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CULT U R A L

J O U R N A L I S M

Scotland Issue 98 November 2013

MUSIC Moonface Shearwater GSA Reborn Ubre Blanca Wooden Shjips Connan Mockasin The Dillinger Escape Plan Public Service Broadcasting CLUBS Kevin Saunderson FILM Andrew Bujalski French Film Festival Abdellatif Kechiche

ART Michelle Hannah David Ogle COMEDY Josie Long Daniel Sloss BOOKS Nicola White Andrew McConnell Stott TRAVEL Malawi FASHION Nightwalk

“THERE’S ALWAYS SOME DARKNESS AND MYSTERY” MUSIC | FILM | CLUBS | THEATRE | ART | BOOKS | COMEDY | FASHION | TRAVEL | FOOD | DEVIANCE | LISTINGS


PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

ANDY WEATHERALL +

SAT 14TH DECEMBER

GLASGOW SECC 0844 395 4000 www.ticketsoup.com a Regular Music and SJM Concerts presentation by arrangement with X-Ray

ROKIA TRAORÉ

plus Special Guests

MICHAEL JEROME BROWNE

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

Friday 8 November EDINBURGH Liquid Room

SUN 10TH NOV

EDINBURGH QUEEN’S HALL

P.32 Daniel Sloss

Photo: Jill Furmanovsky

plus special guests

FRI 8TH & SAT 9TH NOV

P.44 Malawi

PLUS FIONA SOE PAING Sun 17th Nov

Edinburgh

WED 4 DECEMBER GLASGOW CCA

Voodoo Rooms

+ special guests plus special guests

Led To Sea

P.14 The Art School

ORAN MOR GLASGOW THURSDAY 28TH NOVEMBER WED 13TH NOV O2 ABC GLASGOW

November 2013

Saturday 16 November Glasgow O2 ABC2

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

I N DEPEN DENT

CULTU R AL

JOU R NALI S M

Issue 98, November 2013 © Radge Media Ltd. Get in touch: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk T: 0131 467 4630 P: The Skinny, 3 Coates Place, Edinburgh, EH3 7AA

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WEDNESDAY 27 NOVEMBER

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regularmusic.com 4

Contents

Sun 22 Dec Old Fruitmarket GLASGOW

P.53 Ubre Blanca

Editorial Editor-in-Chief Music & Deputy Editor Art Editor Books Editor Clubs Editor Comedy Editor Deviance Editor Events Editor Fashion Editor Film & DVD Editor Food Editor Travel Editor Theatre Editor Staff Writer / Sub Editor

Rosamund West Dave Kerr Jac Mantle Ryan Rushton Ronan Martin Vonny Moyes Ana Hine Anna Docherty Alexandra Fiddes Jamie Dunn Peter Simpson Paul Mitchell Eric Karoulla Bram E. Gieben

Production Production Manager Lead Designer

Billie Dryden Maeve Redmond

Sales Sales Director Sales Executives

Lara Moloney Eddie Chung Tom McCarthy George Sully

printed on 100% recycled paper

Company PA

Kyla Hall

Publisher

Sophie Kyle

In person from Ticket Scotland Glasgow/Edinburgh & Ripping Edinburgh and usual outlets

regularmusicltd

regularmusicuk THE SKINNY

Photo: David P Scott

BEN WATT


Contents 06 Opinion: Welcome to the magazine, with

Skinny on Tour, Shot of the Month, Hero Worship with Kyuss's John Garcia saluting The Cult's Ian Astbury bemoaning the death of lyrical skill in hip-hop, Stop the Presses, and a mediation on the nature of burlesque.

33

Connan Mockasin: The New Zealand songwriter and beatsmith takes us through his new LP for Phantasy.

34

Josie Long: The transition from comedian to filmmaker has been a rewarding journey for the young comic – she gives us the lowdown.

08 Heads Up: Remember remember,

Remember Remember always have a gig on the 5th of November. Cultural events for every other day of the month too.

Lifestyle 36 Showcase: David Ogle makes drawings with light, exploring the nature of the form in glorious technicolour.

Features 10

Julia Holter: The cult singer-songwriter explains how her new album was influenced by 1950s musical Gigi and Lynchian weirdness.

12

Wooden Shjips: Ripley Johnson's team of bearded psych shaman went cosmic with 2011's West, now they've gone Back to Land.

14

As Glasgow School of Art gear up to launch their newly revamped, state-ofthe-art Vic, a look back at why the venue has played a defining role in the city's cultural landscape.

17

Kevin Saunderson: KMS Records founder and Detroit techno legend Saunderson talks about DJing with his son. D'awww.

18

Mumblecore originator Andrew Bujalski tells us why he chose to make a movie about computer chess programming.

38

Fashion: A look at the catwalk show Nightwalk, plus an exhibition of work by Dutch photographer Vivienne Sasson, and an interview with Gothic-inspired designer Amy Davidson.

41

Food & Drink: A look at handy apps for food-lovers, drinking in Australia, November's Food News, plus Phagomania looks at some horrible foodstuffs with DudeFoods.

44

Travel: Our intrepid reporter visits Malawi for the City of Stars festival and stays on to explore the 'warm heart of Africa.'

45

Deviance: Could this be the end for Scottish strip clubs? Our reporter Twinkle investigates.

Review

47

Music: Interviews with mercurial minstrel Moonface and New Blood band Ubre Blanca, this month's albums in review including Chino Moreno's †††, The Cosmic Dead's split with Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs, Cate Le Bon and Midlake, live reviews of Manic Street Preachers, These New Puritans and The Spook School, plus yer Gig Highlights for November.

54

Clubs: A look at Pressure's 15th birthday extravaganza with Ben Sims in interview, plus this month's Clubbing Highlights.

20 Under The Influence: The man behind

Dillinger Escape Plan, Ben Weinman, shares ten classic albums that shaped his approach to music.

21

Public Service Broadcasting: J. Wildgoose Esquire talks us through the stock footage-loving band's new DVD.

22

A closer look at the winter programme of Edinburgh's Summerhall, offering a darkly challenging alternative to the impending panto season. Plus, arriving in Scotland this month, the French Film Festival offers up an array of Gallic cinema.

25

Glasgow-based performance artist Michelle Hannah tells us of her dreams of pop stardom.

26 Nicola White: The winner of this year's

Dundee International Book Prize discusses her controversial modern classic In the Rosary Garden.

26

Byromania: Stand-up comic-turnedliterary biographer Andrew McConnell Stott discusses his love of Lord Byron.

29

Shearwater: Jonathan Meiburg lays out his reasons for delivering an album of cover versions, with a surprising twist.

30 Blue Is The Warmest Colour: Actress

Adèle Exarchopoulos discusses the controversy around her Palme D'Orwinning film with director Abdellatif Kechiche.

32

56 Fim: Reviews of Blue Is The Warmest

Colour, Leviathan, Future My Love on the big screen, and Fellini's 8 1/2, Red River and horror classic Halloween on DVD.

58 Art: We look at some lovely paintings. 60 Theatre: Previews of Dragon and

Handel's Cross, plus THAT Festival in review.

61

Comedy: Andrew Learmonth argues that comedians are undervalued as storytellers.

62 Listings: Everything that's on, everywhere, with bells on.

71

Competitions: WIN THINGS! Tickets to see ol' Bob Dylan and Glasgow Christmas Market vouchers, to be precise.

Daniel Sloss: He's not just a haircut and some dick jokes – the Sloss man is delivering on his early promise. Don't call him 'young.'

November 2013

Contents

5


Editorial

Crystal Baws With Mystic Mark ARIES This month God breaks millennia of silence to speak directly to you, telling you that he thinks you probably have schizophrenia and you should get some help.



O

utside it may be a horrifyingly grey November prelude to The Worst Winter Known to Man, but in the world of The Skinny we’re hanging around in a Californian forest, basking in the sunshine. On our cover this month is one Julia Holter, an LA-based songwriter whose spellbinding musings on celebrity, loss and love pop up this month in the form of a live set in Glasgow’s CCA, part of a world tour supporting new album Loud City Song. We found a photographer in LA especially to create our bespoke cover imagery. The Skinny: always willing to go the extra mile. As long as that mile involves harassing people on Facebook and no actual physical activity. We’re also extremely excited at the impending relaunch of the Glasgow School of Art Vic building. There has been a gaping hole in all our lives in the years it’s been closed, so we jumped at the chance to get a sneak peek inside the new state-of-the-art facilities, and take a look back at some of the stories that have made it the essential cultural hub it is, and has been for the last several decades. We concentrate on its position as the locus of the Glasgow Miracle, early Franz and Clash gigs et al, rather than using this as an opportunity to share vague reminiscences of ripping up the inconic black and white dance floor in a Tennent’s fuelled haze. Our Music coverage this month includes a bit of a psych bent in the form of interviews with Wooden Shjips’ Ripley Johnson and Kiwi Connan Mockasin, who reveals why he’s transferred his interest from dolphins to humans in new release Caramel. Public Service Broadcasting’s J. Willgoose Esq drops by to introduce the band’s new DVD and look back at what has turned out to be the band’s annus mirabilis, while Shearwater’s Jonathan Meiburg introduces his new album of cover versions. Glasgow new blood Ubre Blanca, wrought from the ashes of Divorce and Shitdisco, present debut EP Polygon Mountain, and Spencer Krug aka Moonface tells us about new album Julia

with Blue Jeans On, sharing his tips for losing one’s mind in the creation of art. In Film, we embrace the ludicrously-named genre of mumblecore in an interview with director Andrew Bujalski, whose new film Computer Chess looks at the glamorous world of computer programing. We also look forward to the French Film Festival and take a closer look at the controversial Palme d’Or-annointed work of director Abdellatif Kechiche, Blue Is The Warmest Colour. Comedy has an exciting month, as Daniel Sloss drops by to charm the shit out of our Comedy editor while revealing himself to be a markedly more intelligent comic than the pretty youth in jeans with haircut stereotype may initially suggest. Josie Long is also in town with a new film project, and wants you to sign up to the alternative old boys network, which aims to promote the study of the arts and pursuit of creative careers. I can only entreat you to dae it. Finally, this month marks your very last opportunity to get involved in real life revolutionary democracy, have your voice heard and, eh, really shake things up around here – vote in our annual Food and Drink Survey! You can support your local greasy spoon at tinyurl.com/foodsurveyscotland. With winners receiving both lavish praise and window stickers, it is truly all to play for. [Rosamund West]

TAURUS  Attending a ‘tea picnic’ hosted by Russian spies you suspect foul play after they spike your drink with polonium-210. Collapsing, you gasp for air and accidentally suck a bee off a daisy. In defence it stings you on the tongue which, combined with the radioactive power, turns you into BEE MAN! Weeks later, fighting your first crime, you sting an escaping mugger and tear your own arse out. Slowly bleeding to death on the pavement you crawl around in circles saying “bzzzzzzzzz� with your human mouth, wishing there was a boot big enough to finish you off, although realistically you were going to die off in winter anyway.



CANCER Cancer rules the limbs, often leaving the rest of your body starved of blood and nutrients. Your rippling arms and legs seem somehow out of place on your wrinkled, emaciated torso.





This Month's Cover: Ye Rin Mok Ye Rin Mok is a photographer living and working in Los Angeles. Her work has been featured in Apartamento, Dwell, Monocle, W and Wired.

GEMINI This month you have full sex with an adult female.

LEO In November your third House of Love burns down completely after you fall asleep smoking a cigarette in a dream.

VIRGO  You like your sex like you like your movies: two hours long and genuinely frightening.



LIBRA You find the editor of the listings magazine you’ve been writing for has been

unusually lenient about the borderline misogynistic, obscene, nauseating and ill-advised little column you write with your disabled thumb-like retarded little girl fingers. SCORPIO This month you are passed files by a whistleblower documenting the unimaginable atrocities committed by the A-Team in Vietnam. The shocking images show Face, grinning and eating a human heart while standing in front of hundreds of skinned bodies; Murdoch making balloon animals out of a mother of two’s intestines; and a reel of grainy footage which shows Mr. T tearing a toddler in half like a phone book. In a cruel twist, the dossier also mentions that, after escaping from a maximum security stockade, the A-Team created a hubristic piece of video propaganda painting them as do-gooders aiding members of the community with extreme acts of charity.



SAGITTARIUS You join a delusional cult who believe the crackpot idea that events in your life are connected to the month you were born and that clues to your fate can be found printed amid the text of national newspapers.





CAPRICORN This month you win the lottery.



AQUARIUS Leave hydrogen alone for a few billion years and it will start writing horoscopes.

PISCES With only weeks to live and all your op tions exhausted, your doctor explains that he knows a guy, and he could totally get a rat’s brain and put it inside your ball sac and see what happens. There’s no guarantee it’ll work. But dammit, he says, it’s worth a shot.

Shot Of The Month LAW at The Skinny's Pleasance Session, Sat 12 Oct, by Sonia Kerr

The Skinny On Tour For your chance to win The Vampyre Family: Passion Envy and The Curse of Byron by Andrew McConnell Stott (courtesy of those lovely folks over at Canongate), just head along to www. theskinny.co.uk/about/competitions and tell us where you think this Skinny reader is holidaying. Hint: it may be sinking.

6

Chat

Competition closes midnight 1 Dec. Winners will be notified via email within two working days of closing and will be required to respond within one week or the prize will be offered to another entrant. Full T&Cs can be found at www.theskinny.co.uk/about/terms

THE SKINNY


Hero Worship: John Garcia on Ian Astbury

La Tengo, Connan Mockasin, Moonface, Wooden Shjips and dozens more, this is essentially your last chance to ‘ave it large at a masterfully curated multi-venue festival abroad in 2013. With tickets priced at a (beyond) reasonable €80 for four glorious days, you are duly advised to spend the last few days of your yearly holiday allocation and check it. For full details and to order tickets visit www.leguesswho.nl

Kyuss and now Vista Chino frontman John Garcia meditates on the Liverpudlian shaman who made him want to pick up a microphone in the first place

Ashbury on stage with Robby Krieger in Glasgow 2006

A

s a musical inspiration, The Cult has to be my number one. Love was hugely influential to me as a kid. A guy on my photography bus at Indio High School had a walkman on and let me listen to this song called She Sells Sanctuary and straight away I became not only a fan but a fanatic. I even went back to find out more about their previous incarnations – The Death Cult and The Southern Death Cult. But that album was the main reason I ever started singing – it’s all because of Ian Asbury. It’s been a good path, but almost curse-like, because I fell in love with that music so much that it became all I wanted to do; any other plans in my life immediately took a back seat. When I turned 27 years old he showed up to my surprise birthday party at Las Casuelas

Nuevas, Rancho Mirage in Palm Springs, California. I was pretty stoked. It just so happens that Chris Goss, who was Kyuss’ producer, worked with Ian on his solo record SpiritLightSpeed. It was through that connection I got this unbelievable chance to meet him. We hung out, went to a couple of parties together and I showed him around the place. He’s a great guy, a great singer, and I have ultra-mad respect for him. Plus, it’s a cool thing to say I’ve seen The Doors with Robby Krieger and Ray Manzarek – God rest his soul – playing together with Ian. They’re all my idols. Vista Chino play Manchester Ritz on 30 Oct and Glasgow Garage on 4 Nov. Read John’s extended article online vistachinomusic.com

Photo: Ross Kilpatrick

PUPPET ANIMATION SCOTLAND’s innovative international festival of visual theatre and film, Manipulate, returns in 2014; featuring two world premieres, a European premiere and four UK premieres. The full programme won’t be announced until 20 Nov, but as the festival’s partner, we can exclusively reveal to you, dear Skinny reader, that world renowned animator Priit Pärn will be in Edinburgh to introduce two of his animations, and engage in an audience Q&A chaired by Kevin Williamson, Director of Neu Reekie. Register for more Manipulate news as it develops over at www.manipulatefestival.org LOCAL ENTREPRENEUR Darren Kavanagh aims to breathe new life into Glasgow's shopping district with the launch of DNA, a pop-up shop and arts venue beside George Square. Their goal is to ‘offer affordable space for creative startup companies to sell their products, exhibit their artwork, and run events and performances.’ They also plan to open an artisan cafe, in the hope of presenting the city centre space as ‘a welcoming hub for the local community.’ With a goal of £10,000 to hit before the end of Nov, they’re seeking contributions from the public, who will receive ‘perks’ in return. Perks will include free shop space, discount cards and artists' exhibition space. To find out more about the initiative and its launch on 30 Nov, visit www.facebook.com/dnaglasgow THE ANNUAL LE GUESS WHO? festival, taking over Utrecht, Netherlands, has just finalised its lineup as The Skinny goes to print, and God damn it looks like the bill we’ve been thirsting after all summer. Taking place between 28 Nov and 1 Dec, featuring Mark Lanegan, The Fall, Oneohtrix Point Never, The Black Angels, Young Fathers, Yo

AND BY THE WAY, The Stand are offering students a new concessionary rate of £2 admission to select shows on school nights, from Monday to Thursday at their Edinburgh and Glasgow branches. See our listings for details of what’s on this month and check www.thestand.co.uk for full details of the offer.

Player 1 by Dennis Reinmuller

ONLINE ONLY Seattle titans Alice in Chains have The Last Word as Jerry Cantrell, Sean Kinney and William Duvall muse on their extraordinary career so far (see theskinny.co.uk/music), plus we have two pairs of tickets up for grabs to their Glasgow gig on 14 Nov (theskinny.co.uk/competitions). From field recordings to video games via Metallica, we get to know what informs the seasonal sounds of Hinterland, the second album from German techno head Recondite. theskinny.co.uk/clubs We also take a gander at new work from Dennis Reinmuller at Summerhall; Sue Tompkins at The Modern Institute, and recap on why you’d be some kind of crazy bas to miss Witches and Wicked Bodies at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art before it closes on 3 Nov. www.theskinny.co.uk/art

Beats, Rhymes and Shite Our resident rap aficionado looks forward to the death of the hip-hop super-ego

W

hat the fuck happened to mainstream hip-hop? Why have all the artists I admire, almost without exception, become hollow, moneyobsessed, misogynistic shills fixated on celebrity culture? Why are all the new rappers fevered egos with no regard or passion for lyrics? 2 Chainz – I mean seriously, come on. Fucking Nae Chainz, mate. Kendrick Lamar? Kendrick Lamer, more like. Mac Miller? Try Wack Miller. Give me. A fucking. Break. The 90s, where underground rap began to bubble up into the mainstream with the likes of Wu-Tang Clan and the Queensbridge crew – Mobb Deep, Nas and others – seem awfully distant. I’m tempted to blame Eminem. It was his decision to foist 50 Cent on the world. Nothing ever measured up to his debut album. His latterperiod lyrics showcased a solipsistic style of storytelling that would come to dominate the culture at large. Slim Shady was reduced to a whingeing shade of his former self, bitching constantly about the pressures of fame, and addiction. New track Rap God promises much, in terms of razor-sharp, Ritalin-chomping speed-rap. But it’s paired with a lazy trap-lite beat, and the next

November 2013

single features Rihanna. You broke my heart, Marshall. You broke my fucking heart. Blame P-Diddy. His shameless cash-ins on the legacy of the superlatively talented The Notorious B.I.G. ushered in the era of ‘bling’obsessed hip-hop, and made it the norm to nick a whole damn chorus of some shite 80s pop song rather than actually focusing on samplecraft. He re-emphasised the street economics of hip-hop as a corporate endgame. Lots of people got rich, not least Jay-Z. And they rapped about being rich. A lot. Blame Kanye West, who in recent years has taken the money-fetishising greed of hip-hop to its logical conclusion. He is a self-proclaimed God, a man who shakes hands with a fake Jesus as part of his show; who believes 300 was about Roman history and doesn’t care that he’s wrong. Who wants you to hurry up with his damn croissants, because he is important, and engaged to a Kardashian. The man is a hate figure in my household. I have a dartboard with his stupid face on it. What happened to hip-hop that was about something? It’s 20 years since Ice Cube’s

Words: Bram E. Gieben seminal Lethal Injection, a record which was a direct response to the beating of Rodney King and the subsequent LA riots. Where’s Cube’s 20year anniversary box set? Perhaps he’s too busy making family-friendly movies to even give a shit.. More likely, though, he’s smart enough to realise that in the current climate, it wouldn’t sell. And yet... Perhaps the hip-hop super-ego’s days are numbered. Increasingly, fans are turning away from the inflated personas of Kanye, Jay-Z and their ilk, despite the willingness of Pitchfork and other trend-setters to embrace bloated, cod-experimental, lyrically bankrupt turds like Yeezus and Magna Carta Holy Grail. There has been a resurgence, from the underground rap community, of brain-bending, tongue-twisting battle rhymes of the kind Eminem used to write – see Run The Jewels, the self-titled collaboration between Killer Mike and Company Flow / Def Jux founder El-P, which gets a physical release on Big Dada this month, as evidence of this trend. The apocalyptic doom-rap futurism of Death Grips no longer seems like a lonely peak in an arid desert, although few if any

Eminem

rap artists out there can touch Exmilitary, The Money Store and No Love Deep Web for content, impact and intensity. Battle lines are being drawn. It’s time to end the hegemony of rap that concerns itself with nothing. Lyrically, it’s time to embrace the radical tradition once more. We’re getting there. Lakutis, Heems and Kool A.D. of Das Racist display more incisive wit than Eminem can muster these days. Action Bronson and Mr Muthafuckin eXquire do hood rap better than it’s been done in years. Tyler, to the kids who follow him, is like a God – and in a much more real sense than Kanye’s nauseating self-deification. It’s a start.

Opinion

7


So, it's one of those long Skinny 'months' that somehow manages to move from October to December, taking in Halloween, Aberfeldy Festival, Sonica, the French Film Festival, Book Week Scotland, and, er, an early mention of Christmas. Sorry about that.

Thu 31 Oct

i AM take up their regular Tuesday slot at Subbie for an All Hallows edition – for which Crème Organization talent John Heckle will take the reins, indulging his love of all things analogue. And, since it's nearly Halloween, punters can expect the night's clever production and décor to be upped to O.T.T. levels. They'll then take to Edinburgh's Cabaret Voltaire on Halloween official. Sub Club, Glasgow, 11pm, £5

More pre-All Hallows' Eve shenanigans, as The Incredible Geek Comedy Night return for a special Halloween outing at the Old Hairdressers, for which tattooed funnyman Billy Kirkwood heads up a night of themed sketches, song, and stand-up from the likes of Eleanor Morton, Neil Bratchpiece, Des O'Gorman, Ewan Denny, and Joe Hullait. Old Hairdressers, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £6

The ever-inventive Cryptic lot return for the sophomore Sonica festival (31 Oct-3 Nov), taking in sonic art of myriad hues – opening with the Scottish debut of Voice, a collaborative audio-visual performance by Norwegian composer Maja S K Ratkje and multimedia artist HC Gilje, built on whistles, growls, whisper-to-scream exhalations, and LED screen backing. Tramway, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £12 (£8)

i AM's Beta & Kappa

Billy Kirkwood

Voice

Wed 6 Nov

Thu 7 Nov

Multi-instrumentalist Graeme Ronald and his Remember Remember cohorts pitch up for a Guy Fawkes special (as in, Remember Remember, playing on 5th November – hurrah!) For it, they'll be showcasing a selection of new tunes, alongside favourites from 2011's The Quickening. Ela Orleans and a Stuart Braithwaite DJ set provide the cherries a-top. CCA, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £6

Paul Vickers (aka Mr. Twonkey), brings his twisted cabaret show – Twonkeys Blue Cadabra – to the plague pit of The Real Mary King's Close as part of the inagural Close Fest. A fairytale mix of magic, music, and funny anedcotes, it sees Vickers makes merry with little hats, Ketchup balloons, and possibly the most tragic puppet ever. The Real Mary King's Close, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £5

NIGHTWALK returns to the runway for its autumn/winter catwalk outing, with a handpicked selection of local designers and labels showcasing their new collections – including Gray's School of Art Costume Design graduate Aymee Charlton, and bespoke corset work from Glasgowbased makers Crikey Aphrodite – all set to an electronic DJ soundtrack, as per. The Arches, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £12.50

Remember Remember

Photo: Takeshi Suga

Tue 5 Nov

Paul Vickers

NIGHTWALK

Thu 14 Nov

Fri 15 Nov

Creative Edinburgh – the Talent incubator for creative industry businesses and individuals in Edinburgh – take to a party setting for their annual awards and birthday bash combined, with Ten Tracks presenting music from FOUND, Jesus H Foxx, and Esther Swift, and microbrewer Barney's Beer concocting a bespoke Creative Edinburgh beer. Slurp. The Bongo Club, Edinburgh, 6.30pm, £7.50 (£4.50)

Fresh from a series of dates in the US (including a Halloween outing with Nine Inch Nails in Orlando – aka Why. Weren't. We. There), electro-pop pioneer Gary Numan returns to the UK to showcase his latest LP, Splinter. Featuring production from techno stalwart Ade Fenton, it once again finds him embracing the poppier end of the industrial spectrum with fervour. All hail. O2 ABC, Glasgow, 7pm, £25

Local spoken word chap Andrew Ferguson showcases the culmination of a year's worth of experimenting in Duality Rango – a one-off night aimed at making spoken word danceable. For it, he'll use a mash-up of handcrafted loops and live guitarists to soundtrack his in turns funny, moving, and surreal wordsmithery, joined live by guests Gavin Inglis, and Dickson Telfer. The Bongo Club, Glasgow, 7pm, £7 (£5)

Unique video art project, Bring Your Own Beamer, returns for its second Glasgow outing – with various artists taking to the multi-chambered industrial space of The Whisky Bond. Armed with video projectors, they'll set the space alight with overlapping and juxtaposing images from floor to ceiling, before discoing down with a selection of live DJs. The Whisky Bond, Glasgow, 8pm, Free (£3 after 9pm)

Gary Numan

FOUND

Andrew Ferguson

Wed 20 Nov

Thu 21 Nov

Indie-rock ensemble, Low, hit the 'burgh to give their Jeff Tweedy-produced new LP an airing in The Queen's Hall's lush surrounds. Composed of founding members and married-with-kiddies coupling Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker, joined by Steve Garrington on bass guitar duties, punters can expect every note and harmony to be as meticulously placed as ever. The Queen's Hall, Edinburgh, 7pm, £19.50

Take the Space theatre company bring their sparse and challenging new work, Stella, to the Traverse – spanning hundreds of years to tell the story of 18th century astronomer Caroline Herschel, who discovered eight comets and 11 nebulae and won the Royal Astronomical Society's Gold Medal, and 21st century radio astronomer, Jessica Bell. Traverse, Edinburgh, 19 & 20 Nov, £15.50 (£12.50/£8)

E'er on hand to start the weekend messiness early, The Arches throw up a biggie of a double headliner bill for your Thursday night pleasure – with two of the most exciting electronic producers of the last year sharing deck dutes: step up Cyril Hahn and Ryan Hemsworth. And, yes, we will mostly be there for Hahn's damn fine Destiny's Child remix. Support comes from the Killer Kitsch DJs. The Arches, Glasgow, 10pm, £10

Low

Stella

Photo: Richard Gamper

Tue 19 Nov

Photo: Chris Scott

Wed 13 Nov

Photo: Martin Baker

Tue 12 Nov

Bring Your Own Beamer

Cyril Hahn

Wed 27 Nov

Thu 28 Nov

Fri 29 Nov

Jo Caulfield hosts her Wednesday-brightening monthly, The Good, The Bad and The Unexpected, joined by a talented collective of comedians experimenting with the medium of stand-up – with punters invited to email their questions to shewasfunny@yahoo.com for the audience round – recorded on the night for dissemination as a live podcast (downloadable via iTunes). The Stand, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £5

Glaswegian industrial trio Black Sun Drum Korps give their dark reimagining of Shakespeare's Macbeth an airing. Inspired by the automatic writing/cut-up technique of William Burroughs and Brion Gysin, the band will create a visceral invocation of a Chorus of Witches for which punters can attend a masterclass the evening prior to become a part of. Summerhall, Edinburgh, 27, 29 & 30 Nov, £13

Journalist and filmmaker Matthijs van der Ven brings his Onder Involved sessions project to a live setting for a special event, for which he'll be joined by a bumper batch of his favourite musicians – amongst them Alasdair Roberts, Three Blind Wolves, and BMX Bandit's Duglas T. Stewart – each performing two covers by artists who've inspired them, and one original. The Glad Cafe, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £5

As part of the Book Week Scotland celebrations (25 Nov-1 Dec), Edinburgh's Fruitmarket Gallery host a special out-ofhours viewing of Louise Bourgeois' I Give Everything exhibition – where punters can pitch up after-dark for an evening of live drawing, writing, screenings, refreshments, and comfy chillout areas, ending rather delightfully with croissants at 6am. Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, 10pm, £10

Jo Caulfield

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Black Sun Drum Korps

Duglas T. Stewart

Photo: Andrew Greer

Tue 26 Nov

Louise Bourgeois, Insomnia Drawings (detail)

THE SKINNY

Photo: THC Gilje

Compiled by: Anna Docherty

Wed 30 Oct

Photo: Tommy Ga-Ken Wan

Heads Up

Tue 29 Oct


Sat 2 Nov

Sun 3 Nov

Mon 4 Nov

Optimo tag team JD Twitch and JG Wilkes host their annual Optimo Espookio night the day after All Hallows' Eve (aka you may have to drag your hungover carcass there). As per, they'll be going dark with a suitably haunted soundtrack and spooky fx, bolstered by a competitive costume competition which has seen everything from Super Mario to, erm, a sanitary towel. Sub Club, Glasgow, 11pm, £9

For your one last blast of 2013 music festival-ing, head for the Highlands and the chilled celebration of music, poetry, and art that is Aberfeldy Festival. Set up by local artist, and lead singer of Star Wheel Press, Ryan Hannigan, this year is a bigger, three-day affair – with a bill made up of the likes of Rick Redbeard, Withered Hand, The Last Battle, and James Yorkston. Town Hall, Aberfeldy, 1-3 Nov, £45 weekend

Showcasing creative work from secure institutions across Scotland, The Koestler Exhibition for Scotland returns – a charitable scheme rewarding artistic achievement in secure sectors since 1962. This year the exhibition is curated by the young people at Paisley's Kibble Safe Centre, who bring together a mix of painting, sculpture, and creative writing. Go marvel. Tramway, Glasgow, 2 Nov-15 Dec, Free

Mark Lanegan brings his soulful baritone to bear on the capital, playing a selection of tracks cherrypicked from his eighth studio album, Imitations, which takes in a collection of his favourite songs – including covers of Andy Williams, Nick Cave, and Frank Sinatra – for which he'll be playing alongside recent musical co-pilot, British instrumentalist Duke Garwood. The Queen's Hall, Edinburgh, 7pm, £20

Rick Redbeard

Optimo's JD Twitch and JG Wilkes

Photo: Sonia Kerr

Fri 1 Nov

Soar, HM Prison Shotts

Mark Lanegan

Sun 10 Nov

Mon 11 Nov

Offering cinema goers the opportunity to revisit old classics and sample new works, the French Film Festival skips across the Channel. Marking its 21st year, things kick off with a premiere of Sylvian Chomet's first full foray into live action, Attila Marcel, for which the man himself will be in attendance. Also showing at Glasgow's GFT the following evening. Filmhouse, Edinburgh, 8.15pm, £8.20 (£6)

John B. McKenna and his Monoganon crew take to the CCA to launch their second LP – simultaneously marking the first release offa Johnny Lynch's new label, Lost Map – written between Scotland and McKenna's hometown of Malmö, Sweden. They'll be supported on the night by Eugene Tombs and a special guest performance from none other than Mr. Lynch himself. CCA, Glasgow, 8pm, £6

All-female post-punk innovators Savages – y'know, they of the howlin' mix of psychedelia, complete with dub-tinged rhythm section – come to Glasgow armed with their debut LP, Silence Yourself, from which punters are as likely to be hit with spoken word intros or experimental noise, as they are distinctively chopped, urgent guitar riffs and snarling, powerhouse vocals. Classic Grand, Glasgow, 7pm, £14

Artist Francesca Perona opens her Liminal Cities exhibtion proper – taking her cue from the changing landscape of Dundee, it sees her exploring the spaces in between the industrial heritage of the city, with the transformation of the waterfront represented in 3D digital visualisations that change over the course of the exhibition. Hannah Maclure Centre, Dundee, 11 Nov-13 Dec, Free

Attila Marcel

Monoganon

Savages

Sun 17 Nov

Mon 18 Nov

The mighty Josh Homme-fronted five piece – erm, that'd be Queens of the Stone Age – take to Glasgow as part of their current tour, taking to the not-so-intimate surrounds of the newly built Hydro space to give their newest LP, ... Like Clockwork, an airing ahead of the pretty exciting news that they'll co-headline an Australian tour in March 2014 with the mighty Nine Inch Nails. The Hydro, Glasgow, 6.30pm, £32.50

Beer specialists The Hanging Bat round off a week of celebrations with their birthday bash proper, for which they'll be sourcing some special beers and doling them out from 1pm, accompanied by scran served at regular intervals. Tickets also get you a bespoke birthday glass and a waxed capped bottle of Barrel Aged Upsmoke Kriek. Slurp. The Hanging Bat, Edinburgh, 1pm, From £16

Icelandic giants Sigur Ros come to town complete with their 11-piece live band ensemble, primed to air a selection of new material, as well as cherrypicking tracks from their latest LP, Kveikur – a gem of a record which sees them taking on a darker, slightly sinister new bent. And, if you've learnt anything from their last live outing, it's surely to book the hell early, no? Support comes from Break Horses. Usher Hall, Edinburgh, 7pm, £28.50

Queens of the Stone Age

Photo: Chapman Baehler

Sat 16 Nov

The Hanging Bat

Photo: Steve Gullick

Sat 9 Nov

Photo: Kenny MCColl

Fri 8 Nov

Liminal Cities

Sigur Rós

Sat 23 Nov

Sun 24 Nov

Mon 25 Nov

Charity-motivated club night, Positive Education, returns with a quartet of likely lads in tow – with Optimo Music's Den Haan rubbing shoulders with floral shirted vinylist David Barbarossa, Endangered Species' Bop Gun, and Maxi Dance Pool's MWX, with profits going to a selection of local causes. Hearts o' gold, the lot of them. The Berkeley Suite, Glasgow, 11pm, £4 (£3)

Following its triumphant first outing in December 2010, Stars in their Eyes returns with another batch of local bands aping their favourite musicians – amongst 'em RM Hubbert, The Pictish Trail, eagleowl, Kid Canaveral, and Withered Hand; all covering tracks by their favourite female artists, with the TYCI gals DJing between acts. Pilrig St Paul's Church, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £6

After the outta-nowhere success of debut LP Lucky Shiner, Berlin-based beatsmith Gold Panda takes his kaleidoscopic new album, Half of Where You Live, on the road – containing enough intermingling layers as to constantly toy with the senses; its gradual earworms whirring and ticking around the cortex as it goes. Suffice to say it'll be proper bewitching in a live setting. The Arches, Glasgow, 7pm, £12

The RSA pitch up for their RSA Open 2013 – taking in small works (with a maximum size limit of 80cm in any direction), all sourced by open submission from artists across Scotland. Showing the usual all-encompassing mix of paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints, and photographs, all works are also available to buy. RSA, Edinburgh, 23 Nov26 Jan, Free

Den Haan

RM Hubbert

Photo: Vito Andreoni

Fri 22 Nov

Gold Panda

Ian Springford Architects, My Place Temporary Hotel

Sat 30 Nov

Sun 1 Dec

Mon 2 Dec

The Book Week Scotland celebrations continue, this time warranting a trip to the wilds of Greenock for a special Words Per Minute outing at Beacon Arts Centre. Their schtick remains pleasingly the same, with guests William McIlvanney, Emma Pollock, Neil Mackay, Adam Stafford, Allan Wilson, Martin O'Connor, and Rachel McCrum getting just 10-minutes before being booted off stage. Beacon Arts Centre, Greenock, 8pm, £7 (£5)

Spoon turns vintage fair for the winter edition of A Spoonful of Vintage – with the cafe taken over by a selection of vintage clothing and accessory stalls, alongside other rummageable gems including ceramics, homewares, collectibles, and jewellery. There'll also be on-site vintage hairstyling from Edinburgh stylists, Boosh, and cake-heavy high teas throughout. Spoon, Edinburgh, 11am, Free

We end this mammoth 'month' on the joybringer that is the December bank holiday – for which you'll be wanting to get along to Princes Street Gardens' Christmas Market to start your Chrismas shopping (aka glug Glühwein and chomp gigantasaurus pretzels), this year stretching from the National Gallery, and onto St Andrew Square. Princes Street Gardens, Edinburgh, until 5 Jan, Free

November 2013

William McIlvanney

Spoon

Edinburgh's Christmas Market

Chat

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MUSIC

THE SKINNY


The Big Dream Julia Holter’s previous albums have explored poetry and Greek tragedy. The LA songwriter and composer talks to us about how, with its themes of celebrity and the loss of love, a 1950s musical has influenced her new LP, Loud City Song

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n The Crying Of Lot 49, Thomas Pynchon describes the joy of the simple pop song: ‘When those kids sing about ‘She loves you,’ yeah well, you know, she does, she’s any number of people, all over the world, back through time, different colours, sizes, ages, shapes... And the ‘you’ is everybody. And herself.’ There is at the heart of pop culture this strange vagueness, especially in the music and cinema of the 1950s and 60s. Before the introduction of precise demographics, before home entertainment and the internet allowed culture to be fractured into a thousand different genres and niches, pop culture really was mass entertainment. Tens of millions of people watched the same shows, and bought the same records. IMDb has 2,201 films attached to 1958, and 8,261 for 2012 – in the 1950s, there was simply a bigger captive market and fewer cultural products. One of those 1958 movies was Gigi, a watchable but modest musical starring Leslie Caron and Maurice Chevalier. Julia Holter was working on Ekstasis, her second album, when she wrote Maxim’s, a song about a scene in Gigi. “I wrote this one song,” she explains over the phone as her tour rolls out of Nashville, “and then I was like, ‘this doesn’t work, I need to make a new record for this song,’ so it would fit. And then I thought, ‘what should it be about?’ And it just happened, it came in an instant – the story of Gigi! It’s just really easy for me because I grew up watching it, it was at my grandma’s house.” Born and raised in Los Angeles, both of Holter’s parents are historians, although her father also played guitar. “He used to play labour folk songs,” she recalls. “He’s a labour historian, studying miners. As a kid at least I think he’d sing songs to us like I’ve Been Working on the Railroad. He does a lot more music now, but growing up it wasn’t a particularly musical household.” Holter herself “just really wanted to make music. I played a lot but very secretly, I didn’t take it seriously. I wanted to play piano, mainly, I started doing that when I was eight.” Following her parents’ academic bent, she enrolled to study composition at CalArts. She started writing at 16: “It wasn’t really ‘songs.’ I started composing music first, for other people to play.” Indeed, Holter explains, “I still think of myself as a composer in a way. ‘Composer’ gives you more freedom. I don’t want to always perform my own music necessarily. But I’ve mainly been writing songs for the past few years and I find it hard to do anything else, musically, I don’t know why that is. It just happened; writing music was so hard until I started doing that, and it was so much easier for me to work intuitively than it was for me to have to think everything out.” So was songwriting a counterpoint to her education in composition? “I wasn’t doing it to rebel,” she assures. “That’s not really my personality, it was just so much easier for me to do. Well, it’s not always fun, it’s hard, but it came naturally.” Of the process of writing about Gigi she explains, “it was just really easy – things that come easily are the things to do, whether or not they’re the things you think are the coolest! If it’s something you know you have a good sense for, I think it’s worth trying.” It’s a theme that crops up repeatedly, Holter explaining that she gravitates towards what feels ‘easy’ or ‘natural’ – partly, you sense, to pre-empt overemphasis on the intellectualism of her work. Nevertheless, Holter’s music reflects her background, both studiously composed and artistically freeform. Each of her records has toyed with a ‘theme’ – 2011’s Tragedy was based

November 2013

Interview: Sam Lewis Photography: Ye Rin Mok

on Euripides’ Hippolytus, 2012’s Ekstasis engaged with the poet Anne Carson’s work, and now this year’s Loud City Song tackles Gigi, both the film version and Colette’s source material. Her songs are full of overlapping vocal layers, fluttering keys and rich harmonies; they are complex, kaleidoscopic pieces that are often driven by strong narratives, with Holter herself lost somewhere in the middle, her voice inhabited by other voices. “With a lot of my music,” she admits, “it’s hard to detect where my actual experience of life comes in.” The idea of exploring other texts is one driven by her background – “that’s what composers do traditionally, they don’t write down lyrics, they use other poets’ lyrics. When I started writing I would usually not use my own text; when I started recording my songs they were usually songs where the text was from somewhere else.” It’s an impersonality that suits the tone of Loud City Song; Holter’s voice lurks somewhere in the background of the story, watching the characters and the city they inhabit drift around each other. The album’s final track, the jazz-inflected ballad City Appearing, describes people leaving a restaurant, swimming, standing on a roof. One of the themes of the album is celebrity voyeurism: the outside world spying on an individual, or, as Holter puts it, “a failed love life in the public eye.” “One of the things I mention,” she explains, “is the [Parisian] tabloid called Gil Blas. The weekly edition had this illustration on the cover that was the latest celebrity intrigue and romance. You see it in the story of Gigi, how the love interest is this wealthy guy, this socialite guy, all his romances are talked about and gossiped about – that was their version of that. And you have this really obvious and intense thing going on in the world now where everyone watches reality TV. It’s really crazy, it’s exponential, the intensity of celebrity and the interest in celebrity.”

“With a lot of my music, it’s hard to detect where my actual experience of life comes in” Julia Holter

As such, Holter’s records are less ‘concept’ albums than explorations of other voices, closer to the poetry and literature that inspires her lyric writing. One influence was the American poet Frank O’Hara, whose work often anthropomorphises the world around him, invoking discussions with a leaf, or the sun. So Holter, on Ekstasis, inhabited a statue: ‘I can see you / But my eyes are not allowed to cry.’ She says she likes “to play with words a lot and I like things like games, ways to generate poems, without it necessarily just being free.” Predating her first album, she worked with a John Cage piece that calls for the performer to transcribe a text into sound – Holter duly created a mesotic poem from a 1920s cookbook, accompanied by field recordings around LA . The Cookbook piece betrays a fascination with the incidental – Holter’s interest in Gigi was first piqued by a scene in the Parisian bar Maxim’s, when the singing stops every time a new character enters the room, leaving a strange hush for a few seconds. “I just like the sound of

movies, the ambient atmospheric sound and the foley art, the sound of people running, people whispering.” Loud City Song’s second track, Horns Surrounding Me, begins with the unsettling sound of footsteps crunching on leaves, then a woman’s hurried breath as she escapes paparazzi, with marching horns mimicking the photographers’ chase. “I like the idea of making music that’s like a film, in a way. Like you’re listening to what’s happening; rather than listening to a person recall a story, for it to be the story. I think I want to make it even more like a film, what it sounds like to listen to a film. I’ve never really done it completely, as extreme as I want to go.” Perhaps the appeal of Gigi for Holter was its amount of incidental detail. In the film, young Gigi’s mother is left unseen, we only hear her singing in the next room, a scene that works its way into the lyrics of World, the album’s opening track – ‘Mother, mothers of the world ... Singer on the fifth floor.’ We get to talking about David Lynch, whose exploration of Roy Orbison’s songs excavates a similar mystery from 1950s pop culture. “I do really like his work and I also have this interest in making the most of mystery, letting yourself take some paths and not question what that path is. I have a sense that when he writes his stuff he doesn’t plan out the thought logically. It just feels right for some reason, there’s always some darkness and mystery.” She pauses, momentarily. “We just passed a town called Lynchburg, by the way, right now!”

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Holter explains how the inclusion of an eerie cover of the 1963 Barbara Lewis song Hello Stranger was intended as a mirror of the film’s song I Remember It Well, where two older characters misremember an old romance. “I grew up listening to Hello Stranger, the original, and I loved it,” she says. “I thought it would be nice to include on the record, it’s this moment of sudden introspection and nostalgia, similar to I Remember It Well. These songs are being nostalgic about some past love without any details that are firm, everything’s so hazy and mysterious. In the Barbara Lewis song it’s very unclear what happened, except for the basics that her heart was broken. She’s saying ‘please don’t leave me like you did before, I still love you’ and that vagueness is really appealing to me. It’s really powerful because you know there’s something there that isn’t being said.” The culture of the period was vague, perhaps, because it could afford to be – it was appealing to a truly mass market. But by leaving details out, it let as many people as possible – including Holter – fill in the gaps in the narrative to make the stories their own. As Loud City Song weaves in and out of Gigi’s narrative, it explores the specifics, the mystery, and the strange silence when the story stops. Julia Holter plays Glasgow's CCA on 20 Nov Loud City Song is out now via Domino www.juliashammasholter.com

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Home Comforts

If previous album West was a story of outward-looking horizons, then Wooden Shjips’ follow-up Back to Land retreats to the familiar – and there’s nothing wrong with that, argues Ripley Johnson

“I

n a big city you have to be driven because the scenes there are so competitive and people really take it seriously. It’s nice here; you can take it easy and not have to worry about that sort of stuff too much.” For Ripley Johnson – follicly abundant frontman of Wooden Shjips, Moon Duo co-founder with wife Sanae Yamada, and firm advocate of the psychedelic reel – moving to Portland from San Francisco has been a relatively easy choice. Driven off the west coast by rising rent prices, Johnson and Yamada spent two years based out in the still wilderness of the Colorado mountains, before relocating to the Oregon city with the former’s Shjips bandmates in tow. “I actually love it,” Johnson adds over the phone. “It’s very lush here. We get a lot of rain and we have a nice summer, it’s a good balance of seasons. It’s affordable so there are a lot of artists here and a lot of the houses are single family homes so there’s a pretty big basement scene. Most bands rehearse at home; it’s very freeing, not having to worry about having to spend all this money down at the studio or havingto lug gear around.” Having any place to call home has been refreshing for Johnson, after nearly two years of constant touring and releasing records with both the Shjips and Moon Duo. Confessing that he’s “exhausted,” it won’t be long before he takes to the road again, with Wooden Shjips’ second album for Thrill Jockey due this November. Back to Land contrasts with the group’s previous LP: where 2011’s West had a loose thematic structure around the idea of America’s Manifest Destiny – the 19th-century idea of its peoples’ expansion to new horizons in the west, having first settled in the east on arrival from Europe – so Back to Land is more introspective, a retreat back to the familiar that was written during a rare opportunity last winter for its chief creator to spend some time at home, re-visiting old possessions and returning to his record collection. “All our things had been in storage for the previous two years while we’d been in Colorado and on the road,” he explains, “so when we got them out, I went straight back to my old records and listened to them all winter while I was writing the album. The process of moving into a new house and listening

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Interview: Simon Jay Catling

to all this comfort music put me in a frame of mind about accepting influences and feeling open to bringing that into our music.” As such, Back to Land glows with a warm familiarity; it was recorded and mixed to tape by Quasi producer and Elliott Smith archivist Larry Crane at his own Jackpot Studios, and the erosive nature of that process gives the record a slightly worn feel, evoking a sense of history and a story to tell within its aural fabric. Beyond that, it loosely echoes the ghosts of classic rock bands like Crazy Horse and Creedence Clearwater Revival, even as it pushes Wooden Shjips’ own sound further on from their one-chord-one-riff beginnings on their Sick Thirst-released 7”s and Holy Mountain material of the previous decade. “In the past we’ve definitely been more wary of these classic rock touchstones, like Neil Young or Creedence or The Stones,” Johnson admits, “but there are moments when you rebel against things from your past and there are moments when you embrace them. These records ultimately influence you and contribute to making you who you are as a person. So you realise it’s not simply the past, it’s actually who you are.” Larry Crane’s involvement marks only the second time in their career that Wooden Shjips have allowed an outside producer in to work with them, following 2011’s collaboration with Trans Am’s Phil Manley on West. Listening to Crane’s previous work alongside Back to Land – be it Portland garage rockers Quasi’s 1999 LP Field Studies or, more recently, his remastering of Elliott Smith’s debut Roman Candle and mix work on Grandaddy man Jason Lytle’s 2012 solo album Dept. of Dissappearance – it’s clear that he’s translated his verve for adding a light touch and working to separate elements to this new record. “It feels more hi-fi than previous albums,” agrees Johnson. “You can hear these little touches and nuances.” Having Crane involved, though, wasn’t wholly comfortable for a band still not fully used to allowing an additional voice into the creative process. “I actually really liked the process of us doing it ourselves and being totally responsible for everything, pushing through the gear we had in that room and our limited skills. Now it’s become an exercise in letting things happen and

letting go, to allow the process to take care of itself.” Back in 2011, with Moon Duo still in their relative infancy – albeit with several releases already out, including debut LP Escape – Johnson gave the impression in interviews that he rarely wrote to specific projects, pointing out to The Quietus that it only differed when it came to recording: “it doesn’t really matter which band does it. The approach will be different, because it’s different people.” Two years on, though, he has started trying to draw lines between the minimal set-up and maximal imaginations of he and his wife’s side project, and the more dextrous, swampy tones of his older outfit. “I get in a different mindset between one band and the other,” he says, “but then the line isn’t too hard to create. Wooden Shjips is just ‘a rock band’ – just a bunch of guys jamming, y’know? We don’t talk about things much; we just play, which is really freeing. But with me and Sanae we can discuss what to do for the next album and can be more experimental with it because we’re on the same wavelength.”

“There are moments when you rebel against things from your past and there are moments when you embrace them” Ripley Johnson

However, it was Moon Duo’s 2012 album Circles that, in part, influenced Back to Land. Written by Johnson while he and Yamada were living in Colorado, it was initially put together as a skeleton entirely on acoustic guitar. “I’d not done that before,” he recalls. “Where we were moving to up there was so isolated that we thought

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we could make all this noise. But actually being there, the silence was so powerful that it felt really weird to be so loud! So I started writing on this acoustic guitar, which gave Circles that strummier sort of feel. It pushed my songwriting in a certain direction and that’s carried over.” Underneath the sun-scorched riffs of Back to Land tracks like Ghouls and In the Roses – their stoner fuzz harking back to the San Francisco they’ve now left behind – the album is laced with acoustic guitar, threaded in and out of thicker slabs of noise, and trickling through like a nattering stream through great crags of sound. It adds a heightened serenity and reflective evocation to the album, and is at its most overt on closing track Everybody Knows; it’s possibly one of Wooden Shjips’ most subdued songs to date and, within their music’s own wider personality, not like anything they’ve ever put to record before. “I’ve written songs like that before and set them aside thinking, ‘this isn’t very appropriate,’” Johnson says. “But it goes back to me embracing these records I’ve always loved and opening up, so for this album I just thought, ‘heck, let’s do this.’ In the past, I’ve just left them in case I ever thought to do an acoustic solo album.” Going back to the past to produce in the present is something familiar to Johnson, a man with a firm sense of belief in the Buddhist view that “the end is the beginning and everything else is just circling around.” For Wooden Shjips, their music transcends time even as it borrows from it, its component parts making up something that is more physical immersion than something to detach yourself from and analyse academically. Another cycle is shortly to accelerate again for them: “Part of the problem with touring is you’re playing the same stuff over and over,” Johnson comments. “Even if you mix up the songs they’re still your songs, and you get sick of yourself. It can feel very self-absorbed, like ‘look at me! Look at me!’ every night. I’m more of an introverted person, so that can be a challenge, but generally I like it.” Playing Back to Land, at least he’ll always have something to remind him of home. Back to Land is released via Thrill Jockey on 11 Nov. Wooden Shjips play Glasgow’s SWG3 on 12 Dec www.woodenshjips.com

THE SKINNY


H E DI D T H I NGS H IS WAY.

WHICH HEL PS EXPL A IN OUR MUTUA L A DMIR ATION. Look onstage any given night and you would see Frank Sinatra, in his trademark tuxedo, captivating audiences everywhere. Look a little closer and his favorite drink, Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey, wouldn’t be far away. Frank was never shy about how much he loved Old No. 7. In fact, he’s even laid to rest with a bottle of it. So we thought it was only fitting to show how much we loved him back. With a whiskey of his own. Jackdaniels.com/sinatraselect.

ACT BOL DLY. DR INK R ESPONSIBLY. SINATRA IS A TRADEMARK OF FRANK SINATRA ENTERPRISES, LLC, USED UNDER LICENSE TO JACK DANIEL’S. ©2013 JACK DANIEL’S. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

November 2013

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Photo: Neil Menzies Photo: Kenflaw Photography

The Art School Reborn After two years residing in a temporary venue while the building was renovated, Glasgow School of Art’s Union is back – we take a look at the refit, upcoming gigs, and speak to regulars including JD Twitch, Casual Sex, Lovers' Rights, and Autechre

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little under two years ago, the Union of the Glasgow School of Art closed its doors to begin an extensive refurbishment project, bringing to a close a rich chapter in the city’s cultural history. From the live debut of Orange Juice in the late 70s, to its significance as a cultural melting pot in the 80s, hosting gigs by everyone from visiting legends like The Clash to local heroes such as The Jesus and Mary Chain and Teenage Fanclub – a melting pot that also provided inspiration and a proving ground for artists like Jim Lambie, Douglas Gordon and Martin Boyce – to its role as a key player in the development of Glasgow’s reputation as one of Europe’s most important cities for rave culture and electronic music, helping to inspire and give birth to nights and labels like Optimo and LuckyMe, the Art School had enjoyed nearly four decades as the locus of the city’s thriving alternative culture. In October, The Skinny was lucky enough to take a tour of the new, purpose-built Art School Union. Having retained the internal structure and several of the original walls, the exterior of the building has a pleasing familiarity, wrapped in an ultra-modern glass exterior, fusing modernist architectural minimalism with the original façade constructed in the 1930s by the architects who worked under Charles Rennie Mackintosh on the first designs. Inside, the space has been reimagined, but with a careful and considered respect for the dynamic of the old venue. Alex Misick, the current Events Convenor for the GSA Students Association, tells us that the Vic Bar, on the lower level, will retain its original signage. In the formerly cavernous Assembly Hall, dead space has been cut away, with bespoke project and gallery spaces leading off the newly-sprung dancefloor, overlooked by the tall Art Nouveau windows

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Interview: Bram E. Gieben Photography (far right): Billie Dryden

which are still a strong visual reminder of the original venue. Misick, promoter Alan Miller, and new Programmer and Live Production Manager Joe Leightley have big plans for the re-launch. Over coffees in the GSA Union’s temporary home on Sauchiehall Street, they sit down to tell us about the history and importance of the venue, its enduring cultural significance and influence, and the exciting plans for the relaunch. We also got some prime Art School movers and shakers to tell us what the Art School meant to them, and what they hope to see happening in the relaunched venue over the years to come. “The return of the Vic, and its adoption into the school, having been pulled into the main building, demonstrates a massive investment,” says Alan Miller, who ran his own nights at the Art School in the early 2000s and beyond. “It postions the Vic as an incredibly important creative space.” The re-fit will allow him and his colleagues to bring the Art School back to its position as Glasgow’s premiere venue for alternative and electronic music. The building’s architecture has always played a huge part in the venue’s appeal. “It was almost like because the building was so old, it retained a sort of charge,” says Miller. “You would walk in and even though it was a bit manky, and stuff didn’t really work, everyone would still get excited in a way that if you walk into a newer venue, you just wouldn’t feel. The dirt and sweat was built up on the floor... but it retained that energy.” Optimo’s JD Twitch has some strong memories of the Art School, remembering a “Bacchanalian rave” thrown as a wake for a local promoter and friend, and the final night before it closed down as some particular highlights. He

speaks of the “huge outpouring of raw, unbridled creativity” which the venue has given birth to over the years, through the students who came to GSA and the clubbers who joined them at the Union. What would Twitch like to see coming out of the revitalised Art School scene? “A lot of iconoclastic art and music,” he says. “Music and art that forsakes any notion of forced coolness, that pays little or no attention to what is in vogue elsewhere, that doesn’t fit into any easily pigeonholed genre, that takes risks and blows minds, that inspires ecstatic highs and kaleidoscopic flights of fancy, that doesn’t care about and isn’t easily disseminated through social media ‘channels.'” A long list of bands have emerged from the social scene centring around the Art School – some of the people in these bands were graduates, others, interested parties drawn in by the heady mix of glamour, fashion, avant garde aesthetics and an anything-goes, hedonistic atomosphere. One rich musical vein begins with Older Mother, some of whom went on to become first Mother and The Addicts, and then Casual Sex; and Shitdisco, whose singer Joel Stone is now in Ubre Blanca with Andy Brown of Divorce – another band to emerge from the same melting pot; and Pro Forma, whose Paul Thomson went on to join Franz Ferdinand. “The Glasgow art community is a village,” says Joel Stone. He and Joe Reeves, who founded Shitdisco, grew up together, but “the Art School was where the band came together. The social side of it, centred around the union, was where the band formed. The first stuff we did was in art projects. It was a cabin project where a guy got shipping containers and put them all around the city, and then people did installation pieces in

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them. That was how Shitdisco began. It was very much a product of that melting pot.” Sam Smith of Casual Sex recalls a particularly hedonistic Mother and The Addicts gig: “I remember our drummer Ian was in the throes of a deep psychedelic immersion, and was walking round the stage claiming he’d lost his drum kit, which was neatly packed up at his feet. He then proceeded to tangle himself in the hardware.” Why was the Art School so important to the city? “It was a great social hub, everyone at some point would be passing through the Union, especially on Thursdays when it was a pound a pint.” It was “the collision of many well lubricated minds,” he says. “Many of the people I’ve been involved with musically I met hanging out at the Vic bar.” Furthermore, “Glasgow provides an environment where artists can get on with doing what they want without the financial and social pressures of London. You’re in an international city that feels like a village,” he continues. “Glasgow is a very creative place. A unique environment, and this needs to be cherished and fostered above and beyond purely commercial developments.” “If you look back, many of these bands came from the post-Optimo scene, and were playing the CCA and the Art School in various different combinations,” Miller recalls. “There are so many people who have been in so many bands, it gets crazy. Someone should do an insane family tree. It would be absolutely mental. Maybe the Glasgow Miracle should put some money into that, instead of completely ignoring the music factor.” The Glasgow Miracle to which Miller refers is, of course, largely focused on the visual artists who have graduated from Glasgow School of Art, including Lambie, and also Douglas Gordon, Martin Boyce, Martin Creed, Richard Wright, David Shrigley, and Toby Paterson, to name just

THE SKINNY


Photo: Kenflaw Photography

a few. Traditionally, as Miller points out, it is the visual arts towards which the main efforts of funding and investment have been directed. The Union building was rarely acknowledged as a decisive factor in enabling the creative practice of these artists. “None of them represent a specific ‘scene.’ Their work is actually really very different,” says Miller. “For a series of artists, all of whom came out of the same institution in the same city, to have a series of artistic gestures that they make which are all completely different from each other is quite surprising in itself. You would expect there to be a dominant style, like the Bauhaus school. What’s also important is that they retained links with artistic mediums that weren’t their own.” Hugely passionate about the relaunch, Alex Misick becomes very animated when discussing plans for the reopening – he believes it is “a miracle” that parts of the old building have been maintained, from the beautiful windows to the original steel beams supporting the structure. “The cost of doing that in relation to the ease of flattening it and starting from scratch is considerable, but it was recognised that not only did the students want it retained, but that the fabric of the building – the walls themselves – were so important.” Most importantly, however, the new building contains a behemoth of a sound system. Joe Leightley, who takes the lead in booking new club nights and electronic artists for the venue, is equally excited about the new space. “The new elements which have been built into it aren’t particularly apologetic about the fact that they are new – instead of trying to create a museum piece, it’s a refit. For all the nostalgic talk of the manky, comfortable, lived-in vibe, it was kind of falling down. The building had been literally shaken apart by bass.” The space is fondly remembered by the likes of Autechre’s Rob Brown, who says: “It’s up there as one of my favourite buildings in the country.” He also recalls the energy of the Art School crowd, describing them as “very up for it.” The Niallist, who has been a regular DJ at the Art School since the early 00s with nights like Menergy, says the venue has always had “a certain open-mindedness that lends itself to unusual collaborations and interesting work.” He will be

November 2013

rocking the decks at the opening party. “GSA has always been very gay-friendly. Some of the most exciting dance music is coming out of the queer scene at the moment, and the Arty is always very forward-thinking in those terms.” With the new exhibition spaces freely available for installations, exhibitions and ‘happenings’ to every GSA student, the potential for new crossovers between the city’s musical and visual art scenes is inherent.

