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ISSUE 61 • OCTOBER 2010

REBIRTH THE PHANTOM BAND RETURN

INTERVIEWS:

PLUS:

GRINDERMAN

GLASGAY!

YEASAYER

LONDON FASHION WEEK

HOWARD MARKS

TRAVELS IN KURDISTAN

GOLD PANDA

TUT VU VU

ICE CUBE

AND MORE...

MUSIC | FILM | CLUBS | PERFORMANCE | DIGITAL | READING | COMEDY | ART | FASHION | LISTINGS


2 THE SKINNY July 2010


With tickets bookable in advance at only ÂŁ10 for anyone under the age of 26, now is the perfect time to give opera a try. Visit scottishopera.org.uk or contact your local box office Registered in Scotland Number SCO37531 Scottish Charity Number SCO19787


CONTENTS OCTOBER LIMITEICDKETS T SEASOANILABLE AV

4 NIGHTS - 4 VENUES 4 SETS - 4 THEMES

WED 20 THE RENFREW FERRY - "DRINKIN" THUR 21 THE GRAND OLE OPRY - "CHEATIN" FRI 22 ORAN MOR - "KILLIN" SAT 23 THE CLASSIC GRAND - "HELL"

The

Lloyd Cole

Small Ensemble

FEATURING

Lloyd Cole - Banjo, Guitar Mark Schwaber - Mandolin, Guitar Matt Cullen - Banjo, Guitar

SAT 9TH OCT O2 ABC2 GLASGOW FRI 15TH OCT LIQUID ROOMS EDINBURGH

Glasgow Old Fruitmarket

Tues 26 Oct www.lloydcole.com 0871 220 0260 www.seetickets.com

P.12 GRINDERMAN

0871 220 0260 www.seetickets.com

IMOGEN HEAP plus gu

ests

O2 ABC GLASGOW FRI 29 OCT 0871 220 0260

EDINBURGH PICTURE HOUSE MON 1ST NOV

0871 230 0333 www.artistticket.com

COWBOY JUNKIES SUNDAY 7 NOVEMBER CITY HALLS, GLASGOW

0871 220 0260 WWW.SEETICKETS.COM by arrangement with Solo present

P.15 YEASAYER

P.10 PHANTOM BAND

PHANTOM BAND CURATION 10: Cover story: A track-by-track guide to new album The Wants, by the band, for the fans 12: Phantoms vs Cave: The band present guest questions to ol' Nick 21: Rick Anthony interviews Swans mainstay Michael Gira 34: Showcase: Conal McStravick gives us a glimpse of his video work ahead of an exhibition in Glasgow Project Rooms 44: Andy Wake meditates on the transcendental Tut Vu Vu 45: Gerry Hart recalls his first sup of Mystery Juice

THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010 Issue 61, October 2010 © Radge Media Ltd.

GLASGOW THE GARAGE TUES 23 NOV EDINBURGH THE LIQUID ROOM WED 24 NOV 0871 220 0260 WWW.SEETICKETS.COM

Let us know what you think: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk T: 0131 467 4630 P: The Skinny, The Drill Hall, 30-38 Dalmeny St, Edinburgh, EH6 8RG The Skinny is Scotland's largest independent entertainment & listings magazine, and offers a wide range of advertising packages and affordable ways to promote your business. Get in touch to find out more.

E: sales@theskinny.co.uk

PLUS KINGS

GO FORTH FRI 5TH NOV EDINBURGH QUEEN’S HALL 0131 668 2019

THUR 16TH DEC O2 ABC GLASGOW 0871 220 0260

MOGWAI

MON 21ST FEB 2011

EDINBURGH PICTURE HOUSE

0871 220 0260 www.seetickets.com www.mogwai.co.uk TICKETS: www.seetickets.com 0871 220 0260 or in person from Ticket Scotland: Argyle Street Glasgow, Rose St Edinburgh & Ripping Records and all usual outlets

4

THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the explicit permission of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within this publication do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the printer or the publisher.

Printed by Mortons Print Limited, Horncastle ABC verified Jul 2009 - Dec 2009: 34,329

Editorial Editor Online & Music Editor Clubs Editor Deviance Editor Performance Editor Film Editor DVD Editor Heads Up Editor Comedy Editor Reading Editor Digital Editor Art Editor Travel Editor Food & Drink Editor Competitions Editor Fashion Editor Listings/Cyberzap Editor

Rosamund West Dave Kerr Chris Duncan Nine Gareth K. Vile Gail Tolley Keir Roper-Caldbeck Anna Docherty Lizzie Cass-Maran Keir Hind Alex Cole Andrew Cattanach Paul 'Dancer' Mitchell Ruth Marsh Ray Philp Alexandra Fiddes Anna Docherty

Production Production Manager Designer Chief Subeditor

David Lemm Lewis MacDonald Paul Mitchell

Sales/Accounts Head of Sales & Marketing Advertising Sales Execs

Publisher

Lara Moloney Jan Webster & Lucy Watters Sophie Kyle


DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…

European Tour Fall 2010 + RYAN CABRERA

boyceavenue.com

P.40 JOHNNY LYNCH & JOSIE LONG

P.20 ICE CUBE

P.32 LONDON FASHION WEEK

6: Opinion: Commentary on the arts world, the merits of Bono, shot of the month, Hero Worship and Skinny On Tour 8: Heads Up: Things to do, every day, for the month.

FEATURES 12: Grinderman justify their existence 15: Yeasayer prepare for their largest Scottish show to date 18: Howard Marks tells us about the film adaptation of his infamous autobiography 19: French shoegazers Team Ghost talk life after M83 20: Gangsta rap godfather Ice Cube reasserts his status, Warpaint divulge their beginnings 23: Sought after remixer Gold Panda goes it alone, Fever Ray dissect their live show 24: Phil Anselmo looks back on Pantera's seminal metal classic Cowboys From Hell 25: We have (another) chat with Rodge Glass, this time about his graphic novel 26: Looking forward to Glasgay! for performance, film, comedy and much more besides 27: Robin Thomson tells us about his new exhibition, including the first ever recording of the human voice

LIFESTYLE 29: In our new Travel section, an intrepid Skinny writer ventures into Iraqi Kurdistan 32: London Fashion Week trend report, aka a glimpse of your fashion future 36: Dooking fer apples for a Food & Drink harvest festival

Glasgow Oran Mor Friday 19th November Edinburgh Cabaret Voltaire Sunday 21st November

TUESDAY 19TH OCTOBER NEW SINGLE ‘MURDER WEAPON’ OUT NOW NEW ALBUM ‘MIXED RACE’ OUT NOW WWW.TRICKYSITE.COM

+ ASTRAL PLANES

+ SILVER COLUMNS

GLASGOW QMU THURSDAY 14TH OCTOBER

GLASGOW BARROWLAND

FRIDAY 26TH NOVEMBER New album ‘BARKING’ out now www.underworldlive.com

O2 ABC GLASGOW

SUNDAY 24TH OCTOBER

+ THE DOMINO STATE

EDINBURGH CABARET VOTAIRE

GLASGOW ARCHES

MONDAY 18TH OCTOBER

SATURDAY 16TH OCTOBER

ATHLETE

02 ABC GLASGOW

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/CHIDDYBANG

SINGLES 01-10 TOUR

+ MISTY’S BIG ADVENTURE + KID A

TUESDAY 30TH NOVEMBER

GLASGOW QMU

SAT 23RD OCTOBER

ATHLETE - The Singles 01:10 released September www.athlete.mu www.myspace.com/athlete

ABERDEEN WAREHOUSE

SUN 24TH OCTOBER

REVIEW 39: Music: Gig reviews, October highlights and forthcoming records 46: Clubs: A look at the coming month's clubbing nightlife 48: Film: A pick of October's films, events and DVD releases 50: Art: What we really thought of Robert Barry and Market Gallery exhibitions 51: Reading: Reviews including Alasdair Gray Digital: Discusses the changing face of phones 52: Performance: Venue of the month, and a look ahead to October's shows 53: Comedy: Profiling Zoe Lyons and up and comer Stuart Mitchell 54: Competitions: Win Rubadub equipment worth nearly £900 55: LIstings: Now featuring highlights – dive in, motherfuckers 63: Starter for 11 with Mudhoney; Crystal Baws (we've seen the future)

GLASGOW ARCHES

GLASGOW ORAN MOR TUESDAY 12TH OCTOBER

+ MILK

EDINBURGH ELECTRIC CIRCUS SATURDAY 9TH OCTOBER

GLASGOW QMU MONDAY 4TH OCTOBER WWW.MYSPACE.COM/OFMONTREAL SKELETAL LAMPING ALBUM OUT NOW!

+ TURBOWOLF

GLASGOW NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY SUNDAY 24TH OCTOBER EDINBURGH ELECTRIC CIRCUS MONDAY 25TH OCTOBER

TICKETS 24HRS 08444 999 990 • www.ticketmaster.co.uk • www.gigsinscotland.com

IN PERSON GLASGOW Tickets Scotland, EDINBURGH Tickets Scotland, Ripping, DUNDEE Grouchos & all Ticketmaster Ticket Centres.

October 2010

THE SKINNY

5


You may or may not have noticed, but we’ve had a bit of a redesign this month. Last month may have been our 60th issue, but October 2010 marks 5 years since The Skinny’s launch party in Glasgow’s Bastille (now Sloan’s). Back then everyone was living off their credit cards, much of the distribution was done on foot and the magazine was produced in our Publisher Sophie’s living room. We’ve come some way since then (we even have an office these days), so we decided to mark the occasion by giving the whole layout and design a fresh lick of paint. Our cover comes to us courtesy of the Phantom Band, who this month kindly helped to curate some of our content. As well as providing us with a track-by-track guide to their (fantastic) new album, they chose the artist for our Showcase, presented questions for Nick Cave, told us about some of their favourite bands (Tut Vu Vu and Mystery Juice) and interviewed Michael Gira from Swans. We make folk work hard to be our cover story. In the rest of the magazine, we’ve changed the

THIS MONTH'S COVER

This month’s cover artwork came from the Phantom Band themselves – they very kindly let us use one of the images they put together for their single a glamour from new album The Wants. While two of the band (Andy Wake and Duncan Marquiss) are established visual artists in their own right, the aesthetic for the Phantom Band is very much a collaborative effort, with every member contributing their input to how artwork turns out. They’re a creative bunch; one of them took the picture, then a few of them messed with it. We like it a lot, so we put it on the cover.

Shot of the month

Minus the Bear, CABARET VOLTAIRE, 31 AUG BY Edmund Fraser

6

THE SKINNY October 2010

Hero Worship

Alasdair Roberts

The Phantom Band's Rick Anthony lays praise at the door of a national treasure I’ve had the pleasure of seeing Alasdair Roberts play on countless occasions and each time has thrown up at least one of those ‘wow’ moments where the hairs go up on your neck and the whole crowd goes as silent as stone – when all of a sudden it’s as if there is nothing in the world but the artist and audience connected in an eerie fragile space. His is a voice that sounds as if it could come from any age and it fits perfectly around the songs he sings. We were lucky enough to have Ali sing on one of our songs during the sessions for The Wants after becoming acquainted through the mutual admiration of Duncan Williamson – the legendary folk musician and storyteller. Duncan happened to once live in a cottage in Fife with our own phantom Andy and, upon learning Ali had cited Duncan as an influence, he tried to get them to perform together at a small festival he was helping to organise. Unfortunately Duncan was unable to perform as he fell ill and died soon after. Ali performed some of Duncan’s songs in dedication to him. The traditions that were so endemic to Duncan and others like him are in safe hands while musicians like Ali continue to study and celebrate the rich thread of stories and music that lie in the foundations of our cultural heritage.[Rick Anthony]

Alasdair Roberts performs at the Music Like A Vitamin concerts as part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film festival on 1 Oct, HMV Picture House, Edinburgh and 2 Oct, O2 ABC, Glasgow www.alasdairroberts.com

PHOTO: WES KINGSTON

Editorial

layout around so all the features are up front. Here you will find interviews with Grinderman, Ice Cube and Yeasayer; Howard Marks talking about the new film version of Mr Nice; some words with Warpaint; Robin Thomson describing his upcoming exhibition in Dundee; a preview of Glasgay!; chat with Gold Panda; discussion with Fever Ray about the evolution of her inventive live show; and Phil Anslemo from Pantera calling Music Editor Dave a “young whippersnapper”. After Features, we’ve got our Lifestyle section, where you can find the debut of our Travel content in print, with a first person account of travelling in Iraq; a beautifully illustrated guide to last month’s London Fashion Week and the trends that you may well be slavishly following come Spring; the Phantoms-curated Showcase; and Food and Drink. Review comes next, where we have our usual encyclopaedic array of reviews, previews and profiles of gigs, club nights, performances, plays, albums, singles, exhibitions, books, comedy, films and games. Out back we of course have exhaustive Listings of events across Scotland in October, as well as a Scottish music-themed quiz for Mudhoney (they don’t do so well) and, finally, horoscopes! Well, Crystal Baws, accompanied by a frankly stunning profile shot. It’s been an exciting issue for us, and we’re pretty pleased with it. We hope you like it as much as we do.[Rosamund West]

Important things we think you should know that you may not... d We produce a weekly email that tells you the ten most exciting things happening across Scotland, as well as news of exclusive prizes to be won, every Thursday. You can get it sent direct to your inbox for FREE by going to www.theskinny.co.uk/ zap and signing up. d You can listen to The Skinny Radio Hour on Subcity every Friday from 3pm, with your host Gareth K Vile. www.subcity.org. We can take no responsibility for what GKV does to the carefully crafted playlists.

SKINNY ON TOUR

In the spirit of the Pope's visit last month, Skinny On Tour has a confession to make: we enjoyed a bit of a lost weekend last month (for weekend, read four weeks – time flies when you’re having a piss-up in a brewery, which, incidentally, was absolute nails to arrange), but after a slap in the face, a good, long look at itself and a sobering shot of raw egg and crushed aspirin, Skinny On Tour is back on the wagon. And what better way to start afresh than by sending a professional to do the job – this month’s snap comes courtesy

of Christina Kernohan, a freelance photographer whose works have graced the likes of The Guardian, Dazed & Confused, Mixmag and many more. And now us, natch. Check out Christina’s work at www.christinakernohan.com. We have three limited edition Skinny t-shirts to give away to whoever correctly guesses where in Europe this photo was taken.

