like this, it will be a pretty interesting trip.[Duncan Forgan] WWW.MYSPACE.COM/GARYWARGARYWAR

Despite pre-dating contemporaries such as Teenage Fanclub and having more than their fair share of seminal moments tucked away in their unjustly niche back-catalogue, Trashcan Sinatras have never managed to inspire quite the same levels of devotion as the Fannies. In The Music is too pedestrian to prompt any major re-evaluation of the band’s ranking in the literary Scot-pop pantheon, but it’ll at least add further gems to their repertoire. Prisons is a cheery jaunt that skips and jumps with delicately deft indie-pop nous, but it’s Should I Pray? (featuring Carly Simon on co-vocals) that impresses most by stylishly breaking free from the overly obvious indie-pop paradigm. For the album’s highlight, the Irvine-ites wrap themselves in a plastic soul sheen and adopt a smooth strut closer to Philly soulsters The Delfonics than anything born of a Glasgow postcode, and in the process redeem the album’s more tepid moments.[Chris Buckle] WWW.TRASHCANSINTRAS.COM


THE CRIBS

MAPS

WITHERED HAND

IGNORE THE IGNORANT

TURNING THE MIND

GOOD NEWS

7 SEP, WICHITA

28 SEP, MUTE

7 SEP , SL RECORDS

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The addition of iconic Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr brings discernible maturity to the structure of The Cribs’ fourth album. While still guitar-heavy and frantic in places, the riffs that made their earlier tracks (Men’s Needs, Our Bovine Public) memorable are extended beyond the chorus, with Marr’s axe gently guiding the band away from its tendency to ricochet through songs. Without compromising the lyrical sarcasm that seals their popularity, Ignore the Ignorant places emphasis on melody and pacing. City of Bugs shines as the most Smiths-like number, with a melancholy, slowly building guitar chiming alongside a militaristic drumbeat. Save Your Secrets showcases unexpectedly lush harmonies, tastefully reminding the listener that there are pretty voices beneath the screeching punk posturing. While the scornful sentiment and appealing aural chaos of former Cribs records is still in evidence, there can be no doubt that Marr’s influence has exposed the tender, more endearing side of the brothers Jarman. [Rosie Nolan]

On Maps’ Mercury nominated debut album, bedroom recording prodigy James Chapman sounded like an especially blissed-out shoegazer (if such a paradox is possible), layering gauzy guitars over organs, synths and unhurried drums, and drawing inevitable Spacemen 3 and Low comparisons as a result. While Chapmans’ almost somnolent vocals ensure that follow-up Turning the Mind is instantly recognizable to fans, it’s a creative departure for the Northampton musician in other ways. That gentle guitar fuzz that coated We Can Create has been culled and replaced with stark pianos and 80s synth-pop stylings, and the lyrical focus has shifted inwards to extreme emotions, chemical imbalance and even aggression: “I will hit you hard as I can,” Chapman warns on I Dream of Crystal. Musically, Maps’ new sheen is frequently too glaring, but when it combines with an uplifting sequence – as on Love Will Come or Everything is Shattering – the results are still quite special. [Nick Mitchell]

By the time Edinburgh’s Withered Hand opens Good News’s final track with “maybe the world would be better without me”, you’ll want to give him a slap and tell him to pull himself together. Depression is a mental illness and that line proves Dan Willson is delusional. That’s the bad news; the good news is that his debut album makes good on the promise of his two early EPs, partly because four of his strongest early songs are included here too. Supported by local musicians, including his friends in Meursault, Willson ponders his own existentialist quandaries on standouts Love In The Time Of Ecstasy and I Am Nothing. But all the self-deprecation and talk of alienation would get dreary were it not laced with dry humour. Every track features a handful of great lines, but Religious Songs is both his most quotable and most graceful number. The world is better for songwriters like Willson. [Ally Brown]

WWW.THECRIBS.COM

WWW.MAPSMUSIC.COM

WWW.WITHEREDHAND.COM

HOCKEY

STRIKE THE COLOURS

MONSTERS OF FOLK

MIND CHAOS

SEVEN ROADS

MONSTERS OF FOLK

21 SEP, CAPITOL

28 SEP, DEADLIGHT RECORDS

21 SEP, ROUGH TRADE

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Showing some admirable self-awareness, Oregon’s Hockey use the first song on their first album to pre-empt what they know is going to be a recurring criticism of their band: singer Ben Grubin’s extravagantly affected vocal style. “Look out, cos I’m just too fake for the world, oh you know it’s just a game to me” he squeals, yells, and coos, but that confession doesn’t make his flagrant oversinging any more palatable. I’d say it was a shame, but it’s a USP they’ll work to their advantage in some quarters: if you catch yourself thinking Brandon Flowers has got himself rather over-excited, or that Razorlight have got much funkier, you’re probably listening to Hockey on Radio One. There’s a few good ideas here—the lilting backing vocals on third track Learn To Lose are particularly nice—but they’re outweighed by repeated resort to modern rock cliche; and everything’s overshadowed by Grubin’s histrionics on the mic. [Ally Brown]

To strike the colours at sea is to accept defeat, to surrender, to give up. As far as nom de guerre’s go, Reindeer Section alum Jenny Reeve has picked one laden with dramatic possibilities and inherent poeticism. Seven Roads builds on the successes of debut The Face That Sunk A Thousand Ships with ten enchanting narratives of love, loss and plenty more besides. On Cold Hands, Craig B (formerly of Aereogramme) provides an earthy counterpoint to Reeve’s crystal cadence, but otherwise it’s her soulful delivery and cutting directness that shine brightest: the final syllable of the line “If I don’t belong to anybody, let my legs walk to the edge of the cliff” could stop you in your tracks. The only criticism to be made is perhaps of a lack of variety – tracks work individually but altogether it’s tough to comfortably digest. Nonetheless, Reeve once again proves herself a refined vocalist and composer who never once sounds resigned. [Chris Buckle]

PLAYING CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 19 SEP AND KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 20 SEP. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/HOCKEY

PLAYING SNAFU, ABERDEEN ON 3 OCT. WWW.STRIKETHECOLOURS.COM

The history of the super-group is chequered at best, so when they come with a name as dodgy as Monsters of Folk, scepticism is pardonable. But Conor Oberst and Mike Mogis, Jim James of My Morning Jacket and M Ward are some of the finest songwriters of their generation. And despite each stuttering slightly on their most recent releases, their collective debut finds them on top form; content to share the spotlight, resulting in a slow-burning, but excellent album. Each possesses a trademark voice; so thankfully they all take a chance to shine. Ward’s smokey croon lounges over Slow Down Jo; Temazcal could have been a Bright Eyes’ classic, whilst James makes the gorgeous closing ballad His Master’s Voice his own with his unmistakable yowl. There’s a sense of emancipation here suggesting they relish the chance to escape the shackles of the day job, producing variety and consistency rarely found on any album, let alone a side-project. [Finbarr Bermingham] WWW.MONSTERSOFFOLK.COM

TAKEN BY TREES

++MONEY CAN’T BUY MUSIC THE UNIVERSE FOR BEGINNERS

NO MORE STORIES...

7 SEP , ROUGH TRADE

7 SEP, PONY PROOF RECORDS

7 SEP, SONY BMG

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EAST OF EDEN

Victoria Bergsman’s second album as Taken By Trees is born of admirable intentions: seeking to break free from her comfort zone, she travelled with a sound engineer to Pakistan to find some local musicians to record with. So while East of Eden never strays too far from Western indie-pop norms, its South Asian instruments and backing vocalists give it a vivid sense of the exotic. Bergsman’s lethargic vocals even sound like she’s wilting in the heat, although, if you remember her guest spot on Peter Bjorn & John’s Young Folks, that’s just the way she sings. A blog-chasing cover of Animal Collective’s My Girls seems unnecessary, but there are other, better moments on several tracks: the man wailing in the distance on unsettling opener To Lose Someone, the flicked-out guitar trills of Watch The Waves, the complex but gentle handtapped percussion of Day By Day. East of Eden is ambitiously conceived and modestly played. [Ally Brown]

Gordon McIntyre has steadfastedly ploughed the emotive indie furrow since the late 1990s in the guise of ballboy, but here branches out into a collaboration with Swedish musician Maja Mangard. The result is a delicate, poignant and heartfelt set of electronic folk-pop fantasies, which immediately brings to mind the recent work of Johnny Lynch’s Pictish Trail – was he involved in production at all? But where the Fence crooner evokes misty, wistful memories of Fife, McIntyre explores the psychogeography of Edinburgh, from the cracks in the pavements, along the cobbled lanes and up to its regal, soaring heights. At points, his delivery invokes the ghost of Arab Strap, but instead of tending toward the painfully real, McIntyre’s spoken-word sermons feel fantastical, whimsical, gentle, never more so than in The Ghosts or Beautifulgirlsunnyledges. A delightful and dreamy collection of otherwordly flights of fancy which capture the soul of the singers and the city. [Euan Ferguson]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/TAKENBYTREESMUSIC

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MONEYCANTBUYMUSIC

MEW

Alas, it seems unlikely that as a consequence of No More Stories..., Mew are going to escape the all-too frequent comparisons with ethereal Icelanders Sigur Rós. After the release of this album, it will probably be safe to throw Flaming Lips and Spiritualized into the mix by means of discerning what to expect. What Mew’s heritage does allow, though, is an injection of ‘muscle’ to complement the spaced, serene and elaborate soundscapes that have characterised their work over the last 15 years. But, where songs like RepeaterBeater and Cartoons and Macrame Woods are good examples of aggressive crescendo building, the overall goal appears to be one of accessibility via pop hooks (see the synth-laden Beach). When it works, as it does spectacularly on Sometimes Life Isn’t Easy, it’s supremely satisfying. However, a lack of variation in tempo and in Jonas Bjerre’s otherworldy-vocal-as-instrument somewhat detracts from some otherwise sublime sonic creations.[Wilbur Kane] PLAYING ABC, GLASGOW ON 5 NOV.

THE VICTORIAN ENGLISH GENTLEMENS CLUB

LOVE ON AN OIL RIG 7 SEP, THIS IS FAKE DIY

rrr Wilfully weird, The Victorian English Gentlemens Club are a band that will remain half-hidden in the darker extremities of British indie. No T4 spots, Radio One playlists or NME tours for this band, oh no. But while the populace at large will carry on unaware of the Cardiff four-piece, more discerning folk can enjoy their unhinged art-punk clatter with their smug sense of obscurity intact. Three years on from their razor-edged eponymous debut, Love On An Oil Rig broadens their sound without neutralising their appeal. An extra layer of melody fleshes out their previously stark sound on tracks like Watching the Burglars, while a rash of guitar squalls and Adam Taylor doing his best PiL-era John Lydon embellishes The Venereal Game. It’s only on Driver’s Companion, an observational tale of the sexual frustration of the HGV driver, that they take their wacky art school mentality too far. [Nick Mitchell]

TOP FIVE ALBUMS

1) ANTI-POP CONSORTIUM

FLUORESCENT BLACK

2) PART CHIMP THRILLER 3) ALICE IN CHAINS BLACK

GIVES WAY TO BLUE

4) PASTELS/TENNISCOATS TWO SUNSETS 5) WITHERED HAND GOOD NEWS

WWW.MEWSITE.COM

REVIEWS ONLINE rrrr rrr rrr rrr rrr rrrr rrrr rrr rrrr rrr rrr rrr rrrr rrrr rrrr

A SUNNY DAY IN GLASGOW ASHES GRAMMAR BADDIES DO THE JOB BAND OF SKULLS BABY DARLING DOLL FACE HONEY CHUCK RAGAN GOLD COUNTRY CHRIST. DISTANCE LENDS ENCHANTMENT TO THE VIEW ENFANT BASTARD HUNKS KILLING ARM... HEALTH GET COLOR KAITO TRUST INCOMING CEREBRAL OVERDRIVE CONTROVERSO MCINTOSH ROSS THE GREAT LAKES MIMES OF WINE APOCALYPSE SETS IN NITKOWSKI CHAUFFERS THE BIG PINK A BRIEF HISTORY OF LOVE THE SOCIAL SERVICES IT'S NOTHING PERSONAL, IT'S NATIONAL SECURITY WE INSIST! THE BABEL INSIDE WAS TERRIBLE

WWW.THEVICTORIANENGLISHGENTLEMENSCLUB.CO.UK

SEPTEMBER 2009

THE SKINNY 51

RECORDS

ALBUM REVIEWS


The Phantom Band Electric Circus, 19 Aug

Faith No More

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Corn Exchange, 25 Aug

Perhaps fittingly, Glaswegian motorik-prog rock bastards The Phantom Band are tonight playing a venue mere feet away from some of the world’s most haunted back alleys. Notorious for keeping their identity obscured in the press and on stage, right here they need no such gimmickry. Led by the bearded Rick Anthony, the sextet blast into choice cuts from dazzling debut Checkmate Savage, sounding like satan’s disciples if they’d swapped death metal and sacrificial virgins for woolly jumpers and endless nights listening to Neu!, with only a 12 year old malt whisky for company. Over the course of the next half hour they break instruments, strings and - during the gorgeous highland chanting of Island - the room’s collective heart. “Oh Spectre, say my name” sings Anthony in his deep Scottish drawl on Left Hand Wave, and on tonight’s evidence it’ll be more than those who haunt the underbelly of Edinburgh with The Phantom Band on their lips. [Scott Longmuir]

rrrr By their own admission, Faith No More are old men in rock ‘n’ roll circles, and a fair portion of tonight’s audience are marching unquestioningly with them towards middle age. But for a band who have never really collected their dues as far as their influence should dictate, this unexpected reunion tour, dubbed ‘The Second Coming’, is a brash reminder that their often ludicrous genremashing can only be viewed as the folly of youth if you’ve really lost touch with what brought you to rock music in the first place. Mike Patton and his men run a tight and very sweaty main set that ticks all the right boxes. From Out Of Nowhere immediately turns the Corn Exchange from awed spectators into a frenzied, clamouring mob with ‘devil horns’ aplenty; Last Cup Of Sorrow is frankly awesome in its rawness, while Epic melts away the years of bad rap-metal it unwittingly foisted on us. Unfortunately such a stacked main set leaves the resulting two encores languishing and feeling a little indulgent, Patton and co. missing a trick of hitting one home with a sadly-missed We Care A Lot. Still, it’s a minor quibble and given what preceded it we can even forgive that second Eastenders segue. ‘Midlife Crisis’? Pah, not a bit of it. [Darren Carle]

Playing Òran Mór, Glasgow on 23 Sep. Rick Anthony (as Rick Redbeard) plays The Skinny Dip at The Bongo Club, Edinburgh with Aidan Moffat and Over the Wall on 3 Sep. photo: Pete Dunlop

Played as part of The Edge Festival 2009. www.fnm.com

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Monotonix

X-Lion Tamer

Sneaky Pete’s, 19 Aug

National Portrait Gallery, 21 Aug

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If you’re unconvinced by the attraction of standing directly beneath a wild-eyed, hairy, garage-metalling demoniac with sweat oozing from every pore, accumulating on miniscule underpants before cascading into your eyes and mouth as you try not to buckle under the pressure of keeping him perched on a drummers stool high above the baying masses, tonight it’s time to reevaluate the way you’re living. It’s tempting to be snooty and suggest that this is performance art contrivance, and yes it’s what Israeli mentalists Monotonix do day in, day out. But the manic exuberance with which they terrorise Sneaky Pete’s, utilising every inch and beyond (at one stage everybody decamps, hilariously, outside as the show continues) whilst engaging each and every one of the positively feral crowd as eager props, strongly suggests that each occasion offers a unique experience. Makes you want to lick their ass-cracks – but tonight, that was someone else’s job. Next time! [Paul Mitchell]

Nestled into the central alcove of the National Portrait Gallery, in front of a 13ft graffiti mural of Jesus, Tony Taylor and his preppy v-neck is a somewhat trippy anachronistic joy. A pre-planned piece of performance art couldn’t capture the surreal set-up better than the stray 5 year old who disco hops out from the sedate crowd, complete with those oh-so-enviable of childhood accessories, the high tops with intermittently flashing red lights. Against the best of intentions though, this short set seems slightly stifled by the institution; moments of glitchy synth flair nodding optimistically towards the frayed edge of peripheral abandon before receding courteously into Taylor’s MacBook. A self-effacing cover of Teenage Fan Club eventually lets X-Lion Tamer’s guard down a fraction, suggesting greater scope beyond the basic electro loops. While the Rough Cut Music programme is a brilliantly conceived idea at-large, it proves a little too restrictive for Taylor’s brand of kitschy neon disco this time around. [Becca Pottinger]

www.myspace.com/monotonix

Amanda Palmer HMV Picture House, 22 Aug

rrrr Although she’s recruited a brass band - arriving in the form of local buskers the Horndogs - to bookend her set, Amanda Palmer spends the majority of two hours onstage alone with a keyboard, ukulele, and an impressive vocal range. Longtime fans are treated to a number of Dresden Dolls songs, as well as a guest appearance from boyfriend Neil Gaiman, reading from their book Who Killed Amanda Palmer? The show momentarily trails off towards the end, with the return of support band the Indelicates who make the encore performance of Oasis unnecessarily busy. But Palmer’s tendency towards barely-rehearsed collaborations with diverse artists is part of her appeal, as is her banter with the audience, her humorous thwarting of their attempts to second-guess what’s coming next, and the promise of a secret gig elsewhere later on. Job well done – which comes as no surprise to anyone who has succumbed to her talents before. [Nine] Played as part of The Edge Festival 2009. Check www.theskinny.co.uk/offthebeatentracks for an exclusive video performance by Amanda Palmer in the coming weeks.

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Music

Live reviews

www.myspace.com/xliontamer

Biffy Clyro Corn Exchange, 21 Aug

rrrr Mancunian quintet Oceansize and their self-proclaimed progressive death indie live up to their name. It takes a good four songs of predominantly new material to break through the near-cultish sell-out swarm of the Corn Exchange and the collective beery baritone chants of “Mon the Biff”. That said though, once they’re in they’re in. Their gutsy frenetic peaks lay a happy tinnitus undercoat for the heavyweight acrylic intro of Biffy Clyro’s new single That Golden Rule. Launching straight in to a hallmark spate of sardonically Ayrshire topless revelry, Simon Neil comes up for air after Joy.Discovery.Invention to clarify that he’s “pretty rusty”. If so, it goes virtually unnoticed. Glitter and Trauma and Mountains command some gloriously unsavory crowd surfing, culminating in disarmingly visceral closer Living is a Problem Because Everything Dies. If this one’s anything to go by, getting tickets for the upcoming November tour is going to be far from easy. [Becca Pottinger] Played as part of The Edge Festival 2009. www.biffyclyro.com

Frightened Rabbit Queen’s Hall, 18 Aug

rrrrr Unlike their winged namesakes, the Moth and the Mirror initially find the bright lights of the Queens’s Hall less than attractive, not relaxing until they’re dimmed. Confidence aside, they’re a muted wonder, encompassing slow-burn melodrama, sleepy folk and the occasional xylophone melody reminiscent of Penguin Café Orchestra. Meursault, by contrast, seem entirely comfortable with the notion of 900 or so people nestled in the palms of their hands. As an anguished Nothing Broke reverberates around pillars and pews it’s almost possible to track the collective wonder rippling through the audience. Though the awed atmosphere is nowt compared with that produced by Frightened Rabbit

when Scott Hutchison unplugs to play Poke. It’s a genuine ‘had-to-be-there’ moment: not in a hyperbolic ‘highlight-of-the-evening’ sense, nor because it’s impossible to imagine it replicated another night in another town, but because singing solo and acoustic leaves the song at the mercy of the crowd’s eager larynxes. The passion that Frightened Rabbit elicit is given plentiful outlets, from an opening Modern Leper’s tumultuous splendour through to impressive new tracks (one of which is christened Steve at the suggestion of the crowd), and only the paucity of Sing the Greys material irks. Tonight the band seem humbled and emotional, the air charged and scintillating, and the crowd enthralled to their limit.[Chris Buckle] www.myspace.com/frightenedrabbit


MUSIC

Live Music

PREVIEWS

Highlights by Mark Shukla

SUNSET RUBDOWN STEREO, GLASGOW 10 SEP

With his fire so congested with irons, it’s a wonder Spencer Krug even manages to make it on tour. The Canadian workhorse, who came to many peoples’ attention as half of Wolf Parade’s acclaimed songwriting team, has gone on to arguably greater successes with his ‘side-project’, Sunset Rubdown. Their 2007 breakthrough Random Spirit Lover was a fine effort, but there was always a feeling that

there was more in the tank. Follow up Dragonslayer is already being touted as one of the year’s best and it really is breathtaking stuff. Epic, eclectic and electrifying: here’s hoping their Glasgow date this month can lay claim to similar adjectives. [Finbarr Bermingham] 7.30PM, £9 WWW.SUNSETRUBDOWN.NET