“The building had been literally shaken apart by bass” Joe Leightley

Misick has also been overseeing the compilation of an archive of material about the history and significance of the Union, some of which will be on show after the re-launch, but which will continue to grow over the years to come. The collected material already includes fancy dress party photographs from Halloween balls in the 60s and 70s, an image of Martin Boyce in a bra at a GSA fashion show, and other curios. “There is already an element of this stuff in the GSA archives, but it’s under-represented,” says Misick. “It’s an untold story about the Art School at large.” Post-relaunch, that story will be told in full – and it will continue to unfold. The trio give us a very impressive taster menu of nights coming up in December and beyond: “We have a good balance between inhouse promotions and external promoters,” says Leightley. Some legendary nights with a legacy at the Art School will be returning, including Mungo’s Hi-Fi, who will be bringing along London grime collective Butters to man the Vic Bar. Celebrating their 10th anniversary, Numbers will be returning with Hudson Mohawke and residents Jackmaster and Spencer. Leightley is also enthused about a series of high-profile ‘in-house’ nights, the first of which will host bass music innovators Shackleton and Appleblim, with support

from Highlife and Auntie Flo. Other names mentioned for live appearances and DJ sets are CHVRCHES, Young Fathers and No Ceremony, who recently supported Foals on their European tour. “Then there are a lot of nights coming back which could only exist at the Art School,” Misick chimes in. “Croc Monsieur vs Croc Madame, Balkanarama, Sub City, Vitamins, Cry Parrot, LuckyMe, Freaky Freaky, Optimo on Hogmanay – they will all be coming back.” Uppermost in their intentions is the effort to “reconnect with the history of the Glasgow music scene,” says Leightley. Two forthcoming gigs that will do just that will feature Edwyn Collins on 15 December, and later on a gig from seminal Glasgow indie band The Pastels. Katrina Mitchell of The Pastels shares a memory from her time at the Union: “Calvin Johnson once played a club night at the Art School. He came on around midnight with his acoustic slung over his shoulder, after the DJs had been spinning for a couple of hours. He likes to play off-mic but the crowd was loud and mostly didn’t notice he’d started. So after a couple of songs he decided to move the show outdoors, and invited anyone who gave a fuck, as he said, to follow him. A few of us trooped outside to the enclosed space between the Vic Bar and the Newberry Tower where we sat on the ground for an incredible performance which came to a gentle finish when a downpour threatened. We stood up after the song finished and the dry shapes on the concrete spotted over with heavy drops of Glasgow night rain...” Another Glasgow duo who have strong memories of the Art School as a venue are recent graduates, Richard McMaster of Silk Cut and Golden Teacher, and Tom Marshallsay, aka Dam Mantle, who play together in Lovers’ Rights. McMaster recalls the final night of Croc Monsieur Vs Croc Madame. It was “the second to last night of [the Union] being open. I walked into a packed room full of people watching Ian Campbell drink about six litres of milk without any pants on and proceeding to throw up all over stage while Fritz Welch did some pretty mind bending music...” Asked what he thinks made the Art School such a successful place for the enjoyment of both art and hedonism, Marshallsay is reticent: “I really don’t know, and even if I did I wouldn’t want

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to reveal the secret,” he says with a smile. “This city is just a magnet for good people... people who share a similar attitude towards making and organising things for the right reasons.” Asked about his hopes for the future of the venue, he says: “My only hope is that people keep partying.” Perhaps the most exciting (and for the new venue, the most promising) event planned postrelaunch is the Scottish debut of Leisure System, a club night usually found in the legendary Berlin club Berghain, and run by electronic maverick Jon Hopkins. His first outing in the new venue will feature live sets from Dopplereffekt and Warp legend Clark. A night of this scale, appeal and renown coming to Glasgow is a landmark – it shows exactly how highly thought of the venue still is, even after a two-year absence, and following an as-yet untested refit. And what of the next wave of Glasgow bands, DJs and promoters – what kind of deals can they look forward to at the Art School? “We want up-and-coming promoters, acts and managers – whatever realm of the music industry exists within the city – all to have a space here where they are able to try out new things, and to be given the opportunity to experiment, and to take risks,” says Leightley. “We want to build a sphere around that for constant development of innovative music and events. The Vic being smaller and more intimate makes it a perfect platform for people to try out their first thing, whether DJing, or playing live. We’ll be back with a bang, and we will sustain that over the years to come.” 12 Dec: Re-opening party (lineup TBC, includes Mungo’s Hi-Fi and The Niallist) 13 Dec: Numbers 10th Birthday with Hudson Mohawke, Jackmaster and Spencer 14 Dec: Mungo’s Hi-Fi 15 Dec: Edwyn Collins 18 Dec: Young Fathers and Yebo 19 Dec: Lucky Me / Freaky Freaky 20 Dec: Shackleton, Appleblim, Beneath and Highlife 21 Dec: TYCI presents: DJ sets from Pretty Ugly, Adele Bethel (Sons and Daughters), CHVRCHES, plus very special guests 31 Dec: Optimo Hogmanay theartschool.co.uk

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Past, Present and Future Ahead of his label showcase at La Cheetah, Kevin Saunderson discusses the history of KMS Records and shares his thoughts on techno’s continued potential

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arlier this year, KMS dropped Logarythm, a track co-produced by a relatively unknown young producer named Dantiez Saunderson. A simple tech house groove, complemented with a hiccupping vocal sample and stretched out, club-friendly build-ups, there was nothing in particular to indicate the rich musical heritage from which the artist had emerged. A solo release soon followed and there surfaced just a slight sense that there was perhaps some history seeping through into the music. With more robust kick drums driving the track, and a deeper sensibility to the synth line, Can’t Stop Us felt more in tune with the illustrious 25 year history of KMS, if still framed by unmistakably contemporary production techniques. The track’s accomplished sound should not have come as a surprise to anyone familiar with the work of Kevin Saunderson, Dantiez’s father and the founder of KMS.    Whenever the history of techno is discussed, Saunderson’s name is more than likely to crop up frequently, and with good reason. Alongside Juan Atkins and Derrick May, the Brooklyn-born producer is routinely credited for his role in developing a scene in Detroit which has since provided the blueprint for countless electronic acts from around the world. Perhaps more so than his contemporaries, Kevin was able to spread the form to wider audiences in a way no-one could have anticipated, earning himself a reputation as being the ‘elevator of techno.’ Through his work with singer Paris Grey as Inner City, which yielded the crossover pop hits Good Life and Big Fun amongst others, Saunderson was arguably the first producer to give techno an air of legitimacy among audiences who had previously sneered at the genre’s potential for growth. Yet, there have always been many sides to Saunderson and the major label success story of Inner City was only part of his contribution to the scene. Early on he decided he needed his own outlet for music and, in the decades since, KMS has been responsible for releasing some of the most celebrated underground records around. “There have definitely been a lot of highlights over the years,” he says, looking back on the label he started in 1987. “When I think about the reason KMS started, because of my vision to have control and put out whatever I wanted to play, some of the greatest highlights are the many talents who came through my building, through the process of me creating music and because of my success with the music.” There’s a palpable feeling of satisfaction as he discusses some of the artists who have released on KMS and its subsidiary labels – the likes of Marc ‘MK’ Kinchen, Chez Damier, Carl Craig and Stacey Pullen come immediately to his mind, though the full list of contributors is as expansive as it is impressive. Of course he also has fond recollections of his own material released through the label under such aliases as Reese, E-Dancer and Tronik House. Tracks like Rock to the Beat and How to Play Our Music (Reese & Santonio) are clearly works he is still immensely proud of. In producing these early hits, he says, his approach was based on finding stimulation and making music that came from the heart. “I always had an inspiration, whether it was something from soul music or disco or whatever. “Disco was a big influence on me because I always thought the four on the floor style was for dancing and my main purpose was to be able to play records as a DJ, and be able to play styles that people could dance to. I used to experience Larry Levan at the Paradise Garage or Ron Hardy at the Music Box, so it came deep from within. My approach always depended on my vibe. I always

November 2013

Interview: Ronan Martin

fed off of creating a sound that was unique.” In the ever-changing electronic music landscape of today, with its sprawling subgenres and increasingly hybrid sounds, some find it hard to imagine how techno music can evolve further and still retain its identity. Ever ready to adopt new approaches himself, Saunderson does not share these doubts about the future of the form he helped establish. “I think techno is forward thinking, still. It evolves with technology and new technology is an important part of pushing the boundaries, depending on how you incorporate it. “Even for me, as I’m changing the way I produce or record, I still have to learn the tools that I have. I’m sitting here with all of these different plugins and software, trying to determine the best way to use them. But you have to bring out the magic within them. It will continue to happen that way because technology is always moving forward.” As electronic music shifts forward and styles mutate and meld together, a new generation of producers are trying to find their own place in the narrative shaped by Kevin and his peers in the late 80s. As Dantiez Saunderson embarks on a career in music, a path also taken by his brother Damarii, one wonders if Kevin anticipated that he would have quite as direct an influence on the new breed of techno torchbearers. In one sense, it may have been expected. After all, Kevin’s wife Ann has long been involved in music too, collaborating with him on the Kaos project among others, and also working with Octave One on hits such as Blackwater. Yet, despite the family’s background in music, Saunderson did not feel the need to push his sons into the music game. “It caught me off guard with my kids,” he admits. “They were really more athletic kids and they were into hip-hop. Even though they were around me with the music, if they were sitting up in the studio, it was because they had to be there, not because they wanted to be there.”

“I  think techno is forward thinking, still. It evolves with technology and new technology is an important part of pushing the boundaries.” Kevin Saunderson

But, growing up around the scene in Detroit and attending events like the Movement Festival every year soon had an impact. “Their friends started DJing and going to these events and talking about techno and they thought, ‘hey, I’ve been doing this all my life. I’ve been around my father and he is one of the creators of this music.’ They got inspired, not by me at first, but more or less by their friends and then they came back to me and said ‘dad, I want to be a DJ.’ They’ve been working hard to achieve their vision of being creative and I think they both have unique talents and are quite different from each other. They have a bit of me and their mother within them though. It’s great to see.”

Recently Kevin has started performing DJ sets with Dantiez, an experience which he seems to revel in. “It keeps me younger in a way,” he says. “I’ve always played for young people, but now I’m playing with my son and for his generation and I think that’s unique. I don’t know if there are many people doing that.” Of course, there is a mutual benefit to the father/son musical bond. While Kevin is clearly energised by the experience, both his sons will also reap the rewards of their father’s vast experience of making tracks and dealing with the music industry. “I try to give them tips on making sure the music comes from the heart. You shouldn’t chase a track or try to sound like another track because there’s money involved or because it’s big and you heard it on the radio. Make sure you love it, or like it a lot, and it’s something that inspires you, no matter what the sound is. I’ll give them pointers on sound, production, developing their skill level and being able to master so they can cover all angles and understand what they can get out of something. I tell them you can’t read a page or

Clubs

two from a book and completely comprehend what that book is saying. So take your equipment just as seriously, and learn it.” It’s often said that the ability to progress forward depends on an ability to look backwards first. Around 25 years after KMS was founded, the label still feels like a very personal venture for Saunderson. He tells us that there are more Inner City tracks on the way, more music under his own name to be released, and the label will continue to work with new talent, including his sons, emerging artists from Detroit and new producers from around the world. Whether he continues to be viewed as an elevator of the scene or not, it’s clear that Kevin aims to have a hand in the future of techno, drawing on the rich history which he has helped shape for over two decades. “I think it always goes back to the beginning, to the roots,” he says. “With all music, somehow it comes full circle.” Kevin Saunderson presents A History of KMS Records for Part II of La Cheetah’s 4th Birthday, 1 Nov

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Man vs Machine Andrew Bujalski talks to us about resurrecting video technology from the 60s to create Computer Chess, the year’s most joyously idiosyncratic movie

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ndrew Bujalski’s name might not be on every film fan’s lips, but it is likely to live on in future cinema history textbooks. Not necessarily for his films (Mutual Appreciation, Beeswax), although they are wonderful, but for the ramshackle, lo-fi film-movement they heralded: mumblecore. It’s a much maligned sub-genre, mocked for its cardigan-wearing protagonists and their first world problems (dating disasters, postgraduate malaise, rent control), but in the sure hands of a director as sensitive to the complexities of the human condition as Bujalski you have films with an elegant emotional register that are as far removed from their closest mainstream equivalents, romantic comedies, as their budgets are from Hollywood’s multi-million-dollar coffers. “I never thought of it as an artistic movement,” says the Boston-born filmmaker down the line from his Austin home when I sheepishly bring up the m-word. (Quite rightly, Bujalski and his peers have never been keen on the clumsy moniker.) Movement or not, Bujalski’s films have been influential, not just on the bona fide mumblecore directors, like Lynn Shelton (Your Sister’s Sister) and Aaron Katz (Quiet City), who followed in his low key wake, but their loose structures and organic rhythms have begun to bleed into the wider film culture. It’s difficult to imagine the rise of Lena Dunam without Bujalski, for example, or the recent success of Frances Ha without its near namesake Funny Ha Ha (Bujalski’s 2002 debut). “For my own sake, you know, I wish that now, retroactively, Funny Ha Ha were commercial and I could go make a million dollars off of it,” he says wistfully, “but I don’t think it works that way.” Does he ever anticipate making films that make it to the multiplex? “I’m probably not going to change, but lord knows I’m trying to learn to get my head in a place where I could conceive of something that would be a little more financially viable.” He’s certainly trying something new with his latest movie, which takes him for the first time from the contemporary world of inarticulate 20-somethings, their poky apartments, their hipster parties and their unmade beds, into the realm of science fiction. Set in the early 1980s, Computer Chess plunges us into the not so highoctane world of competitive computer chess programing. “I didn’t sit down and consciously

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Interview: Jamie Dunn

think, ‘What’s a good topic for my next movie? Oh, I know: computer chess pioneers,’” he says, regarding the film’s peculiar premise. “None of this was too consciously constructed. A lot of the heavy lifting of building this happened in my subconscious and I wasn’t actually privy to what I was thinking”. For Bujalski, form came first; the spark for what would become Computer Chess grew out of the director’s desire to work on the old Sony AVC3260, a 60s video camera so obsolete that the only place you’re able to find any is in junk shops filed next to Betamax players and Stereo 8s. “I came upon some footage from old cameras and really fell in love with it,” he says, but he was also attracted to the challenge of using them: “How could we tell a story in those kind of images? And what would that story be, I don’t know. There’s so much about this project that’s not rational, just from the practical standpoint of filmmaking, and that was, of course, part of the joy of it.” Initially Computer Chess, with its spot-on period detail and grainy image, seems to take the form of mockumentary. We’re invited to giggle at these terribly dressed nerds as they shlep their wardrobe-sized hardware to a drab hotel for a weekend of pitting their chess playing software against each others’ in a round-robin tournament. The film, though, soon shifts to something more subtle, philosophical and humane. “Ultimately I think it is a very human endeavor,” explains Bujalski with regards his characters’ aim to create a machine that will trounce a human in a tactical battle of wits. “You don’t try to create an artificial intelligence unless, on some level, you’re trying to understand something about your own organic intelligence. It always points back to the great philosophical questions, How do humans think? How do we play chess? Why do we play chess? You have to be asking that question somewhat if you’re programing a computer to do it, and so I could identify with all that.” As these questions begin to be asked, the film’s high-concept narrative spirals off from the chess competition to much more freaky territory. One computer refuses to play against its peers: at one point the opponent’s queen is up for grabs and the glitching machine merely nestles its rook up beside her. It’s only when it takes

on a real human challenger that it perks up its game, that it becomes more aggressive. It begins to dawn on Peter (Patrick Riester), the gangly junior programer trying to debug the erratic software, that it has somehow become sentient – it has a soul. Think of the film, then, as a genteel prequel to James Cameron’s Terminator.

“Someone who has spent all day on Facebook has, in some sense, been thoroughly defeated by their computer” Andrew Bujalski

“I feel like Terminator was something that everyone got back in 1984, and still basically everybody gets and makes sense of it now,” suggest Bujalski. It’s transmuted a little bit, though, he admits. It may not take the form of a cyborg that looks like Arnie, but the filmmaker reckons there’s still plenty of reason to be wary of our laptops: “Now the biggest threat that computers pose to us on a daily basis is that they just suck all the time out of our lives – someone who has spent all day on Facebook has, in some sense, been thoroughly defeated by their computer.” With his love for 16mm film and the grainy black and white images he captured using the Sony AVC3260 for Computer Chess, it would be fair to class Bujalski as a technosceptic. As we speak I picture him at the other end of the line speaking into a wall mounted candlestick-style telephone. “It’s more like a 1990s phone – nothing special,” he laughs. “But yeah, of course, I like old technology. As I’m speaking to you I’m looking at my poor, ignored Steenbeck editing machine – I don’t know if I’ll ever get to use it again. This is not a novel idea, but with every technology we adopt theRE are things that are gained and there

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are things that are lost, and of course I mourn the things that are lost and I do have a real affection for the technology that I grew up with.” Why does he think that is? “Maybe that was the last time I felt comfortable with technology, when I felt I was the master in that relationship. Now I certainly don’t.” He says this, but Computer Chess is also another first for Bujalski: it’s his first dalliance with digital filmmaking. “There’s a lot of power in CGI,” he tells me. “You feel like George Lucas and you say, ‘Wow, I can do anything I want to this image.’ It’s really remarkable and exciting what technology is able to do. Now, very clearly, if you look at what that’s produced in our culture: has that greater power over the image given us better movies? Absolutely fucking not.” Bujalski didn’t get drunk on this technology, though. The CGI in Computer Chess is used primarily to tweak and accentuate the natural flaws in the Sony AVC3260’s cinematography: light floods the lens, images ghost across the screen as the camera and characters move – at one point the image inexplicably becomes a photo negative. “They are a lot of little glitches in the movie,” he explains. “Some that we tweaked for what felt like narrative purposes. Most of them are really just oddities that are camera produced, and that’s part of the joy of shooting on these old analogue video cameras: they were unpredictable.” You could almost say they’d a mind of their own... “Yeah, that irony didn’t escape me,” he deadpans. “Ultimately I came to feel the same way about the camera as I tend to about actors, which is that they are not entirely under my control. You can give them direction, you can try and get them to do something like what you envisioned, but they’re always going to bring something of their own, and that is really exciting. That became part of the fun of this camera. And it wasn’t always good: sometimes it would glitch out in a way that we couldn’t use, but sometimes it would glitch out in ways I just thought was glorious.” Computer Chess is released 22 Nov by Eureka Entertainment

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November 2013

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Under the Influence: Ben Weinman

Alice In Chains

Photo: Dave Kerr

Through cult jazz fusionists and Headbangers Ball champions, The Dillinger Escape Plan’s maverick founder unearths the ten LPs that sculpted his unique guitar-playing style

t’s been almost twenty years since Kendrick Jeru ‘the Damaja’ Davis unleashed his seminal debut The Sun Rises in the East (co-helmed by Gang Starr virtuoso DJ Premier) and helped pull the New York scene up by its bootstraps back in the spring of ‘94. In a rare Scottish appearance, the incendiary rapper will grace the O2 ABC on 8 Nov, ahead of his new EP The Hammer, out later this month. Collaborators on the record are set to include Sabor, The Beatnuts, PF Cuttin, and Main Source mastermind Large Professor, who produced his latest single Solar Flares – a slick track that promises the Damaja hasn’t lost his fury. From a hip-hop legend to 90s kings of the heavy, melodic riff: Alice in Chains (O2 Academy, 14 Nov) return to Glasgow off the back of their fifth studio album The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here. While it would be remiss to not mention the palpable absence of the late Layne Staley, now over a decade (and two records) since his passing, the metallers’ groove is reassuringly settled with William Duvall’s solid lead vocals. Far from being fawningly retrospective, this tour is set to be a hot ticket for a band still focused on the future. Recent MOBO champ Shahid ‘Naughty Boy’ Khan (he of hiccupping chart number one La La La) hits the O2 ABC this month, airing his prize-winning LP Hotel Cabana. The album, which reads like a who’s who of current British chart titans (featuring Emeli Sandé, Tinie Tempah, Bastille, Professor Green, and others), is touted as an accomplished concept album of textured depth. Though still relatively fresh on the circuit, Khan’s racked up quite the production pedigree; check out his infectious R&B stylings on 17 Nov and judge for yourself. Saaf Landan Rough Trade ruffians Palma Violets, touring their debut indie-thrash LP 180 relentlessly since its release earlier this year, make a pitstop at the O2 ABC on 23 Nov. They’ve been on the road with numerous bands, notably on this year’s NME Awards Tour with Django Django, so they certainly know the score. With notoriously enthusiastic sets, stage-diving antics and raucous showmanship, expect some high-octane Britpop revivalist carnage from Sam Fryer and pals. The Netherlands might have produced the odd DJ here and there over the years. Here’s one that’s part Surinamese: Clyde Sergio Narain to his mates, Chuckie to his fans. Like Naughty Bog earlier in the month, Chuckie has dwelled in one form or another in international charts, either as a producer or as an artist, pioneering ‘Dirty Dutch’ house – think Cuban tunes fed through a glitching, steroid-fuelled drum machine. All told, he’ll be churning up crowds no bother at the O2 Academy on 30 Nov. [George Sully]

www.o2abcglasgow.co.uk www.o2academyglasgow.co.uk

Photo: Kenny McColl

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1. Fugazi – Repeater (1990) Repeater was a record that was meant to be performed. And no band put on a better show then Fugazi. It was their live show that literally drove an underground punk band based on specific ethics and values to almost mainstream success. 2. Mahavishnu Orchestra – Birds of Fire (1973) This album was so ahead of its time it’s not even funny. It really inspired me to want to make a band like Dillinger. A band that incorporated all of my influences without prejudice or concern for what was popular or typical. 3. Dazzling Killmen – Face of Collapse (1994) Not many people I know ever heard these guys. But most of the great progressive underground bands of the 90s would not exist if it weren’t for them. 4. Alice in Chains – Facelift (1990) I first heard Alice in Chains when I saw the video for Man in the Box on MTV Headbangers Ball. There was something so soulful about this song. It was heavy blues. At the time I was playing primarily blues guitar so it was really inspiring to see this kind of thing. 5. Deadguy – Fixation on a CoWorker (1995) When this record came out, Deadguy were the only band who could truly take what Black Flag had done to the next level. This record was not only a huge inspiration to me musically, but the lyrics really helped me realise that I never want to conform to the norm of society, that I should always look for more and never be complacent.

6. King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King (1969) This band represented a time when music truly had no boundaries When this came out it was the equivalent of Calculating Infinity being on pop radio and in the top 10. 7. Today is the Day – Willpower (1994) I was almost certain that the singer/ guitar player Steve Austin was chewing on and swallowing glass while performing when I first hear this record. These guys were obviously indie rock-meets-jazz players making metal. And it was beautiful. 8. Radiohead – OK Computer (1997) When Radiohead put out this record, music was simply changed forever. If it wasn’t for OK Computer there would be zero worth to popular music right now. It influenced absolutely everything that people are hearing in the music of the moment. 9. Neurosis – Times of Grace (1999) Times of Grace came out the same year as our first full length, Calculating Infinity, and was also on Relapse Records. It was the soundtrack to my life during that time. After making our album I was completely drained and my life would be forever changed. Everytime I hear this record I’m immediately brought back to that time. 10. Soundgarden – Badmotorfinger (1991) Soundgarden was that band that led me down a rabbit hole of interesting music. Badmotorfinger was directly responsible for the first odd meter riff I ever wrote. The Dillinger Escape Plan play Aberdeen Garage on 4 Nov and Glasgow Garage on 5 Nov dillingerescapeplan.org

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THE SKINNY


Public Images Unlimited With a DVD of debut album Inform – Educate – Entertain due shortly, J. Willgoose Esq discusses Public Service Broadcasting’s sounds and vision, and ponders their history-steeped style’s future

Interview: Chris Buckle Photography: David P Scott

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nform. Educate. Entertain. With these three principles, John Charles Walsham Reith laid down a remit for a fledgling BBC that would go on to influence public service broadcasting the world over – and, 90 years later, Public Service Broadcasting, the creative outlet of one J. Willgoose, Esq and his dependable drummer Wrigglesworth. After some well-received singles and calling card EP The War Room, the band titled their debut album after the Reithian ideals – and entertain they did, with a high-concept, high-impact sound combining motorik rhythms, propulsive, hook-filled melodies and an array of archivesourced samples. It’s the latter that provides PSB their USP: they’re neither the first nor only band to utilise spoken-word snippets in such a manner (the haunted/haunting work of The Advisory Circle and other Ghostbox artists come to mind), but they’re the only contemporary practitioners to bring these voices from the past to within a hair’s breadth of the top 20. Factor in keen radio support and a strong showing on the festival circuit and the duo emerge as one of the year’s true musical success stories. This month, the band consolidate their annus mirabilis with a new single (Night Mail) and a DVD originally intended to accompany the album on its initial release, but pushed back when a self-imposed May deadline meant there was “physically no time to put it all together.” Alongside some newly filmed extras (Willgoose in conversation with the BFI, a mini tour diary, live footage) are all of the band’s promo videos and other visuals. Like the music, they’re drawn from a variety of archive material, ranging from US road safety films to 1930s naval newsreel to George Lowe’s 1953 feature documentary The Conquest of Everest, celebrating Hillary and Norgay’s landmark ascent. The collected clips not only complete an audio-visual experience previously reserved for live performances (where they’re screened on vintage television sets – both prop and authentic – for added retro appeal); they also enhance the album’s charm by rounding out the concepts underlying each track – for instance, the aforementioned Night Mail is made more romantic and rousing by the attachment of footage from the GPO documentary of the same name, while ROYGBIV – an ode to the arrival of colour broadcasting – is given extra sparkle by the accompanying montage of tinted rainbows and flowers in bloom. Additionally, a commentary from Willgoose makes good on those other two legs of the Reithian triumvirate – to educate and inform – by offering details about his creative process, and background to the footage that facilitated it. “The commentary is basically just me rambling on in a hot room in the summer,” laughs Willgoose, speaking over the phone ahead of this month’s tour, which begins in Aberdeen the day of the single and DVD releases before winding its way southwards. “It’s just to give a bit of context I suppose. I think a lot of people are quite interested in the stories behind [the songs], and with a lot of our stuff actually having quite a definite origin, this seemed like a good way to do that. Most of it ended up being about the footage, probably because the music kind of speaks for itself… but with stuff like the instrumental [Qomolangma], it’s nice to be able to explain what I was trying to do… It’s not intended to ram anything down anyone’s throat or treat people as if they couldn’t possibly have realised it themselves; it’s just nice that it’s on record, as it were, for people who are interested.”

November 2013

Whether pointing out that Lit Up’s borrowed three-note motif spells B-B-C, likening Late Night Final’s closing drum effect to Mogwai, or selfeffacingly responding to online complaints about the use of Hurricane aircraft in the Spitfire video, it’s a modest trove of insights that fulfils the selfdescribed brief to “not just whack out 11 videos and say ‘there you go it’s a DVD.’ We wanted to make sure that some time, thought and consideration had gone in to it.” What the DVD is not intended to do, however, is put the visuals on a level-pegging with the audio. Exempting the trio of clips cut by others (“the best ones”), Willgoose describes the eight self-edited pieces as “very functional. They don’t have a great deal of flair to them.” He names DJ Shadow as an example of someone “doing amazing stuff with their visuals,” but insists the influence there was purely musical – going so far as to label the project’s initial premise “a kind of minihomage” to the pioneering hip-hop sampler. It was while formulating this homage that Willgoose caught wind of newly available archive footage from the BFI (a purely coincidental discovery – “I don’t have a sort of long-held, burning admiration or love for 1940s documentaries or anything,” he laughs). “The two ideas married together quite well, and it was really once those things were sitting together that the wider concept came in: an album where each song was based on a different public information film. But then the album ended up being something quite different from that anyway, because we used feature films and documentaries and all sorts really.” While the archive-raiding lends the project its distinctive flavour, Willgoose doesn’t want to become defined exclusively by it, emphasising that the PSB aesthetic has plenty of untapped potential. He takes note of critics that paint the band a one-trick novelty, but argues that “the concept is a lot broader than some people seem to have realised.”

Does it bother him when people misread the historical sampling as a gimmick? “I think the novelty thing is definitely something we’re open to as a criticism, or exposed to anyway, just because it is slightly unusual,” he responds. “But I think you have to trust that people have more than one idea up their sleeve. I mean at first it was a bit of a novelty – I was putting songs together without a great deal of thought about the wider concept and what it all could mean and stand for and what we were about. It was only after playing live for a bit that I decided I wanted to write something a bit more hefty, something dealing with a trickier subject matter. And I think with The War Room we took a definite step away from novelty. We showed that we wanted to write music that had depth to it, that it wasn’t just a case of getting some samples and whacking them over any old rubbish.” He lets out a wry laugh. “I mean, some people do think that’s what we do,” he sighs, “but they’re entitled to their opinion I suppose…”

“With The War Room we took a definite step away from novelty” J. Willgoose Esq

Their second album, Willgoose promises, will be “a progression, in terms of it relating to a later period – it takes us into the 1970s, so it’s a bit more up to date I suppose. I think if we leapt from this album into contemporary footage it would be a bit jarring, but as long as we consider where we’re going and how we do it, we’re not particularly limited in what we can cover.” Finally, with several of the institutions

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exalted across the PSB oeuvre weathering political pressure (the BBC), experiencing severe budget cuts (the BFI), undergoing seismic changes (the Royal Mail’s privatisation) or already dismantled (the 2012 closure of the Central Office of Information, i.e. the agency responsible for all the UK’s post-war public information films), we wonder whether Public Service Broadcasting has a political element. Earlier, when discussing the unsavoury side of patriotism, Willgoose expressed his hope that, despite referencing a certain type of nationalist, stiff-upper-lip British Empire iconography, they always manage to handle the material “sensitively enough and intelligently enough that people don’t ascribe to us political beliefs that we definitely, definitely don’t hold.” Which raises the obvious question: what political beliefs do they hold? “If there’s a political message behind it, it’s probably a rather wishy washy liberal one,” Willgoose replies. “It’s probably about the power of ideas, and the power of people coming together and doing extraordinary things – whether that be coming through times of extraordinary stress in the war, or whether it be conquering Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world.” He pauses. “It’s a positive outlook I suppose, and hopefully not a cynical one. I think when a band call themselves Public Service Broadcasting you can probably tell they’re leaning slightly to the left on most issues – it’s not like we’ve called ourselves BskyB Incorporated or anything horrific like that. But I don’t necessarily think that our political inclinations are that important to the music – it’s more about the spirit of optimism, I suppose. The spirit of hope.” In its sincerity and idealism, it’s enough to bring a tear to a monocle-sporting eye. Public Service Broadcasting play Glasgow Òran Mór on 5 Nov and Edinburgh Picture House on 6 Nov publicservicebroadcasting.net

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Vive le Cinéma

With an eclectic programme of Francophone movies screening over a month in Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow, the French Film Festival UK (7 Nov–7 Dec) shows that, in terms of cinema, the Auld Alliance is alive and well

Words: Jamie Dunn

Attila Marcel

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ylvain Chomet makes a perfect headline act for the UK’s annual celebration of French cinema particularly for Francophiles north of the border. Few filmmakers have rendered Scotland with the kind of fine-grained detail he brought to The Illusionist, his elegant third feature based on an abandoned Jacques Tati script, which Chomet relocated to Edinburgh and the Highlands when he fell in love with the landscape. “Scotland is very like Provence,” he told the Guardian back in 2010. “Laugh if you like, but they are very similar. The light is exactly the same... and you only get this special light in these two places, nowhere else.” Which is fair enough, but when he calls North Berwick “this lost bit of the Caribbean” in the same interview you realise that this is a man who, like Isaac Davis to Manhattan, adores this country, he idolises it all out of proportion. He returns to Edinburgh, where he made The Illusionist, to open the French Film Festival (FFF) with ‘a live gift,’ his first live-action feature Attila Marcel, which is reported to be a modern fairytale that calls to mind the two Jacques who have influenced Chomet’s whole career, Tati and Demy. Chomet insists that working with flesh and

blood actors wasn’t too much of a departure, though. “I’ve always made animation as if it was a live-action film,” he says. “Animation is filmmaking, it’s the same thing. And you really train as a director when you do animation. You get the eye, the sense of composition and timing.” Talking of Demy, the FFF’s revival screening of his bittersweet debut feature, Lola , from 1961, is another festival highlight. On the surface it suggests a soapy love story, where the nightclub dancer of the title must choose between the trio of men in her life, but beneath the breezy narrative and flowing camerawork there’s a melancholic core. This mix of brio and wistfulness became, as fans of The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and The Young Girls of Rochefort will know, Demy’s trademark. There’s less nuance to Love is in the Air, a high-concept romantic comedy that seems finetuned for box-office success. Antoine (a slick-dick Casanova, played by Nicolas Bedos) and Julie (Ludivine Gasnier, who gives a fine, Gallic take on the manic pixie dream girl) are exes who find themselves seated next to each other on a flight from New York to Paris. Sparks fly between Bedos

Winter Season

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In the last year, Edinburgh’s Summerhall has come into its own, creating a hub where the worlds of art, theatre, tech and, eh, brewing can collide. Its winter programme offers an array of theatrical darkness, a refreshing alternative to the impending panto Words: Eric Karoulla

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ummerhall’s November programme comes to counter the conventional sparsity of programming most theatres go for in the pre-Christmas buildup. While all the rest are trying to prepare for panto season, Edinburgh’s alternative venue takes on a great deal of performance. Of course, being such a big venue, it would make sense to have many things on at the same time. November finds Summerhall bringing in interdisciplinary multimedia performances ranging from the comical to the dark and hellish. The start of the month finds Dogstar Theatre Company introducing The Tailor of Inverness , Matthew Zajac’s award-winning solo performance about his Polish father, covering themes of identity, migration, and war. A few days later, A Dangerman appears in the Red Lecture Theatre. Described as a tribute to the outsider, Dick Walsh Theatre’s 2012 production takes a look at the 'social terror,' the man who will talk to you for hours although you have no desire to converse. After all, the thing about monologues

Today

and Gasnier, and director Alexandre Castagnetti keeps things interesting with some Michel Gondry-style flourishes. But if you’re looking for a more challenging look at amour, the mercurial François Ozon is on hand. Following his delightfully entertaining In the House, which was concerned with the voyeuristic fantasies of a horny teenage boy, he turns his attention to female desire with Young & Beautiful. Former model Marine Vacth plays Isabelle, a middle-class 17-year-old who turns to prostitution not out of desperation or necessity, but out of curiosity. What’s so impressive is that Ozon manages to avoid sensation and salaciousness, and takes this hand grenade of a story into interesting areas. Told over four seasons, it offers few easy answers to Isabelle’s malaise, but its comparisons to Belle de Jour, François other great film about a woman in the world’s oldest profession, are justified. Look out for a cameo in the final act from an old friend of Ozon’s. Another fine female character study comes in the form of the stark and gripping Camille Claudel 1915, from Bruno Dumont, which tells the story of the eponymous late-19th-early-20th

century sculptor. Dumont being Dumont, though, he centres his film not on Claudel’s successful career, but over a few days in her later life, when she was confined to a church-run mental institution. Juliette Binoche is electrifying in the lead role. Other films to look out for in the wide-reaching programme are Alain Gomis’ beguiling meditation on death Today, about a young and healthy Senegalese man who believes today is his last day on earth; remakes of Marcel Pagnol’s Marius and Fanny, which form the first two installments of Daniel Auteuil’s Marseille trilogy; and Becoming Traviata, a riveting documentary following French theatre/opera director Jean-François Sivadier and celebrated soprano Natalie Dessay through rehearsals for La Traviata. All this plus three obligatory films from the holy trinity of French acting: François Cluzet (11.6), Gérard Depardieu (The Man Who Laughs) and Catherine Deneuve (On My Way). Formidable.

– especially in the theatre – is they treat silence as consent. What are the consequences of sitting down to listen to one such monologue? In the same vein, on a much darker and intense spectrum comes Black Sun Drum Korps’ Invokation of Lady Macbeth. Joined by extreme body artist Ron Athey, the company tackle Macbeth through use of the cut-up technique – made famous by William Burroughs and also used extensively by Lisbeth Gruwez in It’s Going to Get Worse and Worse, My Friend. Led by Drum Major Russell MacEwan, and performed in the haunting Dissection Room, this reworking of Macbeth unleashes the darkness within. Meanwhile, Enough Already / Lâchez Tout takes on the idea of utopia. Through the characters of naïve Bobok and Professor Glaçon, this performance across stage, film, and music seems to try to tackle the tantalising irresistibility of utopias, and the absolute impossibility of their existence. It pulls together different media, and brings together composer François Sarhan, five members

of the Red Note Ensemble, actor Claudio Stellato, and two live sound effect artists, stop-frame animation and film. Aside from all the cool performances – cos let’s admit it, they sound pretty damn cool – the venue also has educational workshops. 5 November features a workshop on object manipulation in conjunction with BE Festival – more simply, puppetry and how to use objects on stage. The Best of BE Festival performance takes place later on that day, gathering the cream of the crop from Birmingham’s international theatre festival onto one Edinburgh stage. Overall, Summerhall’s programming may be many things – dark, terrifying, eclectic, mad even – but it most certainly isn’t boring. Previously the Royal Dick Vet School of Edinburgh, it might be taking advantage of its garish horror-story ridden past, to spook, startle, and amaze you into loving live performance long after Halloween has past.

FILM / THEATRE

French Film Festival UK takes place 7 Nov-7 Dec, with screenings in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and other cities in the UK. See website for full programme details frenchfilmfestival.org.uk/FFF2013

summerhall.co.uk

THE SKINNY


ADVERTISING FEATURE

Vanguard Shelving

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ased in Glasgow, PeterWardDesign specialises in sustainable furniture and products which are all locally designed and manufactured in the city. Designer Peter Ward explains, “I’ve always had a passion for design but a few years ago I decided to take the plunge and try and make a career out of it. While I was studying [Furniture Design and Product Design at City of Glasgow College] I got interested in the whole idea of sustainability and innovation within design. I felt a lot of the sustainable design around was neglecting the design side of the equation. The ethos is about striking a balance between being sustainable while also producing a high standard of design. “It’s not enough anymore to just be green. Customers are more sophisticated than ever and won’t compromise on aesthetics for the sake of principles. You have to deliver on all fronts. “The simple aim of PeterWardDesigns is to locally produce sustainable design, mainly furniture but also domestic products too. The business can be simplified into two sections: I provide a service to businesses and organisations where I remove waste materials otherwise destined for landfill. Then these materials are utilised and developed to create innovative, sustainable designs. “I applied for Starter for 6 last December and had an interview in January. The first session was in April and the programme continued over the summer in Glasgow and in Edinburgh. We covered issues that were relevant for me as a start-up, such as defining my business, marketing, planning, finance and finally presenting and pitching, all of which were tailored to my business. It helped me to focus on areas of importance and allowed me to view the business from a different perspective. “I pitched and won start-up funding for two design exhibitions in London next year – this will give me the chance to take my work to a wider audience and build my profile, which is essential for any new business. “My advice to someone thinking about applying to Starter for 6 would be – jump at the chance. It’s been nothing but a positive experience. I met so many interesting people with a really diverse range of business ideas (which can be seen on the website) and the team have been really helpful and supportive the whole way through the programme. “Over the next few months I’ll be working on new designs and concepts as well as developing the supplier relationships which are so crucial to the business. This will then lead to exhibiting in London 2014 so keep an eye out for me!” Starter for 6 is Scotland’s premier start-up and investment programme for creative industry entrepreneurs. Applications for the next round of Starter for 6 open at midday on Tue 5 Nov www.peterwarddesign.com www.culturalenterpriseoffice.co.uk/starterfor6

November 2013

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3d/2d Christmas Fairs

23-24 Nov. and 7-8 Dec. 2013 at the Assembly Rooms, George St, Edinburgh

Image: ‘Pavilion at the Summer Palace’, 53cm x 76cm, 1983, © the artist’s estate

Paul Gell (1918 - 1996) 9th - 30th November

The Sutton Gallery www.thesuttongallery.com

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18a Dundas Street Edinburgh EH3 6HZ

Open Tuesday - Saturday 11am - 5pm

The Independent

100 makers, artists and designers each weekend selling only their own work. Open 11am to 5pm each day. For details of who’s there: www.3d2d.co.uk Tel: 0131 661 6600

Fresh from sell out performances at this year’s Edinburgh International Festival

Dundee Rep Theatre

Thurs 14 Nov, 7pm & 9pm 01382 223530/dundeerep.co.uk www.scottishdancetheatre.com

THE SKINNY


Herland, Michelle Hannah 2013

New Romantic Artist, performer and self-professed star child Michelle Hannah lets us into her cosmic world

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woman stares intently ahead, her face bathed and beaded in a heavy orange glow. Red hair slicked back from her forehead and black eyes obscured by sultry lashes, she appears to be in another world. “I am the sun and air,” she sings slowly. Her voice is powerful, technologic, metallic. Combining the androgynous theatricality of the New Romantics, Manga-style contact lenses and evening gowns “in the most Twin Peaks format,” Michelle Hannah cuts a figure worthy of her idol David Bowie. Her performances echo the glamour of days gone by, when ‘film stars’ were worshipped instead of ‘celebs.’ In her slowed-down, appropriated renditions of pop songs such as How Soon is Now and Blue Monday there’s a note of intensity, extremism. Though she’s a fan of karaoke and watches The X Factor there’s nothing of the cringe-making amateur about the ‘self-identity’ Hannah performs. Instead she draws on the sounds of Laurie Anderson, Kalup Linzy and Linder, and the original concepts of cabaret – to repel as well as entice through artifice – before it became a hyperfamiliar sexualised parade. Hannah makes herself strange and ethereal by distorting her voice with a voice processor, painting her hair and face and wearing creepy contact lenses. For her performance and video SONNE she covered her face in 24 carat-gold dust – appearing under the glow of a red spotlight as sweat, as though she is staring into the blinding light of a dying sun. “It’s like a cry of help to technology, I guess,” says Hannah. “Or like Nam June Paik said he wanted to find the humanity in technology, something like that.” When we meet she has just performed her new work HERLAND at an event held at Talbot Rice Gallery in association with its Nam June Paik

November 2013

Interview: Jac Mantle

retrospective. It’s the first time she’s videoed herself while performing live, made all the more difficult by wearing ‘blind’ contact lenses that prevent her from seeing and make her eyes entirely white. “I’m trying to figure out why I’m using them. I think it’s because it makes it more an internal thing, the performance,” she says. Playing with an interface between an internal and external landscape, light and darkness, runs through her work. When singing she often appears oblivious of the audience and likes to give the impression of being in her “own cosmic world” both on and off-stage, telling me how she meditates “cause I’m just a big old hippie.” She’ll explore the idea further in an upcoming performance at Queen’s Park Railway Club, styled as a femme fatale sculpture and singing non-stop for two hours, unable to see the audience. The place will be decked out with mirrors and Hollywood spotlights, transforming the little gallery on the railway platform. She’s covering Kraftwerk’s The Hall of Mirrors – “about how even the greatest stars find themselves in the looking glass” – and Illusions, sung by Marlene Dietrich’s character in Billy Wilder’s film A Foreign Affair. “She’s singing to a crowd but she becomes so involved in it that she catches a glimpse of herself in the window at the back and just slowly walks through the crowd and goes to the window. She’s singing to herself like everyone isn’t really there,” says Hannah. Denying herself the narcissistic pleasure offered by dressing up, performing and seeing herself being watched is further complicated by the fact that the audience can watch her without her seeing them – though they might observe themselves doing so, in the array of mirrors. “It’s complete narcissism in a way but [being blind] adds another element to it, I think,” she says. Hannah’s friend Craig Mulholland will be

She’ll soon be breaking out of her bedroom to do a Micro Residency at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop in the company of what she jokingly calls “proper artists,” who work with objects and materials. “The kind of artists I look to are peers, you know. And generally female artists or queer artists, who are in their own world. Maybe we’re making work for the future and not for this time... she says, to justify herself!” The outcome of the residency will be exhibited some time next year – hopefully it won’t clash with Glasgow International, says Hannah. She’s already planning a show in a former car showroom with Opera Autonoma, the collective she’s in along with Craig Mulholland, Claudia Nova, Jim McKinven and Carmel O’Brien. Michelle Hannah She and Mulholland are also busy making an EP for their new band, Picana Electrica – coined “That bit at the end where Hal gets turned after the electric cord that delivers high voltage, off and he’s slowly dying... The only thing that low current electric shocks, enabling prolonged happens at the end is he starts singing. That last sort of humanity and terror of technology. There’s torture. “That’s the kind of essence,” says Hannah. nothing else left to do but sing, and then he slowly “He’s a total genius, Craig, with sound and stuff. I think I’ll go more down that route in future maybe, dies. If I can capture those sorts of moments the music.” every time I perform...” Though she’s adamant she’ll steer clear of As sci-fi greats come to seem less fantastical and pre-teens make avatars, selfies and the kind of live art where everybody gets naked, myriad other digital likenesses in their bedrooms, Hannah foresees that performance will continue performing one’s ‘self-identity’ as art is no doubt to be a big part of her cosmic future. challenging. Hannah draws a distinction between “It seems to last a lot longer than having an this and the alter-egos that she’s created in the exhibition, I find, ‘cause people are like, ‘Oh, I saw past, for example when she started her own cult. you perform last year.’ It becomes a little memory In marked contrast to a lot of the more objectdistilled in people’s minds, which I really enjoy. based art being produced – which she finds And I’m not afraid to make it emotional or beautiful. I’m a big romantic, I don’t care. That’s what it’s “pretty masculine, dare I say it,” – she believes in about.” making work that draws on the personal. “I do find it quite painful to sing, to be www.queensparkrailwayclub.co.uk/ honest. I’m not embarrassed to do it. I don’t go www.edinburghsculpture.org/programme/news/microthrough the motions, you know, I feel every word residents-201314 and I guess that’s what resonates, hopefully, with michellehannah.org other people!” doing the backing track, exactly like the original as “he’s a total Kraftwerk nerd.” As usual Hannah will distort her voice with a vocal processor, hinting at cybernetics and futuristic technology. As well as spending hours watching videos on YouTube – “I’m probably just a frustrated pop star! I’m too old to be a pop star!” – her major influences are sci-fi classics like 2001: A Space Odyssey.

“I’m probably just a frustrated pop star!”

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Literary Prizefighter

Fending off competition from 350 other entrants, Nicola White’s In the Rosary Garden is the winner of this year’s Dundee International Book Prize. She discusses the road to success and the controversial themes of her novel

Interview: Ryan Rushton

Photo: Ruth Clark

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ffering £10,000 and a deal with Cargo publishing, the Dundee International Book Prize is unique in what it offers a writer attempting to get a work into print. No other award offers such a large cash sum for an unpublished book, with the opportunity to get copies into the hands of a waiting readership surely just as attractive. On 24 October, on the opening night of the Dundee Literary Festival, the announcement was made that Nicola White had won the coveted award for her tale of sexual politics in the Catholic backdrop of 1980s Ireland, In the Rosary Garden. “I’ve been aware of the prize for years,” White tells us. “But I thought the more conventional route – to find an agent who would approach publishers – would be easier. It didn’t prove to be. Publishers praised the book, then gave wildly various reasons why they couldn’t commit to it. I think it’s not an easy time for debut writers – mainstream publishers are not wild about the untried or untested.” It is undoubtedly true that finding a publisher with faith in an original voice is one of the largest obstacles a debut novelist has to overcome these days. One only has to look at the boom in self-publishing and the path trodden by authors such as Sergio De La Pava (whose self-published book, A Naked Singularity, ended up winning the PEN prize) to see that worthy work is struggling to find a home. White had almost given up hope before submitting In the Rosary Garden to the all-star judging panel: “I was disappointed, but not discouraged, and decided I’d just get on with writing a second book. Yet all the time, the fact of the first book’s existence niggled at me. I entered the prize on a whim, to be honest – I didn’t expect to get this far.” Fortunately for White, judges as diverse as Brian Cox (actor, not physicist), Lorraine Kelly

Byromania Ahead of the publication of The Vampyre Family, a group biography of key members of the Romantic era, Andrew McConnell Stott talks to us about his former life as a standup comedian and the undying celebrity appeal of Lord Byron

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iterary biography is a strange and problematic genre. The main problem (aside from the usual facile decoding of ‘art’ into ‘life’) is that most writers’ lives are of the dull, solitary, stuckat-a-desk-all-day variety. Thankfully, Andrew McConnell Stott, in The Vampyre Family: Passion, Envy and The Curse of Byron, circumvents this problem. The writers on whom he focuses – Byron, the Shelleys, Claire Clairmont, and John Polidori – lead the kinds of lives that make Hemingway look like Philip Larkin. Stott’s own life, while not exactly Byronic, is nonetheless pretty unusual. Though an academic – he’s currently an English professor at the University at Buffalo in Upstate New York – he was once a stand-up comedian. “Comedy was something I’d wanted to do ever since I was a child,” he tells us. “I never had the nerve, but there I was standing in front of a class full of students telling jokes, when it dawned on me that if I took out the educational stuff, I’d have a set. For about three years I taught in the day and hacked my way through the beginner ranks of the comedy circuit at night. It was a fun – shall I say ‘vampiric’ – double life.” This love of comedy fed into his first book,

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and AL Kennedy agreed her book was the best of three strong finalists. In the Rosary Garden begins with the shocking discovery of a dead baby in the grounds of a convent school and weaves in and out of various genres, while exploring the contentious issues of abortion and sexuality as a whole within Ireland at the time. “I left Ireland in 1984,” White explains. “So that time is particularly resonant for me; a time of bitter debates over reproduction and women’s rights, and also the year when the book is set. It was prompted by my interest in a case known as The Kerry Babies, also from that year, which involved the finding of two dead infants in close proximity. My book doesn’t mirror that story at all, but the germ of the idea started there.” With a subject that continues to be so contentious, the question of a specific agenda or intention in White’s book is the obvious one: “I don’t think an agenda is a good starting place for a novel. You need to surprise yourself,” she says. “In the Rosary Garden started with an image, a scene that came to me of a child finding a dead newborn hidden away in a box, and not really understanding what it was. The story spun out gradually from there.” No doubt questions of this kind will abound as reactions to the book begin to trickle in. For now, though, White is enjoying the award, telling us: “It feels a tremendous piece of good fortune, and I hope that the book will find its audience over the coming months.” On the subject of the cash prize, she answers as a writer in it for the long haul should, thinking in terms of the precious commodity of time and the freedom to keep on writing: “What’s definite,” she says, “is that the money will buy me a precious chunk of time to press on with other ideas stacking up in my head.” See our review of In the Rosary Garden on page 59

Interview: Kristian Doyle

The Pantomime Life of Joseph Grimaldi, a portrait of one of the most influential clowns in history. Despite sharing The Vampyre Family’s exuberance, it’s a markedly different work, although there is an interesting cross-over: Grimaldi and Byron were in fact acquaintances. The famous clown’s life ended in obscurity and alcoholfuelled depression, and, after reading The Vampyre Family, you’d be forgiven for thinking that Byron had a part to play: if there’s one thing the book makes clear, it’s that the philandering poet couldn’t help but scatter ruin in his path, so whirlwind-like was his influence. But it’s precisely this effect on others that attracted Stott to Byron and his cohorts. “I’m interested in what happens at the margins of fame,” he says. “Fame and celebrity are so clamorous and distorting that they alter everything around them. I wanted to explore how proximity to fame... affected the lives of those at the periphery.” Those at the periphery, in this case, were Claire Clairmont and John Polidori – the former was Byron’s occasional lover, the latter his doctor, and both had literary aspirations themselves. “Claire and John were the perfect candidates,” says Stott. “Both were brilliant

and accomplished, with everything to live for. But celebrity created unrealistic expectations that attacked their self-worth and scarred them forever.”

“I’m interested in what happens at the margins of fame”

Andrew McConnell Stott

The notion of celebrity lies at the centre of the book, but when asked if Byron was a prototabloid headline-grabber, Stott is ambivalent: “Anyone from Moses onwards has been called ‘the first celebrity’ at one time or another, so I’m loath to assert to a single point of origin for celebrity culture. Yet there is something about the confluence of events at the beginning of the 19th century that undoubtedly sets the stage for where we are today. For a start, you have a

BOOKS

growing middle class with high levels of literacy hungrily consuming print culture in the form of gossipy periodicals and judgmental magazines. Secondly, you have the first publicity departments that sought to capitalise on what William Wordsworth derided as the public’s ‘degrading thirst after outrageous stimulation.’ Add in the Romantic obsession with ‘genius,’ and you have all the ingredients for a situation in which some people are elevated above the common herd as objects of intense fascination.” The inverted commas around the word genius are there for a reason, however. Stott is certainly an admirer of Byron – reading him, he says, “is like listening to The Beatles – pleasant, accessible, full of stories and characters but with a darker undertow” – but when asked what he’d say to those who consider Byron’s life more interesting and complex than his poetry, his reply is unambiguous: “I’d say, ‘Me too. Read my book!’” The Vampyre Family... is out on 7 Nov, published by Canongate andrewmcconnellstott.com

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THE SKINNY


Natural History Shearwater’s Jonathan Meiburg explains why it took a twist on a tired genre to convince him to finally record an album of cover versions

“I

would send the tracks off and they would come back embellished with all these incredible things. They were exactly what I had hoped for, which is to say, they were not what I would have predicted at all.” Jonathan Meiburg is in midtown Manhattan, New York City (“I’m trying to find a quiet corner to talk to you – it’s quite a challenge!”) and is explaining why he decided it was finally time for Shearwater to record Fellow Travellers, an album of cover versions, a side road that had always appealed but had never been a feasible option until now. “Like a lot of ideas, it started very small,” he continues. “I imagined doing a 7” with a band that we’d toured with, perhaps, and maybe covering each others’ songs. Then I thought about a series of 7”s, and before I knew it, it was a whole record.” An added twist to an intriguing list of song choices is that the artists being covered were invited to contribute – but not to their own tracks. This presented all manner of logistical obstacles. “The technology to allow us to be able to do this has been available for years, obviously, but it’s the first time I’ve had people actually send in tracks via email, and I was nervous about how that might work. But that was really the only way I was going to get tracks from the likes of Clinic, who are in Liverpool, or David (Thomas Broughton), who is in Pyongyang: I was surprised at how well it worked. It was really a lot of fun. And so I then had to figure out how to take these interesting performances and mix them into the songs. I really enjoyed it. Part of the reason we decided to go ahead and release it as a full LP, was that, ultimately, it was just so much fun.” Fellow Travellers is Shearwater’s ninth album in twelve years. Their first, 2001’s The Dissolving Room was intended to act as an outlet for sounds and textures that didn’t fit his then band Okkervil River. Over a decade on and they’re still very much here. Their most recent outing, 2012’s Animal Joy, confirmed that while their focus might shift, and band members come and go, their continued striving remains a given. To the casual observer, a covers album seems like an easy shot. Not having to actually

November 2013

Interview: Gary Kaill

write any songs, for one. Meiburg is refreshingly honest on that score: “Starting a record without having to write the songs is like starting half way up the mountain: it does make it so much easier. Then you’re simply left with how to interpret the songs, how to arrange them, try to make them into something that suits your own aesthetic and voice. Of course, it goes against this rather old-fashioned idea that you have to write all the songs that you sing: that in itself is a relatively new phenomenon.” In this age of talent shows and karaoke, we’ve become too easily attached to the idea of writing your own material being a worthier pursuit, and yet some of the best singers of the pop age have sung songs written by others. “Yeah, absolutely. I always think of Nina Simone. She did write some of her own songs but not very many and yet when she sings a song she owns it so completely and her versions are almost definitive to me. She managed to pull meanings out of them that the original writers didn’t intend or know were there. She could, and did, take a song like Kum Ba Ya or My Sweet Lord, songs that don’t seem like there’s much to ‘em, and really make something.” Fellow Travellers is nothing if not daring. In place of artists and songs safe for interpretation, Meiburg opted for the work of friends and bands they’d toured with and had grown to admire. “It was fun to limit the choices in that way. I said, let’s think about the bands that we’ve toured with, that we’ve seen play these songs, because I wanted to give people a window into the other side of the stage with this record. Touring is very solitary in a way, and these are the people you’re in it with together, so I kind of felt a bond with all of them. I had all of their repertoire to choose from, which was wonderful. I could pick songs that would fit together. The record, like all of our records, it’s very consistent as a whole, I think. It features some very broken characters. Everyone in it is somehow very flawed: from the very first line ‘There’s a kink in the pattern / Did you do the right thing?’ (from their tender take on Jesca Hoop’s Our Only Sun) to the end of Your Fucked

Up Life (by The Baptist Generals), which is a song about accepting someone with all of their flaws, with fondness and with good humour.” Meiburg is genuinely enthusiastic about the colour others have added to the album. Jesca Hoop (“Oh she’s fantastic. Very, very talented”) sings on tracks by St. Vincent and Wye Oak. David Thomas Broughton, never one to make life easy for himself, sent in recordings of bird songs he’d made in North Korea and the Falklands. Meiburg’s admiration knows few bounds: “I watched David night after night when we toured together and his show is never the same twice: truly incredible.”