Closing date: Friday 29 October


CRITICal mass The Great Festival Escape

OPINION

Bono really is an irritating little creep isn’t he? That’s the general consensus right? This is the guy who campaigns for, amongst other things, a higher political profile for the environmental agenda, then gets a hat flown from England to Italy because he forgot it. That kind of hypocrisy takes real application. Yes Bono is an unequivocally infuriating git for sure. But he’s better than you. Everybody loves a sound-bite and they don’t come much more mundane or uninspired than “I hate Bono.” Certainly, he may well have jettisoned the perfectly workable name “Paul David Hewson” in favour of a name more easily attributed to a feisty wee terrier that gets itself into hilarious predicaments. He may also have claimed The Edge was the greatest guitarist since Hendrix. In fact, he very probably wanders each morning through his lavish palace of mirrors in an open-fronted, silk bathrobe documenting his own everyday actions in the third person whilst The Joshua Tree is piped into every room. Despite all that you still make him look like a champion. You see, the thing is, he’s pretty much earned the right to be intolerable. The guy has saved lives. Amidst all the posturing, pontificating and smugness he’s actually helped people that really bloody need it and he wasn’t under any obligation to do so. Instead he chose to try intervening in some pretty unpleasant situations. Sure he just loves to remind you just what a paragon of virtue he is but, as much as we may be loath to admit it, he gets things done. On the other hand your numerous cynical observations still left much of Malawi feeling rather undernourished. Your impressive collection of half-read alternative literature has yet to really impact upon human trafficking in the Third World. The disapproving “tuts” you give whenever David

Scopophilia ART EVENTS It’s monsoon season in Glasgow and you east coasters don’t know what you’re missing, with your crisp cold mornings and blinding sunlight. The heavens open like tear ducts here, and the entire population wades through rivers of decimated brollies to reach their nearest pub where they’ll undoubtedly spend the next six months. Meanwhile, let’s hope there are few exhibitions to punctuate the misery of our northern climate. It appears there are. Nick Evans is showing Henry Moore-esque sculptures at Mary Mary in Glasgow this month along with some plinths ('til 30 Oct); video artist Babette Mangolte is showing at Sorcha Dallas (1-29 Oct) with an exhibition that ties in with the Yvonne Rainer retrospective at Tramway (5-10 Oct); and Anna Tanner and Ronnie Bass mix it up at Transmission (til 16 Oct).

SHELLY NADASHI

ILLUSTRATION: Nick Cocozza

The Proposition Bono is a chump but he’s better than you

Cameron crosses a road on camera have not yet helped eradicate child labour and your controversial tattoo has barely occurred to Somalia’s warlords. Sure, he might be a proper tool but at least Bono makes some kind of difference. At least he and his bland of brothers, most notably Geldof, have made something of a dent – miniscule or otherwise – in the bigger problems of our time. What in the hell did you achieve between your sushi lunch and dozing off during a rerun of Black Books? You probably didn’t meet the Pope. Or George Bush. Or indeed any of the many famous political figures of our time to whom you so desperately wish you could pose some challenging questions. Quite how and why Bono got to his position

of influence is open to debate but these things usually boil down to money: whether it’s the power to sell albums or newspapers, money has the final say. And therein lies the rub. It’s not that you’re any more of a jerk than Bono, it’s just he’s richer and thus he matters more than you do. People listen when he speaks, even if it’s mostly just to his jingling pockets. Eventually something he says will get through, and that’s a lot more than can be said for your last demo tape, your witty t-shirt or, for that matter, your last whining, obnoxious editorial. So Bono is a tube. Change the record. Pick your battles. Your righteous indignation could surely be more constructively targeted at, say, rude taxi drivers, lairy doormen, telephone marketers, or Sting.[Marc DeSadé]

In Edinburgh there is an exciting collection of recent graduates showing at Embassy that includes Hayley Mathers and Alex Tobin, and has been titled Meat Force, which is a good title ('til 3 Oct). This month we have 2010's first installment of New Work Scotland with Glasgow graduates Jacob Kerray and Shelly Nadashi (16 Oct - 28 Nov). I recommend you go see Nadashi’s offsite performance on 16 October. Lastly, Generator Projects is showing an

ambitious solo exhibition by Duncan of Jordanstone graduate Robin Thomson ('til 24 Oct). I refer you to the Features section (p 27), where you can read all about it. Underwhelmed by Robert Barry at Common Guild and overly zealous about Kate V Robertson at Market Gallery, it’s time I found a happy medium and distanced myself from the mania of the summer months. It’s time for cool reflection. And some meat force, naturally.[Andrew Cattanach]

ROBIN THOMSON

Following the Fringe, I was concerned that Festivals – represented this month by the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival, Glasgay! and the Scottish International Storytelling Festival – might have too strong an influence on the work being produced in Scotland. The Fringe is especially guilty of defining  the format:  an hour is optimal, with limited set to enable rapid turn-around, and costs kept low in the hope of avoiding that terrible post-Fringe debt.  In its own way, this dictatorship of the festival is as worrying as the tick-box culture that can lead to companies following a social, rather than artistic, agenda. Combining this with broader concerns about the impact of spending cuts by a new government keen to be seen as tough and rational, and the genuine financial hardship that will damage audience numbers, the Scottish theatre remains surprisingly healthy. Even within the festivals that I eschew, Scottish companies are willing to take risks, and the energy of the Young Teams on both coasts ensure that experimental work is easily accessible. And as The Creative Martyrs ably demonstrated in the summer, the largely unfunded cabaret scene, as found at the Rio Cafe on the first Monday of every month or at Dolly Tartan’s various nights around Glasgow, is beginning to produce break-out artists. Meanwhile, Itsy’s Collective celebrate their second birthday on 1 October at the Electric Circus, while the RSAMD is running an intensive programme of events inspired by their students and courses throughout the winter.  As long as these performers are putting on the show, the future of performance is protected against the harsh economy and tyranny of tickboxes.[Gareth K Vile]

SEX, TRUTH & POLITICS Women on Stage “Comedy,” opined one Fringe booker, “will always be dominated by loud alpha males. It’s in burlesque, where we can use God’s natural gifts, where women will dominate.” It’s a pretty brazen comment in favour of an art form that wears its heart – and not much else – on its sleeve. If you want to see a lot of women on stage, your local comedy club is unlikely to be your first port of call. Still, there’s something about the idea that women performers are best saying it with their bodies – rather than their voices – that raises an eyebrow. With talents like Josie Long and Sarah Millican on this year’s Edinburgh Comedy Awards shortlist, it’s clear that “women aren’t funny” just doesn’t cut the mustard any more. So where does the dichotomy come from? Do women and men just relate to being on stage differently? Comedienne Bethany Black explains, “The expectations for women comedians are massively different than for men. Firstly they don’t expect you to be funny, and they’re not afraid to tell you this afterwards. When you are as good or a little bit better they think it’s a fluke and that you’re an anomaly.” When, as Bethany says, “there’s nothing innately different in the way that men and women handle themselves on stage,” it becomes less about the stage and more about the audience. After a slow gig, she recalls drinking at the bar “and had three different people come up to me to tell me I was terrible. Later in the bill a male comic died, the same three people came over and chatted to him, told him hard luck, and bought him drinks.” So what about burlesque? Historically it’s been an artform as varied as stand-up, with the emphasis being on quick humour and the sending up of more serious performance. With the revival of burlesque in the last decade, it’s still being billed as art that has something to say, that’s more than simply stripping. But is this true? Performers don’t have to use words to say something on stage, and not all near-naked burlesquers conform to harsh body stereotypes. Still, when there are such different expectations of men and women in front of an audience, tongue in cheek or not, women still have to strut that bit further in order not to find ourselves prematurely silenced.[Celeste West]

October 2010

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7


WED 29 SEP

THU 30 SEP

The Bad Seeds' parallel project, GRINDERMAN, comes to Glasgow's Barrowland like a big wailing banshee of noise. It's rock 'n' roll as it should be: raw, bombastic, and fronted by Nick Cave. Barrowland, Glasgow, 7pm, £25

Stadium-swelling choruses, lush orchestration, and bold social statements. That'll be MANIC STREET PREACHERS back on the live-circuit bandwagon, touring new album Postcards From A Young Man. 02 Academy, Glasgow, 7pm, £26.50

Glaswegian big gob, FRANKIE BOYLE, takes it close to the bone with his I Would Happily Punch Every Last One Of You In The Face tour. Nice. Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, until 3 Oct, 7.30pm, £21.50

MON 4 OCT

TUE 5 OCT

WED 6 OCT

With Jill O'Sullivan's brooding harmonies, gilded by finger-plucked guitar and pounding metallic drumbeats, SPARROW AND THE WORKSHOP do country and western gone bad. But good. King Tut's, Glasgow, 8pm, £6

Bloc's relaxed Tuesday night-er, GLASGOW SLOW CLUB, plays host to The Seventeenth Century, who'll be dishing up some Scottish-brogued, baroque folk loveliness. Bloc, Glasgow, 9pm, Free

Fusing breakdance, physical theatre, and animation, Tony Mills' double-performance of WATCH IT!/SUCH A BLOKE is a deranged one-man dance odyssey, making it essential viewing in our eyes. The Arches, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £8 (£6)

PHOTO: DEAN CHALKLEY

HEADS UP

PHOTO: JULIE GREENE PHOTOGRAPHY

TUE 28 SEP

COMPILED BY: ANNA DOCHERTY

TUE 12 OCT

Spreading the indie-pop gospel, VENDOR DEFENDER and CANCEL THE ASTRONAUTS play a double-headliner. Best dust off your dancing shoes. Electric Circus, 8pm, £tbc

It's the finale date of THE TWILIGHT SAD and ERRORS mini tour, as hard-hitting rock squares up to post-electro drone for one last laugh. The Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £12

WED 13 OCT That most famous of banned films, A CLOCKWORK ORANGE, comes to Citizens Theatre for a theatrical adaptation of Anthony Burgess' iconic novel, set in a world of high unemployment, state surveillance, and strict new governmental rule. We're doomed. Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, until 6 Nov, 7.30pm, £10-£17.50 PHOTO: SARAH ROBERTS

PHOTO: PENNYLANE PHOTOGRAPHY

MON 11 OCT

PHOTO: TAKESHI SUGA

PHOTO: MARKUS THORSEN

MUSIC LIKE A VITAMIN GET A LIVE AIRING, GRANDMASTER-BLOODY-FLASH STEPS UP TO THE DECKS, AND WE DO HALLOWE'EN FENCE RECORDSSTYLE

MON 18 OCT

TUE 19 OCT

WED 20 OCT

THU 21 OCT

In a virtual keck-dropping and full bare-bottomed mooning to 'hoes and guns' style hip-hop, on his latest album, Born Like This, DOOM mixes Charles Bukowski poetry and superhero imagery. The Arches, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £19.50

We're still in no doubt as to the live power of TRICKY, who'll be battering out his classic, earlier work alongside tracks from new album, Mixed Race. The Arches, Glasgow, 7pm, £17.50

A rare chance to see rap innovator GRANDMASTER FLASH do his stuff on the wheels of steel, with Profisee, Capitol 2012 Soundsystem, and Bigg Taj on support duty. Sub Club, Glasgow, 11pm, £13.50

Experimental folk-jazz duo (i.e. they've got a saxophone) DOSH make meandering opuses that sound more like journeys than songs, onto which they empty fuzzy percussion and pitter-patter drum beats. Complex and rather beautiful. Nice 'n' Sleazy, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £8

TUE 26 OCT

WED 27 OCT

THU 28 OCT

FRI 29 OCT

Loveable Irish funnyman ED BYRNE drops by The Stand during his current UK tour. The Stand, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £13. Also playing Glasgow's Stand on 24 Oct

Industrial metal act GODFLESH play their first venue gig in over ten years, with support from Japanese heavy metal trio, Zeni Geva. Things could get a little noisy... The Arches, Glasgow, 7pm, £20

Bluesy rock duo THE BLACK KEYS took a funkier turn with recent album Brothers, but then that's what happens when you call in Danger Mouse to take another shot on production. Anyway, suffice to say they are on top form. O2 Academy, Glasgow, 7pm, £16

In celebration of Hallowe'en the GFT are screening, er, HALLOWEEN, the original slasher flick that introduced Micheal Myers to the world. GFT, Glasgow, 10.45pm, £6 (£4.50)

8

THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010


Sat 2 Oct

Sun 3 Oct

The first mini music festival of October, and a good 'un at that, Eastern Promise plays host to Wounded Knee, King Creosote, and Malcolm Middleton's new project, Human Don't Be Angry. Platform, Glasgow, until 2 Oct, 7pm, £15 (weekend)

Our September cover stars, Music Like A Vitamin (Rod Jones and Emma Pollock et.al), perform the songs they made whilst holed up in Perthshire for a week. O2 ABC, Glasgow, 7pm, £6 (part of The Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival, www.mhfestival.com). Also playing Edinburgh's HMV Picture House on 1 Oct

Like Sunday School for creative folk, Hole In My Pocket: Sunday Service is a live sermon from top artists, designers, and performers about what inspires them, plus group karaoke, readings from Moby Dick, and scones. Praise be. Arches, Glasgow, 1pm, Free

PHOTO: WES KINGSTON

PHOTO: Stephen Edgar

Fri 1 Oct

Fri 8 Oct

Sat 9 Oct

Sun 10 Oct

Brooklyn-born hip-hop luminary KRS-One – aka The Teacha – drops by the The Liquid Room to show the kids how it's done. The Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £14

Scottish DJ duo Clouds are still in their teens and working in McDonalds, but their bedroom-produced techno is the talk of the scene, so much so that Tiga has signed them up for a release. Talented chaps. Stereo, Glasgow, 11pm, £5

A little bit of premature Hallowe'en gore as the Filmhouse host all-day yuck-fest, Dead By Dawn: UnHallowe'en. It'll be a mix of premieres, classics, cuttingedge shorts, and, yes, plenty of blood and guts. Pass the ketchup. Filmhouse, Edinburgh, noon, £30 (day pass)

Pairing languid vocals, spazzy guitars, and unorthodox bass, plus a very high level of technical skill, Maps & Atlases do smart arse experimental with aplomb. Captain's Rest, Glasgow, 8pm, £7

Thu 14 Oct

Fri 15 Oct

Sat 16 Oct

Sun 17 Oct

Glasgow's annual queer celebration, Glasgay!, returns with an even bigger mix of events, from Drew Taylor's performance piece, Chromotherapy, examining the social rules of colour (what shade best shows one's feelings after having an epidural?), to the documentary Edie & Thea, the New York lesbians who are marrying after 42 years together. Various venues, Glasgow, until 13 Nov, www.glasgay.co.uk

The epitome of late night cool, Cry Parrot team up with Button Up DJs to host an artsy warehouse party, with live guests Naked on the Vague and Prayer Rug. And, of course, the Button Up boys playing tropical pop into the wee small hours. SWG3, Glasgow, 10pm, £4

You can rely on Death Disco to throw up some of the big boys of the DJ world, and this month they've got Erol Alkan, South Central, and Monarchy, encouraging you to dance yourselves into a frothy-mouthed frenzy. The Arches, Glasgow, 10pm, £14

A 78-year old man, hundreds of rainbow-coloured balloons, and a storyline that made us weep from the opening credits (literally); Up gets a re-screen at the Filmhouse, as part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts & Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh, 1pm, £4 (£2)