GANG OF FOUR HMV PICTURE HOUSE, EDINBURGH, 18 SEP

The original ‘Gang of Four’ shaped Mao Zedong’s political apparatus for a ten year spell; polemical post-punk outfit Gang of Four, on the other hand, are entering their third decade of taut grooves and questionable dancing. OK, so longevity in music is less fraught than in Communist politics – the risk of imprisonment is significantly lower for starters – but thirty years (alright, so they had a decade off) is still no mean feat. A celebratory tour should reiterate why

their debut Entertainment! is still so frequently aped, and unless a price hike in electrical goods forces a rethink, Jon King’s violent microwave-smashing habit will ensure no one doubts their continued passion just yet. [Chris Buckle] 7PM, £20 ALSO PLAYING ABC, GLASGOW ON 19 SEP

September features a bounty of live music goodness and the month gets off to a cracking start with the next Skinny Dip at the Bongo Club on 3 Sep. Featuring none other than Aidan Moffat & the Best-Ofs as headliners, with support from the Phantom Band’s frontman Rick Redbeard in his laconic solo guise and the mesmerising Over the Wall, you know damn well this will be a night of top drawer revelery – don’t miss it! Badass new-wave pop bands are SWEET – particularly bands whose funk-inflected lead singer sounds like he’s receiving 5000 volts of electricity through his testicles at ten second intervals. Yeah sucka, you gotta suffer to make great art – that’s why we suggest you check out Future Islands at Glasgow Captain’s Rest on 7 Sep and Edinburgh Sneaky Pete’s on 8 Sep. Their singer’s smoking ballbag demands it. Formed around the portentously-voiced Robert Fisher (dude can make Leonard Cohen sound like Joe Pasquale), the Willard Grant Conspiracy will unload their apocalyptic balladry at Glasgow Stereo on 7 Sep, Aberdeen Tunnels on 8 Sep and Edinburgh Sneaky Pete’s on 9 Sep. Moody loners take note. Seems like Neko Case has been hammering away just under the mainstream radar for ages now, and it’s a little puzzling why she isn’t bigger than she is. Factor in the incredible voice, the dreamy, invigorating songwriting and the genuine charisma and you’ve got one of alt-country’s brightest stars. Glasgow Òran Mór 7 Sep, Edinburgh Voodoo Rooms 11 Sep. Best known for their association with Devendra Banhart, Vetiver deserve props on their own terms because a) they have never tried to sell me any cheddar, and b) they aren’t a bunch of kooky try-hard fist-magnets. They also have a totally mellow line in folksy Americana – crucially of the catchy, upbeat variety that won’t make you retch. Catch the good vibes at Glasgow Stereo on 8 Sep. Electric Wizard are Dorset’s most legit psych-doom lords: The Skinny has been drowning in their sludge for years and considers Dopethrone to be an all-time genre classic. Metalheads, stoners and all connoisseurs of fucking evil drug music who know what’s up will assemble at Glasgow Ivory Blacks on 10 Sep to pay their respects. 2009 has seen some pretty great female-produced art pop (St Vincent, Florence, Bat for Lashes) and Theoretical Girl is another name to add to that list. Warm, sparkling melodies playing off against jagged, heartfelt lyrics is the vibe here. Glasgow Captain’s Rest 14 Sep and Edinburgh Sneaky Pete’s 15 Sep. Glasgow based trio Zoey Van Goey drop into

ALL CONNOISSEURS OF FUCKING EVIL DRUG MUSIC WILL ASSEMBLE AT GLASGOW IVORY BLACKS TO PAY THEIR RESPECTS TO ELECTRIC WIZARD

Glasgow Òran Mór on 18 Sep. Proudly brandishing the sceptre of technicolour folk pop, fans of classic Scottish groups like The Pastels and Belle and Sebastien should take note. Howling Bells operate in a rather seductive middle ground somewhere between synthed-up celestial pop and grand, emotional rock music. There isn’t really anyone else who’s nailing the balancing act quite like them but their new record seems to be getting slept on a wee bit. Show some love at Glasgow Òran Mór on 19 Sep. Ok, so we’re assuming you’re all feeling the Phantom Band because, well, they released one of the best albums to ever come out of Scotland and you’d have to be crazy not to be digging on it. Predictably they also kill it live, so let the scramble for tickets to their gig at Glasgow Òran Mór on 23 Sep begin now. Anyone looking for a fix of hard-riffing, emotive rock would do well to check out the Xcerts – their yearning, youthful sound has been honed to perfection and they sound absolutely massive live. Definitely a hot ticket: Dundee Fat Sam’s 27 Sep, Aberdeen Tunnels 28 Sep, Glasgow Òran Mór 29 Sep. Genre-smashing New Zealand collective the Black Seeds round out the month with a gig at Edinburgh HMV Picture House on 29 Sep. Dub, soul, funk and reggae all ride high in their feel-good mix – if you’re not dancing, you’re dead.

WWW.GANGOFFOUR.CO.UK

HOCKEY KING TUT’S, GLASGOW, 20 SEP

Not long out of their wrapper and Hockey’s party vibe is already proving as divisive as yeast spread. Their indie-rock shapes, tinged with electro-pop bleeps and whistles (and who isn’t electro-tinged these days?) would make the perfect accompaniment to Judd Apatow’s more adolescently-oriented material, aurally evoking fictional teenage years spent sipping keg beer from red cups. On the down side they’re also brimful of overblown power-poses - though, luckily for them,

such enthusiasm will look exponentially less ridiculous as the venues increase in size. For now, they’ll make do with the diminutive Tut’s, supported by ace synth-smith Deastro.  [Chris Buckle] 8PM, £8.50 ALSO PLAYING CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 19 SEP. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/HOCKEY

FUCK BUTTONS STEREO, GLASGOW, 24 SEP

Given that Bristol’s Fuck Buttons began playing live immediately after forming, it seems moot to extol the virtues of seeing them perform. The experimental noise two-piece, formed in 2004, have made short shrift of amassing a cult following, hooked on their adrenalinefilled, ear-busting cacophony, complete with keyboard drones, waves of circuited vocals and a bounty of melodies. Having signed to ATP Recordings in 2007, Andrew

Hung and Benjamin Power are preparing to unleash another wall of shuddering atmospheric sounds with the forthcoming Tarot Sport. If the widespread thumbs up given to last year’s Street Horrrsing is anything to go by, the duo’s September UK tour should prove a treat. [Lauren Mayberry] 8PM, £8.50 WWW.FUCKBUTTONS.CO.UK Zoey Van Goey, Glasgow Òran Mór, 18 Sep . Photo: Andrew Moore

54 THE SKINNY SEPTEMBER 2009


MUSIC Divorce, Glasgow, 20 Sep

(4 Sep) and Skinandis in the musical Mecca of Thurso (5 Sep). A brief pause ensues before the emo-tinged outfit join kindred spirits Sucioperro at Lochgelly Words Austin Tasseltine Town Hall (26 Sep) which, for the few remaining people still to make their pilgrimage to this social hub, SCOTLAND gives as good as it gets this month resides in sunny Fife. thanks to the valiant efforts of some exciting domestic Back in the city, Glasgow’s Captain’s Rest hosts talent and a relatively modest influx of big names. furious grind machine The Ergon Carousel (2 Sep). Things kick off at Drummonds in Aberdeen (2 Sep) The band, featuring former members of the infamous when Glaswegian trio Tempercalm bring their edgy Beecher and Narcosis, are a frightening prospect but alternative rock to town, followed by trips to The they’ll be hard-pushed to out-do the two-headed riff Raigmore in Inverness (3 Sep), Hustlers in Dundee (5 factory and buzz-magnet that is Holy Mountain, Sep) and the amusingly socialist-named Area Centre in especially in terms of live performance, with the Glasthe big lights of Stewarton (12 Sep). Not stopping there, wegian duo having accrued an intimidating reputation the hard-gigging triumvirate visits Capitol in Glasgow in only a few short months. (19 Sep) and finally Dirty Martini’s in Kilmarnock (26 With the bar glasses having only just stopped Sep). There’s three fellas with an admirable work ethic. rattling, Captain’s Rest is again subjected to some Healthy Minds Collapse are another domestic righteous fury when Belfast’s Standup Guy cross talent dragging their amps the length of the country axes 15:33:29 with native doom outfit Black Sun (9 Sep). throughout Cathouse September.Skinny They begin at Aberdeen’s 25/8/09 Ad_AUG_PRINT.pdf It’s worth pointing out that vintage Brit punk heroes Tunnels (2 Sep), moving on to Madhatters in Inverness

the UK Subs can be spotted at Hustlers in Dundee (11 Sep). Contemporary Dundonian three-piece Gong Fei make an appearance the following night at Drouthy’s with Stirlingshire experimentalists The Radiation Line (12 Sep), then again at Kage’s “Beartrap” night in the same city (25 Sep). Gong Fei’s bullish but innovative rock shapes have been setting some gigs alight and make them ones to keep an eye out for. The Halt Bar in Glasgow serves up a hearty meal of post-hardcore when United Fruit and Hey Vampires noise up the West End venue (12 Sep) followed by the cantankerous Hey Enemy at Captain’s Rest (13 Sep). Intimidating and brutal art-rock troupe Divorce join the equally caustic Ultimate Thrush for some noise abuse at The 13th Note (20 Sep) then kick out the jams with Rock Action’s noisiest slab of filth, Part Chimp, at Stereo (25 Sep). Easily rivalling most of the usual screaming, tattooed hardcore boys, Divorce frontwoman Sinead Youth has an admirable knack

of making most audiences take an anxious step backwards. Meanwhile, the gloriously named Decapitate Your Date are currently turning heads (boom boom) and play a home-town show at the aforementioned Hustlers in Dundee, joined by Seven Car Pile-Up (20 Sep). Arca Felix are yet another kick-ass Scottish export making their presence felt across the UK this month, appearing at Sneaky Pete’s in Edinburgh with English tour-partners and emotional hardcore champions Helsinki 7 (25 Sep). That show finds them joined by Edinburgh’s thunderous, hip-shaking duo Your Loyal Subjects who’s forthcoming record promises to be a belter. The Arca/Helsinki pairing can also be seen at The Captain’s Rest (28 Sep). Lastly, somehow still alive after years of substance abuse, The Wildhearts can be observed not acting their age at the Glasgow Garage (27 Sep). Special request: if Ginger pops a hip, don’t laugh.

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THE SKINNY 55


CLUBS

Keep Your Eyes On The Ballers

Ballers' Social, one of the most eye-and-ear catching nights in Glasgow's club scene celebrates its second birthday this month. Promoter Joe Coghill reflects on a year gone by

Interview Colin Chapman BALLERS’ Social, the club offshoot of the LuckyMe collective, celebrates its second birthday this month. Just as Luckyme’s star in the musical firmament has steadily shone brighter in recent times, so Ballers’ has developed into one of Glasgow’s most forwardthinking nights in its two-year existence. “Rustie and I started Ballers’ so we could hear modern, contemporary hip-hop in a club environment: no one was really playing this stuff out” explains promoter, Joe Coghill. “Glasgow’s very much a houseand-techno city but we wanted to hear producers like Lil’ Boozie, Timbaland and Bangladesh…we just went ahead and did it and included all our friends”. Aside from utilising the talents of Rustie, this has led to the involvement of LuckyMe artists such as Hudson Mohawke, Mike Slott and Jay Prada. “We’ve used it in part as a showcase for the label”, Joe admits. “Hudson performed his first live gig at the night…although we’ve used it to promote ourselves its also worked as a great networking tool too”. Despite initially centring on hip-hop, Ballers’ has come to embrace various other styles. “We couldn’t afford to put on Clipse or Justin Timberlake, so we booked newer producers we liked” says Joe. “The emphasis moved towards instrumental hip-hop artists, though now we’re really a multi-genre night. Basically, what ever I’m feeling musically impacts on my booking policy. I’m quite compulsive, I never really look at Myspace hits or when a producer’s got a record coming out, if I like someone I’ll just book them”. This scattergun approach has led to appearances by international artists such as Joxaren, Hovatron, Dorian Concept and Dâm Funk, from Sweden, Montreal, Austria and L.A., respectively. “A lot of the bookings come from people sending us their music. They get in touch to say they like what LuckyMe are doing and want to share what they’ve been working on. If I like what I hear, I’ll try to get them to play, regardless of where they’re from”. Aside from various guests, Ballers’ can count on an impressive roster of residents, all linked to LuckyMe: aside from Rustie, Hudson and Jay, these include The Blessings, Dema, Tiago Andrade, Éclair FiFi and American Men. “We all met in Glasgow; I got to know Dom (half of the Blessings) and Ross (Hudson) when I was rapping. Dom used to put on a hip-hop club at the old Stereo (now Bar 78) and we hung out together. We met Tiago through another producer we knew, Oddisee; the pair of them both attended The Red Bull Music Academy;

“WE’VE GOT A REALLY DIFFERENT WAY OF THINKING COMPARED WITH OTHER GLASGOW NIGHTS” Both venues host the upcoming birthday celebrations. Jamie Vex’d’s making his live debut at Stereo alongside the DJ skills of Hyperdub’s rightly-hyped Darkstar and LuckyMe’s Rustie and The Blessings. Local acts Fox Gut Daata and Fulgeance will appear at The Ivy the following night. “We’ve also got Dante’s Fried Chicken catering both events,” reveals Joe, excitedly. “Dante’s a celebrity chef from New York who makes quintessential soul-food on his internet-TV show. You’ll be able to book a table in the Ivy on the Saturday and eat some of the best food you’ll ever have!” Throw in some exclusive art from Dom that’ll be on show for the first time and this birthday doubleheader is shaping up to be something a bit special. Get involved. BALLERS SOCIAL 2ND BIRTHDAY PARTY: PART ONE TAKES PLACE ON 11 SEP, 11PM - 4AM IN STEREO (£8/10). BALLERS SOCIAL 2ND BIRTHDAY PARTY: PART 2 IS THE FOLLOWING EVENING, 8 PM - 12AM IN IVY WITH FREE ENTRY AND ORIGINAL SOUL FOOD SUPPLIED BY DANTE’S FRIED CHICKEN. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/BALLERSSOCIALCLUB

DJ CHART JOE KALAMO

Chris Duncan

NEW IN TOWN

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eptember is something of a confusing time in terms of club nights. Wide eyed freshers emerge from their halls of residence only to be accosted by representatives of every licensed venue in town with offers of cheap booze, free food and big name guests. Or Pat Sharp from Funhouse, in some cases. Places that normally focus on drinks promotions suddenly book live acts and DJs in an attempt to portray themselves as the nucleus of nightlife in whatever city they are based. So, how do you avoid this

deluge of shit and charlatans? In Glasgow, focus on Sub Club, The Arches, Art School, Nice ‘n’ Sleazys, Stereo and any night hosted by Numbers, LuckyMe, Huntley’s & Palmers Audio Club, Wrong Island or Optimo. In Edinburgh try The Wee Red Bar, Bongo Club, The Hive, GRV and Cabaret Voltaire. Nights such as Xplicit, Autobahn, Diamond Dollar, We Are Electric, Confusion is Sex and Bass Syndicate come highly recommended. Up north in Aberdeen try any night at Snafu or Moshulu. Special mention goes to Everything Else

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Hudson did his first record with Oddisee. Rustie and I just met at parties” “The Edinburgh contingent, American Men, Jay Prada all knew Dom because he’s based there”, Joe adds. “Dema used to run Freak Menoovers, if you’re into hip-hop in Glasgow it would’ve been hard not to bump into him”. Though he describes Ballers as a multi-genre night, what does this actually mean in terms of its music policy and how does he feel it differs from other clubs in Glasgow? “Well, it’s pretty broad but you’re definitely going to get hip-hop…we really like to push the ‘new’…we don’t really play tracks to build them up into LuckyMe ‘classics’ in the way a club like Optimo might. We definitely want to keep things moving”. “We’ve got a really different way of thinking compared with other Glasgow nights,” he continues. “We’re not so ingrained into house and techno and the associations that go with these sounds…we might be similar to Numbers in some ways, though they’re more of a techno club putting on hip-hop, while we’re a hip-hop club putting on techno.” With monthly events at both Stereo and the more intimate Ivy, Joe’s able to bring both club-orientated and more experimental artists to Glasgow. “The Ivy’s used as a feeler-club: we take risk bookings with it…you can have a small crowd and put on really innovative stuff”.

Sucks and The Deep End. A much more in depth guide to Scottish clubbing is featured in our Student Handbook, currently being dished out across the country. Hopefully it will ensure that you will never be in the vicinity of a Hollyoaks ‘star’ making an appearance at the Savoy during your brief time on Earth. As a way of thanking us, freshers, please refrain from standing in circles on various dancefloors taking 900 pictures a minute for a Facebook photo album featuring the word ‘random’ in the title.

1. Hudson Mohawke - Fuse Nightcrawlers, Timbaland and Quincy Jones ain’t got shit on this one! 2. Tiago Andrade - Babel Fish A monster of a track from the king of chorizo. 3. Rustie - Keisha Cole Reesmack One of the most requested tracks at Ballers. 4. Low Limit - TrapperKeeper Lazersword’s Low Limit thumps out a certified thizz-face maker for the locals. 5. Joxaren - Sangria Skwee meets Depeche Mode whilst dining with Joker.

6. Apple - Siegalizer U.K Funky’s catchiest melody. 7. Dema - CHANGXXX One of the biggest tracks you will ever hear in a club. 8. Fulgeance - Absolut Belta Honorary Scotsman Fulgeance makes a tribute track for Glasgow. 9. Fabolous - Everything, Everyday, Everywhere Ryan Leslie cuts crisp pop with ugly soul. 10. Chaka Khan - Through the Fire Power ballad essential. [Colin Chapman]


The Wee Chill Queens Park Glasshouse, 26 Sep

The Wee Chill makes a return for its second outing this year in the familiar confines of Queens Park’s Glasshouse. Another tasty line-up has been drawn up to help signoff the summer in style, with the Ralph Lawson-helmed, 20:20 Soundsystem; Prins Thomas and local, current hot-property, The Revenge; Optimo’s JD Wilkes, joining Wee Chill regulars, Harri and Domenic, Sensu and Craig Moogroove; and Subculture’s up-and-coming resident, Telford, set to make his debut at the event. Norway’s Prins Thomas is probably best known for his production partnership with fellow countryman Lindstrom, though he’s also recorded solo as Major Swellings. Responsible for his own, Internasjonal label, he’s been kept busy in recent times, releasing a glut of rather fine mix compilations including latest offering, Live At Robert Johnson, and recently reprised his Lindstrom association with their third full-length effort II. A collaboration with Manchester drummer Danny Ward (aka Dubble D) - combined with the discovery of Argentinean-band Silver City - saw Back To Basics resident Ralph Lawson bring the trio into the studio to form 20:20 Soundsystem. Lawson’s turntable talents, accompanied by the drumming of Ward, Fernando Pulichino’s bass-playing and Julian Sanza’s keys, have seen them form a polished live and studio act, responsible for albums ‘No Order’ and the forthcoming ‘Falling’. The Revenge is a local DJ/producer whose stock has definitely risen of late, thanks to a busy schedule and recent podcast outings for Resident Advisor and our own fair publication. With a talent for slick re-edits released on the L.E.S.S. Productions, Jisco and Instruments Of Rapture labels, recordings on Five20East, the imprint he runs in conjunction with brothers Scott and Ross Langley, and an Ooft Music partnership with Ali Herron - not to mention in-demand engineering skills - it’s surprising he finds the time to eat and sleep! [Colin Chapman] 6pm - 12am, £22 + £2 b.f. Tunnel General Skinny Ad_AUG_PRINT.pdf www.myspace.com/theweechill

The Skinny & ten tracks twisted kids birthday party The Arches, Glasgow, 10 Oct

Shameless self promotion? Yes. Worth getting excited about? Most certainly. The very magazine you hold in your hands turns four years old in October, which makes us a toddler. Walking shakily, drooling, talking with minimum coherency, these are all traits the The Skinny’s editorial staff will surely display come the anniversary bash. But the acts on show are the main selling point. Confirmed so far are Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club, David Barbarossa, Slabs of the Tabernacle and Meursault, with more to be announced in the coming weeks. Meursault’s album received critical acclaim across the board and they have been described as “one of the country’s most promising new bands - a group who in the wondrously evocative Pissing On Bonfires/Kissing With Tongues have created one of Scotland’s records of the year”. [by who? - ed] David Barbarossa of Curious Curious and Damaged Goods will be teaching the kids a long-overdue lesson in the finest kraut, funk, disco and anything else that is good and available on vinyl. Joining him will be Andrew Thomson of Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club, following a similar manifesto of high quality music, unrestrained by genre. Italo disco and all related cosmic sounds will be provided by Slabs of the Tabernacle, fresh from their newly found home at Universal, while Brian D’Souza could play, well, anything he damn well pleases. Fingers crossed for an acid set. All this and more artists in the pipeline yet to be announced over the coming weeks. Bouncy castle, paper hats, sweets and piñatas filled with amyl nitrate included in the ticket price. [Chris Duncan] 10PM-3AM, £10.