“I would take extreme exception to the idea that we’re an Americana act. I’ve been trying to get out of that ghetto for many years” Jonathan Meiburg

But it’s the inclusion of Coldplay’s Hurts Like Heaven that might raise a few eyebrows. Shearwater opened for them on their Viva La Vida tour in 2008. Meiburg rejects the idea that the world’s biggest band and an act perceived unfairly as being part of the Americana scene might not be an obvious mix: “That’s interesting. I would take extreme exception to the idea that we’re an alt.folk or Americana act. I’ve been trying to get out of that ghetto for many years – we don’t belong there.” Anyone who’s followed the band’s

MUSIC

development over the last decade wouldn’t question their lyrical, expansive sound being suitable for opening a stadium show. Those who saw them play on last year’s extensive Animal Joy tour would be in no doubt at all. “On the last tour we did with Animal Joy, we were loud as hell. For some of that record we were touring with Dinosaur Jr, so we really had to make a huge racket. Anyone who’d turned up hoping for a folk show would have been confused at best.” He pauses and laughs. “And perhaps enraged.” “Coldplay were actually very inspiring,” says Meiburg, returning to the subject of the band’s time with the ‘circus,’ as he subsequently described it. “They were working far harder than they had to. And watching them rehearse for the first night of their tour for that record, they were really sweating it, trying to figure out how to do a show for 20,000 people, how to make it interesting, how to make it live up to peoples’ idea of what their show should be like. They had moving stages, lasers, confetti, trampolines and it was just so complicated, and it all just hung on them giving an incredibly committed performance in a very strange and artificial setting. I was really impressed by them.” With Fellow Travellers in the can and primed for a November release, attention turns to an album of new material. Talk of the future animates and excites Meiburg. The UK can expect to see the band return next year (“we should be over there late April, early May,” he reveals) but it’s the content and structure of the live show that’s proving troublesome: “I’m still trying to figure it out exactly because I think a show of covers would be a bit strange. We’re already about two months into working on the new record and so I imagine we’ll play a combination of songs from Fellow Travellers, some of the new ones and a few old ones.” It sounds like a nice headache to have. “Absolutely.” Not for the first time, he reflects and laughs. “You know, people like to watch artists suffer! It’s a perverse thing in audiences.” Fellow Travellers is released via Sub Pop on 25 Nov shearwatermusic.com

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Media Circus Amid a flurry of activity before Blue Is the Warmest Colour’s UK premiere, we sat down with its star Adèle Exarchopoulos to discuss this controversial Palme d’Or-winning film and its even more controversial shoot

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dèle Exarchopoulos is in London for the city’s 57th film festival. She has just done a photo shoot for a big glossy. Yves Saint Laurent were asked to supply a dress for her to wear on the red carpet for Blue Is the Warmest Colour, and press are kept hovering in the hallway of the Mayfair Hotel while she tries it on. When I’m summoned for the interview, she’s sitting among a bombsite of clothes and beauty stuff and camera equipment and handlers, a black cocktail dress hugging her, a stylist fussing over her hair. In two hours, the Palme d’Or-winning, sex abuse claimtrailing Blue Is the Warmest Colour will premiere at the London Film Festival. Then it’s a sponsored dinner, an afterparty, a flight out to another junket and premiere. I navigate my way to a seat next to Exarchopoulos and introduce myself, but there’s not a hint of response. I lean over and place a dictaphone in front of her, but she doesn’t seem to realise she’s being interviewed. She pushes the creases of her dress and shares a joke with the guy doing her hair. Then she turns and raises her eyebrows, as if to say, ‘You should begin.’ How does she find speaking to the press? “So many times I have done interviews. In Cannes, after Cannes, every day for two months. And you, you all speak about the same things. That’s why it is really boring, because you all reduce the film to sex and controversy.” You’re frustrated by it all? “Yeah I was frustrated but now I don’t care. Now I understand I can do nothing. So many people have said to me, ‘In my article I’m really going to understand the controversy. I’m really going to understand what nudity is for you.’ They try to turn things away from the film.” “I’m really sorry,” her stylist interrupts, and blasts her hair with an industrial-sized dryer. Exarchopoulos is 19, but she doesn’t seem very awed by all of this. The daughter of a guitar teacher and a nurse, she was born and raised in Montparnasse, near the Place des Fêtes on Paris’s Left Bank. She has Greek ancestry and two younger brothers and, until the age of ten, was almost

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wordlessly shy. Her parents encouraged her to act to help her anxiety in public. By 12, she had her first film role. By 13, she had an agent. Blue Is the Warmest Colour, for which she shared a Palme d’Or with her director, Abdellatif Kechiche, and co-star Léa Seydoux, is her tenth film. And what a film. It’s a genuine five-star

“You can’t presume or summarise a human adventure.” Adèle Exarchopoulos

trail-blazer. A love story about – and a love letter to – sex and youth and pride and the loss of innocence, powered with incredible force and commitment by Exarchopoulos and Seydoux, and by the intimate courage of Kechiche’s direction. Set in the northern French city of Lille, the film charts a love affair between Adèle (Exarchopoulos), a 17-year-old student from a lower middle-class family, and Emma (Seydoux), an openly gay twenty-something artist from an affluent, liberal background. Yet it is Adèle’s story we are told; from the moment she first became aware of her desires, to an abortive early attempt to have sex with a boy, to meeting and falling headlong for Emma, to leaving school and becoming a nursery teacher, to trying to support the more career-driven Emma in an artistic pursuit that is at best private and remote. The sex scenes in this film are explicit and unflinching – one continuous sequence lasts for 12 minutes. Yet they’re also powerful and moving. It’s a film capable of making you feel like a teenager again, capable of bringing back what it felt like to have sex for the first time, how life-altering and fundamentally significant it all felt. It’s a film of unbridled emotions and intensity that does not for a moment feel forced or melodramatic or ratcheted beyond itself. Instead, and despite a runtime of over three hours, we’re left feeling

Interview: Tom Seymour deeply invested in a tiny chapter of these characters’ lives. We’re left desperately wanting more. Kechiche succeeds in asking a basic but needling question: why are we so accepting of sensationalised violence on screen but so scared of turning sex – something we all do, and into which we all have a degree of insight – into something heightened and cinematic? In talking honestly about this, the film has mired itself in a controversy partly authored by Adèle herself, and which now bugs her so much on the press circuit. Talking to The Daily Beast shortly after the film’s world premiere in Cannes, Léa Seydoux revealed she and her co-star were “made to feel like prostitutes,” on a “horrible” set, depicting Kechiche as an aggressively extorting director who would throw things and scream at them if he didn’t get his way. The 12-minute sex scene allegedly took ten days to shoot, with the actors asked to do take after take after take – no pre-direction, no choreography, three cameras surrounding them. “Once we were on the shoot, I realised that he really wanted us to give him everything,” Exarchopoulos told The Daily Beast. “Most people don’t even dare to ask the things that he did. They’re more respectful.” Both have vowed never to work with him again. Kechiche has responded by talking of his own “humiliation” at their behaviour. He’s been totally absent from press duties in London, and has basically disowned the film since, saying to the French magazine Télérama: “I think this film should not go out, it’s too dirty. The Palme d’Or was a brief moment of happiness, then I felt humiliated, disgraced. I felt it’s a rejection of me, a curse.” Does Exarchopoulos now regret talking about the humiliation she felt at the hands of Kechiche? “I don’t regret. I stand by what I said. I regret that people speak a lot about it because they don’t know what they’re speaking about. You can’t presume or summarise a human adventure.” Did she expect such a fevered reaction? “No, never. I didn’t realise the impact it would have. It

FILM

was very surprising. It hasn’t sunk in because it was so crazy.” How did she feel on the shoot? “I had a bit of a continuous feeling during shooting, but I was helped by the fact that we shot chronologically, as I could understand what was happening all the time.” Would she change anything, if she could do it all again? “No, nothing.” Blue Is the Warmest Colour has not reinvented the wheel. Few national cinemas lionise youth as brazenly as the French; few seem so earnestly enamoured of first love, sexual awakening and innocence lost. Over the last year, Olivier Assayas has released Something in the Air, about the serious art of chasing girls in the pseudo-revolutionary 70s, while his partner, Mia Hansen-Løve, has talked openly about the teenage love affair that led her to make Goodbye, First Love. The godfathers of French cinema were at it too: Jean-Luc Godard’s Pierrot le Fou is a young love story, as is François Truffaut’s Baisers volés, the sequal to Les quatre cent coups, and Eric Rohmer’s Full Moon in Paris. Blue In the Warmest Colour is more than a match for its contemporaries, even good enough to be compared to the doyens of the New Wave, because it’s taken something familiar and pushed it to its limits. Kechiche asked his actors, in not very polite terms, to go to places they will probably never go again, and he framed every moment – sexual and otherwise – in delirious and exacting close-up. First love was so intense, so immediate, so possessed of life, and he has managed to recall it in unvarnished honesty. Exarchopoulos and Seydoux may or may not now regret the experience. They may or may not have been exploited. This may or may not be tinged by Kechiche’s own latent desires. Whatever the circumstances of the shoot, we now have a film, a creation of body and soul, that will live on in undimmed romance. Exarchopoulos is right: we can’t really know what it was like. But thank you for going through it. Blue Is the Warmest Colour is released 22 Nov www.artificial-eye.com

THE SKINNY


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November 2013

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Beyond the Hair and Jeans Ahead of his November tour, Daniel Sloss reveals there’s much more to him than the ‘young hair and jeans comic’ stereotype might suggest lmost everything I read about Daniel Sloss refers to him as a ‘young comedian,’ as if the number of monotonous days clocked up on planet Earth have some bearing on the validity of what he’s doing. Surely, if someone is talented enough to be the epitome of industry success, then age is a secondary detail? On an otherwise unremarkable Edinburgh Wednesday, I camp out in one of the city’s trendier coffee shops, waiting to meet him. A comic whose career has gleefully whizzed past all of the industry benchmarks in record time: panel shows, Michael McIntyre’s Comedy Roadshow, Russell Howard’s Good News, five sell-out Fringe festivals, a live DVD and even his own TV show. This is an impressive legacy for anyone; not just someone that’s only just turned twenty-three. But again, does that even matter? I sit at a sturdy wooden table, drinking in the smell of roasting beans, and the sound of screaming steamers and thirty conversations. Daniel walks in, spies me awkwardly poking a notebook and comes to the rescue, with a hug and a much-needed coffee. He fires into a banana and a smoothie and we talk about life in “the world’s greatest job.” For every frighteningly talented person lumbered with youth, there are those who delight in picking holes. People who can’t ignore the prickling desire to buff the shine off of achievement. Is it genuine dislike? More probably they see a reflection of themselves not having done ‘enough.’ The criticism doesn’t seem to faze him, though. “It’s not the case – I just couldn’t give a fuck. I don’t let reviewers into my shows anymore. Why would I care what the one person who didn’t pay for a ticket and came to a show thinks? I would rather sell that extra ticket to someone who actually cares. When the people who pay for tickets don’t enjoy my show, that’s when I’ll listen. As long as the people in front of me are laughing, that’s what matters.” It’s a self-assured opinion that catches me off-guard, even more-so because I spend a substantial amount of my time reviewing shows. Am I the devil incarnate? I want to know more. “It’s easy to get very angry, but a lot of the time reviewers don’t realise the damage they’re doing. If you give me a one, two star review, I couldn’t give a fuck. But you’ve got other people who paid up to fifteen grand to come up, and if you just go and give them a three or a two, that could be the turning point when they decide not to be a comic, and I think that’s a horrible, horrible thing to do.” It’s unexpected to see someone who so openly delights in comedic vitriol being so vocal about the industry as a whole. With six years on the circuit, he’s in a far better place to pass comment than a humble observer. I ask him how it was growing up with an audience and if the ‘young comic’ label is haunting him. “I wouldn’t say it’s haunting me. I never begrudged it. It’s annoying when people say ‘he’s a young comic that’s funny.’ No, you’ve said that the wrong way – I’m a funny comic who just happens to be young. Funny should always be the first thing I am. I wasn’t a great stand-up when I was younger; I got very lucky in my career, because comedy is about box-ticking – absolutely – and I ticked a box. That’s why I got on television. It wasn’t because I was the best. I wasn’t even fucking close to being in the top 100 on the circuit, but I was young, and I was Scottish, and Kevin Bridges is young and Scottish... I ticked a box. I was confident, I was young – I was arguably attractive so I was going to get the young female audience, so they put me on telly, and that’s when I went ‘Aaah... I don’t want to be this...’ The fact

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that I started young has given me the success I’ve had, which has developed me into the wanky cunt that I am today, who just so happens to be able to write a good dick joke.” We spend a good five minutes discussing the masturbatory predilections of comedians, and the validity of wank-jokes as pieces of genuine observational material. They’re souvenirs of a life spent hopping between hotel rooms on your own. I wonder if being a comedian has immunised him from having to grow up quickly? “No, it’s made me grow up substantially, because I’ve got so much life experience now. I’ve travelled the world. I’ve met people I never expected to meet. I’ve done things I never thought I would do. It really makes it impossible to be racist, or homophobic, or sexist because it’s one of the most diverse jobs in the world. I’ve gotten more life experience now than most people under thirty-five, purely because they’ve gone from high-school to university, to a job, to a wife, to kids. I’ve sat on my ass and lived in my own head for six years . And I hate the term ‘self discovery,’ and that sort of hippy wank, but when you’re just in your own head constantly – and you smoke the amount of weed I do – then you discover things. Intelligence isn’t necessarily about what you know – book smarts – it’s your reasoning and your ability to work things out. ‘I’m gonna go find myself... oh, it turns out I’m lazy.’

“I can feel my comedy getting smarter. I used to be the floppyhaired cheeky shit, whereas now I’m making a point.” Daniel Sloss

“The cool thing is, I can feel myself getting better. Every time I write a new joke I think ‘Now that’s fucking good. I’m now making me laugh.’ which is nice. It sounds slightly arrogant – that’s because I really am – I can feel my comedy getting smarter. I used to be the floppy-haired cheeky shit, whereas now I’m making a point. It sounds so wanky, but it’s true; I like saying stuff that has a point. You’ll laugh harder at Jason Byrne’s show than you ever will at mine, but I’d like to think I make you think more.” Introspection with a dash of ego; a recipe for far more charm than I care to admit. I ask if he feels he’s helped strengthen the idea of young people as credible acts. “I hope so. I had a lovely compliment the other day – my PR came to see this year’s show and said it was the best he’d ever seen me. That meant a lot because ‘no – you know me.’ He’s seen all of my shit. The guy who runs The Last Laugh in Sheffield said he was genuinely impressed because he had me down as a ‘hair and jeans’ comic, because I was young. And I was almost at one point.” As if provided by the universe itself, a girl materialises at our table and mumbles “Are you Daniel Sloss?” before five minutes of genuine fan-girl adoration ensue. She references specific shows and jokes, before praising his cleverness. I stifle giggles with my empty cup as Daniel chats to her with the enthusiam and grace of someone

Photo: Jill Furmanovksy

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Interview: Vonny Moyes

genuinely thankful for what he does. When she continues on with her no doubt vastly improved day, I ask what the future holds. Will he be back on our tellies? “I want to do more stand-up on telly, but only stand-up. I did a lot when I was younger before I found my voice, and then had an audience turn up and I’d changed as a comedian and they got upset thinking ‘this isn’t what we saw, this is a lot darker than we were expecting.’ I only want to do it if I can be myself. I got asked to do Splash last year, and just thought ‘no.’ Let’s Dance for Comic Relief, and I said no – I’d rather less people knew me for being good, than more people knew me for being shit. I did some shitty telly when I

COMEDY

was young, I did some stupid things, but it’s all a learning process.” Acutely conscious of time, we make the last fifteen minutes count, jawing over vasectomies, gay penguins, dead babies and UFC before saying our goodbyes. I leave smiling, feeling that I’ve very much spent an hour glimpsing the future of comedy. It makes me excited about what’s to come. Catch Daniel on the Scottish leg of his tour 6-16 Nov, appearing in Edinburgh, two nights in Glasgow, Musselburgh, Falkirk, Aberdeen, Inverness and Dundee. For more details visit danielsloss.com

THE SKINNY


Living in Phantasy Land New Zealand’s psychedelic son returns, Connan Mockasin with Caramel, transferring his interest from dolphins to humans, and creating pop music on a whole other plane

Interview: John Thorp Photography: Elinor Jones

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onnan Mockasin hails from Te Awanga, New Zealand, a sleepy coastal idyll where the sheer force of the tide is so great that it’s eroding away the coastline at almost world-beating levels. As a younger man, he watched the property of one of his closest neighbours gradually fall into the sea. His own parents still live a few hundred metres further inland, but he simply remembers that his family had, in fact, “always wanted the beach house.” A defining sense of optimism and curiosity took Mockasin and his then band, The Mockasins, to London in 2006, where, despite running out of money very quickly, their initial style of psychedelic 60s beach pop caught the attention of various indie labels. Despite prolonged courting, eventually they all demanded a creative control that was unsurprisingly rejected by a man who would soon return to New Zealand to complete a 30-minute concept LP about a man falling in love with a sea mammal, Forever Dolphin Love. Ariel Pink might be one comparison, or even Bowie at his most experimental, although crucially, it sounded like little else of the moment. But that was then, and this is now, with Mockasin having recently finished his beautiful, occasionally beguiling follow-up, Caramel, recorded in a nameless, faceless Japanese hotel room and released as quickly as possible at his own insistence. Far from Tokyo, New Zealand or even Shoreditch, Connan Mockasin is sat with his feet outside a patio window in his current home in Whalley Range, Manchester. Wearing a silk dressing gown and rolling a cigarette, he admits that he’d planned to do the interview upstairs in bed (it is Sunday morning after all), but the hefty, heated laptop necessary to record the whole affair might make things awkward. It goes without saying that there’s an air of otherworldliness to Mockasin and his music. As well as his unusual recording methods, he has had the incredible good fortune of an accidental career that has seen him tour with Radiohead and Grizzly Bear, work with Charlotte Gainsbourg, and make a fan out of Tyler, The Creator. A recent Guardian interview perhaps overstated a recent admission that he hadn’t really listened to a record since Outkast’s Speakerboxxx/The Love Below, way back in 2003, irking several vocal readers, much to Mockasin’s bewilderment. (‘I’m an amateur producer and quite often come across other producers that do not listen to others’ craft,’ observed one commenter. ‘Personally I find them to be self absorbed and full of their own creed.’) And yet, Mockasin is far from full of his own creed, and over the course of a morning in his company, it becomes clear that there’s a well developed logic and direct method to what many industry-led performers might see as madness. “Maybe when I settle down, have a house, then I’ll get a record collection. For now, there’s just too much music; I can’t be bothered,” he reasons. “Also, when you’re working on a record, you can’t listen to other music. You can’t focus on what you’re hearing in your head.” Purity of vision seems to be a major priority. “Working out of a studio, there’s almost too many options,” he explains when asked why he chose to record Caramel alone in that aforementioned Japanese hotel room. How did the management take to his unscheduled residency? “We kept it pretty quiet in the room, it’s all just me really.” Occasionally throughout, chattering female voices float into the mix, as if the listener is inadvertently tapped into a strange, faintly melancholy party. The music on Caramel utilises a four-track, Mockasin’s bluesy guitar, a microphone and little else. “I like to try and make it

November 2013

sound as good as it can with as little as I’ve got,” he says. “Keeps it exciting.” But while he’s unable to even remember the name of said hotel, Japanese culture, and it must be said, Japanese girls in particular, feature heavily in his oeuvre. As if to illustrate this point perfectly, Mockasin’s beautiful Japanese girlfriend graces the lounge in a timely fashion. “She’s on the record actually,” he says, flashing a warm smile. “I just really felt at home in Japan. I really like the films of [Studio Ghibli founder] Hayao Miyazaki, and Japan itself has a similarly mysterious feel.” The surreal press photos for Caramel detail Connan in bed, surrounded by yet more Japanese girls. While Forever Dolphin Love was a narrative laced with fantasy, with whole songs concerning unicorns and other associated whimsy, Caramel is a much more sensual, perhaps more physical, but undoubtedly earthier release. “It’s definitely a little bit sexy-ish, a little bit flirty,” he coyly agrees. “It’s quite slick, or as slick as I could make it with the little equipment I used. I find it quite difficult to be flirty in reality, so I can do it safely on the record. Also, I was around people this time, so people were a big influence.” Indeed, I’m The Man, That Will Find You is a proper, longing love song that sees Mockasin’s falsetto croon sound determined, while Do I Make You Feel Shy?’s ‘Take me to yours and I’ll leave you / Book that hotel and I’ll please you’ goes some way to suggesting that Mockasin, terminally relaxed though he is, remains frustrated by the same desires as the rest of us. After an initial opening gambit of what unexpectedly resemble three-minute pop songs, the centrepiece of Caramel unfolds; five largely instrumental pieces entitled It’s Your Body. It’s credit to Mockasin’s soulful guitar work that the album remains compelling in the absence

of his distinctive vocals, and that Why Are You Crying? confronts listeners with over a minute of unedited female weeping to get to it. “That’s real crying,” he explains. “It didn’t start off real, but by the end, it’s real crying.”

“Psychedelic? That just means drug music, doesn’t it?” Connan Mockasin

Spontaneity apparently remains key to Mockasin. Upon his return to New Zealand, Forever Dolphin Love was only recorded at the request of his mum, and wasn’t intended to be shared with anyone in particular, nevermind with the likes of club DJ Erol Alkan, indulging his more offbeat tastes when releasing Mockasin on his carefully curated label, Phantasy. Nonetheless, he regards his continuing success as something of a fluke. “It’s just a sort of hobby that’s turned into a job,” he shrugs. Alkan is hugely attracted to Mockasin’s recording methods, not to mention his minimal record collection. Does he ever fear he’ll falter, or transpire to contrive something supposedly curious? “If I get bored or it feels like a chore, I’ll just move on and do something else,” he concludes. A brief divergence from the topic of Caramel reveals a glimpse at the potential of ‘something else.’ Right now, it could be illustration, it could even be stand-up comedy, but it might be neither. The sheer, understated confidence of Mockasin’s vision is easy to underestimate, and it’s similarly easy – not to mention frustrating – for the occasional Guardian commenter to

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wonder from where he draws such conviction. “My dad was very intelligent, he could have done much more, but he’s really quite safe,” he recalls. “Both he and my mum were very supportive of me and my brothers.” When his dad fell seriously ill earlier this year, Mockasin flew home immediately, which inadvertently allowed him the time and situation in which to record Caramel. “It was at least a well-timed illness,” he acknowledges. Given his general unfamiliarity towards most aspects of popular culture, it proves fruitless to ask Mockasin where he feels he fits among the emerging roster of psychedelic acts such as Hookworms or Melody’s Echo Chamber. In fact, he’s not sure how to feel about the ‘psychedelic’ tag in general. “I just say sensitive rock,” he stresses. “Is this new record that psychedelic? It just means drug music, doesn’t it?” On the subject of the music industry and any surrounding expectations, Mockasin seems savvy to his options, understandably keen to let little outside influence interfere with his work. However, he describes his art and creative process with such charming light-footedness that probing his methods feels somehow like asking a child how he thought a magician managed to hide a whole, living rabbit within a man’s hat. “It’s neat that people make music that can achieve a good feeling or a good mood, or a great atmosphere, that’s really nice,” he offers. “But the amount of seriousness around it, it is funny, it is a bit of a joke. And because people take it so seriously, people take things I say out of context. But I don’t even write much, I just hear things in my head and then I’ll write it down. If I think it’s good enough, I’ll record it.” Caramel is released on 4 Nov via Phantasy Sound. Connan Mockasin plays Le Guess Who? Festival, Utrecht NL on 29 Nov and Glasgow’s King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut on 22 Jan www.facebook.com/connanmockasin

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Let’s Go Adventure

Indie-kid comic Josie Long has added yet another string to her bow – she tells us about making films and why Glasgow’s “prettier than Paris”

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ention Josie Long’s name and you’re likely to be greeted with chirps of approval. Arguably the most upbeat comic on the circuit, and mind-bogglingly inventive, you’d be hard pushed to find anyone who doesn’t think the sun shines out of her corduroys. It probably does. At just 31, her CV reads like an indie-kid’s dream: award-winning stand-up comedian, writer, broadcaster and now she’s adding film-maker to that list. Embracing the DIY spirit with her pal Doug King, they’ve made two short films, Let’s Go Swimming and Romance and Adventure. The pair are hopping in a camper van, and bringing them to an indie-cinema near you, on their Let’s Go Adventure Tour. We caught up with Josie to find out a bit more about it, and what she’s been up to... Films! How exciting! Where did the ideas come from, and how did you get from the ideas stage to here? I’d always wanted to make short films but hadn’t felt like I’d had a good enough idea or met the right people to work with. Then two and a half years ago I had a bit of a personal crisis – I kind of lost faith in the life I’d made for myself in London; I ended up leaving someone and it was really painful and just broke me a bit. And much as that was no fun, I really felt like it was a massive thing, and that I wanted to try and make sense of it and write about it. Then two years ago I met Doug King, my director and collaborator, and felt like we really should work together, so it grew quite organically from there. We meet up and talk in quite a heavy way for a week, I write it up and put some jokes in and then we make it! The other actor in the films, Darren, is Doug’s best friend who’s been in his films for about 20 years, and we have a really good laugh filming together. The first film was such an exciting process that we wanted to make another one straight away, and use the same crew, locations and actors in it. You’re only 31, and you’ve contributed to a scary number of wonderful things. Do you think it’s your success as a stand up that has given you

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Interview: Vonny Moyes

the confidence to branch out into new areas? Ah, what a nice question! Nobody ever says “only 31” to me! I think finding something that I loved doing when I was still a teenager has definitely helped me to have an attitude that if I’d like to make something happen then I should try, and that it might be possible. I think too, that I’m quite greedy with my life – it’s like a buffet and I want to try everything. I also think growing up loving DIY music, zines and comics has meant that I like having an attitude that’s like ‘let’s just do this, and do it ourselves, and do it quickly. It might be a bit shoddy but we’ll have fun.’ How do you find the energy and the motivation to do so many things? Ha! I don’t know! I just really like the stuff I do and I want to get as much done as possible. I wish I did a lot more; I was recently in New York and people there are so productive I felt ashamed! But then afterwards I did gigs in Berlin and people there were so laid back I felt like Margaret fucking Thatcher or something. Cinema is quite a big departure from straight stand-up; do you see yourself going back to that, or is this a new direction for you? I really love being a stand-up, and I think I won’t ever want to stop writing and touring shows, but I’m hoping that I can keep doing both things as much as is possible, as making the films was the most fun thing I did last year. I think I was starting to feel a bit worn out by how ephemeral stand-up is: even if you record a show you never manage to capture the atmosphere of the night, which is great, but a bit hard to look back on all of your work and feel like you’ve not got enough that’s permanent to show for it. I wanted to work in a medium for a bit, where the finished project lasts a bit longer, just for my own sanity really! I also wanted to make a sad comedy, which is so much easier when you’re making a narrative thing, than onstage when people start crying or asking for refunds. What are you looking forward to most about this tour? Is there one date in particular you’re

looking forward to? I’m not trying to suck up to Scotland but the Glasgow Film Theatre is the one I’m most excited about; it’s beyond my hopes for the films that we are able to screen them there. It’s so beautiful and cool. A lot of the films are about me idealising Glasgow a bit and I do love it as a city; I think it’s prettier than Paris and more fun than anywhere else in the country, so it feels really special to screen them at the GFT.

“I did gigs in Berlin and people there were so laid back I felt like Margaret fucking Thatcher” Josie Long

You’re making another film; what can you tell us about it? It’s a low (possibly no at this stage) budget feature film that’s kind of building on the two short films we’ve made – it’s set in Glasgow again, with the same main characters, and Jesse Armstrong is helping script edit it. It’s another sad comedy about a similar character – a woman who is desperate to make a difference in the world around her but doesn’t know how, and who doesn’t get the love back that she gives out. But it’s also silly and about people mucking around with their friends and playing silly games. I’m writing the screenplay and Doug and I are currently in this weird cult-like state about it where most nights one will text the other ‘This has to happen! I am so excited!’ 2013 has been a really exciting year for women in comedy, with big wins at the Fringe; do you feel the political tide is changing in terms of women’s voices? Oh gosh, I really hope so! I was thrilled when

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Bridget Christie won the comedy award; she’s amazing and I feel like her show winning will be a good thing for all of us. We are still so drastically underrepresented though – not just on TV (although, defs on TV!) – but in most aspects of public life. When I think about how few women there are in the cabinet I feel embarrassed in front of all of the proper, grown-up countries. What’s happening with Arts Emergency? Two years on, have you made the progress you’d hoped? How can we help? YES! Arts Emergency is going great, thank you – my co-founder Neil works full time for it and this year we finally established as a charity, with a proper board of accountants, lawyers, journalists and other good people. When we started out talking about the idea three years ago we had no notion of how slow and complicated a process it is to start up an organisation like ours. Every step of the way there are a hundred questions and things to be considered! We currently have 22 young people in Hackney being mentored, our pilot year is just coming to an end and I think it’s been really successful. We’ve emboldened some young people to go to university, and to study what they love, we’ve helped connect them with all kinds of helpful people. It’s been so cool. The big thing we are doing is called the’ alternative old boy’s network’– it’s a way for anyone who’s an arts graduate, or a creative or creative professional, (or simply agrees with us that art is vital and important for society, and that your background shouldn’t be a barrier to doing what you love and having the life you want) to be ‘on call’ for the young people we work with. You guys should join up at www. bit.ly/altoldboy And finally, Peter Capaldi as The Doctor: how do you feel about that? I am so happy about it. Anyone who isn’t excited about Peter Capaldi playing Doctor Who is dead inside, 100% fact. Catch Josie and Doug on their Let’s Go Adventure Tour across the UK from 2 Nov-2 Dec Details at www.dougandjosie.com

THE SKINNY


November 2013

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08005 (2011)

Pink - Orange - Yellow - Green (4) (2013)

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SHOWCASE

THE SKINNY


08019 (2013)

David Ogle D

avid Ogle is a Liverpool-based artist and PhD researcher at The University of Liverpool in collaboration with FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology). “Exploring the concept of drawing has remained central to my practice for some years now, asking what it is to generate marks and to describe with line. “The nature of line itself has become a key consideration in much of my work and I have increasingly begun to regard it as a fundamental element, one that transcends mediums and emerges within numerous disciplines. “Line begins, it spans a distance, and ultimately it ends. It is durational; it traces a progression from one place to another. From the marks of a pencil, to a flow of prose, to the sustained oscillations of a musical note; the spatial and temporal actuality of line charts its course.

November 2013

Investigating an understanding of line in this way has led me to a practice and working methodology that is, in a sense, self-reflexive; marks that describe the process of their own making – a drawing of drawing itself. “Line can multiply across a surface; it can trace paths through space and even navigate along with the passage of time. What, then, is line, and how can we categorise its materiality and formal properties? “Flatness is perhaps the property that we most associate with drawing, but line is not restricted to a two-dimensional plane. Line can navigate space just as it does surface. The capacity to emerge within both of these contexts reveals line as something neither wholly flat nor wholly spatial; it is an abstracted, conceptual form, one whose formal properties are not anchored to material. Not flatness then, but

masslessness; it is the absence of materiality that characterises the nature of line. “This, however, raises a problem, as it is objects and their material elements that frame our experience of even the most conceptually driven work in a visual medium. How can we perceive line without material, without mass? In pursuit of this, I have attempted to work with line using a medium that is divorced from the static and sculptural nature of physical material, one that flows in constant motion and is the weightless foundation of visual perception itself: light. “Using light as a primary medium, I have increasingly questioned its connection to empty space and the reciprocal relationship that exists between light and dark – whereby one cannot exist without the other. “Just as we require silence for a sound to come to the fore, and blankness to understand

SHOWCASE

a composition on a flat surface, it is only in darkness where one can witness light return. There is a co-dependence between these opposites; they are dualities of being that are tightly bound to one another. “Our relationship to light in nature is one that is based around this duality, the daily shifting of night into day. I think it is in these transitional stages that our connection to light is at its most profound; the spectral effects of sunlight drawing a line along the passage of time as the sun arcs from horizon to horizon.” www.davidogle.co.uk Exhibiting at: Making Sense, Fallout Factory, Liverpool, until 8 Nov; Warrington Contemporary Arts Festival, until 22 Nov; Crystallize, Old Billingsgate Market, London, 4-6 Nov

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In and Out of Fashion Arriving in the capital this month, a retrospective of fashion photographer Viviane Sassen Words: Charlotte Geoghegan

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f you haven’t heard of Dutch photographer Viviane Sassen and her work, now’s the time to get clued up. The contemporary photographer is bringing her first retrospective exhibition, In and Out of Fashion to the UK this autumn and it is not one to be missed. With different pieces of her work from 1995 to 2012 on display, there’s something on show that will interest every photography enthusiast; from the fans who will know her work inside out to those who are just lovers of fashion and amazing imagery. Along with her photographic work the exhibition is littered with her notes, plans and magazines she has worked with and taken inspiration from. The centrepiece of the retrospective is a mirror, onto which 200 of Sassen’s images are projected. Sassen initially studied fashion design and worked as a model before she started studying photography in 1992. Both her artwork and her fashion photography are stamped with her signature style. However, while her art work is surreal, flamboyant and extremely personal, her fashion photography is made in a collaboration

Nightwalk AW 2013

Nightwalk is back, bursting into the Arches with an array of contemporary Scottish fashion design Words: Alexandra Fiddes

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n Thursday 7 November independent fashion event Nightwalk returns to the Arches for its third year and sixth season. Bursting onto the scene back in 2010, Nightwalk has firmly established itself as a notto-miss event on the Scottish fashion calendar. This bi-annual catwalk show prides itself on being a platform for independent labels to showcase their collections each season, hosting both established and up-and-coming designers. Angie Koorbanally, the hugely passionate organiser of the event, explained the reason for its beginnings: “It was apparent to me that the fashion industry in Scotland was growing fast, yet there was nowhere for designers to showcase their collections, unless they organised a catwalk show themselves. The time was right to start Nightwalk.” And how have things changed since 2010? “[The Scottish fashion scene] is ever-evolving. With social networking and blogging, the fashion industry has grown massively around the western world. It’s a lot easier to stay up-to-date with trends. The Scottish fashion scene is more current these days. Trends are followed but people are not afraid to be individual. That’s what fashion is all about.” With that in mind, what does Koorbanally look for in designers who want to be involved? “We look for collections that stand out for their tailoring, construction, concept and aesthetic. It takes a lot of research and time but we always find exciting names. And we like to work with people who have a passion for what they do!”

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The fashion-hungry audience can certainly look forward to seeing a huge wealth of Scottish talent this season, as Nightwalk AW 2013 will present work from a variety of designers based all around the country, this time with participants from Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Dundee, Glasgow and Orkney involved. The event has always strived to be truly representative of the contemporary fashion industry in Scotland, and by the look of the line-up, we have very high hopes for the AW 2013 offering. What is Koorbanally most looking forward to seeing at her carefully curated event? “Personally my favourite collections to see on the Nightwalk runway are the avant garde ones, the crazy theatrical garments which are totally out there. So I’m really looking forward to seeing Tracey Cochrane’s collection, giant flowers and volcano dresses – sounds exciting to me!” She’s also “Very excited about Natalie Adamson-Wain too. She uses wood in her garments and is a very exciting name on the scene right now. The calibre of participants is higher than ever and we are really excited to see all these amazing designers together.” Other designers that will surely shine on the runway include bright young designer Kirsty Elizabeth MacLennan, who was nominated as Graduate of the Year at the Scottish Fashion Awards. She will show pieces from her latest collection Black Butterflies, inspired by the life of South African poet, Ingrid Jonker. The pieces are glamorous, delicate and intricate, with stunning hand painted embellishments. MacLennan will

be in good company, as another Scottish Fashion Award Graduate of the Year nominee, Jennifer Rowland, will also be displaying her work; an edgy collection of printed lycra and laser-cut leather based on tribal body modification. Emerging Glasgow-based label Naromode (design duo Iain Macdonald and Anna Thorn) are sure to be another crowd pleaser with their collection The White Snake (after the Brothers Grimm fairytale) hitting the runway – expect utterly stunning, bold illustrated garments in silk crepe. There will also be womenswear from established brands such as Spencer Clothing, Crikey Aphrodite and Psychomoda, accessories from Kirsteen Stewart and millinery by The Little Hat Parlour. For the boys, Skinny favourite Amber Hunter will be showing her MA collection of tailored menswear. As well as the 14 designers taking part, there are around 100 individuals who contribute to the planning and smooth running of the show itself, with numerous dressers, stylists, photographers and models all part of the Nightwalk team. As part of the show (and to give the models something to strut down the 30ft runway to) there will be music by URSULA, who will create a livemixed soundtrack. Hair styling will be provided by Sassoon Salon, who will show up-to-theminute, high fashion looks suitable for the AW13 season. Models from one of Scotland’s biggest and most respected agencies, Superior Model Management, will bring the collections to life. Koorbanally explains, “I believe that Nightwalk has become an enabler for the Scottish fashion industry, that it helps people decide if they are cut out for the industry, by giving them the chance to experience a real fashion show, in Scotland.” At only £12.50 a ticket, available from the Arches’ website, Nightwalk AW 2013 is a must for anyone who wants to discover, appreciate and support Scottish design talent. Missing out is not an option – get your tickets now!

FASHION

with a large team of people. Sassen has said that for her fashion photography is a place where she can work spontaneously while assisted by a team, almost like a laboratory where the photographs are the experiment. By working with small, underground magazines, Sassen was not caged by convention and was able to take a more playful and creative approach to fashion photography. Some of the work she has done for magazines like Purple and Dazed & Confused are on show throughout the exhibition, as well as some of her more recent work for clients such as ACNE and Louis Vuitton. In and Out of Fashion will open on 19 Oct and will be staying at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh until the 2 Feb. Although its only stop in the UK is in Edinburgh, the good news is there is no admission charge, so for those who don’t live in the capital, all it will cost is the train fare! 19 Oct 2013 – 2 Feb 2014 Admission free www.nationalgalleries.org

@NightwalkEvents Tickets: £12.50 phone 0141 565 1000, in person at box office or online at www.thearches.co.uk Doors 7.30pm, show at 8pm, drinks until 1am www.facebook.com/pages/NightwalkEvents/116177201780944

THE SKINNY


Intricate Architectures Interview: Jessica Campbell

Photo: Emerson Utracik

Inspired by the Gothic, Amy Davidson’s laser-cut leathers have taken her from Manchester to the Royal College of Art. She discusses her influences and aspirations

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ecent Manchester School of Art graduate Amy Davidson has many talents. In addition to putting together a beautifully sculptured yet intricate graduate collection, Davidson proved her versatility by creating a range of bags that led to her success at Graduate Fashion Week earlier this year. With her suitcase-style bags reflecting her collection concept of Gothic architecture, Davidson caught the eye of a panel of judges at Mulberry, impressing them with her ‘incredible attention to detail’ and ‘beautifully considered use of material.’ She went on to win the prestigious Mulberry Accessories Award outright. “I couldn’t believe it,” she says. “The competition was tough this year so I was overwhelmed with joy. It also gave me the confidence to keep designing and thinking of new ideas.” This was an exceptional achievement for any designer, but particularly for someone like Davidson, who has had no formal training in accessory design. She explains why she chose to include bags alongside her womenswear collection. “It’s good to have an open mind when I’m designing,” she says. “In my fashion studies I always used wood and plastic and attached them to garments, so I tried to use the same materials in accessories and I really enjoyed the new process.” Growing up in Ashton-under-Lyne, Greater Manchester, Davidson explains how she has always had an artistic side. “I always loved to draw and sew,” she recalls. “I wanted to choose something where I could do both, so I studied fashion and fell in love with it.” Her fashion journey began at Tameside College, where she studied Fashion and Clothing, before going on to study a BA (Hons) in Fashion at Manchester School of Art. She credits the School of Art for helping her achieve her chosen career path: “I couldn’t have done it without their

November 2013

support,” she says. Like many designers, Davidson undertakes an extensive design process before she can achieve her unique creations. “I like to spend a lot of time researching and collecting great imagery to influence my design development. Then I try to find fabrics and trims that relate to my project and then put the two together.” Describing her work as considered, original, and creative, Davidson believes that studying in the Northwest has inspired her work. “It influenced me to look at architecture, and I learned how to translate inspiration that is not typically fashion-related into a garment or a bag.” It was this architectural influence that ended up literally shaping her graduate collection. “The inspiration for my collection came from my travels in France last summer,” she says. “I visited a few cathedrals and fell in love with the intricate details found around the buildings and on the ceilings. I also love things that are delicate, like lace; you can see the skill and time that went into making something like that. My fascination with both these things led me to design detailed laser-cut patterns inspired by Gothic imagery. I chose to use the colours black and silver because they are the colours most used in my research and work best with the look I tried to achieve.” The development of her laser-cutting technique and her use of unfashionable materials made such an impact that she hopes to rely on the same techniques in the future to create something new and exciting. Now living in London after being accepted to one of the most distinguished and soughtafter MA courses at the Royal College of Art, Davidson is on track for success. For her MA she has decided to focus on menswear accessories, an intriguing choice for a designer who produced a womenswear graduate collection – yet this is

another exciting dimension to Davidson’s work, and proof of her versatility. Davidson’s transition to the Royal College of Art has affected her work in a positive way. “My workplace at the Royal College is beautiful, I’m on the top floor and I have a great view across London and of the Royal Albert Hall. We have industrial leather sewing machines that help us work to professional standard.”

“I love things that are delicate, like lace; you can see the skill and time that went into making something like that” Amy Davidson

Once she has completed her MA she hopes to go on to work in the fashion industry. “I would love to have my own brand one day but I want to have enough knowledge and understanding of every aspect of a brand before I do it on my own.” With this in mind, her dream career plan is to firstly work with fashion and accessory giants Mulberry or Marc Jacobs. “They design stylish accessories that are clean and sophisticated, which I’m really interested in,” she says. “I love the quality of finish and the craftsmanship in each item.” Davidson also considers J.W. Anderson as a designer she would be honoured to work with, due to his understanding of “the

FASHION

balance between menswear and womenswear” and how he “isn’t afraid to switch roles by having a man in a ‘feminine’ lace top.” His androgynous style is an element she likes to reference in her own work. Compared to her own exciting yet relatively conceptual fashion designs, Davidson opts to dress herself casually for everyday. She describes her down-to-earth personal style as “usually practical and functional.” She tends to wear comfortable clothing such as textured jumpers with soft skirts and skinny jeans with shirts. It’s no surprise, then, when she claims Alexa Chung to be her fashion icon. “She is effortless in the way she dresses. She does not try to stand out and is not too glamorous, she mixes tailored pieces and feminine classics.” Ever ambitious, Davidson spent some time during the summer finalising her bag designs to a professional standard. Alongside her studies, Davidson now has a sideline selling her accessories on Etsy. She also makes bags to order, with prices ranging from £40 to £200. (Any enquires should go directly to amydavidson@live. co.uk) There will also be the opportunity to catch Davidson’s work when she showcases and sells pieces at Lustre, a contemporary craft market in Nottingham’s Lakeside Arts Centre, on 9 and 10 November. With her unique designs and clever ideas, Amy Davidson is definitely a designer to watch. The question is, will she focus her craft on accessory design or return to her former roots as a womenswear designer? Or maybe she’ll excel at both practices. With her obvious talent, anything is possible. amydavidson@live.co.uk @Amyloudavidson amydavidson.wix.com/amydavidson

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Discover the area, check what’s around, food to fill up your larder, fab street food to eat as you shop, drinks, crafts & fun. A great day out for all the family

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THE SKINNY


Eating It App There’s lots of food out there, and sometimes you need a little help to sift through it. Help like an app, perhaps. We rummage through the biscuit tin that is the world of mobile applications to find you one that isn’t completely broken

Words: Peter Simpson Illustration: Luke Brookes

Around the World in 20 Drinks: Australia In the penultimate stop on our booze-soaked tour of the globe, we visit a country where size and strength are everything, and the animals go on drunken rampages Words: Peter Simpson

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ustralia has what one might deem a ‘complex’ relationship with alcohol. It’s a relationship best summed up through two recent anecdotes. We’ll start with the one involving the pig. Swino was a feral pig who achieved considerable fame earlier this year when he broke into a campsite in northern Australia and drank 18 cans of beer left unattended by campers. Once spotted, Swino ran away, tried to fight a cow, then fell in a river. Swino hailed from the same part of the country as the Darwin Stubby, the world’s largest commercially-available bottle of beer. It measures up at 2.25 litres, and is an ideal gift for the beer fan in your life who also has a soft spot for The Borrowers. 2.25 litres, by the way, is just under 7 cans’ worth, or four-tenths of a Swino. Now Victoria Bitter is one of Australia’s most famous beers, and something of an iconic beverage in the country. Several years ago, its makers decided to fiddle with the formula a little, with one of the changes cutting the alcohol content by three-tenths of one percent. Here in the UK, the natural response would be to start some kind of twee social media campaign with hashtags and the like, but one Australian man decided to use slightly simpler methods to get things sorted. “I am not f***g happy with the taste of the ‘new’ product you are providing,” the anonymous consumer wrote, “and you can shove it up your arse! Next thing you know I’ll be drinking f***g lattes on the side of the road! So what the f**k is going on?” Needless to say, the letter went global, and things were soon back to normal thanks to one man’s mildly aggressive yet deftly-censored letter. So that’s alcohol and Australia – there’s lots of beer, the pigs get crunk, and the drinkers come over all poetic if you mess with their booze. All of a sudden, the huge annual gap year exodus to Australia makes a lot more sense...

November 2013

Untappd

A social network for beer drinkers, Untappd allows enthusiasts to share their reviews of their favourite tipples, mark out what’s available where, and keep track of which bottles behind the bar they’ve yet to take on. Good idea, very current, all lovely. One problem – you have to have an Untappd account for the app to be any use. That is to say it won’t load anything at all until you hand over your email address. Pubs may have a whole host of problems, from insufficient seating to the occasional presence of dogs that everyone has to just tolerate for some reason, but no member of bar staff has ever interrupted a punter mid-order to shout ‘PLEASE ENTER USERNAME AND PASSWORD.’ Not to say we wouldn’t welcome that as a hilarious development – bar persons of Scotland, our email address is at the front of the mag, YouTube clips will suffice.

Platter

‘Food porn’ – that’s a thing that dour people refer to. Taking pictures of food in a way that makes it look appetising – what’s next, using a fork for your noodles because it’s winter in Scotland and handling chopsticks with cold hands is like playing football with canoes strapped to your feet? Platter is the acceptable face of food porn, combining lots of colour-corrected photos of other people’s dinners with information on how to make said dinners. Users can tag their photos with the ingredients used, allowing others to misinterpret quantities and ratios to create a completely different dish. A photo of this dish can then be posted on Platter, thus ensuring its

place as the first ever perpetual motion machineslash-food photography app.

British St. Food

Now this should be right up our street. A sleek and swanky interface, an intelligent map interface that doesn’t automatically assume you’re living in the developer’s house, and a chance to get some on-trend street food? British St. Food, you are spoiling us. Well, you would be, if this were the Northwest edition of this fair magazine. As it is, British St. Food in Scotland is a bit like a high-powered yet austere car with no wheels or passenger side door. On our test, we walked past several prominent street food spots in central Edinburgh, waving our phones in their direction in the vague hope that our screens would tell us what we could literally see in front of our eyes. Wait, what’s this? All the info in this app is provided directly by the street food vendors? Right, this is fixable. Street food types of Edinburgh and Glasgow – get your phones out, then we’ll all be able to find you without having to find you. This would be good.

Evernote Food

So you want to cook something, but you can’t decide what. It’s a common problem, and one that we can well understand and would quite like a fix for. Now, do you live in a particularly large branch of Tesco? If so, Evernote Food is the app for you. Pulling together recipes from across the web in a nice format complete with arty cropping of the food photography, Evernote Food can give out hundreds of ideas for the evening’s eating, letting you save the recipes you like most to the

FOOD AND DRINK

app so you’ll never lose them. Unfortunately, there’s no way of seeing what’s in any of the recipes before you click through, so you’ll spend a while flicking back and forward between recipes trying to find something achievable. By ‘a while’ we mean all evening, and by ‘flicking back and forward’ we mean picking shards of iPhone screen out of the wall because who has two kinds of marsala to hand when they’re short of ideas and just want to use some chicken up AAAGH.

Foodspotting

Basically, what we’re looking for is an app that shows us nice pictures of food then tells us where that food is. A Foodspotting app, as it were. What, really? The name and everything? Yes, Foodspotting is a brilliant food app. Load it up and bam! Loads of user-submitted photos of the best food near you. The map view plays like a cross between food porn and an aerial bombing raid. Pick a bit of your city, press a button and boom! Thumbnails of tasty-looking food appear all over the place, with directions and links and everything. You can set up your own little spotters’ network if you don’t have enough social interaction points to manage as it is, or you can do absolutely everything without signing up at all. It’s intuitive, it’s well-presented, and it can show you what your dinner will look like before you even leave the house. It may also be food journalism’s SkyNet moment, so please don’t download it. All apps are free on Android and iPhone; while you’re online, vote in our Food and Drink survey at tinyurl.com/ foodsurveyscotland

Lifestyle

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Phagomania: Dude, Where’s My Food?

Food News

Meet a wild maverick, breaking all the rules and spreading the joy of crazy food and potential health complications. Could Dude Foods be our greatest Phagomania guest ever?

Interview: Lewis MacDonald

November’s food round-up keeps things simple, and throws in some free beer while it’s at it Words: Peter Simpson Illustration: Eva Dolgyra

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his insatiable McEverything. This simple stunt involved ordering and piling high (bamboo stick aided) the full 42 burger menu of McDonalds. I know what you’re thinking: how wasteful? Profligate even? “If I was just making these ridiculous creations and then throwing them away then yeah, go right ahead and criticise me,” Nick retorts. “But I’m really not wasting any of it. The truth is, I eat every single thing I make and never throw any of it away.” I know what you’re thinking: how nutritionally unsustainable? “At some point it might catch up with me, but it definitely hasn’t so far,” Nick reflects. “It’s like running a race, you don’t just one day say, ‘hey, I’m going to compete in this marathon,’ you have to work up to it. I’ve pretty much been eating this way forever so I like to tell people that I basically trained my whole life for this.” This marathon isn’t ending anytime soon, so keep up to speed with Dude Foods’ crazy concoctions on his site. Let’s hope we see Nick at the finish line, and that we can match his hectic pace.

hen pitching your food-based event, there are a number of things to consider. Got to get the venue right, do your market research, decide whether to make your staff wear humiliating lanyards or more humiliating uniforms. You also need a cool, memorable name – a name like Cambolicious. Yes, it’s Cambolicious, the East Neuk of Fife’s premier bi-annual craft beer festival. There will be beer from some of the best craft breweries from Fife and beyond, there will be food and music, and apparently there’s even going to be table football if that’s a deal-breaker. But above all else, it will be an opportunity to drink beer while saying the word ‘Cambolicious’ a lot. Go on, enjoy it, it is a cracking name. Sat 9 Nov, Cambo Estate nr St Andrews, £10, cambolicious.com Culinary puns involving country estates are great, but sometimes a simple event name is just as good. A name like Glasgow Beer Week, for example. Back for a third year, the Beer Week will bring all manner of tastings and tap takeovers under its mighty umbrella, with the centrepiece event being the Scottish finals of the SIBA beer competition. There will be lots of nice beer, in Glasgow, for a week. Nice and straightforward. 1-9 Nov, various venues, glasgowbeerweek.com Straightforward also happens to be the byword for our annual Food and Drink Survey. This month sees your last chance to name your favourite pho, top tapas, best beer, and quintessential food-that-begins-with-Q. Go to tinyurl. com/foodsurveyscotland to cast your vote Much less straightforward is the pop-up bar/mechanic service/barbershop being provided by the Belgian beer Heverlee this month. Let us explain – Heverlee are taking a speciallydesigned mobile bar around various barbers and bike shops in Edinburgh and Glasgow, and giving away free beer to hirsute hipsters as they go about their business. Free booze for folk with unkempt facial hair and run-down second hand bicycles – that, reader, is what we call ‘knowing your audience.’ Various venues and dates, heverlee.com for details. This month does conclude with another simple and straightforward event to sink your teeth into. Perth’s Festival of Chocolate scarcely warrants an explanatory blurb as that name does all the work, but key points to note are that the Festival is outdoors (like Glastonbury!) and features demonstrations and workshops (like a university class!) Take advantage of this simplicity while you can folks, for Christmas is coming, and that’s never easy. 22-24 Nov, King Edward St, Perth.

www.dudefoods.com

tinyurl.com/foodsurveyscotland

BACON WEAVE TACO

SWEET & SOUR WONTON CONE

DEEP FRIED NACHO CHEESE

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f you mash together popular US TV guzzle-’emup Man v. Food with the bizarre and unsettling antics of Heston Blumenthal, the smashed patty that remains is Nick Chapman of DudeFoods. com. An alchemy of meat, cheese, desserts and frying, what Nick hasn’t turned into a taco, burger or sandwich isn’t worth thinking about. Nick’s work consists solely of the type of ideas we Brits may talk of but would never dare try. Here’s a brief menu of Nick’s recent creations: crumbled Oreo-coated deep fried cookies with cream ice cream; a hash brown bun breakfast sandwich (his answer to September’s ramen noodle burger); sweet and sour chicken in a wonton cone; chicken and waffle wings (chicken wings ‘breaded’ with actual waffles); beer and baconbattered deep-fried Krispy Kreme doughnuts. Yep, you read right. Then there are the ‘sandwiches,’ if they can be called that. There’s the Inside Out Grilled Cheese Sandwich – cheese, bread and cheese – or the 100% Cheese Grilled Cheese Sandwich (cheese, cheese and cheese). Or maybe you fancy the Bacon Weave Taco, or its Choco brother filled with vanilla ice cream.