Fri 22 Oct

Sat 23 Oct

Sun 24 Oct

Mon 25 Oct

After the success of Hidden Door, the Roxy host Hidden Door II, a mini arts festival featuring a five-stage amphitheatre, an indoor garden, and an interactive sonic laboratory. Plus, Sunday's closer party sees Not Squares, American Men, The Foundling Wheel, Tokamak, and Lipsync for a Lullaby playing on five stages at the same time to a unique film created at the opening night. Roxy Art House, Edinburgh, until 24 Oct, £10 (session)

Dan Le Sac and Scroobius Pip, or Daniel Stephens and David Peter Meads to their mothers, do their pop-lit thing, overlaid with sped-up keyboards and nut-pummelling beats. Queen Margaret Union, Glasgow, 7pm, £17.25

Unashamed of their love for euphoric pop and squelchy euro house, there’s no danger of a limb staying still when Yeasayer play O2 ABC, especially when single Madder Red gets an airing. O2 ABC, Glasgow, 7pm, £13.50

The recently-resurrected Swans are back doing what they do best – post-punk at extreme volume levels, lynch-pinned on Michael Gira's distorted sing/howl. Lullabies they ain't. The Arches, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £20

Sun 31 Oct

Mon 1 Nov

Fence Records host an all-day Hallowe'en party with a Wildwest 3010 theme (yup, us neither). And, since Hallowe'en wouldn't be the same without a few surprises, the live acts are being kept a closely-guarded secret, but some old Fence faves are promised to be in the mix, alongside a Silver Columns DJ set. Stereo, Glasgow, 2pm, £25

Little Comets provide the hooks and danceable beats with their bouncy indie rock. Can't say fairer. Cabaret Voltaire, Edinburgh, 7pm, £6

PHOTO: JAZZY LEMON

Sat 30 Oct Beckoning in Hallowe'en is the cheerilynamed Death Weekend, featuring Ya'll Is Fantasy Island's Adam Stafford, a Zombie Walk, a corpse author, B-movie screenings, and an Embassy performance night. Sounds suitably eclectic. Roxy Art House, Edinburgh, £tbc

PHOTO: helen abraham

Thu 7 Oct

October 2010

THE SKINNY

9


the phantom band (L-R): greg sinclair, gerry hart, andy wake, duncan marquiss,rick anthony

10 THE SKINNY October 2010


MUSIC

into the wild Strap yourself in as robo-folk's finest embark on a new journey this month. Track-by-track, The Phantom Band unveil The Wants...

1

A Glamour This was the track that seemed least likely to develop from its conception as an odd little noodle into an album contender, so we worked on it near the beginning of the recording process to give it the best chance of survival. The sawing sound at the start is Duncan [Marquiss] trying to get the Bali-phone in tune – the whole intro section makes me think of some lunatic hermit on a hill, building random shit out of wood and junk. As soon as this track was nearing completion we knew it had to go at the start of the record. And we put a donk on it. Apparently a ‘Glamour’, as well as being the opening track on this album, is a 17th Century term in witchcraft to describe an illusion by which a male member could be castrated by magic. Andy [Wake] just told me that. I don’t know if it’s true and I can’t really decide if I want it to be.

2

O This started off more laidback and it was known only as ‘the sexy one’, but it ended up sounding a little dark and creepy and, let’s be honest, that was always going to happen with us trying to be sexy. When we were writing it Andy and I would walk around the studio singing the chorus harmony; serenading each other like a wonky Righteous Brothers… told you it was creepy.

3

6

Come Away in the Dark This was the only time we’ve ever been able to record something as a live take without feeling the need to layer on hundreds of overdubs – it’s just the band in the live room. It was a real pleasure to record like that and it felt quite satisfying to get a song nailed in a day – utterly unheard of for us and something we’ll probably never manage again. The calmness of this track is a really nice shift in mood after Mr. Natural – like it’s patting the previous tracks on the head and telling them to fucking calm down.

7

Walls At first this was really slow and plain tive with more of a 50s feel to the guitar but it evolved into a different beast when we changed the drums. It’s the kind of song that could work in a lot of different ways when we come to play it live – we could probably do a nice quiet stripped down version of it or maybe we could make it heavier and faster still. It’s still quite sad sounding; I guess a cow is still a cow even if you stick wings on it. In any case it’ll be a novelty for us to have a track with that flexibility... did anyone see Neighbours today?

8

Into the Corn We’d never heard this song in its entirety until it was recorded. Turned out we all quite like it, which was pretty lucky.

There’s a re-tuned Stylophone in there; some sleigh-bells; Gerry [Hart] shouting ‘I’m glowing’ and a high-end pop harmony on the verses that I will always hear in my head but wasn’t allowed to record. The lyrics are maybe a little more coherent than on some of our other tracks as it was one where we had a solid thematic idea we wanted to explore. If you can work out what that idea is you can send your answers on a postcard to us and you’ll win a shit prize.

9

Goodnight Arrow This grew and grew far beyond anything we had originally conceived – like someone baking a cake and accidentally creating a nuclear weapon. It went from being a little nod to Wayne Smith to being a wrestle with Wagner. We decided to really go for it with the vocals (because by that point we were using two studios in unison and living by Paul’s ‘If you’re going to steal a horse…’ mantra), piling on more and more until we’d used up all the channels and broken Pro Tools. That meant there was over 130 tracks or something – we had to keep bouncing tracks down to create more – and that still didn’t seem like it was enough. It probably was though… just.

It ended up sounding a little dark and creepy and, let's be honest, that was always going to happen with us trying to be sexy

The Wants is released on 18 Oct via Chemikal Underground www.phantomband.co.uk

Everybody Knows it’s True This track took the entire length of the recording session (from the start of February until around about yesterday) and it went through a lot of pushing and pulling along the way. It was the first rough idea we had and the spooky E-Bow sound on the chorus was the very last thing we recorded on the very last night we had in Chem19. So there you go… did anyone see Neighbours today?

4

The None of One When we first played this it was quite spare and folky but for some reason, the more we played it, the more these other totally different sections grew out of it. We couldn’t decide which ones were better so we just stuck them all in the pot. The track is like a little adventure – it definitely doesn’t end in the same place that it starts and it doesn’t really end where it ends either. The second-last end section makes me think of the end of a movie – the sun setting over distant blue hills; the credits beginning to roll… so obviously we had to put this fourth.

5

Mr. Natural This was probably the hardest one of all to capture and there are still bits of it floating around out there somewhere. It was meant to sound more like Suicide but only ever did very briefly. OK it never did. We tried it out at some shows while we were writing the album but we always played it too fast and it just became a big flavourless emo soup. That spooked us a little and we wanted to try and totally reinvent it with a kind of Steve Reich / Glenn Branca meets Sonic Youth feel. We didn’t really manage that and just ended up recording layers and layers of guitars over it instead – we’d still be recording guitars on it now if Paul [Savage] had had his way. There are two angle-poise lamps recorded on there as well, in case you’re wondering why it’s so bright.

October 2010

THE SKINNY 11


MUSIC

Grinding up the Bad Seeds

In The Skinny's review of Grinderman 2 , we asked if the band really needed to exsist. Here Nick Cave and his esteemed cohorts answer overwhelmingly in the affirmative INTERVIEW: PAUL MITCHELL Martyn Casey, Nick Cave, Warren Ellis and Jim Sclavunos are all pondering the point of their band Grinderman, who have just released their second album, Grinderman 2, the rather tidily titled follow up to 2007’s debut release, eh, Grinderman. Cave acknowledges the validity of the question given that all four band members are members of the highly successful and long-standing Bad Seeds. In a nutshell, it appears to be confusing for everyone, a point Nick himself hammers home. “It’s a very good question as to the ‘why’ of Grinderman, and it’s something I don’t think any of us can really answer successfully. It’s very confusing for everybody within The Bad Seeds and sometimes even within Grinderman itself as to what we’re actually doing and why. The fans find it confusing on some level and the record company definitely find it confusing. But at the end of the day we really like the Grinderman records and we really like the chaotic and confusing effect that it’s had.” Consider Nick (and everyone else) ‘confused’. Casey is a little more specific about the raison d’etre of the band: “I think it gives us an opportunity to explore other kinds of music. With The Bad Seeds; I don’t know why but because there are more people it tends to conform to ‘what it is’. It’s been going for such a long time that it has this particular sound. Whereas with just the four of us, it’s easier to explore kinds of music that The Bad Seeds wouldn’t do.” Ellis agrees that it’s all about getting a different atmosphere going. “It was a way of downsizing the band because The Bad Seeds is really big. I guess psychologically it was good to try something different. For Nick it was a case of him being able to let go of, to a certain degree, a lot of the responsibility he feels with The Bad Seeds. With this, everybody was taking the risk. On paper it might not seem like a big deal but these were really important concepts for the project.” Sclavunos chimes with the notion that Cave feels almost unlimited responsibility for the successes and failures of The Bad Seeds. “Nick is very much in the foreground in The Bad Seeds and that’s one of the advantages of Grinderman in that he can allow himself to be subsumed by the Grinderman machine.” Do these pressures not affect each of the members, given their cumulative years of service? “I think the whole legacy thing; it doesn’t matter to me personally,” says Sclavunos. “It maybe matters a lot to the fans because they have expectations and there’s a history. There’s no issue, for example, if Grinderman does remixes, or allow other artists to do remixes of our stuff. Whereas, there’s no precedent with The Bad Seeds. They, to my knowledge have never done a remix in the whole life of the band.” Cave himself admits that he revels in the somewhat more egalitarian approach of the four-piece. “The songwriting pressure is off. If we make a bag of shit I don’t have to take full responsibility. That’s how I feel, y’know. Even though The Bad Seeds is a collaboration, at the end of the day I still have to take the rap if it’s a bad or a good record and I guess that influences things for sure. There’s a legacy there and a sense of duty to that legacy.” Given that they work so closely on a variety of projects (Ellis and Cave, for example, have collaborated on a variety of film soundtracks), are there ground rules about the type of music they’re going to play as Grinderman? Ellis suggests there may be the vague notion of a blueprint. “With the first album, Nick and I had spoken about it quite a

12 THE SKINNY October 2010

The Phantom Interrogation: Nick Cave Admirers of the sharp-suited poet's staggering body of work, The Phantom Band, pose their own questions to Nick Cave

bit before and it was this talking that got the ball rolling. When we started messing around in the studio, Nick sat down on the piano and started playing a certain kind of song, so we were like ‘OK, you’re not playing the piano, play the guitar’. I didn’t play the violin, because as soon as I start it sounds like The Bad Seeds. I also said to Nick ‘Let’s not have any songs about love or God,’ and he was like ‘Well what do I write about then?’ There wasn’t a structure as such but I guess there were certain guidelines to stop us going to places whereby we knew what would happen if we went there.” Sclavunos comments on the idea that whilst there may be certain principles agreed to in theory, it’s really all about the dynamic between the members. “There are things like that verbalised but for me the essence of the difference between the two things is not so much in what’s forbidden or the arbitrary rules that we set up momentarily and then dispense with; it’s more about the numbers. It’s easier for people to follow each other and go off on tangents and pursue the unpredictable in a more compact combo. A smaller band lends itself to impulsive, instantaneous responses, whereas a larger band lends itself more to orchestration and arrangement.” Cave seems to bristle at the idea there are ever any strict guidelines in place, no matter which project he’s working on. “It’s not like I’m walking around in The Bad Seeds saying ‘we can do this and we can’t do that,’ it’s definitely not like that at all. It’s just re-energised everybody, even those people who aren’t in the band. With Dig Lazarus, Dig, it wasn’t like we went in to do a record like Grinderman or anything like that, it just gave the rest of the band the licence to make a fucking racket again. And they felt ‘well, if they can do it, we can do it’. I’m not sure where the trajectory of The Bad Seeds would be, but I think that Grinderman has been hugely beneficial for it. I also don’t know what the next [Bad Seeds] record’s going to be like at all but I can’t help but think that Grinderman will have had a really positive effect on it.”

I said to Nick ‘Let's not have any songs about love or God’, and he was like ‘Well what do I write about then’? Warren Ellis

❞ Casey agrees with the sentiment, adding: “That’s the thing, there aren’t any rules of engagement. It comes from us just playing together in a room. I think we all know when it’s not working when there are hours and hours and hours of what is basically fucking rubbish, and we just winkle out the good bits and then form something from that.” When it’s pointed out that the end result seems to be a sound more overt than The Bad Seeds, often quite explicit and straight up by comparison, Casey has the last word. “So far that seems to be what we end up with but I don’t think we’re deliberately trying to be ‘in your face’, we just end up making a lot of fucking noise basically.” read the full reviews with each individual member online at the skinny Grinderman play Barrowlands, Glasgow on 28 Sep Grinderman 2 is out now on Mute www.grinderman.com

Is it true you once said you wanted to make music that was as sad as someone snapping a little finger? Which songs, either your own or someone else’s, would you say come close to matching that? A. The last time I wept to a song wasn’t actually that long ago. I was in my car and a song came on by Nina Simone called My Father, which is a terrible title, but the song is extraordinary and it gets me every time. It’s the most measured piece of songwriting, sentimental but very beautiful at the same time and she just sings it extraordinarily. So, there are those songs out there. I don’t know if I’ve written any. I don’t respond that way to my own stuff because that’s a little narcissistic isn’t it – to have yourself weeping from singing your own songs? Given your prolific output in a number of mediums – is there one that gives you more satisfaction than the others? For instance do you feel more of a sense of achievement having finished writing a screenplay than you do when you finish recording an album? A. I love screen writing. I’m not sure if I get the same long term satisfaction out of it but I love the process. You can just do it anywhere I guess. I’m not sure how to explain it properly without sounding completely stupid but to write a screenplay is a different discipline altogether, it doesn’t require every ounce of heart and soul that writing a song does. To write a song is often a very taxing, sometimes agonising thing, because it’s so difficult to catch a good song. Whereas writing a film script is a craft thing. You just sit down and write a story and I’ve learnt how to do that stuff now and so I find it much easier. Grinderman was my highlight of the Connect festival in 2008 and the Bad Seeds were my highlight of last year's T in the Park – do you still enjoy live performance as much now as you did when you first started out? Perhaps enjoy is the wrong word. Can you ever see a point where you think you’ll want to stop? A. Well no. The thing about the live stuff that I used to find difficult is that it took so long just to do the same thing over and over. I mean, you go on tour for three months or something, but now I’ve worked out ways to use that time in another way and work on things at the same time. It makes the experience a little less repetitious. To do a show is always a unique thing and something you put everything into, but there’s just so much other time spent doing nothing on tour. Any band will tell you the same thing. I’ve worked out ways to use that time to do other stuff. The last tour I went on I wrote Bunny Monroe the novel, on the bus. Is it true that you are working on a script for a remake of The Crow? A. Ah, so the internet is saying. Not at the moment.


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MAKING “ñO PLåCE SπéçêA¬”

ßPíCIåL SôNçE 1866.

No matter where you drink, do it responsibly.