25/8/09

10:00:21

Xplicit

Pressure

Potterow, Edinburgh, 2 Oct

the arches, glasgow, 25 Sep

Straight up, nae messing, Xplicit throw their biggest party ever this October. Taking place within Potterrow at Edinburgh University, the night boasts a live appearance from Chase & Status, a set from dubstep heavyweight Skream as well as Xplicit resident D’n’B overlord Eno and MC Tonn Piper. How many artists and producers can count Jay Z, Snoop Dogg and Pharell in their fanbase? All whilst D’n’B stars Andy C, Hype and Pendulum give them heavy rotation in the hands of dub-step royalty such as N-Type and Skream? On top of this, have each release enthusiastically supported by the likes of Annie Mac and Zane Lowe? Not many at all, but this is what Saul Milton and Will Kennard, producing under the name Chase & Status, have achieved in a mere five years, with the the highlight of their youngful career so far being their debut LP More Than Alot. The album has helped turn them into a unique phenomenon and by far the biggest crossover act to come out of the underground since Pendulum. If keeping themselves busy in the studio with multi-platinum artists and extensive DJ commitments all around the globe wasn’t enough work, they have confirmed a 29 date live tour of the UK and Europe. This will be their first ever live tour following on from the success of their debut performances at the 2009 BBC Radio 1 Big Weekend and Relentless’ Nass Festival. Their new set up includes the amazing Andy Gangadeen on drums and appearances from vocalists including homegrown talent Plan B, Kano and Yolanda who all feature on More Than Alot. [Anna Seale]

Slam’s landmark techno night rears it’s beautiful head once again this month, this time sans Slam or Silicone Soul, who are currently busying themselves with a tour down under. Standing in for them will be Funk D’Void, fresh off the plane from Barcelona and no doubt crippled by seasonal affective disorder. Headlining this month’s outing is Len Faki, formerly of Lexicon fame during the mid 90s on the renowned house label Plastic City. Faki’s innovative productions and bold concepts quickly attracted artists such as Umek, Samuel L. Session and Oxia to call the label home. After moving to Berlin at the beginning of 2003 there was a definitive turning-point in Faki’s music and business career. He founded the independent mother label Len Series which set itself up as a trademark for innovative techno music that became full of untamed and vibrant energy and whilst remaining strongly aimed at the club. Faki’s concept with succeeding labels demonstrates his open-mindedness for the diverse shades of dance culture whilst also offering the opportunity to fully explore his musical depths and creativity. With his first offshoot, Len Series label Figure, the produce filled the record bags of various DJs and producers such as Umek, Ben Sims, Monika Kruse and Marco Bailey across the years. Joining Len Faki on 25 Sept are Paul Ritch (live), Funk D’Void, Davide Squillace, Sebo K and Aren Weinberg. Fresh from his performance at Slabs of the Tabernacle on 5 Sept, German ex-pat Arne Weinberg will be appearing at Pressure, celebrating the launch of his brand new Diametric label. [Chris Duncan]

2 Oct, 10pm - 3am, £12 advance.

11pm-3am, £15

theskinny.co.uk

More club previews and reviews online

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September 2009

THE SKINNY 57

Clubs

Previews


Clubs

Boutique, C’est Chic What does the music press do when a scene begins to establish itself, but seems to escape branding? Stick a label on it, that's what. Anyone for 'boutique clubbing', the new sound of Glasgow? Text Rosie Davies Photo Katie Leeyoung In 2007, on the music geek-infested forum of DJhistory.com, an emergent promoter seemed to be struggling with an issue: What, he puzzled, can we call “this disco, boogie, cosmic, space, balearic, electro-funk, re-edits type vibe”, which was becoming more and more popular with the young kids in the underground clubs of the northern English city he lived in? The post provoked a discussion on the perils of defining a scene. On one hand, argues Greg, “it’s quite a good thing that there isn’t a name”, knowing that often, definition means either the death of a scene, or a fate worse than death - it becomes mainstream. On the other, though, “this hardly helps things grow”. Any discerning and vaguely alternative clubber in Glasgow will have stumbled into at least one night recently which fits the above description, give or take a few genres. Huntleys & Palmers at Stereo, Slabs Of The Tabernacle at the Twisted Wheel (now relocated to Universal) or Wrong Island at Nice ‘n’ Sleazies. The disco-italo-electropsychedelic vibe is certainly hot right now. But it’s true, they seem to escape any kind of categorisation. Slabs, for example, is a little more defined, “broadly speaking it’s a techno night at heart”, says promoter Joel Shaw. Others simply flounder when you ask them their music policy, focusing on what they wouldn’t play, rather than what they would, “Let’s just say, I’d never play something I didn’t like at all”, says Thomson, founder of Huntleys & Palmers Audio Club. Teamy, one half of Wrong Island, just wants to play anything he considers good music, full stop, as long as it makes for a better club experience. “I still only use vinyl, except for the odd thing that isn’t out yet. Music sounds better in a club, played off a nicely mastered piece of vinyl through a proper system and to a crowd of dancing people.” And yet, they all seem to...click. Perhaps it’s the seemingly relaxed attitude of the promoters, with often obscure or self-indulgent bookings, these nights refuse to book on a pull-a-crowd basis. Or maybe it’s the focus on sharing music, whether that’s via the Slabs monthly podcasts, or the mixtapes which Thomson hands out. It could be the fact that every night started out as a party for their mates. “I used to make CDs for my friends and the club nights seemed to be an extension of that. I was always that person and still am now, but to a larger extent.” The quote is Thomson’s, but it could have been from any of their mouths. Perhaps, instead of creating some new term for this scene, some hideous hybrid of genres to lump them together, we could compare them to another social activity, which won’t confine the nights or herald their predictability: boutique clothes shopping? There’s something in this. As with any credible boutique, they tend to escape definition by constantly changing, eschewing any attempt at gripping onto one style, or genre, for too long. Try to shove any of these nights under a tag at your peril - each promoter instinctively, seemingly out of necessity, makes it his business to ensure that you know they’re not just about disco. That they’re not just about any kind of music. They firmly believe that ‘good music is good music’, as stated on the Huntleys & Palmers website, and they all play whatever they feel like on the night, selected from their enviably huge, impressively wide-ranging record collections. Yes, you cannot escape the Optimo comparisons. But, muses Andy McColgan, keen promoter of a series of fledgling party nights, and station manager at underground music haven

58 THE SKINNY September 2009

Radio Magnetic, “we are all Optimo’s children”. Images of Twitch and Wilkes in earth-mother pose aside, it’s true. This policy of having no music policy is by no means unique. But on the Optimo website, the Glasgow gurus are, as ever, already one step ahead, aware that “not following a formula becomes a formula in itself.” The key, most likely, is to realise that even eclecticism is a formula, in the same way that the boutique clothes shop, popping up seemingly unconnected and de-contextualised, is still intrinsically linked to its sisters. All the nights offer a slightly different twist, yet all are offering the same type of product, explains Thomson. “It is hard to be an alternative if you’re the same as everybody else. But, before I started my nights, I was hanging out with the Numbers mob, and they thought I was this weird guy who listened to bands and wears brogues. To guys who listened to bands, I was this weird guy who went to Numbers. So, as much as I knew all these fellow promoters, there was a difference in the style of music we were putting out.” Like the boutique clothes shop, despite the seeming attitude of spontaneity and ease with which they pop up, “the spirit of making it up as you go along is alive and well, let’s put it that way”, says Teamy - the nights also seem to involve a business mind of some sort at the core. “Putting on a club night seemed a logical progression”, Teamy continues, “especially as I’d learned loads about club promotion through working at Optimo for about five years”. It’s this mix of know-how and spontaneity that seems to generate the nights’ success, transforming them from small time parties for mates to more established, and respected, brands. When I ask Thomson why he is going to London to put on a night of some exciting yet unknown names, he says “If I put them on here, no-one would come and see them. My hope is to build up a relationship with the acts, and step it up gradually. In October, I’m going to put on a night taking over the whole of Stereo, and hopefully that means some of these acts can get a chance to play.” There are two kinds of boutique: those that seem to deliberately deter a wide custom, valuing oneoff pieces and remaining relatively unknown, and those that encourage a wider engagement with the unusual. These nights are more like the latter: each one is actively promoted. Why? Thomson has to think about it, before concluding: “The main point of a night being busy is so people can have a better time”. However, this tight group of music fanatics seem to genuinely lack the sense of cut-throat rivalry that accompanies the promotion of bigger, more institutional nights. If there weren’t so many of them, they’d most likely get a steadier, fuller crowd. Do they not feel a little frustrated by the level of choice out there for the intrepid Glaswegian clubber? “That argument takes away from the diversity of the acts they have playing,” McColgan argues. “Because they are all booking according to their personal taste. If only one of them existed, certain acts might not be seen in Glasgow. Maybe you would find that the one night would end up eventually booking them all, but I doubt it.” “What’s amazing is how different the nights that you’re talking about are. It would not be unimaginable for three more good nights to start up, which are similar enough to be linked to them, but different enough to all exist separately. Can you imagine? It’d be awful! What would you go to?”

Andrew from Huntleys & Palmers

Wrong Island, 12 Sep, 11.30pm-3am, Nice ‘n’ SleazY, £3. Slabs Of The Tabernacle, 5 Sep, 11pm-3am, The Universal, £7.


The basement of one of Glasgow's favourite watering holes continues to hold some of the most exciting new club nights in the city. Wrong Island host Teamy talks about his creation ahead of its second birthday

Clubs

Wrong Sounds Iggor's Inferno

Former Sepultura drummer turned genre masher Iggor Cavalera comes armed with technological goodies to headline this month's Death Disco. The giant, glowing, rotating skulls won't know which way to look

Interview Chris Duncan “I suppose we are carrying on the great DJ tradition of playing anything that fits the dancefloor, regardless of genre. That’s definitely something that I think was lost for a while in lots of clubs, [it was] one genre all night, but you definitely see more of it again. All the guests we have had over, more or less, played a variety of stuff and all of my favourite DJs at the moment do it too. Optimo, Kode 9, Tim Sweeney, Andy Blake, Jackmaster, Ramadanman et al, they all have certain genres associated with them but their DJ sets are chock full of all sorts.” Teamy, one half of the duo who host the monthly Wrong Island parties every month in the basement of Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, is charting the two year success of his creation. “We had already done a party with Shit Robot down at the Sub Club in July. Marcus Lambkin’s birthday is the day before mine, so we’d decided to do a wee party to celebrate. Larry and I both played at that, so I suppose that was the de facto beginning of Wrong Island. But the first official Wrong Island was back in September 2007: I played with my good friend Dirty Larry, who was one of the resident DJs at The Glasgow School of Art’s Eskrima night many moons ago. He left to live in Dubai for a few years and when he got back we were offered the chance to do a slot in Sleazy’s.” Wrong Island ultimately aims to throw a monthly party with an emphasis on enjoyment and excellent records, instead of pandering to the latest fad genre or big act in an effort to pull in larger numbers. It is a goal the night has succeeded in achieving, although they haven’t done it alone. “Over the past two years we’ve had James and Pat from LCD Soundsystem, Truffle Club, Andy Blake, The Niallist, George Issakidis, Xaver Naudascher, Prince Language, Ramadanman and Den Haan. The night George Issakidis played was a riot. It wasn’t the busiest night we’ve ever had but everyone that was there was absolutely wasted and got really into it. It’s one of the few guest nights we had the forethought

to record and the mix is this great slo-mo, sleazy acid thing. But we’ve been lucky in that all the people we book turned out to be really great people with great record collections, a sure-fire way to a good party. Sleazy’s is so much fun and works so well that I reckon we’ll keep doing it for as long as we’re welcome. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it and other clichés. “The first night we did Wrong Island in Sleazy’s, we were a bit worried that an electronic night might not

"We were a bit worried that an electronic night might not work, Sleazy's being the famous indie venue that it is and all that, but how wrong we were"

Interview Chris Duncan Iggor Cavalera is still best known for his time as the drummer in Brazilian metal band Sepultura. Throughout the nineties, Sepultura became a key part of the modern metal music scene and Iggor was a major factor in making this happen. His percussive talents saw him build up a wealth of accolades including several “Best Drummer“ titles across the years, as well as touring the world and shifting well over 10 million albums. Today however, Iggor is part of a new and starkly different project, in the form of Mixhell. “I’ve always been into different styles of beats through my whole carrier and that includes electronic beats. People just started inviting me to do DJ sets in Brazil...that’s how the whole thing started.” says Iggor. After working alongside the likes of Necro, Ice T, Zegon, Sabotage and LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy, Iggor and his wife Laima have now moved the project from its creative home in the studio to the stage. Here it has become a DJ project with an unusual live element. Iggor and Laima have incorporated an MPC sampler into their DJ sets, allowing them to combine electroclash, hip-hop, punk and rock more easily. The music they are

creating on the fly is very beat oriented and still has its roots in Iggor’s dominating percussive background. Iggor and Laima’s blend of old and new makes it a perfect fit for Death Disco as the combination of turntables, CDJs, mixers, laptops and drum pads create an extremely versatile and engaging experience. Add to this the implementation of a live aspect with Iggor on a drumkit and the whole show takes a different turn. “Live we use three Pionneer 1000 CD decks, an Akai MPC 500, a Korg KPD 3, a Pioneer 800 mixer and live drums. Honestly, we are not big fans of playing live with computers, we don’t feel the sound so bright. We’ve already tried to DJ with Serato for example and it sounded too compressed on the highs and lows.” Mixhell’s first release, ‘Highly Explicit’, came out on the German label Boyz Noise Records earlier this year. The track is received heavy rotation from some of the biggest names in the industry after it was remixed by Brodinski. “Our friend alex (Boys Noize) heard the track and asked us to release as a picture disc. We love it, we are very proud to work with him!” 19 Sep, £12, 10.30pm-3am

work, Sleazy’s being the famous indie venue that it is and all that, but how wrong we were. Halfway through the night I noticed the crowd, part people we knew who’d come to dance, part people who’d just wandered in but everyone was getting right into it. After that, we’ve not looked back. It’s the perfect little venue for a rave-up.” Wrong Island’s second birthday takes place in Nice ‘n’ Sleazys on 12 Sept. Teamy and Dirty Larry’s podcast for The Skinny will be online soon.

253 Argyle Street, Glasgow 0141 565 1000 www.deathdisco.info

September 2009

THE SKINNY 59


wee chill.pdf

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60 THE SKINNY September 2009

1

27/08/2009

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Glasgow music Wed 02 Sep Live Jazz

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:00, £2

Fortnightly residents

Barry Moore

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie

Ohbijou, Barn Owl, Rags And Feathers

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie folk rock

THE ANIMALS, SPENCER DAVISÊ The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £16.50

Classic rock and blues

Mono Jazz

The Dodos, Dan Michaelson

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Indie

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7

Revelations

The Rutlands, Unknown Method, The Vibe, Fist Fights For Old Men

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–01:00, £3

Weekly indie.

Cry Parrot Presents: Blues Control, Tropa Macaca, Nackt Insecten Trio 13th Note, 20:30–23:00, £5

International rock and pop

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie rock

Thu 03 Sep Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Classic rock

Dave Dominey

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Funked up bass loops with laptop, electric bass and a guest soloist

The Apple Scruffs, Tenemants, Symptoms, Ewan Butler ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6.50

Indie punk

cheap’n’nasty night

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Showcase of sleaze

The Shed Live (ACRYLIC IQON, THE TOI and KIZZY STAR) The Shed, 19:30–23:00, Free

Weekly live music showcase

Herculean

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Mythological rock

Conspiracy 5, Vidi Well, Sams Dice Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Punk rock

Shut Up and Eat Your Garage Rock: Alkotron, The Retrofrets, The Fnords, The Pharisees Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

Scuzzy, fuzzy garage rock ‘n’ roll

String Driven

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Folk rock

Dropkick, The Sweetheart Revue, Paul McLinden 13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Americana folk

The Drawing Room Sessions Drawing Room, 21:00–23:45, Free

Weekly acoustic sets

Fri 04 Sep Recreating Existence, Black Dog Obsession, The Dead Leaves, Soul Remover

Sat 05 Sep Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

CG Live present: Echofela (Would Be Kings, Daybreak, Rockburn) ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Acoustic pop rock

Macfloyd

The Pavilion Theatre, 19:00–23:00, £15/14

Tribute

Echofela, Would Be Kings, Daybreak, Rockburn Classic Grand, 19:00–23:30, £6.00

Up and coming Scottish bands for over 14s

you can’t eat the word food Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Insightful indie rock

The Blow Monkeys, Paul McGranaghan

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Pop and soul

Charlotte O’Connor, The Fifty Penny March, Caragh Nugent

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Acoustic folk

Flowers In The Dustbin presents: The Melodic Recession (The Echo Session, The Rudiments, The Hardy Souls) 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £5

Alt. indie

monrow, The Twist, Someones Sons Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie pop

Thunder in Paradise Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Glasgow based promoters and a yet to be confirmed line-up

Halt Bar Hijack

The Halt Bar, 21:00–23:00, Free

Weekly showcase

Sun 06 Sep Final Silence, Break The Skyline, Kementian, Purpose Failed, As Darkness Falls Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Death metal and grindcore

Zoobizaretta

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Golden Ghost

CJÕs Amazing Rock N Roll Night - The Brutes, The Acid Fascists, Thee Phantom Herd

Rock and punk

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Laura Goetz plays addictive songs with catchy melodies.

Jane McDonald

The Pavilion Theatre, 19:00–23:00, £18.50-£27.50

‘Loose woman’, in a strictly professional sense

Mr. Kil

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £5

Rock

The Lava Experiments

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Shoegaze

Flowers In The Dustbin presents: The Darkwave Opera (KICK TO KILL, The Hallions, Betatone Distraction, Scragfight) The V Club, 20:00–23:00, £5

One of the country’s newest indie labels presents an evening of alt. gothic indie for the musically morose

Numbers and Academy Events present: Moderat (aka Modeselektor + Apparat) ABC, 20:00–23:00, £12

aka Modeselektor and Apparat

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

folk, blues and beyond

Initial Itch

13th Note, 19:00–23:00, £2/1

Flatrate return with another scintillating night of music, spoken word and scratch performance. A high octane night full of thrills, spills and faint disgust. Five-piece instrumental band from Montreal

Album launch

The Wholigans, Combat Rock

Michael Simons

Indie punk rock

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Noise experimentalists

Jinty McGinty’s, 20:45–23:00, Free

Pop punk

Jim Bob (Ex Carter USM)

Man Must Die

Acoustic Butterfly

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

BELLE ORCHESTRE

Blues Control, Tropa Macaca, Nackt Insecten, Single Helix Trio 13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Mon 07 Sep Glasgow Live presents: Not advised-Summerlin, Up For The Let Down

New wave, down-tempo Dutch pop

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

Primitive, swampy garage

Ergon Carousel, Holy Mountain

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Prog grindcore

The Computers, Expanding Demands, theeightyseven

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

The nubile six-piece swagger forth with their latest synth fuelled nihilistic gem, Dirty Carpets & Contraception

TRIBUTE TAKEOVER in aid of NORDOFF-ROBBINS: Gallus Cooper, Tigers on Vaseline Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alt. Indie

No Tribe

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

Throw rocks against your ear drums. Weekly.

Wreckin pit: Crossfire, Prairie Dugz, The Begrudgers, The Fuck Ups 13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Punk

The Arches, 19:30–22:00, £12

Neko Case

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £12.50

Revelations

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–01:00, £3

Weekly indie.

Podcart: bronto skylift Acoustic Butterfly

Indie rock

Jinty McGinty’s, 20:45–23:00, Free

Thu 10 Sep ELECTRIC WIZARD

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Psychedelic metal

JEM

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Indian and Scottish style music on guitar, cello, soprano sax and vocals.