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I know what you’re thinking: how bloody American? But Nick has been approaching these heavyweight knockouts with craft, humour, and even a bit of finesse. Working hard at it like an outsider artist, Nick had no previous chef experience, which may be his secret. “The fact that I’ve never even worked in a restaurant helps me as

“I like to tell people that I basically trained my whole life for this” Nick Chapman

well because I really have no preconceived notions about what should or shouldn’t go together in the kitchen,” states Nick, “so I’m just experimenting all the time to come up with this stuff.” Experimenting in public has certainly paid off for Nick. His crowning achievement has been

FOOD AND DRINK

THE SKINNY


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November 2013

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21/10/2013 16:53

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Malawi On My Mind Our writer takes a trip to the ‘warm heart of Africa’

Words: Gillian Provan

Tea plantations at Mulanje

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eep your head down, avoid eye contact and ignore strangers on the street – that’s how we go about business in the UK. After spending time in Malawi, a country where greetings, waves and even hugs are offered unconditionally to visitors, it’s difficult readjusting to the guarded British way of life. They don’t call it the warm heart of Africa for nothing – the southeastern country is credited as having the friendliest people around. And those people are the reason why my two weeks in Malawi, and my first proper visit to Africa, were among the most exciting, cheap and safe days I’ve ever spent abroad. As someone who would never even have the confidence to take a solo trip to the cinema, the thought of taking three flights and then travelling for 24 hours to spend a fortnight in a strange country on my own was a prospect that concerned me. However, backpackers, locals and guidebooks assured me that with English as an official language and low crime rates, Malawi is one of the safest places for female travellers to go. Jumping into a taxi (between $30 and $40 from the airport to Lilongwe) to get to my accommodation, everything is new and fascinating. On what appears to be the main road in and out of the capital there are few cars, but cyclists can be seen pedalling furiously in the heat, and people are walking everywhere. Stands selling mobile phone top-ups in the middle of a barren stretch of land, men taking a rest under traffic signs and ladies balancing water on their heads and carrying babies on their backs instantly tell me I’m far from home. My few days in Lilongwe are split between backpacker favourite Mabuya Camp, and the pricier $59 a night Kiboko Hotel. At Mabuya travellers can stay in the luxury of a chalet for $25 a night or camp for $6. Lilongwe is such a spread out city that it’s impossible to take it all in by foot. The state-ofthe-art Parliament built by the Chinese stands proudly in Area 40 beside conference centres and offices, while only a few streets away there are curios selling wooden carvings and paintings in the Old Town. There’s little in the way of green space in the city, and for those longing to find somewhere to rest from the heat, the Lilongwe Nature Sanctuary is the ideal place. While there are few opportunities for people

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watching, there’s an unusual collection of birds and a network of trails through the forest lining the Lingadzi River. Entry is under 50p (200 kwacha) and it’s worth it to get an escape from the chaotic, traffic-jammed city life. Next door is the Lilongwe Wildlife Centre, a rescue shelter where hourly tours treat visitors to sightings of blue monkeys, leopards and of course Bella, the one-eyed lioness who was rescued from a zoo in Romania. My visit to the capital is for the City of Stars festival – a two-day programme of music, comedy, theatre, film and dance organised by the team behind the Lake of Stars festival. Fringe events, including a poetry night at the National Library featuring iconic Malawian writer Jack Mapanje reveal the dynamic arts movement thriving in the city. The Living Room in Area 4 now hosts weekly documentary film, acoustic and poetry nights and there are slots for local musicians at Serendipity in the Old Town Mall. Darkness may loom at 6pm but it certainly doesn’t mean bedtime in the city. Although the festival bill, which included Glasgow DJs Auntie Flo and Esa Williams and Edinburgh band Bwani Junction, is unlikely to return to Lilongwe, the event signals an ideal way of attracting backpackers to the often forgotten capital. Growing up across the bridge from the David Livingstone Centre in Blantyre, I was keen to visit the Blantyre in Malawi. While politicians and ambassadors favour Lilongwe, bankers and financiers can be found in Blantyre, Scotland. Multistorey office blocks and banks fill Malawi’s oldest city, and after wandering around the commercial districts I’m relieved to find a Tourist Information centre where I make plans to go to the Museum of Malawi. This marks my first experience of a Malawian minibus. Arriving at the stop I’m bombarded by men asking where I’m going – who can fill up a minibus first seems to be an ongoing competition between the drivers. I’m redirected onto a 16-seater vehicle, and before I can even question the lack of space I find myself sitting on some poor passenger’s knee. My visit to the small museum coincides with the recent launch of National Museums Scotland’s exhibition celebrating the bicentenary of Dr David Livingstone, in collaboration with their Malawian counterparts

with letters, sketches and objects from the explorer’s travels are on display. With newfound confidence in my ability to navigate the minibus network, later in the week I take a trip to Mulanje – the tallest mountain in south-central Africa. A hike up the mountain and stay in the huts takes two to three days, involves lots of planning and booking a porter but I just want to see the landmark and the tea plantations that surround it. The two-hour trip which costs 1000 kwacha (less than £2) is certainly memorable. I see men run off the bus and board again after the police checkpoint. I’m crammed beside two men and a family of four in a four-seater row, and at each stop the bus is surrounded by people knocking on windows selling water, rolls, corn on the cob and cabbages. Mulanje town is a nice break from city life and my walk up through the tea plantations ends up being a really special afternoon when I bump into motorcycle instructor Wycliffe on his lunchtime jog. For the next few hours Wycliffe tells me about the politics, economics and health problems of the region, and I’m warned that it’s dangerous to walk alone on the mountain – not because of thieves or gangs but because the spirits do not like foreigners. Close to Blantyre is the Liwonde National Park. Unfortunately I run out of time for a three day safari there but I’m told there’s no shortage of operators who can organise trips to see the hippos, elephants and crocodiles at the game reserve, or there’s the option of hiring your own car to do it yourself. With a limited amount of time I instead chose to visit the country’s famous Lake Malawi. Two hours out of Lilongwe is Senga Bay, as one of Malawi’s biggest fishing communities by day the beach is lined with boats getting ready for an evening hunting for kapenta fish and by night it’s a twinkling sea of torch lights searching for the creatures. Cool Runnings is a guesthouse overlooking the gorgeous sandy beaches and tranquil Lake Malawi. It’s definitely my favourite lodgings of the fortnight with delicious food and quirky furnishings, and a host of opportunities for volunteers ranging from blood donations to coaching football teams in the village. Walking along the water front reveals much about local life. I find children running up to me

TRAVEL

for hugs and photos, ladies washing their clothes and men sewing their fishing nets. For $50 I take a trip out to Lizard Island, a craggy rock which is a popular spot for swimming and snorkelling. For a little more money you can sail out to the tropical fish and crocodile farms near Kambiri Point. It’s worth noting that bilharzia – an infection caused by a parasite worm – can be caught swimming in the lake, so it’s important to check in with the doctor when you return home. From Senga Bay I decide to see more of the lake around the Mangochi area and in planning my journey completely forget that African time is more leisurely and laidback than British time. I end up waiting three hours for the coach to Mangochi. I have to stand on board for two out of the five hours. The horrifically cramped and claustrophobic conditions are worth it though for the gorgeous views and quiet beaches at Monkey Bay. A combination of poor research and forward planning leads me to spend two nights in the oldest building in Mangochi town – the Villa Tafika Lodge, where for 20,000 kwacha (or £40) I, as the only guest, have to haggle with taxi drivers, fight off salesmen and dine and dress by candlelight when the electricity cuts out. A short drive out of town, and I’m given the chance to visit the home that cares for up to 40 young orphans in Mangochi. I pop into two of the project’s nursery schools and feeding stations that educate hundreds of children in the area. At the Open Arms Mangochi facility it’s emotional to meet the 27 babies, aged between one day old and two years, who have been abandoned by their families or lost their parents through HIV/Aids and other diseases. A team of 35 staff care for the orphans during the most vulnerable first two years of their life and then, where possible the child is reunited with a grandmother or aunt. Spending time playing games, singing and feeding the children is a day that will stick in my mind forever. As a tourist Malawi is a stunningly scenic country with fantastic people, gorgeous sights and great culture. There is poverty and a real need for foreign aid, but it shouldn’t just be viewed as a charity case. With sun, sandy beaches and delicious food it is a perfect holiday destination just waiting to be discovered. www.malawitourism.com

Fishing boats

THE SKINNY


Last chance for a Scottish lap-dance? Twinkle discusses a recent government consultation which could have serious consequences for Scotland’s lap-dancing industry

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ith a burlesque boom and the breakthrough of fitness-fad pole dancing, stripping has shirked off some of its seedy champagne-room reputation like an unwanted brassiere. Many women reclaim the pole as empowering rather than exploitative, embracing striptease as an art form. Even A-list female celebrities have been hitting the titty bars and have been papped raining dolla on twerking lap dancers. Part time pole-dancing and celebrity endorsement may show stripping has gone mainstream, but the industry behind the velvet curtains remains a moral grey area for many. Talk of criminal underworld connections, fears of prostitution and rumour of human trafficking dominate public discussion about strip clubs in the UK. Rights campaigners wage war against the industry, viewing it as male-dominated, degrading and dangerous to the women caught up in it. Stricter regulation on the industry has now been proposed which could see strip clubs in Scotland close for good. A Scottish Government consultation released in June 2013 has outlined how stricter regulation of strip clubs in Scotland might look. Currently regulated under alcohol licenses, the venues would also require a secondary license – the Sexual Entertainment License – under the proposed regime. Strip club owners would be required to apply for a new sexual entertainment license annually and local authorities would have rights to set limits on the number of strip clubs in their area. This would give councils the power to set their sexual entertainment venue limit at zero on any given year, which could lead to a collective eradication of the industry.

November 2013

Illustration: Zhang Liang

“Activities such as lap dancing are unregulated,” said Jan McLeod of Glasgow Women’s Support Project, one of many groups in support of a change in legislation. “Alcohol licensing was never an appropriate attempt at regulation. There is evidence of sexual harassment, stalking, assault, coercion and prostitution associated with these activities, although that is not to say that these concerns apply to every person involved nor to every venue. It is necessary for the government to look at what can be put in place to regulate these activities and to do what is necessary to reduce harassment and exploitation.” The Women’s Support Project define adult entertainment such as lap-dancing as “part of a spectrum of commercial sexual exploitation [that] contributes to a culture in which women are viewed as objects available for sexual gratification” and say that it plays a role in “normalising sexual violence against women.” White Ribbon Scotland, the Scottish branch of a male-run feminist organisation who campaign against gender violence, share this view point. Their response to the consultation spells out their wish to wipe out the industry in Scotland: “Sexual Entertainment Venues should not exist in a Scotland free of violence against women, and regulation on behalf of the state condones their existence.” While many Scottish strip club owners welcome further regulation of the industry, they reject accusations that their clubs are hotbeds of harassment, prostitution and exploitation. Steven McDonald, owner of Diamond Dolls Glasgow and Baby Dolls Edinburgh, is one club owner who has been an active campaigner and spokesperson for Scotland’s sexual

entertainment industry in recent years. Steven is head of the Association of Adult Entertainment Venues (AAEV) which represents 17 strip clubs in Scotland, and was involved in the 2010 parliamentary process that saw a similar sexual entertainment licensing proposal rejected. Steven believes the consultation holds no weight and that attempts to close premises are the result of a perpetual smear campaign against the Scottish strip club industry. “Our feeling towards the consultation is that it sets out to cause fear and alarm from the very first paragraph,” said Steven. “If you read the wording, most people outside the industry would perceive that there are these sorts of issues [trafficking, harassment] in clubs. I don’t blame the public for thinking like that when reading it, but there’s no proof of it as far as we’re aware, they’re creating a problem out of nothing. It’s driven by women’s groups fuelled by the misconception of exploitation. I’d refute that. If you’re coming into this free of choice, earning money in a safe environment and you decide it’s not for you, you have the freedom to stop.” Shane Manning, manager of Private Eyes Inverness, also refutes criminal accusations levied against the industry. Shane faced opposition from the Highland Violence Against Women Strategy Group and local religious groups when opening his club, the first of its kind in the Highlands, in 2013, but claims he gained a positive response from the rest of the community. He believes there is no weight to claims of criminality in the industry, and that the draft legislation is a question of morality and personal taste. “There’s no evidence. It’s a morality issue,” said Shane. “If you don’t like it or don’t want it, don’t

DEVIANCE

come. It would be like vegetarians trying to close down all McDonalds – if it’s not your cup of tea, that’s OK, but don’t take away everyone else’s chance of entertainment or how they choose to be entertained. I’ve been involved in four clubs, and never – not on one occasion, have I encountered prostitution, illegal immigration, trafficking or anything of the sort. Not one occurrence.” An estimated 350 lap-dancers work in clubs across Scotland in under 20 venues, and many have taken to social media to campaign against the threat of club closure and potential loss of jobs. As no ‘grandfather rights’ are set out in the Government’s proposal – rights that would give existing club owners special dispensation when licensing laws change – the likelihood of existing premises closing is heightened. The existence of similar sexual entertainment licensing in England and Wales may also encourage the Scottish Government to follow suit. “There’s an apparent danger of experienced operators having to close as a result of changes to the law, despite premises operating without difficulty or injury to anyone for several years,” said licensing expert Stephen McGowan, partner and head of licensing Scotland at TLT Solicitors. “We’re talking about a small industry of 20 or less venues in Scotland who through no fault of theirs could be closed down due to individuals’ moral perception, regardless of police not having any issues with the premises. As for the industry, I believe the industry is used to and welcomes regulation. The operators of these premises don’t fear regulation, they fear being closed down because of a morally subjective stance.”

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Fireplace Acoustic Sessions

Woodlands Road Glasgow

November 7th:

FREE ENTRY 9.00pm

Friends in America + Guest

November 14th: Finn LeMarinel + Guest November 21st: Randolph’s Leap + Guest November 28th: Honeyblood + Lightguides

There Will Be Fireworks Album out 25th Nov Launch Party 22nd Nov @ SWG3, Glasgow

Blood Relatives Album out now

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24/10/2013 17:23

09/10/2013 16:04

THE SKINNY


Gig Highlights

A varied month in gigs sees the return of titans Queens of the Stone Age and Nick Cave’s Bad Seeds, post-punk mob Savages, synth-heads Ubre Blanca, and a sublime double-header from Mount Kimbie and oOoOO

Words: Illya Kuryakin

orget April, November is the cruellest month. The encroaching consumerist spend-fest that is Xmas approaches (we refuse to call it Christmas, not this month... Carcass are playing), looming over the horizon, “slouching towards Bethlehem” as the poet Yeats might have it. The weather descends into an apocalyptic blend of torrential rain and winds that could cut steel. You may as well stay indoors, right? Wrong! Because November has more awesome gigs crammed into it than Santa’s bulging sack. You’d better believe it. On 1 Nov, miserablists supreme Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds come to Edinburgh’s Usher Hall, to play tracks from the deliriously wellreceived Push The Sky Away, and a few classics from their voluminous back catalogue. Cave is one of the few giants of modern music whose shoulders could bear the weight of the title ‘greatest living songwriter’ – from his early start in The Birthday Party, through the PJ Harvey and Kylie-courting Murder Ballads, to the feral intensity of Grinderman, his work is truly deserving of legendary status. Staying in Edinburgh, the Queens Hall gets a visit from gravel-voiced ex-Screaming Trees/ QOTSA bellower and occasional Soulsaver Mark Lanegan on 4 November. With two albums out this year to draw on – covers collection Imitations, and Black Pudding, his collaboration with Duke Garwood – Lanegan, like Cave, will be spoiled for choice when it comes to picking a few classics. On 5 November, veteran hardcore and math-rock titans Dillinger Escape Plan are set to blow up the Garage in Glasgow. Latest album One Of Us Is The Killer garnered some serious praise on its release this year, but it’s their frantic live shows that really impress. On 10 November, justly-hyped post-punk art-rockers Savages return to Glasgow to play the Classic Grand, still touting the delectable wares from their striking debut Silence Yourself. With tasteful nods to the likes of Bauhaus and Siouxsie and the Banshees, this mob are as punishingly upfront as they are politically astute. On 8 November, the Glasgow institution that is Stereo celebrates its 6th birthday – home to top-notch vegan nosh, excellent beer, and a bewildering array of punters with trendy beards and Skrillex-a-like haircuts, Stereo has become a mainstay of the bustling Glasgow live scene. They celebrate in style with live sets from a huge bill of local faces, including Duncan Harvey, The Yawns, Julia Scott, and a DJ set from Cry Parrot. Deap Vally’s two-woman, guitar, drums and

Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds

vox setup does recall the White Stripes, but their DNA is also infected with a healthy dose of epic, Led Zeppelin-esque classic rock, and front-woman Lindsey Troy has both the lung capacity and attitude of a young Janis Joplin. They’ll be playing the hits from debut album Sistronix at The Liquid Room, Edinburgh, on 11 November, and Glasgow’s Òran Mór the following night. When it comes to death metal, there is perhaps no band more feted in the current crop of doom-merchants than Sweden’s Amon Amarth. Touring this year’s well-received Deceiver of the Gods at maximum volume, they are joined by another veteran band – Liverpudlian extreme metallers Carcass, whose album Surgical Steel dropped in early 2013. Their Defenders of the Faith co-headline tour rolls through Glasgow’s Barrowland on 14 November. Unarguably the greatest modern rock band in existence (cue, we imagine, a great many arguments), Josh Homme’s current lineup for Queens of the Stone Age includes shit-mental drummer Jon Theodore of The Mars Volta. As a result, their live sound has been considerably beefed up, with fans comparing Theodore’s reign on the skins to Dave Grohl’s storied run. Latest album ...Like Clockwork was a blinder as well – don’t miss them as they blow through town on 16 November, playing the SECC in Glasgow. Our featured New Blood band Ubre Blanca release their debut EP Polygon

Mountain on 16 November. To celebrate, the duo, comprised of Andy Brown (ex-Divorce) and Joel Stone (ex-Shitdisco) will be joined by Sheffield’s Unmade Bed and doomy Glaswegian synth-pop chanteuse Hausfrau. Catch them at the Old Hairdressers – this one will be unmissable for fans of classic synth scores by Carpenter, Goblin and Vangelis. Sigur Rós bring their magisterial postrock to Edinburgh’s Usher Hall on 18 November, focusing on the sounds of latest album Kveikur. The same night, over at Electric Circus in Edinburgh, singer, songwriter and composer Gary Lucas plays a rare gig – the man behind the band Gods and Monsters, which featured a young Jeff Buckley for a spell, he is a prolific collaborator, with a list of musical allies too long to mention, but including names like Captain Beefheart, Lou Reed and John Cale, Nick Cave, John Zorn and a host of others. To see him perform in such an intimate setting will be a rare treat. The Pixies, sans Kim Deal, roll through the Barrowlands on 22 November. Despite Deal’s departure, the band have been garnering rave reviews for their recent live gigs, and new singles have provided a taste of the old magic. A setlist packed with classics, and, reports suggest, a cover of The Fall’s New Big Prinz, can be expected. The same night, their Surfer Rosa producer Steve Albini’s respected post-hardcore band Shellac play Edinburgh’s Liquid Room, heading

Photo: Chris Butler

F

through to SWG3 in Glasgow on 23 November. Always a visceral experience live, our Music Ed reports that they were on career-best form at Primavera this past spring. On 24 November, London-born electronic whizzkid Gold Panda tours his stonking sophomore album Half Of Where You Live, coming to the Arches in Glasgow. Expect a thrilling mixture of techno, house, glitched beats and sublime electronic experimentation from this Ghostly International mainstay. The same night, opt for the feral intensity of post-industrial noiseniks Wolf Eyes at Glasgow’s Nice ‘N’ Sleazy’s. To finish up, two gigs taking place on 25 November, which have more in common than might first appear. At the Arches in Glasgow, seminal 1980s synth-pop duo Sparks bring their tour – The Revenge of Two Hands, One Mouth – back to the UK, taking us on a journey through their enigmatic, deeply experimental back catalogue. If all you know are This Town Ain’t Big Enough For The Both Of Us and No. 1 Song In Heaven, prepare to marvel at their jaw-dropping, theatrical live performance. Another master of experimental, angular, piano-driven electronic pop is LA beatmaker and songwriter Baths, whose fantastic Obsidian was one of this year’s quirkiest and most moving albums. He plays Edinburgh’s Sneaky Pete’s on 25 November, following an appearance at Glasgow’s CCA the previous night with local hero Dam Mantle.

Do Not Miss O

ur cover stars back in May, Mount Kimbie, aka Kai Campos and Dominic Maker, emerged from the fertile breeding ground of post-dubstep, bursting onto the scene in 2009 with a series of gorgeous EPs on Hotflush, following it up with their classic debut Crooks & Lovers in 2011. Initially occupying similar territory to the likes of James Blake (who was a touring member of the band, and a childhood friend), they made real steps forward this year on the excellent and deeply experimental Cold Spring Fault Less Youth, straying into territories as diverse as micro-house, krautrock-influenced motorik rhythms and shoegaze-y neo-soul. They

November 2013

are currently on the form of their lives as a band, and will no doubt set the cavernous space of SWG3 alight with fragile melodies, washed-out synths and complex beats. They are joined for the night by another artist recently featured in these here pages – San Francisco-based producer oOoOO, making his first Scottish appearance. Initially associated with the ‘witch house’ sound, his acclaimed debut album Without Your Love explored a twilit fusion of ethereal R ‘n’ B, introverted hip-hop rhythms and crepuscular dub techno atmospherics. As double-headers go, this one’s an absolute must.

MUSIC

Mount Kimbie

Preview

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Photo: Gemma Burke

Mount Kimbie SWG3, 8 Nov


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Earlier this month, These New Puritans’ Jack Barnett apparently called time on his band’s future touring prospects. “By my calculations this week will be our last UK tour, so come,” he posted across their social media feeds, prompting ripples of concern amongst fans. But if it was a vague booking-style effort to spur concern from those unwilling to cough up the (admittedly steep) ticket price, it’s failed. Standing in a quarter-full Òran Mór, the disconnect between the astonishing sounds emanating from the stage and the scarcity of people on the receiving end makes the viability of taking such ambitious music on the road seem bleak indeed. None of which matters too much to first-on East India Youth (aka Bournemouth-born William Doyle), who gives a sterling account of his own considerable talents. Comfortable with a range

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 11 Oct

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Rather aptly, Edinburgh oddities the Spook School have returned to the scene of their first ever gig – the tiny sweat-pit that is Henry’s Cellar Bar – to launch their debut album Dress Up, on the cred-laden Fortuna Pop label, with a few friends and silly costumes in tow. We’ll get to those, but first up are Plastic Animals who bravely pack their short set with new tunes, largely ignoring last year’s Automaton EP and their contribution to the Beer Vs Records project. The new songs are as dreamy and hypnotic as anything they’ve managed before and confirm that this is a band now brimming with maturity and ambition. Durham’s Martha are billed as a vegan straight-edge pop band but pack more muscle than four non-meat eaters have any right to.

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Review

Manic Street Preachers / Public Service Broadcasting Barrowland, Glasgow, 29 Sep

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thesenewpuritans.com

The Spook School

Spook School / Martha / Plastic Animals

Manic Street Preachers

Their songs are fast, furious and packed with four-part melodies, although one too seamlessly starts to blend into the next by the time their short set comes to a close. The Spook School’s reputation for daftness is well known and tonight guitarist Adam Todd is dressed as a spider while bassist Anna Cory appears to be someone’s garden. But their music needs no such gimmicks. Heavily referencing C86 and twee-pop bands of yore, the older Are You Who You Think You Are? dovetails wonderfully with spiky latest single I’ll Be Honest, loosening both the limbs and vocal chords of the packed house. For a young man of limited height, Todd cuts a towering stage presence and sibling Nye (here as a vegan straight-edge pop Buster Keaton, seeing as you asked) is an increasingly confident singer. While they may never take themselves too seriously, it might just be time for the rest of the country to. [Stu Lewis] soundcloud.com/spookschool

With prop televisions screening cut-and-paste newsreel and a sound that marries krautrock jams with clipped RP samples, Public Service Broadcasting’s high-concept, wartime arts-andKrafts-werk schtick sees this evening off to a spiffing start. Clipped talk of planes, trains and automobiles is reflected in the dynamic momentum of tracks like Signal 30 (invigoratingly noisy), Theme from PSB (more playful, with banjo augmenting the various electronics) and other picks from their archive-raiding debut – the title of which (Inform – Educate – Entertain) could stand as a manifesto for tonight’s headliners. Indeed, James Dean Bradfield makes it clear that information and education still spur Manic Street Preachers 21 years after their debut’s righteous, erudite bravado. “I wish a younger band would try and write a lyric like this,” he bristles, “the lazy fucking gap year bastards…”, introducing a song (30-Year War) that references the Battle of Orgreave, L.S. Lowry and “the endless parade of old Etonian scum [that] line the front benches” – proof that while Rewind the Film may be their acoustic album, it hasn’t quietened their political ire. Said album furnishes their set with another five tracks, from single Show Me the Wonder (dedicated to tonight’s crowd for making “a

Islet / Ubre Blanca / Leafwrist Nice ‘N’ Sleazy, 15 Oct

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Leafwrist’s approach to his live set has matured in the few short months since his support slot with Umberto, adding thick slabs of minimal electro beats to his tortuously constructed walls of found sound and samples. It’s not quite there yet – there is a sense of exploration, of happy coincidence, when his beats and melodies collide and fuse into glittering moments of intensity, rather than the feeling of a journey with a destination. Given time to refine his sound even further, though, one suspects his music will deliver on its early promise. Second act of the night, Ubre Blanca, simply astound. Trading in cinematic, synth-fetishising compositions which nod heavily to Vangelis, John

MUSIC

Sunday feel like a Saturday”) to the folky feel of This Sullen Welsh Heart. The latter forms part of Bradfield’s customary mid-set solo section, which culminates in The Everlasting – sung back in full, dodgy pronunciation and all. With their other millennial hits also accounted for (Tsunami, You Stole the Sun, If You Tolerate This), this alternation between unplugged and commercial-peak anthems risks overlooking other (often more interesting) corners of their discography, with whole albums unrepresented and others given only cursory visitations. But if the song choices seem uninspired it’s only in comparison to past visits – and in terms of execution, there’s little to criticise. Furthermore, although loaded with songs from the softer end of their output, they keep their big guns close at hand: the iconic riff of Motorcycle Emptiness opens proceedings to ballistic effect; sole Holy Bible-offering Revol forms a fitting Richey-tribute; while Motown Junk sounds as fiery and fresh as ever. But some of the loudest cheers of the night come from “fuck-up of fashion” Nicky Wire’s announcement that they’ve already got the Barrowlands booked for April next year, coinciding with ready-to-go 12th album Futurology. Judging by the high-emotion of finale Design for Life, there’ll be more than a few here choosing to repeat the experience. [Chris Buckle] Public Service Broadcasting play Edinburgh Picture House on 6 Nov manicstreetpreachers.com

Carpenter, Kraftwerk and even Glass Candy, they are not reiventing the wheel. But the combination of towering, interlocking synth riffs with the mathematical, intense drumming of Andy Brown is undeniably powerful, and in the live setting, it proves formidable. When headliners Islet take the stage, they do so like an invading army of hippies armed with deadly percussion. Rhythm is at the forefront of their psychedelic, funk-infused sound – over the course of their set, every single member drums on something, from the ceiling, to the air conditioning system, to the tables and pint glasses of punters, to actual drums. It’s an absorbing stage show, and if there is something overly familiar about their jazz, funk and folk fusion, it is offset by their energy and intensity. When they leave the stage, the night feels like it’s over too soon. [Bram E. Gieben]

THE SKINNY

Photo: David P Scott

Òran Mór, Glasgow, 17 Oct

of styles from blissful synth-pop to full-on techno breaks, his set peaks with Hostel EP highlight Heaven, How Long – several minutes of emotive electro tailed by a euphoric coda. But while under-attendance is de rigour for support acts (and possibly aggravated by the dreich weather outside), the partial emptiness during the headline slot is more bothersome. Not that the band let it affect them, filling the room with unorthodox, inventive symphonies mostly drawn from Field of Reeds. With Elisa Rodrigues reprising her vocal parts and brass boosting the orchestral sweep of tracks like Spiral, the innovative results are spellbinding throughout. Particularly hypnotic are the loops of Organ Eternal and the cinematic slow-build of The Light in Your Name, while well-positioned Hidden cuts up the pace at all the right moments. That more don’t witness it is a shame; that they may never get another opportunity makes it considerably worse. [Chris Buckle]

Photo: Kat Gollock

These New Puritans / East India Youth

Photo: Jassy Earl

These New Puritans


Industrious Resolution Taming mercurial impulses with a solo piano record, Wolf Parade and Sunset Rubdown alumnus Spencer Krug finds grace in simplicity as Moonface

“I

don’t think I make any more music than an average musician,” says Spencer Krug, a man whose full-length output since 2003 surpasses that of his Montreal peers Arcade Fire at a 5:1 ratio. “I don’t make more music than some 15 year old with a guitar,” he reasons. “What I have is the luxury of an open-minded label, Jagjaguwar, who’ll release almost anything I give them. And perhaps I should be more picky, but at this point what’s the difference? It’s not like I can confuse people with random output any more than I already have. So maybe that’s my role: jack of all trades, master of none.” His modesty is as misplaced as it is genuine. The industrious Canadian’s third LP as Moonface, Julia with Blue Jeans On is inspired by Satie and Philip Glass, a masterclass in elemental piano-and-voice songwriting. Krug has always been impassioned and earnest (in the best way), always creatively outstretched, never a man whose work you would regard and say, ‘Not bad, but where are the guts of the thing?’ But Julia... goes one further – the songwriting innards hang twisted and bare, Krug’s insecurity and vulnerability plain to see. “Here and there it’s about self-acceptance,” he says of the record. “And there’s a universal theme, that we need to take care of one another, as humans.” It was a long road to clarity. Krug took up piano aged 12 in his native Penticon, a small town in British Columbia, later leaving for Victoria, where he met Handsome Furs singer Dan Boeckner. One evening in 2001, believing Krug an established bandleader, the ascendant Arcade Fire offered him an upcoming support slot. Krug accepted, seducing Boeckner into co-founding Wolf Parade, and swiftly forged a superior songwriting alloy. After the hype-storm of their Isaac Brockproduced debut, Apologies to the Queen Mary, the four-piece took hiatus for its principal songwriters to tend their respective crops. As those groups conquered pastures of their own, Wolf Parade attained retroactive indie supergroup status, its elevated profile affording Boeckner and Krug yet more freedom outside the group. For Krug, this meant developing pet project Sunset Rubdown. The mercurial art-rockers

November 2013

made elemental tunes that wallowed and whorled like tropical thunderstorms, a comparison abruptly literalised when nonfatal lightning struck bassist Marc Nicol in 2009. The manic fritz of SunRub’s zigzag guitars and rainbow-reaching vocals at once compelled and confounded, albums like Random Spirit Lover breathlessly depicting the machinery of a schizophrenic mind. Such was their deranged potency that, preparing to portray the Mad Hatter in Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland, Johnny Depp would spin Random Spirit Lover for inspiration. On returning in 2008, Wolf Parade neatly distilled their rock impulse on the unfairly maligned At Mt. Zoomer, a one-album hit factory, before releasing Expo 86 in 2010. But like Sunset Rubdown, that mothership was soon for retirement. For all his talk of collaboration and improvisation being the lifeblood of progressive music, it wasn’t until he left Wolf Parade and SunRub to venture on as Moonface that Krug’s ambition purified. Choosing not to perform under his own name, he sees Moonface as a “sort of mask or persona which allows more creative freedom, somehow. Maybe it was just something to hide behind.” Far from veiled ego-trips, early Moonface efforts felt like wilful demystification after the fantasy of Sunset Rubdown and Swan Lake, Krug’s mystical baroque-noise project with Dan Bejar and Carey Mercer. The autistically titled Organ Music Not Vibraphone Like I’d Hoped, Moonface’s 2011 follow-up to debut EP Marimba and ShitDrums, was bedroom-recorded and sounded it – oppressive, dense and fusty, as if set to tape in a windowless attic with Bela Lugosi films beaming against the back wall. It took last year’s teamup with post-rockers Siinai to crystallise Moonface’s potential. Not just a sonic upheaval, the acclaimed collaboration encouraged Krug to relocate long-term to the Finns’ homecountry. It’s here that Krug resides today, sharp, chatty and slightly dozy after a late night grappling with iMovie, a new concept to the technophobe. “I assume this application isn’t difficult for most people,” he drily concedes. “Luckily there were some YouTube tutorials provided by 11 year old kids, which helped.”

Interview: Jazz Monroe

Musically, Krug’s Finland move yielded animating results, but where his and Siinai’s Heartbreaking Bravery LP – a bleakly euphoric thing – saw Krug mesmerised by the dark glamour of heartache, new record Julia... opens its heart to the light. It’s avowed and proud, an album of “big, soft and fuzzy themes: love, acceptance, compassion.”

“Making art alone is a great way to go insane, if that’s what you’re looking to do” Spencer Krug

These themes are not hard to spot. All of Julia...’s songs stem from doubt, vulnerability and despair. “There’s no reason I should feel like dying/But you’re the reason I’m here and alive, either way,” he sings on centrepiece Dreamy Summer – but they flourish and branch into contradictory utopias, somewhere hopeful and pure and elevated. On First Violin, Krug’s tender lyrics are borne by pluvial piano lines, his wails evoking a skydiver in freefall, upper-echelon keys fluttering like doves, and it sounds magnificent. “The music is sort of vulnerable and exposed, yet true, or pure. So the approach to lyrics was to keep it simple and tell the truth. There’s a vulnerability in that, too.” It’s never clearer than on opener Barbarian: “I am a barbarian,” Krug roars, before adding, “sometimes.” Even his self-flaggelation is noncommittal. Elsewhere, unfashionable biblical allusions at once rebuke and sympathise with a Godless generation. These pangs of transcendence don’t speak of hippy spirituality or genuine theism, but rather of a man who has seen darkness all over and deduced that the only way out

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is up. “This album is more optimistic than anything I’ve put out so far as Moonface,” he confesses. “There are a lot of love songs, which in part address the rock-angry, love-is-shit songs of Heartbreaking Bravery. Julia... is like a current version of myself talking reasonably to a younger version of myself.” Does working alone help or hinder sanity? “It hinders! Making art alone is a great way to go insane, if that’s what you’re looking to do. It’s this combination of paralysing self doubt and delusions of grandeur, running free in your brain. There’s no one to stop you when you’ve gone down a rabbit hole of some bullshit idea, only to realise weeks later that it’s so convoluted it expresses nothing. Working with other people can save you days and days of that sort of agony.” His flowery language is telling: agony, insanity and paralysing self-doubt all figure on the album’s title track, a sweetly histrionic ballad about music’s inadequacy in the face of real beauty. It seems to rebuke his entire catalogue: “It’s a mad man’s game/To make the commonplace unreal... I see you there/At the bottom of the stairs/Obliterating everything I’ve ever written down.” Is he getting disillusioned with it all? “Musical burnout is not something I’ve ever felt close to,” Krug claims, before pausing to change course. “Although I’ve definitely noticed it looming on the horizon from time to time. Maybe I saw it there once or twice while making this album. I firmly believe that forced art is shit art, and I try to stay very aware of that.” “Trying to express pure ideas through songwriting somehow belittles them,” he concludes, without resignation. “The medium just isn’t sophisticated enough to be a true reflection of the ‘soul’. It always ends up being cracked and distorted. So to make music that does justice to its subject is an almost impossible task, for me, and I basically always fail in some way. I think most artists do, and that’s why they keep making art.” Julia with Blue Jeans On is released via Jagjaguwar on 4 Nov Playing Le Guess Who? Festival, Utrecht NL on 1 Dec moonface.ca

Feature

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Album of the Month

The Cosmic Dead / Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs

Djamba / The Wizard & The Seven Swines [The Old Noise, 8 Nov]

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The Glasgow-based psych stalwarts return with a split 12” on Newcastle’s The Old Noise label. Flip it and you’ll find The Wizard & the Seven Swine, the debut recording from Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs. There’s a challenge for the name-droppers out there. There’s a musical challenge, too; The Wizard... is 21 uncompromising minutes of whip-crack guitars and driving, pounding rhythm. Get in its way at your peril. Reverb-soaked vocals are guttural and half-screamed, and there’s a hint of early Hawkwind in there somewhere. Arresting stuff, but not, you suspect, for everyone.

Shearwater

Steve Ignorant with Paranoid Visions

Nothing Is Real [Innovative Leisure, Out Now]

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shearwatermusic.com

theoldnoise.co.uk

Crystal Antlers

Fellow Travelers [Sub Pop, 25 Nov] Like live albums and B-side compilations, cover version LPs usually occupy a fringe position in an artist’s discography, and Fellow Travelers is no different. But as far as stopgaps go – bridging last year’s Animal Joy and next year’s in-the-works follow-up – Shearwater’s ten-song tribute to/collaboration with past touring partners is more attractive than most. Few recordings rival the originals, but most offer something of interest: for example, a take on Xiu Xiu’s I Luv the Valley OH! doesn’t come close to the original’s intensity, but fashions a more conventional rock song out of the ingredients; similarly, St Vincent’s Cheerleader loses a lot of its poignancy in translation, but at least the gender switch invites new lyrical resonances. Less effective is a cover of Clinic’s Tomorrow, which smudges the original’s cold precision without subbing in any distinct character of its own, making Fellow Travelers a mixed bag in terms of quality as well as source material. [Chris Buckle]

Stick with the A-side because, much in keeping with the colour and shape of their recorded output to date, The Cosmic Dead’s similarly lengthy Djamba is epic and relentless. It’s built around a deep groove but an emerging narrative highlights a level of ambition beyond mere texture and sonics. Guitars chime and swell. Much of the psych-rock juggernaut gradually gaining a foothold of late can seem wilful and attitude-led, built on wobbly foundations, but The Cosmic Dead’s continuing adventures are ever more accomplished. Djamba takes intriguing detours on its way to a disquieting come-down, its various ‘movements’ artfully meshing arrangement and structure in a package more accessible than you might expect. [Gary Kaill]

When...? [Overground, 11 Nov]

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Tricky things, influences. You can reference all the Dinosaur Jr licks or Fugazi rhythms you want, but no-one ever fell in love with tasteful record collector rock. We want our ears blown out! Our hearts torn asunder! Our senses ragged and ruined and reborn while the riffs roll by! Even if their speculative shots don’t always hit the target, this Californian collective thrills so effervescently because they never aim for less. Take the climax of Archers of Loaf-esque mosh-along Licorice Pizza, where the turbulence subsides and everything skids to an abrupt halt. A previously-undetectable sax skronks frantically; flailing messily like a body hurtling through a windscreen. It’s Nothing Is Real’s defining moment – the point where Crystal Antlers truly flick the safety switch to ‘off’ mode. Rattlesnake and Persephone provide additional boneshakers, but to prove the band ain’t just kids playing with matches, there’s wistful moments like We All Gotta Die that balance their brute force with admirable finesse. Pretty great, all told. [Will Fitzpatrick]

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While much of the music which dominated the UK underground in the late 70s and early 80s holds an uncanny sway over current trends, anarcho-punk feels more distant than ever – despite some key similarities in our political landscape. The title of this collaboration – between the former Crass frontman, and a Dublin outfit who followed in that band’s wake – would have felt like a call to arms in Thatcherite England, but now feels bitterly ironic, given the depoliticisation of ‘alternative’ culture. Musically, When...? is mostly what you would expect: anarchopunk always prided itself on immediacy and simplicity, and the urgency of the frazzled riffs, edgy leads and ranted vocals here shows that neither party have lost their rage. The lyrical topics have been updated – Log On/Bog Off attacks the age of government internet surveillance – but this remains an anachronistic, refreshing reminder of an age both less cynical and more angry. [Sam Wiseman] steveignorant.co.uk

L.B. Dub Corp

Sebastien Tellier

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Unknown Origin [OstGut Ton, 11 Nov] Luke Slater’s dub-influenced moniker as L.B. Dub Corp does a convincing job of polishing up the dub techno sounds pioneered by the likes of Basic Channel and adding a slick house and traditional techno sheen, aiming the results straight back at the dancefloor. The presence of radical poet Benjamin Zephaniah on Take A Ride and I Have A Dream adds some lyrical heft, and although he is underused on the former, the latter is a rousing political anthem. The piano-led, echoing house of Ever and Forever acts as an earworm, balancing a simple melodic hook with drfiting synths and understated percussion. L.B.’s Dub adds some skanking digital dub to the mix, while the driving Turner’s House takes things in an electro direction. The pulsating, echoing synths of Any Time Will Be OK are a particular highlight, while Function’s appearance on closer Roller adds some darkness with layers of static and minimal synths. [Bram E. Gieben] soundcloud.com/luke-slater

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On Julia…, Spencer Krug confirms Moonface as the most diverse of his storied musical projects. After solo synth-prog debut Organ Music… and 2012’s fullband, rock-slanted Siinai collaboration Heartbreaking Bravery, he could arguably have taken his sound absolutely anywhere, so the decision to contrarily turn inwards and produce a stripped-back piano and voice collection feels instinctively like a stroke of genius – a purified reminder of his core compositional abilities, and a more complete exploration of a side to his writing previously only glimpsed. With so little adornment, the poetry of Krug’s words (delivered in that inimitably baleful croon) is inescapable. Opening lines are invariably arresting (for example: ‘And if I am an animal I am one of the few that is self-destructive / I have chewed through my beautiful muscle / I have chewed through my beautiful narrative’), and throughout, the originality of his themes and metaphors places him in the upper echelons of lyricists. [Chris Buckle]

Tape Recorder And Synthesiser Ensemble [Finders Keepers, 4 Nov]

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France’s Sebastien Tellier has always been a difficult figure to pin down. Having worked with Daft Punk, Mr Oizo and the legendary Nigerian drummer Tony Allen (who reappears here), Tellier is a respected figure in the French electronica scene; on the other hand, he’s a one-time Eurovision contestant whose compositions can seem kitsch and superficial. Confection is a series of mainly instrumental pieces that, for many, will confirm that perception. The lush, glossy strings and cheesy synth lines on pieces like Adieu Mes Amours, for example, wouldn’t sound out of place on a Ferrero Rocher advert (appropriately enough, given the LP title). Nonetheless, there’s an atmospheric allure to Tellier’s compositions that will work a strange magic on those willing to go along for the ride. There’s no profundity of emotion here, but there is a Badalamenti-esque, cinematic oddness to Confection which, despite surface appearances, gives it an endearing, melancholy charm. [Sam Wiseman]

Given the current popularity of retro-futuristic synth music, it is a joy to hear this long-forgotten prototype from the early 80s, made with bedroom recording equipment and a self-constructed synthesiser by the teenage Andy Popplewell, who would go on to be an engineer at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Occasionally accomapnied by his younger brother on guitar, these instrumental takes on the synth-pop sound are the 16 year-old Popplewell’s attempts to mimic and recreate the sounds of early Gary Numan, Human League, and the soundtrack work of John Carpenter. In many ways these minimal, stripped-down compositions equal or even better the artists he was emulating. Gently shimmering synth layers breathe and interact over linear drum patterns while gentle eddies of guitar echo in and out. A preparedness to let simple melodic sequences play out recalls Music For Films-era Eno, but the hooks are undeniable. This is not just a fantastic record, but something of a revelation. [Bram E. Gieben]

recordmakers.com/sebastientellier

finderskeepersrecords.com

Moonface

Julia With Blue Jeans On [Jagjaguwar, 4 Nov]

T.R.A.S.E.

Confection [Record Makers, 18 Nov]

Melvins

Chantal Acda

Tres Cabrones [Ipecac, 4 Nov]

Let My Hands Be Your Guide [Gizeh Records, 11 Nov]

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Despite growling their way into middle age, the Melvins never really seemed the sort of band who’d bother to grow up. The snickering nastiness of their metal-soaked hardcore always felt too gloriously delinquent to age truly gracefully, and indeed album number nineteen sees them reaching back into their past. The return of founding drummer Mike Dillard sees long-term sticksman Dale Crover switching to bass (“As close as we’re willing to get to the 1980s lineup,” explains Buzz Osbourne helpfully), and the results are raucously wonderful. The Black Flag rage and sludgy riffs of Dr. Mule put us in familiar territory, arching sinister smiles around tightly-gritted teeth, while Stick ‘Em Up, Bitch conjures up images of Lemmy staring down the barrel of a nail gun. Just for laffs, there’s also a handful of truly terrifying campfire singalongs – old fellas they may be, but the Melvins’ capacity for demented glee remains happily undimmed. [Will Fitzpatrick]

Though billed as her first ‘real solo record’ (following a trio of softly sumptuous slowcore releases under the Sleepingdog moniker), Chantal Acda’s Let Your Hands Be My Guide comes courtesy of a raft of esteemed collaborators, including composers Nils Frahm and Peter Broderick and Múm cellist Gyda Valtysdottir – all figures well-practiced in the subtle-yet-soaring arts in which Acda is specialist. Her unhurried compositions aren’t afraid to fade to nearsilence, exhibiting such gentle poise that listeners would be forgiven for nodding off mid-song – not a charge of tedium, but an acknowledgement of the lullaby effects of Acda’s refined songwriting, with minimalist arrangements allowing her attractively light voice the muted spotlight. Pushed for highlights one might identify the twinkling ether of My Night or the duet at the core of Arms up High, but it’s as a delicate whole that Let Your Hands… conveys its true gossamer beauty. [Chris Buckle]

themelvins.net

chantalacda.com

Playing Le Guess Who? Festival, Utrecht NL on 1 Dec moonface.ca

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Review

RECORDS

THE SKINNY


Midlake

Connan Mockasin

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Antiphon [Bella Union, 4 Nov] Stripping any band of a member will prompt doubts about the future, but in the case of the amiable Texans, it’s songwriter and lead singer Tim Smith that’s jumped ship. Guitarist Eric Pulido has already lent his backing vocals to memorable 2006 breakout The Trials of Van Occupanther and its rather aimless follow-up The Courage of Others; on Antiphon he steps up to frontman. It’s a smooth enough transition and for the first time Midlake actually feel like their own men, rather than aping Fleetwood Mac or Fairport Convention. The dreampop of The Old And The Young and its title track plants their feet in new terrain, whilst Vale’s psych rock is tougher than a pair of old cowboy boots. There’s the odd meandering misstep as they undergo this renewal, but there’s still plenty of evidence here to suggest an interesting new chapter for the band. [Stu Lewis] Playing Manchester’s Ritz on 20 Feb and Glasgow’s O2 ABC on 22 Feb 2014

It’s been a busy period for Erol Alkan’s Londonbased Phantasy Sound label, with this second LP from New Zealander Connan Mockasin following the release of Daniel Avery’s widely-acclaimed Drone Logic in October. Where Avery specialises in ornately-wrought techno, Caramel sees Mockasin moving away from the twisted psych of his debut Forever Dolphin Love towards a bizarre blend of soul, funk and downbeat electronica. Beneath this woozy, soporific mix, Mockasin remains a singer-songwriter at heart, and on highpoints like Nothing Lasts Forever, there’s a tenderness which permeates the tremolo-heavy guitar work and sparse percussion. At other points, the lack of a clear sense of purpose can be frustrating. With his intuitive, idiosyncratic approach to arrangement and composition, however, Mockasin hits upon those moments of intimacy enough to make Caramel a strangely arresting record. [Sam Wiseman]

Magik Markers

Public Spaces

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Surrender To The Fantasy [Drag City, 18 Nov] Sonic Youth’s venerated legacy represents an untouchable milestone in the history of rock music; an unrepeatable, nail-biting scene where dissonant avantgardism and trashy punk irony collide spectacularly. So how fucking refreshing is it when a band seems to view the likes of Daydream Nation and EVOL as a gauntlet laid down before it? Surrender To The Fantasy rattles and rolls with the freshfaced energy of a debut. It’s ragged yet quietly assured amongst long-fuse incendiaries like WT and American Sphinx Face, where Elisa Ambrogio’s eardrum-lacerating feedback squalls stab viciously throughout. The softer Mirrorless represents a particular highlight, resembling Yo La Tengo whispering country classics at the bottom of a swimming pool, but the best moment comes in the shape of Bonfire – a pedal-to-the-metal ramraid of da Yoof’s signature tricks, executed with a devious flair that’s all their own. Kill yr idols indeed. [Will Fitzpatrick] dragcity.com/artists/magik-markers

KP-LP [Electropapknit / Dirty Beard Monthly, 4 Nov] Generated in Glasgow from the collective efforts of Lewis Macdonald, double bassist Alastair Quietsch and a host of collaborators, this album takes the template of rough-hewn, experimental art school noise and feeds it through the lucid filters of pop-industrial; couples it with the growling, foreboding storytelling of Tom Waits, and adds a dash of genuinely frightening found sound abuse and musique concrete techniques. Constantly threatening to collapse into shambolic, abstract dissonance at every turn, it pulls back from the brink with distorted robot voices or visceral bursts of punk energy. These artists have embraced both structure and narrative as the focal points for their transgressive sample-craft. Two highly inventive musicians pushing analogue and digital gear to its limits, but anchoring the results in a bedrock of feral jazz, snarling blues and brutal industrial rhythms. Outstanding, challenging, transgressive, it will undoubtedly prove too strong medicine for some. [Bram E. Gieben]

Talulah Gosh

Ulrich Schnauss & Mark Peters

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Was it Just a Dream? [Damaged Goods, 4 Nov] Superseding the increasingly hard-to-find Backwash compilation, Was It Just a Dream? is the complete Talulah Gosh: 29 tracks encompassing every EP, single, radio session and demo that the twee-pop icons committed to tape in their brief but influential mid-eighties existence. For died-in-the-wool fans already in possession of Backwash and the 2011 Demos EP, there’s nothing here you haven’t already spun to death; no new archival discoveries, just a welding of the two into one package. But for anyone too young or otherwise engaged to have enjoyed the band at the time, Was It Just a Dream? contains compound delights. Tracks like Bringing up Baby wear their quarterof-a-century so well a newcomer might swear they’d been knocked together moments earlier by one of Amelia and co.’s numerous disciples, and it’s this long-term freshness that makes the album far more than a niche nostalgia hit for the Sarah/K Records appreciation societies. [Chris Buckle] damagedgoods.co.uk

†††

††† [Sumerian Records, 25 Nov]

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Deftones vocalist Chino Moreno has kept himself busy with the release of the excellent Palms earlier this year, but he’s also been making dramatic, electronic-tinged rock as ††† (or, for simplicity’s sake, Crosses) with Far guitarist Shaun Lopez. The outfit’s first two EPs from 2011 and 2012 are included here, resequenced, essentially rendering this an expanded reissue or deluxe mixtape. Though it serves as an excellent retrospective of their work thus far, the short supply of new material is something of a let-down. Luckily, the original songs are just as strong – †he epilogue is a seductive slice of dark pop, and the brooding bi†ches brew gloriously erupts into blissful catharsis in its final minute. Moreno’s iconic voice is right at home within the context of laptop click tracks and keyboard melodies. He’s been transcending genres for years now, but it’s only recently that he’s begun to prove himself as a master of the hook. The proof is right here. [Ross Watson] crossesmusic.com

Son Lux

Lanterns [Joyful Noise Recordings, 4 Nov]

Caramel [Phantasy Sound, 4 Nov]

Tomorrow Is Another Day [Bureau B, 25 Nov]

Following 2012’s swooning Underrated Silence, Ulrich Schauss and his occasional Engineers bandmate, guitarist and producer Mark Peters, have produced another album of such glittering, sun-drenched niceness that it sometimes borders on the twee, but for the most part, its a rich and musically complex addition to the catalogue of electronica combining diverse elements from shoegaze, folk, post-dubstep and ambient. Peters’ playing in particular – gently bent and plucked strings looped and swathed in effects – is technically brilliant. Fragments of electro (on Inconvenient Truths), minimal disco (Bound By Lies) and shoegaze-y synth-pop (Walking With My Eyes Closed, which features vocals) leaven the mix, making this a diverse listen - if there are criticisms to be made, its that that the tones and effects used on Peters’ guitar lines are rather staid and traditional, in sharp contrast to the arrangements. A little more experimentation and this could have been a classic. [Bram E. Gieben]

Maria Taylor

Something About Knowing [Saddle Creek, 4 Nov]

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Maria Taylor’s fifth album, Something About Knowing, is quintessential Saddle Creek: production from label founder Mike Mogis; a musical style that gently browses country-soul and dream-pop; and that warm, familiar voice, recalling past Creek peaks as half of Azure Ray and as backing vocalist on I’m Wide Awake, It’s Morning (amongst other things). As well as echoes of Bright Eyes’ full-on alt-country period, the work of erstwhile Creeker Jenny Lewis is evoked on a number of occasions, with songs like Folk Song Melody eerily close to her post-Rilo Kiley solo work. Unfortunately Taylor has a more pronounced saccharine streak than either of the aforementioned, and with her young son an expressed influence (“I heard the sweetest voice call me mommy”), you may be inclined to agree with Cyril Connolly’s warning about the pram in the hall as the enemy of good art. Those with a metaphorical sweet tooth, however, will find much to savour. [Chris Buckle]

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Some albums wantonly thrust their virtues upon the listener; others guard them like a secret to be teased out over time. Lanterns, Ryan Lott’s third album as Son Lux, achieves both: on first encounter, the melodic intelligence and invention lassos attention, while a dozen listens later there’s still much to discover. Comparisons could be drawn with Lott’s s / s / s bandmate Sufjan Stevens: both are classically trained, and serve their abundant ambition with orchestral flourishes and imaginative, layered production. But Son Lux emphatically takes a path of his own making, mixing up haunted hip-hop beats and choral moans on Pyre; and rupturing a hushed digital waltz with heartbeat horns on Easy. In sum, Lanterns is the sound of a maverick talent edging ever closer to his full, stimulating potential. [Chris Buckle] sonlux.tumblr.com

Cate Le Bon

Mug Museum [Turnstile, 11 Nov]

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You’d be forgiven for thinking Wales a sunny place, hearing Cate Le Bon’s third jaunty, psychedelic record Mug Museum. Wales isn’t, of course, but its musical output’s pretty sun-soaked (look at pals Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci or Super Furry Animals); this LP’s no exception. Much like the Welsh themselves, though, there’s a charming stoicism here, a maturity beneath the folk-pop, and a darker turn since 2012’s CYRK. From the off we’re assaulted with cheeriness, tickling boardwalk organ here and cosily strummed guitar there, all belying Le Bon’s moodier lyrics. But when the album’s volta, Wild, excavates some darker fuzz, we’re taken deeper into antsy gloom. Her whimsy teeters into weirdness on Mirror Me, a lonely sax spiralling over the mantra-like refrain; Cuckoo Through The Walls unravels with a similar thumping madness. The emerging chaos risks muddying her message, but instead bolsters it; like dappled shadows cast by clouds against the sun, a beguiling melancholy. [George Sully] Playing Glasgow Broadcast on 12 Feb 2014 catelebon.com

OvO

Abisso [Supernatural Cat, 4 Nov]

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Halloween may be done with for another year, but there are plenty of long nights ahead; plenty of inky witching hours crying out for a suitably unsettling soundtrack, preferably one with a daft edge so as to keep the demons from taking over. Italian doom-sludge-droneetc duo OvO are specialists in such matters, and latest LP Abisso proves as dark as its namesake but with moments of silliness that depressurise the oppressive atmosphere. Whether the latter trait is wholly deliberate is another matter, though Grand Guignol titles like I Cannibali and a final track of squeals and screeches (plus drummer Bruno Dorella’s tendency to perform wearing a luchador mask) all suggest awareness of the absurdity underlying their ghoulish façade. As on past releases, Stefania Pedretti’s idiosyncratic vocals are key: whimpering, growling, gibbering and screaming, her range stops their simple setup from growing repetitious, though also earns the album its ‘approach with caution’ epithet. [Chris Buckle] ovolive.blogspot.co.uk

The Top Five 1

The Cosmic Dead / Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs Pigs

Djamba / The Wizard & The Seven Swines

2 3 4 5

Magik Markers

Surrender To The Fantasy

†††

†††

Moonface

Julia With Blue Jeans On

Son Lux

Lanterns

mariataylormusic.com

November 2013

RECORDS

Review

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auldhoose hoose TheTheauld punk, metal & goth jukebox quality selection of craft ales good food served ‘til late everyday vegetarian & Vegan options available

“the largest nachos in edinburgh!”

10% student discount on food

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THE SKINNY


Synthetic Pleasures Formed from the ashes of Shitdisco and Divorce, synth enthusiasts Ubre Blanca discuss their debut EP, retrofuturism, and Glasgow’s alternative music scene

Interview: Bram E. Gieben Photography: David P. Scott

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s we sit down to discuss their debut EP at Nice N’ Sleazy’s, Andy Brown – drummer in Remember Remember, and until recently, Divorce – is lamenting his choice of location for the photoshoot. His bandmate Joel Stone – formerly of Shitdisco – makes an interesting observation about the fashion choices in Glasgow’s Charing Cross: “There were loads of guys wearing football manager jackets,” he says. “The people you see wearing them in social situations are always people you wouldn’t trust to carry a fucking glass of water across a room, let alone trust with a football team.” In direct contrast, both Stone and Brown could each be described as a safe pair of hands. Brown’s demoniacal drumming for extreme noise art-punks Divorce grounded the band in a riveting and intense hardcore dynamic – he is equally at home behind the kit for the ten-minute atmospheric post-rock voyages of Remember Remember, using an altogether subtler approach. Stone meanwhile toured with Shitdisco across the world during the brief dominance of ‘new rave’ – pairing him with Brown on an electronic project was bound to produce impressive results. That the results would resemble the synth-driven soundtrack to an undiscovered 80s horror classic is more of a surprise. The duo announced their presence officially in August, and since then have played gigs with Zombie Zombie, Islet, and at the Music Language Festival. Stone used the name as an umbrella project for several collaborations, but eventually, it “came down to just the two of us,” says Brown. “We both wanted to try something we had never done before.” That something was “a John Carpenter and Giorgio Moroder-sounding project,” to put it mildly. “The rules are different for synths – you’re allowed to do stuff that would be absolutely offensive on a guitar,” says Stone. Inspired by a love of Kraftwerk, Carpenter, Moroder and Claudio Simonetti (of Goblin fame), they began recording tracks. Their music avoids the over-compression so common in electronic music, that leads to “audio sausage” syndrome. Stone notes that “in cinema, composition has gone the other way.” Brown describes how this affects their writing process: “We make a point of making sure that there is dynamic range – that there’s a really wide scope, so that when something does get big, you can viscerally feel it.” On first listen, you could be forgiven for thinking Ubre Blanca were analogue synth purists, but this is not the case. They use soft synths and Ableton Live to recreate and expand upon the analogue synth sound live, and in the studio, they use a combination of digital and analogue gear. “For practicality, it makes more sense,” explains Brown. “Carting around a bunch of old, expensive synths can be very expensive and difficult.” Stone has a cautionary tale about touring with more valuable analogue gear. “I was touring with a synth guitar, which was the first synth guitar – the Roland GR-500. It’s quite rare, and worth a lot of money. I was waiting for a plane and I looked out of the airport window, and I saw the throwers on the tarmac. There were ‘fragile’ stickers all over it, in every language under the sun. I saw one of the baggage handlers lift it up over his head and WHAM! He just stoated it off the floor. My heart was just like... fuck. It was so painful. Not because it was my instrument – because it was a historical artefact. There are only about a thousand of them. After that I figured I’d go digital. You can figure out ways to make the same sounds using equipment which, if it

November 2013

gets smashed by throwers, isn’t a crime against history.” They use soft synths fed through guitar amps or analogue synths in the studio to achieve an approximation of analogue warmth. “You can use the filters and parameters of the analogue synth, but you can play polyphonic sounds,” explains Stone. “Use a Yamaha DX7 through a Multimoog, or something like that. You get really interesting results.” Brown shakes his head warily. “This will make the purists spin. They’ll hate it. Luckily I just play the drums.” Their cover art, not to mention their sound, also derives from the aesthetic of ‘retro-futurism’ - a focus on visions of the future from byegone eras. “I’ve had this phrase knocking around my head – ‘when the future was something you could look forward to,”’ says Stone. “Generally now, people are probably not incorrectly terrified of the future and what it might hold, but that wasn’t always the case. That’s a mindset that’s really interesting to look at – when the future wasn’t purely existential horror.” Ubre Blanca’s music seems to carry an implied rejection of what they describe as the “clean, white and brushed chrome-looking future, where everything purrs and nothing smells” in favour of a lost “ZX-81 future,” as Stone puts it. “There is enough of a disparity between what really is – what’s going on now – and what they were proposing would be the future, that we can look back and say, ‘That would have been great,’” says Brown. The duo are both excited to be releasing on Clan Destine, a record label which, aptly, only trades in vinyl and cassettes. Clan Destine offers a home within a very diverse and experimental roster, whose bands share an aesthetic more than a sound: “There is a kind of ‘hive mind’ effect at work,” Brown believes. “Our record will stand out but it won’t seem weird.” They’re also full of praise for Glasgow-based promoter Cry Parrot, aka Fielding Hope. They were an “11th-hour addition” to this year’s Music

Language Festival, and had a great response to their set at the Glue Factory, despite the dreich weather. “It’s a testament to Fielding that he is the kind of guy who can bring all of these people – who can be quite prickly... there is something about people who make experimental music, the way they are wired – and he can get them on the same side,” says Brown. “He’s created a legitimate alternative to things like King Tut’s and T in the Park – anything that promotes the meat and potatoes indie-schmindie rubbish.”