14 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010


MUSIC

Odd Fellow

Yeasayer’s Chris Keating looks back at the success of second album Odd Blood whilst keeping an eye on the band’s glittering future interview: DARREN CARLE

What we can be sure of is that Keating will not be resting on his laurels, something he confirms when asked if there’s any formula for how the band writes and records. “There’s been no real set way of doing it, and hopefully there won’t ever be,” he states. “I think that’s how you learn a lot; by experimenting with each other and just making sounds. It’s all about not getting bored. I think once you have your formula, then you go in and you ‘do your formula’ and then that’s when things start to sound very tired.” However the creative process goes, it seems clear the end product will be free from the constraints of any perceived label expectations that Odd Blood’s success may bring. “I think the second album is the one where’s there’s pressure,” suggests Keating. “There’s pressure from ourselves, certainly, and there’s some debate with the label, sure. I mean, they thought that The Children (Odd Blood’s wrong-footing, robotic chug of an opener) might alienate people, but we thought it followed on well from the last song on the first album. And of course, we won. But they’re very supportive and they let us do anything in the end.” And that ‘anything’ could be something very good indeed if Keating’s current influences make it onto the record. “I’ve been listening to a lot of post-disco stuff,” he says. “Some New York, circa 1980 cuts. Also a lot of amazing dancehall stuff that’s got me very excited lately. I’m always trying to keep my ears open.” A basis for the next record perhaps? “Yeah, if it were up to me, but we’ll see. Otherwise I’ll just have to do my own album.” More immediately, the New York trio are gearing up for a 27-date tour which will see them arrive at Glasgow’s ABC at the end of the month. It’s a leg up from their previous date at the Òran Mór, something that’s unsurprisingly indicative of their final tour of the year. “In general, we are playing much bigger places,” admits Keating. “In Paris though, I think we’re playing a bigger venue this time, but to less people. Maybe that says something about us or maybe something about France. I’m not really sure.” Let’s just blame the French. Overall though, it would be safe to say Yeasayer are a bigger band than when they first caught our attention with the single 2080 in, er, 2007. It also means the trio are hob-nobbing with a different class of band, something that’s been an eye-opener for Keating. “We played Reading and Leeds and there were nine or ten bands where these kids Six months after Yeasayer dropped second album Odd Blood onto a largely unsuspecting public, singer Chris Keating is drawing a line in the sand regarding the record’s perceived departure into pop territories. “If someone prefers the first album, it still exists, they can go listen to it,” he rallies. “But if anyone had any perception that that was the type of music we were going to make forever, then they were very wrong.” Very wrong indeed, as Odd Blood’s crazy-paved, synth-laden, ultra pop has already proven. Though Keating initially plays down notions of progression and accessibility, the past year has seen Yeasayer climb a fair few rungs on the exposure ladder. Heavy air-play of Odd Blood’s cracking lead single Ambling Alp, as well as O.N.E. and Madder Red has ensured that the group have become ‘pop’ in both senses. “We began to write in a way that’s a little more pop orientated,” Keating concedes. “So we automatically started thinking about dance music and love songs being the two defining elements of that genre. Working in that context became very interesting.”

In the past, the band have ruminated on the pros and cons of their debut album All Hour Cymbals. With half a year having passed since Odd Blood’s release, does Keating have any objectivity on it yet? “I remember reading a quote from John Lennon about how he wasn’t happy with any of The Beatles’ stuff,” he illustrates. “He said he would redo all of it. I think that’s just the nature of making art or music, even with something like that, which is perfect in my eyes. But by the time you’re done, you’ve already moved onto something else.” As we talk, the Yeasayer frontman is engaged in one of his own projects: creating “sloweddown, twisted funk music” for a friend’s fashion installation. More pertinently he, along with fellow members Ira Wolf Tuton and Anand Wilder, will be entering the studio in October to put the first touches to what could become the band’s third album. “Yeah, yeah. I’ve always got ideas,” responds Keating when asked if he will be going in prepared. “I don’t know if they’re any good but that’s why the band’s there. The other guys will be able to tell me what’s good and what’s bad.”

I think that’s how you learn a lot; by experimenting with each other and just making sounds. It’s all about not getting bored Chris Keating

were all seventeen years old,” he marvels. “I was asking them ‘how are you playing these things at this age? You’re just finishing school.’ That can be bad because they’ve never worked real jobs in their lives, so they don’t actually know how lucky they are. Also, taking yourself too seriously can go to your head when you’re younger than if you’re a little more experienced.” Experience Yeasayer certainly have where such youthful folly may escape them. Still, Keating is keen to light a path for such bands rather than merely watch them inevitably stumble. “As long as you don’t end up succumbing to some label’s fleeting idea of what is cool, what sounds good or what sounds interesting. As long as you stay true to yourself, I think everything else will be fine,” he offers. “I think it’s the experienced bands who can brush all that stuff off and keep making music that is interesting.” Yeasayer can definitely count themselves as one such band. Playing the ABC, Glasgow on 24 Oct www.yeasayer.net/ www.myspace.com/yeasayer

the crooked beat Chris Keating picks out a few choice slabs of wax that helped shape Yeasayer as they are today Shriekback - Care (1983) I listened to the first Shriekback album a lot during Odd Blood’s recording. I think it’s one of the dudes from XTC and one of the dudes from Gang of Four (Barry Andrews and Dave Allen respectively). They’re one of those dark, weird post-punk, dance-y bands from the early 80s. It’s a strange collaboration, a ‘super-group’ I suppose. Very cool stuff. Can – Tago Mago (1971) Tago Mago is the Can album that always sticks out for me. Every time I put it on my brain gets tricked into thinking it’s something new. It just sounds so cutting-edge and contemporary still. It has a great combination of electronics, really cool drumming and great abstract songwriting. It adds jazz and funk to its dark, Germanic krautrock elements. Can were very inspirational. The Clash – Sandinista! (1980) I was listening to The Clash a lot, particularly Sandinista! It’s both weird and genius at the same time. It’s very eclectic. It’s the album where they recorded all over the place; Jamaica, New York and London that I know of. There’s crazy disco-funk songs followed by weird samba songs. A very strange but rewarding album.

October 2010

THE SKINNY 15


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FILM

Meeting Mr Nice

Howard Marks, the Oxford-educated dope smuggler, discusses the adaptation of his autobiography Mr Nice, his thoughts on prohibition and how he acquired his intriguing pseudonym interview: Gail Tolley

At the age of 65 Howard Marks still appears to have a healthy disregard for rules. As he quietly rolls himself a cigarette in the plush surroundings of Edinburgh’s Caledonian Hotel I can’t help but think how apt Marks’ pseudonym (and the title of his best-selling book) Mr Nice, really is. It’s difficult to equate this gentle mannered, softly spoken Welshman sitting in front of me with the character I’ve seen on screen. Is this really the man who during the height of his career was responsible for a huge percentage of the world’s cannabis trade, who worked alongside on-the-run criminal and former IRA member Jim McCann, who even dabbled in spying for MI5 and who, in 1988, was eventually sentenced to serve 25 years for his crimes? Apparently so. In 1996 Marks published his remarkable autobiography, Mr Nice. This month the film of the book reaches the big screen, directed by Bernard Rose and starring Rhys Ifans in the title role and David Thewlis as the vociferous and volatile McCann. In many ways Ifans was an obvious choice to play Marks – in fact the two had been friends long before the casting of the film. “Over the years we became friends and met each other at festivals and other hedonistic events,” recalls Marks, “so we got to know each other very well. He didn’t need to study me at all. Absolutely no need whatsoever.” Many authors might feel precious about the representation of their life on screen; not Marks, who appears genuinely chuffed with the final result, even if it didn’t always match his memories. “I suppose if one looks at it and analyses it then no it wasn’t like that, it was a different place or I came out of the car a different side or wasn’t

18 THE SKINNY October 2010

wearing anything like that, but it captures the essence, the emotions, more effectively then the book ever could.” Mr Nice has had a delayed release, apparently due to the recurrent debate surrounding the legalisation of cannabis in the news, and Marks is conscious that the film will again bring up the issue of the criminalisation of the drug. His views on prohibition have remained firm though. “There’s no recreational drug so far discovered that wouldn’t be safer to society if it was legalised and controlled,” he argues. “To keep it within criminal circles is just insane. If you look at the argument of the harm drugs [do]… obviously some drugs can produce harm but we’re allowed to kill ourselves, suicide is legal… it’s alright to kill myself quickly just not slowly, it’s ridiculous.” The film avoids making any overt political comment on the criminalisation of cannabis and the (what many believe to be) harsh sentencing that Marks received, which saw him serve 7 years of a 25 year sentence in a prison in Indiana in 1988. Instead the film focuses on the context for the decisions he made and the subsequent repercussions. Marks adds, “I think it shows at least there was no intended victim in what we did, obviously we were breaking the law, we were criminals, but it wasn’t stealing from anyone or hurting anyone, we were very careful. It was peace and love, hopelessly idealistic.” Has he seen a change in attitudes to cannabis over the decades? “By and large it’s the same. It always has been a generational thing, people between 18 and 25 tend to be pro it. It is a different product [now], largely in the content of THC

that is in skunk and doesn’t even exist in Afghan hash. The fact that it’s stronger shouldn’t make any difference at all, you just put less in the joint. I’ve never quite seen what that’s about. It’s like objecting that whisky is stronger than wine, you just have different glasses! I think the attitudes are by and large the same, no one can really provide a rationale for prohibition, they couldn’t then and they can’t now.” At the same time he

I think it shows at least there was no intended victim in what we did... we were criminals, but it wasn’t stealing from anyone or hurting anyone, we were very careful. It was peace and love, hopelessly idealistic

acknowledges that the world of drugs today isn’t the same as the one he was involved in back in the 70s. “It’s a very different business these days; there’s a lot of violence, there’s better technology so it’s a very difficult business.” Before adding, “though I suppose it requires the same sort of character to be a drug dealer now as it did then!” And what about the name, Mr Nice? “Well, he called it ‘Nice’ [pronounced ‘niece’], it was a guy I met who’d been convicted of murder, had done a 12 year sentence and was just happy to be free again, no intention of travelling or anything like that. So I bought his passport off him, applied for a birth certificate and went through all those motions. It was quite a good name to have because it usually sparks up conversation, I felt comfortable with it.” In more recent years and following the success of his book, he’s become a well-loved figure through his book readings which have gradually morphed into something close to stand-up. “Book readings normally take place in a book shop in the middle of the afternoon and they’re terribly sterile and lacking in entertainment. Quite a few authors, Irvine Welsh, Nick Cave, Roddy Doyle started doing readings in pubs and clubs, so I started doing that and it suited me better. And of course you have to modify what you wrote. No author wrote a book thinking he’d have to read it out loud in a book shop! Then I started using multimedia and things like that, anything to make it more rock and roll, more hardcore and more entertaining really.” That’s Howard Marks it seems, the quiet, unassuming former dope smuggler still intent on adding some rock and roll to the world. Mr Nice is released in cinemas on 8 Oct 


MUSIC

HIGH HOPES

Nicolas Fromageau, former founder of M83, talks about his new project Team Ghost and what lies ahead for the spectral popsters interview: Darren Carle photography: ashley good

In 2004, effusive electro French outfit M83 broke through with their third album Before The Dawn Heals Us. It was a grandiose statement that found itself topping end-of-year lists as well as soundtracking advertisements and films. It was also the first album not to feature founding member Nicolas Fromageau, who left after previous album Dead Cities, Red Seas and Lost Ghosts. Since then, M83 have continued under the guise of co-founder Anthony Gonzalez, going from strength to strength, currently peaking with 2008’s Saturdays = Youth. However, Fromageau has been no slouch either and earlier this year the first fruits of his labour with Christophe Guérin were borne as Team Ghost. And if Fromageau has any regrets at being the Stuart Sutcliffe of the French electro shoegaze scene, he certainly isn’t showing it. “I guess Anthony wanted to make music by himself, and so did I,” he begins when asked about the split. “I’m really glad he’s so successful. We’re still friends and I really love his music. I don’t really have any regrets. It hasn’t always been easy, but I’m really excited about Team Ghost. I really believe in my band.” That belief seems entirely justified too. In April this year debut EP You Never Did Anything Wrong to Me impressed with its ambition, range and brevity. In an era where making a good first impression, and making it before itchy mouse fingers click your soul away, is key, it seemed a perfect introduction to the group, something Fromageau confirms. “We wanted to say ‘hello’, to release some good stuff before the album.” If their first EP was a hearty handshake, then follow up Celebrate What You Can’t See is a poignant and searching introductory question from a stoned host who has categorically decided to skip the small talk. That being the case, what can we expect to hear on the stereo? “I’m really into Krautrock, ambient, shoegaze, electronic and pop music,” lists Fromageau. “I like many different kinds of music and I love to create different atmospheres.”

I love Paris, but I’m not sure it consciously influenced me. Travelling is a much bigger inspiration Nicolas fromageau

❞ All of which, and more, permeate the music of Team Ghost. Having moved from southern France to the capital, it would seem a fair assumption, judging by his predilection for towering guitar crescendos, that Fromageau was also influenced by his upheaval to Paris. “Oh, you know, I never lived in the country,” he corrects. “[The first EP] is about moving from your hometown, missing the people you love. But it’s not so negative; it’s about starting a new life too. I love Paris, but I’m not sure this city consciously influenced me. Travelling is a much bigger inspiration.” And travelling is something he, Guérin and the rest of the nebulous outfit will be doing this autumn as they tour once again. Sadly there’s no Scottish date this time, although it shouldn’t be too long before they have more wares to take on the road. “We’re already working on the album,” confirms Fromageau. “Hopefully we can release it soon. It’s gonna be huge; I can’t wait!” Neither can we, monsieur. Celebrate What You Can’t See is released on 11 Oct via Sonic Cathedral www.myspace.com/teamghostmusic

autumn10 SEPTEMBER – DECEMBER

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www.vinowines.co.uk www.twitter.com/vinowines www.facebook.com/vino.wines October 2010

THE SKINNY 19


MUSIC

Wicked Rhymes, Picket Signs

From his furious beginnings with NWA to a latter-day rebirth as the lord of light family entertainment, this month Ice Cube returns to answer the critics who say Hollywood has diminished his edge interview: dave kerr

Rap is still a relatively young genre and you’ve been recording for most of its lifespan, but tastes are changable. Your old pal Dr Dre has T.I ghostwriting his verses and cuts about Ibiza clubs with David Guetta to keep an eye on what’s current. Do you not concern yourself with what’s happening in contemporary music, or is it a case of ‘fuck that, I’m Ice Cube’? Mostly it’s the latter, I really just do me. I’m not here to make radio happy; I’m here to make my fans satisfied. I’ve got a figure-it-out-yourself mentality, and I don’t want to listen to what’s hot. To the hiphop nation, the way of the world is out with the old and in with the new. We’ve still got good hip-hop, and I don’t think the youngsters are doing it any better than we are. That’s why we’re still here. The lyrics in the latest track [Drink the Kool-Aid] from your new album [I Am the West] single out Lil Wayne, Eminem and most notably Dre as people you explicitly are not... Yeah, but me and Dre are cool – he knows I didn’t diss him. We’re always going to be cool. If you listen to the whole record, it’s a record saying ‘I’m not this, I’m not that, I’m Ice Cube’. I ain’t dissin' nobody, you’ve just got to listen to it without thinking ‘I heard this person’s name, it’s a diss.’  On my blog I’ve got the lyrics written out, so there shouldn't be any mistake.” Is that what I Am The West is about – reasserting your position? Yeah, when you’ve been at it as long as I have you’ve gotta piss on a few trees, let ‘em know you’re still here.