BLEED FROM WITHIN

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £6

Punk rock 5-piece

The Low Anthem

Country rock

Eightball, Jeye T, Ryan Bisland Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £16

PCL Concerts present: Lemonheads ABC, 19:00–23:00, £16

Alt. indie

Rap and hip hop

Sunset Rubdown

Future Islands, Fevrier

Indie

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie rock

THE LONELY SOULS (Peski Kings)

Hank III

Alt folk

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Punk rock

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Country americana

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £8

Lost in Oxygen, The King Hats, YRock School Special

Stereo, 19:00–23:00, £10.50

Blackhole, The Plight, Throats

THE MEN THEY COULDNÕT HANG

Hype-house club rock

The Arches, 19:30–22:00, £14

Folk punk

Hard, alt. and soft rock

KMR presents: ocean reid

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Acoustic pop

Alt indie

Call Me Ishmael, Spy Movie, Croma

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

Acoustic folk

Tue 08 Sep

Live at The Mill (Diamond Sea, My Cousin I Bid You Farewell) The Mill Glasgow @ Òran Mór, 20:00–22:30, Free

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Showcase double-bills for the best upand-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to themill

Andy Miller

Room 039, Lowe, Cold Dog Soup, Ready2Fall

Acoustic

Rock pop

THE SUBHUMANS Punk

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Tori Amos

Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 19:00–22:30, £33.50

American pianist singer/songwriter

FLEET FOXES

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

COUNSELLED OUTÊÊ

Touring the release of We’ll Make Our History

Soul and R&B

Coldplay @ Hampden Park

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £8

Hampden Park, 00:00–00:00, £55/50

Information Libre Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £5

Wed 16 Sep

Monthly indie rock

Live Jazz

Mumford & Sons, King Charles

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, sold out

Alt. folky londoners

Death metal

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Twisted Melons

All The Young Nudes - Life Drawing

Alt rock

I Am Enforcer, Decoy, Third Wheel

Tribute

Using only guitar and laptop, I Am Enforcer is a one man Machine Head. Decoy make tight n' tidy indie rock. Third Wheel combine the song structures of Oasis with the guitar virtuosity of Eddie Van Halen

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

THINK FLOYD

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £13.50

MakethisRelate (EP Launch): Whatever They Say

Weekly acoustic sets

Fri 11 Sep FEI COMODO Metalcore

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £16

Alt acoustic blues

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Pop

Okkervil River

The Ocean Fracture, Your Tragic Silence

Indie folk

Prog rock

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £12.50

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

A Wilhelm Scream, Failsafe, Always Until Victory

Mulehog, The Only Jones, A fight You Cant Win

Punky hardcore

Bluesy rock

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Red Light Exit, Midget & The Gems, Exit to Your Left + Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Sat 12 Sep NO DICE, The Brilliant Independance Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £6

Punk and rockabilly

Stand Up Guy, Black Sun

BLACK HACK, ROUGHMUTE, MAGGIE KILLED ME, THE REVIVAL, LONG WAY HOME

indie rock

Punk rock and emo

Alt. rock

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Rock pop

Energy!, CircleStop, Expanding Demands, Your First Mistake

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Post-punky synthy house/ bungalow

SUNDAYS are SPECIAL: Mike Nisbet, Lyndsey Sugden, Storm, Tukoo, Dean Queasy Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

Rock

Whispertown 2000

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Soul

Revelations

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–01:00, £3

Weekly indie.

Acoustic tribute night: the beach boys v’s the byrds 13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Acoustic glam

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £8

No Tribe

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

Throw rocks against your ear drums. Weekly.

Sonny Marvello

Acoustic covers night

Acoustic Butterfly

Jinty McGinty’s, 20:45–23:00, Free

Thu 17 Sep Rockstar Promotions present: Wrecked, Room 039, Medusas Curse Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Rock

Confined Human Condition

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Tron Theatre, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Indie

Featuring the world premiere of Terror of Love by award winning young composer Phillip Neil Martin and Alejandro Viñao’s The Baghdad Monologue.

Mon 14 Sep Indian classical

BMX Bandits, The Primary 5, Randolph’s Leap

Mono Jazz

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, cancelled

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £8

Yaman

Academy Events present: Twenty Twenty (The Gap Year Riot, Snakes Hate Fire, The Broadcast)

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

the black hand gang

Country rock

Powerpop

The alt. folk soundtrack to every 90’s rom-com you ever saw

Mono Jazz

Sun 13 Sep

Aussie rock

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £5

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £25

Alt folky jazz

Folk rock

Drawing Room, 21:00–23:45, Free

PCL Concerts present: Jet (Detroit Social Club)

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £14

DF Concerts present: David Gray

Weekly showcase

The Halt Bar, 21:00–23:00, Free

The Drawing Room Sessions

Weekly eclectic collective.

Wed 09 Sep

Soft rock matadors and hip hop bling boy

Halt Bar Hijack

Punk

Indie

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £6

Richmond Fontaine

Hampden Park, 19:00–23:00, £49.50/£60.50

clara belle, earl grey & the loose leaves, D bass collective

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

The Duke and the King, Jonathan Carr, 32 Miles to Breakfast

Eclectiv

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

Coldplay, Jay Z

Out Of Sight, Save Your Breath, Light and Sounds

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Rock pop

Honest Thief, The Villeins, Part Time Signals

Harcore metal

Mando Diao

Punk

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Indie rock

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Alt rock

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6

The Hot Melts, Variety Suite

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Open Fire

Cinematic cacophonies of contradiction

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

red scarlet

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

Totally Enormous Extinct Dinosaurs

Fortnightly residents

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, Free

The Flying Duck, 20:00–22:00, £4

The Halt Bar, 20:00–23:00, Free

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:00, £2

Triple G present: FACT

Acoustic Session/Open Mic

Alt. indie folk

Bar Bloc, 23:00–13:00, £tbc

Shut Up and Eat Your Burghers - Dupec, Pose Victorious, White Heath The Briggs, Strawberry Blondes, Middle Finger Salute

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Weekly eclectic collective.

The Void

Alt rock

Noise-rock from Newcastle

Scratch poetry and comedy

Eclectiv

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

The Shed Live (NIGHTSHIFT, Maria Doherty)

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Jeremy Jay

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Pop

The Shed, 19:30–23:00, £6.50

Forever Broken, Sparrahawk

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £16

That Defensive Arm, Hey Vampires, United Fruit

Initial Itch

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

James Grant

Acoustic Aid

Weekly acoustic. Free pizza and a charity cause. Karmic balance, oh yes

All The Young Nudes - Life Drawing

The Flying Duck, 20:00–22:00, £4

KMR presents: fol chen

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, Free

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, Free

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £6

Indie rock

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Acoustic Session/Open Mic

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Paloma Faith, The Langley Sisters

KMR presents: times new viking, copy haho, mellifluous, surreal knights Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £9.50

Neo soul

Psychobilly breakbeats

The Shed Live (THE WEE MAN, Bratchy, Rob Kane) The Shed, 19:30–23:00, £2

Theoretical Girl

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Electro folk pop

Acoustic Aid

Kalla Heartshake, Castaway, Must Be Something, Red Scarlet Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, Free

Weekly acoustic. Free pizza and a charity cause. Karmic balance, oh yes

Tue 15 Sep

Alt rock

Espoinage Of Loc, The Welks, Wee Spies Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Triple G presents: ANAVARIS

Funk fusion

James Lindsay

Shut Up and Eat Your Chanteuse - Emma Curran, Julia and the Doogans, Kat Healy, Gillian Christie

Monthly jazz session

Female singer/songwriters

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Alt rock

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

The Void

Glasgow University Union, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Touring the release of We’ll Make Our History

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

The Mission District, Save Your Breath, Snakes Hate Fire

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6

Gentrified new wave

September 2009

THE SKINNY 61


Glasgow music The Troubadours

Part Chimp

Presumptious pop

... part band

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Hi-Jack Oscar, Dave Arcari Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Bluesy soul

Humanzi, The hype

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £5

Alt. punk

Mono Jazz

Mono, 20:00–23:00, Free

EDINBURGH CABARET VOLTAIRE, 36 BLAIR STREET SEE GIG LISTINGS

Weekly jazz night with the resident house four-piece, plus guests.

Rats of the Capital, Social Schism, Violet Rains Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

Alt. rock and experimental electro deviations

ROCK TAKEOVER: The Fabian, 21 Grams

Ghosts Of Progress, Tragic City Thieves,The Vespas & The Dieyoungs 13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Garage rock

The Drawing Room Sessions Drawing Room, 21:00–23:45, Free

Weekly acoustic sets

Fri 18 Sep Love Pirates, Shiny, Kris Tennant, Breakpoint Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Psych folk

Confined Human Condition Tron Theatre, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Featuring the world premiere of Terror of Love by award winning young composer Phillip Neil Martin and Alejandro Viñao’s The Baghdad Monologue.

Box Concerts present: Sixteen Fingers (Models for the Radio, Bridges, Lost In Oxygen, Simple Outfit, Vespas) ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Punk metal

The Gig Cartel present: Livewire Ac/DC (Limehouse Lizzy) ABC, 19:00–23:00, £15

Tribute

Stereo Open Day Stereo, 15:00–03:00, £5

Huntleys & Palmers Audio Club and Stereo present ANDY BLAKE (Dissident) JACKMASTER (Numbers) CORRECTO JACOB YATES & THE PEARLY LOCK PICKERS TUT VU VU DESALVO FOX GUT DAATA GUMMY STUMPS FURHEAD SCHNAPPS PETER PARKER CHLORINDE NANOBOTS

Michael Simons

ANAAL NATHRAK

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Rock

Confined Human Condition Tron Theatre, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Featuring the world premiere of Terror of Love by award winning young composer Phillip Neil Martin and Alejandro Viñao’s The Baghdad Monologue.

Regular Music present: Gang of Four ABC, 19:00–23:00, £18.50

Rock

Howling Bells

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £9

Indie electronica

findo gask

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Alt. electro pop

Pirate Parrrty! - The People, Eddy and the T-Bolts, Shoes on Fire, Pilljaw Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

The Used

2nd annual International Talk Like a Pirate Day Pirate Parrrty!

Punk rock

The Boycotts, The King Hats, Popolo

The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £18.50

Zoey Van Goey

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £6

Edinburgh show to promote the release if their debut album ‘The cage was unlocked all along’

regular music presents: the selective service Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Indie

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie pop punk

The Hard Lines, The Senses, Sol Diablo Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie rock

The Sunday Social

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Marlow, Invidia

Rumble in the Jumble Flea Market, live acts and DJ sets

Grimey garage

The Halt Bar, 21:00–23:00, Free

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Halt Bar Hijack

William Francis

Weekly showcase

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Rock

Sun 20 Sep

Misery Signals

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £12.50

Indie punk

Acoustic Aid

The Shed, 19:30–23:00, £3

90s near near misses

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, Free

Weekly acoustic. Free pizza and a charity cause. Karmic balance, oh yes

Tue 22 Sep

SAVAGE MESSIAH, EXISTING THREAT, DAEMONOLITH, ESCHATON CREED

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Rock

Metal

Throw rocks against your ear drums. Weekly.

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Sat 19 Sep

No Tribe

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

RORY GALLAGHER TRIBUTE

LE RENO AMPS, SUPER ADVENTURE CLUB, PETER PARKER, THE ELVIS SUICIDE

Tribute, surprisingly

Pop punk

The Ferry, 14:00–16:00, £18

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

62 THE SKINNY September 2009

Chuck Prophet, Otis Gibbs

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £13.50

Indie soul

Popup

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Mill Glasgow @ Òran Mór, 20:00–22:30, Free

Slow Club

Punk

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alt folk

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Sat 26 Sep TRONIC ALL DAYER (Espion (Bass4Bots), Sean Kerwin, (Modifier), Alex Tronic, (ATR), Mark Swift, (Sublight), Satellite Dub, Ives, Binary Zero, Deltason, Gavin Hislop, Third Mountain, Leigh Myles, Unmortal) 13th Note, 14:00–23:30, £5

THE VIBRATORS

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Grime and R&B

Acoustic Session/Open Mic

Alt. blues

Tigertown in the City Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, Free

A monthly residency for Tigertown Promotions at Pivo

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

The Drawing Room Sessions

chicks Pop rock

All The Young Nudes - Life Drawing

The Flying Duck, 20:00–22:00, £4

John Smith

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Zouk meets cheap lager

Bob Log III, Zener Diode, Chomsky Allstars

Drawing Room, 21:00–23:45, Free

Weekly acoustic sets

Fri 25 Sep Seperate Reality, Cast Iron Alibi

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Alt rock

Rock and funk

Peter Doherty

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £19

Solo gig

The Veronicas

Prog punk

Bombay Bicycle Club

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

Indie alt rock

SUNDAYS are SPECIAL: Emerald Sunday, Lucky 8

Metal ... get out your Strepsils

No Tribe

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

Throw rocks against your ear drums. Weekly.

FLATLANDS, TIGER WARSAW, LOW SONIC DRIFT 13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4

Rock

Mon 28 Sep Yaman

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Indian classical

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, sold out

THE NEXT BIG THING

Alt. rock five-piece

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £10

New talent showcase

YRock present: The La Barrons (Exit To Your Left, YRock School Special) ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Rock

madaleine pritchard

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £8.50

Jersey Budd, Sergeant, The Mode

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £6.50

Rock

Lucky 8

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, Free

Numbers themed night

Soul, rock and pop

MXD: Kenny McMinigal

regular music presents: malcolm ross, the low miffs

Electroacoustic

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Acoustic Aid

Moscow Club, Tijuana Sun

Weekly acoustic. Free pizza and a charity cause. Karmic balance, oh yes

Indie j-pop

THE RISING

Shiggajon, Dreamers Cloth, Helhesten

Springsteen tribute

Experimental noise

Shoegazey country

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £10

THE BEST IN LIVE EMERGING MUSIC FOR FREE TICKETS VISIT themill-live.com

Female electro pop-rock duo

Phantom Band

Òran Mór, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Folk rock

Socks off! Indie pop

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Rumble Strips

ABC, 19:00–23:00, sold out

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Arca Felix, Helsinki Seven

The first UK tour in three years

David Thomas Broughton, Twi the Humble Feather

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Hip hop pioneers

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £10.50

Rock

Wed 23 Sep

The Arches, 19:30–22:00, £15

MASSIVE ATTACK

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £8

Mute Defeat, Laserbeat, Coastal Erosion

GRANDMASTER MELLE MEL AND THE FURIOUS FIVE, KURTIS BLOW

Punk

Electro punk

The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £10 (Original tickets still valid)

The Garage, 19:00–23:00, £15.50

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

Mercury nominated Pre-Raphaelite macabre anti-folk

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £12.50

Sun 27 Sep

Throatwrench

Pop punk

DF Concerts present: Tinchy Stryder

Weekly showcase

Indie rock

Acoustic folk

T-Model Ford, The Black Hand Gang, Big Ned

The Halt Bar, 21:00–23:00, Free

Tribute

DF Concerts present: Florence & The Machine

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Halt Bar Hijack

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alt Ruadh

ABC, 19:00–23:00, sold out

International medleys

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £14.50

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Hanney, Inspired

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:00, £3

THANK YOU FOR THE MUSIC

DF Concerts present: All Time Low

Weekly eclectic collective.

Pop punk

Live at The Mill (Atlas Skye, The Darien Venture)

Diementia, Elegia, Lost Persona

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, £3

SUNDAYS are SPECIAL: The Drowned & The Saved

The Shed Live (OCTOBER SKY, MARK RAFFERTY, KEVIN YOUNG)

Classic Grand, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Eclectiv

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Rock

dead in the queue

cry parrot presents: nite jewel

New wave soul

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie rock

Experimental pop

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

Indie rock

Punk rock

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

World Music Night - Billy Bates Trio

Rock metal

eryka

Stereo, 19:00–23:00, £9.50

Toploader

Indie rock

Acoustic singer songwriter

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £10

F. Buttons

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7.50

The Wildhearts

MXD: Casino City, Indian Ink, Burnout, Shenanigans

Prog rock

The Temper Trap, Magistrates

Tommy Reilly

Punk

Cinematic techno

The Zips, The Bromptons, The lovely Fires

Irish knee-slapping celtic stuff

Prog metal

Declining Winter, The Seventeenth Century, Savings and Loan

New wave pop

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £18

The Cathouse, 19:00–22:30, £10

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £19.75

Charlie & the Bhoys

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £10

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £23

Hockey, Deastro, Little Comets

Alt. rock

REALISTIC TRAIN, Citizens, Ablach

ORBITAL

Lounge-ish pop

ABC, 19:00–23:00, £6

Indie rock

Folk fae Fife

Triple G present: INME

Indie

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Great music from the kingdom and beyond.

Hardcore punk

KAJAGOOGOOÊ

ENOCHIAN THEORY

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 20:00–23:00, £7

Acoustic indie

Thu 24 Sep

O2 Academy, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Charlotte Hatherley, Futuristic Retro Champions, Nespresco

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Acoustic Butterfly

DEAF HAVANA

Triple G present: PAINT IT BLACK, CEREMONY

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Weekly indie.

Prog metal

Rock

Box Concerts present: What the Dead Know, Make This Related, Fist Fights With Old Men, Marillo

2 Way Traffic, The Black Lights

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

folk, blues and beyond

Blues

Revelations

Jinty McGinty’s, 20:45–23:00, Free

Mon 21 Sep

Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 19:00–22:30, £2

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–01:00, £3

THURSDAY 3RD SEPTEMBER 2009

Wing and a Prayer

Box, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Rock

THE MILL IS AN 18+ VENUE. DRINK SENSIBLY

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8.50

THE MILL IS AN 18+ VENUE. DRINK SENSIBLY

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–03:00, Free

13th Note, 20:30–23:30, £3/4


Edinburgh music Tue 01 Sep Arditti Quartet & Barbara Hannigan

The Queen’s Hall, 11:00–12:45, From £7

The Quartet are joined by soprano Barbara Hannigan in a programme of work by Beethoven, Dutilleux, Webern and Schoenberg.

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Vignettes from Handel

St Mark’s artSpace, from 19:30, £8.00

Deutsches SymphonieOrchester Berlin

Usher Hall, 20:00–21:50, From £10

Conductor Ingo Metzmacher leads a programme featuring three diverse pieces by Webern, Berg and Brahms linked by the music of JS Bach including Berg’s Violin Concerto with soloist Christian Tetzlaff.

Fri 04 Sep Emerson String Quartet

The Queen’s Hall, 11:00–12:45, From £7

The multi-Grammy award-winning Emerson Quartet perform a concert featuring the transparent beauty of Beethoven’s Harp quartet with Mendelssohn’s earliest and last string quartets.

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

FIGHT CLUB, EVENT HORIZON

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

MUSICHESS

Alt. rock

The Montevideo Five, Collosus, The Diversions

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:30, Free

Live acoustic performances and a chess game free-for-all. Jolly show chappy

Cantus Cölln

Greyfriars Kirk, 17:45–18:45, 17

Cantatas by Thomas Buxtehude and Bach performed by the acclaimed German early music ensemble. Part of the Bach at Greyfriars series. Supported by Dunard Fund.

Free Tuesday

The GRV, 19:00–22:30, Free

Credit crunching live acts of an indie and alt. rock inclination

Der Fliegende Holländer Usher Hall, 19:30–21:50, From £10

Simone Young conducts the Hamburg State Opera and internationally acclaimed soloists in Wagner’s early intensely evocative work based on Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. A concert performance sung in German.

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Wave Park, The Limits, Jack Douglas

Whistlebinkies, 21:30–02:30, Free

Indie rock and some americana

Thu 03 Sep Christian Zacharias

The Queen’s Hall, 11:00–12:45, From £7

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

The Sixteen

Greyfriars Kirk, 17:45–18:45, 17

Alt. Rock

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

White Noise (X Lion Tamer)

The Electric Circus, 20:00–03:00, £4

Soundtracks for Daydreams, Vanishing People, The Red Show, Kid Fire Whistlebinkies, 22:00–01:40, Free

Alt. metal, rock, folk and power pop

Wed 02 Sep Bernarda Fink & Anthony Spiri

The Queen’s Hall, 11:00–12:45, From £7

Mezzo soprano Bernarda Fink and pianist Anthony Spiri perform Dvorák’s Biblical Songs and Gypsy Songs alongside a selection of songs by Schubert.

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Retrospect Ensemble

Greyfriars Kirk, 17:45–18:45, 17

Matthew Halls directs from the keyboard in a concert featuring critically praised early music soprano Carolyn Sampson. Part of the Bach at Greyfriars series. Supported by Dunard Fund.

The Electric Circus, 19:00–03:00, Free

A whirlwind of super heroic kitsch, a veritable smorgasbord of glam

Lorraine McCauley, The Angel conversations The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Alt. indie

Aidan Moffat & The BestOfs, Over the Wall, Richard Anthony (Phantom Band) The Bongo Club, 19:30–00:00, £10

Moffat’s expletive-strewn lyrics have never been kind to the prudish, but even your granny shouldn’t miss his first gig in Auld Reekie with the BestOfs in tow.