“The rules are different for synths – you’re allowed to do stuff that would be absolutely offensive on a guitar” Joel Stone

Brown however is insistant that he “never expected to make a living out of music.” If one does expect this, “that can dilute what kind of music you make – if that’s not a consideration you are free to follow your own methods. Even if it’s an audience of one, at least you’ve created something honest, instead of pandering to a commercial template.” Ranting against the ubiquity of bands composed of “guys in fedoras with ukeleles,” Stone observes: “There have always been swine getting away with it.” Asked about the recent breakup of Divorce, Brown says that it “just wasn’t much of a story. The thing had kind of run out of steam.” He

MUSIC

is working on the new Remember Remember album and new tracks for Ubre Blanca concurrently. With 12 songs recorded, and more on the way, the duo intend to release a series of 12-inch records next year, following up with an album in 2015. “We’re moving faster than I’ve ever worked in a band before,” observes Brown. “It’s been a real creative spurt.” Remixes and collaborations are also in the offing. We chat briefly about the influence of the Glasgow School of Art, less as an academic institution (Brown, a graduate of the GSA, says “there is a cliche that you go to art school to study painting and come out with a degree in Marxist cultural theory... which is basically what happened to me...”) than as a cultural “melting pot” focused around the Students Association and its attendant clubs and gigs. Stone offers a final observation about his time at the Art School. “A lot of people you meet in an academic context are not very interesting. It’s not their fault sometimes – maybe it’s because they’ve just come out of school and they’ve not done anything. You haven’t had the time to develop a really fascinating personality. You’re not going to be a raconteur at 17, you don’t have the material there.” Brown laughs. “It would be a bit suspicious if you were...” Stone puts on an incredulous codAmerican accent. “You were never in ‘Nam...’” The pair laugh, displaying the same easy camaraderie they share on stage. “We had a lying kid in our school who claimed he designed the James Bond gun from the 60s,” Stone remembers, heading off on yet another tangent. “He was obsessed with Lexus cars, but to an unhealthy and prurient degree... he claimed to have fucked one up the exhaust pipe.” Brown’s smile widens with appreciation. “That’s borderline schizophrenic...” Ubre Blanca’s Polygon Mountain EP is releaszed via Clan Destine on 16 Nov. They play The Old Hairdressers the same night soundcloud.com/ubreblanca

New Blood

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Pressure Turns 15 We chat to frequent guest Ben Sims and residents Slam, ahead of the legendary club night’s birthday celebrations…

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hances are, if you are reading this and live in Scotland, you need no introduction to Pressure. You probably count it as one of your first dancefloor stomping grounds, where you cut your teeth (or at least your gums) to futuristic music that had never sounded so powerful until it clattered and crashed from a PA that wouldn’t fit in your house. Pressure is many things to many people; the site of chance encounters, life-long friendships, hedonistic nights and game changing musical epiphanies. Without wishing to romanticise too much about this vital piece of Scottish music heritage, were it not for Pressure, Friday nights in Glasgow would be a different prospect altogether. Carrying on from Stuart McMillan and Orde Meikle’s weekly ‘Slam at the Arches’ parties, Pressure was sprung upon Glasgow’s clubbing community in 1998 and has since brought the city some of the most notable names in electronic music, on the last Friday of every month, for 15 years. A run-down of previous guests would be ridiculous at this stage in the game, but a few of the author’s notable highlights would undoubtedly include Richie Hawtin, Jeff Mills, Adam Beyer and Marco Carola, and that was just in the last three years. It should be of no surprise then that the birthday party line-up is nothing short of a colossus. Loco Dice, Maya Jane Coles, Ben Sims, Kirk Degiorgio and Hans Bouffmyhre will all be bringing to the table their own bludgeoning brands of mind-bending techno, to blow out the candles on what is undoubtedly one of this year’s most important UK club night anniversaries. Despite being the home of Slam and a landmark party in Scotland, the significance of a party like Pressure can sometimes be lost on those for whom it is a constant presence in their clubbing calendars. With this in mind we thought it only fitting to catch up with some of the upcoming birthday party participants, to exalt parties gone by and consider those yet to arrive… Ben Sims’ illustrious career of 30 years has

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Preview

Interview: Calum Sutherland

seen him visit the iconic club night numerous times and is in many ways a typical Pressure guest. Consistently hard-hitting, disorientating and fast-paced, yet always with the capacity to surprise, Ben’s sets have been a welcome addition to any Arches lineup since his debut nearly ten years ago. “It’s always been a great place to play, [with] consistently passionate, energetic and occasionally fanatical crowds. I don’t think I’ve ever had a bad gig there, some better than others, yeah, but no bad ones and that’s bloody rare…” For DJs and fans alike, Pressure stands out as something special. This can be attributed to a number of resonating factors; insightful bookings which recognise the present, look to the future, and remember to recognise older generations, The Arches itself and, most importantly, the legions of dedicated electronic music fans across the city. According to Sims, “aside from the up-for-it, ready-to-go-as-soon-as-the-fuckingdoor-opens crowd, the key to its success and individuality is everyone behind it genuinely loves and knows the music. They book the people they want to see/hear and you can feel that, it’s not a case of just booking who’s supposedly hot, and the lineups don’t read like some money man has just read Mixmag, which is typically how big multi room parties are these days.” This ideal was in place since the very first party, says Slam’s Stuart McMillan. “We have always pushed fairly underground sounds, albeit balanced with some diverse and more eclectic offerings at times. We have managed to balance headlining techno from the likes of Richie Hawtin, Chris Liebing, Len Faki, Jeff Mills, Pan-Pot and more underground talents like Surgeon, Marcel Dettmann, Regis and Robert Hood alongside slots for house DJs like Derrick Carter, Levon Vincent, Cassy, Sneak & Heidi, and live shows from amazing musicians like Galaxy 2 Galaxy or Laurent Garnier’s band. We’ve managed to bring names like Sven Vath, Luciano, Ricardo Villalobos, Loco Dice, Magda and Matthew Dear

to Glasgow early in their careers and over the years we have also managed to programme more eclectic and left of centre artists like Vitalic, Boys Noize, Tiga, Green Velvet, DJ Shadow, the Chemical Brothers and DJ Yoda. We’ve always played, which gives the night a link and continuity too – sometimes opening up, sometimes closing and occasionally performing a live set – but always in the main room no matter what the style of the headliner.” Newcomer Hans Bouffmyhre performs his first set at Pressure this month and he is well aware of the significance of the event, the associated Soma label and its founders Slam. “They are well known across the world and everywhere I go when you mention ‘Glasgow Techno’ they are the first name to come up.”

“The   lineups don’t read like some money man has just read Mixmag” Ben Sims

Ben Sims also recognises this sentiment; “You just can’t argue with their history and the back catalogue of the label, it speaks for itself. They’ve influenced many over the years and continue to do so. Soma is a truly global brand with the broadest range of acts, whether you’re into Detroit techno, Chicago house, dub tech or machine funk, there’s something for you on the label and there’s very few labels you can say that about.” In considering such a diverse array of electronic treats made readily available, it would be callous to overlook the venue which hosts such a spectacle. The Arches is undoubtedly a hub for many different artistic outgoings in Scotland, but

Clubs

is perhaps most closely tied within music circles as the home of Pressure. “It’s never all about one DJ in the main room,” says Stuart. “We often hear that the Warehouse Project can be a little too big and impersonal – for DJs and clubbers alike. Pressure is just about as big as you can go and still has that scale where it’s possible to find a friend you know is there and get a drink at the bar easily enough . We love Fabric in London too and Space in Ibiza – probably two of the best [venues] we play each year and these places manage to get a good vibe going over all the rooms that are open.” With all three vital components of a successful club night in place, highlighting stand out moments is a daunting task. “We’ve had many – a couple of the live performances spring to mind, maybe because having live musicians on stage at a techno club is a rarer event. Laurent Garnier’s sax player, the first time he performed at Pressure, did an amazing freestyle solo of the Man with the Red Face and he was visibly awestruck by the reaction of the crowd. Similarly the first time UR brought Galaxy 2 Galaxy live to Pressure there were tears of joy. DJ performances that stand out are when one of the birthdays several years back, Richie Hawtin and Ricardo Villalobos played back to back for a few hours, both at the peak of their strength. Maybe seeing Jeff Mills for the first time, jamming on the 909 drum machine for the last 20 minutes of a blinding DJ set like a man possessed!” Sims struggles to pin down a single party too. “I’ve had lots of really good times there, the one that most springs to mind today is the night with Jeff Mills and Random Noise Generation live in 2006. I played relatively early and saw how mental the crowd were from the get go for the first time, but then I got to hang out and watch two incredible sets too, so best of both worlds for me.” Pressure’s 15th Birthday takes places at The Arches Glasgow, 29 Nov, 11pm-5am, £20

THE SKINNY


Diner by day. Drinks by night

Hire our

fully equipped

function room Clubbing Highlights

call for details

Words: Ronan Martin Illustration: Lewis Loughman

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e start off in Glasgow with the visit of the multi-talented Madlib. Working with some of the most talented names in modern hip-hop over the years, releasing albums with the likes of MF Doom and the late J Dilla, Otis Jackson Jr has gained critical acclaim for his output as a producer and his work as an MC. He considers himself a DJ first and foremost though, and his passion for a range of sounds as diverse as jazz, ska and electronica should ensure interesting selections find their way into this turntable masterclass. Support comes from Eclair Fifi (SWG3 Fri 1, Nov £12). The same night sees late Halloween high jinks with the legendary Twitch & Wilkes hosting their popular Optimo Espookio party (Sub Club, £10) and Pressure inviting Ben Klock and DVS1 to The Arches (£16). On Sunday 3 Nov, Caribou AKA Dan Snaith adopts his Daphni moniker and treats the Sub Club to a four hour set – his first Scottish performance under this more club-oriented guise. Snaith followed up on the success of the dark dancefloor destroyer Ye Ye with last year’s full length album Jiaolong, and his leftfield take on house music is an interesting counterbalance to the bland, imitation deep house that has become so prevalent in recent years (£12). On Friday 22 Nov, globe-trotting local crew Numbers pop up to host London-based producer and DJ, Peter O’Grady AKA Joy Orbison. Announcing his presence in 2009 with the Hyph Mngo/Wet Look EP, O’Grady has continued to build a loyal fanbase with a sound combining elements of house, bass music and UK garage. His tracks have been released on leading labels such as Hotflush, AUS and Nonplus (Sub Club, £TBC). Later in the month, another artist with ties to

November 2013

Boddika’s Nonplus label, Kassem Mosse, hits Glasgow to play a live set for Missing Persons Club alongside local analogue wizard Meschi (La Cheetah, Fri 29 Nov, £10). Now we take a look across the M8, where Cocoon Edinburgh unfolds in a secret location, headlined by veteran showman and label boss Sven Väth. Having begun his career in the early 80's, at first championing trance through the influential Harthouse label, the Frankfurt-based producer and DJ has become one of the biggest names in dance music. On Saturday 2 Nov, he’ll bring the spirit of his celebrated Ibiza events to this one-off party (Buses run to the secret location, £24.50 adv). The following weekend, drum n bass purveyors Xplicit welcome Ram Records’ Wilkinson to the Bongo Club (Fri 8 Nov, £10). Towards the end of the month, The Picture House plays host to Annie Mac Presents 2013. The stylistically diverse Radio 1 DJ tops a lineup featuring Duke Dumont and Cyril Hahn (Fri 22 Nov, £22). Elsewhere, notsosilent give free reign to German duo Hauke Freer and Matthias Reiling AKA Session Victim for an all night DJ set. Freer and Reiling have been on a roll since the release of their debut EP No Friends in 2009. They have since developed a close link with Delusions of Grandeur, with their album, The Haunted House of House, dropping on the label in 2012 (Sneaky Pete’s, Fri 29 Nov, £7-10). Finally, on the same night, Kapital’s 6th Birthday brings Gaiser to The Caves on Niddry Street. One of the leading lights on Richie Hawtin’a Minus label, the Detroit-born artist’s breed of minimalist techno has earned him many followers since he first surfaced in 2005 (£10).

CLUBS

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November Film Events Halloween may be over, but there are still plenty of scares on our screens, from FrightFest’s GFT takeover to the horror of John Travolta’s flares in Saturday Night Fever at DCA Words: Becky Bartlett Leviathan

Leviathan

Don Jon

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Director: Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel Starring: Fish, Fishermen, Birds Released: 29 Nov Certificate: 12A

Director: Joseph Gordon-Levitt Starring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Scarlett Johansson Released: 15 Nov Certificate: 18

Paravel and Castaing-Taylor’s non-narrative, anthropological collaboration – both a documentary and an abstract horror film – depicts the mayhem of life and labour on a large fishing vessel through chaotic, overwhelming first-person footage on the ship, under it and even above it. The name comes from that biblical terror from the sea, and the film is a thundering beast itself. In its opening stretches, what’s on screen feels almost primordial. The world is clearly our own but unrecognisable; the visceral noise, rusty colours and images, like fish-blood geysers from the side of the ship, feel straight out of some vision of the apocalypse. It’s this quality that makes a late sequence that simply observes an exhausted man staring at a television, and looking almost like a husk, a profoundly moving sight after the prior sensory rush. Leviathan is likely like nothing you’ve ever seen, with filmmaking methods you can barely comprehend, and it absolutely demands to be seen on the big screen. [Josh Slater-Williams]

In Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Don Jon, the first-time director stars as the beefcake of the title, a cocky stud who has no trouble picking up women, but who still can’t resist the lure of internet porn. Sadly, it’s quickly revealed that this is about as deep as his characterisation goes, and Gordon-Levitt can’t do enough with this protagonist to justify building an entire feature film around him. Instead, Don Jon settles for repetition and crude gags, before opting for the kind of fake romantic-comedy epiphanies that it has earlier decried. Gordon-Levitt shows ample confidence, and some of his choices do pay off (e.g. unearthing Tony Danza), but he too often mistakes rapid-fire editing and boisterous energy for filmmaking style. This is the work of a young director reaching to impress without having fully formed ideas, and in a film about the objectification of women, it’s a shame that fine actresses such as Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore are stuck in such reductive roles. [Philip Concannon]

Future My Love

Computer Chess

Director: Maja Borg Starring: Jacque Fresco, Roxanne Meadows, Nadya Cazan Released: 15 Nov Certificate:

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Might society soar if only we discharged the economic ballast? Such notions illuminate Swedish filmmaker Maja Borg’s debut feature, Future My Love, which flicks gracefully between documentary, road trip and love story. Journeying across the US with cardboard signs and candyfloss, Borg traces the indelible footsteps of Jacque Fresco to The Venus Project in Florida. Here, she speaks with the nonagenarian visionary who continues to self-subsist and hone his holistic model of a resource-based economy. Further inquiries connect everything from the price of tomatoes to the atom bomb. Super 8 footage and colour HD are delicately knitted together, and Borg’s poetic vision of her muse, Nadya Cazan, is enchantingly abstract. Complemented by a resonant orchestral score and feather-soft narration, Future My Love is beautiful, but never flimsy. While its originality resides in the suggestion we are married to damaging societal structures, its ambition lies in its faith we would ever consider a divorce. [Kirsty Leckie-Palmer] futuremylove.com

Director: Andrew Bujalski Starring: Patrick Riester, Myles Paige, Gordon Kindlmann Released: 22 Nov Certificate: 15

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A cursory glance at the new movie from Andrew Bujowski, which centres on a programing tournament taking place at a crummy hotel in the early-80s, where men (and one unicorn-like woman) with terrible clothes and hair do battle to see whose fridge freezer-sized computer is best at chess, might suggest a Christopher Guest-style satire. But it’s much more. This is a philosophical comedy as dense and complex as any programing algorithm. Like Bujowski’s previous wonderful films (Funny Ha Ha, Mutual Appreciation), Computer Chess is concerned with loneliness and miscommunication. And it’s not only the humans struggling to connect. One melancholic computer refuses to play against its fellow hardware: it will only match wits against a soul. Captured on vintage black and white video cameras that were obsolete decades ago, the aesthetic is as glitchy and idiosyncratic as the characters and their programs. Bujowski is credited as the inventor of the mumblecore sub-genre; this bracingly strange, often surreal movie requires a new classification. But, for now, lets go with brilliant. [Jamie Dunn]

Philomena

Blue Is the Warmest Colour

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Director: Stephen Frears Starring: Steve Coogan, Judi Dench, Clark Released: 1 Nov Certificate: 12A

Philomena’s premise couldn’t be more hokey. Based on true events, the film is an odd-couple road movie following smart aleck journo Martin Sixsmith (Coogan, giving off only the tiniest whiff of Partridge) as he investigates a human interest story about Philomena Lee, a little old Irish lady (Dench) searching for the child she was forced to give up for adoption after getting up the duff while training to be a nun. Director Frears knows a tale this sweet needs plenty of sharpness. Instead of some sickly mismatched friendship forming (see The King’s Speech), the class/age chasm between Philomena and Sixsmith remains uncrossed – in fact, a thin veil of prickly contempt hangs over the relationship ‘til the final scenes. This salty-sweet flavour is enriched by a consistent flow of gags. But what makes Philomena so winning is the sophisticated way in which it condemns the behaviour of the Catholic Church without denigrating people of faith – a delicate tightrope act that has given plenty of more high-minded films vertigo. [Jamie Dunn] pathe.co.uk

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Review

Director: Abdellatif Kechiche Starring: Adèle Exarchopoulos, Léa Seydoux Released: 22 Nov Certificate: 18

Blue Is the Warmest Colour made history at Cannes this year when its leads, Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux, shared the Palme d’Or with director Abdellatif Kechiche. In truth, the two stars might be more deserving of the prize than the filmmaker: it’s their astonishing performances that hold this sprawling film together. Over three hours, Kechiche explores the tumultuous relationship between Adèle (Exarchopoulos) and Emma (Seydoux), allowing us an extraordinary sense of intimacy not only through the sex scenes but also through their arguments, laughter, debates and many scenes of eating. At its best, Blue throbs with a vivid sense of real life and appears to be propelled forward by its characters’ emotions and choices. The experience of watching the film even comes to resemble the feeling of being in love – it’s a messy, unpredictable affair that provides both moments of exhilaration and moments of agonising emotional pain – but at the end of it all you’ll be glad you experienced it, and it’s something you won’t soon forget. [Philip Concannon]

FILM

FrightFest returns to the GFT in Glasgow on 2 Nov for a post-Halloween gorefest. Five films are being screened – controversial 1970s classic Mark of the Devil kickstarts the day, including a special Q&A session with its director, Michael Armstrong. This is followed by four new films, all of which are UK premieres: Discopath (the title’s fairly self-explanatory), religious horror Nothing Left to Fear, a remake of 1978 film Patrick, and The Station (think The Thing down under). With ticket deals for all five films, don’t miss the chance to see some new movies and have a bloody great day.

Jack Nicholson, Chinatown

If you’d like your disco with a little less horror, dig out your flares and strut down to the DCA in Dundee, where Saturday Night Fever is screening on 16 Nov. With a wonderfully evocative soundtrack by the Bee Gees and an iconic, Oscar nominated performance by John Travolta, this is a quintessentially 70s film, combining social realism with dance-filled escapism. Filmhouse in Edinburgh, in association with Drambuie, are paying homage to Jack Nicholson, the most Oscar-nominated man ever and one of only three to win three Academy Awards. Running through November and December, the eight films selected predominantly concentrate on his early career, with three bona fide classics showing: Chinatown (25 Nov), Easy Rider (27 Nov), and The Shining (28 Nov). Check out the Filmhouse website for more details. The 48 Hour Film Project is taking place this month, when filmmakers are invited to make a short film – from start to finish – over just one weekend. The GFT is showing the results on 26-27 Nov, where the audience can meet the filmmakers, vote for their favourites, and win prizes of their own. With the films yet to be made, who knows what they’ll be like, but it’s a great opportunity to see what will undoubtedly be a wide and unconventional selection of assorted shorts. Aspiring directors should head to www.48hourfilm.com/glasgow for details about participating. On 2 Dec, Dirty Wars is screening at the Cameo in Edinburgh. This documentary, in which investigative reporter Jeremy Scahill explores America’s military ethics in Afghanistan following witness reports about US soldiers pulling bullets out of pregnant Afghani women after a night raid, is essential viewing for those interested in the ongoing ‘war on terror’ and the covert operations involved. There will be a special panel discussion following the screening – guests yet to be confirmed.

THE SKINNY


Red River

Hummingbird

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Director: Howard Hawks Starring: John Wayne, Montgomery Clift, Joanne Dru, Released: 28 Oct Certificate: U Howard Hawks made so many great films that it’s inevitable a few are unjustly overlooked. One such film is 1948 western Red River, which offers a prime example of Hawks using a tried-and-trusted template to explore complex themes. It’s a fascinating study of masculine codes and an attempt to de-mythologise the legend of the cattle trail, but that subtext is in service to a grandly entertaining adventure, which ranks alongside the finest work of all involved. The central conflict between Wayne and Clift brings the best out in both actors (“I didn’t know the big son of a bitch could act,” John Ford said of Wayne after seeing the film), but Hawks also makes sure the men don’t have it all their own way. The scene in which Joanne Dru shrugs off an arrow to the shoulder to trade flirtatious dialogue is perhaps the most Hawksian moment in a film full of them. [Philip Concannon]

The Heat

Director: Paul Feig Starring: Sandra Bullock, Melissa McCarthy, Demian Bichir, Michael McDonald, Released: 25 Nov Certificate: 15

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Bridesmaids definitively proved for the umpteenth time to a sexist Hollywood that, yes, women can be funny, and yes, they can be funny without the film descending into a Bechdel test-failing slushfest. Director Paul Feig returns along similar lines here, but without the benefit of a razor-sharp Kristen Wiig script, it’s not quite the surprise triumph that earlier film turned out to be. The laughs come a little clumsier and more cartoonish than you might hope, but at least they come. Sandra Bullock plays a tough and unlikeable career-driven FBI agent, who finds herself unwittingly thrust into buddy-cop territory with brusque Boston beat detective Melissa McCarthy. McCarthy, a comedy juggernaut, comfortably steals most of her scenes, and while the script rarely surprises, it is often funny. And on that point, happily, gender is irrelevant. [John Nugent]

Director: Federico Fellini Starring: Marcello Mastroianni, Claudia Cardinale, Anouk Aimée, Released: 11 Nov Certificate: 15 Eight and a half films into his career, Fellini decided it was time to turn the camera inward. 8½ is a portrait of a creatively blocked filmmaker (Mastroianni) reaching crisis point, beset by memories and fantasies as he searches for the right path. The path Fellini eventually chose proved to be colour – 8½ was his last black-and-white film and marks a clear divide in his career – but the images captured here by the great Gianni Di Venanzo are some of the most memorable in cinema. From the opening dream sequence, Fellini dazzles and confounds the viewer with one extraordinary scene after another, finding endless beauty and mystery in the women from Guido’s past. This singular film is playful, bitter, enigmatic and undeniably self-indulgent, but it’s also one of cinema’s most extraordinary acts of creative expression, and grows more stimulating and ambiguous with each viewing. [Philip Concannon]

Director: Steven Knight Starring: Jason Statham, Agata Buzek, Released: Out now Certificate: 15 If you’re expecting another manic actioner, you could be disappointed by Jason Statham’s latest, which swaps OTT gunplay for religious symbolism and a broken man struggling to do the right thing. After being attacked while sleeping on the streets, a homeless ex-soldier (Statham) starts squatting in a rich businessman’s flat and becomes embroiled in the London underworld. As he makes a name for himself, he’s forced to choose between revenge and possible redemption through the love of a young nun who runs a local homeless shelter. What’s most unexpected about Steven Knight’s film is a very committed performance from Statham, who clearly isn’t afraid to take chances. Yes, there’s some action here and there, but Hummingbird shows that he’s quite capable of being a credible actor when pushed. It’s a worthy attempt by the Stath to stretch himself. [Scott McKellar]

The White Dove / Josef Kilián

Halloween

Director: František Vláčil / Pavel Juráček & Jan Schmidt Starring: Karel Smyczek, Vjaceslav Irmanov Released: 28 Oct Certificate: PG

Director: John Carpenter Starring: Jamie Lee Curtis, Donald Pleasence, Tony Moran, Nancy Kyes Released: Out now Certificate: 18

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Before Kes, Czech master František Vlácil’s 1960 feature debut The White Dove told of another young boy caring for a prized bird, here a carrier pigeon intended for a small island in the Baltic sea that gets lost in Prague along the way. Míša (Smyczek), a child seemingly unable to walk, shoots and injures the bird with a pellet gun. His artist neighbour seeks to make the boy feel the full weight of his actions regarding this likely fatality, but it is Míša’s faith that helps rehabilitate the bird, as well as conquer his own psychological condition. Thriving as both humanist tale and survival fable regarding totalitarianism, this is a haunting film of oft-stunning visual poetry – its haunting imagery is enriched by Zdenek Liska’s frequently other-wordly score. [Josh Slater-Williams]

John Carpenter’s iconic horror defined the slasher genre and for many it’s never been bettered. Looking at it today, it’s startling just how simple it is, free of the dreaded bloat of more modern horror films that can’t help but over-complicate themselves. ‘The Shape’ is a nebulous terrifying boogeyman stalking Lori Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), the perfect ‘final girl.’ Carpenter lets us use our imaginations to fill in the blanks and the result is one of the most effective, frightening films there is. This 35th anniversary release adds an all new hour-long documentary filmed at HorrorHound 2012, where Curtis made a onetime-only appearance to meet lifelong fans of the series. This, plus a newly recorded audio commentary from Carpenter and Curtis, makes this an essential Blu-ray for fans. [Scott McKellar]

Anouk Aimée in Lola ©2012 Ciné-Tamaris – Fondation Groupama Gan – Fondation Technicolor

7 November to 7 December 2013

GLASGOW FILM THEATRE 0141 332 6535 9 – 26 Nov EDINBURGH FILMHOUSE 0131 228 2688 7 – 24 Nov EDINBURGH DOMINION 0131 447 4771 15 Nov – 1 Dec DUNDEE CONTEMPORARY ARTS 01382 909900 10 – 16 Nov INVERNESS EDEN COURT 01463 244234 14 – 28 Nov ABERDEEN THE BELMONT 01224 343536 21 Nov – 7 Dec KIRKCALDY ADAM SMITH THEATRE 01592 583302 10 – 14 Nov INSTITUT FRANCAIS D’ECOSSE 0131 225 5366 14 Nov ALLIANCE FRANCAISE DE GLASGOW 0141 331 4080 12 & 28 Nov BO’NESS HIPPODROME 01324 506850 30 Nov

www.frenchfilmfestival.org.uk November 2013

FILM

Review

57


There Is No Rewind Talbot Rice

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Karren Cunningha, Fib, Stills

Karen Cunningham

Collective, until 24 Nov

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Contemporary art’s ongoing project to wean itself off philosophy and onto newer disciplines such as anthropology seems to be progressing well, particularly if Karen Cunningham’s newly commissioned film at Collective is anything to go by. The first exhibition taking place within the temporary gallery space on top of Calton Hill takes as its starting point and title popular and (of course) French anthropologist Bruno Latour’s concept of ‘factish’ – a cross between fact and fetish. The film focuses on two young census takers in Fife, neither of whom ever do any real census taking, instead preferring to scribble abstractly on their sheets whilst speaking emptily into houses, scenes that seem to recall the pseudo-scientific games enacted in honour of those concepts put forward by the somewhat less popular (but also French) founder of pataphysics, Alfred Jarry.

“It doesn’t really matter what questions we ask, as long as we ask a lot of people the same questions,” intones the female lead, one of many cute pop-anthropological phrases offered up to us in the first half of the film. Things seem to get a little more interesting once the concept of factish has become long-forgotten, the shots of our two census takers grimly pedalling a floating swan about a lake recalling the Finnish arthouse slapstick of Aki Kaurismaki’s lusciously shot awkward silences. Later, shots of our male lead standing at the mouth of a cave puffing on an electronic cigarette, sunlight glancing off the small mirror that takes the place of his ID card, preface some genuinely funny lines. There is a clear intentionality and carefully constructed aesthetic to the film, even if it does seem that art’s new diet of anthropology is ultimately still only tackling diet anthropology. [J.D.A. Winslow] Until 24 Nov, 6-8pm, Free www.collectivegallery.net

Within the darkened Neoclassical interior of the Georgian gallery a single projector screen stands before a scattering of candlelit tables. It shows the familiar, if now obsolete image of a digitised test card, which for the duration of the evening will be in control. Its vocoder provides a crackled introduction to the three hours of video, performance and sound that proceed. A devotion, of sorts, to Nam June Paik’s creative vision of technology. There are some standout works. One is a performance by Ed Atkins titled Depression, in which a blue face-masked figure chews on the term’s ambivalence, flipping between its various physical and emotional meanings. His broken monologue is punctuated by snippets of audio and moments of darkly humorous distanciation. The body on stage is embedded within the screen – a theme concurrent with a number of works, perhaps as a strategy to provide the increasingly ubiquitous status of video with a physical aspect. For example, in Herland, a new work by Michelle Hannah, a silhouette behind the screen emerges from the shadows as a familiarly miserable fragment of How Soon is Now becomes gradually clearer. Its murmurs of adolescent angst are recast as an eerie mantra. Craig Mulholland’s Before the Law (After Kafka) involves a similar interface between performer/video. A masked figure, stiffly clad in a linen blazer, stands before a crackling visualisation of Kafka’s parable. Its bleak coda, in which the gate finally closes on the figure, marks a dystopic moment within Nam June Paik’s creative vision. Elsewhere, the programme seems oddly balanced. Jillian Mayer’s videos seem an almost obligatory nod to the exhausted end of ‘post-net’ faddishness, while the inclusion of Stockhausen’s Connection provides a contrastingly historical voice. One that recalls nostalgic avant-gardism

Craig Mulholland, Semiconductor (2013) Courtesy Talbot Rice Gallery

via Paik’s Fluxus heyday. A tired crowd leaves to the hum of static. Overloaded, perhaps. Confused and unable to rewind. [Alex Kuusik] www.ed.ac.uk/about/museums-galleries/talbot-rice

ADVERTISING FEATURE

CultureLabel: A Very Scottish Collection Words: Jac Mantle

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t doesn’t take an expert to see that the contemporary art coming out of Scotland is some of the finest in the world. Why, anyone rolling along to the city’s whitest walls of a Friday evening mainly to avail themselves of the free booze could tell you that. A typical run-down of creative hotspots worldwide might read ‘New York | London | Scotland’ – and in fact this is exactly the line-up carried by online retailer CultureLabel.com, which has just launched its Scottish Collection. A partnership between Creative Scotland and CultureLabel, The Scottish Collection is a curated selection of contemporary art and design from a diverse range of organisations across Scotland, with many original and limited edition works on offer. Buyers can browse the works by city, gallery, artist, medium, size, colour and price. Many of them are available to buy through the Own Art scheme, making it easy and affordable to start collecting or just to spruce up one’s home a bit. Participating organisations include heavyweights like Fruitmarket Gallery, Dundee Contemporary Arts and Streetlevel Photoworks, but also newer faces – at least to the realm of e-commerce – such as iota, Patricia Fleming Projects and online gallery Artpistol. Examples of sterling design will also be available from

the likes of Brazen Studios and Craft Scotland. Coming from a country of astonishing range and breadth, choice will not be something the collection is short of. After all, Scotland is surely the only land in the world where one can take in some first-class visual art or design and a pizza crunch in the same evening – sometimes even enjoying the two simultaneously, if we’re honest. In this vein the collection packs big names alongside talented emerging artists and designers – much like the Scottish art scene itself. Launching with almost 200 works, the selection will be regularly refreshed with new stock – which is frankly a relief, with some Scottish cities nighon spewing out Turner Prize contenders. Winner of the 2004 Turner Prize, Jeremy Deller features in the collection as one of the works selected by Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art. For the Festival’s 2012 edition Deller installed a huge bouncy castle of Stonehenge on Glasgow Green, instantly beckoning all the school children in Glasgow to its slippery surfaces, where they made fools of all the adults who had forgotten how to stay upright. A print of the installation, titled Sacrilege, will be available to purchase on CultureLabel.com. Other highlights of the collection include work by internationally acclaimed artists Martin

Jeremey Deller, Sacrilege

Boyce, Rachel Whiteread, Harland Miller, Callum Innes and Elizabeth Blackadder, along with emerging talents like Patrizio Belcampo, Katie Rowlands, Martin McBride and Martin Sloss. If you fancy investing in some future Turner Prize winners (seriously, spewing them out) but don’t know where to start with looking round galleries, CultureLabel is the place for you. With all

the works in the collection selected by industry experts, the hard work has really been done for you – and the legwork too. Yet another reason not to even leave the house – though we have to warn you, you’ll be missing out on a nice warm beer and a slice of heart attack. www.culturelabel.com/scotland

Galleries across Scotland are members of the Own Art scheme. By offering interest-free loans of £100-£2,000 through Own Art, buying an original piece of quality contemporary art or craft couldn’t be easier. For more information about Own Art and a list of participating galleries see the Own Art website: www.ownart.org.uk

Offer subject to age and status. Terms and conditions apply. You will need a UK bank account that can handle direct debits, proof of identity and address, and you will also need to be over 18. Own Art is an Arts Council England initiative operated by Creative Sector Services CIC, a Community Interest Company registered in England and Wales under number 08280539. Registered address: 2-6 Cannon Street, London EC4M 6YH.

Look for the pink logo. (representative 0% APR)

249 West George Street Glasgow G2 4QE

58

Review

ART

THE SKINNY


Mounira al Sohl/Sarah Forrest

and moments are lifted from Sartre’s novel, making his the text around which Forrest’s work rrrrr is wrapped. This ‘double solo show’ sees two female artists Exactly how much or how little of John take their departure from two male-authored Cassavetes’ films have inspired Mounira al Sohl’s classics. Taking centre-stage in the largest galwork Dinosaurs is difficult to tell – featuring her lery, Sarah Forrest’s video is based around Jeanfriends and family in Beirut, the five video sePaul Sartre’s seminal existentialist novel, Nausea. quences purposefully blur the line between actShot in Forrest’s Glasgow studio, the video melds ing and real life. Each revolves around the social extracts from the novel with Forrest’s musings on act of drinking, the gluttonous guzzling serving to the similarity of her own experiences and those blur the boundary even more. of Nausea’s anguished protagonist. Shot cumulatively over a period of time, the A nice twist to the homage is that it’s sitecollection do not tell a single narrative but one specific, Forrest making reference to Maryhill can make observations about the various characand the ‘real sort of West End crowd’ she enters. The gorgeous, brightly-coloured scenes of counters by the River Kelvin. In the same vein the Lebanon are enough without trying to discover narrators’ Scottish accents and poetic language Cassavetes within them. For al Sohl the filmic Nevan Lahart, Pedagogie Chums, digital print (2013) evoke existential literature nearer home, such as reference has served its purpose, but it’s debatAlexander Trocchi’s Young Adam. able what our knowledge of it adds to the videos, I Want To Be Your Dog dressed in a Mondrian costume, a model dog Beautifully-shot and edited, it’s disappointexcept to emphasise the question of whether or The Glue Factory, until 2 Nov wrapped in lacy tights. There are hobby-paintings ing when you register that quite so many lines not the actors are acting. [Jac Mantle] rrrrr of dogs, dogs dressed in gimp costumes and even The blurb for I Want To Be Your Dog proclaims it a video from a dog’s-eye-view. to be ‘an exhibition that isn’t about anything in Amid what sadly comes to feel like a lot of particular.’ With a star-studded line-up of artists filler pieces are a couple of league-of-their-own inhabiting the perpetually pleasing Glue Factory, gems that magnetise the crowd. One is Rachel this elusive pre-opening teaser feels like a huMaclean’s Over the Rainbow; the other is Vanessa morous downplay of what is sure to be a mega Donoso Lopez’s kinetic installation with found success. objects, which – as far as anyone can tell – reThe entrance is promising. An arresting, freshingly has nothing to do with dogs other than ultra-hypnotic Beagles and Ramsay video efforthaving the word ‘Bitch’ in the title. lessly engages an entire room with chilled-out If you treat the dog as a medium, and look beats and stripped-back monochrome splendour. really hard, you might find themes of submisSomewhere between a propaganda campaign and sion being investigated in works like those by trendy nightclub visuals, objects that are disRichard Kern and Bryan Derballa, or an explotinctly sausage in theme spin amongst pulsating ration of identity through costume. It is about ecstasy-esque smiley faces and statements that dogs though, isn’t it? And the jury is still out on shout silent orders like ‘SELL A LUNG TO FEED whether that can be a legitimate curatorial conTHE KIDS.‘ Yes! We’re ready for this, bring it on. cept. [Emma Ewan] And then the music disappears and there thegluefactory.org/index.php?/events/want-to-be-your-dog are just dogs – dogs everywhere. A digital collage that references C.M. Coolidge’s Dogs Playing Sarah Forrest, I Left it on Page 32 (2013) Poker series, an oil painting of a greyhound CCA, until 10 Nov

Book of the Month Personae

By Sergio De La Pava

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Postmodern to the core, Sergio De La Pava’s Personae starts out telling the story of Detective Helen Tame – musical prodigy/polymathic essayist extraordinaire turned homicide cop – as she tries to impose order on the chaos of the cosmos one case at a time. De La Pava’s boundlessly kinetic prose, however, sends it tearing off away from this conventional central narrative, touching down in existential quandaries, metatextual discourses on the art of writing, intertextual dissections of the work of the great Gabriel García Márquez, hallucinogenic theological debates in the jungle of Colombia and a two act play that reads something like a mesmerising marriage of Samuel Beckett and Lewis Carroll, before briefly checking in with the original story once again. There’s a moment during the play in which one character, to the total disbelief of his compatriots, suddenly and inexplicably pulls a sword out of thin air. At many of its more mind bending twists and turns, Personae often leaves the reader with a similar sense of dumbfounded perplexity, but by combining its absurdist wit and fierce intelligence with a core of heartfelt emotion, it remains completely irresstible even when it’s being more than a little incomprehensible. [Ross McIndoe] Out now, published by University of Chicago Press, RRP £12

The Vampyre Family

In the Rosary Garden

By Andrew McConnell Stott

By Nicola White

Double Negative

By Ivan Vladislavić

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Halfway through the book, there’s a quote from Samuel Johnson: “The best advice to authors would be, that they should keep out of the way of one another.” To say The Vampyre Family bears out this dictum is putting it lightly indeed. In the summer of 1816, a group of authors – Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and John Polidori – came to the Villa Diodati near Lake Geneva. Stott’s group biography covers the build-up to and aftermath of their stay, paying particular attention to the group’s lesser-known members, John and Claire. The former, who also served as the group’s doctor, is best remembered for writing The Vampyre, an influential if creaky gothic novel, while the latter, Mary’s half-sister, had her astonishing precocity arrested and her life ruined by a maniacal devotion to Byron, who fathered her child but couldn’t have cared less. It’s a meticulously researched book, but for the most part wears its research lightly. The narrative is brisk, vivid and sinuous, skillfully taking in the larger Romantic milieu while sticking close to the fiery interactions of the principal characters – and with his loving focus on hitherto sidelined figures, Stott manages to illuminate and revivify a brief moment in history that’s been all but written-out. [Kristian Doyle]

Nicola White’s debut novel begins with the shocking discovery of a dead baby in the grounds of a convent school in 1980s Ireland. From there we follow the stories of Ali Hogan, the young woman who found the baby and is promptly brought to national attention by a vampiric media, and Detective Swan who is assigned the task of discovering the infant’s fate. For the latter, White moves seamlessly into the tropes of the detective genre, giving Swan his own troubled personal life, useless partner, and steadfast determination to get to the bottom of the case. Ali’s attempts to find her own voice and position as she is paraded on national television allow an exploration of the novel’s central examination of sexuality, religion and most centrally abortion in the Irish state. In the Rosary Garden is an accomplished debut that handles its difficult themes with care, guided by the natural voice of an author who lived in Ireland at the time and witnessed the maelstrom of issues at the forefront of society. While the treatment is hardly groundbreaking, the novel deftly weaves together its various elements to present an engaging, non-didactic look at how this issue affected and continues to affect a developing Irish identity. [Ryan Rushton]

From a hilltop overlooking Johannesburg, Neville Lister and his photographer companion pick three rooftops at random and decide to pay the occupants a visit. What they find behind the closed doors is a microcosm of what lies in the city beyond: grinding poverty, racial divides and social inequality. Yet they also witness moments of powerful beauty and redemptive love in which characters are shown muddling through the harrowing realties of life on either side of the divide. The novel portrays a city in upheaval: a place battling to come to terms with itself in which both black and white people struggle to position themselves in a new society. Vladislavic began the novel as a collaborative project with photographer David Goldblatt, and it is apparent that the author has an intrinsic understanding of the artistry of photography; indeed, it is in his descriptions of the technical process that his writing is at its most poignant: “the shutter fell through the moment like a guillotine. You can see the relief on Mrs Ditton’s face as she drops from the fullness of life into a smaller, diminished immortality.” [Rosie Hoegood] Out now, published by And Other Stories, RRP £10

Out now, published by Cargo, RRP £8.99

Out 7 Nov, published by Canongate, RRP £25

November 2013

BOOKS

Review

59


Couldn’t Care Less Traverse

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Do not be fooled by the pastel colours and floral patterns on the elaborate set of this production; Couldn’t Care Less unfurls a narrative about Alzheimer’s and the impact it can have – both physically and mentally – on the lives of the people who have it, and those in their immediate environment. In a little over an hour, Morna Pearson’s play follows the evolution from mild forgetfulness to aggression through the tale of a mother and her daughter who comes to stay for a weekend. It observes the growing frustration on both sides of the relationship, as well as the awkward blankness that overcomes Alzheimer’s patients and eventually devours them whole. This comes across quite strongly as Elspeth (Hilde McKenna) drifts into surreal sequences merging her past and her thoughts, physically rearranging them. Couldn’t Care Less also demonstrates the difficulties of taking on the role of the carer. To paraphrase Lilly (Liz Strange), it is often a matter of adapting to each other’s needs and learning “a new dance.” Of course, it is much more difficult than it sounds; caring for someone with Alzheimer’s is a full-time job. With comic and tragic moments peppered here and there in the script, the production doesn’t really allow itself to reach a dramatic climax. Nonetheless, it is a difficult subject to breach on a stage, and so it is commendable and wonderful that Strange Theatre and Plutôt la Vie have managed to put together a show about Alzheimer’s that is comical without ridiculing either of its two characters. [Eric Karoulla] Part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival, and Luminate: Scotland’s Creative Ageing Festival strangetheatre.co.uk plutotlavie.org.uk

Liz Strange in Couldn't Care Less

couldntcarelesstheplay.wordpress.com

Dragon

Handel’s Cross

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Citizens Theatre

CCA

From the first glimpse of the cotton wool clouds hanging from a brooding sky it is with a sense of wonder that you watch Dragon. Wonder at the choreographed dance of events, wonder at the precise execution of the story and wonder at the glorious dragons bought to life by puppetry. Co-produced by Vox Motus, National Theatre of Scotland and the Tianjin People’s Art Theatre, Dragon is full of wonder and wonderful. Since his mother’s death, Tommy’s life has taken a nose dive. His dad is catatonic with grief, his sister barely sees him and he’s being bullied at school. All alone and with no-one to turn to his life changes when one night he looks outside straight into the eyes of a dragon. The dragon enables Tommy to cope with all the change. It has many guises: a wooden dragon with a devilish sense of humour morphs into a wispy one who entices and then transforms to give him courage and flight. Another feeds and needles him before a massively beautiful one is tamed. Tommy’s relationship with his dragon and thus himself is ever growing and changing. The play finally heads towards the climax where Tommy realises he can neither outrun his dragon, nor his own anger. Endlessly creatively, superbly balancing pathos with humour, the adventure transforms Tommy from boy to young man and being a play without words ensures that everyone gains some insight alongside him. It’s a seamless performance from the ensemble and a play for older children and adults alike. [Susannah Radford] Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh 30 Oct-2 Nov, 7.30pm, £15.50/12.50/£8 The Lowry, Salford Quays, 8 & 9 Nov, £9, £14/£10 Dragon

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Review

nationaltheatrescotland.com/content/default. asp?page=home_Dragon

As part of Glasgay 2013, Theatre North bring Handel’s Cross to the CCA. The play follows one man’s fantasy about the famous composer Handel, all of which is played out while Martin Lewton is strapped to a wooden St. Andrew’s cross. Of course, as a fantasy, it doesn’t have to answer to any laws of theatrical convention or even historical accuracy. Nonetheless, ‘fat Handel’ is represented in period – 18th century – costume, and is given a Yorkshire accent. While the narrative presented by Lewton is fascinating and reflects an intelligent and thorough research of Handel’s life, the stationary re-enactment – extremely passionate from Lewton’s side but rather passive on the part of Handel – makes it hard to focus on the tale being told. Daring though it may be to be flogged or have wax dripped on your

Dance

THAT Festival

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A youth festival would be quite poor without dance in it; after all, it is how many young people interact – in clubs, or in dance classes (or dare I say it, zumba?) THAT Festival brings two youthfully energetic companies to the fore. 9-2-5 / Heartbeats, performed as part of the Macrobert’s THAT festival, is a double bill by Bright Night International, featuring beatboxer Bigg Taj. Both pieces examine our boredom with daily life, and the desire to spice things up. The performers showcase their ability to be comical in a physical form, while also extremely versatile in style. Each movement is smooth and precise – this becomes obvious quite quickly from the entertaining and furiously fast chase regarding

THEATRE

naked body in public, it distracts rather than adding to the tale’s narration. Admittedly, the focus on the method of narration may be petty, since the play opens up so many questions about the nature of sexuality and the relationship between God, Christianity, and sex. While the performance is called Handel’s Cross, and it is implied that the cross is the one Lewton finds himself strapped to, it could also be the metaphorical cross that Handel would have carried for his sexual orientation, a cross he couldn’t possibly choose to bear. Finally, the idea that someone who made such spellbinding music, such iconic hymns, could have been gay might not be entirely groundbreaking, but it definitely makes for an interesting starting point for discussion about artistic expression, repression of desire, sex, and religion. [Eric Karoulla] theatrenorth.co.uk/current-shows/tunnels-of-love glasgay.co.uk/handels-cross

one piece of paper in the second part. On the other hand, Ponydance’s Anybody waitin’? takes the idea of going out specifically for the purpose of meeting someone, and turns it into an interactive dance performance. Hilarious, raunchy and quite an accurate depiction of a night out, with drinks spilt and awkward, almost aerobic dancing, Anybody waitin’ is not for audiences who don’t like interacting with performers up close and personal. It will leave your sides split with laughter, and a burning question in your mind: is that really what our ‘mating dance’ looks like? [Eric Karoulla] brightnightinternational.com/performance/925-2 ponydance.com macrobert.org

THE SKINNY


A Serious Business Is comedy respected as an art form? Andrew Learmonth makes an impassioned plea for Scotland to take its comic storytellers seriously Illustration: Maisie Shearring

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n October’s Skinny, Scottish publishers Canongate printed a list of the 40 storytellers they thought would ‘define’ Scotland over the next four decades. It was a list compiled by the great and the good of Scottish arts. And it was a great list. A phenomenal list. A list that would make you weep with patriotic pride. “Look!”— it said— “look at the calibre of Scotland’s storytellers”. I could not fault the selection panel. Everyone deserved to be there. But there weren’t any comedians. No stand ups, no comedy writers, nothing. Odd, isn’t it? If ‘the nation has been thoroughly scoured for the very best storytellers,’ surely that should include a comedian or two? That it doesn’t, can mean one of two things: 1.) That the panel scoured the nation for storytellers across all mediums and didn’t find a comedian who defined the nation… Or 2.) They didn’t consider comedians. It didn’t cross the panel’s minds to think of including any comedians. It has to be reason 2; it can’t be reason 1. If you scoured the nation you’d want to include Limmy. You’d maybe think of Kevin Bridges or Susan Calman or Greg McHugh or Frankie Boyle or Janey Godley. You might look at future stars like Matt Winning, Susie McCabe, Eleanor Morton, Fern Brady or Richard Gadd. It just has to be reason 2. And that’s sad because in the same way Billy Connolly, Rikki Fulton, Stanley Baxter etc have defined Scotland’s identity, home and abroad for 40 years, surely we can expect comedians to continue this between now and 2053? Comedy isn’t taken as seriously as it should be by the arts community in Scotland. It’s not thought of as an art. It receives little funding in the way that other arts do. I would be amazed if any local authorities support it as they support theatre, photography and writing groups. Even the arts media barely regard it as an art. In the recent Scotsman’s A-Z of arts autumn highlights there wasn’t a single comedy gig mentioned. We

have the Scottish Album of The Year, the Critics Awards for Theatre in Scotland, The Scottish Book of The Year, but nothing for comedy. In fairness there is undoubtedly a lot of dull stand-up – dull jokes about nothing, performed by people who only want to be liked and don’t have anything to say (I am as guilty of anyone at playing-it-safe when faced with a bunch of drunks in some dark room in a pub on a Friday night). Comedy isn’t helped by the BBC, who ask that commissions be as broad and as accessible as possible. Maybe it’s very hard to get past that. But this dull safeness isn’t exclusive to comedy. There is plenty of dull, safe music and theatre. Yet music and theatre as art forms aren’t written off in the way that comedy is because of this. Ultimately Canongate’s list doesn’t really matter; creators will create regardless. But it is important. Scotland is a nation defined by her storytellers. The image we show to the world, to

“We accept there can be different kinds of theatre, music and art. It’d be nice if the same were true of comedy” the rest of the UK and to ourselves comes from the stories they tell. In this year of referendum and sport when the world is watching us it’s up to the storytellers to explain to the world who we are. It’s up to the storytellers to explain to us who we are. It’s not all knob jokes.

Music | Comedy | Spoken Word | Film | Performance

NO POLITICIANS | NO SPEECHES National Tour kicking off in Edinburgh on St Andrew’s Day. For more information check out: www.facebook.com/2014socialclub “When you make art you are more willing to take a blank canvas and imagine something wonderful on it” – Stuart Braithwaite, Mogwai

Facilitated by Yes Scotland

November 2013

COMEDY

Preview

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Glasgow Music Tue 29 Oct Sub Focus

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15.50

The electronic music producer (aka Nick Douwma) plays a trademark captivating performance, featuring audio-reactive circular LED technology.

Wed 30 Oct Steve Cradock

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

The long-serving guitarist to Ocean Colour Scene takes to the road solo. Bring Me The Horizon

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

Yorkshire lads known for their rock and metal musical stylings, currently touring the hell outta their fourth album, Sempiternal. Francis Dunnery

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £22.50

English singer/songwriter, record producer and record label owner, best known for fronting the original line-up of It Bites. John Smith

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £8

English folk guitarist and singer from Devon, doing his one man with a guitar thing.

Thu 31 Oct

Paradise Lost (Lacuna Coil)

O2 ABC, 18:00–22:00, £22.50

Longstanding gothic metal-styled hellraisers, taking to the road in celebration of their 25th anniversary. Axis Of (Atlas:Empire)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–22:00, £6.50

The Belfast hardcore outfit bore a hole through the stage as per, fresh-ish from supporting The Bronx earlier in the year. Tyler Hilton

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £15

Acoustic rock-meets-pop singer/ songwriter, who also dabbles as an actor on the side don’tchaknow (most notably in One Tree Hill) Jake Bugg

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Young Nottingham-born folkmeets-indie singer/songwriter, known to his mammy as Jake Edwin Kennedy. Lilygreen and Maguire

Classic Grand, 19:30–22:00, £12.50

Two young lads from South Wales, churning out songs on guitars since they were kids – currently recording their debut LP. Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds

Barrowland, 19:00–23:00, £sold out

Throughout his thirty year career with the Bad Seeds, Nick Cave has nary put a cloven hoof wrong – with newest LP, Push the Sky Away, further testament to that. Go clamour for a ticket to the album’s live airing. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang: Halloween Extravaganza

Classic Grand, 19:00–23:00, £9 adv. (£12 door)

Voice Tramway, 19:30–21:30, £12 (£8)

Scottish debut and opening performance of Sonica 2013 – Voice – a stunning audio-visual piece by Norwegian composer and sound sculptress Maja S K Ratkje, accompanied by light design by HC Gilje. Part of Sonica 2013. Walk With Me: Sounds in Your Pocket

CCA, 11:00–18:00, free

Unique sonic walk experience playing melodies, chatter and electronica around Glasgow, using GPS data to trigger sounds through a musical iPhone app. Download the app via sonic-a.co.uk. Part of Sonica 2013. Door

Tramway, 18:00–20:00, free

American-born composer George Higgs brings his musical piece to Glasgow, for which two musicians push through Tramway, stopping periodically to perform their musical compositions. Part of Sonica 2013.

Fri 01 Nov

John Cooper Clarke

SWG3, 19:00–22:00, £20

More satirical and biting political verse, delivered in Cooper Clarke’s rapid-fire performance style – aka punk poetry at its finest. Arctic Monkeys

The Hydro, 18:30–22:00, From £25

Benefitting from some mentoring from a certain Mr Josh Homme, the Monkeys are back on the live circuit touring their latest LP offering, AM.

Pete Macleod (Proud Honey + Stonehouse Violets + Crawford Smith)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £7

Scottish singer/songwriter who recently swapped LA for Lanarkshire, as you do. Ozric Tentacles

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £15

The psychedelic space rockers take to the UK armed with a 28-strong back catalogue of albums, celebrating 30 years of music-making. Jake Bugg

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Young Nottingham-born folkmeets-indie singer/songwriter, known to his mammy as Jake Edwin Kennedy. The Vex

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The newly-reformed Weegie lot play an extended set of classic and rockin’ tributes of songs that inspired them. Bill Orcutt

The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:00, £7.50

The Harry Pussy co-founder takes to the road armed with his new LP, A History Of Every One, which again acts as a signature interrogation of his trusty four-stringed vintage acoustic Kay. Dressed To Kill + Bad Name

Burlesque-styled horror show, featuring a headline set from steampunk-influenced quartet, The Courtesans, plus live burlesque, fire-eating and free horror facepainting by Sarah’s Scars.

Double dose of tribute acts, representing Kiss and Bon Jovi respectively.

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, Free

The Brighton-based melodic punk lot bring the joy Glasgow-way.

Blaenavon

Fledgling Hampshire trio built on soaring choruses and the manic energy of yoof. Parquet Courts

Mono, 19:30–22:00, £10

The NYC ensemble make their Scottish debut, mixing up punk-rock and indie in their own inimitable way. St Johns Ambience (The Unpeople)

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alternative-styled Glasgow quartet made up of members from various Scottish bands past and present. Shotty Horroh

Audio, 19:00–22:30, £7

UK rapper known for his multi-silible rhyme patterns, clever wordplay and humourus punchlines, performing a special Halloween set with support from a selection of local hip-hop crews.

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Listings

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:30, £10

River Jumpers

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £4

The Buffer Zone

Tramway, 19:30–21:30, £12 (£8)

Scottish Premiere of Yannis Kyriakides’ powerful multimedia work; an operatic world of division inspired by the Cyprus UN Buffer Zone, exploring the boundaries of separation. Part of Sonica 2013. Door

Tramway, 13:00–15:00, free

American-born composer George Higgs brings his musical piece to Glasgow, for which two musicians push through Tramway, stopping periodically to perform their musical compositions. Part of Sonica 2013. Blood On The Dancefloor

Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, £9

Electro-pop duo based in Phoenix, Arizona, touring with their latest album, Bad Blood.

Sat 02 Nov Chase and Status

The Hydro, 18:30–22:00, £28

Manc DJ duo and dance music’s hot property, effortlessly marrying liquid funk with rich ragga sounds, much to many a clubber’s delight. Gabrielle Aplin

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Experimental singer/songwriter working her magic over the folkpop template, all hints of choirs here and twinkly noises there. Future Of The Left

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £10

The Welsh alternative rockers tour their current re-jigged, beefed-up line-up. Aeon Zen (Jiezuberband)

Classic Grand, 18:30–22:00, £10

The Rich Hinks-led progressive metal rockers play their latest LP, Enigma, in its entirety. One Last Secret (For What You’re Worth)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £8

The Kilmarnock rock-meets-pop foursome continue to tour their unsigned little arses off. Luke Sital- Singh

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £7

Promising young London singer/ songwriter with an innate ability to capture the raw emotion of a moment in song. Gary War (Purple Pilgrims + Muscles of Joy + Dick 50 + Confidential Waist Soundsystem) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:00–23:00, £5

Special showcase night celebrating the release of a new Gary War/ Purple Pilgrims split release on esteemed London DIY label Upset The Rhythm. Compositions for Involuntary Strings Tramway, 19:30–21:30, £12 (£8)

Australian composer Michaela Davies wires herself and her players to an EMS system, triggering strange, paroxysmal movements, to perform pieces of music via electrical impulses. Part of Sonica 2013. Big Strauss

Stereo, 19:30–23:00, Free

The moody Glasgow indie stars re-unite for their first show in a decade.

James Yorkston + Jon Thorne + Suhail Yusaf Khan

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £15

Following a 2012 experiment – where musicians from India and the UK were placed in a recording studio in Edinburgh for a week to come up with original songs – a trio of the artists unveil the fruits, amongst them Fife-dwelling folkie, James Yorkston.

Sun 03 Nov

We Came from Wolves (Algernon Doll + Wolves at Heart + True Arcadian)

The Art School Union, 19:30–22:00, £4 (£3)

Post-rock foursome all about harmonic, melodic soundscapes with hook-laden, euphoric choruses. Bear’s Den (The Mariner’s Children)

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

London-based trio led by folkster Andrew Davie (formerly of Cherbourg). The Boomtown Rats (Patrik Fitzgerald)

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £24

The longstanding Irish new wave lot return to the stage, a full bag of hits in tow. Gabby Young and Other Animals

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £8

Crafting a new genre of entertainment, Gabby Young et al bring their circus swing/burlesque folk show to the UK. The Toy Dolls

Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

Punk rock trio hailing from Sunderland, bringing the noise since 1979.

Mon 04 Nov Little Green Cars

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

London-based indie-rock ensemble made up of four chaps and one lass.

Vista Chino The Garage, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

American rock band formerly known as Kyuss Lives!, touring under their new line up that excludes a certain Mr Josh Homme.

Tue 05 Nov

Public Service Broadcasting

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £12

Experimental duo who sample old public information films and archive material and set them to new music, making for a pretty special live set. Jacco Gardner

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–23:00, £7

Baroque pop multi-instrumentalist from the Netherlands, creating a unique sound by combining the sounds of harpsichord, strings, flutes and other classical instruments with raw psychedelic effects. Bipolar Sunshine

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £6

Solo project of Manchester-based musician Adio Marchant (formerly of Kid British fame), touring with his newly-released EP, Aesthetics. No Joy (Fear of Men)

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £6

Canadian shoegazing duo made up of Jasamine White-Gluz and Laura Lloyd.

Daddy Long Legs (The Reverse Cowgirls + Los Tentakills)

Mono, 19:30–22:00, £5

NYC residing rock’n’blues trio deriving their moniker from their longlegged harmonica-blastin’ frontman. Dillinger Escape Plan

The Garage, 19:00–22:00, £14

Hardcore metal four-piece from New Jersey, touring their latest album, One Of Us Is The Killer, with a slightly modified line-up of players.