20 THE SKINNY October 2010

As you creep into your forties, did you picture a life as a career entertainer? Yeah, everybody dreams to be doing it till you die. I always looked at the history and longevity of rap artists and felt like I was going to be the one who broke the mould. When did acting become a realistic path? It was definitely accidental; John Singleton – the director of my first movie Boyz N the Hood – sought me out. He kind of followed me around for two years. It was cool because he knew exactly what he wanted, and I’m glad he chose me. That’s how it all started. Some said Boyz N the Hood glorified the violence in Los Angeles at the time, others claimed it was highlighting a few uncomfortable truths about America. The same could be said for your early albums with NWA and as a solo artist. Did the negative attention and media hyperbole get too much? Nah, I think everything is what it is. Some people understand what we’re doing, others not. Boyz N the Hood, to me, showed a lot of people that the kids you might see on the news going to jail are not animals and they come from different circumstances. That movie was showing the world this for the first time, you hadn’t seen this anywhere else, so it was very necessary. Now, the whole world glorifies sex and violence in some way or another, you can find sex and violence at a football game – it’s everywhere. Of course it’s in the music; of course it’s in the movies. When it’s already everywhere, showing it isn’t always glorifying it.

The Scottish press and criminal defence were quick to associate the violence in your lyrics with the unprovoked stabbing that ended in tragedy at your Barrowlands gig in ‘94. How did that impact on you? I never understood why somebody got stabbed that night, because everybody had so much fun. It was one of the most electric shows that I’ve ever had. To hear when we got back that somebody had been murdered, it was devastating. I’ve not gone back in years because of that, I couldn’t get a show there no more. I don’t know if I’m the first person for somebody to get hurt at their show like that, I don’t know how many stabbings go on in Scotland, I don’t know what music will make me go stab somebody. These are human, social problems, there have to be other forces at work here. You really can’t blame the entertainment for that, it’s a people issue. I hope they look past that and invite me back. I suppose it’s the same stigma Marilyn Manson endured around the time of the Columbine massacre, a similar witch-hunt... Well, you know, it’s an easy target. People never understand why we want to do these kinds of records, they always just attack what we’re saying on the record. They never want to go deep enough to figure out why it’s coming out this hard. What’s the problem in society? Where is it? Let’s deal with that. It’s easy to deal with the surface, the artist who goes a little bit over the top for a certain person’s tastes, and now they’re the reason why anything bad happens. We live in a world of hypocrites, of people that want you to do as they say and not as they do. Your kids appeared with you on the back cover of Lethal Injection as toddlers. They must be of an age where they listen to all types of music now. Do they listen to yours? They listen to them – but I’ve been there to explain the world to them. See, they don’t know the streets, they don’t come from the streets. That’s a parents job, to make sure their child understands the world that they’re up against. I try to do my best; sometimes they listen, sometimes they don’t. Hopefully there’s an understanding, that’s all these records are about – a little more understanding between people. Have you observed a greater understanding since those social ills reached fever pitch and the LA riots tore your city apart all those years ago? Yeah, I know people are aware, but I don’t know what they’re going to do about it. People are looking for ways to escape. You either fight or you flee. People drink, smoke, buy material things, go to clubs, and fuck just to escape. But that’s only going to last for so long, pretty soon reality comes in and you realise you can’t escape and you’re going to have to fight for what’s right. To me, we’re still in escape mode in Los Angeles, everyone’s trying to get away from their problems without confronting them. What do you want to say to people about your perceived retreat from the forefront of rap music after Lethal Injection? When did I depart hip-hop? After Lethal Injection came the Westside Connection album, after that I put out the War disc, after I put out the Peace disc. After that I put out another Westside Connection album, then I put out Laugh Now, Cry Later, then came Raw Footage. So I ain’t never left, the mainstream media pushed my movies as though that was all I was doing, so it is a perception thing. I’ve never left the game, the game’s trying to leave me.

How would you describe Warpaint to a stranger in a bar? Elegiac tribal fairies in a trash can, beat boxing to the giggles of a common hip-hop thread. What were the circumstances of the band’s formation? Library meetings, Gap castings, coffee bean blends, Bobby Brown gatherings, sister love, and childhood kindredship. The name is entirely at odds with what you play – this isn’t exactly Slayer... We are all hardcore at heart, but we are very sensitive little peapods crying when the sun rises. And when it sets, we don’t want anything to come, but we don’t want anything to go. So what are your songs about? Cats, dogs, La Brea Tar Pits, the obscene fantasy of the ice age, traffic, taxes, and HEART BREAK. Your first EP was self-released but took a few years to get together, what set the pace? What doesn’t take a few years? We’re all just trying to figure it out as best as we can, and tell our stories honestly. Sometimes that takes awhile. Now that you’re signed, has that alleviated some of the strains that perhaps slowed you down? Yeah! We can pay our rent, sort of. Maybe a little late, but it gets paid. More recently, you worked with Tom Biller [Liars, Elliot Smith] on The Fool. Which qualities did you see in his work that you hoped might embellish what the band has? He allowed us complete freedom. It was confirmed that imagination is king – actually, queen. We went with our gut everything, thank god. You recorded your album in a gym, was this for acoustic purposes, financial necessity or something else entirely? It was a gym, and then converted into a studio – so no treadmills or Stairmasters on this record, but maybe the next. Your Stereo gig will be your first trip to Scotland, what are you most looking forward to about our cultured land? Can’t wait for the accents...the best ever!

I Am the West is released via Lench Mob Records on 4 Oct

Warpaint play Stereo, Glasgow on 22 Oct. Debut album The Fool is released via Rough Trade on 25 Oct

www.icecube.com

www.myspace.com/worldwartour

The Inquisition:

Warpaint Jenny Lee Lindberg from all-girl Los Angeles art rock quartet Warpaint gave us riddles when we asked for answers


MUSIC

THE PHANTOM BAND CURATE:

THE ECSTATIC

The Phantom Band's Rick Anthony engages MICHAEL GIRA, mainstay of recently resurrected New York no wave crusaders SWANS and founder of Young God Records

How has it been to revisit Swans after so many years – are you picking up where you left off or is this a reinvention of sorts? It’s definitely a reinvention; it’s not a nostalgia act. This is not a bunch of old people getting together and playing their old songs – it’s a new way to work. It’s turning out to be really inspirational. Early on in the band’s career, there seemed to be a sense of danger and confrontation with stories of people being sick from the noise. Do you still feel compelled to confront and challenge the audience to the same degree? I’m not sure I ever wanted to confront an audience, I don’t know about challenging either – I wanted to make a total experience. As much as for selfish reasons, I was hoping people would get something out of it as well. The idea of it being at all aggressive seems kind of silly to me and the word danger I find a little preposterous as well. Dangerous is being a soldier in Afghanistan or suffering from the bombardments of the drone in Pakistan, that’s danger. I’m just making music. But I do strive to make something that’s completely overwhelming, other times it’s delicate of course. I’m moving towards an extreme experience. Do you have to work hard to maintain the intensity of the music and live performances? It’s very physically difficult to do what we do, it takes a lot of concentration and time to develop it. I’m speaking about the record, but also we’re in the midst of live rehearsals right now, which takes focus. We have to continually try to make the song invigorated and alive. The set we’re doing right now has four songs from the record and four older songs. Three of the songs are about 20 minutes long (laughs), it’s not that they’re some prog rock thing where there’s twenty changes in it; it slowly, gradually, morphs within itself. We’re making a sound which I find incredibly satisfying and physically ecstatic. Is playing with Swans a cathartic experience for you?

I don’t know about catharsis – if you could picture someone’s body atomising – that’s what I want - just that idea of disappearing within the music. The best moments are when something becomes better than you’d anticipated. Even when the song’s just awful and you’re ready to shitcan the whole thing, then you try some desperate move and it becomes something else even better than you could have envisioned. That’s the way I like working. But the songs are never fixed, they constantly change – they’re changing now live, they’re morphing into something completely different. Angels of Light’s We Are Him is one of my favourite records of the last few years. Is that a project you imagine you’ll return to in the future? It’s not something I’m against, but we’re touring Swans for probably around 18 months and I’m still trying to keep my record company together, at least in a limited way. And I have the exigencies of family life, etc, so that’s a lot right there. If I have time, sure, I would like to do Angels at some point, but right now my main focus in life is Swans. Young God has released some fantastic music over the years. Other than the new Swans album, what else has the label got coming up? We just released James Blackshaw’s album, called All is Falling, which I find to be quite beautiful. The next thing is an album by the supremely talented Wooden Wand – James Toth is the songwriter for that. All I can say is he’s a really high level American songwriter with a great sense of purpose and place, he has lyrics that describe everyday events in a very expansive way but with a good sense of black humour involved too. The orchestration in the songs is just compelling and beautiful, I think he’s right up there with the greats like Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, and the more recent Vic Chesnutt. MY FATHER WILL GUIDE ME UP A ROPE TO THE SKY IS OUT NOW VIA YOUNG GOD. SWANS PLAY THE ARCHES, GLASGOW ON 25 OCT WWW.YOUNGGODRECORDS.COM

We’re looking for Scotland’s finest band to grace the stage at this year’s Edinburgh’s Hogmanay, playing to thousands of revellers and joining a line-up featuring some of the best bands around. If you think your band can make the party bounce like never before, then now’s your chance to Hog the Stage.

LEITH

TO ENTER YOUR BAND AND SEE THE REST OF THE ENTRIES VISIT: CORDS.COM RE

For full event and ticket information visit www.edinburghshogmanay.com

Skinny-256mmx155mm.indd 1

OCTOBER 2010

21/09/2010 17:31

THE SKINNY 21


22 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010


Well Groomed Fever Ray

CLUBS

Deconstructing:

One of the golden boys (excuse the pun) of 2010, Essex beatsmith Gold Panda talks about sampling, Ghostly International and the best place to buy a keyboard interview: CHRIS DUNCAN

Karin Dreijer Andersson tells us about reinventing the Fever Ray live show, working with her brother and why she decided to go solo

photo: Annika aschberg

interview: CHRIS DUNCAN

Deep within Essex, Gold Panda spent the start of 2009 building an incredibly solid reputation as a talent to look out for in the remix stakes. His reworks of tracks by Little Boots, Telepathe, Bloc Party, Simian Mobile Disco, Health and The Field were met with great interest, as were three EPs of his original material – Miyamae, a 12” on Various, Quitters Raga, a 7” on Make Mine, and Before, a digital release which also received a 250 CD run on Puregroove. Live performances naturally followed, with an appearance at this year’s Stag & Dagger festival finding his material gain acceptance and new fans beyond the blogosphere. Gold Panda’s long awaited debut album Lucky Shiner emerges later this month, the hand-picked nuggets of a back catalogue of over one hundred tracks that Gold Panda has at his disposal, the majority of which have yet to see the light of day. He is a bedroom producer and frantic archiver of electronic music, this is what we know about him, but so much remains a mystery. Firstly, Gold Panda refuses to go by anything other than his stage alias, claiming that people wouldn’t believe his real name even if it were revealed. Secondly, what category does his music fall into? Tracks built up layer by layer from stolen vinyl samples and second hand instruments give each of Gold Panda’s songs a unique sound. Gold Panda himself doesn’t offer up much insight: when asked how he would describe his sound he simply says “I wouldn’t”. An easy response isn’t forthcoming then, instead the answer to the question might lie in the process of Gold Panda’s work, the equipment he uses and how he arrived at the creation of Lucky Shiner. “Pretty much all the samples [I use] come from old vinyl. I love the old crackle and the atmosphere it gives everything. I mainly use an Akai MPC to write all the sequences and have the files in Ableton. A lot of the time I just use the MPC2000xl alone, well not at the moment because I broke it. [I also use] Casio and Yamaha keyboards, cheap ones from eBay and a Roland

TR606 and 909. I started making music when I was about 15 and my uncle gave me an Akai sampler and an Atari with Cubase, then I started sampling my dad’s record collection.” Aside from the influences on his work, which Gold Panda cites as “loneliness, solitude, winter, rain, being upset, feeling worthless, drinking tea, eating cake and walking Daisy the dog,” the samples Gold Panda speaks about are the most obvious element of his music to focus on, as they consistently prove to be the foundations of his tracks. “My approach to finding samples is that pretty much anything goes as long as it isn’t completely obvious. I never sample from CDs or download wav files or anything like that. I grew up listening to hip-hop and sampling rules seemed quite strict and I liked that, I liked that you had to make an

Sam and Jeff from Ghostly International groomed me like a couple of paedos on Myspace. We put the You EP out to see how it went and took it from there

effort. If I want to use some drum machine sound then I’ll have to use the actual drum machine. Most of [the album] was made in two weeks in the countryside at Christmas while looking after my aunt and uncle’s dog while they were away.” Lucky Shiner’s release lands on Ghostly International, keeping esteemed company alongside artists such as Matthew Dear and Solvent. How did the signing to this highly respected label come about? “Sam and Jeff [of Ghostly International] groomed me like a couple of paedos on Myspace. We put the You EP out to see how it went and took it from there. It’s pretty strange because I remember having the Lusine remix CD, the Matthew Dear album and the first Dabrye release and thinking ‘I wish I could make music as good as that.’ Actually I was teaching English in Japan at that point wondering ‘what the fuck am I doing with my life?’. When Sam contacted me I was just thinking ‘Ah cool, they like it’, but I never thought they’d be putting my album out less than a year later.” What’s surprising about Gold Panda is not only his ability to quickly gather obscure samples and fashion them into well crafted tracks, but the fact that these tracks translate well when performed live, although he doesn’t appear to see what all the fuss is about. “It’s a nervous guy on stage with an MPC, a laptop and a loop pedal playing some tracks he made in his bedroom that were never intended to be performed live. It gets pretty noisy and pretty messy. I need to really spend some time on it at the end of this year but touring has been pretty relentless. I’m moving to Germany this winter so I’ll have another source of inspiration for some new tracks. Trying to follow up the album with another EP, hopefully some collaborations and stuff.”