The Monteverdi Choir & The English Baroque Soloists Usher Hall, 20:00–21:50, From £10

The Alchemists of Sound, Some of Us Never Die, Adam Holmes Whistlebinkies, 21:30–02:30, Free

Acoustic emo and a bit of hip hop

Club For Heroes (JD Twitch)

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

SEE GIG LISTINGS

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

Acoustic indie

Y-ROCK NO DRIVE

The GRV, 19:00–22:00, £6

Rock

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:15–21:00, From £14

WE COULD BE HEROES! (Alphabeat )

Father and son fiddling combo

THE 48, FITZROY SOUL, SEVEN HILLS

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Brainz In Jarz

The Village, 19:30–22:30, £8

Punk, covers and classic rock

Bainbridge presentsÉ

Conductor and founder Harry Christophers leads his renowned choir and period ensemble, bringing vigour and passion to cantatas written by Bach during his Leipzig years. Part of the Bach at Greyfriars series. Supported by Dunard Fund.

Gerry & Donal O’Connor

Whistlebinkies, 18:30–02:30, Free

Perenial Festival favourite Christian Zacharias shows the full range of his virtuosity and expressivity in a programme including the rarely played highly lyrical Brahms Four Ballades opus 10 by Brahms alongside work by Haydn and Scarlatti. The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

EDINBURGH CABARET VOLTAIRE, 36 BLAIR STREET

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:30, £5

Line-up to be confirmed

THE CHAP, PAPER PLANES

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Alt. rock

Actus Tragicus

A striking musical and theatrical experience that brings to life the minutiae and repetition of human behaviour as fifty members of the award winning Staatsoper Stuttgart Choir perform separate, interweaving pieces of sacred music by Bach within the cross

The Members, Guns On The Roof

Citrus Club, 19:30–22:30, £10

Rock

The Energy Plan, The Amorettes, The Detours

Frightened Rabbit

The Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £6

The, nearing mythic, bunnies on the tail of an epic Edge Festival performance Acoustic indie rock

Alexis Kossenko, John Holloway, Jaap ter Linden & Lars Ulrik Mortensen

The Queen’s Hall, 11:00–12:45, From £7

Four great musicians come together to bring Festival audiences music by Johann Sebastian Bach and his son Carl Philipp Emanuel.

Reggae, rock and ska

Friendly indie, much like a berry

Acoustic pop and punk

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Sebastian Dangerfield, Endor, Washington Irving Maggie’s Chamber, 19:00–22:30, £5

EP launch for My Feet Left the Ground Once; entry includes a free copy. Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:30, £5

Colossal Indie (Svengali, The Trade, The Chymes)

The Voodoo Rooms, 19:00–23:00, £5

Indie .. more info at www.colossalinc. co.uk

Actus Tragicus

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:15–21:00, From £14

A striking musical and theatrical experience that brings to life the minutiae and repetition of human behaviour as fifty members of the award winning Staatsoper Stuttgart Choir perform separate, interweaving pieces of sacred music by Bach within the cross

Volts AC/DC, Supercharger The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Rock and punk

The combined forces of the Hallé conducted by Mark Elder, the National Youth Choir of Scotland and the Edinburgh Festival Chorus led by Christopher Bell gather to perform Elgar’s masterpiece The Dream of Gerontius. Sponsored by Lumison

Covers, blues and indie rock

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Usher Hall, 20:00–22:15, From £10

ZUPROWSKI CONNECTION, FIREBRAND SUPER ROCK, ARCANE CORPS Alt. rock

THE MILL GLASGOW • 10 SEPTEMBER • 24TH SEPTEMBER THE MILL EDINBURGH • 3RD SEPTEMBER • 17TH SEPTEMBER SEE GIG LISTINGS

Saturday Night Fish Fry The Jazz Bar, 22:00–03:00, £3/4

Weekly institutional live jazz funk line-ups

Jam The Box (Jetlad, JTB residents) The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Disco, soul, electrofunk, hiphop, house, techno.

Sun 06 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Alasdair Young

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Indie

Bank of Scotland Fireworks Concert

Princes Street Gardens, 20:00–20:45, From £10

THE MILL IS AN 18+ VENUE. DRINK SENSIBLY

EP launch for The Void

Red 2ÊRed

The Dream of Gerontius

Whistlebinkies, 16:45–02:30, Free

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £3

Prime Suspect. One Day Life, A Day Overdue

Rock

The Ged Hanley Trio, The Deal, 60 Persons, Live Wire

THE VOID, MAKE SPARKS

REGULAR MUSIC : THE JUNIPERS

THE RAB HOWAT BAND

Bannerman’s, 16:00–18:00, £4

Alt. Rock

Weekly vocalist showcase

Bluesy ironic americanca

Sat 05 Sep

The GRV, 19:00–22:00, £5

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–23:00, £4/3

The Fairy Queen

Leading early music choir and period instrument ensemble The Sixteen with Conductor Harry Christopher are joined by a top drawer cast, including Gillian Keith, in a concert performance sung in English of Purcell’s version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

THE VIVIANS, DARKLIGHT

The GRV, 19:00–22:00, £5

The Un-Americans

Usher Hall, 20:00–22:30, From £10

The Electric Circus, 20:00–23:00, Free

Singers Night

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Rock

ACOUSTIC SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT (Michael MacLennan, The Red Well)

POSE VICTORIOUS

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

UPCOMING GIGS

THE MILL IS AN 18+ VENUE. DRINK SENSIBLY

THURSDAY 3RD SEPTEMBER 2009

CRANACHAN

Bannerman’s, 20:00–22:30, £4

Celtic

Whistlebinkies, 21:30–02:30, Free

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Laptop Lounge

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, Free

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Cutting-edge international and UK electronic music and video artists perform live in the venue and into the venue via the net

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

VERSUS: Meursault vs The Foundling Wheel vs DeadBoyRobotics

Mon 07 Sep The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Re-Opening night with Dan Costello and Wounded KneeÊ

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Bowery, 19:30–22:45, £5

New York anti-folk with support from Edinburgh-based Knee

A new monthly night of experimentation and collaboration inspired by thecommunity-focused, “Do It Together” (DIT) ethos of the Edinburgh musicscene.

HAEMORRHAGED, PURPOSE FAILED, HE SLEPT ON 57

A DAY OVERDUE, PANDA TRAP, CALL ME ISHMAEL

Alt. rock

Alt. rock

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Club For Heroes

Tue 08 Sep

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

MUSICHESS

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Live acoustic performances and a chess game free-for-all. Jolly show chappy

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:30, Free

Free Tuesday

The GRV, 19:00–22:30, Free

Credit crunching live acts of an indie and alt. rock inclination

FUTURE ISLANDS, REMNANT KINGS

Fri 11 Sep The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

CHRIS HELME, DAVID BATEMAN, KERRIE LYNCH The GRV, 19:00–22:00, £7

Acoustic alt. folk

THE CHLOE HALL TRIO

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £3

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

American punk boys

Ray Lamontagne

Usher Hall, 19:00–22:30, £21.50

Acoustic folk

White Noise (The Pineapple Chunks)

The Electric Circus, 20:00–03:00, £4

Wed 09 Sep

Aussie folk singer/ songwriter

Neko Case

The Voodoo Rooms, 19:00–22:30, £12.50

Canadian alt. country member of the New Pornographers and Moaw

The Gap presents: Ewan Butler, Jonny Deacon, Kristoffer Morgan and Wardy & Freak Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:30, £5

Indie acoustic

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Alt. garage folk

Women of Rock (Scrap Brain, Storm in a D Cup, Sonorous Breaks, Dead on the Live Wire, Cherenkov Drive, The Number and Seafield Foxes)

SOUNDSHOK

Seven female fronted rock groups

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Willard Grant Conspiracy Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £12.50

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 19:00–23:00, £4

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

999

Citrus Club, 19:30–22:30, £9.99

Thu 10 Sep

Punk

Svengali

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Alt. indie

Hanley Hunter Trio

EdTwestival (Epic 26, Chutes)

The Village, 21:00–22:30, £3.00

Edinburgh leg of a central belt twitter festival in aid of charity CLIC Sargent

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Soul trio

The Electric Circus, 19:00–03:00, £tbc

GREAT JUNCTION REHEARSAL ROOMS SHOWCASE Alt. rock

September 2009

THE SKINNY 63


Edinburgh music DANCE ENERGY U18S EDINBURGH LAUNCH PARTY

The HMV Picture House, 21:30–01:00, £10

Sat 12 Sep THE RAB HOWAT BAND

Bannerman’s, 16:00–18:00, £4

Rock

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Fei Comodo, Don Broco, Over The Skyline, Boygirlanimalcolour, The Last Phixx, Battle At Cougar

The Electric Circus, 18:00–22:00, £6

Youth Brit metalcore

JESU

The GRV, 19:00–22:00, £12 (Weekend ticket £20)

Metal-ish shoegaze

Saturday Night Fish Fry

MUSICHESS

Weekly institutional live jazz funk line-ups

Live acoustic performances and a chess game free-for-all. Jolly show chappy

The Jazz Bar, 22:00–03:00, £3/4

Sun 13 Sep

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £6.50

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Free Tuesday

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

CRIPPLED BLACK PHONEIX

The GRV, 19:00–22:00, £10 (Weekend ticket £20)

Alt. pop

Akolayd, Iain Raeper The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Indie punk

ACOUSTIC SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT (Man Gone Missing, Steve Carey) The Electric Circus, 20:00–23:00, Free

CRANACHAN

Oklahoma-based songwriter

Singers Night

DROPKICK ALBUM LAUNCH Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Indie power pop

You Me at Six

The Bongo Club, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Supporting the release of Take Off Your Colours

Jesus H. Foxx E.P Launch, Some Young PedroÊ

Theoretical Girl

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

SAMANTHA CRAIN, THE MIDNIGHT SHIVERS

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £3

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:30, Free

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Celtic

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–23:00, £4/3

Weekly vocalist showcase

Electro folk

Rock

Cachín Cachán Cachunga! (Zorras, Lily, Gein Wong, Rabiya Choudhry, Pat Cunningham ) The Street, 19:30–23:00, £3/2

A monthly queer and trans night of dance, film, poetry and music

Victoria Park Hotel, 20:00–01:00, £8

ROMEO MUST DIE, SEVEN YEAR KISMET, DOUBTS CAST SHADOWS, THE COLOUR PINK IS GAY, ONLY IN ABSTRACT Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

Tue 15 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Bluesy country

The Electric Circus, 20:00–03:00, £4

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Thu 17 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

WHISPERTOWN 2000, Joe McAdam, No Pasaran

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Soul

Fri 18 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

THE RIOTEERS

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £10

Charity fundraiser in association with Action For Children Scotland

BANJO OR FREAKOUT, DEAD BOY ROBOTICS

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

A.k.a Alessio Natalizia

Mean Fiddler present: Gang of Four Entertainment!

The HMV Picture House, 19:00–23:00, £20

70’s post-punkers

The Amorettes

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Classic rock

IMPERIAL LEISURE

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

Sat 19 Sep THE RAB HOWAT BAND

Bannerman’s, 16:00–18:00, £4

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

The GRV, 19:00–22:30, Free

Credit crunching live acts of an indie and alt. rock inclination

ES, CHRIS FORSYTH, IGNATZ, SCRIM

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 19:30–22:30, £7/6 adv.

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

JAM HOUSE EXPERIENCE The Jam House, 18:30–03:00, Free before 8pm £5.50 After

Resident musicians whip you through a range of modern jazz. Dress code: smart/ casual.

Finnish free folk and drone, obscure Belgian blues and acoustic psych workouts

THE LOW MIFFS & MALCOLM ROSS

White Noise (Homework)

Glasgow and Edinburgh collaborative force

The Electric Circus, 20:00–03:00, £4

Wed 23 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

David Thomas Broughton Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–23:00, £8.50

Pop

PAUL WISHART, NEIL WATSON, RICHARD COBB Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

Thu 24 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

JENIFEREVER, MIDAS FALL, BEERJACKET

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Lyrical Swedish soundscapes

SUCIOPERRO

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Punk rock

The Hive, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Confined Human Condition Traverse Theatre, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Featuring the world premiere of Terror of Love by award winning young composer Phillip Neil Martin and Alejandro Viñao’s The Baghdad Monologue.

The Valkarys Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:30, £5

Alt. indie

Andi Neate and Lee Patterson The Lot, 19:30–22:00, £8/6

Traditional folk

LadyfestÊ The Bowery, 19:30–22:30, £5

Adrenalyn The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Rock

Rockin’ at the Web The Spiders Web, 20:00–01:00, £5

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

WE COULD BE HEROES!

Rock ‘n’ roll, rockabilly, rhythm & blues

HOCKEY

The Electric Circus, 19:00–03:00, Free

A whirlwind of super heroic kitsch, a veritable smorgasbord of glam

BOMBJUICE PRESENTS: ONE WAY SYSTEM, HATEFUL, HAPPY SPASTICS

DAVIE SCOTT

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £8.50

American dance punk

Manky Bastard Presents: The OK Social Club, Black Alley Screens, Sebastian Dangerfield Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £5

Alt indie and post-punk

Trampoline presents: Alasdair Roberts and Beerjacket Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:30, £7

Rock

Declining Winter, FieldheadÊ

The Bowery, 19:30–22:00, £5

The Guilty Lily, 19:45–22:30, £5

Acoustic

HIJACK OSCAR, THE CUBICLE, MISSING CAT, KALLA HEARTSHAKE

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

Club For Heroes

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

Fri 25 Sep

Ambient electronica

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Attrition,Twisted Nerve,Tin Omen

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

Saturday Night Fish Fry The Jazz Bar, 22:00–03:00, £3/4

Weekly institutional live jazz funk line-ups

Sun 20 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

ACOUSTIC SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT (The Stigs, Quixote, Iain Reaper)

The Electric Circus, 20:00–23:00, Free

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

JAM HOUSE EXPERIENCE

The Jam House, 18:30–03:00, Free before 8pm £5.50 After

Resident musicians whip you through a range of modern jazz. Dress code: smart/ casual.

Alt. rock

Saturday Night Fish Fry The Jazz Bar, 22:00–03:00, £3/4

Weekly institutional live jazz funk line-ups

Sun 27 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

ACOUSTIC SUNDAY SUPPLEMENT (Strike The Colours, Zoe Van Goey) The Electric Circus, 20:00–23:00, Free

CRANACHAN Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

DEAD GOOD VILLAINS, BEATNIC PRESTIGE, DAY OF DAYS

Celtic

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

Singers Night

Rock ‘n’ roll

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–23:00, £4/3

Confined Human Condition

Weekly vocalist showcase

Traverse Theatre, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Featuring the world premiere of Terror of Love by award winning young composer Phillip Neil Martin and Alejandro Viñao’s The Baghdad Monologue.

Vibrators

Mon 28 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Citrus Club, 19:00–22:30, £10

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Singers Night

Julie Doiron, Construction & Destruction, Former UtopiaÊ

TRC , DEFENCE, CARVE THE FUTURE

Weekly vocalist showcase

Art grunge

Alt. rock

CRANACHAN

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Celtic

The Jazz Bar, 21:00–23:00, £4/3

64 THE SKINNY September 2009

Live acoustic performances and a chess game free-for-all. Jolly show chappy

Rock

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Bannerman’s, 16:00–18:00, £4

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Free Tuesday

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sat 26 Sep

MUSICHESS

Alt. rock

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

White Noise (The Kays Lavelle, Wounded Knee)

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:30, Free

Monthly queer and trans night of dance, film, poetry and music

The Street, 19:30–01:00, £3

Tue 22 Sep

HUMAN COLLECTIVE PRESENTS: AWOL, DOUBTS CAST SHADOWS, DANA WALKER

Cachín Cachán Cachunga!

Alt. rock

Alt. rock and punk

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

Club For Heroes

Indie storytelling

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Alt. rock

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

Iain Bruce

Starlight (Del Rio Ramblers)

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

Doc Daneeka

Edinburgh alt. Folk stalwarts Indie

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4

DEAD IN THE QUEUE, DECIPHER

New York Anti-Folk star

Wed 16 Sep

CASINO CITY, RED LIGHT DISTRICT, SCOPE

7 CAR PILE UP, VERONA, BURIED IN VEGAS, NO DRIVE HOME

Glam rock and metal

THE RAB HOWAT BAND

The Bowery, 19:30–22:00, £4

98 PAGES, THE RED SHOW, BLACKSNAKE

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

The Mill Edinburgh @ Cabaret Voltaire, 19:30–22:30, Free

Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

The Ark, 19:30–23:00, £4

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Credit crunching live acts of an indie and alt. rock inclination

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Bowery, 19:00–22:00, £7

Live at The Mill (Little Eskimos, Jakil)

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

Gallus Cooper

Brook PridemoreÊ

The GRV, 19:00–22:30, Free

Jeremy Jay, Tisso Lake, The Colourful BandÊ

The Bowery, 19:30–22:00, £5

A whirlwind of super heroic kitsch, a veritable smorgasbord of glam

Mon 21 Sep TEATIME ACOUSTIC

Alt. rock

Mon 14 Sep Daily sessions featuring eastablished singer/ songwriters and bands

The Electric Circus, 19:00–03:00, Free

Showcase double-bills for the best up-and-coming acts. For more information on these gigs go to: http://www.themill-live.com/gigguide. aspx

TEATIME ACOUSTIC

The Jazz Bar, 17:00–20:00, Free

WE COULD BE HEROES!

Battery operated punk

The Bowery, 19:30–22:30, £10

Bannerman’s, 21:00–23:00, £4


Glasgow Clubs Wed 02 Sep

Absolution

Clubhouse Wednesdays The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Mainstream chart-ish

Dysfunktional

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

A heavy alternative concoction involving styles from metal to emo, punk to industrial. Drinks offers all night to keep you absolved.

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £4/£3 after

Melting Pot (Horse Meat Disco, Ali Tillet)

TONGUE IN CHEEK

Disco.

Indie and electro

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £10

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Nu Skool

Remote Control

Sabado Saturdays

R&b, hip hop and indie

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, £3/1

Alt. indie and disco

Octopussy (Bouncycastle, pool, hot tub, ball pool.) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5

Watchamacallit

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Punk Flavor Funk. Caramel. Milk Psychoclate.

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Second City (Heiko MSO) Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £10

House, techno.

Slabs Of The Tabernacle (Arne Weinberg [LIVE], Andrew Ingram, Brian d’Souza, jwins) The Universal, 23:00–03:00, £7

Disco, italo, techno, electro.

Thu 03 Sep

Subculture

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

Common Room

Common, 19:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 (students) after

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Weekly hotpot of punters on the pull to a backdrop of commercial, house, pop and R&B

THIRTYTWO DJs (Pasty and Twonko)

Bazodee

The Halt Bar, 20:00–02:00, Free

Mash up, fidget, electro, wonk and techno.

Student Night

Itch! (Dirty Basement, Bonjour Boi, Matthew Craig)

Indie anthems and skewed pop

Electro, techno, house.

Reggae and dancehall

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Electric Gypsyland (Miss Electric Gypsyland)

Blackfriars Basement, 21:00–13:00, £4

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £2

Pivo Pivo, 23:56–04:00, £5 (£4)

Sun 06 Sep

Octopussy (Bouncycastle, pool, hot tub, ball pool.) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5

Watchamacallit

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Punk Flavor Funk. Caramel. Milk Psychoclate.

Thu 10 Sep

Weekly hotpot of punters on the pull to a backdrop of commercial, house, pop and R&B

Bazodee

The Halt Bar, 20:00–02:00, Free

Reggae and dancehall

Student Night

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Indie anthems and skewed pop

Alternative Nation

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

FunkyMilk (Cheesy)

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Rolling funk, soul and classics.

Fri 11 Sep Free before

Disco to stroke your ego to

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

Liquid Cool

Rolling funk, soul and classics.

Disco Badger

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Fri 04 Sep Audiofilth

Common, 17:00–03:00, 11pm, £5/£3 after

House: past, present and future

Optimo Free before

The sluttiest mixes this side of the Clyde

Numbers (Moderat (live)) ABC, 20:00–23:00, £12

‘My mum told me I could DJ’ The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Disco to stroke your ego to

Bamboo Fridays

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

Damnation

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

Old Skool

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Unabashed genre bending with JD Twitch and JG Wilkes

Ritual

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Rock, metal, punk and industrial tunes

Sheek

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Sunday Session

The V Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

With Craig Loosejoints and Stevie Elements

Mon 07 Sep Heat

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Trade night

Pass The Peas (Andy Taylor )

Passionality

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £2

Funk, breakbeat, house.

Paul Van Dyk - Volume World Tour (Paul Van Dyk) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £24

Trance, big room dance.

Tic Tac Toe (Audiofly) Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£7)

House & techno.

Velvet (Prompt, Mash)

O’Couture, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£5)

House, techno, dubstep.

Sat 05 Sep This Is...

Common, 17:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £7/£5 after

Electro indie

Kinetic Blue

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free entry before 10.30pm

Indie, house and urban

Homegrown

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

Infexious (MARK DOC, ROB DA RHYTHM) Soundhaus, 22:00–04:00, £7

Hardstyle, hard dance, techtrance.