Wed 06 Nov

Jake Morley (Ryan Morcombe + Lynsey Hurren)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6

More acoustic loveliness from the London singer/songwriter. Natives (The Ciazarn Affair + Cavaliers)

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £7

Hampshire-hailing pop-rockers formerly known as Not Advised. Pokey LaFarge

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £15

Country blues and early jazz restyled for the 21st century, thanks to the suited-and-booted St Louis musician. Hildamay + Steak Number Eight

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £7

Double headline tour, taking in Hildamay’s rock soundscapes and Steak Number Eight’s modern metal. TRC

Stereo, 19:00–22:00, £7

Aggressive hardcore seven-piece hailing from London, blending street punk with underground hip-hop.

Kaelea Vs. Bear + Dead Temple + Alistair Quietsch

Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Showcase of adventurous electronic sounds from a pioneering trio of bands. The Union

Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, £13.50

English rock outfit, formed in 2009 by Thunder’s Luke Morley and Winterville’s Peter Shoulder. Tape

City Halls, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£4)

The Swedish trio make their first visit to Glasgow since 2006, comprising brothers Andreas and Johan Berthling with Tomas Hallonsten – still taking their cues from pop, experimentalism and minimalism.

Thu 07 Nov Blancmange

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £14

The original 80s English synthpopsters take to the road again. Hawkwind

O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £20

The seminal spacerockers tour their new studio album, Onward, headed up by original overlord Dave Brock. Stereophonics

The Hydro, 18:30–22:00, From £32.50

The Welsh rockers take to the road armed with their recently-dropped new album, Graffiti On The Train.

Ryan Morcombe (Rachel Addison + Far) Stereo, 19:00–22:00, £8 (£6)

Acoustic showcase night headered by West Lothian singer/songwriter Ryan Morcombe. Bane (Power Trip)

Classic Grand, 18:30–22:00, £10

Hardcore punk lot who began life as a side project between Aaron Dalbec (then of Converge) and Damon Bellardo. Boy George

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £25

Following his sell-out Meltdown performance, the 80s new romanticist returns with his first new studio album of original material in almost two decades. Fireplace Acoustic Sessions (Friends In America) The Drake, 21:00–01:00, Free

All-new night at favourited Glasgow drinking den, The Drake, featuring a handpicked selection of up-and-coming Scottish talent playing special acoustic sets in’t warmth of the log fire glow.

Fri 08 Nov VNV Nation

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £16

Alternative electronica duo of Ronan Harris and Mark Jackson, combining elements of electroindustrial, trance, synthpop and EBM into one danceable whole.

What The Blood Revealed (Celestial Wolves + Vasa)

Quadrophenia Night (The Atlantics + DJ Drew Stansall + The Collectors) O2 ABC, 19:30–22:00, £10

A night celebrating all things Quadrophenia, with special appearances from The Specials’ DJ/ Saxophonist, a film screening and a live set from The Atlantics. Eric Bibb

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

American-born acoustic blues singer/songwriter with a huge repertoire of soulful, gospelinfused folk blues at his disposal.

Second Hand Marching Band (The Just Joans + Ex-Teens) The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Collective folk ensemble whose vast ranks include members of Danananaykroyd, How To Swim, Eagleowl, Q Without U, The Just Joans and a dozen or so others. Son of Dave

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:00–23:00, £12

The Canadian singer/songwriter and former Crash Test Dummies guitarist, otherwise known as Benjamin Darvill. The Enablers (The John Knox Sex Club + Adam Stafford)

Stereo, 19:00–22:00, £7

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–23:00, £5

The Edinburgh quartet do their alternative folk-meets-indie racket of a thing to suitably fine eddect. Stereophonics

The Hydro, 18:30–22:00, From £32.50

The Welsh rockers take to the road armed with their recently-dropped new album, Graffiti On The Train. Eric Bibb

Savages

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £14

Beady Eye

Liam Gallagher’s post-Oasis mob take to the road – expect melodies by the Beatles, and haircuts by The Jam. Aly Bain + Ale Möller + Bruce Molsky

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £18

Triple header of folk from traditional style fiddler Aly Bain, Swedish multi-instrumentalist Ale Möller, and American fiddler, singer, guitarist and banjo player Bruce Molsky. Mutya Keisha Siobhan

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

American-born acoustic blues singer/songwriter with a huge repertoire of soulful, gospelinfused folk blues at his disposal.

Aka the Sugababes to anyone who remembers the early 00s, back and touring with the original line-up of Mutya Buena, Keisha Buchanan and Siobhan Donaghy.

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12.50

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12.50

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

36 Crazyfists (Lazarus)

Alaskan heavy metal outfit, still going strong some 18 years on. Glass Animals

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £6

Baroque folk trio with distinct pop(ish) influences, launching their new limited-edition double A-side single.

Stereo: 6th Re-Birthday Party (Afrodeesia + Cosmic + Duncan Harvey + Fielding Hope + Figs in Wigs + Flore De Hoog + Fucking Unlimited + Ghana Sounds + Jamie and Rickie MacNeill + Julia Scott + Naked + The Modern Institute + The Yawns) Stereo, 20:00–03:00, Free

Stereo celebrate six years of being an all-round ace venue, with live guests including Glasgow lo-fi experimentalists The Yawns, Cry Parrot’s Fielding Hope and the mayhem-wielding Cosmic DJs. Mount Kimbie (oOoOO)

SWG3, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Minimal electronic duo, made up of Dominic Maker and Kai Campos, touring their second release, Cold Spring Fault Less Youth.

Sat 09 Nov Omar Souleyman

The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £15

The Syrian singer/songwriter does his inspired thing, blending euphoric folk styles with classic vocal techniques and hard electronic beats.

Lucy Spraggan (Andreas Moe + Shannon Saunders) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Little Lucy Spraggan, of X Factor fame, now a fully fledged touring musician making ‘flop’ – that’s folk meets hip-hop for the uninitiated. Nick Mulvey

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £7

The founding member of Portico Quartet does his solo singer/songwriter thing, touring with his new single, Fever To The Form.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £12.50

Polished electro-pop foursome hailing from Northamptonshire, arriving fresh from a string of 2013 music festival appearances. The Boston Boys

The Godfathers (The Exiles)

British rock’n’rollers group formed back in 1985 by brothers Peter and Chris Coyne from the ashes of their previous band, The Sid Presley Experience. San Fermin

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £6

Brooklyn-based alternative lot led by composer Ellis Ludwig-Leone.

Mon 11 Nov Turin Brakes

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £20

The London folk rock ensemble perform their classic album, The Optimist, in honour of its 10th anniversary. Depeche Mode

The Hydro, 19:30–22:00, £45

Kinning Park Complex, 19:30–22:00, £10 (£8)

Broadcast, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Fresh from the studio creating sounds and rhythms of the glam and prog rock variety, Fugazi’s Brendan Canty and remix master Rich Morel take to a stage as Deathfix – fortified with the considerable talent of Jerry Busher and Mark Cisneros. Gary Numan

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £25

Click Clack Club (Orange Claw Hammer + Texture + Herschel 36) The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:00, £5

Monthly experimental music club bringing the good times with their Beefheart-inspired funk. New Model Army

The Garage, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Hard-rockin’ five-piece from Bradford, named after the English revolutionary army of Oliver Cromwell. Tyler Ward

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £11

Primal, bluesy, LA rock’n’roll duo consisting of crochet pals Lindsey Troy and Julie Edwards, out touring their rather fine debut LP.

O2 Academy, 18:30–22:00, £17.50

The US-of-A rockers tour offa the back of their fifth LP, with new vocalist William DuVall at the helm. Adrian Edmondson and the Bad Shepherds

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Punk outfit crafting their sound on folk instruments, touring with their 2013 release, Mud, Blood and Beer. Fireplace Acoustic Sessions (Finn LeMarinel) The Drake, 21:00–01:00, Free

Fri 15 Nov

Nails

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:30, £10

Southern California hardstyle punk metal lot formed back in 2007 by Todd Jones (ex-Terror), along with the help of Taylor Young and John Gianelli. The Night VI (Pale Fire + Brave Young Red)

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

Anglo-French six-piece fronted by songstress Sophie Rose-Harper. Ben Watt

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £15

One half of Everything But The Girl, and in-demand DJ turns to the guitar to try out the solo singer/ songwriter thing.

Thu 14 Nov The Wonder Years

The Garage, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Yuck

More fragile and cinematic folk soundscapes from the Newcastlebased sextet.

Deap Vally

Alice in Chains (Ghost + Walking Papers)

Mad Dog McRea

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Pop-meets-rock quintet named after Juliette Lewis’ psychopathic character in Natural Born Killers, in case you were wondering.

Self-described as making ‘paintings you can listen to’, the London-based singer/songwriter tours with his latest album, Love From London.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £8

Raggle taggle folk ensemble blending a unique mixture of rock, pop, gypsy jazz and bluegrass into their mix.

Noise-pop 90s revivalists, building their sound around the lullaby-lilt of Daniel Blumberg’s ghosting tones.

Mallory Knox

Robyn Hitchcock

Mono, 19:30–22:00, £12.50

Denver-based singer/songwriter and producer whose interests apparently include cheese pizza and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. We hear you, Tyler.

Soul duo hailing from Copenhagen, taking their latest up-tempo folk/ pop offering, Avalanche, out for a spin.

The Garage, 19:00–22:00, £10

The Leader of the Sun-Ra Arkestra performs a unique set of collaborations with a selection of handpicked Scottish musicians, accompanied by experimental cinematic projections.

All-new night at favourited Glasgow drinking den, The Drake, featuring a handpicked selection of up-and-coming Scottish talent playing special acoustic sets in’t warmth of the log fire glow.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–23:00, £10

Tue 12 Nov

Marshall Allen

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £7

Glasgow-based quartet producing sounds influenced by a hybrid of pop-punk and metal stuff.

Good Grief’s Good Shop (Billy Ray Osiris + Kwoon)

Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Deathfix

Pop-punk collective from Philadelphia, led by vocalist Dan ‘Soupy’ Campbell, and named after the American TV show that basically ruled our lives from 1988-1993.

Atimilla (Another Years Effort + Constance)

Kodaline

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £11.50

The DIY label and zine collective present an evening of alternative sounds, with Billy Ray Osiris launching his new EP on the night.

The Essex electo-rock legends return to the touring circuit with their latest studio album, Delta Machine, in tow.

Quadron (Cheryl Risk + Rachel Rhienne)

The inimitable Kunt sings his way through a variety of obscene subjects, taking in such hits as Fucksticks and Use My Arsehole As A Cunt. Nice.

Stereo, 20:00–22:00, £7

Boston-hailing (funny that) Americana country ensemble led by singer/songwriter and mandolinist Eric Robertson.

Sun 10 Nov

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Trapped Mice (Galoshins + Where We Lay Our Heads)

Dublin-based indie-rock quartet who use their music as a form of therapy (i.e. they write about being dumped).

The electro-pop pioneer presents a selection of tracks taken from him newest LP, Splinter.

Barrowland, 19:00–23:00, £sold out

The legendary Brooklyn hip-hop MC performs a rare Scottish set.

Fenech Soler

The Manchester outfit, recently signed to Bella Union, take to a live setting with their new album, The Shadow of Heaven – a gem of an LP, with Jamie Lee’s soft crooning vocals once again taking centre stage.

Wed 13 Nov

London-based foursome bringing the noise with their howlin’ mix of psychedelia, complete with dubtinged rhythm section.

Jeru The Damaja

Kunt and the Gang 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

San Francisco indie rockers featuring the poetry/spoken word of Pete Simonelli.

Instrumental rock foursome hailing from Irvine on the West Coast of Scotland.

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Money (Holy Esque) SWG3, 20:00–22:30, £10

Peter Hook and The Light

The Garage, 19:00–22:00, £20

The former Joy Division and New Order bassist plays with his new band, The Light, cherrypicking a set of predominantly Joy Division songs. Imagine Dragons

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Beat-heavy indie-rock, laced with raspy vocals and infectiously catchy lyrics, as the Las Vegasdwellers embark on a Europe-wide tour with their latest album, Night Visions. Roddy Hart and The Lonesome Fire

The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Glasgow singer/songwriter Roddy Hart and his live band bring their darkly compelling conjunction of classic Americana and Celtic soul to bear.

Remembering Chet (Iain Ewing + Colin Steele + Euan Stevenson)

The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:00, £10

Following its Edinburgh Fringe success, Scottish musicians Iain Ewing, Colin Steele and Euan Stevenson bring their moving tribute to late jazz trumpeter and singer, Chet Baker, to Glasgow for one night only. Vampire Weekend

The Hydro, 18:30–22:00, £28.50

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

The NYC-hailing indie rock quartet tour the hell outta their latest release, Modern Vampire of the City.

Federation Of The Disco Pimp (Fat Suit)

The Gary Stringer-led 90s wonders celebrate their 20th anniversary with a hits tour.

Lanterns On The Lake

Stereo, 19:30–22:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

Reef

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £21.50

Dave Hause

High-energy disco-pop from the bouncy Glasgwegian seven-piece, providing unstoppable grooves since 2010.

Philadephia-based musician who cut his chops as a roadie before becoming a performer proper.

Barrowland, 19:00–23:00, £18.50

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Amon Amarth (Carcass)

Swedish death metallers of the long-haired and melodic variety.

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £9

Rail Fan

Americana-styled family band hailing from the fiery musical furnace of Stirling.

THE SKINNY


MONO: 11TH BIRTHDAY PARTY (SHANE CONNELLY + SINEAD YOUNG + JAMIE GRIER + FRITZ WELCH + ALEX NEILSEN + STEVIE JONES + DAVE GOW + JULIA SCOTT + CHARLIE MCCANN) MONO, 19:30–22:00, FREE

Beloved gig venue Mono celebrates 11 glorious years of being with a live line-up that belies their favourited place in the hearts of many a local musician – amongst ‘em Fritz Welch, Sinead Young and Alex Neilsen. CORRUPT MORAL ALTAR

AUDIO, 19:00–22:00, £5

Malevolent Liverpudlians riding along of Chris Reese’ vocal assault barks, shrieks and shreds. DENNIS LOCORRIERE

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £20

The former Dr Hook man plays a two night stint in the Weege.

Sat 16 Nov HAYSEED DIXIE

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £16

US novelty metal legends playing a mixture of hard rock cover versions and original compositions. KORELESS

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £7.50

Talented producer whose beatless, deconstructed take on garage and house never fails to make for a beast of a live show. THE LITTLE KICKS (NEVADA BASE + GAV PRENTICE)

13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £5 ADV. (£6 DOOR)

More upbeat and catchy indie-pop from the Scottish four-piece, still riding his on the release of their debut LP. LAURA VEIRS (LED TO SEA)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

The Colorado singer/songwriter does her lush acoustic thing, showcased no sweeter than on new album Tumble Bee – a selection of children’s songs drawn from US folk tradition. DRY THE RIVER (MODEL AEROPLANES + HUEVO AND THE GIANT)

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £5

London-based quintet of the ‘stealth rock’ variety, so say they. FRIGHTENED RABBIT

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £SOLD OUT

The mighty F’Rabbit take some time out from conquering the US-of-A – where they’ve spent the past two months – to play a series of UK dates, a selection of new tunes quite rightly in tow.

THE CREEPING IVIES (FUTURE GLUE + TWIN MIRRORS + HOMESICK ALDO) NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 19:30–23:00, £3

Dundee-based rock’n’roll duo made up of Becca Bomb and Duncan Destruction (totally their real surnames), launching their new single on the night. QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE

THE HYDRO, 18:30–22:00, £32.50

The Josh Homme-fronted five piece take to the UK as part of their current tour, ahead of the goshdarn exciting news that they’ll co-headline an Australian tour in March 2014 with the mighty Nine Inch Nails. UBRE BLANCA (UNMADE BED + HAUSFRAU)

THE OLD HAIRDRESSERS, 20:00–23:00, £4

The experimental Glasgow duo, featuring members of Shitdisco and Divorce, launch their debut 12-inch EP, Polygon Mountain.

GLENN JONES (WOUNDED KNEE + FRASER MACPHERSON)

THE GLAD CAFE, 19:30–22:00, £8

Boston musician set apart for his expressive playing and technical skill, most significantly his inventive use of alternate tunings and partial capos. DEADLY INSCRIPTION

CLASSIC GRAND, 19:00–22:00, £TBC

The high energy UK metallers launch their new EP, Substance. THE DYNAGLIDES

THE ADMIRAL, 20:00–22:00, £4

The local nine-piece juggernaut take in a selection of hits from the 50s and 60s. KARNIVOOL

THE GARAGE, 19:00–22:00, £10.50

Following the release of their third album, Asymmetry, the Australian progressive rock lot embark on a European tour. DENNIS LOCORRIERE

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £20

The former Dr Hook man plays a two night stint in the Weege.

November 2013

Sun 17 Nov THE ICARUS LINE

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £8

Joe Cardamone and his band stick to what they know best: untamed rock’n’roll performed with bags of confidence. THE FAMILY RAIN

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £8

Bath-based band of brothers who had previous projects before embracing tropical indie-rock as The Family Rain. FRIGHTENED RABBIT

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £16

BOB DYLAN

SCOUTING FOR GIRLS

PALMA VIOLETS

SECC, 18:30–22:00, FROM £55

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £11

The legendary American singer/ songwriter plays a trio of dates in the not-so-intimate surrounds of the SECC, for those with a spare £50+ for tickets. WARPED TOUR 2013 (ITCH + RDGLDGRN + THE HYPE THEORY + GHOST TOWN)

KING TUT’S, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

Showcase tour curated by Vans (aka the shoe people), headed up by Itch (aka Jonathan Fox). SALLIE FORD AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE

The mighty F’Rabbit take some time out from conquering the US-of-A – where they’ve spent the past two months – to play a series of UK dates, a selection of new tunes quite rightly in tow.

The visceral Oregon rockers tour their rock’n’roll romp of a new LP, Untamed Beast.

13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £8

PINACT

Brash Glasgow duo playing hyperactive punk-rock rich with energy and catchy melodies. LEO SAYER

O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £30

The longstanding fuzzy-heided British singer/songwriter plays as part of his 40th anniversary tour. NAUGHTY BOY

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £11

The English songwriter, producer and musician (aka Shahid Khan) tours in support of his new gospeltinged LP, Hotel Cabana.

THE GLAD CAFE, 19:00–22:00, £5

Wed 20 Nov SUMMER CAMP

New indie-pop project from London chap Jeremy Warmsley, accompanied by Elizabeth Sankey on softly, softly vocals. HALF MOON RUN (MIKHAEL PASKALEV + AS ELEPHANTS ARE)

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £8.50

Talented young trio from Ottawa, Ontario and Comox, British Columbia, working their magic across elements of indie, pop

The English pop trio showcase their third album, The Light Between Us. THE TRIPPS

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £6

Five dapper chaps from Ayr who play rock’n’roll with a mod and northern soul kick.

FIREPLACE ACOUSTIC SESSIONS (RANDOLPH’S LEAP) THE DRAKE, 21:00–01:00, FREE

All-new night at favourited Glasgow drinking den, The Drake, featuring a handpicked selection of up-and-coming Scottish talent playing special acoustic sets in’t warmth of the log fire glow.

Fri 22 Nov DUB PISTOLS

STEREO, 19:00–22:00, £15 ADV.

London-based dub ensemble chewing up hip-hop, dub, techno and ska-punk and spitting it out in a renegade futuristic skank. MOTORHEAD (SAXON + SKEW SISKIN)

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £SOLD OUT

Lemmy et al take to the stage for their now annual sell-out November tour, letting rip with a growl of incomprehensible lyrics and battering of thrash metal. THERE WILL BE FIREWORKS

SWG3, 20:00–22:30, £7

The Scottish-brogued indie foursome take to a hometown setting to launch their new LP.

WOVEN TENTS

STEREO, 19:00–22:00, £TBC

Expect a meltdown of guitars, melodicas, violins, saxophones, pianos and pounding drums as local lot, Woven Tents, launch their new LP.

THE SOUTH (THE KIRKLAND TURN)

O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £22.50

South London rock’n’roll quartet, who’ve spent the year touring with the likes of Alabama Shakes, Django Django and Savages.

JOHNNY GRAHAM (THE ROSETTES + THE COLONY)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £8

Tue 26 Nov

BEARPIT BROTHERS

GOATS DON’T SHAVE

CLASSIC GRAND, 19:00–22:00, £13

Irish folk rock mainstays, formed way back in’t 1990 in bonnie County Donegal. ANDREA BOCELLI

THE HYDRO, 19:30–22:00, FROM £45

The acclaimed classical artist returns to his love of romance, performing some of the greatest songs ever composed – taken from his new album, Amore. VUVUVULTURES

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £9

London-based four-piece crafting dark synth pop sounds with a skuzzy edge and unmistakably catchy vibe, fronted by Harmony Boucher’s distinct vocals.

THISCLOSE (HEADLESS KROSS + BLACK COP + VUIL + BRIAN CURRAN)

13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Shared punk vision of founding members Rodney Shades and Sunny De Beat, whose wish was to create music inspired by the legendary Discharge. SHELLAC

SWG3, 19:00–22:00, £12

Mon 18 Nov

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £6

WHITE DENIM

ANE BRUN

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Scandinavian singer/songwriter riding along on her mid-Southern vocal twang, backed by delicatelyplucked acoustic guitars, piano and strings. HEART OF A COWARD

CLASSIC GRAND, 18:30–22:00, £7

UK groove metal outfit with Jamie Graham at the helm. BLUE MONDAYS (JULIAN ARGÜELLES)

ROYAL CONSERVATOIRE OF SCOTLAND, 19:30–21:30, £9.50 (£7.50)

The Royal Conservatoire’s jazz student lead an intimate evening session, led by Julian Argüelles. BOB DYLAN

SECC, 18:30–22:00, FROM £55

The legendary American singer/ songwriter plays a trio of dates in the not-so-intimate surrounds of the SECC, for those with a spare £50+ for tickets. MORCHEEBA

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

The darlings of down-tempo return to a live setting to give their new LP, Head Up High, the live treatment. HAR MAR SUPERSTAR

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £12

and folk.

ALGERNON DOLL (POOR THINGS + LOVERS TURN TO MONSTERS + LIGHTNIN PAPA TAM) 13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Off-kilter alternative folk project from Glasgow’s Ewan Grant, in the vein of Red House Painters, Mark Lanegan and Elliot Smith. DISCLOSURE

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £16.50

Garage-meets-house duo made up of brothers Guy and Howard Lawrence. MS MR

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £11

New York-based duo, made up of vocalist Lizzy Plapinger and producer Max Hershenow, who also run indie label Neon Gold Records. JULIA HOLTER

CCA, 19:30–22:00, £14

The LA-based musician tours her third LP, Loud City Song, again displaying her gift for merging high concept, compositional prowess and experimentation with pop sensibility. Go marvel. BOB DYLAN

SECC, 18:30–22:00, FROM £55

The sleazy-styled American r’n’b singer/songwriter (aka Sean Matthew Tilmann) does his thing, hopefully wearing nowt but a pencil moustache and white y-fronts.

The legendary American singer/ songwriter plays a trio of dates in the not-so-intimate surrounds of the SECC, for those with a spare £50+ for tickets.

Tue 19 Nov

STEREO, 19:30–22:00, £9

JONAH MATRANGA (ALICE AND THE RAMPANT TRIO + BEHOLD, THE OLD BEAR)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 19:30–23:00, £9

Singer/songwriter and guitarist who has released a variety of solo material under his own name and onelinedrawing, as well as having previously been part of Far and New End Original and Gratitude. GAZ COOMBES

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £15

The Supergrass frontman goes it alone, playing tracks from his first solo offering, Here Come The Bombs. THIRTY SECONDS TO MARS

THE HYDRO, 18:30–22:00, £29.50

American alternative rock outfit fronted by Jared Leto, taking in the UK as part of their epic world tour, with their latest album Love, Lust, Faith and Dreams in tow.

AKALA

Award-winning hip-hop artist and younger brother of rapper, Ms. Dynamite, currently carving out his own path with his rap, rock and electro influences. JARBOE (HEATHER LEIGH)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 20:00–23:00, £7.50

New Orleans singer/songwriter and keyboardist who came to prominence in the mid-1980s as a member of NYC outfit Swans. ILENKUS (VOE)

BLOC+, 21:00–01:00, FREE

Irish metal quintet of the progressive and Mastadon-aping variety.

Thu 21 Nov KT TUNSTALL

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, FROM £17.50

More singalong pop with substance, via Tunstall’s trademark earthy melodies and folky guitar, mixed to great pop effect with disco stomp and clever keyboards.

Blues-meets-folk-meets-rock quintet moving from the delicate to the, well... let’s just say they’ve got two drummers. TREMORS

FLAT 0/1, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Resident DJs Connor Byrne and Feedback Junkie provide an eclectic mix of house, techno, disco and garage. CASUAL SEX (HALFRICAN + UBRE BLANCA)

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 19:30–23:00, £6

The Glasgow indie quartet – the sleaze-heavy brainchild of vocalist and guitarist Sam Smith – bring their wares to a live setting; expect a pop-heavy synthesised joy of a sound as they perform tracks offa their new EP. EUROS CHILD (LAURA J. MARTIN + THE WELLGREEN)

THE GLAD CAFE, 19:30–22:00, £8

The Welsh musician and songwriter, best known as the frontman of Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci, takes to the stage solo in support of his latest LP. PATRYCJA MARKOWSKA

CLASSIC GRAND, 19:00–22:30, £20

Polish pop-rock songstress whose debut LP was nominated for the Fryderyk Award (the Polish equivalent of the Brits). PIXIES

BARROWLAND, 19:00–23:00, £SOLD OUT

Charles, Joey and Dave bring their reunion schtick back to Scotland, for which you may well have to beg, borrow or steal your way in. JASON ISBELL (AMANDA SHIRES)

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £12.50

The former Drive-By Truckers chap continues to tour solo after leaving the group in 2007.

Sat 23 Nov THE WOLFE TONES

BARROWLAND, 19:00–23:00, £20

Alternative Irish chaps, incorporating elements of traditional Irish music into their sound. MOTORHEAD (SAXON + SKEW SISKIN)

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £17

Lemmy et al take to the stage for their now annual sell-out November tour, letting rip with a growl of incomprehensible lyrics and battering of thrash metal.

METZ (CHEETAHS + THE WYTCHES)

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £8

The Toronto-based grunge trio bring the energy and volume as only they know how.

DARK HORSES (NATALIE PRYCE)

THE GLAD CAFE, 19:30–22:00, £TBC

The locals lads launch their new EP with a planned unconventional gig.

The hot jazz-meets-western swing trio bring their merry hybrid of a sound to Glasgow.

BROTHER AND BONES

Thao Nguyen-fronted alternative/ folk-rock vibing trio, visiting all the way from San Francisco to show off their latest album, We the Common. Brighton-based gloom merchants probably best described as ‘motoric kraut’.

More post-punk brutality from the perennial Primavera house band, featuring legendary producer Steve Albini.

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £17

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Following stints in bands Tonik and the Stranded, Johnny Graham continues his musical path as a solo singer/songwriter.

Former members of The Beautiful South, Dave Hemingway, Alison Wheeler and Dave Stead come re-packaged as, er, The South.

THE HOTCLUB OF COWTOWN

THAO AND THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN

Sun 24 Nov BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £15

Genre-spanning Texans, omnivorously squeezing as many diverse influences as possible into every track. GOLD PANDA

THE ARCHES, 19:00–22:00, £12

After the outta-nowhere success of debut LP, Berlin-based beatsmith Gold Panda takes his kaleidoscopic new album, Half of Where You Live, on the road – containing enough intermingling layers so as to constantly toy with the senses. BLACK INTERNATIONAL (PINACT + FRANKENEINSTEIN)

13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £5

Brutal alternative pop duo from Edinburgh, formed in late 2006 by ECA graduates Stewart Allan and Craig Peeble. ARCANE ROOTS (EMPIRE)

KING TUT’S, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

Surrey-based rockers adept at pushing the genre in fresh and unexpected ways. RYAN MCGARVEY

STEREO, 19:00–22:00, £10 ADV.

Passionate young bluesy rock guitar player.

MY LIFE STORY (THE SECOND HAND MARCHING BAND)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, FROM £6

Orchestral indie pop lot, celebrating 20 years of doing what they do. WOLF EYES

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 19:30–23:00, £10

Post-industrial noisemakers from Detroit, which began as a solo project of former Nautical Almanac member Nate Young, with Aaron Dilloway joining in 1998 and John Olson in 2000.

Mon 25 Nov SPARKS

THE ARCHES, 19:00–22:30, £22.50

After performing for the first time ever as a duo on their 2012 tour, Ron and Russell Mael (aka Sparks) return to a live setting – again performing as a twosome using only voice and keyboards. CRYSTAL STILTS

MONO, 19:30–22:00, £9

Post punk/psyche bunch from over the pond – Brooklyn to be more precise – touring with their third LP, Nature Noir.

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £6

CRYSTAL FIGHTERS

THE ARCHES, 19:00–22:00, £10

The all-screaming Basque folktronica five-piece tour the hell outta their new LP, Cave Rave. NICKELBACK

THE HYDRO, 19:30–22:00, £37

Responsible for the most (over) played song of the 00’s, the Canadian mainstream rock stalwarts return for a European tour. EDITORS

BARROWLAND, 19:00–23:00, £20

The Tom Smith-led ensemble cut the anthemic romanticism deep, playing a set of new tracks (taken from 2013’s The Weight Of Your Love LP) and old favourites. BUCKCHERRY (HARDCORE SUPERSTAR)

O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £17.50

Los Angeles-hailing hard rockers touring on the back of their latest LP, Confessions. FÖLLAKZOID

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £5

Chilean-based cosmic musos, dabbling in everything from classic rock to punk. Oh, and it’s pronounced foll-ack-zoid, FYI.

KID CONGO AND THE PINK MONKEY BIRDS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 19:30–23:00, £10

Fuzzy rock quartet made up of legendary guitar stylist Kid Congo Powers and long time cohorts, bassist Kiki Solis, drummer Ron Miller and guitarist Jesse Roberts.

Wed 27 Nov THE NAKED AND FAMOUS

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

Alternative fivesome hailing from New Zealand, who do a good line in getting NME’s pants in a twist. DAN BAIRD AND HOMEMADE SIN

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

The Georgia Satellites frontman returns to Glasgow with his rockin’ and rollin’ live band, Homemade Sin.

Thu 28 Nov ELECTRIC SIX

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

Detroit underdogs with enough joyful hooks, mischievous wordplay and unexpected pathos to worm their way into your heart. THE RIFLES (LIFE IN FILM + DEXTERS)

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £12.50

London indie-rock outfit on the go since 2003, when principle members Joel Stoker and Lucas Crowther met at college. TEXAS

Fri 29 Nov

DEAD SEA SOULS (BUTTONMEN + THE LAPELLES + EWAN BUTLER)

STEREO, 19:00–22:00, £5

Singalong West Lothian quartet touting their funky ska wares across the Central Belt since 2006. SCOTT MCWATT

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

Glasgow-based folk singer/ songwriter imbued his sound with melodic vocals and his trusty acoustic guitar accompaniment. THE FRATELLIS

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £23

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £SOLD OUT

Glasgow indie-rockers led by lead vocalist and guitarist Jon Fratelli, who’s also forged a solo career for himself of late.

THE INFLUENCES (ALASDAIR ROBERTS + RYAN JOSEPH BURNS + THREE BLIND WOLVES + DUGLAS T. STEWART AND FRIENDS + PAUL TASKER + A NEW INTERNATIONAL + LES JOHNSON AND ME)

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £13.50 (£10)

Sharleen Spiteri and co. do their rock-pop thing, working the template since 1986 – and back with a new LP, The Conversation.

THE GLAD CAFE, 19:30–22:00, £5

Journalist and filmmaker Matthijs van der Ven brings brings his Onder Involved sessions project to a live setting for a rather special event, joined by a bumper batch of his favourite musicians.

THE BROWNING (BURIED IN VERONA + SHOOT THE GIRL FIRST + UPON THIS DAWNING) CLASSIC GRAND, 18:30–22:00, £8

Kansas City electronicore ensemble taking their cue from across the metal spectrum, them fusing it with hardstyle, trance and other areas of electronic. THE JUNE BRIDES

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £8

English indie-pop ensemble formed in London back in the early 80s by Phil Wilson and Simon Beesley of International Rescue.

LOUISE RUTKOWSKI (WOLF RUBY) 13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

The haunting voice of former This Mor-

LIGHT OF DAY SCOTLAND

Charity night for autism charity Light of Day, with Jesse Malin on headlining duties. STORNOWAY

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Alternative indie-folk band hailing from Oxford, built on the crystalline vocals of Brian Briggs and Jon Quin’s delicate arrangements. HUGH CROMWELL (DAVID FORD)

THE ARCHES, 19:00–22:00, £20

The English musician and songwriter, best known as the vocalist and guitarist of The Stranglers, plays a rare acoustic gig. THE BANTER THIEFS

CLASSIC GRAND, 19:00–22:00, £6

Indie-rocking four piece hailing from bonnie Motherwell, bringing their upbeat tunes to their dedicated fanbase. HACKTIVIST

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £8

The Milton Keynes-based fivepiece grime outfit embark on a UK headline tour. EASTCOASTDEFECTOR (DUGLAS T STEWART AND FRIENDS + EASTWOOD) 13TH NOTE, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Indie-pop collaboration between Alan Clarke (who’s previously played with strangethatway) and a team of musicians from both Glasgow and Dunfermline.

Sat 30 Nov

QUICKBEAM (ST MAX AND THE FANATICS + GHOSTS OF DEAD AIRPLANES) STEREO, 19:00–22:00, £5

Sublime minimal folkies who earlier in the year launched their debut LP in a disused swimming pool, as you do.

SIMPLE MINDS

THE HYDRO, 18:30–22:00, FROM £39.50

The Jim Kerr-led classic rock outfit return to play five songs from each of their landmark first five albums. LEWIS WATSON

ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £9

Fledgling young Oxford singer/ songwriter, best known for his stripped-down YouTube take on Tracy Chapman’s Fast Car. BILLY BRAGG

GLASGOW ROYAL CONCERT HALL, 19:30–22:00, FROM £18

After his 2012 solo tour, Billy Bragg returns to a live setting to air his first new album in five years, Tooth & Nail – which takes a more personal bent, ala his Wilco-collaborating 1998 album Mermaid Avenue. BARENAKED LADIES (BOOTHBY GRAFFOE)

STONE FOUNDATION (THE CUT THROAT RAZORS + JAMIE REILLY)

O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £27.50

The longstanding Canadian rock quartet take to the road to mark their 25th anniversary, playing tracks offa their new LP (the first on Vanguard Records), Grinning Streak. PAT MCMANUS BAND

CLASSIC GRAND, 19:00–22:30, £10

Blues-meets-rock trio headed up by former Mama’s Boys and Celtus guitarist/violinist Pat McManus. RAVEN + GIRLSCHOOL

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £14

Double-headline set of rock, made up of all-girl rockers Girlschool and metal-tinged sonic batterers Raven. DEEZ NUTS

CATHOUSE, 18:30–22:00, £11

Self-described as ‘unfuckwithable’ – which says it all, really – the Melbourne-based party hardcore four-piece tour with their latest album, Bout It.

KING TUT’S, 20:30–23:00, £6

tal Coil vocalist, performing an ethereal and eclectic set featuring some tracks from her forthcoming new LP, Diary of a Lost Girl. THE DISMEMBERMENT PLAN

STEREO, 19:30–22:00, £12

Washington DC-hailing punk lot, taking their name from a stray phrase uttered by insurance salesman Ned Ryerson in Groundhog Day.

FIREPLACE ACOUSTIC SESSIONS (HONEYBLOOD + LIGHTGUIDES) THE DRAKE, 21:00–01:00, FREE

All-new night at favourited Glasgow drinking den, The Drake, featuring a handpicked selection of up-and-coming Scottish talent playing special acoustic sets in’t warmth of the log fire glow.

The Midland rock’n’soul collective make a return visit to King Tut’s. ROSE ROOM

THE GLAD CAFE, 19:30–22:00, £TBC

Glasgow-based ensemble playing songs from the swing jazz era, with a dash of western swing thrown in for good measure. THE BAND PERRY (LINDSAY EII)

O2 ABC, 18:00–22:00, £16.50

US-of-A band of siblings combining classic country with an eclectic infusion of rock, gospel and soul. HUDSON TAYLOR

BROADCAST, 20:00–23:00, £8

Dublin-based brother duo made up of Harry and Alfie Hudson-Taylor, who honed their craft at an early age busking the streets of their hometown.

Listings

63


PALLAS CLASSIC GRAND, 19:00–22:00, £12

Longstanding UK progressive rockers known for their atmospheric and epic soundscapes. BLACK BALLOONS

NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, 19:30–23:00, £TBC

Garage pop-styled Bathgate quartet combining elements of alternative rock and noise pop.

Edinburgh Music A HOPELESS CAUSE

BAD MONKEY

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £5

One man acoustic emopunk misery bringer (aka Tommy Smith) playing songs about love, loss and everything in between. NIGHT OF THE DEVIL FISH (SEA BASS KID + VICTORIAN TROUT CONSPIRACY + JAMIE & SHOONY) THE VOODOO ROOMS,

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £5 (£3)

Live ensemble playing a mix of classic and modern covers. BLACK COP + FACEHANDLE + SUFFERINFUCK

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, 19:00–22:00, £5

Hardcore punk showcase, taking in the wares of abrasive hardcore outfit, Sufferinfuck, amongst others. PMCJ HIJACK

SNEAKY PETE’S, 15:00–22:00, £5

The leading grassroots promoters celebrate the wealth of Edinburgh talent with an all-day show in Sneaky’s diminutive grotto.

Sun 03 Nov SHARON SHANNON

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

Irish accordionist known for her collaborations – from Bono to Shame MacGowan – touring on the back of her latest LP, The Galway Girl.

Mon 04 Nov

THE SUNSHINE UNDERGROUND (KING DINOSAUR)

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–23:00, £12.50

The self-proclaimed ‘party band’ hit the road for their current UK tour, all beats, bleeps and rousing indie choruses. MARK LANEGAN

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £20

19:00– 01:00, £5

Edinburgh Music Tue 29 Oct PALOMA FAITH

USHER HALL, 19:30–22:00, FROM £20.50

The British singer/songwritercum-actress does her glossy, retro-referencing soul-meetspop thing, joining up with the 42-piece Guy Barker Orchestra for what promises to be a special set. NELL BRYDEN

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–22:00, £12

The young New York-based singer/ songwriter makes a return visit to Edinburgh’s The Voodoo Rooms. JOE NISBET JR

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–22:00, £5

The gospel-styled vocalist and guitarist launches his new LP, The Gospel According to Mr. Niz.

Wed 30 Oct THE STAVES

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Headline set from Communion Records all-female folk harmony trio. BASTILLE

PICTURE HOUSE, 18:00–22:00, £14.50

Dan Smith-led indie ensemble who may or may not have their faces painted as skulls (aka, they will). HADOUKEN!

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Genre-bending dance-punk grindie band based in London, still riding high on their early 2013 album, Every Weekend. BAL MASQUE

THE CAVES, 19:30–23:00, £8.50

Halloween-styled masked ball, featuring Brussels’ internationalist sleazy-listening orchestra, Georgio Valentino and his Société des Mélancoliques, plus a DJ set from Danton’s Death via live astral projection.

Thu 31 Oct FATHERSON

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £10

The Kilmarnock trio do their alternative rock-meets-powerpop thing, you do the moshing. CAT’S CLUB

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £12 (£10)

Scottish jazz collective led by singer Cathie Rae, and not a furry feline in sight, alas.

64

Listings

Halloween-themed night of live music, burlesque dancing and live VJ sets, headed up by Edinburgh-based indie/ska/reggae/blues/rock/anything they damn well fancy lot, Sea Bass Kid.

Fri 01 Nov GABRIELLE APLIN

PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:00, £14

Experimental singer/songwriter working her magic over the folkpop template, all hints of choirs here and twinkly noises there.

JAMES YORKSTON + JON THORNE + SUHAIL YUSUF KHAN

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £15 (£13)

Following a 2012 experiment – where musicians from India and the UK were placed in a recording studio in Edinburgh for a week to come up with original songs – a trio of the artists unveil the fruits, amongst them Fife-dwelling folkie, James Yorkston. NICK CAVE AND THE BAD SEEDS

USHER HALL, 18:30–22:00, £SOLD OUT

Throughout his thirty year career with the Bad Seeds, Nick Cave has nary put a cloven hoof wrong – with newest LP, Push the Sky Away, further testament to that. Go clamour for a ticket to the album’s live airing.

Mark Lanegan brings his soulful baritone to bear, touring in celebration of his eighth album – a collection of his favourite songs including covers of Andy Williams, Nick Cave and Frank Sinatra – playing with recent musical co-pilot, Duke Garwood.

GABBY YOUNG AND OTHER ANIMALS (OLD DOLLAR BILL) BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £8

Crafting a new genre of entertainment, Gabby Young et al bring their circus swing/burlesque folk show to the UK.

Tue 05 Nov VILLAGERS

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £12

Conor O’Brien-fronted folk outfit that began life as a nameless collection of musical poems (penned by O’Brien), currently out and touring their new album.

Wed 06 Nov

PUBLIC SERVICE BROADCASTING

PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:00, £12

Experimental duo who sample old public information films and archive material and set them to new music, making for a pretty special live set. BIPOLAR SUNSHINE

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:00, £6

Solo project of Manchester-based

Fri 08 Nov

SHOOTING STANSFIELD

THE REAL MARY KING’S CLOSE, 22:30–00:00, £8

The Edinburgh-based indie-rock foursome play a special set in the echoey surrounds of The Real Mary King’s Close. Part of Close Fest. ROCKIN’ FOR TOTS (AFTERLIFE + GARRISON + MOOSEKNUCKLE)

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:00–00:00, £10

A selection of bands play in aid of Simpsons Special Care Babies. MT. WOLF

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £7

The South London dream folksters do their thing in a suitably intimate setting, all hazy electronica, acoustic guitar and whisper-quiet harmonies. ROKIA TRAORE

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £19

Mali-born singer/songwriter and winner of the 2003 BBC Radio 3 World Music Award, touring with her fifth album, Beautiful Africa, featuring lyrics sung in her native languages of French and Bambara, with some English. CHORDLESS BEACHES (SLUMBER CLUB + THE MONA LISAS + FALL ROCKETS)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £5

Edinburgh-based quintet of the alternative indie-rock variety. GIANLUCA LITTERA + HÉCTOR INFANZÓN

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £15

Unique new collaborative piece – entitled Citadino (Citizens) – between modern harmonica player Gianluca Littera and jazz pianist/ composer Héctor Infanzón. PULSELOOPER + BUBU + COMPTROLLER + SKY POPE

THE BANSHEE LABYRINTH, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Showcase night of chiptune, electro and 8-bit, including the UK live debut of São Paulo’s chip powerhouse, Pulselooper.

RBS MUSEUM LATES: MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCOTLAND, 19:00–22:30, £10 (£8)

Late night museum happening, this time in celebration of Mary Queen of Scots (coinciding with the final weeks of the exhibition) – with music from Glaswegian indie lot Blood Relatives, plus facepainting, animal handling, pop-up bars and the like. SILVERJET (THE AMORETTES + SOUL REMOVER)

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £5

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £5

The Edinburgh-formed noiseniks celebrate the physical release of their debut single with the usual feedback-fuelled set. Single included in entry price.

Sat 02 Nov BILL ORCUTT

SUMMERHALL, 19:30–22:00, £TBC

The Harry Pussy co-founder takes to the road armed with his new LP, A History Of Every One, which again acts as a signature interrogation of his trusty four-stringed vintage acoustic Kay.

THE PHANTOMS + THE ANGELS (INDIGO SIXTEEN)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £8 (£6)

Double whammy of celebrations, as The Phantoms and The Angels launch their respective new EPs.

CHRIS THILE

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 20:00–22:00, £15

Known for his roles in both Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek, Chris Thile continues his role as lead figure in the modern bluegrass revival. IAN SKELLY AND THE SERPENT POWER (THE JACKALS)

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–23:00, £12

Former The Coral drummer embarks on a solo psychedelicinspired project, touring with his debut album, Cut From A Star.

Thu 07 Nov

THE LAST SEPTEMBER (JAKE MORLEY)

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–23:00, £6

The Edinburgh indie-folk six-piece return to the stage, having recently regrouped after a fiveyear hiatus.

Ali Downey’s Americana-styled folk ensemble play under their clipped back Woodenbox moniker, still imbued with the same propensity for full-on barn-raising anthems..

Arizona-hailing five-piece, The Maine, tour their most recent release, Forever Halloween, playing a double headline set with Essex-based rock quartet, We Are The Ocean.

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 20:00–01:00, £6 ADVANCE (£8 DOOR)

THE BONGO CLUB, 18:30–22:00, £7.50 (£4.50)

LIMBO: 6TH BIRTHDAY (WILLIAM DOUGLAS AND THE WHEEL + JAQUIMO + ELYSSA VULPES)

Edinburgh’s William Douglas and The Wheel make their Limbo debut, helping the much-loved gig-in-a-club night celebrate its 6th birthday, joined by fellow locals Jaquimo and Elyssa Vulpes.

GET OUT OF TOWN: TEN TRACKS’ 5TH BIRTHDAY (NUMBERS ARE FUTILE + BIRDHEAD + YOUR LOYAL SUBJECTS + AND THE MOOSE CAME IN SECOND + THE TIDE INSIDE + THE BLUE SHIP + THE PINEAPPLE CHUNKS + ROYAL EDINBURGH MUSIC + LIPSYNC FOR A LULLABY + THE FORGOTTEN WORKS) VERDEN STUDIOS, 19:00–23:00, £5 ADV. (£7 DOOR)

Online music platform Ten Tracks celebrate their 5th birthday in fine company, playing host to sets from a mighty ten-band bill – including Birdhead, Your Local Subjects, Pineapple Chunks and Lipsync for a Lullaby – playing across two rooms.

Sun 10 Nov

RODDY HART AND THE LONESOME FIRE

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:00–23:00, £12

Glasgow singer/songwriter Roddy Hart and his live band bring their darkly compelling conjunction of classic Americana and Celtic soul to bear. LUCY SPRAGGAN

PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Little Lucy Spraggan, of X Factor fame, now a fully fledged touring musician making ‘flop’ – that’s folk meets hip-hop for the uninitiated. SWEET BABOO

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:00, £7

North Wales singer/songwriter all sparkling melodies and deft lyrical turns. CAPERCAILLIE

USHER HALL, 19:00–22:00, £20

The Karen Matheson-fronted Scottish folk ensemble continue with their modern reinvention of Gaelic music. ERIC BIBB (MICHAEL JEROME BROWNE)

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £20

American-born acoustic blues singer/songwriter with a huge repertoire of soulful, gospelinfused folk blues at his disposal.

Sat 09 Nov

Primal, bluesy, LA rock’n’roll duo consisting of crochet pals Lindsey Troy and Julie Edwards, out touring their rather fine debut LP.

TURIN BRAKES

THE PLEASANCE, 19:30–22:00, £20.50

PLEASANCE THEATRE, 20:00–22:00, £16

WOZNIAK (VLADIMIR + WE CAME FROM THE NORTH)

FERRIC SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £5

Mon 11 Nov

The London folk rock ensemble perform their

musician Adio Marchant (formerly of Kid British fame), touring with his newly-released EP, Aesthetics.

THE MAINE + WE ARE THE OCEAN THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £14

High voltage rock’n’roll equipped with suitably ballsy riffs and huge hooks.

ALY BAIN + ALE MÖLLER + BRUCE MOLSKY

Triple header of folk from traditional style fiddler Aly Bain, Swedish multi-instrumentalist Ale Möller, and American fiddler, singer, guitarist and banjo player Bruce Molsky.

WOODENBOX (PRONTO MAMA) ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:00, £7

DEAP VALLY

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £10

CADAVER CLUB

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £7

Self described ‘funeral punk’styled lot, big on singalong tunes about death, devils and dark desires.

classic album, The Optimist, in honour of its 10th anniversary.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alternative rock quartet from the southwest of Glasgow, led by Ross Bradley on vocals and backing guitar.

SARA LOWES (TOKOLOSH)

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–23:00, £5

Manchester-via-the-North East musician and writer, with a skill for fusing classic influences through thoroughly modern composition.

Wed 13 Nov MALLORY KNOX

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £10

Pop-meets-rock quintet named after Juliette Lewis’ psychopathic character in Natural Born Killers, in case you were wondering. CAMPFIRES IN WINTER (GARDEN OF ELKS)

MAD DOG MCREA

Raggle taggle folk ensemble blending a unique mixture of rock, pop, gypsy jazz and bluegrass into their mix. JOHN CORABI (MATTY JAMES)

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £11

Solo acoustic set from the exMotley Crue and Scream classic rocker.

THE ANIMALS

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–23:00, £20

Formed in Newcastle back in’t 60s, the original band members take to the road joined by a selection of friends. BURN THE MAPS

WEE RED BAR, 19:00–22:00, £5.00

Unsigned alternative indie-rock Fife quartet, currently taking their brand of celtic-tinged rock to all of the venues. KRISSY MATTHEWS

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £9

The fledgling blues guitarist takes to the Bannermans stage. ELEVENTH HOUR (ENGINES OF VENGEANCE)

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, 19:00–22:00, £5

Lamb Of God tribute act.

Sat 16 Nov

POST WAR GLAMOUR GIRLS

Singer/songwriter and guitarist who has released a variety of solo material under his own name and onelinedrawing, as well as having previously been part of Far and New End Original and Gratitude. SIGUR ROS

USHER HALL, 19:00–22:00, £28.50

The Icelandic ambient post-rockers par excellence tour their latest LP, Kveikur – which sees them take on a darker, slightly sinister new bent. PANIC! AT THE DISCO

PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:00, £20

American alternative rock ensemble of dapper chaps (aka they wear shirts and clearly visit the hairdresser a lot), formed by Brendon Urie and Spencer Smith some ten years ago. GARY LUCAS

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–23:00, £13.50

The American guitarist and songwriter composer takes in Scotland, still riding high on his recently reissued 2001 LP, The Edge of Heaven – taking in arrangements of 30s Chinese pop songs.

Tue 19 Nov

FEDERATION OF THE DISCO PIMP

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–23:00, £8

The alternative Leeds quartet make the trip up’t north, taking a decidedly heavier bent of late. THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £20

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £12

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 20:00–22:00, £17.50 (£14.50)

The former Joy Division and New Order bassist plays with his new band, The Light, cherrypicking a set of predominantly Joy Division songs.

Bath-based alternative punk lot dosing out a mix of guitar-heavy rock using crunchy guitar, funky horns and Curtis Mayfield-like vocals.

CITRUS CLUB, 19:00–22:00, £7 ADV. (£10 DOOR)

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £19.50

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £5

ARILD ANDERSEN TRIO

Europe-spanning jazz trio, made up of Norwegian ECM bass legend Arild Andersen, Scottish saxophonist Tommy Smith and Italian drummer/composer Paolo Vinaccia. BRYAN FERRY

USHER HALL, 19:00–22:00, FROM £35

The Roxy Music frontman takes to the road for the first time since 2007, featuring his usual live band, plus The Bryan Ferry Orchestra who accompanied him on his The Jazz Age LP. THE BRIMESTONE DAYS

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £5

The Swedish noisemakers play a set of their soul and blues-styled rock. MAN WITHOUT COUNTRY

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–23:00, £6

South Wales-based duo who’ve added a new techno shuffle and trance synth work to their psychedelic digital palette.

Thu 14 Nov HAYSEED DIXIE

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £22

US novelty metal legends playing a mixture of hard rock cover versions and original compositions. YOUNG REBEL SET

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–23:00, £5

Stockton’s Young Rebel Set make their UK return, bringing the folkish indie-rock with ‘em. DUALITY TANGO

THE BONGO CLUB, 19:00–22:00, £5 ADV. (£7 DOOR)

Local spoken word chap Andrew Ferguson showcases the culmination of a year’s worth of experimenting in Duality Rango – a one-off night aimed at making spoken word danceable, bolstered as he’ll be by a selection of live guitarists.

Fri 15 Nov

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £7

THE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

The Brooklyn originals (aka John Flansburgh and John Linnell) play a set cherrypicked from their new LP, Nanobots – their boundless creativity and live spontaneity all well and in place.

JONAH MATRANGA

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £8

The alternative Croy indie-rockers tour their new EP amidst the usual melodic wall of post-rock and experimental noise.

Rome-based power-meets-heavy metal overlords, born back in 1998 after the split between lead guitarist Alex Mele and his then band, River of Change.

Tue 12 Nov

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS (WONDER VILLAINS)

Mon 18 Nov

High-energy disco-pop from the bouncy Glasgwegian seven-piece, providing unstoppable grooves since 2010.

KALEDON

WEE RED BAR, 19:00–22:00, £6 (£5)

THE USUALS (THE LITIGATORS + THE NOMADS)

The talent incubator that is Creative Edinburgh take to a party setting for their annual awards and birthday bash combined, for which Ten Tracks will be providing the live music and Barney’s Beer the bespoke brew.

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £8

TWO WINGS (DOUG TIELLI + NAP SHOLTY)

Experimental ensemble born of a songwriting collaboration between singer/ multi-instrumentalist/visual artist Hanna Tuulikki and guitarist/ singer Ben Reynolds.

CREATIVE EDINBURGH AWARDS (FOUND + JESUS H FOXX + ESTHER SWIFT)

Edinburgh-based alternative indie-rock quintet led by Cal Black.

QABALALA! (ZED PENGUIN + NUMBERS ARE FUTILE + JAMES METCALFE)

LEITH DOCKER’S CLUB, 20:00–01:00, £5

The unique ‘maximalist qabaret’ party night returns featuring live stints from Zed Penguin, Numbers Are Futile and James Metcalfe. JOHN LEES’ BARCLAY JAMES HARVEST

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £22

English singer/songwriter John Lees tours with his band of rockers, the Barclay James Harvest.

HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, 19:00–22:00, £5

PETER HOOK AND THE LIGHT

THE SEX PISTOLS EXPERIENCE

Sex Pistols tribute act.

SCOTTISH FESTIVAL OF BRASS AND VOICES 2013

USHER HALL, 19:00–22:00, FROM £14

A mass of male and female voices join forces with Grimethorpe Colliery Band, under the direction of William Relton, for the annual charity event – usually held in London’s Royal Albert Hall. Raising funds for Cancer Research UK.

SUNSET ABBEY (HIGH PRIORITY + LATITUDE FIFTY FIVE + PORTALOOTH AND THE MUSKETEERS)

STUDIO 24, 19:00–22:00, £6

The fledgling ‘burgh indie rock quartet launch their new EP.

DONNA MACIOCA & GIDEON CONN

WEE RED BAR, 19:00–22:00, £8.00

THE HEAVY

LOW (MIKE NOGA)

Minnesota-formed indie-rock ensemble composed of founding members and married-withkiddies coupling Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker, joined by Steve Garrington on bass guitar, out touring their Jeff Tweedyproducer new LP.

THE MONSTER NME RADAR TOUR (CEREBRAL BALLZY + THE AMAZING SNAKEHEADS) ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:00, £8

NME present a showcase line-up of up-and-comers, including New York punk lot of the highly dubious band name, Cerebral Ballzy.

Wed 20 Nov BROTHER AND BONES

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:00, £7

Edinburgh singer/songwriter Donna Macioca (aka the voice of Amplifico) plays a special set with Gideon Conn, celebrating their joint EP release.

Blues-meets-folk-meets-rock quintet moving from the delicate to the, well... let’s just say they’ve got two drummers.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £5

The American hard rock powerhouse return to the live arena.

MIDDLETON HALL

Dunfermline-based alternative country chaps, formed in 2010 when guitarist and vocalist Steve Haddow returned from exile in Japan. THE POST ORGASMIC SUNSHINE BAND (NEW URBAN FRONTIER + ALBA ROMA)

BANNERMANS, 22:00–23:00, £5

Glasgow and Edinburgh-straddling collective of musicians, doing their thing across genres of dub, reggae, Celtic and groove.

Sun 17 Nov BLUE ROSE CODE

COHEED AND CAMBRIA

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:00–22:00, £18

QUIET AS A MOUSE (THE DEADLY WINTERS + SAVE THE RECKLESS)

THE CAVES, 19:00–22:00, £5

Edinburgh indie-meets-country quartet riding along on mainman Alex Moran’s vocals, guitar and harmonica-playing. ROSS ARTHUR

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £4

Young Edinburgh-based singer/ songwriter and guitarist known for his energetic and crowd-pleasing live outings. MAHLER CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

USHER HALL, 19:00–22:00, FROM £12

London post-folk singer/songwriter Ross Wilson does his thing – big on the Celtic lullabies and Caledonian soul – playing a special live band set.

The classical chamber orchestra play a special set including two of Beethoven’s piano concertos, ahead of their ambitious tour of all five concertos across over 10 countries.

BANNERMANS, 20:00–23:00, £12

THE BANSHEE LABYRINTH, 19:00–22:00, £5

THE VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–23:00, £10

THE MARCH VIOLETS (DEAD EYES OPEN)

English goth rockers touring with original members Si Denbigh, Rosie Garland and Tom Ashton, plus new bass player Jo Violet. TRAVIS

PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

The Glasgow-formed 90s mainstays make their live return, marking the release of their new LP, Where You Stand. THE BLOW MONKEYS

CRYPT LURKER + COLTSBLOOD + OF SPIRE & THRONE + GENETIC NOOSE

Alternative showcase of noise, headed up by Liverpudlian subterranean ritual doom merchants, Crypt Lurker. SALLIE FORD AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE

WEE RED BAR, 19:00–22:00, £5.00

The visceral Oregon rockers tour their rock’n’roll romp of a new LP, Untamed Beast.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:00, £13

Mid-80s pop ensemble led by Robert Howard (known to his fans by his Beatles-inspired stage name, Dr. Robert).

THE SKINNY


Thu 21 Nov

Birdhead (Hagana + Electric Gardens)

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £5

The ‘burgh’s own fledgling dance-inspired troupe, placing themselves somewhere between DFA1979, Cold Cave and Factory Floor. Euros Childs

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £10

The Welsh musician and songwriter, best known as the frontman of Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci, takes to the stage solo in support of his latest LP. Temperance Movement

The Liquid Room, 19:00–22:00, sold out

Alternative, blues-drenched rock’n’rollers formed between London and Glasgow in the summer of 2011.

Fri 22 Nov Emilio Largo

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alternative rock trio, made up of three ex-aspiring fisherman (so say they). Fridge Magnets

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

New electro-rockers on the block, headered by the fine sing-shouty tones of Steven Winton.