Lucky Shiner is released on 11 Oct via Ghostly International www.ghostly.com

Identity and myth building plays a large part in Karin Dreijer Andersson’s work as an artist, whether she is alongside her brother Olof as one half of The Knife, or operating under the guise of her solo project Fever Ray. Karin’s manipulation of her voice when performing as Fever Ray – the costumes, the elaborate headgear, make-up, masks and disorientating onstage lighting – is this all an attempt to put something between herself and the listener, whether it is at one of her shows or on record? “I think music is a medium for trying out ideas so I don’t think of [how I fit] within it, I think of it more as a place where you can do anything. I’d rather investigate things that I don’t know so much about.” After suggesting that her performance at the Forum in London last year would be the last chance to see Fever Ray live, the decision to resurrect the wonderful live spectacle came as a pleasant surprise to many. But what sparked the decision and the new look? “We were having so much fun, it seemed too early to shut it down. Before tonight [in Glasgow] we had only done two shows this year, so we’re doing a few more. I work very closely with Andreas Nilsson, the artist who has been working with me on the live shows and videos, and we decided to take it further. We didn’t want to get stuck in a rut, we just wanted to continue experimenting with how the show can be experienced in different settings and what the live show is really all about.” What compelled her to temporarily abandon The Knife to go it alone as Fever Ray, and how do the two compare? “Both Olof and myself wanted to work on our own for a while, we’ve worked together for so long now. It’s a big difference, with The Knife I write very closely with my brother but with Fever Ray I am working by myself most of the time, sometimes working with three different producers but always writing on my own. For me there was no different agenda, both are free but they are two different ways of working.” Which brings us neatly to the inevitable question regarding future plans. Karin remains tight-lipped about whether the final date on this mini tour will actually be her last as Fever Ray, clearly learning from her mistake of speaking too soon previously. “Once I get home I’m going into the studio and writing music for a play called The Wolf Hour. I’m going to be working on a new Knife project too, which consists of improvisations for the time being.” feverray.com

October 2010

THE SKINNY 23


MUSIC

The Art of Shredding Hardcore and heavy metal were unusual bedfellows twenty years ago, but a certain Dallas outfit made it look effortless with Cowboys From Hell, the departure that winched Pantera out of spandex hell and put them on the road to becoming heavyweights. Twenty years later, frontman Phil Anselmo considers the lasting influence of the album and that of his old friend Dimebag interview: dave kerr

LEFT TO RIGHT: Rex Brown, Phil Anselmo, Vinnie Paul AND Dimebag Darrell

It’s the 20th anniversary of Cowboys From Hell and it’s no secret you’ve been estranged from Vinnie [Paul, Pantera drummer and brother of late guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott] for most of the last decade. Did this present an opportunity to work through your issues? No, Rex [Brown, bass] and I speak quite often but I have not talked with Vince. We work through this lovely young lady named Kim Zide Davis, she’s been with Pantera since [1992 album] Vulgar Display of Power. So we all mediate through her and it works fine, she does a great job. There are two new discs of material to this expanded edition of the album, including an unheard song, the original demos from the Cowboys sessions and a messy cover of Sweet Home Alabama. How did you feel about blowing the dust off that lot after all this time?   When the idea came about that they wanted to do the 20 year anniversary, I was like ‘sure, that’s great.’ Of course, the distributors and record company putting it out want more content. But speaking of that one track, it’s got early 1988 written all over it. That song didn’t even make Power Metal [Anselmo’s first album with Pantera, but the band’s third and last as a glam act] to tell you the truth, it just happened to be the one almost intact song that we had. I think there was another one but it wasn’t worth it. If you listen closely enough, there’s a certain riff that was later used in another song [This Love]. It’s a nice little nod though, to where Pantera would go next with Vulgar Display of Power… Sure, but figuring that the last song we wrote for Cowboys From Hell was Primal Concrete Sledge, that shows you more of where we were headed, mentally and musically. Is Cowboys an album you can listen back to and appreciate as a listener today? To be honest with you, when we were writing all that stuff – when I was there and living it – there’s no way I could deduce how people were going to take it. But when I look back at it today, stuff that I felt was really simple ended up being tricky. Stuff that I thought was pretty plain, regular or ho-hum is pretty spectacular. It’s an impressive listen. We get asked a lot about the production and whatnot – it being pretty high-end and tinny – and all I can say is I think at the time we were really trying to figure

24 THE SKINNY October 2010

out the best way to take the monstrous guitar sound that Darrell had and put it on a record. You have to understand, you young whippersnappers, back in the day when we did Cowboys From Hell, we recorded that fucker in 1989 – no pro-tools, no tricks or whistles. We had to really track that thing; production in itself was changing and I know Pantera with Terry Date [who would later oversee Soundgarden’s Badmotorfinger and Deftones’ White Pony] producing and Vinnie Paul knowing what he does – we as a band helped change the production of heavy metal records.

We were really trying to figure out the best way to take the monstrous guitar sound that Darrell had and put it on a record

Cowboys From Hell was – I would say – a launch pad in many respects – not the actual full figured out article yet but it was a great starting point. Few bands with Pantera’s intensity have managed to pull off a ballad in the middle of an otherwise aggressive record. Was this something you set out to do on Cowboys from the beginning, or was Cemetary Gates a bit of a happy accident? I think it’s a little bit of both. Take for instance

that unreleased track on the new Pantera rerelease, The Will to Survive – we knew that was more of a Judas Priest-ish power ballad type thing. But I think that yes, there was a conscious effort being made to – let me tell you straight – perhaps put something more palatable out for listeners with Cemetary Gates. But the way we wrote was so for real and things came in such a natural fashion that at the time it didn’t feel like ‘hey, we’d better jump on this ballad thing because we need one.’ It was just a riff that Dimebag wrote and if you think about it, the intro to the song is three minutes long with the acoustic part. That’s a six minute song. So fair enough, you can’t say this is a definite radio cut.  Cowboys from Hell is regarded as one of the definitive metal albums of all time, what’s yours? From my generation, British Steel by Judas Priest – such a harsh record for its time. We’re talking about the early 80s, man, and British Steel stood alone. There were also Iron Maiden moments, especially Killers – the Paul Di’Anno years – but also Number of the Beast; very, very influential record. When I say this I don’t want anyone to take me the wrong way, but for heavy metal, when I was a kid, Black Sabbath was a tremendous influence – everybody wanted to be like Black Sabbath. And I’ve got to say, Randy Rhoads did a hell of a lot for heavy metal guitar playing, so did Eddie Van Halen. They really bumped the guitar sound to a mainstream level. Just listen to Dimebag’s playing, he’s so Van Halen and Randy Rhoads, but then Dimebag could play a lot of different ways. Figuring Pantera’s such a guitar heavy band, I can’t leave those guys out. You’ve become best known for your various other projects – most notably Down – since Pantera’s split in 2003. Tell me about the new hardcore band you’re playing guitar with, Arson Anthem. Arson came out of pure boredom, man. Hurricane Katrina wiped us out and pretty much wiped out a lot of the music around New Orleans, Louisiana – the whole area. For so long it got crazy, I wasn’t in any specific band at that point in time. I’d just had major back surgery and I was fuckin’ itching. The story goes, Mike Williams – the singer from Eyehategod and a very good friend of mine – his house burned down in the riots following Katrina, so after the storm blew over he ended up staying in my apartment above the jam room,

which he still lives in. We just had this crazy idea, and Hank [Williams III, Superjoint Ritual] offered to play drums, Collin [Yeo, Ponykiller] offered to play bass and we just said let’s see what’ll happen. Hank, when I first met him, was a 15 year old kid drummer in a band. Sure enough he grew and started doing his country thing, and then he did the Superjoint thing with us, playing bass. But little did I know how great a drummer he really was, and let me tell you, the new Arson Anthem full-length is coming out soon. It’s really brutal, man. The EP was meant to be hideously raw, we meant it to be hideously loud, so everything you’re hearing is purposeful. But the new one makes that looks like child’s play, which it is in all reality. Are there any plans to tour? Honestly, if it were up to me I’d love to do it. But it’s a side band as far as Hank the Third goes, and everybody else has another primary band. In my book, I think this record is so fucking good that it deserves to be toured on. The only thing I can tell you is that Hank has agreed to do some shows in the next few months, but that doesn’t promise many. We’ll see how the popularity of the record goes. I’d love to come overseas with Arson Anthem.

Cowboys From Hell Ultimate Edition is available via Rhino on 22 Nov Diary of a Mad Band by Down is available via Koch on 4 Oct Insecurity Notoriety by Arson Anthem is available via Anselmo’s own Housecore Records on 11 Oct www.pantera.com

Mouth For War Phil Anselmo's three point plan to unearthing the roots of hardcore Agnostic Front – Victim in Pain (1984) I was 15 years old when Motörhead came through town and played a show in New Orleans. It was Hallows Eve and they had Agnostic Front opening up. They ripped a fuckin hole through the world that night, changed my life forever. Black Flag – My War (1994) At first, when I was younger it was all about the songs My War and Beat My Head Against the Wall, and I Love You – they were anthems to me. But then, you know how you revisit a record later on, there are some droning tunes, Nothing Left Inside, Scream. This is a brooding, dark album. Discharge – Hear Nothing See Nothing Say Nothing (1982) This is when thrash was making its movement and everyone was saying how extreme it was. You can go back to this record and the guitar still sounds like a chainsaw. There are two or three lines of lyrics that are – once again – very anthemic. It was just a blast to the senses. 


READING

The War After The War Dougie’s War is a new graphic novel written by Rodge Glass (who I’m frankly getting sick of interviewing) and illustrated by Dave Turbitt (who’s a nice guy).The book focuses on a particular issue, and a very serious one; that of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, suffered by ex-soldiers interview: Keir Hind

WORLD FOLK

Series 2010

The title is a reference to the classic comic Charley’s War, a surprisingly well-written comic story by Pat Mills that started in the late seventies, but was about a soldier in the First World War. However, this is a contemporary tale, focusing on Afganistan Veteran Dougie Campbell, home from the warzone but still haunted by his experiences there. Rodge tells me “the core of the story that I kept hearing again and again was ‘we don’t have a voice’. It’s very difficult to settle back into civilian society, very difficult to feel like you’re being remembered or appreciated and it’s tough to be able to deal with having been, as one of the interviewees said, turned into a killing machine and then expected to go to Tesco’s.” It’s a serious piece, and in keeping with that, the book also includes important bonus material, such as interviews with veterans, photographs specially taken from Afghanistan, and even some contacts for veterans who would like assistance. At its core though, Dougie’s War is the tale of a specific man. Dougie Campbell is fictional, but his story is drawn from various real-life sources. Dave Turbitt says, “The thing that I wanted to draw when I started this project, and yes there were the big war scenes and explosions, but the important thing was about trying to get the people across, the characters of the leads.” And though it’s set in modern times, it’s sad to note that, as Glass says, “We’re talking about a number of conflicts over a long period of time, including all the interviews that deal with people who’ve had experiences in very, very different conflicts over many, many decades.” Turning this into a story was a challenge, but Glass found he could “find a thread that was really common in the interviews I did with lots and lots of guys, regardless of the conflicts they’d been in.” This didn’t just extend to experiences of PTSD, but also to the reasons people joined up. “A lot of what we came up against both in interviewing much older guys who are veterans, and also people who’d left really quite recently,” Glass says, “was that a significant number of them felt like they didn’t have many other opportunities. Now I’m not saying people shouldn’t join up, but I’m saying that any decision

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of that scale that you make has to be because you want to go towards something, not because you want to run away. It’s no coincidence that many of the places that have large recruiting numbers are pretty deprived areas.” Despite the author’s views on this issue, the book isn’t judgemental about the War in Afghanistan itself. It avoids preaching (for either war or peace) to look at a specific human problem, and how it affects Dougie Campbell. Dave Turbitt lives in London, and Rodge Glass in Glasgow, so their working relationship was a modern one, benefiting greatly from technology. Turbitt is originally from Glasgow, but when down south he found Google Street View invaluable. “Although I remember what [for example] Buchanan Street Bus Station looks like, actually knowing for real, I needed the details. As a reference it’s brilliant, and I got loads of stuff that way.” And other modern technology helped too. “I was also working a lot with my camera phone,” Turbitt says, “taking pictures of the sketches I’d done, sending it through to Rodge, saying ‘What about this for Dougie, what about this for his sister?’ and getting a reaction that way. And so it was a very invaluable part of the tool kit.” As far as the human aspect of collaboration goes, it seems like as smooth a collaboration as can have been expected. “Dave and I have a lot in common,” says Glass, “we’re both quite frantic, we both anguish over the tiniest little details, but are both incredibly enthusiastic about absolutely everything.” Despite the serious nature of the book, the artist and the writer seem to have enjoyed working together, which in turn benefited the project as a whole. Or as Turbitt says, “Working with Rodge is sometimes a bit of a challenge to find where we actually agree on a topic. Sometimes the things I think up aren’t what Rodge had in mind, and part of the fun of putting Dougie’s War together was that we had to go through a lot of things like that, and we ended up with, I think, a really good book in the end.” Judge for yourselves. Dougie’s War is out now. Published by Freight. Cover price £14.95 www.dougieswar.com

Edinburgh University Students’ Association

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Presented in association with

The Songs of Nick Drake Saturday 16 October 7.30pm

Thursday 30 September

Monday 25th October

TERRY CALLIER

KODO DRUMMERS

MICHAEL MCGOLDRICK AND FRIENDS

Thursday 7th October

Doors:7.30pm £22.50

Saturday 23 October 7.30pm

KATHRYN TICKELL BAND

SALSA CELTICA

Friday 8th October

15th Anniversary Tour with Julie Fowlis & Guests Saturday 6 November 8pm

HUGH MASEKELA

Doors:7.30pm £14

Doors:7.30pm £12

Thursday 28th October

NUS D is On All counts E Buy O vents! nli Phone ne or Now!

MAMANE BARKA Doors:7.30pm £10

AN AUDIENCE WITH HOWARD MARKS

Thursday 4th November

Saturday 23rd October

Wednesday 17th November

ROB DEERING

DAN ANTOPOLSKI

Begins 8pm £10

Begins 8pm £10

BRIAN KENNEDY Doors:7.30pm £18.50

Begins 8pm £10

Thursday 18th November

MARTIN CARTHY

& The Mahotella Queens Sunday 14 November 7.30pm

Doors:7.30pm £12.50

AFROCUBISM

Thursday 2 December 7.30pm Pleasance Theatre, 60 Pleasance, Edinburgh, EH8 9TJ

www.usherhall.co.uk

Ticket Scotland: www.tickets-scotland.com / 0131 220 3234 In Person: Tickets Scotland, 127 Rose St, Edinburgh, EH2 3DT Ticketline:

www.ticketline.co.uk / 0845 2 500 500

October 2010

THE SKINNY 25


PERFORM

GLASGAY!