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Tue 08 Sep All The Young Nudes - Life Drawing

The Flying Duck, 20:00–22:00, £4

3Some

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm. £4/3 after

Lewd posing, with prizes

Audioculture

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

Killer Kitsch

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4(3)

Wed 09 Sep Clubhouse Wednesdays The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Mainstream chart-ish

Dysfunktional

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £4/£3 after

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £2

Disco and funk.

Old Skool

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Slave To The Rhythm Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £2

Tech-house and techno.

Sat 12 Sep This Is...

Common, 17:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £7/£5 after

Electro indie

Ballers Social Club (Fulgeance (Live) (Musique Large), Fox Gutt Daata (Live), Dema (LuckyMe)) The Ivy Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Techno, electronica, hip hop.

Kinetic Blue

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free entry before 10.30pm

Indie, house and urban

Homegrown

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

Alt. indie and disco

Damnation

Optimo

CARNAVAL

Unabashed genre bending with JD Twitch and JG Wilkes

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Brazilian dancing, authentic capoeira, carnival costume shows, samba bands, and caipirinha cocktails.

Ritual

Cotton Cake (RITON)

Sheek

House, techno.

Sunday Session

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £2

Rock, metal, punk and industrial tunes

Electro, disco, 80’s, 90’s, techno.

Sheek

Old Skool

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Rock, metal, punk and industrial tunes The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 The V Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

With Craig Loosejoints and Stevie Elements

Mon 21 Sep

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Sunday Session

Raw Vibez (Digital Stitch (No Such Luck!, Dopefish Audio))

Heat

Fidget, House, Dubstep, Electro, Techno and DnB.

Passionality

Section (Move D (live), Dan Bell)

Trademark Mondays

The V Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

With Craig Loosejoints and Stevie Elements

Mon 14 Sep Trade night

Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Techno.

Syntax (Derrick Thompson)

Passionality

Trademark Mondays

Tue 15 Sep

Soundhaus, 23:00–04:00, £7 (£6), £4 students

House, techno.

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm. £4/3 after

Audioculture

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4(3)

Clubhouse Wednesdays The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Mainstream chart-ish

Dysfunktional

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £4/£3 after

Indie and electro

Huntleys & Palmers Audio Club and Stereo present ANDY BLAKE (Dissident) JACKMASTER (Numbers) CORRECTO JACOB YATES & THE PEARLY LOCK PICKERS TUT VU VU DESALVO FOX GUT DAATA GUMMY STUMPS FURHEAD SCHNAPPS PETER PARKER CHLORINDE NANOBOTS

Electro indie

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free entry before 10.30pm

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

R&b, hip hop and indie

Remote Control

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, £3/1

Alt. indie and disco

Octopussy (Bouncycastle, pool, hot tub, ball pool.) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Punk Flavor Funk. Caramel. Milk Psychoclate.

Common Room

Common, 19:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 (students) after

Weekly hotpot of punters on the pull to a backdrop of commercial, house, pop and R&B

Killer Kitsch

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4(3)

Wed 23 Sep Clubhouse Wednesdays The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Mainstream chart-ish

Dysfunktional

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £4/£3 after

Indie and electro

TONGUE IN CHEEK R&b, hip hop and indie

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

Absolution

A heavy alternative concoction involving styles from metal to emo, punk to industrial. Drinks offers all night to keep you absolved.

Remote Control

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, £3/1

Alt. indie and disco

Octopussy (Bouncycastle, pool, hot tub, ball pool.) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5

Watchamacallit

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £14

Punk Flavor Funk. Caramel. Milk Psychoclate.

Mount Heart Attack

Common Room

Death Disco

With Bloody Beetroots and His Majesty Andre

Disco, electro, wonky techno and booty.

Nu Skool

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Thu 17 Sep

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

Homegrown

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £3

Watchamacallit

Audioculture

Indie, house and urban

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

TONGUE IN CHEEK

Tue 22 Sep All The Young Nudes - Life Drawing

Lewd posing, with prizes

Stereo, 15:00–03:00, £5

Kinetic Blue

Wed 16 Sep

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, Free entry with a wage slip

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm. £4/3 after

Common, 17:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £7/£5 after

Killer Kitsch

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

3Some

This Is...

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3

Trade night

The Flying Duck, 20:00–22:00, £4

Sat 19 Sep Stereo Open Day

The Flying Duck, 20:00–22:00, £4

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Pest Control (Mr. Pauli, Andrew Ingram, Eclair Fi Fi, dommm, The Wasp) Ad Lib, 23:00–03:00, £8.50

Electro, techno, italo, disco.

Thu 24 Sep Common, 19:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 (students) after

Weekly hotpot of punters on the pull to a backdrop of commercial, house, pop and R&B

Bazodee

The Halt Bar, 20:00–02:00, Free

Reggae and dancehall

Student Night

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Indie anthems and skewed pop

The Halt Bar, 20:00–02:00, Free

Subculture

Student Night

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3 Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

Tronicsole (Lovebirds)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Nu Skool

Indie anthems and skewed pop

Alternative Nation

One More Tune (Jackmaster)

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Deep house and techno.

FunkyMilk (Cheesy)

Bottle Rocket

Rolling funk, soul and classics.

Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

A heavy alternative concoction involving styles from metal to emo, punk to industrial. Drinks offers all night to keep you absolved. The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 b4 11.30pm

Sabado Saturdays

The V Club, 22:30–03:00, £3/1

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Sabado Saturdays

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

TONGUE IN CHEEK

Remote Control

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Lewd posing, with prizes

Monkey Puzzle (Eddie Railton)

Disco Badger

Johnny Whoop! presents...

Ballers Social Club (Jamie Vex’d Live / DJ (Planet Mu) Darkstar (Hyperdub) Rustie (Warp / LuckyMe) The Blessings (LuckyMe)) Techno, electronica, hip hop.

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 after

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

Ritual

3Some

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Liquid Cool

House: past, present and future

Bamboo Fridays

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10, £8 b4 12am

Damnation

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

Disco to stroke your ego to

Unabashed genre bending with JD Twitch and JG Wilkes

All The Young Nudes - Life Drawing

Indie and electro

R&b, hip hop and indie

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

techno/house/funk/disco/electro/punk/ minimal/acid/hiphop/breaks/dubstep/ rocknroll/bmore

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Optimo

ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, Free entry with a wage slip

Alternative Nation

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 after

Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

‘My mum told me I could DJ’

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

FunkyMilk (Cheesy)

Disco Badger

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

The Arches, 23:00–02:00, £5

The sluttiest mixes this side of the Clyde

All manner of sins, from pop to back alley funk

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Liquid Cool

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Bamboo Fridays

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free before 10:30pm. £5/3 after

All manner of sins, from pop to back alley funk

Heat

Snakebite Sundays

Mediterranean, balkan beats, middle eastern rhythms.

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free before 10:30pm. £5/3 after

House: past, present and future

Common, 19:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 (students) after

Common, 17:00–03:00, 11pm, £5/£3 after

‘My mum told me I could DJ’

Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 after

Common Room

Audiofilth

Sun 13 Sep Snakebite Sundays

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Subculture

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

Weekly snapshot of the ever-evolving house blueprint.

Bazodee

Reggae and dancehall

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Rock, industrial, metal, punk and electro

FunkyMilk (Cheesy)

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Rolling funk, soul and classics.

Common, 17:00–03:00, 11pm, £5/£3 after

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £9 (£7)

Free before

The sluttiest mixes this side of the Clyde

BonBon

House & techno.

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Flying Duck, 23:30–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

A night for dancing to indie-pop, postpunk, motown, twee and anything else that gets feet tapping.

Sun 20 Sep

Fri 18 Sep Audiofilth

Alternative Nation

Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Fri 25 Sep Audiofilth

Common, 17:00–03:00, 11pm, £5/£3 after

Free before

The sluttiest mixes this side of the Clyde

Snakebite Sundays

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free before 10:30pm. £5/3 after

All manner of sins, from pop to back alley funk

Soulsville

Mono, 19:00–01:00, Free

Classic 60s and 70s soul, the last Friday of every month

September 2009

THE SKINNY 65


Glasgow Clubs ‘My mum told me I could DJ’ The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Disco to stroke your ego to

Bamboo Fridays

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £5 (free before 11pm/ 12pm with matric)

autumn09 12 Sep – 4 Dec

R&B, hip hop, rock, indie and electro

Damnation

Electronic groove-based music with Affi Koman

Equalised (Affi Koman, Bobby Wilson, Alex Ash and Truman Data) Stereo, 23:00–03:00, Free

House & techno.

Mount Heart Attack (Dan Monox)

Black Sparrow, 23:00–03:00, Free

Disco, electro, wonky techno and booty.

Old Skool

The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Pressure (Len Faki, Paul Ritch (live), Funk D’Void, Sebo K, David Squillace, Arne Weinberg ) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £15

Hoose & techno.

Kinky Afro (Matthew Herbert)

Sub Club, 23:00–05:00, £tbc

With a live set from Bass Clef and Mungo’s Hi-Fi

Sat 26 Sep This Is...

Common, 17:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £7/£5 after

Electro indie

Kinetic Blue

The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free entry before 10.30pm

Soul, funk, disco, cosmic. The Brunswick Hotel, 23:00–03:00, £5

Nu Skool The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Sabado Saturdays Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Send N Return (Jon Gurd (Killawatt Records)) Ad Lib, 23:00–03:00, £8, £5 students

House, tech-house, techno.

Sun 27 Sep Snakebite Sundays The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free before 10:30pm. £5/3 after

All manner of sins, from pop to back alley funk

Liquid Cool Common, 22:00–03:00, Free before 11pm, £5/£3 after

House: past, present and future

Disco Badger Bamboo, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Optimo Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Unabashed genre bending with JD Twitch and JG Wilkes

Ritual Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Rock, metal, punk and industrial tunes

Sheek The Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Indie, house and urban

Sunday Session

Million Dan, Le Shadow, DJ Def K, Jee4ce, Profisee, Capitol 1212, DJ Krash Slaughta, Jaisu, S-Type

The V Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

The V Club, 21:00–03:00, £10

Hip-hop, ragga, DnB, Bashment, dub step and reggae

Dance! Dance! Dance! (PHIL MISON (Cantoma/ Reverso 68/Frontera))

The Universal, 22:00–03:00, £8 (£5)

Funk, soul, disco, house, boogie.

Homegrown Scottish Charity No. SC025512

Cosmic Microwave (Clinical)

Der Supermax Love Machine

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

14 – 16 Grassmarket Edinburgh EH1 2JU

A heavy alternative concoction involving styles from metal to emo, punk to industrial. Drinks offers all night to keep you absolved.

BLOC+ROCKIN’ (Eddie Railton and David Sinclair) EQd presents: EQUALISED LAUNCH PARTY

dancebase.co.uk

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £2

Disco and electro.

courses, drop-in classes and workshops for everyone

Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5(4)

Bar Bloc, 23:00–03:00, £3

get on your dancing shoes

Edinburgh Clubs

Bamboo, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

R&B, street soul, funk, rock and pop

With Craig Loosejoints and Stevie Elements

Mon 28 Sep Heat The Viper, 21:00–02:00, Free

Trade night

Passionality Byblos, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Trademark Mondays ABC 2, 23:00–03:00, Free entry with a wage slip

Wed 02 Sep Chambles (Jez Hill)

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

The Pit

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

We Are Electric

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

Indie / 60’s Garage / Northern Soul / Ska / 70’s / Punk / New Wave. www.eggsite.co.uk

Kitsch

Sun 06 Sep Rise (John Hutchinson)

Subtext

Coalition

Spanish and Latin Grooves from Juan Car.Techno, electro, breaks and minimal from various rotating guests including INGEN, Jealous Kid, C.L.B, AMELDRUM and Bruno FK.

Drum and bass, breaks, bassline and electro

The GRV, 23:00–05:00, Free

Thu 03 Sep WE COULD BE HEROES! (Alphabeat )

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Electrohouse and cherished club classics. Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Killer Kitsch

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dance music.

New Idols

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Vanity

New Idols is Edinburgh’s new monthly Sunday night party night, featuring club classics, dance-not-dance and, yes, of course, New Idols being played on the wheels of steel.

R&B, electro and funky house.

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Electric Circus, 19:00–03:00, Free

A whirlwind of super heroic kitsch, a veritable smorgasbord of glam Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Rude

Po Na Na, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Funky house, electro anthems, hip shaking urban jams, dirty sexy mashups and reinvented club classics.

Club For Heroes (JD Twitch) The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

Diamond Dollar Faith, 23:00–03:00, £2

Dubstep, bassline, fidget, electro, b-more, jungle, UK funky, house, drum & bass.

Kinky Indie

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, £2 students/ £5 others

Kitsch

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 11.30pm

Cheese.

Sick Note

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave.

Fri 04 Sep Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:00–00:00, £5, free b4 10.30pm

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

Friday’s at Opal (Jez Hill) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Mix of electro-pop, classic beats and disco.

Dirt (Zuni, Physicist, Dfrnt, Tactus)

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £4, £2 b4 12am

Techno, Electro, Dubstep, B-more, Ghetto

Misfits

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £10

House night with skilled house house band

Sat 05 Sep Mixed Bizness (Boom Monk Ben (Mixed Bizness/ Solid Steel), Nick AKA (Sneaky Pete’s/Sicknote))

Sneaky Pete’s, 11:00–03:00, £3, free for members

Hip hop, house, drum & bass, funk, dance hall, electro, garage, break beat and disco.

Saturday’s at Opal

Opal Lounge, 21:00–03:00, £tbc

Glamorous vocal house, accessible electro, past and present club classics with a hint of R&B.

Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:00–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

Sections

2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

Taste

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Gay friendly night. House music from Fischer and Price.

Mon 07 Sep

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, £2 students/ £5 others The Hive, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 11.30pm

Cheese.

Sick Note

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave.

Fri 11 Sep Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:00–00:00, £5, free b4 10.30pm

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

Friday’s at Opal (Jez Hill) Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Mix of electro-pop, classic beats and disco.

Furburger

GHQ, 23:00–03:00, Free passes available on the night from Planet

“For girls who like girls who like music”. With aural stimulation from the funki diva, dejaybird, boy toy and debi t.

JakN & Cause It (Tekamine, ACID 69, Morphamish, Tamobanter.) The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £6

Fundraiser for St Columba’s Hospice, 12 DJs/LIVE acts across 3 rooms. Everything from hip-hop to house, from breaks to techno to drum and bass.

Kapital (Nathan Fake (live)) The Caves, 23:00–03:00, £7

House, techno.

Dirty Stop Out (DJ Andrew Taylor)

Misfits

Funk, R&B, classics.

Our House

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Trade Union

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

Tue 08 Sep Missbehave (Rennie Rich and 3 pieces)

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, Free

Antics

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

Hybrid

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Every week will see different genres and artists from different clubs in Edinburgh: Noizteez, Volume, Ghantin, Mutiny, Dirt, Big n Bashy, Jakn, Synthetic, Coalition, Riddim Tuffa, Pangea. Techno, dubstep, drum and bass, hip hop.

Split

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wed 09 Sep Chambles (Jez Hill)

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Subtext

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7, £6 b4 12am

We Are Electric Friday Special (Popof)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £tbc A night of deliciously twisted dancefloor electronica.

Sat 12 Sep Starlight (Del Rio Ramblers) Victoria Park Hotel, 20:00–01:00, £8

Saturday’s at Opal

Opal Lounge, 21:00–03:00, £tbc

Glamorous vocal house, accessible electro, past and present club classics with a hint of R&B.

Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:00–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

Beep Beep Yeah!

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £3

A retro soundtrack of 50s rock, 60s grooves and 70s psychedelia.

Bubblegum

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Spanish and Latin Grooves from Juan Car.Techno, electro, breaks and minimal from various rotating guests including INGEN, Jealous Kid, C.L.B, AMELDRUM and Bruno FK.

A chewed up, spat out mix of electro. pop, chart, indie and retro floor fillers.

The Pit

Karnival

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, Free

We Are Electric

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

Thu 10 Sep EdTwestival (Epic 26, Chutes) The Electric Circus, 19:00–03:00, £tbc

Edinburgh leg of a central belt twitter festival in aid of charity CLIC Sargent

Vanity

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

R&B, electro and funky house.

Bubblegum

Rude

Fake

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

House, techno, electro.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7, £5 b4 12am

House & techno.

Substance (Smooky, Glaxian) The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £5

The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 b4 11.30pm

Indie / 60’s Garage / Northern Soul / Ska / 70’s / Punk / New Wave. www.eggsite.co.uk

Sun 13 Sep Blitz Ballroom Tea Dance The Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 16:00–20:00, £9.50

Rise (John Hutchinson)

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

The Hive, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Po Na Na, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

A chewed up, spat out mix of electro. pop, chart, indie and retro floor fillers.

Funky house, electro anthems, hip shaking urban jams, dirty sexy mashups and reinvented club classics.

Jam The Box (Jetlad, JTB residents)

Club For Heroes

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

Doghouse

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Disco, soul, electrofunk, hiphop, house, techno.

66 THE SKINNY September 2009

Kinky Indie

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 b4 11.30pm

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

Tokyoblu

theskinny.co.uk

The Egg

Sick Note Vs. Killer Kitsch Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 12am

Leftfield, indie-dance, noise-pop.

Electrohouse and cherished club classics.

Coalition

Drum and bass, breaks, bassline and electro

Diamond Dollar

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dubstep, bassline, fidget, electro, b-more, jungle, UK funky, house, drum & bass.

Killer Kitsch

Faith, 23:00–03:00, £2

Rock and metal.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dance music.


2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

MON 14 SEP DIRTY STOP OUT (DJ ANDREW TAYLOR)

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Funk, R&B, classics.

TRADE UNION

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 12AM

TUE 15 SEP

SAT 19 SEP SATURDAY’S AT OPAL

OPAL LOUNGE, 21:00–03:00, £TBC

Glamorous vocal house, accessible electro, past and present club classics with a hint of R&B.

TEASE AGE

CITRUS CLUB, 22:00–03:00, £6, FREE B4 11PM

BANG BANG

THE SPEAKEASY @ CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £5

BUBBLEGUM

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, £4, FREE B4 11.30PM

CACHÍN CACHÁN CACHUNGA!

A chewed up, spat out mix of electro. pop, chart, indie and retro floor fillers.

Monthly queer and trans night of dance, film, poetry and music

MILK (NASTY P, P STYLES, TONY THRILLS, GINO, FRYER )

MISSBEHAVE (RENNIE RICH AND 3 PIECES)

Funk, soul, hip hop.

THE STREET, 19:30–01:00, £3

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

ANTICS

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

HYBRID

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Every week will see different genres and artists from different clubs in Edinburgh: Noizteez, Volume, Ghantin, Mutiny, Dirt, Big n Bashy, Jakn, Synthetic, Coalition, Riddim Tuffa, Pangea. Techno, dubstep, drum and bass, hip hop.

SPLIT

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

WED 16 SEP CHAMBLES (JEZ HILL)

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

SUBTEXT

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Spanish and Latin Grooves from Juan Car.Techno, electro, breaks and minimal from various rotating guests including INGEN, Jealous Kid, C.L.B, AMELDRUM and Bruno FK.

THE PIT

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

WE ARE ELECTRIC

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 12AM

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

THU 17 SEP WE COULD BE HEROES!

THE ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–03:00, FREE

A whirlwind of super heroic kitsch, a veritable smorgasbord of glam

VANITY

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

R&B, electro and funky house.

CLUB FOR HEROES

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

DIAMOND DOLLAR FAITH, 23:00–03:00, £2

Dubstep, bassline, fidget, electro, b-more, jungle, UK funky, house, drum & bass.

KINKY INDIE

CITRUS CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £2 STUDENTS/ £5 OTHERS

KITSCH

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, £5

THE EGG

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 B4 11.30PM

Indie / 60’s Garage / Northern Soul / Ska / 70’s / Punk / New Wave. www.eggsite.co.uk

ULTRAGROOVE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £7, £5 B4 12AM

House music, disco.

SUN 20 SEP

PLANET EARTH

CITRUS CLUB, 22:00–00:00, £5, FREE B4 10.30PM

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

FRIDAY’S AT OPAL (JEZ HILL) OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £TBC

Mix of electro-pop, classic beats and disco.

COMPAKT (PHIL KIERAN, PAUL THOMAS, JAMIE KIDD, FUK NUT (JAKN), MICK MACNEIL (WIRED), BRUNO FK) CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £8, £6 B4 12AM

House & techno.

MISFITS

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, £4, FREE B4 11.30PM

RIDDIM TUFFA SOUND PRESENTS ONE YEAR CELEBRATION THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, £6, £4 B4 12AM

Reggae, dubstep and jungle.