Vic Godard and the Subway Sect (The Sexual Objects) The Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £10

Punk legend Vic Godard returns with the latest incarnation of the Subway Sect, including ex-Sex Pistol Paul Cook on drums, playing with Davy Henderson’s The Sexual Objects on their annual visits to Scotland. Skinny Molly

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £13

Tennessee residing rock’n’rollers featuring former members of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Blackfoot. Tomlin Leckie (Erin Todd+ Kat Healy) The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £7

The bluesy folk singer/songwriter plays alongside his live band, The Strollers – armed with his newlylaunched EP, We Are Stories. Shellac

The Liquid Room, 19:00–22:00, £15

More post-punk brutality from the perennial Primavera house band, featuring legendary producer Steve Albini.

Sat 23 Nov

The Mirror Trap (Fall Rockets + Broken Boy)

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alternative indie-rock quartet born and bred on the means streets of Dundee. The Lumineers

Corn Exchange, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

Denver folk-rock trio awash with timeless melodies and soulstirring lyrics. Dapitz (Glassface + Babylon Dub Punks + Seafield Foxes)

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5.00

Leith-residing band of ‘burgh punk-rockers, who met in the 70s but only formed a band in 2011. Twelve Gauge (Nest of Vipers)

Bannermans, 22:00–23:00, £5

English classic rock quintet taking their sound into some hard and metallic places.

Stars in their Eyes (RM Hubbert + The Pictish Trail + eagleowl + Kid Canaveral + Withered Hand) Pilrig St Paul’s Church, 19:30–23:00, £6

A batch of local bands – amongst ‘em RM Hubbert, The Pictish Trail and Withered Hand – cover tracks by their favourite female artists, with the TYCI gals DJing between acts. Profits go to Edinburgh Women’s Rape and Sexual Abuse Centre. Titus Pullo (Deep Red Sky + The Jellman’s Daughter)

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £5

An offshoot of established Edinburgh-based band Death Trap City, which began as a solo project for singer/songwriter Craig Robson to explore a more intimate, acoustic vibe, launching their new LP on the night.

Sun 24 Nov Bell X1 (Lyla Foy)

Electric Circus, 20:00–23:00, £13.50

Damien Rice’s former group do their strings and melodies-laden indie troubadour thing, as part of their current acoustic tour.

November 2013

Dark Horses Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £5

Brighton-based gloom merchants probably best described as ‘motoric kraut’. Black Bomb A (Dog Tired + Excellent Cadaver + Disposable) Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

The French hardcore punk lot square up to a selection of local metal support.

Mon 25 Nov Belcea Quartet

The Queen’s Hall, 19:45–22:00, From £12 (£11)

The British-based string quartet make their first appearance as part of the 2013/14 season. Tigertailz (Thunderfuck and The Deadly Romantics + Estrella)

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £10

The Welsh glam legends do their darndest to sleaze up Bannermans.

Tue 26 Nov Daughn Gibson

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £7

The Pearls & Brass drummer embarks on a solo project, doing a mashed up electronic-meetsChristian-folk-thrift-store-finds thing, layered up with booming vocals and served with a side of piercing eyes.

Wed 27 Nov Madeleine Peyroux

Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, From £18.50

The acclaimed American jazz singer, songwriter and guitarist takes to a live setting for a set of her reworked and contemporary classics. Striker + Screamer + Vuil

Bannermans, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

Noise-styled showcase night headed up by Canadian speed metal heroes Striker – making their Scottish debut, no less. Young Light

Electric Circus, 20:00–23:00, £5

Ethereal indie-rock side project of Michael Feerick (of Amusement Parks On Fire), joined by Micah Calabrese (of Giant Drag) on drums and keyboards. Turning Plates + Quickbeam

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5

Double headline set from diverse Glasgow musos Turning Plates – spanning genres of diverse classical, jazz and rock – playing alongside sublime minimal folkies, Quickbeam.

Thu 28 Nov LAU

The Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:00, £14 (£12)

The award-winning Scottish folk trio – made up of Kris Drever, Martin Green and Aidan O’Rourke – play a special set in the suitably grand surrounds of The Queen’s Hall. The Leisure Society (Alessi’s Ark)

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £12

Lovely folk-pop lot lead by Nick Hemming – of early 90s indie fame with former group She Talks To Angels – drawing comparisons to the Fleet Foxes, which is hardly a bad thing. Ducks Deluxe

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £14

Having celebrated their 40th birthday in 2012, the longstanding London ensemble plays a set of their trademark Americana rock. Barenaked Ladies

Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £27.50

The longstanding Canadian rock quartet take to the road to mark their 25th anniversary, playing tracks offa their new LP (the first on Vanguard Records), Grinning Streak.

Fri 29 Nov Horse

The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

The inimitable Scottish singer/ songwriter celebrates the release of her new (ninth) LP and the 20th anniversary of her acclaimed second LP, God’s Home Movie. The Retrophones

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £5

Edinburgh-based retro-styled funk outfit built on female vocals and a full-on horn section.

The Wynntown Marshals (Jay Brown) The Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £9

The Americana-styled Edinburgh lot with a penchant for guitars, catchy choruses and using music as a storytelling medium. Texas

Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, From £37

Sharleen Spiteri and co. do their rock-pop thing, working the template since 1986 – and back with a new LP, The Conversation. Blueswater (Violent Mood Swings + Black Cat Bone)

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

The rockin’ Edinburgh 11-piece do their thing, resplendent with an old-school r’n’b vibe and a threehorn brass section.

Sat 30 Nov Eddi Reader

Usher Hall, 19:30–22:00, From £22.50

Reader weaves her velvety vocal palette around a selection of traditional and contemporary songs, as is her way. Visually Unheard

City Cafe, 20:00–01:00, £3

All-new night of music and film from Edinburgh-based collective Visually Unheard, showcasing their new EP, alongside their short film, La Lucha. Held downstairs in the City Cafe. Hacktivist (The Algorithm + Inceyte)

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £8

The Milton Keynes-based fivepiece grime outfit embark on a UK headline tour. The Light Assembly (The Rain Experiment + James McKay)

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £6 (£5)

London-based alternative indiepop quartet, currently in the midst of recording their debut LP. The Zips + Spat + Molotov 100%

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

Bannermans throw up a Saturday pleasing showcase of classic punk bands from the central belt.

Glasgow Clubs Tue 29 Oct Killer Kitsch

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Killer Kitsch residents take charge – eight years old and still offering up the best in house, techno and electronic. Voodoo Voodoo

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Duncan Harvey plays a mix of vintage rock ‘n’ roll, sleazy R’n’B, swing, soul, surf and pop from a bygone age.

i AM: All Hallows (John Heckle)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (free via iamclub.co.uk)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa host a pre-Halloween party starter, manned by DJ/producer talent John Heckle, and likely lit up by the night’s usual clever production and décor. TV Tuesday

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Weekly Tuesday party playing a selection of dancefloor-friendly anthems.

Wed 30 Oct

Milk: Halloween Party (Friends In America + Rungs)

Flat 0/1, 21:00–03:00, £4

Those gig-meets-club hellraisers, MILK, host a special Halloween edition – with Friends In America taking on headline duties, jollied along by apple dooking in cider, themed cocktails and their very own Boogie Man handing out sweeties. Sub Rosa

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Subbie’s regular student night with residents Ray Vose and Desoto at the helm. Musique Boutique

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Midweek party night with resident Bobby Bluebell playing classic house only. Disco Riot

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Disco-styled party night with Alfredo Crolla spinning a selection of favourites, bolstered by karaoke and popcorn stalls, just cos.

Glasgow Clubs BEAST Wednesdays Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Midweek rammy of pop punk, hardcore and deadly slushy drinks. Yebo (The Ninetys)

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

The mighty Wednesday blend of the best alternative hip-hop, trap and footwork goes weekly, this edition boasting a set from London producer Jordan Price (aka The Ninetys). Nice ‘n’ Sleazy’s Halloween Party

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Sleazy’s start the Halloween celebrations early, with their night afore party playing host to the Clan Destine DJs spinning some spooky house, post-punk and disco. ShangriLa (Deadboy)

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

All-new midweeker with décor inspired by festivals across the globe, with rotating DJ guests and a different theme to each week.

Thu 31 Oct Counterfeit

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Full-on mix of nu-metal and hard rockin’ tunes with DJs Mythic and Div. Jellybaby

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 adv. (£5 door)

Chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer. Hip Hop Thursdays

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Early weekend party starter, with Euan Neilson playing the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. Different Drum: Halloween Special

Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5)

The forward-thinking new Saint Judes weekly host a special Halloween edition of the night, joined by Aussie DJ Dro Carey.

Green Door’s Psychedelic Halloween Jungle Disco (Hausfrau + Big Ned + Green Door Halloween Disco Band) Stereo, 22:00–03:00, £5

The Glasgow music studio host a spooky bash featuring Halloween supergroup, the Green Door Halloween Disco Band – featuring members of Golden Teacher, Happy Meals and The Rosy Crucifixion playing Goblin and John Carpenter hits. Sub Club Halloween (Bicep + Will Saul)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Subbie celebrate Halloween with a double dose of guests – with hyped Belfast-based duo Bicep joining forces with the main man behind Simple Records, Aus Music and Close, Will Saul. Shore: Halloween Special

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

With their regular Thursday party night falling on Halloween, the eclectic Shore crew play host to a special set from Sam (of Vitamins fame), and likely a spooky shenanigan or two. Neverland: Halloween Edition

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Themed night with a live Twitter feed and a bouncy castle for added LOLs, with this edition taking on a Halloween bent (aka dress daft and drink more). R.U.IN Thursdays: Halloween Special

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Rock, metal and emo mix up, with this edition celebrating Halloween with dress up shenanigans and a dedicated bar of Jager. Octopussy Halloween

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £5

The favourited student club returns to The Arches for a oneoff Halloween special, resplendent with a swimming pool, a wedding chapel and the now obligatory bouncy castle daftness.

Fri 01 Nov Old Skool

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul.

Damnation Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £6

Two floors of the best in rock, metal and industrial tunes picked out by DJ Barry and DJ Tailz. Propaganda

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Cathouse Fridays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Residents night of rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels. Optimo Espookio

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

Optimo host their annual Halloween special, going dark with a suitably haunted soundtrack and spooky fx, bolstered by their somewhat competitive costume competition which has seen everything from Super Mario to, erm, a sanitary towel. Booty Call

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mixed bag of indie and chart classics across four rooms, plus karaoke shenanigans. Jamming Fridays

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez. Yes!

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

New gay indie night on the block, with a playlist that mixes classic Bowie, The Smiths, Blondie et al alongside new kids like Django Djanjo and Grimes. Rock The Bloc

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sat 02 Nov Nu Skool

Black Tent

A taste of the decadent sound systems of NYC’s disco era with yer main man Billy Woods.

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk. Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Indie, electro and anything inbetween with Pauly (My Latest Novel), and Simin and Steev (Errors). Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative weekend blowout, taking in metal, industrial, pop-punk, rock, emo and ska soundscapes over two floors. Cathouse Saturdays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet. The Rock Shop

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney. Love Music

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Saturday night disco manned by Gerry Lyons and guests. Deathkill4000 (The Vile Imbeciles)

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Industro-rock noise party with live players and bespoke visuals to boot. I Heart Garage Saturdays

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart. Freakbeats

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Flying Duck, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £15 (£10)

Pressure Halloween (Ben Klock + DVS1 + Sebo K + Mark Henning + Silicone Soul) The Arches, 23:00–05:00, £16

Glasgow’s mighty deep house and techno monthly host a packed Halloween bash, with resident merrymakers Slam bringing a heavy Berlin connection to proceedings – with Ben Klock and DVS1 joined by Sebo K, Silicone Soul and Mark Henning. Wolf Music Halloween Party

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £5

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Residents Garry and Andrew incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath, taking in chart anthems, mash-ups and requests. Supermax

Mod, soul, ska and groovy freakbeat 45s, with DJs Jamo, Paul Molloy and Gareth McCallum.

One-off night manned by Monty Funk and Michael Urquhart, rather predictably playing mostly odd disco, allied with snatches of house and bass.

Sunday Roaster

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

The HNDPCKD Cassette chaps take control of the decks, playing a set of classic hip-hop, instrumental beats, future funk and head nodders, this month joined by Subcity DJs. Oddisco

Sun 03 Nov

Moda Black (Marco Faraone + Catz ‘N Dogz + Jaymo and Andy George + Shadow Child + Darius Syrossian + Mia Dora)

A dark and electronic off-shoot of the Moda Music label, Moda Black take over The Arches for a showcase night, joined by the liks of Mia Dora, Marco Faraone and Shadow Child. Day of the Dead Glesga

The Poetry Club, 20:00–01:00, £10 adv. (£12 door)

Halloween extravaganza in the spirit of Mexican festival, Dia De Los Muertos, chock with live music, dance performers, loadsae tequila, the obligatory facepaint and a Glaswegian twist on some Mexican traditional rituals. Halloween @ Classic Grand

Classic Grand, 22:00–03:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £5

Renegade

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Rock, metal and punk playlists all night long, selected by yer man DJ Mythic. Violent Sweat

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Sunday party night designed to make y’all sweat – violently – to a mix of disco, nu-disco and house. Trash and Burn: Halloween Special

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £4

The monthly glam trash and sleaze tease party host their third annual Halloween bash, this year with a Day of the Dead theme (aka dig oot the facepaint). Daphni

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £12

One of electronic music’s most interesting figures comes to Glasgow for his Scottish debut, with Daphni playing a four-hour set in Subbie’s inimitable basement.

Mon 04 Nov Burn

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats. Space Invader

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, while DJ David Lo Pan holes up in The Attic playing retro classics.

Tue 05 Nov Killer Kitsch

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Killer Kitsch residents take charge – eight years old and still offering up the best in house, techno and electronic. Voodoo Voodoo

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Duncan Harvey plays a mix of vintage rock ‘n’ roll, sleazy R’n’B, swing, soul, surf and pop from a bygone age. i AM

La Cheetah Club: 4th Birthday, Part 2 (Kevin Saunderson)

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–04:00, £13 adv. (£14 door)

La Cheetah Club continue to celebrate their four years of being, joined on the night by ‘The Elevator of Techno’, Kevin Saunderson, playing a very special history of KMS Records’ set. Madlib (Eclair FiFi + Moogroove)

SWG3, 22:30–03:00, £12

Los Angeles-based DJ, multiinstrumentalist, rapper and music producer (aka Otis Jackons Jr.), hailed as one of the most prolific hip-hop producers of the 00s – having collaborated with a myriad artists, including MF DOOM and the late J Dilla.

Nudes on Mars (Flore De Hoog + Grant Canyon + Russell Elder )

First Saturday of the month fun night specialising in all hues of 70s vintage erotica. Subculture (Jasper + Josh)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks, this edition joined by a double dose of DJ guests: Jasper and Josh.

Hip Hop Thursdays

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Early weekend party starter, with Euan Neilson playing the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. Jelly Baby

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Thursday nighter of chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer. Different Drum

Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Forward-thinking new Saint Judes weekly, featuring guest talent of the house, garage and techno persuasion.

Fri 08 Nov Old Skool

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul. Damnation

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £6

Two floors of the best in rock, metal and industrial tunes picked out by DJ Barry and DJ Tailz. Kino Fist

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Genre-spanning mix of 60s psych, leftfield pop and Krautrock with resident Charlotte (of Muscles of Joy). Propaganda

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Cathouse Fridays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Residents night of rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels. Laidback Luke (Tom Swoon)

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £24.50

Common People

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Take It Sleazy

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

An unabashed mix of 80s pop, electro and nu-disco. They will play Phil Collins. Sub Rosa

Booty Call

Mixed bag of indie and chart classics across four rooms, plus karaoke shenanigans. Jamming Fridays

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

Musique Boutique

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £8

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Disco Riot

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Disco-styled party night with Alfredo Crolla spinning a selection of favourites, bolstered by karaoke and popcorn stalls, just cos. BEAST Wednesdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Luska (Joran Van Pol)

Midweek rammy of pop punk, hardcore and deadly slushy drinks.

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Fledgling electronic specialist Joran Van Pol makes his Scottish debut, taking over the Luska decks for an evening of merriment.

Rock, metal and emo mix up, plus guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

Wed 06 Nov

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £4

We all know Halloween means zombies, and Thirst throw down with a themed electro house offering. Dress dead.

R.U.IN Thursdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Celebration of all things 90s, with hits a-plenty and a pre-club bingo session.

Midweek party night with resident Bobby Bluebell playing classic house only.

Thirst: Zombie Party

Eclectic party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra.

Weekly Tuesday party playing a selection of dancefloor-friendly anthems.

Subbie’s regular student night with residents Ray Vose and Desoto at the helm.

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£8 door)

Shore

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

The Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

TV Tuesday

The Melting Pot crew host a residents special in honour of Day of the Dead, for which The Admiral will supply the Mexican beverages and residents Andrew and Simon the party tunes.

All-new night taking in a bit of disoc, house, techno and acid, plus all manner of other wavy beats,

Themed night with a live Twitter feed and a bouncy castle for added LOLs.

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Haus Dimension

Neverland

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of house, techno and electronica.

Classic Grand’s Jagermeisterheavy Halloween party (they’ve got the stuff on tap), bolstered by a £500 prize for the best costume. Melting Pot: Dia de los Muertos

The Danse Macabre regulars unite those two happiest of bedfellows, goth rock and, er, classic disco, in their regular home of Classic Grand.

The electro-house specialist makes a return visit to The Arches, now an annual affair of hyper-drive-house-step and ghetto-jack-trance-bass.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (free via iamclub.co.uk)

The label which launched the likes of Medlar, KRL, Greymatter and Bicep comes howling back to Glasgow, as Wolf Music bosses Matt and Stu head up a night of unbridled Halloween house pleasure.

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3 after 12)

Danse Macabre Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £4

ShangriLa

All-new midweeker with décor inspired by festivals across the globe, with rotating DJ guests and a different theme to each week.

Thu 07 Nov Misbehavin’

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Monthly mish-mash of electro, dance and dirty pop with DJ Drucifer.

A Love From Outer Space

Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston’s rather ace London night makes its now regular trip north, with the mighty duo playing backto-back all night long.

Philanthrobeats Vs Rubix (All Caps + Grampian Mountains + Tarantism + Denney + Fortywinks) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Charity club promoters Philanthrobeats team up with Rubix for a clubber’s special, featuring a versus set from Fortywinks and Floyd, alongside myriad others. All proceeds go to Mother Care India. Return to Mono (Karotte)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £11

Monthly night from Soma Records taking in popular techno offerings of all hues, this month joined by German native Karotte – known for his unique mixture of house and electro.

Listings

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Sat 09 Nov Nu Skool

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk. Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative weekend blowout, taking in metal, industrial, pop-punk, rock, emo and ska soundscapes over two floors. Cathouse Saturdays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet. The Rock Shop

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney. Love Music

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Saturday night disco manned by Gerry Lyons and guests. Back Tae Mine

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £8

House-party styled night with residents Gav Dunbar and Sci-Fi Steve, plus free toast for all as standard. I Heart Garage Saturdays

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart. Fantastic Man

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Messy Saturday night uber-disco featuring a rotating schedule of live talent. Subculture (Harri & Domenic)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10 adv. (£12 door)

Long-running house night with regulars Harri & Domenic manning the decks. Wrong Island

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

The legendary Teamy and Dirty Larry spin some fresh electronics for your aural pleasure.

Freefall: The Future (KhoMha + Aerofoil + Fabio XB + Will Atkinson + Angry Man + David Rust + Stewart Green + Alan Forrest + Harvey Anderson) The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £10

Following Freefall’s The Return, the clubbing crew continue with Freefall: The Future – this time featuring a selection of fresh talent from across the globe. Stigma (Miss Ogyny)

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

All-new club night from Hector Bizerk, comprising the celebratory elements of hip-hop culture including graffiti, beak dance and a good dose of DJing – with all-female line-up Miss Ogyny playing their opening night. Bigfoot’s Tea Party (Stacey Pullen)

Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, £7

Nomadic techno and tech-house, Bigfoot’s Tea Party, take to Saint Judes for a special set from Stacey Pullen – hailed as a key innovator of the second wave of Detroit techno. DJ Greenman

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Versatile turntablist chap Danny Greenman takes control of the decks – flitting between soul, funk, reggae, hip-hop, garage, dubstep, jungle, and anything else he damn well fancies.

Let’s Go Back… Way Back (Yogi Haughton)

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £8

Residents Bosco and Rob Mason bring acid-house, techno and rave back to the dancefloor, joined by inimitable Scottish house and techno specialist, Yogi Haughton.

Sun 10 Nov Sunday Roaster

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Residents Garry and Andrew incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath, taking in chart anthems, mashups and requests. Renegade

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Rock, metal and punk playlists all night long, selected by yer man DJ Mythic.

66

Listings

Violent Sweat Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Sunday party night designed to make y’all sweat – violently – to a mix of disco, nu-disco and house.

Secret Sundaze (James Priestley + Giles Smith) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The longstanding night (on the go for some 11 years) provides the usual haven for house and techno heads and party people alike, manned by founders Giles Smith and James Priestley.

Mon 11 Nov Burn

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats. Space Invader

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, while DJ David Lo Pan holes up in The Attic playing retro classics.

Tue 12 Nov Killer Kitsch

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Different Drum Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Forward-thinking new Saint Judes weekly, featuring guest talent of the house, garage and techno persuasion.

Fri 15 Nov Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £5

Old Skool

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul. Damnation

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £6

Two floors of the best in rock, metal and industrial tunes picked out by DJ Barry and DJ Tailz. Propaganda

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Cathouse Fridays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Residents night of rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels. Bottle Rocket

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Indie dancing club, playing anything and everything danceable. Booty Call

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mixed bag of indie and chart classics across four rooms, plus karaoke shenanigans.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Duncan Harvey plays a mix of vintage rock ‘n’ roll, sleazy R’n’B, swing, soul, surf and pop from a bygone age. i AM

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (free via iamclub.co.uk)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of house, techno and electronica. TV Tuesday

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Weekly Tuesday party playing a selection of dancefloor-friendly anthems.

Wed 13 Nov Musique Boutique

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Midweek party night with resident Bobby Bluebell playing classic house only. Disco Riot

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Disco-styled party night with Alfredo Crolla spinning a selection of favourites, bolstered by karaoke and popcorn stalls, just cos. Death By Unga Bunga

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Summer-styled party night playing the best in garage, soul, rockabilly, punk, surf and anything else you can sway along to. BEAST Wednesdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Midweek rammy of pop punk, hardcore and deadly slushy drinks. ShangriLa

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

All-new midweeker with décor inspired by festivals across the globe, with rotating DJ guests and a different theme to each week. Sub Rosa (Prosumer)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Subbie’s regular student night with residents Ray Vose and Desoto at the helm, joined by Berlin Panorama Bar resident, Prosumer.

Thu 14 Nov Neverland

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Themed night with a live Twitter feed and a bouncy castle for added LOLs. Shore

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Eclectic party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra. R.U.IN Thursdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Rock, metal and emo mix up, plus guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar. Hip Hop Thursdays

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Early weekend party starter, with Euan Neilson playing the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. Jelly Baby

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Thursday nighter of chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

The all-female collective, blog and fanzine bring together a selection of live acts and DJs for their 1st birthday bash, including Body Parts – the lush fledgling duo comprised of Jenny Reeve and Jill O’Sullivan.

The Killer Kitsch residents take charge – eight years old and still offering up the best in house, techno and electronic. Voodoo Voodoo

TYCI: 1st Birthday (Body Parts + Jen Long DJ)

Jamming Fridays

Adventures In Paradise

Wayne Dickson, Malcolm McKenzie and Roddie Gibb host their monthly party, fuelled on uptown funk and soulful disco tuneage. Daniele Baldelli (DJ Billy Woods)

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £8

The Italo disco innovator takes control of the decks for the evening. Code (Pfirter)

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 earlybird (£10 thereafter)

CODE bring back returning guest, Argentinian techno legend Pfirter, for another night of driving, dancefloor techno in the basement.

Sun 17 Nov Sunday Roaster

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Residents Garry and Andrew incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath, taking in chart anthems, mash-ups and requests. Renegade

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

Rock, metal and punk playlists all night long, selected by yer man DJ Mythic.

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Lock Up Your Daughters

Violent Sweat

The straight-friendly lesbian party returns for its regular themed shenanigans.

Sunday party night designed to make y’all sweat – violently – to a mix of disco, nu-disco and house.

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £5

Mon 18 Nov

Wax Works

Regular session of house and techno, inviting residents from Glasgow’s best nights to represent. Offbeat

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Offbeat crew take to their now regular home of La Cheetah, with guests being kept under wraps for now. Kill Yr Idols

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

DIY disco with a punk attitude, where psychedelic voodoo grooves meet souped-up turbo-tech, played out by the regulars and their occasional guests. Subculture (Recondite)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10 adv. (£12 door)

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks, this edition joined by German techno specialist Recondite.

Sat 16 Nov Nu Skool

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk. Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative weekend blowout, taking in metal, industrial, pop-punk, rock, emo and ska soundscapes over two floors. Cathouse Saturdays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet. The Rock Shop

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney.

Burn

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats. Space Invader

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, while DJ David Lo Pan holes up in The Attic playing retro classics.

Tue 19 Nov Killer Kitsch

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Duncan Harvey plays a mix of vintage rock ‘n’ roll, sleazy R’n’B, swing, soul, surf and pop from a bygone age. i AM

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (free via iamclub.co.uk)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of house, techno and electronica. TV Tuesday

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Weekly Tuesday party playing a selection of dancefloor-friendly anthems.

Wed 20 Nov Not Moving

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

South African house, grime, jungle, R’n’B and hauntology – tropical mix, ayes. Sub Rosa

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Musique Boutique

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Midweek party night with resident Bobby Bluebell playing classic house only.

Strange Paradise

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Party night from Wild Combination man David Barbarossa, specializing in leftfield disco, post-punk and far-out pop. Matthew Craig

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Eclectic mix of electronic dance, techno, house and funk from yer man Matthew Craig.

Themed night with a live Twitter feed and a bouncy castle for added LOLs. Shore

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Eclectic party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra. R.U.IN Thursdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Disco Riot

Disco-styled party night with Alfredo Crolla spinning a selection of favourites, bolstered by karaoke and popcorn stalls, just cos. BEAST Wednesdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Midweek rammy of pop punk, hardcore and deadly slushy drinks.

Positive Education #3 (Den Haan + David Barbarossa + Bop Gun + MWX) The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Charity-motivated club night dedicated to raising funds for local causes by bringing together a variety of local talent, with this edition manned by Den Haan, David Barbarossa, Bop Gun and MWX. Numbers (Joy Orbison)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Numbers Joy Orbison mans the decks at their occasional club night, likely doing his electronic dubstepgarage-house hybrid of a thing.

Hex Vs Nineteen89 Records (Sebmann + Llesca + Conor Wheeler)

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Rock, metal and emo mix up, plus guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

The Hex residents team up with the Nineteen89 Records chaps to celebrate the launch of their Sebmann EP.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Sat 23 Nov

Hip Hop Thursdays

Early weekend party starter, with Euan Neilson playing the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. Jelly Baby

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Thursday nighter of chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

Cyril Hahn + Ryan Hemsworth

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £10

Double headliner set from two of the most exciting electronic producers of the last year, Cyril Hahn and Ryan Hemsworth, bolstered by support from the Killer Kitsch DJs. Different Drum

Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Forward-thinking new Saint Judes weekly, featuring guest talent of the house, garage and techno persuasion. We Own Glasgow

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Nu Skool

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk. Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative weekend blowout, taking in metal, industrial, pop-punk, rock, emo and ska soundscapes over two floors. The Rock Shop

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney.

The Hot Club

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Tearin’ it up with 60s psych-outs and modern sleaze, provided by Rafla and Andy (of The Phantom Band). Damnation

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £6

Propaganda

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music.

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

2manydjs

Notorious Belgian mash-up party starters, using their agile cut-andpaste mixing to chop up classic party and dance hits from Dolly Parton to 10cc. Singles Night

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy Divine and Chris Geddes’ gem of a night dedicated to 7-inch singles from every genre imaginable. Falling Up

Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, Free

The vinyl-obsessed residents play a four-hour long session of house tracks. Spit & Grind

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Art collective 85a provide the beats, spinning a danceable mix of heavy beats.

Booty Call

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10 adv. (£12 door)

Cathouse Fridays

Residents night of rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels. The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mixed bag of indie and chart classics across four rooms, plus karaoke shenanigans. Jamming Fridays

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez. Tremors

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Resident DJs Connor Byrne and Feedback Junkie provide an eclectic mix of house, techno, disco and garage. Jaguar Skills

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £12.50

London DJ Jaguar Skills does as he does best – restoring the genre of mash-up to its full glory via his skilled craftsmanship in the art of electronic cutting and pasting. In a ninja mask. As you do. Flug (Lindsay Green)

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

Rising techno star, Flug, takes to Stereo’s decks, joined by Lindsay Green and a special guest whom they’re keeping under wraps for now. Teases.

Space Invader

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, while DJ David Lo Pan holes up in The Attic playing retro classics.

Subculture (Telford)

The Killer Kitsch residents take charge – eight years old and still offering up the best in house, techno and electronic. Voodoo Voodoo

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Duncan Harvey plays a mix of vintage rock ‘n’ roll, sleazy R’n’B, swing, soul, surf and pop from a bygone age. i AM

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (free via iamclub.co.uk)

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Full-on mix of nu-metal and hard rockin’ tunes with DJs Mythic and Div. Sunday Roaster

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Residents Garry and Andrew incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath, taking in chart anthems, mash-ups and requests. Renegade

Propaganda

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Cathouse Fridays

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £5

TV Tuesday

Weekly Tuesday party playing a selection of dancefloor-friendly anthems.

Wed 27 Nov Sub Rosa

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Cosmic

Monthly club bringing the spirit of the psychedelic trance dance ritual to the floor, with live acts, VJs and colourful fluoro decor. Booty Call

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Mixed bag of indie and chart classics across four rooms, plus karaoke shenanigans.

Musique Boutique

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Jamming Fridays

Midweek party night with resident Bobby Bluebell playing classic house only.

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

So Weit So Gut

The party sounds of Ean, Smiddy and Kenny White on decks. Disco Riot

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Disco-styled party night with Alfredo Crolla spinning a selection of favourites, bolstered by karaoke and popcorn stalls, just cos. BEAST Wednesdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Midweek rammy of pop punk, hardcore and deadly slushy drinks. ShangriLa

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

All-new midweeker with décor inspired by festivals across the globe, with rotating DJ guests and a different theme to each week.

Thu 28 Nov Counterfeit

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Full-on mix of nu-metal and hard rockin’ tunes with DJs Mythic and Div. Frogbeats

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4

Neverland

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Shore

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Eclectic party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra. R.U.IN Thursdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Rock, metal and emo mix up, plus guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar. Hip Hop Thursdays

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Early weekend party starter, with Euan Neilson playing the best in classic R’n’B and hip-hop. Jelly Baby

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Violent Sweat

Fledgling jazz-influenced alternative night, moving from mathcore to improvisational soundscapes.

Sunday party night designed to make y’all sweat – violently – to a mix of disco, nu-disco and house.

Damnation

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £6

Two floors of the best in rock, metal and industrial tunes picked out by DJ Barry and DJ Tailz.

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Thursday nighter of chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul.

Residents night of rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Rock, metal and punk playlists all night long, selected by yer man DJ Mythic.

Old Skool

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual fine mix of house, techno and electronica.

Themed night with a live Twitter feed and a bouncy castle for added LOLs.

Slide It In

Pressure: 15th birthday

the arches 23:00 - 05:00 £20

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Killer Kitsch

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£7 after 12)

Sun 24 Nov

Fri 29 Nov

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Frogbeats crew pump out the jungle and D’n’B beats a-plenty, as per.

The Nightrave crew bring Mark Archer of Altern8 back to Glasgow, manning the decks for the full four hours straight.

Forward-thinking new Saint Judes weekly, featuring guest talent of the house, garage and techno persuasion.

Tue 26 Nov

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks, this edition joined by regular Subbie frequenter, Telford. Nightrave (Mark Archer)

Different Drum Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

The mightly deep house and techno monthly celebrates its 15th birthday, with the colossal line-up including Loco Dice, Ben SIms, and Hans Bouffmyhre.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Fri 22 Nov Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul.

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats.

I Heart Garage Saturdays

Saturday night disco manned by Gerry Lyons and guests.

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £19.50 earlybird (£24.50 thereafter)

Old Skool

Burn

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Subbie’s regular student night with residents Ray Vose and Desoto at the helm.

Love Music

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Mon 25 Nov

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

The We Own clothing crew bring a concentrated version of their famed party blowouts to Glasgow.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Voodoo Voodoo

I Heart Garage Saturdays

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4

Neverland

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Thu 21 Nov

Two floors of the best in rock, metal and industrial tunes picked out by DJ Barry and DJ Tailz.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Saturday night disco manned by Gerry Lyons and guests.

All-new midweeker with décor inspired by festivals across the globe, with rotating DJ guests and a different theme to each week.

The Killer Kitsch residents take charge – eight years old and still offering up the best in house, techno and electronic.

Subbie’s regular student night with residents Ray Vose and Desoto at the helm.

Love Music

ShangriLa The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Stretched

Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Shake Appeal

Damn fine evening of hip shakers and neck breakers, combining everything from Buddy Holly to Motorhead. Rinse FM (Skream)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

Rinse FM play host to a special set from Skream – one of the key pioneers behind the rapidly developing dubstep movement.

La Cheetah Club Vs Missing Persons Club (Kassem Mosse + Meschi) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–04:00, £10

La Cheetah celebrate the last Friday of the month with a 4am licensed party night manned by live sets from guests Kassem Mosse and Meschi.

Sat 30 Nov Nu Skool

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk. Absolution

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative weekend blowout, taking in metal, industrial, pop-punk, rock, emo and ska soundscapes over two floors. Cathouse Saturdays

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet. The Rock Shop

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney. Love Music

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Saturday night disco manned by Gerry Lyons and guests. Duncan Harvey

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Saturday mix of soul, funk, motown and northern soul from the Glasgow veteran. Houndin’ The Streets

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Resident DJs Jer Reid, Martin Law and guests play music from, and some music inspired by, 1970s and early 80s NYC . DIVINE!

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£7/£5 student after 12)

Stellar mix of classic and rare 60s and 70s psych, soul, freakbeat, ska and funk dug deep from Andrew Divine’s vinyl archives.

THE SKINNY


Fantazia: 20th Anniversary Party The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £25 earlybird (£30 thereafter)

To celebrate their 20th anniversary, Fantazia return to The Arches for a monster nine-hour extravaganza celebrating all that’s great about the Scottish rave scene. Flash Mob (Leon Vynehall)

Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Flash Mib welcome on form Aussie producer Leon Vynehall to their lair, making his usual racket on the ol’ Funktion One. Chuckie

O2 Academy, 21:00–03:00, £15 earlybird (£20 thereafter)

Dutch DJ and producer of Surinamese descent (known to his mammy as Clyde Sergio Narain), whose risen to fame on the back of a batch of chart smashes. Subculture (Michael Mayer)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Subculte residents Harri & Domenic welcome Cologne electronic specialist Michael Mayer to their Subbie – treating y’all with a four-hour set. #notsosilent (Move D)

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £8 earlybird (£10 thereafter)

Edinburgh’s #notsosilent house specialists bring Move D back to the La Cheetah Club for a special three hour set. I Heart Garage Saturdays

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Tue 29 Oct Antics

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk. Soul Jam Hot

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul and boogie from The Players Association team. I Love Hip-Hop

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be. Hector’s House

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. CCTV

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, Free (£4 after 12)

Edinburgh Clubs Juice

Playdate

CCTV

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3

Pumped Thursday nighter playing a mighty mix of everything from Hud Mo to Fly Mo. Fire Walk With Me: Twin Peaks Halloween Party

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£7 door)

The Wax On DJs transform The Wee Red Bar into the wee ‘Black Lodge’ for a one-off Halloween special, decking oot the venue with surreal visuals and decorations to the tune of a certain cult TV show. Bat Gross and The Repulsions’ Hallowe’en Extravaganza! Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5

Rock-styled covers band Matt Gloss and The Emulsions host their own musical Halloween bash – playing two live sets followed by a DJ set, with additional live art from The Too Much Fun Club. Dress spooky.

Fri 01 Nov Misfits

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms. Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top. This Is Music

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Regular indie and electro outing from the Sick Note DJs. Propaganda

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Wonky

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5

A cast of players take care of all your hardtek and breakcore needs, with full UV decor and glowstick action. Pop Tarts

Electric Circus, 17:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Pop and rock gems spun by DJs from Electric Circus’ Saturday club nights, including Magic Nostalgic, Beep Beep, Yeah! and Pop Rocks. Hot Mess

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Fun night of chart, cheese and other student favourited party tunes.

DJ Simonotron hosts the gay disco party like no other, playing disco, house and acid on vinyl only.

Wed 30 Oct

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Cookie

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Midweek student rundown of chart, club and electro hits. Witness

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of house, garage and bass adventures. Champion Sound

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

Midweek celebration of all things dub, jungle, reggae and dancehall. Stay Gold

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

All-new club night brought to you by the We Own and Fly lot, playing hip-hop classics and soul soul in one room, and house in’t other. Tribe

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

New night manned by residents Khalid Count Clockwork and Craig Wilson. Tiki Tiki Wah Wah

Picture House, 23:00–03:00, Free (£2/£1 student after 12)

Exotic-styled new midweeker (and, no – not that kind of exotic) awash with tiki beats and all the cocktails you can tank.

Thu 31 Oct High Society

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Student-friendly chart anthems, bolstered by hip-hop, r’n’b and urban in the back room. Tease

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, Free (£3/£2 students after 11.30)

Party night of R’n’B, hip-hop and dancehall anthems.

November 2013

FLY

A powerhouse of local residents take over Cab Vol, joined by a selection of guest talent both local and further flung (aka London). JakN: 10th Birthday Halloween Party (F-N + S3konz + Morphos)

The Dram House, 22:30–03:00, £7

Having been providing their inimitable three-deck mix up of techno in all its forms for a mighty 10 years now, the JakN crew host a double-header celebration in honour of said birthday and Halloween weekend. Dressing up encouraged. Electrikal: Dance of the Dead

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£7 door)

Fun Halloween collaboration, which sees mighty bass junkies Electrikal Soundsystem team up with tropical micro venue Samedia Shebeen for a night of breaks, bass and beats.

Sat 02 Nov Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night. The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£5 after midnight)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Jake playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk. Bubblegum

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard.

House specialists Stewart and Steven play, er, some special house. Propaganda

Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. VEGAS!

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:30–01:00, £6

50s-themed party fun night, with Frankie Sumatra, Bugsy Seagull, Dino Martini, Sam Jose and Nikki Nevada. Plus Vegas showgirls ago-go, natch. Speaker Bite Me

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 after 12)

The Evol DJs worship at the alter of all kinds of indie-pop, as long as it’s got bite. Thunder Disco Club

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

The Thunder Disco Club residents churn out the 90s house, techno and disco hits. Messenger

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£7 after 12)

Conscious roots and dub reggae rockin’ from the usual beefty soundsystem.

Cocoon Edinburgh (Sven Vath)

Secret location, 21:00–04:00, £24.50 earlybird

Fun night of chart, cheese and other student favourited party tunes.

Wed 06 Nov Cookie

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Midweek student rundown of chart, club and electro hits. Witness

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of house, garage and bass adventures. Champion Sound

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

Midweek celebration of all things dub, jungle, reggae and dancehall. Stay Gold

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

All-new club night brought to you by the We Own and Fly lot, playing hip-hop classics and soul soul in one room, and house in’t other. Tribe

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

New night manned by residents Khalid Count Clockwork and Craig Wilson.

Thu 07 Nov i Am Edinburgh

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free via iamclub.co.uk)

Xplicit (Wilkinson) The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

Heavy jungle and bass-styled beats from the inimitable Xplicit crew, joined by Ram Records’ DJ/ producer Wilkinson.

Sat 09 Nov Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night. The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£5 after midnight)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Jake playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk. Bass Syndicate

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

The regular Edinburgh breaks and bassline Manga crew takeover. Mumbo Jumbo

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£7 after 12)

Funk, soul, beats and mash-ups from the Mumbo Jumbo regulars, joined by Bubble DJs Brainstorm and Durkit for some added acid and house. Bubblegum

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard. Propaganda

Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Dr No’s

The Cocoon lot touch down in Scotland for their first fullyfledged production night, taking to a secret location (with purpose built insides) for a guest set from Frankfurt-based DJ, Seth Vath. Free buses run to and from the venue.

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass.

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£5 after 12)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Beep Beep, Yeah!

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £15

Juice

Colours (Will Sparks)

High Society

Student-friendly chart anthems, bolstered by hip-hop, r’n’b and urban in the back room. Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Colour welcome Will Sparks to their deck set – a name now snynonymous with that trademark Melbourne sound, with hints of Diplo and big EDM bangers.

Pumped Thursday nighter playing a mighty mix of everything from Hud Mo to Fly Mo.

Sun 03 Nov

All-new evening of motown, 50s rock’n’oll, northern soul and swing.

Coalition

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Weekly cross-genre of bass from a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs. DM Lovers

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Alternative monthly night taking its inspiration from the skinhead and punk movements, with discounted entry in Dr. Martens. Obviously. The Club

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of. Dive!

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 21:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£6 door)

Queer party night flaunting its suitably eclectic wares across a programme of performance, music, spoken word, live art and comedy – before discoing down until late.

Mon 04 Nov Mixed Up

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics. Nu Fire

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

DJ Fusion and Beef move from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Tue 05 Nov Antics

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk. Soul Jam Hot

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul and boogie from The Players Association team. I Love Hip Hop

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Weekly selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be. Hector’s House

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats.

The Soul Revue

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Soul Revue

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

Danceable mix of the best in 60s ska, rocksteady, bluebeat and reggae. Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 after 12)

Retro pop stylings from the 50s to the 70s, via a disco tune or ten. Pocket Aces (Think Twice)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Dance-inducing party night, with Craig Smith making his monthly appearance rich with deep, soulful house sounds. Club Houch

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £10

The Club Houch crew bring the hard house and trance tunes; you do the sweatin’.

All-new evening of motown, 50s rock’n’oll, northern soul and swing.

Sun 10 Nov

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Hullabaloo

Mash-up mix of beats, breaks and hip-hop from Mumbo Jumbo’s Trendy Wendy and Steve Austin, bolstered by Tall Paul’s vintage selections.

Fri 08 Nov Misfits

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Coalition

Weekly cross-genre of bass from a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs. The Club

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of. Rise: 5th Birthday Party

Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Planet Earth

Johnny Frenetic spins a special mash-up mix of funky house, electro, indie and urban in honour of the night’s 5th birthday.

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Mon 11 Nov

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms.

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top. Propaganda

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Stacks

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Rip-roaring soul, funk, and 50s r’n’b, jollied along by free mix CDs on the door. Pop Tarts

Electric Circus, 17:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Pop and rock gems spun by DJs from Electric Circus’ Saturday club nights, including Magic Nostalgic, Beep Beep, Yeah! and Pop Rocks. FLY

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

A powerhouse of local residents take over Cab Vol, joined by a selection of guest talent both local and further flung (aka London). Teesh

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

DJ Cheers – frequent flyer at many a Sneaky’s night – finally gets his own show on the road, launching a clothing line on the night to boot.

Mixed Up

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics. Nu Fire

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

DJ Fusion and Beef move from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Tue 12 Nov Antics

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk. Soul Jam Hot

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul and boogie from The Players Association team. I Love Hip Hop

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Weekly selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be. Hector’s House

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. CCTV

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3

Fun night of chart, cheese and other student favourited party tunes.

Wed 13 Nov

ETC23: 50 Years Of Time Travel (Munky Yoyo)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Teviot Underground, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4 fancy dress)

Cookie

Midweek student rundown of chart, club and electro hits. Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Edinburgh Tekno Cartel bring the sleazy bass and techno beats once more, this month with a Doctor Who theme (aka make like a Dalek) – bolstered by a live set from Munky Yoyo.

Champion Sound

Sat 16 Nov

Witness

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of house, garage and bass adventures. The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after midnight)

Midweek celebration of all things dub, jungle, reggae and dancehall. Stay Gold

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

All-new club night brought to you by the We Own and Fly lot, playing hip-hop classics and soul soul in one room, and house in’t other. Tribe

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

New night manned by residents Khalid Count Clockwork and Craig Wilson.

Thu 14 Nov i Am Edinburgh

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free via iamclub.co.uk)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass. High Society

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Student-friendly chart anthems, bolstered by hip-hop, r’n’b and urban in the back room. Juice

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Pumped Thursday nighter playing a mighty mix of everything from Hud Mo to Fly Mo. The Soul Revue

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, £3

All-new evening of motown, 50s rock’n’oll, northern soul and swing. Hullabaloo

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Mash-up mix of beats, breaks and hip-hop from Mumbo Jumbo’s Trendy Wendy and Steve Austin, bolstered by Tall Paul’s vintage selections.

Fri 15 Nov Misfits

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms. Four Corners

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Soulful dancing fodder, from deep funk to reggae beats with your regular DJ hosts. Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top. Propaganda

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Pop Tarts

Electric Circus, 17:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Pop and rock gems spun by DJs from Electric Circus’ Saturday club nights, including Magic Nostalgic, Beep Beep, Yeah! and Pop Rocks. Bixon

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £5 (members free)

Hip young party collective spinning house jams all night long. Qabalala! (Zed Penguin + Numbers Are Futile + James Metcalfe)

Leith Docker’s Club, 20:00–01:00, £5

The unique ‘maximalist qabaret’ party night returns featuring live stints from Zed Penguin, Numbers Are Futile and James Metcalfe. FLY

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

A powerhouse of local residents take over Cab Vol, joined by a selection of guest talent both local and further flung (aka London).

Animal Hospital: Birthday Party

The Outhouse, 21:00–01:00, Free

The Animal Hospital troops continue to medicate Edinburgh with their unique blend of techno, house and minimal – hosting a birthday bash special upstairs in The Outhouse Loft.

Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night. The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£5 after midnight)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Jake playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk. Bubblegum

I Love Hip Hop The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Weekly selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be. Hector’s House

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. CCTV

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3

Fun night of chart, cheese and other student favourited party tunes.

Wed 20 Nov Cookie

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Midweek student rundown of chart, club and electro hits. Witness

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of house, garage and bass adventures.

Propaganda

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard. Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Big ‘N’ Bashy

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£6 after midnight)

Mighty mix of reggae, grime, dubstep and jungle played oot by the inimitable residents. Torture Garden

The Caves, 21:00–03:00, £18

Infamous fetish club spread over three dungeon-themed playrooms in the glorious cavernous surrounds of The Caves. Fantasy dress code, i.e. everything from circus freakshow to Venice carnival. And PVC, loadsae PVC. Decade

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Fresh playlists spanning pop-punk, emo and hardcore soundscapes. Wasabi Disco

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Heady bout of cosmic house, punk upside-down disco and, er, Fleetwood Mac with yer man Kris ‘Wasabi’ Walker. Pop Rocks!

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 after 12)

Pop and rock gems, taking in motown, 80s classics and plenty danceable fare (well, the Beep Beep, Yeah! crew are on decks after all). Pocket Aces (Gareth Sommerville)

Champion Sound

Midweek celebration of all things dub, jungle, reggae and dancehall. Stay Gold

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

All-new club night brought to you by the We Own and Fly lot, playing hip-hop classics and soul soul in one room, and house in’t other. Tribe

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

New night manned by residents Khalid Count Clockwork and Craig Wilson.

Thu 21 Nov i Am Edinburgh

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free via iamclub.co.uk)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass. High Society

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Student-friendly chart anthems, bolstered by hip-hop, r’n’b and urban in the back room. Juice

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Pumped Thursday nighter playing a mighty mix of everything from Hud Mo to Fly Mo. The Soul Revue

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

All-new evening of motown, 50s rock’n’oll, northern soul and swing. Hullabaloo

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Dance-inducing party night, with Mr Gareth Sommerville making his regular monthly appearance.

Mash-up mix of beats, breaks and hip-hop from Mumbo Jumbo’s Trendy Wendy and Steve Austin, bolstered by Tall Paul’s vintage selections.

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £12.50

Fri 22 Nov

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Compakt Vs Pulse (Ben Klock)

Two of Edinburgh’s top techno nights, Compakt and Pulse, unite to welcome Berlin born DJ, producer and label owner Ben Klock for a deck takeover.

Sun 17 Nov

Misfits

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms. Planet Earth

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top.

Coalition (Rain City Riot)

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£7 after 12)

The Club

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of. Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Weekly cross-genre of bass from a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs – this edition joined by the mysterious Rain City Riot; the new project of a certain wellknown dubstep producer who’s keeping himself secret for now.

Mon 18 Nov Mixed Up

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics. Nu Fire

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

DJ Fusion and Beef move from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Tue 19 Nov Antics

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk. Soul Jam Hot

Confusion is Sex

Glam techno and electro night, this time with a robot theme (aka make like Robocop). Transmission

Studio 24, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Midweek session of house, breaks and techno soundscapes. Propaganda

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. LuckyMe

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The globetrotting music, art and all-round party crew host their regular Sneaky’s outing, with an as-yet-unrevealed guest in tow. Dirty teases. Pop Tarts

Electric Circus, 17:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Pop and rock gems spun by DJs from Electric Circus’ Saturday club nights, including Magic Nostalgic, Beep Beep, Yeah! and Pop Rocks.

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul and boogie from The Players Association team.

Listings

67


FLY

Baths (Swallow Fly Low)

Substance

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £8

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

A powerhouse of local residents take over Cab Vol, joined by a selection of guest talent both local and further flung (aka London). 4x4

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Two-fold night of house and techno manned by the regular 4x4 crew.

Annie Mac Presents: 2013 Tour (Duke Dumont + MNEK + Cyril Hahn + Lulu James) Picture House, 21:00–03:00, £18.50

The Radio 1 DJ brings her club night north of the border – headed up by London producer Duck Dumont, hailed for his barking mad electro output. Warm Fuzzy

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5.00

DJs Nick Nasty Biscuit and Bill Spice serve up the deep house and techno grooves.

Sat 23 Nov Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night. The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£5 after midnight)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Jake playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk. Bubblegum

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard. Propaganda

Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Soulsville

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Swinging soul spanning a whole century, with DJs Tsatsu and Fryer. Gasoline Dance Machine

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

More classic Italo and straight-up boogie allied with contemporary house and disco, as Edinburgh’s GDM crew do their thing. Speaker Bite Me

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 after 12)

The stage moniker of bedroom producer Will Wiesenfeld, known for his layered up, experimental sounds, employing some unusual ambient sounds.

Tue 26 Nov Antics

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk. Soul Jam Hot

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul and boogie from The Players Association team. I Love Hip Hop

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Weekly selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be. Hector’s House

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The HH crew serve up their usual fine mix of electronic basslines allied with home-cooked house beats. CCTV

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3

Fun night of chart, cheese and other student favourited party tunes.

Wed 27 Nov Cookie

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Midweek student rundown of chart, club and electro hits. Witness

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of house, garage and bass adventures.

Mark Balneaves and Martin Lightbody play some of the finest underground house and techno around, keeping things as per for their 6th birthday celebrations.

Sun 24 Nov The Club

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

The Caves, 23:00–03:00, £10

The Kapital crew pitch up for part two of their 6th birthday celebrations, helped along by one of the most revered artists in Richie Hawtin’s Minus collective – techno specialist, Gaiser. #notsosilent (Session Victim) Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

The #notsosilent crew boast a set from the two man house team bubbling up from five years in Berlin’s underground, Session Victim.

Sat 30 Nov Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night. The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£5 after midnight)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Jake playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk. Bubblegum

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

All-new club night brought to you by the We Own and Fly lot, playing hip-hop classics and soul soul in one room, and house in’t other. Tribe

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

New night manned by residents Khalid Count Clockwork and Craig Wilson. i Am Edinburgh

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free via iamclub.co.uk)

High Society

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Student-friendly chart anthems, bolstered by hip-hop, r’n’b and urban in the back room. Juice

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Pumped Thursday nighter playing a mighty mix of everything from Hud Mo to Fly Mo. Hullabaloo

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

The Ride girls play hip-hop and dance, all night long – now in their new party-ready Saturday night slot. Propaganda

Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Madchester

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5 students)

Monthly favourite of indie classics and baggy greats, from Primal Scream and the like. Betamax

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Monthly offering of new wave, disco, post-punk and a bit o’ synthtastic 80s with your hosts Chris and Big Gus. VEGAS!

The Voodoo Rooms, 20:30–01:00, £6

50s-themed party fun night, with Frankie Sumatra, Bugsy Seagull, Dino Martini, Sam Jose and Nikki Nevada. Plus Vegas showgirls ago-go, natch. Messenger

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£7 after 12)

Queer party night flaunting its suitably eclectic wares across a programme of performance, music, spoken word, live art and comedy – before discoing down until late.

Fri 29 Nov

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

The musical hub and record label brainchild of Mighty Mouse and Matt Van Schie, Nightfilm makes its second Cab Vol appearance – manned by a plethora of hot talent performing alongside Mighty Mouse himself.

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 21:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£6 door)

Coalition (Curses)

Weekly cross-genre of bass from a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs – this edition joined by alter ego of long-time friend of the venue Drop The Lime, Curses, head of the Trouble & Bass label.

Mon 25 Nov Mixed Up

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics. Nu Fire

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

DJ Fusion and Beef move from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

68

Listings

Mojo Fury (Captain + Ohio State Fair + Isak)

Beat Generator Live!, 19:30–22:00, £5

Northern Irish alternative rockers rich with hardcore and progressive stylings.

Fri 01 Nov

Kris Drever and Eamonn Coyne

The Gardyne Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £12

Rare chance to see folk singer/ guitarist Kris Drever and renowned accompanist Eamonn Coyne in an intimate gig setting. Maxwell’s Dead (Tragical History Tour + Salemstreet + Hated ‘Til Proven) Kage, 20:00–22:30, £4

The Scottish quartet launch their new LP, serving up an agglomeration of uplifting punk rock party bangers, mixing ska and harmonies in their own inimitable way.

Sat 02 Nov Dressed To Kill

Buskers, 20:00–23:00, £10 adv. (£12 door)

Fri 08 Nov

Conscious roots and dub reggae rockin’ from the usual beefty soundsystem.

Dive!

Thu 31 Oct

Stay Gold

Ride

Mash-up mix of beats, breaks and hip-hop from Mumbo Jumbo’s Trendy Wendy and Steve Austin, bolstered by Tall Paul’s vintage selections.

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of.

Beat Generator Live!, 19:30–22:00, £5

Post-rock foursome all about harmonic, melodic soundscapes with hook-laden, euphoric choruses.

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Midweek celebration of all things dub, jungle, reggae and dancehall.

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass.

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

Kapital: 6th Birthday (Gaiser)

We Came from Wolves ( Broken Boy + Phantom Brake Pedal + The Rosettes)

Kiss tribute act.

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5 students)

Definition: 6th Birthday

Occasional night playing the finest in Swedish indie pop, plus 60s, 70s and independent tunes from near and far.

Wed 30 Oct

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard.

Champion Sound

Thu 28 Nov

Themed night of chart and house classics with Tommy Kay and Claudio.

Mjölk

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£4 after 11.30)

Dundee Music

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

The Evol DJs worship at the alter of all kinds of indie-pop, as long as it’s got bite. Republik

The Substance crew mix up cutting edge and classic electronic music from across the spectrum, with resident Gavin Richardson likely joined by a guest or two

Misfits

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms. Planet Earth

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top. Propaganda

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student-orientated night playing the best in new and classic indie music. Pop Tarts

Electric Circus, 17:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Pop and rock gems spun by DJs from Electric Circus’ Saturday club nights, including Magic Nostalgic, Beep Beep, Yeah! and Pop Rocks. FLY

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

A powerhouse of local residents take over Cab Vol, joined by a selection of guest talent both local and further flung (aka London).

Nightfilm

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £9 (£7)

Dr No’s (Jerry Dammers)

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 23:00–03:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

Danceable mix of the best in 60s ska, rocksteady, bluebeat and reggae, this edition manned by The Specials’ Jerry Dammers.

Aye, We’re Pure Magic Nostalgic!

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£7 after 12)

A hodgepodge of quality tracks chosen by JP’s spinning wheel, this time with a pure Scottish theme – dedicated to all the best music to have ever come out of Scotland, ever. They will play The Proclaimers.

Who’s Next

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:00, £8

The Who tribute act. The Human Project

Sun 24 Nov Eddi Reader

The Gardyne Theatre, 19:30–22:15, £25

Sat 09 Nov The Boomtown Rats

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:00, £25

The longstanding Irish new wave lot return to the stage, a full bag of hits in tow. The Vibrators (Rabid Dogs + Diddums)

Beat Generator Live!, 19:30–22:00, £7

London-based punk-rock trio formed way back in’t day (as in 1976), still touring and recording.

Fri 15 Nov

Ramage Inc. (Man Made Origin + Animus + Tosca)

Non-Zero’s, 19:00–22:00, £5

Ambient metal quartet formed by Ramage for the purpose of bringing life to his musical work on stage.

Sat 16 Nov Urang Matang

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:00, £5

Experimental ska-meets-reggae ensemble led by vocalist and guitar player Al James.

Mon 18 Nov

Silent Screams (Shields + To Kill Achilles + Aletha)

Beat Generator Live!, 19:00–22:00, £6

Coventry-based hardcore metal five-piece, taking to the UK for a mini tour in support of their new single, The Way We Were.

Tue 19 Nov

Franz Nicolay + The Cut Ups (Broken Stories) Kage, 19:30–22:00, £6

Franz Nicolay continues his reinvention as a troubadour of heartland America, playing a special set with Exeter melodic punk rockers The Cut Ups – one with Nicolay as part of The Cut Ups and one with The Cut Ups as Nicolay’s electric backing band.

Wed 20 Nov Euros Child

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:00, £10

The Welsh musician and songwriter, best known as the frontman of Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci, takes to the stage solo in support of his latest LP.

Rooms Thursdays

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Reader weaves her velvety vocal palette around a selection of traditional and contemporary songs, as is her way.

Weekly Thursday nighter (as the name would suggest) playing what they promise will be ‘good’ music. Sold.