Edinburgh may get all the attention in August, but Glasgow takes the spotlight every autumn. The Glasgay! festival has come a long way since its inception in 1993, and nowadays covers a full month of events from midOctober to mid-November. This year's diverse programme of art, film, performance, clubbing, and more besides, takes the annual celebration of queer culture to new heights Seeming to follow a highly idiosyncratic path, often ignoring other West Coast trends, Glasgay! has consistently supported the younger generation of Scottish artists, and connected with established companies for a programme that is the envy of larger festivals. Both Drew Taylor and Wendy Millar have received ongoing support: after last year’s Even In Another Time (a trilogy of witty and trenchant sketches), Millar returns with The Bridge, a look at the difficult transition into adulthood. Cryptic, another veteran company, offer an adaptation of Orlando, Virginia Woolf’s gender-switching saga of an immortal being’s search for life and a lover. This year, the focus on local artists has increased: James Ley’s UP makes a welcome return to grapple with issues of sexuality and psychiatry, and the author of last year’s Maw Broon Monologues, Jackie Kay, comes back with a reading from her memoires, accompanied by vocalist Suzanne Bonnar. Cabaret arrives courtesy of Gram Cumming – his Head Over Heels combines comedy, drag and musical theatre, while spoken word outfit Confab offer Gracie Flair, and guests, getting political and poetical. Another distinctive characteristic of Glasgay! is its consistent attempt to go beyond simple categories: as in past years, it presents events for a variety of ages, and across the spectrum of performance. Even the King’s Theatre gets involved, with the Glee-inspired Don’t Stop Believing and another visit from The Rocky Horror Show. Despite a clear commitment to queer politics and work, Glasgay! is never exclusive: while it is unlikely that anyone would follow the entire performance programme, there is consciously something for everyone: how much of the King’s audience even realises that the November events are part of a radical queer celebration?[Margaret Kirk] Glasgay! Across Glasgow, 14 Oct - 13 Nov www.glasgay.com

PREVIEW Chromotherapy @ THE ARCHES A word from Drew Taylor, poet and theatre maker presenting Chromotherapy as part of Glasgay! I reckon poetry is as viable as any other type of theatre – when done properly. Construction, intention and delivery of a poem, or literary brain spew as I like to call it, can be just as affecting and moving as a song from a music theatre show or a heart-wrenching scene from the best playwright. How do I know this? I’ve seen it. As an avid fan of poetic artists like Polar Bear, Laura Dockerill and Taylor Mac, spoken word that hits you right in the heart IS possible, leaving audiences wonderfully entertained and emotionally challenged. My new piece Chromotherapy aims to do the same. It’s an exploration of colour: its social construction, its variety, importance and most importantly how it makes us feel. With my theory in mind, I wanted to really connect with my audience, so each night an off-cuff poem dedicated to one audience member interviewed prior to performance will be delivered. Together we’ll look at everything colour from grey hair, colour coding in concentration camps, colours for boys and girls, eye colour and of course, 'getting your colours done'. [Drew Taylor] The Arches, 20-23 Oct, 7.30pm, £8.50 www.glasgay.com

26 THE SKINNY October 2010

Glasgay! Film

Find out what's in store as part of Glasgay!'s film programme this October Glasgay! returns this autumn to queer your silver screens once more, with an ever varied and transgressive look at LGBT identity and film, accompanied by a series of investigative Queers & Answers talks to digest and debate the issues raised. Starting out strong, or with a strong stomach anyway, this year’s film strand opens with John Waters’ infamous cult classic Pink Flamingos (15 Oct, Glasgow Film Theatre). Starring the notorious Divine as Babs Johnson, one lady hell bent on defending her title as ‘the filthiest woman in the world’. It’s the ultimate in anarchic and comic gross out.

Drew taylor Pink Flamingos

REVIEW Bette/Cavett @ TRON

rrrr Poor old Bette Davis has had her fair share of impersonators over the years but Grant Smeaton’s production takes imitation to a whole new level in this bizarre note-for-note recreation of her appearance on the Dick Cavett show in 1971. With a staggering performance that uncannily inhabits the theatrical spirit of great dame, he captures Bette’s every twitch, cadence and throwaway line with an unnerving authenticity. The show is a kind of three dimensional YouTube, bringing aged fuzzy video images to life complete with advertising breaks, obligatory presenter sideburns and bleachy 70s colour schemes. Each section is book-ended with hilarious real adverts from a time when health conscious country clubbers smoked Salem fags, Ayds was a slimming biscuit and Coke taught the world to sing in perfect harmony. Gordon Munro gives a sparkling performance as the unctuous Cavett, teasing and cajoling his guest to bigger revelations. But it’s Bette who dominates proceedings. Ably assuming the mantle of the best chat show guests she regales us with a storm of home-spun wisdom, diva-esque grumbles and high wire anecdotes. And Smeaton delights in underscoring her fake sincerity and occasional unintended candour as she heartily trashes her former Hollywood employers and changing social structures. Although it’s an acting tour de force, chat-show recreation can be an unsettling spectator sport. Since it’s a verbatim transcript of real event, the dramatic peaks and troughs sometimes fall in the wrong places and the embarrassing spaces that mark real conversations can make a theatre audience slightly uneasy. But the actors brazen it out, forcing us to live through the show as it actually happened – with some of the crowd getting so engrossed they forget they’re watching a play and started answering Bette back.

Bette/Cavett is an exhilarating and enjoyable experience  but it doesn’t reveal so much about Miss Davis: she’s plainly hamming it up for the cameras. The performances are terrific, however, and if this real-life recreation lark is the birth of a new genre maybe we’ll soon see Billy Connolly on Parky or Grace Jones whacking Russell Harty again.[Malcolm McGonigle] Part of Glasgay! Tron, 9- 13 Nov, 7.30pm, £12 www.glasgay.co.uk

Stonewall Uprising (22 Oct, CCA) documents the events leading up to the Stonewall riots in 1969, when the gay community in New York’s Greenwich Village spontaneously resolved to make an impassioned stand against a corrupt and violently homophobic police force when faced with a routine raid of the Stonewall gay bar. Along similar lines, City of Borders (23 Oct, CCA) is a testament to the fearlessness of contemporary Jerusalem’s only gay bar and its patrons, existing in spite of daily religious and social intolerance.

Prayers for bobby

Other films in the programme also tackle daily struggles and sacrifice, Edie & Thea: A Very Long Engagement (Oct, Glasgow Women’s Library) is a documentary about a New York lesbian couple who have waited a lifetime to get married. Look out too for Prayers for Bobby (24 Oct, GFT) starring Sigourney Weaver as a Christian who rethinks her homophobia following her gay son’s tragic suicide. The screening will be followed by a talk and Q&A in association with The Metropolitan Community Church Scotland. [Rachel Bowles] www.glasgay.co.uk/events/genre/Film

Glasgay! runs from 14 Oct - 13 Nov. For the full events listing visit www.glasgay.co.uk


ART

Ghost In The Machine

Robin Thomson takes us to the afterlife in his first ever solo show at Dundee's Generator Projects this month interview: Andrew Cattanach

You can listen to the first ever audio recording of the human voice on Wikipedia. Lasting around 20 seconds, it’s thought to be the voice of a man singing a line from the French folk song Au Clair de la Lune recorded on 9 April 1860 on a device called a phonautograph. Hauntingly sombre, the sung notes form a textured whole with the accompanying crackle of white noise; and as with vinyl records, the musical content is barely distinguishable from the methods used to reproduce it. Unlike our reified digital age, here the medium refuses to be mute. Never intended to be heard, the original recording is a graphic representation: the reverberations of the voice marked out on a roll of paper to help decipher the frequency of pitch. New technology, however, has allowed scientists to translate the marks into sound, giving us the chance to hear the 150 year old recording for the first time. Robin Thomson takes these early graphical representations of the human voice as a starting point for his forthcoming show at Generator Projects. He looks to “explore the representation of the human voice in a visual landscape, and to explore the boundaries of its (im)material nature”. The central piece, By the Light of the Moon, a large scale video installation, will be “a sort of meditation on the first recording device, the phonograph, by Thomas Edison,” Thomson reveals. It will be a neurotic retelling of the technological developments of the past 150 years – “It’s like a road trip, taking you from the beginning of the voice.” The video promises to be a suitably eccentric journey through the history of recording media, with intersecting narratives and overlapping characters. Once-disembodied voices are given a corporeal presence and ghostly figures haunt the machinery that brings them once more to life. “My projections are beaming false channels,” he discloses. “Imagine the Ghostbusters crashing the Discovery Channel. In the background a Thomas Edison mix-tape soundtrack blasted backwards through a megaphone.”

Central to the show is the somewhat fantastical notion that the voice has an afterlife, that it is in some way preserved in a spirit world, its tuneful lamentations only conveyed through specific media. “Once the voice is recorded then that’s it preserved forever,” Thomson explains. “That got me thinking about how things are stored and brought back to life” Drawing on concerns he has held since graduating from Duncan and Jordanstone in 2008, Thomson has always “been interested in miscommunication and also studying language as a visual medium. Not like concrete poetry or anything, more like a material thing.” He describes his current video project where he has recorded a number of individual screaming voices and played each through a loudspeaker that is then thrown from a high window “so the speaker falls and the scream falls until it smashes at the bottom. It’ll be like treating sound as a sculpture.” Currently living and working in Berlin, this is Thomson’s first ever solo exhibition, and sees the young artist return to Dundee for the duration of a one month residency. Taking time out of his busy lifestyle as the main social media PR for the musician Peaches, he explains how “it’s good to come back here and concentrate on things.” The first solo show Generator has hosted in some while, the gallery will be transformed by the saturation of Thomson’s video and sculptural works. With projections on screens, walls and floor, as well as multiple monitors, the two galleries will become the very afterlife of recorded media; the voices of long departed individuals given material credence once more. Robin Thomson returns to Dundee, but he has not come alone.  By the Light of the Moon runs from 25 Sep - 24 Oct Thu - Sun 12-5pm Generator Projects, 2526 Mid Wynd Industrial Estate, Dundee www.generatorprojects.co.uk

The savagery of war. The power of love... TRON THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS

BY ABIGAIL DOCHERTY

WINNER OF THE OPEN.STAGE PLAYWRITING COMPETITION 2010

THU 7- SAT 23 OCTOBER TICKETS 0141 552 4267 www.tron.co.uk October 2010

THE SKINNY 27


28 THE SKINNY October 2010


TRAVEL

Journeys in Kurdistan

I had been in Iran for three weeks, where, after talking to another backpacker, I was convinced to travel through Iraqi Kurdistan. There are a few vibrant young cities there, however most of the sights lie just outside the Kurdish Autonomous Region, near Mosul and Kirkuk. The exception is Lalish: the home, pilgrimage site and sanctuary for the Yazidi religion and people. The Yazidi religion holds that the Peacock angel, Taus Malak, descended to Earth at Lalish, after the world had been left in his charge by God. The Yazidi faithful have suffered frequent and severe persecution at the hands of the Muslims of the region, as they believe that Taus Malak was told to submit to Adam after God created him. Taus Malak refused, saying that Adam was born from dust, while he was born from the luminance of God’s own breath. God forgave the Peacock angel for his refusal and placed the world and all in it in his care. The comparison to the figure of the prideful and punished Satan in the Abrahamic religions is obvious and for this reason the Yazidis have long been unfairly labelled as devil-worshippers. I was travelling with some Erasmus students. We flagged down a few pickup trucks and, checking for the Kurdish flags that meant we weren’t veering towards Mosul, made our way to near Lalish by nightfall. We caught the final part of the trip with three young guys, who drove us to the shrine and sanctuary complex. Lalish offers a place to stay for any returning Yazidi, but not for a bunch of smelly backpackers pitching up in the middle for the night. Without hesitation, the three young guys, Jamal, Dian and Fahrad, took the six of us to Dian’s house. After a polite but brief welcome from the women of the family we were shown into a living room. The men of the family then proceeded to give us beer, cigarettes and fruit. It was typical hospitality from that part of the world, but that made it no less special. The evening passed with great cheers as Dian introduced us to all his kids (4 at 22 years

old!) and we bellowed with laughter, trying to hide any grave concerns, as he encouraged his baffled toddler son, of whom he was clearly proud, to drink some of his beer, while WWE played on the TV in the corner. Around 7 April, 2007, a young Yazidi woman named Du’a Khalil Aswad was beaten to death by men from her town, one in a long line of honour killings in the area. What was the heinous act for which they had to exact revenge to reclaim their honour? She fell in love with a Muslim boy. This happened in Beshika, a Kurdish speaking village outside of the Kurdish Autonomous Region, not far from the town of Shekhan, the town on the outskirts of Lalish where I was now sitting. This led to a long string of attacks against the Yazidis through the summer of 2007, during which almost 800 Yazidis were killed. I asked Farhad about this with some sympathy, but he immediately became slightly defensive. He maintained that they (the Yazidis) didn’t know who did it despite video footage of the crime being captured on a mobile phone and distributed across the internet. He told me that they felt embattled; there was no feeling of security in this area and town. No matter how many good, Muslim friends each individual Yazidi might have (and Jamal, the third young man there, was one of them, although he was out of the room at this point, allowing Farhad to be frank) there was just pure distrust and fear between the communities. The Yazidi supreme religious head, the Baba Sheikh, informed us that we were welcome in his house. We wanted to know what the most important lesson of the Yazidi faith was. This prompted a long explanation from the Baba Sheikh and his son, mirroring Farhad’s from the day before that they were constantly under siege. They didn’t know when or if peace would ever come. They felt threatened because they were so few and the Muslims so many. I understood why they

In the first dispatch from out new travel section a traveller in the Middle East is confronted by some unanswerable questions regarding 'honour' killings words & Photography: Ally McLeod

felt the need to talk about their siege mentality, but I wanted to move away from this and learn about their religion. I didn’t want to interrupt a people venting their frustration and fear to a neutral third party, but this could have been my only chance to learn about a religion from its leaders. I pressed the question again and finally from the Baba Sheikh came the answer. Peace. Peace is the most important thing to them. No side is ever blameless in any squabble, feud, crusade or war. However, it was difficult not to be moved by their preoccupation with peace. Violence comes in bursts, but when it does, whole percentage points of their population dies. More than their sorrow, their lack of answers or solutions was the most disheartening. “But what can we do? They are so many and we are so few.” We left the Baba Sheikh with handshakes and kisses on the cheek. We were told that we would always be welcome in his house. It was the same kind of hospitality that you can find in many places in the Middle East, but it seemed that these people could do with, and were deserving of, all the friends they could find. I am embarrassed to admit it but my only awareness of Du’a Khalil Aswad’s killing was as part of a general awareness of how bad things were in Iraq, and the honour killings in particular. My only exact knowledge of this sequence of carnage came from a box in the Middle East Lonely Planet. However, the article was purposefully vague and I was left with the impression that Muslims were responsible for the killing and the subsequent attacks. It was only after later research that Farad’s reluctance to talk about it made more sense. The Yazidis themselves were responsible for the killing of Aswad. Various motives have been offered: the simple act of falling in love with a Muslim; she was going to convert to Islam to marry the boy (the rumour of which led to the reprisals); she had spent a night away from her house. Whatever the explanation

(and it seems a poor mockery of that word to try and apply it to this situation) a thousand to two thousand Yazidi men gathered and supported 8 or 9 men who beat the seventeen year old girl for thirty minutes before finally caving in her head with a concrete block. The Yazidi community in Kurdistan is so close and insular. Did the three young men who had welcomed me into their home know the men who were there on that horrible day? Had the leaders of the faith that I met at the Baba Sheikh’s house condoned or disregarded the attack in the wake of the reprisals, the venerable men who had so sorrowfully proclaimed their persecution and desire for peace? Did I shake hands and share tea with anybody who had been there? I’ve lived a life happily lacking in violence, but I come from a family with a long military history. I’ve spent time with men and women who I know have killed. This felt different. This wasn’t just murder, this was a lynch mob. I can’t help but hope and doubt that the family I stayed with had anything to do with it; it absolutely does not taint the hospitality and friendship that was offered and received in any way. I think I was just mistaken to give affection or sympathy to one group or another when travelling. Is it an act of cowardice to keep neutrality? Or is it a part of keeping the open mind that is crucial to travelling? No side is ever blameless, I still believe that. But in the Middle East, the cradle of civilisation, the origin of any enmity is almost timeless. Every tribe has its turn, bad bastards are conquered by worse bastards and to stand in the middle of such a hornets’ nest of history and say “They’re right and you get what you deserve” is foolish and arrogant and will exclude you from much that the area has to give. I won’t forget the men and the family that offered us help, hospitality and friendship. And I won’t forget Du’a Khalil Aswad.