36 BLAIR ST, EDINBURGH. 0131 220 6176

FAITH, 23:00–03:00, £2

KINKY INDIE

CITRUS CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £2 STUDENTS/ £5 OTHERS

KITSCH

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 11.30PM

Cheese.

SICK NOTE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave.

FRI 25 SEP PLANET EARTH

CITRUS CLUB, 22:00–00:00, £5, FREE B4 10.30PM

70’s, 80’s and 90’s hits

FRIDAY’S AT OPAL (JEZ HILL) OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £TBC

Mix of electro-pop, classic beats and disco.

MISFITS

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, £4, FREE B4 11.30PM

Electrohouse and cherished club classics.

All things soul, motown, psychedelic funk, garage punk & ska.

COALITION

SUGARBEAT (SHIT ROBOT, FAKE BLOOD, FOAMO)

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Drum and bass, breaks, bassline and electro

KILLER KITSCH

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Dance music.

SECTIONS

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

MON 21 SEP DIRTY STOP OUT (DJ ANDREW TAYLOR)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

Breaks, beats, bootlegs.

SAT 26 SEP ROCKIN’ AT THE WEB

THE SPIDERS WEB, 20:00–01:00, £5

Rock ‘n’ roll, rockabilly, rhythm & blues

CUTS AND STRINGS (CHRISTIAN KLEIN, KELPE, CHRIST) THE GRV, 20:00–03:00, £12

IDM

SATURDAY’S AT OPAL

OPAL LOUNGE, 21:00–03:00, £TBC

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Glamorous vocal house, accessible electro, past and present club classics with a hint of R&B.

TRADE UNION

TEASE AGE

Funk, R&B, classics.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 12AM

TUE 22 SEP MISSBEHAVE (RENNIE RICH AND 3 PIECES)

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

ANTICS

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

HYBRID

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Every week will see different genres and artists from different clubs in Edinburgh: Noizteez, Volume, Ghantin, Mutiny, Dirt, Big n Bashy, Jakn, Synthetic, Coalition, Riddim Tuffa, Pangea. Techno, dubstep, drum and bass, hip hop.

SPLIT

WED 23 SEP OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

SUBTEXT

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Spanish and Latin Grooves from Juan Car.Techno, electro, breaks and minimal from various rotating guests including INGEN, Jealous Kid, C.L.B, AMELDRUM and Bruno FK.

THE PIT

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

WE ARE ELECTRIC

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 12AM

The city’s leading punk-funk electrodisco party with resident electro-punk Gary Mac playing the sounds of Berlin & beyond.

THU 24 SEP WE COULD BE HEROES!

THE ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–03:00, FREE

A whirlwind of super heroic kitsch, a veritable smorgasbord of glam

VANITY

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

R&B, electro and funky house.

Vs

SATURDAy 5TH SEPTEmBER 11pm - 3.00am

Dubstep, bassline, fidget, electro, b-more, jungle, UK funky, house, drum & bass.

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

CHAMBLES (JEZ HILL)

FRI 18 SEP

BREAKING BOUNDARIES IN MUSIC

DIAMOND DOLLAR

MODERN LOVERS

SICK NOTE

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave.

Psychedelic disco music from beyond the stars.

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, FREE

RISE (JOHN HUTCHINSON)

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 11.30PM

Cheese.

CLUB FOR HEROES

CITRUS CLUB, 22:00–03:00, £6, FREE B4 11PM

BUBBLEGUM

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, £4, FREE B4 11.30PM

A chewed up, spat out mix of electro. pop, chart, indie and retro floor fillers.

PLAYDATE (MATT WALSH [CLOUDED VISION / TURBO RECORDINGS]) SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, £3

SICK NOTE (MATTIE SAFER (THE RAPTURE))

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave.

LIVE HIGHLIGHTS Friday 11th September

NEKO CASE

Thursday 10th September 7pm £3

Friday 2nd October

‘We’ll Make Our History’ EP Launch

From 7pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £12.50 stbf

NEIL INNES - ONE MAN SHOW From 7.30pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £15 (stbf ).

SUN 27 SEP OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Electrohouse and cherished club classics.

www.myspace.com/thevoidband

VEGAS!

Friday 11th September 7pm £3.00

From 8.30pm - 1am. Admission £7 (no advance tickets).

Thursday 15th October

COLIN MACINTYRE

(aka Mull Historical Society) and Band+ 8 Track Stereo+ Sorren MacLean

pLUS SpeCiaL GUeStS

www.chloehall.com

From 7.30pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £10 stbf

Friday 16th October

THE FIVE CORNERS QUINTET From 7.30pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £14 stbf

Sunday 18th October

KATE WALSH

A Regular Music Presentation. From 8pm.£10 stbf

Monday 19th October

CATFISH KEITH

SATURDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER 09 7PM £3.00

SAMANTHA CRAIN & THE MIDNIGHT SHIVERS

From 8pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £12 stbf

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

Friday 23rd October

WWW.SAMANTHACRAIN.COM

NEARLY DAN

From 7.30pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £12 stbf

Saturday 24th October

CINDYTALK

+ The Tenebrous Liar+ Somatic Responses+ Blackmass Plastics DJ From 8pm in The Ballroom. Advance tickets £9 stbf

Monday 26th October

25th SEPTEmBER

10.30pm - 3.00am

FOAMO

SH!T ROBOT

& UTAH SAINTS

WWW.SUGARBEATCLUB.COm

THE UNTHANKS

A Regular Music Presentation. From 7.30pm Advance tickets are available from The Voodoo Rooms, Ripping Records, Tickets Scotland (Edinburgh & Glasgow), & www.ticketweb.co.uk. For more information visit www.thevoodoorooms.co.uk BSP Concerts & Cabaret Voltaire present

Daniel Johnston

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5, £2.50 B4 11.30PM

RISE (JOHN HUTCHINSON)

Make Sparks + Special Guests

Saturday 3rd October

THE EGG

Indie / 60’s Garage / Northern Soul / Ska / 70’s / Punk / New Wave. www.eggsite.co.uk

THE VOID

c

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

w a e e re le . ct.. ri

SECTIONS

Wednesday 4th November thefantasticvoodooroomssmashingsuper

SEPTEMBER OFFER

COALITION

The Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh Tickets now on sale

THE SPEAKEASY

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Drum and bass, breaks, bassline and electro

KILLER KITSCH

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Dance music.

SECTIONS

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

2 rooms of Metal/Rock, Punk/PopPunk, EBM/Industrial, Goth/Grunge and Eighties.

MON 28 SEP DIRTY STOP OUT (DJ ANDREW TAYLOR)

OPAL LOUNGE, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Funk, R&B, classics.

TRADE UNION

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £2, FREE B4 12AM

Please take advantage of our generous spirit and enjoy anything from our food menu at half the normal cost* all we ask is you present this coupon to the staff. *THE SMALL PRINT - The least expensive item is the free one obviously. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer, i.e half price is as cheap as it ever gets. This offer does not apply to any special event catering. This offer has no cash value and is only valid during September 2009. Management reserve the rights to move the goalposts and change everything completely without prior warning.

For table bookings & corporate or private hire: speakeasy@thecabaretvoltaire.com

RIPPING RECORDS T: 0131 226 7010 WWW.TICKETWEB.CO.UK T: 08444 77 1000 TICKETS SCOTLAND T: 0131 220 3234

WWW.THECABARETVOLTAIRE.COM SEPTEMBER 2009

THE SKINNY 67


aberdeen music Wed 02 Sep Healthy Minds Collapse The Tunnels, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Rock

Thu 03 Sep Murderburgers

The Tunnels, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Pop punk

DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Fri 04 Sep Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Weekly sessions with local blues and folk singers

Oxjam Charity Event

The Tunnels, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Showcase

Sun 06 Sep Belhaven Sunday Jazz

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Charity Night

The Tunnels, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

with Wendy Craig

Mon 07 Sep THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with a pass

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

Tue 08 Sep

DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Fri 18 Sep Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Weekly sessions with local blues and folk singers

Fraser & Ant

MUSA, 20:15–22:15, Free

Guitar and vocals duo

Sat 19 Sep

Thu 10 Sep DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Fri 11 Sep Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Weekly sessions with local blues and folk singers

Sun 20 Sep Belhaven Sunday Jazz

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Mon 21 Sep

Sat 12 Sep Funk Machine Presents: Das Contras

The Tunnels, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Latin funk

Sun 13 Sep Belhaven Sunday Jazz

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Mon 14 Sep THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with a pass

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

Tue 15 Sep Ruby Tuesday presents (various)

Bar 99 , 21:00–01:00, free Live weekly lounge set-up with local + national musicians. Acoustic sessions within this cocktail bar’s well-stocked walls. Folk, country, indie and the likes with specials on juicy bourbons.

Thu 17 Sep Anavris

The Tunnels, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Pop rock

Electric Institute (Krazzy Martin and Talcolm X) Korova, 23:00–02:00, free

Tiger Tiger, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with a pass

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

Tue 22 Sep Bar 99 , 21:00–01:00, free

Wed 23 Sep

Mon 07 Sep

Sat 12 Sep Adventures In Stereo (DJ Steve Milne)

Offshore

The Rig, 19:00–02:00, Free

Alt. indie and oil rig punter puns

Latin Night

Moshulu, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Indie electro disco club... weekly

THE DEEP END (D’Julz (Paris) the deeper than deep maestro joins Iain MacPherson)

The Tunnels, 22:00–03:00, £3

with DJ Yuri

THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with pass

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

Mon 14 Sep Offshore

Weekly club sessions in the dirty side of electronic moosick The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Electro and dance

Sat 05 Sep Adventures In Stereo (DJ Steve Milne)

Moshulu, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Latin Night

The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £3

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

Electric Institute (Krazzy Martin and Talcolm X) Korova, 23:00–02:00, free

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £3/ Free with flyer

Electro

Thu 17 Sep DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Octopussy

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Tiger Tiger, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Fri 11 Sep

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

Indo Silver Club

Electric Institute (Krazzy Martin and Talcolm X)

Electro, disco and indie visuals

Weekly electro, house and techno to keep Aberdeen sweaty

Korova, 23:00–02:00, free

The Tunnels, 22:00–03:00, £3

Kamikazi (DJ PSYDOLL)

THE DEEP END (Iain MacPherson)

Weekly alt. rock and punk night

Funky Transport (Classic/Playhouse) hosts the long standing house music night.

Wed 16 Sep

Weekly electro, house and techno to keep Aberdeen sweaty

Indie electro disco club... weekly Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Moshulu, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

MIXTAPE (Giles Walker)

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Weekly club sessions in the dirty side of electronic moosick

Fri 18 Sep Indo Silver Club

The Tunnels, 22:00–03:00, £3

Electro, disco and indie visuals

Kamikazi (DJ PSYDOLL) Moshulu, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Weekly alt. rock and punk night

El Dog Alt. indie

Trapped in Kansas

The Tunnels, 19:00–23:00, £4

1000s of jobs available through JobServe

Shoegaze indie

www.jobserve.com/live

Funk

Aly Bain and Phil Cunningham

Music Hall, 19:30–22:30, £15

Folk

The Lemon Tree, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Fri 25 Sep Shell Friday Live

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Weekly sessions with local blues and folk singers

Misery Signals

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

No Borders

.Looking for new career. .opportunities in 2009?. Visit the JobServe Live! Recruitment & Careers Exhibition

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Sun 27 Sep Belhaven Sunday Jazz

Face to Face Recruitment Careers Advice Job Hunting Tips

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alt folk

THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS, EDINBURGH Thursday 17 September 10.30am – 7pm

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with a pass

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

68 THE SKINNY September 2009

Mon 21 Sep Offshore

The Rig, 19:00–02:00, Free

Alt. indie and oil rig punter puns

THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with a pass

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

T2: Latin Night

The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £3

With DJ Yuri

Wed 23 Sep ELECTRIQUE BOUTIQUE (GILES WALKER)

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £3/ Free with flyer

Electro

Hero Next Door: Traffic Light Night The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £3

Pop

Thu 24 Sep DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Octopussy

Tiger Tiger, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Reggae and dancehall

Fri 25 Sep Kamikazi (DJ PSYDOLL) Moshulu, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Weekly alt. rock and punk night

MIXTAPE (Giles Walker)

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Weekly club sessions in the dirty side of electronic moosick

CUT/EDIT/REWIND

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £5

Acollection of different style Hip-Hop DJs and artists from your very own backdoor to halfway round the World giving it the best in turntabiliism trickery to techno effects tom foolery.

Adventures In Stereo (DJ Steve Milne)

Moshulu, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

THE DEEP END (Iain MacPherson)

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Funky Transport (Classic/Playhouse) hosts the long standing house music night, one of the premier weekly events in Scotland for fouring to the flooring.

Sun 27 Sep Aberdeen Student Radio DJs

Visit www.jobserve.com/live for more details or search for JobServe Events online

Mon 28 Sep THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

Funky Transport (Classic/Playhouse) hosts the long standing house music night, one of the premier weekly events in Scotland for fouring to the flooring.

Indie electro disco club... weekly

The Lemon Tree, 12:00–14:00, Free

Slow Club

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Sat 26 Sep

Charity world music night

Tim & Sam band with Tim & Sam

THE DEEP END (Iain MacPherson)

The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Sat 26 Sep

T2: Elizium

Petrocollapse

Funk Machine Presents: AZ-I Cool & Klunk The Tunnels, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

Café Drummonds, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Thu 24 Sep

Bliss

Live music/ club crossover with dive bar blood running through it’s filthy veins

Snafu, 23:00–02:00, £3/2/free with a pass

ELECTRIQUE BOUTIQUE (GILES WALKER)

MIXTAPE (Giles Walker)

Indie electro disco club... weekly

Electro

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £3/ Free with a flyer

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

Weekly alt. rock and punk night

Moshulu, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

The Tunnels, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

with DJ Yuri

Moshulu, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Sat 19 Sep Adventures In Stereo (DJ Steve Milne)

THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Kamikazi (DJ PSYDOLL)

Weekly club sessions in the dirty side of electronic moosick

ELECTRIQUE BOUTIQUE (GILES WALKER)

Alt. indie and oil rig punter puns

Indo Silver Club

Electro, disco and indie visuals

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Dance and electro

Wed 09 Sep

Thu 10 Sep

The Tunnels, 22:00–03:00, £3

MIXTAPE (Giles Walker)

The Rig, 19:00–02:00, Free

Fri 04 Sep

Trash Disco

The world’s longest-running Ômobile guitar festivalÕ

Touring the release of We’ll Make Our History

The Deen’s institutional live music/ club cross-over, expect weekly electro-indie rock to fall in love to...

THE BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE

Rock

Breakbeat disco house

Café Drummonds, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Snafu, 22:00–02:00, £3/2/Free with a flyer

The Tunnels, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

nternational Guitar Night

The Void

DIRTY HEARTS CLUB

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £6/3 before midnight

Humanzi

Copy Ha-ho

The Tunnels, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Thu 03 Sep

Octopussy

Live weekly lounge set-up with local + national musicians. Acoustic sessions within this cocktail bar’s well-stocked walls. Folk, country, indie and the likes with specials on juicy bourbons.

Live weekly lounge set-up with local + national musicians. Acoustic sessions within this cocktail bar’s well-stocked walls. Folk, country, indie and the likes with specials on juicy bourbons.

Electro

Conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen leads the orchestra in a programme of work by Bartók, Debussy, Janácek. Salonen’s own Piano Concerto is also performed by Yefim Bronfman, the pianist to which the concerto is dedicated.

Music Hall, 19:30–22:30, £tbc

Alt. rock

Bar 99 , 21:00–01:00, free

Snafu, 23:00–03:00, £3/ Free with flyer

Philharmonia Orchestra

Ruby Tuesday presents (various)

Ruby Tuesday presents (various)

Wed 02 Sep ELECTRIQUE BOUTIQUE (GILES WALKER)

Weekly electro, house and techno to keep Aberdeen sweaty

Willard Grant Conspiracy, Doghouse Roses The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Aberdeen Clubs

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Mon 28 Sep Offshore

Upload your CV at the event for a chance to win an iPod nano!

See www.jobservelive.com/ipod.asp for more details.

The Rig, 19:00–02:00, Free

Alt. indie and oil rig punter puns

LATIN NIGHT

The Tunnels, 20:00–23:00, £3

Playing a heady mix of salsa and meringue that will get you dancing all night.


Glasgow Comedy Tue 01 Sep Red Raw (With Steven Dick and Billy Kirkwood.) The Stand, 20:30–22:35, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

Wed 02 Sep Midweek Comedy Cabaret (With Steven Dick and Gary Little.) The Stand, 20:30–22:36, £4/£2

Thu 03 Sep SILLY CONNOLLY - The World’s No. 1 Billy Connolly Tribute The Pavilion Theatre, 19:30–21:37, £12.50

The Thursday Show (With David Kay, Aaron Counter, Charlie Ross and Stephen Callaghan. Hosted by Bruce Devlin. ) The Stand, 21:00–22:50, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Fri 04 Sep DAM Fine Comedy Gramofon, 20:30–22:45, £5/£3

The Friday Show (With David Kay, Aaron Counter, Charlie Ross and Tony Dunn. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

Sat 05 Sep The Saturday Show ( With David Kay, Aaron Counter, Charlie Ross and Tony Dunn. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 21:00–23:02, £13

The State Bar The State Bar, 21:00–23:16, £6

Wed 09 Sep Midweek Comedy Cabaret (With Mark Nelson) The Stand, 20:30–22:36, £4/£2

Thu 10 Sep The Thursday Show (With Ron Vaudry, Keir McAllister, Fred Cooke and Carly Baker. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.) The Stand, 21:00–22:50, £8/£7

Fri 11 Sep

Sun 06 Sep Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (With Aaron Counter, Chris Henry, and Jay Lafferty.) The Stand, 20:30–22:39, £5/£4

The Ivory

DAM Fine Comedy

Gramofon, 20:30–22:45, £5/£3

The Stand, 20:30–22:54, £4/£2

Red Raw (With Phil Differ and Scott Agnew.) The Stand, 20:30–22:35, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

Tue 15 Sep Red Raw (With Ron Vaudry and Chris Henry.) The Stand, 20:30–22:35, £2/£1

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

Thu 17 Sep

Doors open 7pm

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Sat 12 Sep The Saturday Show (With Ron Vaudry, Keir McAllister, Fred Cooke and Carly Baker. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.) The Stand, 21:00–23:02, £13

Brand new fast paced improv show featuring the nation’s top comics.

Tue 08 Sep

Brand new fast paced improv show featuring the nation’s top comics.

The Thursday Show (With Dave Fulton, Billy Kirkwood, Saj and Woody. Hosted by Susan Morrison.)

Free

Improv Wars

The Stand, 20:30–22:54, £4/£2

The Friday Show (With Ron Vaudry, Keir McAllister, Fred Cooke and Carly Baker. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.)

Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00,

Mon 07 Sep

Mon 14 Sep Improv Wars

Sun 13 Sep Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (With Ron Vaudry, Fred Cooke, Andrew Learmonth and Ailsa Johnston.) The Stand, 20:30–22:39, £5/£4

The Ivory

Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

New talent show with professional headliner

The Stand, 21:00–22:50, £8/£7

Fri 18 Sep The Friday Show (With Dave Fulton, Mike Woznaik, Saj and Woody. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

Sat 19 Sep The Saturday Show (With Dave Fulton, Mike Woznaik, Saj and Woody. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–23:02, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 20 Sep

Fri 25 Sep

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (With Dave Fulton, Viv Gee, and Stephen Callaghan.) The Stand, 20:30–22:39, £5/£4

The Ivory

Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

New talent show with professional headliner

Mon 21 Sep Sit Down, Pedal, Pedal, Stop And Stand Up (Dave Gorman) The Pavilion Theatre, 19:30–22:43, £15

Improv Wars

The Stand, 20:30–22:54, £4/£2

Brand new fast paced improv show featuring the nation’s top comics.

The Friday Show (With Gus Tawse, Colin Owens and Luke Benson. Hosted by Joe Heenan.) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

Sat 26 Sep The Saturday Show (With Gus Tawse, Colin Owens and Luke Benson. Hosted by Joe Heenan.) The Stand, 21:00–23:02, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 27 Sep

Red Raw (With Gus Tawse and John Ross.)

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (With Colin Owens, Martin McAllister, Barry Mcdonald and Andrew Learmonth.)

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

The Ivory

Tue 22 Sep The Stand, 20:30–22:35, £2/£1

Wed 23 Sep Midweek Comedy Cabaret The Stand, 20:30–22:36, £4/£2

The Stand, 20:30–22:39, £5/£4

Ivory Bar & Restaurant, 20:30–23:00, Free

Scottish Comedian of The Year Grand Final

Old Fruitmarket, 20:30–23:09, £13/£15

Grand Final of Ha Ha Comedy’s annual contest.