Fri 29 Nov

Fri 08 Nov

Kage, 18:00–22:30, £20

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £8 earlybird (£10 thereafter)

Book Yer Ane Fest VII

Headway (Alan Fitzpatrick)

Three head-pounding days of DIY punk, hardcore and emo goodness from Make-That-A-Take Records, including the likes of The Muderburgers, Cleavers, Algernon Doll, Uniforms and The Kimberly Steaks, with all profits going to Safe-Tay.

The Headway crew welcome one of their favourite techno artists, Alan Fitzpartrick, to the decks – likely doling out the thumping bass until the wee hours.

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:00, £9

Fun Friday nighter soundtracked by big party tunes and punter requests.

The June Brides (The Hugs + The Wildhouse)

English indie-pop ensemble formed in London back in the early 80s by Phil Wilson and Simon Beesley of International Rescue.

Sat 30 Nov Book Yer Ane Fest VII

Kage, 18:00–22:30, £20

Three head-pounding days of DIY punk, hardcore and emo goodness from Make-That-A-Take Records, including the likes of The Muderburgers, Cleavers, Algernon Doll, Uniforms and The Kimberly Steaks, with all profits going to Safe-Tay. Target 5

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:00, £5

All-Mod tribute night.

Sun 01 Dec Book Yer Ane Fest VII

Kage, 18:00–22:30, £20

Three head-pounding days of DIY punk, hardcore and emo goodness from Make-That-A-Take Records, including the likes of The Muderburgers, Cleavers, Algernon Doll, Uniforms and The Kimberly Steaks, with all profits going to Safe-Tay.

Beat Generator Live!, 19:30–22:00, £5

The Leeds-based quartet bring the melodic punk rock and riffs, in support of their debut LP.

Thu 07 Nov

Dundee Clubs

House Party

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £8

Kaos

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

New night exploring new music and the bands that inspired them, and the bands that in turn inspired them... And so on for eternity.

Sat 09 Nov Fat Sam’s Saturdays

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £6

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms, with Ricky H spanning dance, house, r’n’b and hip-hop selections. Asylum

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative tunes.

Wed 13 Nov Co2

Fat Sam’s, 23:00–02:30, £3.50

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and five quid fish bowls.

Thu 14 Nov Rooms Thursdays

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Co2

Fat Sam’s, 23:00–02:30, £3.50

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and five quid fish bowls.

Thu 31 Oct Rooms Thursdays

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Fun Friday nighter soundtracked by big party tunes and punter requests. Gorilla In Your Car

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Hardcore, emo, punk and scenester selections. Also perhaps the best-named club night in Dundee’s existence. Level Up

Sat 16 Nov

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £8

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £6

Warped

Ska, screamo and pop-punk offerings, featuring additional live performances from a selection of choice noisemakers.

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative tunes.

Wed 27 Nov Co2

Fat Sam’s, 23:00–02:30, £3.50

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and five quid fish bowls.

Thu 28 Nov Rooms Thursdays

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Weekly Thursday nighter (as the name would suggest) playing what they promise will be ‘good’ music. Sold. Subterráneo (Moodymanc)

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £5

The all-new night launches in suitably fine style, with residents Dyte and Neil Clark joined by jazz-inflected house specialist Moodymanc (aka Danny Ward).

Fri 29 Nov House Party

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £8

Fun Friday nighter soundtracked by big party tunes and punter requests.

Sat 30 Nov Fat Sam’s Saturdays

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £6

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms, with Ricky H spanning dance, house, r’n’b and hip-hop selections. Asylum

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Glasgow Theatre

House Party

Fri 01 Nov

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Asylum

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Fri 15 Nov

Eclectic mix of bass, breakbeat, d’n’b, dub and electro playlists from the resident DJs.

Fun Friday nighter soundtracked by big party tunes and punter requests.

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £6

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms, with Ricky H spanning dance, house, r’n’b and hip-hop selections.

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative tunes.

Weekly Thursday nighter (as the name would suggest) playing what they promise will be ‘good’ music. Sold. House Party

Fat Sam’s Saturdays

Weekly Thursday nighter (as the name would suggest) playing what they promise will be ‘good’ music. Sold.

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £8

Wed 30 Oct

Sat 23 Nov

Beat Generator Live!, 22:00–02:30, £5

Fat Sam’s Saturdays

CCA

Lunchbox

31 Oct – 2 Nov, 1:00pm – 3:00pm, £10

Unique lunchtime adventure created by multidisciplinary artist and Cryptic Associate, Josh Armstrong, for which a series of bespoke performances will unfold in unlikely places. Part of Sonica 2013.

Citizens Theatre True West

29 Oct – 16 Nov, not 3 Nov, 4 Nov, 10 Nov, 11 Nov, times vary, From £12

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

various dates between 1 Nov and 30 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, prices vary

Co2

Fat Sam’s, 23:00–02:30, £3.50

Rooms Thursdays

The ever-popular Tony and Pulitzer prize-winning musical celebrates 20 years on the stage.

Fri 22 Nov

7 Nov, 6:30pm – 9:30pm, From £20

Slam

Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:30, £10

Wed 06 Nov Fat Sam’s, 23:00–02:30, £3.50

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £8

Co2

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and five quid fish bowls.

Rent

Weekly Thursday nighter (as the name would suggest) playing what they promise will be ‘good’ music. Sold.

Producer/DJ duo Slam (aka Stuart McMillan and Orde Meikle) make their now regular trip to Dundee, sharing deck duty over a four-hour set of underground techno.

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative tunes.

London performer, director and writer, Scottee, confronts a series of self truths – performed entirely in a photo booth, exposing the viewer to four snapshots of his troublesome teens, intended to show him at his very worst. Part of Glasgay! dream//life

8 Nov, times vary, £7 (£5)

A charming, funny and sometimes bittersweet window into the dreams, memories, fantasies and realities of two people faced with their biggest struggle yet. Etiquette Of Grief

12 Nov, 7:30pm – 8:30pm, £9 (£7)

Playful and at times provocative solo performance from Ellie Harrison, exploring our ways of dealing with public and private grief.

The King’s Theatre

Seven Brides For Seven Brothers

various dates between 25 and 30 Nov, times vary, prices vary

Musical favourite set in Oregon in 1850, following young Adam – the eldest of seven brothers – and his quest to get a bride for ‘em all. Carnaby Street

various dates between 4 and 9 Nov, times vary, From £13.90

The musical story of a generation, set against the backdrop of London’s West End in the sixties (and packed with hits from the era, obvs). The Butterfly Lion

28 Oct – 2 Nov, times vary, From £10

Heart-warming tale of an enduring friendship, following the adventures of Bertie and the White Lion as they strive to find sanctuary amongst adversity. Cockles = warmed. Calamity Jane

29 Oct – 2 Nov, times vary, From £11.90

12–16 Nov, times vary, From £11.90

Acis and Galatea

SECC

Asylum

The Worst of Scottee

Oct, 7:30pm – 8:45pm, £11 (£8)

27–28 Nov, 8:00pm – 10:00pm, £5 (£3)

Thu 21 Nov

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Revelatory verbatim show for which award-winning writer Chris Goode asked 40 ten-year-olds to talk about their lives, with their words spoken by adults, playing adults in adult situations.

Mono

Asylum

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and five quid fish bowls.

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms, with Ricky H spanning dance, house, r’n’b and hip-hop selections.

Monkey Bars

various dates between 1 and 6 Nov, times vary, prices vary

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative tunes.

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £6 (£8 after 12)

Fat Sam’s Saturdays

The Arches

Set in the Wild West outpost of Deadwood City in 1876, sharp shootin’ tomboy Calamity Jane tries to help the local saloon owner by promising to fetch a music hall star from Chicago – much singing ensues.

Wed 20 Nov

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £6

Inspired by Cryptic Associate Sven Werner’s film, Oculista, and featuring music by Graeme Miller, The Escapement explores the flow of time and invites the audience to choose between two parallel worlds as they watch. Part of Sonica 2013.

Sam Shepard’s fiery domestic drama about the sibling rivalry between two brothers, deftly exposing the cracks of the American Dream as it goes.

Sat 02 Nov

Resident DJ Dicky Trisco welcomes Mr Chris ‘The Duck’ Duckenfield to jack the discotheque, with a free mix CD for the first 50.

The Escapement

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 5:00pm – 9:00pm, free

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms, with Ricky H spanning dance, house, r’n’b and hip-hop selections.

Mono dip their toe into the world of opera, with Music of the Spheres and the Glasgow Opera Collective presenting a baroque charmer of a piece in the venue’s intimate setting.

Disco Deviance (Chris Duckenfield)

Sven Werner’s Studio

House Party

Fun Friday nighter soundtracked by big party tunes and punter requests. Irie Lion Sound

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £tbc

Occasional night of chilled out reggae vibes to nourish the soul.

Aida

Elton John and Tim Rice’s rock musical: y’know, just a light love story in which three people are forced to make difficult choices that will alter history foreverever.

Stereo

5 Minutes To Move Me: Arches Live Redux

Hello Dolly

New look production of the favourited Barbara Streisand film, about widowed Dolly Levi – who has the answer to everyone’s problems, except, of course, her own. Shang-a-Lang

19–23 Nov, times vary, From £12.90

Three forty-something Scottish women decide to relive their youth by going to a 70s revival weekend in Butlins, where the Bay City Rollers are playing...

Tramway Quartet

15 Nov & 16 Nov, 7:30pm – 9:30pm, £8 (£6)

Two up-and-coming Scottish dance artists, Jack Webb and Rosalind Masson, perform their own solo material simultaneously, side-by-side – transforming theur physicality and juxtaposing that of the other.

4 Nov, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, £donation

All-new collaborative performance event between Buzzcut, The Arches and Stereo, composed of one-on-one experimental performance taking place across a table in a darkened room.

THE SKINNY


Theatre Enough Already 7–9 Nov, 7:30pm – 9:30pm, £12 (8)

World premiere of French composer/artist Francois Sarhan’s music-theatre performance for actor, musicians, live sound effect artists, stop-frame animation and film, centred around how irresistible — and impossible — it is to achieve utopia. Every House Has A Door

22–23 Nov, 7:30pm – 9:30pm, £10 (£6)

In Testimonium director Lin Hixson combines the performances of Bryan Saner, Stephen Fiehn and post-rockers Joan of Arc – with the result being a complex weave of recitation, movement and live music.

Royal Lyceum Theatre Crime and Punishment

various dates between 22 Oct and 9 Nov, 7:45pm – 10:00pm, From £14

Chris Hannan’s new stage adaptation of Dostoyevsky’s iconic novel, told with a raw energy and bold conviction intended to shine new light on its relevance to today’s world of corruption and crime.

Summerhall

The Tailor Of Inverness

1 Nov, 2 Nov, times vary, prices vary

Tron Theatre

Matthew Zajac brings his play about his Polish father back to Glasgow for the first time in three years, coinciding with the publication of his book on the story.

1–9 Nov, not 4, times vary, From £8

27 Nov, 29 Nov, 30 Nov, 7:30pm – 9:00pm, £13

The Maw Broon Monologues

All-new adventure for the formidable mother of eight, in which Maw Broon and her doppelganger are having a mid-life crisis – at the same time holding up a sneaky mirror to the whole of Scottish society. Wilful Forgetting

6–9 Nov, times vary, From £7.50

Donna Rutherford and Martin O’Connor delve into the heart of everyday life – where through a series of family photographs we zoom in on a son and a mother keeping a tight hold on expectations.

Edinburgh Edinburgh Playhouse The Lion King

various dates between 11 Oct and 18 Jan, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, From £30

Stage adaptation of the favourited Disney film, bolstered by suitably dazzling staging and elaborate costumes, masks and puppets. Matinee performances also available.

Festival Theatre Made at Sadler’s Wels

29–30 Oct, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, From £12.50

Programme of short pieces produced by international dance house, Sadler’s Wells in London, created by some of its world class associate artists. Scottish Opera: Don Giovanni

various dates between 14 and 23 Nov, times vary, prices vary

Scottish Opera present a production of Mozart’s tale about the notorious serial seducer, Don Giovanni, sung in Italian with English subtitles.

King’s Theatre Rent

various dates between 16 and 30 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, prices vary

The ever-popular Tony and Pulitzer prize-winning musical celebrates 20 years on the stage. To Sir, With Love

29 Oct – 2 Nov, times vary, From £14

All-new stage adaptation based on the 60s film of the same name, telling the story of Ricky Braithwaite’s struggle to tame his class of unwilling students from the East End in post-war London. Mansfield Park

5–9 Nov, times vary, From £14

New adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel, which finds young Fanny Price (no sniggering at the back) dropped into the bustling, aristocratic household of her uncle, Sir Thomas Bertram. Edinburgh Gang Show 2013

19–23 Nov, times vary, From £9

Colourful annual music-meetscomedy show performed by over 200 young things from the world of Scouting and Girlguiding.

Invokation of Lady MacBeth

Glaswegian industrial trio Black Sun Drum Korps stage a new imagining of Macbeth, using the writing/cut-up technique of William Burroughs and Brion Gysin to create a visceral and feminine invocation of a Chorus of Witches. A Dangerman

8 Nov, 8:00pm – 9:00pm, £10 (£8)

Multi-layered theatre experience detailing social terror up close, as we’re presented with a homage to the outsider (aka ‘a dangerman’).

Traverse Theatre Feral

15 and 16 Nov, 8:00pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

Innovative piece of visual theatre that combines puppetry, film and live sound to create and destroy a miniature world in front of the audience’s eyes. Monkey Bars

various dates between 31 oct and 6 Nov, times vary, prices vary

Revelatory verbatim show for which award-winning writer Chris Goode asked 40 ten-year-olds to talk about their lives, with their words spoken by adults, playing adults in adult situations. No End

8 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

The fifth and final piece in a series of interdisciplinary works based on the premise of waiting, aiming to reveal new means for movement and modes of dialogue between art forms. Dragon

1 Nov, 2 Nov, 8 Nov, 9 Nov, times vary, prices vary

New family friendly show by National Theatre of Scotland, Vox Motus and Tianjin Children’s Arts Theatre, following a young boy in the wake of his mother’s death, and the dragon that follows him, burning with the anger and hate that he feels. More Sky Than We Need

5 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

Following on from the Shoogle Project, plan B are back with a serene meditation on the vast clouds above us – a reflective piece exploring how the natural wonders above dictate our moods, thoughts and actions. Record of Events/Threshold

6 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

Double bill of performance from Joss Arnott Dance, taking inspiration from classical ballet, commercial dance, pop culture, fashion and film. Extremely Bad Dancing to Extremely French Music

7 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

New collaborative live dance and music performance by choreographer Karl Jay-Lewin and composer Matteo Fargion, comprising of over 50 discretely made piano, dance and text-based solos, edited around strict rhythmic structures.

A thriller about spies, double agents and the opaqueness of the human soul, in which a woman is found dead only for her sister to investigate and stumble into a world of secrets.

Stella: A story of women, their men and astronomy

19–20 Nov, 8:00pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

Sparse new work from Take the Space, spanning hundreds of years to tell the story of 18th century astronomer Caroline Herschel and 21st century radio astronomer, Jessica Bell.

Dundee Dundee Rep September in the Rain

5–9 Nov, times vary, From £11

Star-studded (as in, Claire Sweeney offa Brookside and John Thomson fae Cold Feet) tale following a Yorkshire couple’s annual trip to Blackpool; a ritual for over 40 years. Scottish Dance Theatre: SisGo

14 Nov, times vary, From £8

Following its sold out run at the Edinburgh International Festival, Scottish Dance Theatre present their powerful dance piece – which puts the audience up close with the dancers.

Glasgow Tue 29 Oct Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Wed 30 Oct

The Incredible Geek Comedy Night: Halloween Special (Eleanor Morton + Neil Bratchpiece + Des O’Gorman + Ewan Denny + Joe Hullait) The Old Hairdressers, 19:30–22:00, £6

Tattooed funnyman Billy Kirkwood hosts the return of The Incredible Geek Comedy Night, with added blood and gore for a Halloween special of sketches, songs and stand-up. Best Of Irish Comedy

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£6/£3 members)

A selection of top comics from the contemporary Irish circuit do their thing, under the watchful eye of host Michael Redmond.

Thu 31 Oct

A Buddy Good Laugh (Bruce Morton + The Reverend Obadiah Steppenwolf III + Des Clarke)

Paisley Arts Centre, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

All-new comedy night from the Dead Sheep Comedy lot, with compere Scott Gibson introducing a selection of stand-up talent. The Thursday Show (Boothby Graffoe + Nick Beaton + Elaine Malcolmson + Dan Petherbridge) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£7/£5)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

Fri 01 Nov The Dolls

Tron Theatre, 20:30–22:30, £12

Comedy/vocal duo of pure Scottish talent, mixing singalong classic hits with plenty of cheeky banter. The Friday Show (Boothby Graffoe + Will Franken + Elaine Malcolmson + Eleanor Morton) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Something Old, Something New...

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

9 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

Sat 02 Nov

David Hughes Dance present a mixed programme featuring four works from genuine icons of dance, casting a glance both ahead to its future and back into its past.

November 2013

Ciphers 12–16 Nov, times vary, £15.50 (£12.50/£8 unemployed)

Comedy The Saturday Show (Boothby Graffoe + Will Franken + Elaine Malcolmson + Eleanor Morton)

Sun 10 Nov

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 students/£1 members)

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. Ed Byrne

The Pavilion Theatre, 20:00–22:00, £22.50

The self-confessed miserable git takes his mid-life crisis of sorts on the road as he embraces middle age with open arms.

Sun 03 Nov

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 students/£1 members)

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond and guests.

Mon 11 Nov

Craig Campbell: Thrilling Mic Hunt

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £15

Campbell returns with yet more of his yarn-spinning, full of whimsical personal tales and a unique ability to find humour in, well... anything.

Tue 12 Nov Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond and guests.

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Mon 04 Nov

Wed 13 Nov

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£2/£2.50 members)

Roisin Conaty: Lifehunter

The Foster’s Comedy Award 2010 Best Newcomer tours her new show, rich with her usual self-deprecating stories and deft observational humour.

Tue 05 Nov Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Wed 06 Nov

Wicked Wenches (Kate Smurthwaite + Luisa Omielan + Iszi Lawrence + Becky Price)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 students/£3 members)

All-female stand-up extravaganza, with a suitably varied mix of headliners and newcomers taking to the stage each month.

Thu 07 Nov

West Brewery Comedy Night (Bruce Morton + Gareth Waugh + Mikey Adams) WEST, 20:30–22:30, £7

Jamie Dalgleish hosts a night of live stand-up, headlined by longstanding comic Bruce Morton, with support from Gareth Waugh and Mikey Adams.

The Thursday Show (Mark Maier + John Hastings + Luisa Omielan + Robin Grainger) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Fun Junkies

Diverse offerings from the comedy spectrum, featuring stand-up, variety acts, sketches, musical comedy, magicians... and a partridge in a peartree.

Thu 14 Nov

The Thursday Show (Brendon Burns + Simon Donald + Susie McCabe + Gareth Mutch)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

Fri 15 Nov

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Sat 09 Nov

Craig Hill: Tartan About!

Tron Theatre, 22:00–00:00, £16 (£12)

The cheeky chappie brings his new show to Glasgow as part of Glasgay! 2013 – presented in his usual live and unleashed manner.

The Saturday Show (Mark Maier + John Hastings + Luisa Omielan + Robin Grainger) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend.

The Friday Show (Mrs Barbara Nice + Damian Clark + Chris Henry + Ashley Storrie ) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Sat 16 Nov

The Saturday Show (Brendon Burns + Simon Donald + Susie McCabe + Gareth Mutch)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 students/£1 members)

Mon 18 Nov

Hal Cruttenden: The Tough Luvvie Tour

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12

As seen on The Royal Variety Performance, Michael McIntyre’s Comedy Roadshow and The Rob Brydon Show, Hal Cruttenden brings his usual brand of simultaneously warm and catty stand-up oor way.

Tue 19 Nov Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Wed 20 Nov

Amnesty International Benefit (Billy Kirkwood + Elaine Malcolmson + Martin Bearne) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£5)

Live comedy fundraiser in aid of Epilepsy Scotland, with Billy Kirkwood the lucky lad keeping a quartet of acts in check.

Edinburgh

Mon 04 Nov

Tue 29 Oct

All-new monthly satirical look at how the big stories in the independence referendum debate have been covered in the media.

Bright Club

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5

A selection of comedic academics do a stint of stand-up for your entertainment and enlightenment. Laughs and learning in one neat package: tick. Grassroots

The Pleasance, 19:30–23:00, £1

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Sat 23 Nov

Wed 30 Oct

The Saturday Show (Mrs Barbara Nice + Damian Clark + Scott Gibson + Ashley Storrie ) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend.

Glenn Wool: This Road Has Tolls

The Stand, 17:00–19:00, £5

The Canadian-born, UK-living comic entertains y’all with tales of a life spent living on the road.

Sun 24 Nov

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 students/£1 members)

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond and guests.

Mon 25 Nov Bright Club

The Stand, 19:30–22:00, £5 (£2)

A selection of comedic academics do a stint of stand-up for your entertainment and enlightenment. Laughs and learning in one neat package: tick. Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Wed 27 Nov Best Of Irish Comedy

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£2 students/£3 members)

A selection of top comics from the contemporary Irish circuit do their thing, under the watchful eye of host Michael Redmond.

Thu 28 Nov

A Buddy Good Laugh (Scott Agnew + Joe Heenan + Janey Godley)

Paisley Town Hall, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

All-new comedy night from the Dead Sheep Comedy lot, with compere Scott Gibson introducing a selection of stand-up talent. The Thursday Show (Tanyalee Davis + Jarlath Regan + Steven Dick + David Burke)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

Fri 29 Nov

The Friday Show (Tanyalee Davis + Jarlath Regan + Steven Dick + David Burke) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Sat 30 Nov

The Saturday Show (Tanyalee Davis + Jarlath Regan + Steven Dick + David Burke)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend.

Propaganda Now

Cabaret Voltaire, 20:00–21:00, £4

Showcase night featuring the best in fresh, local talent – bringing together first-time and upand-coming comics in a series of quickfire 10-minute slots.

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond and guests.

The Friday Show (Mark Maier + John Hastings + Luisa Omielan + Robin Grainger)

Fri 22 Nov

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Fri 08 Nov The Garage, 20:00–22:00, £14

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

Tue 26 Nov

Sun 17 Nov

The award-winning comedian and internationally acclaimed halfman-half-Xbox brings the laughs once more, touring his latest show – aptly titled ‘Stand Up’.

The Thursday Show (Mrs Barbara Nice + Damian Clark + Chris Henry + Ashley Storrie )

The Friday Show (Brendon Burns + Simon Donald + Susie McCabe + Gareth Mutch)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase. Daniel Sloss

Thu 21 Nov

Steve Hughes: While It’s Still Legal

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £15 (£13)

The Australian comic and ex-heavy metal drummer delivers his beautiful live rant of a thing, out on the road for his second solo tour.

Thu 31 Oct

The Thursday Show (Lloyd Langford + Robbie Bonham + Davey Connor + Bob Graham)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£7/£5 members)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

Fri 01 Nov

The Friday Show (Lloyd Langford + Robbie Bonham + Davey Connor + Bob Graham)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups. Improverts

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5.50 (£5 members)

Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Tue 05 Nov

Barry Humphries’ Farewell Tour: Eat, Pray, Laugh!

Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:30, From £15

Probably best known as Dame Edna Everage, the character comedy specialist plays a series of shows as part of his farewell tour, going out in all-singing, all-dancing style. Wicked Wenches (Kate Smurthwaite + Luisa Omielan + Iszi Lawrence + Becky Price)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 student/£3 members)

All-female stand-up extravaganza, with a suitably varied mix of headliners and newcomers taking to the stage each month. Grassroots

The Pleasance, 19:30–22:00, £1

Showcase night featuring the best in fresh, local talent – bringing together first-time and upand-coming comics in a series of quickfire 10-minute slots.

Wed 06 Nov Daniel Sloss

The Pleasance, 20:30–22:30, £14

The award-winning comedian and internationally acclaimed halfman-half-Xbox brings the laughs once more, touring his latest show – aptly titled ‘Stand Up’. Twonkeys Blue Cadabra

The Real Mary King’s Close, 19:30–20:30, £5

The former frontman of Dawn of the Replicants, Paul Vickers (aka Mr Twonkey), brings his staged show of absurd ideas, funny anecdotes and one very tragic puppet to the plague pit of The Real Mary King’s Close for one night only. Part of Close Fest. Barry Humphries’ Farewell Tour: Eat, Pray, Laugh!

Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:30, From £15

Long-standing improv comedy troupe made up of an everchanging line-up of local students, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Probably best known as Dame Edna Everage, the character comedy specialist plays a series of shows as part of his farewell tour, going out in all-singing, all-dancing style.

Sat 02 Nov

Rant-heavy comedian from Bucks, with a Guild of Connoisseurs, rather than fans – as you do.

The Lumberjacks: Stewart Francis + Craig Campbell + Glenn Wool

Paul Foot: Words

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12.50

The Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:00, £16

Thu 07 Nov

Fascinating Aida: Charm Offensive

Probably best known as Dame Edna Everage, the character comedy specialist plays a series of shows as part of his farewell tour, going out in all-singing, all-dancing style.

Following their successful run at the Edinburgh Fringe, Stewart Francis, Craig Campbell and Glenn Wool hit the road to each perform their own set, side by side, on their debut UK tour as ‘The Lumberjacks’. Festival Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £21

Comedy cabaret trio, performing new numbers and a fair few old favourites (and, yes, Cheap Flights is a guarantee). The Saturday Show (Lloyd Langford + Robbie Bonham + Davey Connor + Bob Graham)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Sun 03 Nov

Roisin Conaty: Lifehunter

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12

The Foster’s Comedy Award 2010 Best Newcomer tours her new show, rich with her usual self-deprecating stories and deft observational humour.

Barry Humphries’ Farewell Tour: Eat, Pray, Laugh!

Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:30, From £15

The Thursday Show (Pierre Hollins + Kate Smurfwaite + Stuart Mitchell + Davey Strong) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

City Edinburgh Comedy Night: Halloween Special (Ro Campbell + Teddy + ImproFX: Men With Coconuts + Daniel Downie + Rick Molland) Sportsters Bar, 19:30–21:30, £5 (£4)

A mix of stand up, improv and sketch performers – including Scottish Comedian of the Year 2010, Ro Campbell – unite for a night of Halloween-tinged fun.

Fri 08 Nov

Barry Humphries’ Farewell Tour: Eat, Pray, Laugh!

Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:30, From £15

Probably best known as Dame Edna Everage, the character comedy specialist plays a series of shows as part of his farewell tour, going out in all-singing, all-dancing style.

The Dolls

Tron Theatre, 20:30–22:30, £12

Comedy/vocal duo of pure Scottish talent, mixing singalong classic hits with plenty of cheeky banter.

Listings

69


The Friday Show (Pierre Hollins + Kate Smurfwaite + Stuart Mitchell + Davey Strong) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups. Improverts

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5.50 (£5 members)

Long-standing improv comedy troupe made up of an everchanging line-up of local students, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Sat 09 Nov Daniel Sloss

Brunton Theatre, 20:00–22:00, £14

The award-winning comedian and internationally acclaimed halfman-half-Xbox brings the laughs once more, touring his latest show – aptly titled ‘Stand Up’. Barry Humphries’ Farewell Tour: Eat, Pray, Laugh!

Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:30, From £15

Probably best known as Dame Edna Everage, the character comedy specialist plays a series of shows as part of his farewell tour, going out in all-singing, all-dancing style. The Saturday Show (Pierre Hollins + Kate Smurfwaite + Stuart Mitchell + Davey Strong) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Sun 10 Nov

Robin Ince: The Importance Of Being Interested

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12 (£10)

The comic-cum-science enthusiast follows up his Happiness Through Science show with a humourous look at his favourite scientists – Charles Darwin and Richard Feynman.

Mon 11 Nov Pandamonium

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–21:30, £3

The Pandamonium Comedy crew return to Cab Vol with a line-up of the best in new, fresh stand-up comedy. Hosted by Rory McAlpine. Red Raw

Thu 14 Nov

The Thursday Show (Josh Howie + Alan Francis + John Gavin + Jay Lafferty) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase. Witches, Quacks and Painted Ladies

The Stand, 17:30–19:30, £5 (£3)

Comedian, broadcaster and history addict Susan Morrison muses on Edinburgh’s weird and wonderful past – from treacherous courtesans to deranged countesses.

Fri 15 Nov

The Friday Show (Josh Howie + Alan Francis + John Gavin + Jay Lafferty)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups. Improverts

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5.50 (£5 members)

Long-standing improv comedy troupe made up of an everchanging line-up of local students, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Sat 16 Nov

The Saturday Show (Josh Howie + Alan Francis + John Gavin + Jay Lafferty) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Tue 12 Nov

The Speakeasy (Kris Haddow + Rod Vestibule + Keir McAllistair + Jen McGregor) Scottish Storytelling Centre, 20:00–22:00, £6

Monthly spoken-word show of the rather ace variety, featuring a feastful of writers, comedians and musicians telling (mostly) true stories, under the watchful eye of host Jo Caulfield. Grassroots

The Pleasance, 19:30–22:00, £1

Showcase night featuring the best in fresh, local talent – bringing together first-time and upand-coming comics in a series of quickfire 10-minute slots.

Wed 13 Nov

Craig Campbell: Thrilling Mic Hunt

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £15

Campbell returns with yet more of his yarn-spinning, full of whimsical personal tales and a unique ability to find humour in, well... anything.

Listings

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £12 (£10/£6 members)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £12 (£10/£6 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

The Beehive Comedy Club

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5.50 (£5 members)

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5.50 (£5 members)

Improverts

Long-standing improv comedy troupe made up of an everchanging line-up of local students, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Sat 23 Nov

The Saturday Show (David Kay + John Ross + Adam Vincent + John McGoldrick)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Sun 24 Nov

The Sunday Night Laugh-In

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 students/£1 members)

Chilled comedy showcase to cure your Sunday evening back-towork blues.

Mon 25 Nov

Mon 18 Nov Red Raw

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Bright Club

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£2)

A selection of comedic academics do a stint of stand-up for your entertainment and enlightenment. Laughs and learning in one neat package: tick. Grassroots

The Pleasance, 19:30–22:00, £1

Showcase night featuring the best in fresh, local talent – bringing together first-time and upand-coming comics in a series of quickfire 10-minute slots.

Tue 19 Nov

Wed 27 Nov

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£6)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£2 student/£3 members)

Macmillan Cancer Support Benefit

Live comedy fundraiser in aid of Macmilla Cancer Support, with a line-up of fresh faces and Scottish comedy stalwarts. Grassroots

The Pleasance, 19:30–22:00, £1

Showcase night featuring the best in fresh, local talent – bringing together first-time and upand-coming comics in a series of quickfire 10-minute slots.

Wed 20 Nov

The Good, The Bad and The Unexpected

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£2)

A bright collective of comedians experiment with the medium of stand-up, under the ever-watchful eye of regular host Jo Caulfield.

Thu 21 Nov

The Thursday Show (David Kay + John Ross + Adam Vincent + John McGoldrick)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Improverts

Long-standing improv comedy troupe made up of an everchanging line-up of local students, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Sat 30 Nov

The Saturday Show (Zoe Lyons + Keith Farnan + Rick Molland + Martin Bearne)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday evening bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes to jolly along your weekend. A Short History of Lady Claire MacDonald The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£3)

Award winning comic and broadcaster Bruce Morton and genealogy expert Dr Bruce Durie present a short lunchtime feast of family history revelations, centred upon Lady Claire MacDonald. The Beehive Comedy Club

Beehive Inn, 20:30–22:30, £7

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Best of Scottish Comedy

Comedy cabaret trio, performing new numbers and a fair few old favourites (and, yes, Cheap Flights is a guarantee).

Sat 02 Nov

Craig Hill: Tartan About!

Dundee Rep, 20:00–22:00, From £12

The cheeky chappie brings his new show to Glasgow as part of Glasgay! 2013 – presented in his usual live and unleashed manner.

Sat 16 Nov Daniel Sloss

Whitehall Theatre, 20:00–22:00, £14

The award-winning comedian and internationally acclaimed halfman-half-Xbox brings the laughs once more, touring his latest show – aptly titled ‘Stand Up’.

African and Caribbean Centre

The Devine Interrogation

The Stand, 17:30–19:30, £5 (£3)

Professor Tom Devine and guests blow off steam about Scottish History (and other things), with added audience interrogation as standard.

In the second installment of her ongoing Murnau Trilogy – a series of works based around the making of Tabu: A Story of the South Seas (1931) – Allison Gibbs presents the final film produced by the German Expressionist director F.W Murnau. Truce: Strategies for PostApocalyptic Computations

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, free

Interactive sound installation by artist and composer Robin Meier and Ali Momeni, highlighting the musical interactions between insect and computer (from which we’ve so far learned that mosquitoes sing in tune to copulate mid-flight). Part of Sonica 2013. Raydale Dower: The Eye of the Duck

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, free

All-new sonic installation by Raydale Dower, exploring sonic form, spatial composition and duration – taking its reference point from the ideas and work of cult film director David Lynch. Part of Sonica 2013.

DNA Glasgow Picture Window @ DNA Glasgow

31 Oct – 2 Nov, 4:30pm – 10:30pm, free

Series of pop-up window installations, with All Eyes Wide playing on the senses via live projected visualisations inviting passers-by to become audio tourists. Part of Sonica 2013.

Gallery of Modern Art

Niki de Saint Phalle: The Eric and Jean Cass Gift​

17 Dec – 16 Nov, times vary, Free

22 Jun – 1 Mar, times vary, Free

Thu 28 Nov

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

2–16 Nov, not 3, 10, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Dundee Rep, 19:30–22:00, £sold out

Fascinating Aida: Charm Offensive

Glasgow

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£2 students/£5 members)

Allison Gibbs: Spirit Shadow Spectre Bones and Shadow

Fri 01 Nov

Dundee

A selection of top comics from the contemporary Scottish circuit do their thing, aye. The Thursday Show (Zoe Lyons + Keith Farnan + Rick Molland + Martin Bearne)

Art

Exhibition of 13 sculptures, one lithograph and other related ephemera by French sculptor, painter, and film maker Niki de Saint Phalle, gifted to Glasgow Museums through the Contemporary Art Society.

Pandamonium

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–21:30, £3

The Pandamonium Comedy crew return to Cab Vol with a line-up of the best in new, fresh stand-up comedy. Hosted by Rory McAlpine.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £12

As seen on The Royal Variety Performance, Michael McIntyre’s Comedy Roadshow and The Rob Brydon Show, Hal Cruttenden brings his usual brand of simultaneously warm and catty stand-up oor way.

The Beehive Comedy Club

Regular weekend comedy showcase featuring a selection of up-and-coming acts from Scotland and beyond, topped with a guest headliner. Check their Facebook page on the day for line-ups.

Tue 26 Nov

Hal Cruttenden: The Tough Luvvie Tour

The Friday Show (Zoe Lyons + Keith Farnan + Rick Molland + Martin Bearne)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Sun 17 Nov

Weekend-welcoming selection of handpicked headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

70

Fri 29 Nov

The Friday Show (David Kay + John Ross + Adam Vincent + John McGoldrick)

Open-mic style beginners showcase, plus some old hands dropping by to roadtest new material.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2

Fri 22 Nov

Picture Window @ African and Caribbean Centre

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 6:00pm – 12:00am, free

Series of pop-up window installations, with Thomas LeylandCollins’ edition examining the role of sound in advertising, as visitors are encouraged to interact with a window display of salvaged television sets. Part of Sonica 2013.

CCA

Mounira al Solh + Sarah Forrest

various dates between 28 Sep and 9 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Double-header solo show by Amsterdam artist Mounira al Solh and Glasgow artist Sarah Forrest, attempting to bring together, as well as separate, their two artistic practices.

Ian Hamilton Finlay: Poet, Artist, Revolutionary

Exhibition of graphic prints and sculptural installations by the late Ian Hamilton Finlay (1925–2006), drawn from Glasgow Museums’ own gifted collection. A Picture Show

18 Jul – 2 Feb, times vary, Free

Group show of 12 Glasgow-based painters, intended to survey the complexity, subtlety and variety of the art form – with no unifying concept of theme, other than painting being their central practice. Living with the War

7 Oct – 9 Mar, times vary, Free

Work from Glasgow Museums’ art collections, illustrating how artists from places as far ranging as Berlin, Brazil, Glasgow, London, Los Angeles, the Middle East and South Korea respond to the effects and prevalence of war and conflict around the world. HearAfter Sound

26 Oct – 2 Nov, times vary, Free

Nichola Scrutton uses words and sounds to create a contemplative sound installation, inspired by the birth-life-death cycle, memory and the transformative process of decay. part of Glasgow’s first ‘Day of the Dead’ celebration.

Glasgow Print Studio Stuart Duffin

various dates between 19 Oct and 30 Nov, times vary, Free

A member of staff at the Glasgow Print Studio since 1984 – currently as Studio Master Etcher – Stuart Duffin displays a series of trademark work using 17th century engraving and etching and 21st century digital printmaking techniques.

Glasgow Sculpture Studios Haegue Yang

various dates between 5 Oct and 20 Dec, 11:00am – 5:00pm, Free

The internationally acclaimed Korean artist displays the fruits produced during his three-month residency at Glasgow Sculpture Studios, bringing together work exploring themes of economy of labour, movement, time, handicraft and abstraction.

Grassroots Café

Picture Window @ Grassroots Cafe

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 6:00pm – 12:00am, free

Series of pop-up window installations, with Ariane Jackson, Nicola Reade and William Aikman ‘s triple header taking its inspiration from Yakov Protazanov’s 1924 film, Aelita Queen of Mars. Part of Sonica 2013. Picture Window @ Grassroots Cafe

3 Nov, 7:00pm – 9:00pm, free

Series of pop-up window installations, with Gordon Douglas, Charlie Know and Matt Collings’ triple header taking in text projections, live interactive sonic projections and innovative sound amplification. Part of Sonia 2013.

Hunterian Art Gallery

Allan Ramsay: Portraits of the Enlightenment

various dates between 13 Sep and 5 Jan, times vary, £7.50 (£5)

Intriguing exhibition casting new light on the work of Allan Ramsay (1713-1784), to mark the 300th anniversary of his birth – taking in a selection of works from across his 30 years as a painter.

Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Jack Vettriano: A Retrospective

21 Sep – 23 Feb, times vary, £5 (£3)

Hugh Hood: Glasgow 1974 7 Nov – 8 Dec, not 11 Nov, 18 Nov, 25 Nov, 2 Dec, times vary, Free

Series of images by the Glasgow photographer – who began his photographic ‘career’ at the age of 10, helping his father develop black and white prints, before attending Glasgow College of Printing – taking in the streets of Glasgow between 1974 and 1978. Sylvia Grace Borda: Camera Histories

various dates between 23 Nov and 2 Feb, times vary, Free

Four new bodies of work by the Canadian and UK visual artist, in which the apparatus becomes the central subject of her digital compositions – with found and staged photographs of cameras manipulated and montaged to create unconventional portraits. Poetic Documents

11 Oct – 10 Nov, not 14 Oct, 21 Oct, 28 Oct, 4 Nov, times vary, Free

Collective exhibition of the works of various generations of photographers and writers, which poetically convey a particular aesthetic experience of the past and present of Lithuania – and the relationship between photography and poetry. The Young Photographers’ Alliance: Escape

13–16 Nov, 10:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Created to help photographers aged between 18 and 29 bridge the gap between their passion and professional success, The Young Photographers’ Alliance showcase work from this year’s mentoring programme – all with the theme of ‘escape’.

The Common Guild Roman Ondák

various dates between 12 Oct and 14 Dec, times vary, Free

Solo exhibition by Slovakian artist Roman Ondák, known for his arresting installations – amongst them being his acclaimed 2009 piece, Loop, created for the Czech and Slovak Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

The most comprehensive exhibition​ ever devoted to Scottish artist, The Glue Jack Vettriano - bringing together Factory his most definitive works gathered I Want To Be Your Dog for the first time from private various dates between 11 Oct and 2 collections around the world. Nov, 12:00pm – 6:00pm, Free Group exhibition that takes its Project Ability theme from ‘nothing in particular’, Outside In: Scotland collecting together the work of a various dates between 8 Oct and 9 Nov, varied bunch of artists including 10:00am – 5:00pm, Free Rachel Maclean, Beagles & Ramsay, Project Ability artists Simon Erica Eyres, Jim Fitzpatrick and McAuley and Lea Cummings, Harry Hill. together with tutor John Fitzpatrick, present a selection of work The Lighthouse handpicked from the Art Angel Anna Gibb: 365 drawings later output – taking in David Ford, Alan 5 Oct – 23 Nov, times vary, Free Lesslie and Una Carter. Anna Gibb presents her selfmotivated drawing challenge, Scottish Music beginning on 1 February 2012 Centre and documenting the 364 days Picture Window @ Scottish thereafter. Music Centre

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, free

Series of pop-up window installations, with Ev Buckley’s exhibition taking viewers through a series of sounds and glimpses of images of suspension bridges, ship moorings and the weather. Part of Sonica 2013.

South Block

Picture Window @ South Block

31 Oct – 3 Nov, 6:00pm – 12:00am, free

Series of pop-up window installations, with Justyna Ataman and Amy Pickles’ double-header Investigating the social implications of hip-hop and pop music through innovative uses of music. Part of Sonica 2013.

Street Level Photoworks

Jill Todd Photographic Award 2013 various dates between 23 Nov and 2 Feb, times vary, Free

Annual exhibition celebrating the work of talented photographers from major Photography and Arts Degree programmes in Scotland in the last three years, displaying a selection of the finalists work.

Stuart White: Waiting for Google

25 Oct – 1 Dec, times vary, Free

Visual Communication graduate Stuart White presents an intriguing body of work looking at the time wasted procrastinating on the Internet, and the systems that purposefully distract and control our experiences on’t web. Mackintosh Photographic Exhibition

11 Oct – 30 Nov, times vary, Free

Group exhibition taking in the entries to the Mackintosh Photography Competition, which ran alongside Doors Open Day 2013.

The Telfer Gallery

Mathew Parkin: One Touch

various dates between 12 Oct and 3 Nov, 11:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Taking its name from the debut album by British popstresses the Sugababes, artist Mathew Parkin presents a collection of new sculpture, video and performance work existing as gestural reference points and surfaces.

The Virginia Gallery I AM...

various dates between 4 Oct and 9 Nov, 11:00am – 5:30pm, Free

Collective exhibition featuring work by Michael James, Claire Stewart, Mitch Alexander and various I AM art project participants, for which over 20 young LGBT people have drawn on their own experiences to explore the theme of identity. Part of Glasgay! ROTAROT

15–29 Nov, not 17, 18, 24, 25, 11:00am – 5:30pm, Free

Glasgow-based comic book artist and designer, Garry Mac, showcases a new series of solo work taking the form of a brand new Tarot deck.

The Whisky Bond

Bring Your Own Beamer

15–16 Nov, 8:00pm – 1:00am, Free (£3 after 9)

Over 50 artists and their projectors take to The Glue Factory for the second edition of the unique video art event, presenting works floor-to-ceiling in the multichambered industrial space of The Whisky Bond.

Tramway

The Koestler Exhibition for Scotland 2013

various dates between 3 Nov and 15 Dec, times vary, Free

Exhibition of artwork and writing from prisons, secure hospitals, secure childrens’ homes and criminal justice services in Scotland, taking in painting, drawing, sculpture and creative writing selected from entries to the 2013 Koestler Awards. House Style

various dates between 25 Oct and 19 Jan, times vary, Free

Series of new commissions in response to, and alongside, a specially selected film programme from the British Film Institute archive – combining new work and historic material, re-interpreting and expanding narratives of taste and cultural identity. Lucy Skaer: Exit, Voice and Loyalty

various dates between 25 Oct and 15 Dec, times vary, Free

The contemporary Glasgow artist exhibits her most ambitious series of work since her 2009 Turner Prize shortlist, showcasing a selection of sculptures exploring the tension between material and meaning through a series of handmade and mass produced forms. Whispers

31 Oct – 3 Nov, times vary, Free

Intriguing sound installation featuring five larger-than-life ceramic trumpets that appear to be floating in a semi-darkened room, through which viewers can plot their own auditive route within the three dimensional soundscape. Part of Sonica 2013.

Edinburgh

The Modern Institute @ Airds Lane

Bonhams

various dates between 7 Sep and 2 Nov, 12:00pm – 5:00pm, Free

21–24 Nov, times vary, Free

Sue Tompkins

Selection of new paintings by Glasgow-based visual and artist Sue Tompkins – also known as the frontwoman of Life Without Buildings – each showing text within a field of varying colours, patterns and representations.

Edinburgh Macmillan Art Show 2013

Fundraiser exhibition now in it’s 11th year – this year built around the theme of ‘art of nature’, showing artwork in a wide variety of materials and styles to celebrate the creativity of various artists.

THE SKINNY


City Art Centre

Inspace

19 OCT – 2 MAR, TIMES VARY, FREE

2–3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

WALTER GEIKIE

Retrospective exhibition of 19th century artist Walter Geikie (1795-1837), concentrating on his figurative imagery – taking in the etchings for which he is best known, alongside a selection of drawings and paintings. CITIZEN CURATOR

26 OCT – 23 FEB, TIMES VARY, FREE

THE BRAIN TRILOGY

3D installation with interactive pop-up images and sound from artists Wiretrace, inspired by Open University neurology research – commemorating 50 years since the idea of the ‘University of the Air’, which became the Open University, was first suggested. PERCEPTUAL DISCONNECTION

Special exhibition exploring and celebrating Leith’s fascinating and varied heritage, taking in works by well known Leithers such as Eduardo Paolozzi, and depictions of the local area by artists including Alexander Nasmyth, Jock McFadyen and Kate Downie.

19 NOV, 5:00PM – 8:00PM, FREE

Collective Gallery

Inverleith House

KAREN CUNNINGHAM: FACTISH FIELD

12 OCT – 10 NOV, NOT 14 OCT, 21 OCT, 28 OCT, 4 NOV, 11:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

For Collective’s first artistic showcase in their new home on Calton Hill, Karen Cunningham presents an all-new film work taking as its starting point Bruno Latour’s concept of the ‘factish’, a combination of fact and fetish.

Dovecot

JAMIE PRIMROSE: REFLECTIONS ON A CITY

8–16 NOV, NOT 10, 10:30AM – 5:30PM, FREE

Solo exhibition of new oils and works on paper – all of Edinburgh – celebrating ten years of painting by the contemporary Scottish artist. SELECTED

29 NOV – 21 DEC, NOT 1 DEC, 8 DEC, 15 DEC, 10:30AM – 5:30PM, FREE

Dovecot’s own hand-selected celebration of contemporary Scottish craft and design, presented as a ‘selling exhibition’ showcasing local makers across disciplines including wood and metal, ceramics, jewellery, furniture, textiles, glass and silver.

Edinburgh Printmakers THE WRITTEN IMAGE

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 16 NOV AND 21 DEC, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Collaboration between Edinburgh Printmakers and the Scottish Poetry Library to launch a project that fosters collaborations between printmakers and poets – with the results showing how image can be the vehicle that links and inspires artists across media. JOHN BELLANY: A LIFE IN PRINT

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 12 OCT AND 9 NOV, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Commemorative exhibition celebrating the life and work of the late Scottish artist in the medium of print, spanning four decades of work taking its cue from his rich and often tempestuous life and the colourful coastal communities from which he came.

Fruitmarket Gallery

LOUISE BOURGEOIS: I GIVE EVERYTHING AWAY

26 OCT – 23 FEB, TIMES VARY, FREE

Major exhibition of renowned French-American artist and sculptor Louise Bourgeois, taking in a selection of works on paper centered on her Insomnia Drawings – a suite of 220 drawings and writings made between 1994 and June 1995 to combat her insomnia.

Ingleby Gallery IRAN DO ESPÍRITO SANTO: ASIDE

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 12 OCT AND 16 NOV, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Prominent Brazilian artist Iran do Espírito Santo marks his second Ingleby outing, presenting four gigantic new glass sculptures, alongside a series of delicate drawings made directly onto the gallery walls.

Multimedia group exhibition from postgraduate students Jonathan Hemelberg, Sara Ocklind, Javier Vidal Aguilera and Claire Holmes, bringing together text and image about our aesthetic relationship to the landscape. DAN COLEN: THE ILLUSION OF LIFE

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 12 OCT AND 24 NOV, 10:00AM – 5:30PM, FREE

A selection of work by New Yorkbased multimedia neo-Pop artist, Dan Colen, consisting of paintings made by smashing artificial flowers onto raw canvas.

Out of the Blue Drill Hall COMMITMENT/CONSUMED

4–13 NOV, 10:00AM – 5:00PM, FREE

Duo of photography showcases from Edinburgh-based photographer Craig Buchan, shown simultaneously alongside each other.

Patriothall Gallery

ACJ EDINBURGH: CHROMATIC

2–9 NOV, NOT 4, TIMES VARY, FREE

The Association for Contemporary Jewellery (ACJ) Edinburgh showcase a selection of work by some of Edinburgh’s premier jewellery designers, each exploring the influence of colour.

Royal Overseas League TRACES

11 OCT – 19 JAN, 10:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Group exhibition by Leigh Chorlton, Tim Le Breuilly and Robin Wu, taking their inspiration from the writings of W.G. Sebald – each with their own personal interpretation of his writing, which in turn is imbued in their drawing, painting and printmaking.

Royal Scottish Academy (RSA) IN PERSPEXTIVE

12 OCT – 7 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

Selection of works from 50 RSA academicians and STAR Tapestry artists, focusing on works in perspex boxes – giving a uniformity to the layout and allowing visitors to get up close and personal to the works on display. RSA OPEN 2013

23 NOV – 26 JAN, TIMES VARY, FREE

Exhibition of small works sourced by open submission from artists across Scotland, including paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints and photographs – all available to buy – with this year again seeing the addition of a room dedicated to architecture.

Scottish National Gallery PETER DOIG: NO FOREIGN LANDS

3 AUG – 3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

First major exhibition of painter Peter Doig to be held in the country of his birth, surveying works created during the past 10 years, with emphasis on the artist’s approach to serial motifs and recurring imagery. ALLAN RAMSAY AT 300

19 OCT – 9 FEB, TIMES VARY, FREE

Showcase of the Scottish National Gallery’s unrivalled holdings of drawings by Allan Ramsay (1713-1784), to mark the 300th anniversary of his birth. Coinciding with the major exhibition at the Hunterian Art Gallery in Glasgow.

Scottish The Scottish National Portrait Parliament ANDY WARHOL: POP, POWER AND Gallery POLITICS MINETTE: THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF A STUART PRINCESS

19–5 JAN, TIMES VARY, FREE

The youngest sister of Charles II comes under the spotlight, with a mini exhibition centred around a full-length portrait of Henriette Anne (aka Minette) by the French artist Jean Nocret. VIVIAN SASSEN: IN AND OUT OF FASHION

19 OCT – 9 FEB, TIMES VARY, FREE

First retrospective of Dutch-born contemproary fashion photographer Viviane Sassenand - taking to the Portrait Gallery from Huis Marseille Museum, Amsterdam – displaying her trademark flamboyant, formally inventive and occasionally surreal imagery. WORK, UNION, CIVIL WAR, FAITH, ROOTS

5 OCT – 6 MAY, TIMES VARY, FREE

Group exhibition created during five community outreach projects investigating the contemporary relevance of major transformations in Scottish history – inspired by portraits and personalities from the Scottish National Portrait Gallery collection. MAKING HISTORY

12 OCT – 28 SEP, TIMES VARY, FREE

Solo exhibition of recent work by Sandy Stoddart (Sculptor In Ordinary to The Queen of Scotland), of which the main focus will be the creation of a new figurative statue of William Birnie Rhind commissioned by the Scottish National Portrait Gallery.

Summerhall

JOHN LEE BIRD: BEFORE ENCORE

11 OCT – 22 NOV, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

The London-residing painter and collagist presents a themed batch of portraits, for which he grabbed a selection of his famous chums – including Jarvis Cocker and characters from The Mighty Boosh – just before they returned to the stage for their encore. POLISH CONTEMPORARY ART GROUP: QUALITY OF EVERYDAY LIFE

11 OCT – 22 NOV, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Showcase exhibition of the first art exhibition organised by the Polish Contemporary Art Group, bringing together fourteen artists and a collective of authors in various stages of their artistic practice. CECILIA VISSERS: TIME AND TIDE

11 OCT – 22 NOV, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Netherlands artist Cecilia Vissers presents a selection of her minimalist sculptures, inspired by her love of landscapes and mostly limited to her favoured palette of grey, black and orange.

DENNIS J. REINMÜLLER: SUBJECT – ROOM #1

11 OCT – 22 NOV, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

New installation by Glasgow-based artist Dennis J. Reinmüller, clashing pop-art with quantum mechanics and explorations of the self – intended to be viewed as a starting point of an inquiry, rather than an end in itself. COBRA: HELD OG HASARD

11 OCT – 22 NOV, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Small collection of documents, artists books, journals and small works from the COBRA artists (which stands for Copenhagen/ Bruxelles/Amsterdam) – an artistic group that was founded in 1948 and in its first form lasted until 1951. JOHN PATRICK BISSETT: TRAIN

The Scottish Parliament host an exhibition of over forty works by Andy Warhol, brought to Scotland by the Carnegie UK Trust from the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh – with the pieces detailing how Warhol depicted the politics of his time through his art. ANDREW CARNEGIE: THE LEGACY THAT CHANGED THE WORLD

Showcase of work from the legacy of the Scots born philanthropist, including an Andy Warhol painting of Carnegie, a bagpipe-playing robot, six Sesame Tree puppets and a replica bone from a dinosaur named Diplodocus Carnegii.

Dundee Cooper Gallery GEORGINA STAR: BEFORE LE CERVEAU AFFAMÉ

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 10 OCT AND 13 DEC, TIMES VARY, FREE

One of the most original and distinctive British artists, celebrated internationally since the 1990s for her magically complex and multi-layered works, presents her glimpse into ‘Le Cerveau’ – a space for metaphysical transformation.

DCA

HIRAKI SAWA

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 5 OCT AND 5 JAN, TIMES VARY, FREE

Solo exhibition of animated and video works from the Japan-born, London-based artist – adept at captivating audiences with his captivating video animations, imbued with a haunting dream-like quality via surreal imagery and atmospheric sounds. JACKIE SMITH: EYE CAN DRAW

Showcase exhibition of prints by artist Jackie Smith, acting as the culmination of a ground-breaking two-year project funded by Creative Scotland and DCA – documenting how she has developed her practice using interactive drawing technology.

Hannah Maclure Centre LIMINAL CITIES

11 NOV – 13 DEC, WEEKDAYS ONLY, 9:30AM – 4:45PM, FREE

Francesca Perona takes her cue from the changing landscape of Dundee, exploring the spaces in between the industrial heritage of the city, with the transformation of the waterfront and the future vision represented in changing 3D digital visualisations.

The McManus MODERN MASTERS IN PRINT

23 AUG – 17 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

Dundee’s McManus play host to prints by four of the 20th Century’s greatest artists – Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí and Andy Warhol – as part of a special touring exhibition organised by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

RE:NEW: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION

23 AUG – 1 MAR, TIMES VARY, FREE

The Old Ambulance Depot

Vision Building

BLOOD/MARCYAV

1–3 NOV, 10:30AM – 5:00PM, FREE

B

ob Dylan and his band are currently in the midst of a world tour and this month they arrive in Glasgow. They'll be performing for the very first time at the Clyde Auditorium on Monday 18, Tuesday 19 and Wednesday 20 November. We have two pairs of tickets to give away for each of the Tuesday and Wednesday nights. For your chance to see a living legend, head along to www. theskinny.co.uk/about/competitions and answer this very very simple question:

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 8 OCT AND 14 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

Pieces selected from Dundee Art Galleries and Museums most recent art acquisitions go on display in a temporary exhibition that offers opportunities to engage with a selection of contemporary work from both Scottish and European artists.

Edinburgh painter John Patrick Bissett showcases a selection of old and new works moving from his large, abstract paintings to smaller works on wood – collected together in one exhibition for what will be the first time.

Win tickets to see Bob Dylan

15 OCT – 25 JAN, TIMES VARY, FREE

11 OCT – 22 NOV, 11:00AM – 6:00PM, FREE

Mixed media group exhibition by Edinburgh-based visual artist Michele Marcoux, Texas-based poet Sheila Black and New York-based sound artist Lynne Thermann centred around a particular neighbourhood in Southside Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

November 2013

5 OCT – 3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE

YUCK ‘N YUM’S ANNUAL GENERAL KARAOKE

9 NOV, 8:30PM – 11:00PM, FREE

Art collective, and makers of a rather fine quarterly zine, Yuck ‘n Yum host their version of an AGM, where artists and filmmakers compete for karaoke glory and a top prize of £300 for best video. It’ll also mark the end of their printed zine. Blub.

What is the name of Bob Dylan's new album? a) Modern Times b) Tempest c) Love and Theft

Competition closes midnight Wed 13 Nov. Please include your location in your entry. Winners will be notified via email within two working days of closing and will be required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. Full terms and conditions can be found at www.theskinny.co.uk/about/terms

Win vouchers for the Glasgow Christmas Market T

he beautiful Glasgow Christmas Market is coming back to St Enoch Square with a fantastic range of continental traders as well as some exciting local stalls, bringing a great range of delicious foods and unique crafts to explore, taste and enjoy! The Christmas Market will be on location for even longer this year, bringing festive cheer every day from Friday 15 November through to Monday 23 December. With over 50 traders, the Christmas Market offers shoppers a gastronomic journey around the globe. Offerings include crepes from France, a fantastic selection of chocolates and other delicious Scottish confectionery and an exotic selection of ostrich, wild boar and crocodile burgers for those with a taste for adventure. There shall also be some tasty giant bratwurst sold from the iconic and authentic German Schwenkgrille, Spanish paella, and nougat from Italy is also on offer for hungry festive shoppers. To be in with a chance of winning one of ten sets of £25 vouchers simply head along to www. theskinny.co.uk/about.competitions and answer the question below: What is Glühwein? 1) Hot spiced wine 2) Hot whiskey 3) Hot Chocolate

COMPETITIONS

Competition closes midnight Sun 10 Nov. Please include your location in your entry. Winners will be notified via email within two working days of closing and will be required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. Vouchers will be available to pick up at the Market Manager's office. Winners must bring ID. Full terms and conditions can be found at www.theskinny. co.uk/about/terms Competition open to over 18s only facebook.com/pages/Glasgow-Christmas-Market

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The Skinny Scotland November 2013  

The Skinny is Scotland's leading entertainment and listings magazine