Thu 24 Sep The Thursday Show (With Gus Tawse, Colin Owens and Jay Lafferty. Hosted by Joe Heenan.)

Improv Wars

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Brand new fast paced improv show featuring the nation’s top comics.

The Stand, 21:00–22:50, £8/£7

Mon 28 Sep The Stand, 20:30–22:54, £4/£2

Edinburgh comedy Thu 03 Sep The Thursday Show (With Joe Heenan, Mark Nelson, Tiffany Stevenson and Chris Henry. Hosted by Raymond Mearns) The Stand, 21:00–23:17, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Fri 04 Sep The Friday Show (With Nick Revell, Steven Dick, Tiffany Stevenson and Chris Henry. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.) The Stand, 21:00–23:21, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

Sat 05 Sep The Saturday Show (With Nick Revell, Steven Dick, Tiffany Stevenson and Chris Henry. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.) The Stand, 21:00–22:05, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 06 Sep

Mon 07 Sep Red Raw (Gus Tawse and Siân Bevan) The Stand, 20:30–22:55, £2

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

Tue 08 Sep Midweek Comedy Cabaret The Stand, 20:30–22:36, £4/£2

Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry.

The Sunday Night LaughIn (With Nick Revell, Jim Park, and Halley Metcalfe. Hosted by Scott Agnew.) The Stand, 20:30–23:01, £5/£4

Wed 09 Sep Melting Pot

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5/£4

Watch a series of short comedy sketches, presented by top actors and comedians. Vote for your favourite, and see a longer version next month.

Thu 10 Sep The Thursday Show (With Ian Cognito, Andy White, John Whale and Stephen Callaghan. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–23:17, £8/£7

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Fri 11 Sep The Friday Show (With Ian Cognito, Andy White, John Whale and Stephen Callaghan. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–23:21, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

Sat 12 Sep The Saturday Show (With Ian Cognito, Andy White, John Whale and Stephen Callaghan. Hosted by Susan Morrison.) The Stand, 21:00–22:05, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 13 Sep Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry.

The Sunday Night LaughIn (With Andy White, John Whale and Kim MacAskill. Hosted by Billy Kirkwood.) The Stand, 20:30–23:01, £5/£4

Tue 15 Sep

Tue 22 Sep

Midweek Comedy Cabaret (Hosted by Stu Murphy.) The Stand, 20:30–22:36, £4/£2

Thu 17 Sep

Red Raw (With Ron Vaudry and Bruce Fummey.) The Stand, 20:30–22:55, £2

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

The Stand, 20:30–22:36, £4/£2

Thu 24 Sep

The Thursday Show (With Ron Vaudry, Mark Bratchpiece, Chris Forbes and Jay Lafferty. Hosted by Scott Agnew.)

The Thursday Show (With Kevin Gildea, Alan Francis, Bruce Fummey and Kim MacAskill. Hosted by Craig Hill.)

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

Ease yourself into the weekend with top laughs and delicious food.

The Stand, 21:00–23:17, £8/£7

Fri 18 Sep

The Stand, 21:00–23:17, £8/£7

Fri 25 Sep

The Friday Show (With Ron Vaudry, Mark Bratchpiece, Chris Forbes and David Quirk. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 21:00–23:21, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

The Friday Show (With Kevin Gildea, Alan Francis, Bruce Fummey and Jason Kavan. Hosted by Craig Hill.) The Stand, 21:00–23:21, £10/£9

Doors open 7pm

Sat 26 Sep

Sat 19 Sep The Saturday Show (With Ron Vaudry, Mark Bratchpiece, Chris Forbes and David Quirk. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.) The Stand, 21:00–22:05, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 20 Sep Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry.

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (With Mike Woznaik, Elaine Malcolmson, Rab Brown and Gordon Alexander. Hosted by Siân Bevan.) The Stand, 20:30–23:01, £5/£4

Mon 14 Sep

Midweek Comedy Cabaret

Mon 21 Sep

The Saturday Show (With Kevin Gildea, Alan Francis, Bruce Fummey and Jason Kavan. Hosted by Craig Hill.) The Stand, 21:00–22:05, £13

Top acts. Hot food. An altogether great night out.

Sun 27 Sep Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Improvised comedy led by by audience suggestions, with Stu and Garry.

The Sunday Night LaughIn (With Alan Francis, Andrew Learmonth, Michael Manley and Stephen Callaghan. Hosted by JoJo Sutherland.) The Stand, 20:30–23:01, £5/£4

Mon 28 Sep

Red Raw (With Chris Forbes and Rick Molland.)

Red Raw (Hosted by Billy Kirkwood.)

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

New acts, new material from old acts; a classic lucky dip of comedy.

The Stand, 20:30–22:55, £2

The Stand, 20:30–22:55, £2

September 2009

THE SKINNY 69


Edinburgh theatre Brunton Theatre Fur Coat and Magic Knickers 07:30PM, 05 Sep, 10.50

An old lady goes shopping crazy

Meet The Company 06:00PM, 09 Sep, free

Resident dance company in informal showcase

Cock and Bull Story 07:30PM, 12 Sep, 10.50

Boxing drama

The Bonzo Dog Doo Dah Band Changed My Life Forever 07:30PM, 12 Sep, 10.50

Dinner and play

The Beauty Queen of Leeane 07:30PM, 18 Sep—19 Sep, 10.50

Popular County Galway domestic drama

Playhouse Halfway to Paradise 07:30PM, 12 Sep, 17.50

The tale of rocker Billy Fury

Mrs Brown Rides Again 07:30PM, 15 Sep—19 Sep, 17.50

Rude and cheeky comedy

King’s Theatre Afterplay Various times, 01 Sep—05 Sep, not 2nd, From £10

The Yalta Game Various times, 01 Sep—05 Sep, not 2nd, 3rd, From £10

The Silver Darlings 07:30PM, 08 Sep—12 Sep, various prices

Scottish classic novel redone for the stage

Stepping Out 07:30PM, 15 Sep—19 Sep, contact www.ambassadortickets.com

Musical humour

Dinner Ladies 07:30PM, 22 Sep—26 Sep, contact www.ambassadortickets.com

Royal Lyceum Peter and Wendy Various times, 02 Sep—05 Sep, not 3rd, From £10

The Beggar’s Opera 07:30PM, 12 Sep—27 Sep, £9-£27

Vanishing Point Theatre Company drags John Gay’s 18th Century satirical ballad opera kicking and screaming into the 22nd Century

The Tron Little Johnny’s Big Gay Musical 07:30PM, 09 Sep—12 Sep, 10.50

McKnight’s loving parody of the musical. Contains swishing.

Traverse The Beggars’ Opera 07:45PM, 12 Sep—26 Sep, not 13th, 14th, 20th, 21st, various prices

Award winners take on the Gay classic

Experimentum Mundi 08:00PM, 02 Sep—05 Sep, 17

Faith Healer

Bright Black

07:30PM, 02 Sep—05 Sep, not 3rd, From £10

The story of Orpheus with cool visuals

Arguably Brian Friel’s greatest work, this play influenced a generation of Irish writing for the theatre. It is presented by Dublin’s Gate Theatre as part of a Festival residency offering the opportunity to see three masterworks by Ireland’s most popular

Various times, 15 Sep—26 Sep, 8.00

Confined Human Condition 07:30PM, 17 Sep—26 Sep, not 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, contact venue

Inside the minds of two women left helpless, one from grief and the other from feeling the agony of love.

glasgow theatre Citizens Theatre House of Bernada Alba

07:30PM, 15 Sep—26 Sep, not 20th, 21st, from 9.50

Female hothouse classic

The Arches Arches Live

06:00PM, 17 Sep, to be confirmed

Live art and theatre fun. Catch it all for best value.

Theatre Royal Singin’ in the Rain

07:30PM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, contact www.ambassadortickets.com for details

A musical about the rise of the Talkies. Classic song and dance in the shadow of a film

Tron Theatre No Obvious Trauma 07:45PM, 09 Sep—12 Sep, 8.50

Freudian hospital drama

White Tea 07:45PM, 15 Sep—26 Sep, not 20th, 21st, 8.00

Loss, nuclear bombs and crosscultural friendship

Confined Human Condition 07:30PM, 17 Sep—26 Sep, contact venue

Inside the minds of two women left helpless, one from grief and the other from feeling the agony of love.

Motherland 07:30PM, 22 Sep—26 Sep, 14.50

political tales from war-tor lands

Aberdeen theatre Arts Centre Batboy the Musical 07:30PM, 23 Sep—26 Sep, 12.00

Laughter and tears with this left-field musical

His Majesty’s Evita 07:30PM, 08 Sep—19 Sep, not 13th, contact venue for details

Show-stopping tunes in the political hagiography

Rain Man 07:30PM, 22 Sep—26 Sep, contact venue for details

Neil Morrisey in fraternal comedy

The Lemon Tree White Tea 07:00PM, 02 Sep, 10.00

Leddy’s latest imaginative flight

No Obvious Trauma 07:00PM, 05 Sep, 10.00

Edinburgh art ARTSPACE2LET ARTSPACE2LET

03:00PM, 27 Sep, Free

An exhibition held on the last Sunday and Monday of every month, showcasing the work of recent graduates and young contemporary artists.

Atticsalt Passing

02:00PM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Beyond Words We Love Lomo

10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Bourne Fine Art 200YearsofScottishPainting 10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Collective The Enlightenments

12:00PM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, not 7th, 14th, 21st, Free

The Enlightenments: Susan Norrie / Enola & SHOT 12:00PM, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 7th, 14th, 21st, Free

Corn Exchange There and here

11:00AM, 01 Sep—10 Sep, not 6th, 7th, Free

Lilah Fowler

11:00AM, 18 Sep—26 Sep, not 20th, 21st, Free

Dean Gallery The Enlightenments:

10:00AM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, Free

Dovecot Studios The Creative World of Alan Davie

11:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, £3 (£2 concessions)

CCA The Last Days of Jack Shepperd 11:00AM, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 7th, 14th, 21st, Free

Collins Gallery Timo Jokela: Northern Traces: 1999-2009 Various times, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 6th, 13th, 20th, Free

GSA Emergent Artists Various times, 01 Sep—19 Sep, Free

Dai Nippon 10:00AM, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 6th, 13th, 20th, Free

Art Gallery The Tartan Lens 10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, FREE

Maritime Museum Crossing Cultures Various times, 01 Sep—27 Sep, not

Bright Black

Harbour Views

07:00PM, 23 Sep—26 Sep, 8.00

Various times, 01 Sep—27 Sep, not 7th, 14th, 21st, FREE

20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 8.00

Homecoming and Aberdeen on Screen

The story of Orpheus with cool visuals

12:30PM, 09 Sep, FREE

Various times, 15 Sep—26 Sep, not

70 THE SKINNY September 2009

10:00AM, 12 Sep—26 Sep, not 13th, 14th, 20th, 21st, Free

Scotland’s Islands & Edges; Beautiful Trophies. New print works.

Fruitmarket Eva Hesse Studiowork Various times, 01 Sep—27 Sep, Free

Ingleby Gallery CALLUM INNES 10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Modern Art Artist Rooms 10:00AM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, Free

Paul and Nusch Eluard and Surrealsim 10:00AM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, Free

National Galleries The Discovery of Spain 10:00AM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, £8 (£6)–£8/£6

National Museum Ballast: Bringing the Stones Home 10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Nekojuice Change - an international Art Project

10:00AM, 01 Sep, Free

RSA Allison and Bray: Homeland 2009 10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Raphael to Renoir 10:00AM, 01 Sep—06 Sep, £4 (£3)

Talbot Rice The Enlightenments: Joseph Kosuth / ‘An Interpretation of This Title’ Nietzsche, Darwin and the Paradox of Content 10:00AM, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 7th, 14th, 21st, Free

The Saint Gammel Butikken 12:00PM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, Free

www.christinakernohan.com

Voodoo Rooms Laptop Lounge 08:00PM, 10 Sep, Free

Cutting-edge international and UK electronic music and video artists perform live in the venue and into the venue via the net

Total Kunst Total Kunst 09 10:30AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

doggerfisher Nashashibi / Skaer 10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

gallerA1

11:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, £1 for

JUMP 2 DE-Light

charity

10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Mary Mary ‘The Power Structures, Rituals & Sexuality of the European Shorthand Typists’ 12:00PM, Multiple dates, Free

Sorcha Dallas The Bedfords

The Flying Duck All The Young Nudes 08:00PM, Tue 1st, Tue 8th, Tue 15th, Tue 22nd, £4

Modern Institute Alex Dordoy Various times, 05 Sep—27 Sep, Free

Transmission Bee Paintings

14th, 20th, 21st, Free

11:00AM, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 6th, 7th, 13th, 14th, 20th, 21st, Free

Taking Liberties

Tron Theatre

12:00PM, 11 Sep—26 Sep, not 13th,

A Sage of the Stage, not a Beast in a Cage

14th, 15th, 20th, 21st, 22nd, Free

10:00AM, 01 Sep—05 Sep, Free

Foyer Jade Doig Various times, 01 Sep—05 Sep, FREE

Kilau Stu Allan 09:00AM, 01 Sep—27 Sep, free

Peacock Adam Barker-Mill. Colour Play 09:30AM, 01 Sep—19 Sep, not 6th, 7th, 13th, 14th, free

William Moulding 09:30AM, 01 Sep—19 Sep, not 6th, 7th, 13th, 14th, free

Thu 03 Sep Mind the Gap

Underground, 18:00–02:30, Free entry before 10pm. £6/£3 after

Fri 04 Sep HEADWAY

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Sat 05 Sep PLASTIC SOUL

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Saturdays

London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Thu 10 Sep Mind the Gap

Underground, 18:00–02:30, Free entry before 10pm. £6/£3 after

Fri 11 Sep CTRL*ALT*DEFEAT

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Sat 12 Sep Saturdays

London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Thu 17 Sep Mind the Gap

Underground, 18:00–02:30, Free entry before 10pm. £6/£3 after

Fri 18 Sep PANGEA

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Sat 19 Sep SMASH & GRAB

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Saturdays

London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Thu 24 Sep Mind the Gap

Fri 25 Sep

11:00AM, 08 Sep—26 Sep, not 13th,

Photo Works

Clubs

Underground, 18:00–02:30, Free entry before 10pm. £6/£3 after

Aberdeen Art

7th, 14th, 21st, FREE

Bright Black

Gillian Murray; Lesley Logue

John Bellany ?A Celtic Voyage?

glasgow Art

A doctor cannot forget a love affair

Orpheus re-envisioned

Printmakers

dundee

Messenger Sound System

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Sat 26 Sep Neon Nights

The Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Saturdays

London Nightclub, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Music Fri 11 Sep You Me at Six

Fat Sam’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Sun 13 Sep Twin Atlantic

Fat Sam’s, 19:00–22:30, £7.50

Thu 17 Sep The Void

The Reading Rooms, 19:00–23:00, £tbc

Project Slogan Insert 06:00PM, 01 Sep, £1

Provost Skene’s Crombie: Story of a Textile Mill 10:00AM, 01 Sep—26 Sep, not 6th, 13th, 20th, FREE

BeautifulMountain Fledgling and Friend Various times, 01 Sep—27 Sep, FREE

The Tolbooth Coming to Aberdeen 01:30PM, 02 Sep—13 Sep, not 8th, FREE

MAKE SPARKS, THE VOID, QUIVER & THE LADIE SNATCHERS, PACIFIC THEATRE, BASS ORGY CLUBNIGHT

The Reading Rooms, 20:00–22:00, £tbc

Fri 18 Sep The Hip Parade

Fat Sam’s, 19:00–22:30, £6

Thu 24 Sep Tommy Reilly

Fat Sam’s, 19:00–22:30, £10

Fri 25 Sep The Troubadours

Fat Sam’s, 19:00–22:30, £5.50

Sun 27 Sep The Xcerts, This City, 3 Times Over

Fat Sam’s, 19:00–22:30, £6


WIN A VIP TRIP TO

MERCHANT CITY FESTIVAL! The Skinny have teamed up with Merchant City Festival (24 – 27 September 2009) to give one lucky reader the chance to win an exclusive pair of tickets to this year’s event on Sunday 27 September. The prize includes one night’s accommodation at Fraser Suites (1-19 Albion Street); cocktails and dinner for two in Metropolitan; tickets to see comedian Raymond Mearns at The Tron, courtesy of Magners Glasgow International Comedy Festival and a pair of tickets for the Festival Party at Byblos, featuring performances from Rodney Branigan, Ian Smith and Carnival Collective, as well as music from DJ Junior Otamon with breathtaking visuals from RM*. Merchant City Festival returns to Glasgow’s cultural quarter for its eighth year. the cutting edge festival is one of the most diverse platforms for the arts and features some of the best of Scottish art and entertainment with a packed programme of theatre, music, comedy, fashion, visual art, film, dance, literature, markets and much more. Featuring over 300 performances, spanning more than 80 venues, with many free of charge, the event attracts crowds of over 50,000 each year.

To enter just answer this question : In which year did the inaugural Merchant City Festival take place? VISIT THESKINNY.CO.UK/COMPETITIONS BEFORE 19 SEPTEMBER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN! For terms and conditions, visit theskinny.co.uk/terms. Entrants must be 18 or over. Please drink responsibly - for the facts, www.drinkaware.co.uk.

WIN A LIMITED EDITION LIVE CD FROM THE MILL ANNIVERSARY SHOWS! Two days at the tail-end of summer (27 August and 3 September) will mark the first anniversary of The Mill, a fortnightly evening created by Miller Genuine Draft to showcase the best of what the scene has to offer. Bands playing these two sold out shows, many of whom are regulars at The Mill, include We Were Promised Jetpacks, Broken Records and Found. Whether you missed out on a ticket, or you want a chance to re-live your favourite moments from the gig, The Mill have put together a special live recording of both shows. Thanks to The Mill, The Skinny are giving away ten of these limited edition, highly sought after CDs. Other bands set to be featured on the CD include Sparrow and The Workshop, The Ok Social Club, Come In Tokyo, and many more. For more information, visit themill-live.com.

To enter just answer this question :

Q: How many walls are there in Glasgow-based We Were Promised Jetpack's debut album title? VISIT THESKINNY.CO.UK/COMPETITIONS BEFORE 28 SEPTEMBER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN! Terms and Conditions: Please refer to theskinny.co.uk/terms. The Mill is an 18+ venue. Please drink responsibly.

WIN A CASE OF RELENTLESS ENERGY SHOTS AND TICKETS TO GALLOWS! Relentless, the UK's fastest growing energy drink, is releasing an intense energy shot; Relentless Energy Shots. Relentless will be setting up shop in Glasgow (158 Ingram Street) to offer you a much needed boost to get you through the day. The shop will feature a visual and musical experience that recreates the world of Relentless. To celebrate the launch, The Skinny are offering you the chance to win a case of Relentless Energy Shots (12 shots per case) plus a pair of tickets to see Gallows (visiting Aberdeen's Moshulu and Dundee's Fat Sams on 29 and 30 November), touring on the back of their recently released second album, Grey Britain.

To enter just answer this question :

On Gallow's second album, Grey Britain, what type of flower is depicted on the album sleeve? VISIT THESKINNY.CO.UK/COMPETITIONS BEFORE 25 SEPTEMBER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN! For terms and conditions, please visit theskinny.co.uk/terms. Entrants must be 18 and over.

WIN A TRIP TO THE BIRTHDAY JD SET IN LONDON! The Birthday JD Set is the musical culmination of the traditional month-long celebrations of Jack Daniel’s birthday, celebrated every September by discerning music fans and whiskey connoisseurs. The Skinny are offering the chance for you and three of your mates to head to London’s Village Underground on Thursday 8th October to be a part of Jack Daniel’s birthday celebrations at the Birthday JD Set, a prize that also includes one night's acommodation in London and £50 per person towards travel. The line up features the UK’s top young music maestros: Brett Anderson, Carl Barât, and Jon McClure (Reverend & The Makers). Each will perform a series of exciting, one-off collaborations with the New Silver Cornet Band - a group of hugely talented session musicians from Mr. Jack’s homestead Tennessee, including: David Hood, founder of the Muscle Shoal Sound Studio and Wayne Carson, who wrote Elvis Presley’s ’Always on My Mind’. For more information on the event and Jack Daniel's full terms and conditions, visit thejdset.co.uk and theskinny.co.uk/terms/bjdset.

To enter just answer this question :

In which month is Mr Jack Daniel's birthday celebrated? VISIT THESKINNY.CO.UK/COMPETITIONS BEFORE 25 SEPTEMBER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN! For terms and conditions, visit theskinny.co.uk/terms and theskinny.co.uk/terms/bjdset. Entrants must be aged 18 and over. Make Mr. Jack’s birthday a memorable one. Please drink responsibly.

SEPTEMBER 2009

THE SKINNY 71



September 2009