October 2010

THE SKINNY 29


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

BRUGAL COMES TO EDINBURGH Candy Bar, Edinburgh give a cocktail masterclass

Just the thing to cheer you up as the weather turns cold, Brugal, the best loved rum in the Caribbean, is bringing a little of its tropical homeland, over to Scotland this month. The Dominican Republic's thriving and vibrant street art culture is the inspiration for a live art event under Edinburgh Castle. Involving artists from Edinburgh and further afield, you can watch artwork be created before your very eyes over 15 and 16 October when a giant paintbox will be adorned with the mixed visual influences of the Caribean and Scotland. Be sure to check it out on Castle St. Also, keep an eye out for the 'pimp your shirt' workshops in selected bars across Edinburgh throughout the month where you will get a chance to dabble with your own tee designs. To find out more about what’s happening, and to watch our artists in action, please look for Brugal Pimped My City on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @BrugalUK. For more information on Brugal rum visit www.brugal-rum.com.

BRUGAL SANTO LIBRE INGREDIENTS

• 1 shot Brugal Aňejo Golden Rum • 1 lime wedge • Top with lemonade  

METHOD

• Pour all ingredients over cubed ice in a tall glass starting with lime wedge, light stir, top up with fresh cubed ice if needed • Garnish with lime

Photography: David Anderson

BRUGAL GOLDEN MOJITO

BRUGAL TROPICAL STORM INGREDIENTS

• • • • •  

2 dashes of Angostura Bitters 1 wedge fresh lime/squeezed 1 shot of Brugal Aňejo Golden Rum 1 shot of Bols Triple Sec Top with ginger beer

METHOD

• Pour all ingredients over cubed ice in a tall glass starting with lime juice • Stir • Top up with fresh cubed ice if needed • Garnish with lime

INGREDIENTS

• 2 shots Brugal Aňejo Golden Rum • 3 fresh squeezed lime wedges • ½ shot gomme (sugar) syrup • 8-10 fresh mint leaves • Splash of ginger ale   Alternatively use Brugal Extra Viejo for a spicy Golden Mojito  

METHOD

• Clap mint and drop in empty tall glass • Add all other ingredients except ginger ale and gently muddle • Add ½ glass of crushed ice and churn well to infuse flavours   • Top with fresh crushed ice and ginger ale • Garnish with a fresh sprig of mint and two straws

30 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010

Recently launched in the UK, Brugal is the Dominican Republic’s number one selling rum and is the only rum distilled, matured and bottled on the island. The Brugal family has managed the brand for five generations, and this tradition continues today, currently headed up by Franklin Brugal.


TRAVEL

GO AWAY! – TO BLAIR CASTLE

Each month we take a closer look at a Scottish location to help inspire your forays into the magical worlds of daytripping and mini breaks WORDS: PAUL MITCHELL

Where? Blair Castle, near the Perthshire village of Blair Atholl. What? A 13th Century castle with an ornate walled garden, located on an estate of 145,000 acres – which includes Britain’s second-tallest tree (a 200 foot Grand Fir). Why? Britain’s second-tallest tree not good enough? Try the scenery for starters. The Perthshire Highlands dominate the landscape and specially marked 40-mile trails are ideal for walking, cycling, organised pony treks, Land Rover safaris and tractor tours. Adventure sports are also catered for. Accomodation options include camping, a five star caravan park or the newly installed and

extremely comfortable woodland lodges. There’s a restaurant in the castle, and the friendly nearby village has ample shops and pubs. There are organised daily tours, spooky Halloween events, piping and fiddling competitions and Victorian banquets during November and December as a festive makeover turns it into the ‘Christmas Castle’. How? Blair Castle is just off the main A9 road at Blair Atholl in Highland Perthshire between Perth and Inverness, about a 90 minute drive from Edinburgh or Glasgow. There is a train station in Blair Atholl about a kilometre from the castle, with a regular daily connecting service with all the major Scottish cities.

SAMHUINN SHENANIGANS

Sauchiehall Street (ahaha) and go see the Glasgow Zombie Walk 2010! Details will be confirmed at www.glasgowzombiewalk.co.uk/ There are officially 3.2 million (probably) spookily-themed events to choose from all over Scotland on Halloween weekend. Dundee’s Doghouse (www.myspace.com/ dundeedoghouse) has fancy dress parties on 30 and 31, with the Saturday night event entitled Halloween Burlesque, 1930s style. That really does sound scary. Glasgow’s Stereo (www. stereocafebar.com/) hosts the Fence Records Halloween Party from 2pm. Not much word on line-up or cost yet, but we hear Silver Columns are a definite starter. We’ve met those guys, and they freak the shit out of us! And nobody celebrates a Death Weekend like the Roxy Art House (www. roxyarthouse.org) with macabre manifestations of various artforms, from cult film to wild parties, experimental literature to live art, oh and another zombie parade. Most events are free, none cost over a fiver. Get dying! [Paul Mitchell]

Our pick of haunting events happening throughout Scotland in October There are those at The Skinny (not the Fashion Ed it must be said) who long for the return of the tunic as everyday wear for all and sundry. Until that day arrives, we’ll be taking the opportunity to don one at Spooks & Sacrifice at the Celtic Samhain Festival, where we shouldn’t look out of place. The setting is The Scottish Crannog [ancient loch-dwelling huts] Centre, Kenmore, Loch Tay. Halloween was pretty much invented by the Iron Age Celts who lived in these abodes, so you can go all ‘authentic’ and join a torchlit procession through loch-side woods or burn a (wicker) ram in ceremonial sacrifice. Bring a lantern, and a tunic, then wear it to work next morning. Dare ya! Adults £6.50 Children (age 4-16) £4.00 Tel. 01887 830583 www.crannog.co.uk Generally sporting considerably less than, well, any garment really, the Edinburgh Beltane Fire Society present the Samhuinn Festival showing us that Pagans really do have more fun as they take to the Royal Mile for the all-dancing, all blazing showdown between the Winter and Summer Kings. The event starts from 9pm and is free. Are we going to see the Summer King win FOR A FUCKING CHANGE??? www.beltane.org The updated ‘Hollywood’ take on such parades takes place over the road in Glasgow. Watch mindless, reanimated corpses shuffle along aimlessly sporting grotesque make up – then leave

SEE WWW.ATHOLL-ESTATES.CO.UK FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

OCTOBER 2010

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FASHION

London Fashion Week: Trend Report WORDS: EMMA SEGAL

introduction: alexandra fiddes

ILLUSTRATIONS: DAVID LEMM

Forget about the darkening of the nights, forget about the cooling of the breeze, and forget about Autumn’s imminent arrival, if only for a little while… In September, all eyes were on London for Fashion Week, where more than 80 design houses showcased their Spring/Summer 2011 design offerings to press, buyers and fashion fans from around the world. So ignore the shops full of Autumn/Winter 2010 col-

Louise Gray

32 THE SKINNY October 2010

lections bursting with cosy layers and heavy knits for the moment (block out the inner turmoil about whether or not the heating should be turned on) and join us in a daydream about next Spring...

The excitement surrounding the Spring/Summer 2011 shows was palpable and the season’s work turned out to be far more ambitious and adventurous than those that had come before; perhaps the promised emergence of the UK from recession has sparked a renewed vigour in the industry? The result was that, far from predictable pastels and florals, this season’s collections have embraced the need for a change, producing some very exciting work indeed. Several key trends stood out amongst the S/ S11 shows. The first of these was a clever new take on colour blocking, where the main base colour of choice was tan and nude or for others (such as Nicole Farhi) midnight blues and sea greens. These base colours were then accented with neon hues, which, when done successfully, produced striking effects. Many designers seemed to be using lime, a staple colour carried forward from last springsummer, in addition to the colour of the season, canary yellow. Christopher Kane took the neon trend even further, using laser-cut leather to jazz up his neon outfits. Others such as Maria Grachvogel and Emilio de la Morena showed infinitely more wearable ways of following the trend, Grachvogel with a canary yellow silk top tucked into nude,

Topshop UNIQUE

HOUSE OF Holland

high waisted trousers and de la Morena by using triangular patchwork like colour flashes. Despite the 80s connotations associated with neon, it was arguably the 70s which proved most inspirational for the coming season. This trend was most evident in the presentation of high waisted shorts, as well as flared, paper bag waisted trousers and full length jumpsuits (which was certainly amplified by some catwalk song choices like 70s hits by Donna Summer and Barry White). The result was that the overall silhouette remained largely streamlined but relaxed, possibly also as a reaction against the excessive volume and sculpturing of 40s inspired A/W10. Focus turned to the embellishment of the garments where various finishings and trimmings were added in abundance. In addition to the use of metallic yarn and threads, designers were using everything from Perspex to fur, studs to sequins and crystals to cut outs. Many of these were seen in the collection by Sass and Bide. Through these individual design details, pieces with a naturally luxe feel were able to gain a more rock ‘n’ roll edge.

emilio de la morena


k: Spring/Summer 2011 Pleating and fringing were key techniques in the collections also giving a 70s edge. Topshop Unique (impressively the only high street chain to show at LFW) demonstrated how to do wearable fringing, with the technique mostly being used on accessories or on the hems of wine red dresses. At House of Holland, the 70s-Xanadu feel was felt very strongly (Henry cited Xanadu as his main influence), with dresses made up almost entirely of long neon blue fringing, alongside glittering stars, and metallic palm patterns through the fabric. A particular note of interest at this show were the accessories; oversized round fur earrings, cuffs and belts, which were part Elmo of Sesame Street, part Hoxton chic. Here, billowing pleats flowed from the shoulders, elsewhere the pleating technique was implemented in midi-length skirts. The second major key trend was the chain-mail technique. It was literally everywhere and very much determined the tone of spring-summer 2011’s knitwear. Craig Lawrence’s mermaid inspired collection consisted of intricately knitted chain-mail dresses with (more) metallic yarns

Topshop UNIQUE

which were juxtaposed with murky sea greens and blues. Overall knitwear had a thin, featherlight feel, perfect for layering and exposing the layers underneath for a subtly sexy look. This ‘peek-a-boo’ approach was also carried through in Richard Nicoll’s show, and offered a welcome break from the overt sexiness of skin tight, body-con looks which have been so prevalent in recent seasons. Jewellery shown at the NEWGEN exhibition also reflected this trend with work from designers such as Fannie Schiavoni. Interestingly, multi-fabrication and ‘pieced together’ clothing seemed to become a microtrend gaining momentum fast, with more established designers taking their cues from fashion’s newest superstar, Michael Van Der Ham. Many, including Louise Gray, seemed to be influenced by his signature technique, allowing them to weave several influences together into one garment. This multi-influence approach is one which industry trend predictors argue we will see more of in the next few seasons. Gray’s collection was particularly inspirational and thought provoking. Whilst some might argue that this technique results in schizophrenic clothing lacking in focus, for Gray it instead resulted in polished and exciting pieces. Michael Van Der Ham’s show itself highlighted that he is not running out of ideas either, quashing fears that his collections were becoming repetitive. In fact, his choice of colours (midnight blues clashing with lilacs and canary yellows) showed that Michael has grown as a designer; the collection overall seemed very sophisticated and easily wearable. Another trend which seemed very prominent was the use of laser print techniques. Mary Katrantzou created an impeccable collection in her signature futuristic prints of stunning snapshots of room interiors, but this was not the only place to witness the technique done well. Hot duos Falguni and Peacock and Basso and Brooke both utilised the technique to great effect. The prints looked almost sculptural and architectural and used handwritten notes by Da Vinci, Tolstoy and Balzac, which worked well against the relatively softly sleek silhouettes. The staying power of this trend is particularly exciting news for those who normally find summer too safe. Most designers took note of the fact that florals have been done to death, and those that did use florals used them in the context of the other trends. Whilst laser print techniques may be difficult to replicate successfully on the high street, the designers seemed to offer plenty of interpretations of the technique to choose from. These ranged from the more avant garde at Mary Katrantzou with room interior snapshots, to an adorable white shift-dress accented subtly with stripes of print at Basso and Brooke. Overall, it seems that summer 2011 is going to take an exciting step into the future, with some references to the past present in the 70s influences. The increasing presence of both multi-fabrication and laser print techniques is symbolic of an interesting change in the industry, with the more established houses and designers taking cues from up-and-coming, new designers. The overall silhouettes suggest a return to a simple, sleek and luxe look which will appeal to most, whilst the embellishing and use of interesting accessories will also allow the rock ‘n’ roll inclined to keep expressing themselves (one would only need to look at Maria Francesca Pepe’s show to find evidence of that). Finally, the return to a more muted, subtle sexiness as opposed to the overt sexiness of previous seasons is one which should be welcomed (if only because it means we might be able to indulge in some more barbeque food!). This truly felt like a season everyone could enjoy, get excited about and, ultimately, wear.

Sass and bide

Michael Van Der ham

Basso and Brooke

Mary Katrantzou

October 2010

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SHOWCASE

THE PHANTOM BAND CURATE:

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Glasgow based artist Conal McStravick works in video, object sculpture and installation to present works that address the exhibition setting and the situation of making while reflecting on the modalities of artistic production and presentation, the social constitution of being an artist and attendant political or rhetorical ethical drives and their consequences. Recent work includes The Scene (This last Gi we saved ÂŁ70,000 in voluntary labour) a contribution to the Kiss of Life exhibition at Glasgow International and the artist is currently developing new work for a Project Rooms, Glasgow exhibition around the video Selfishness, The Smell of Selfridge's and Creativity Incense produced earlier this year. The Project Rooms exhibition opens on Saturday 30 October.

This month's Showcase was chosen by The Phantom Band.

October 2010

THE SKINNY 35


FOOD & DRINK

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Dookin’ Fer Apples

Also on the menu for the week will be a specially designed dish of bangers and mash with cider onion gravy. Family-run Findlays of Portobello use a splash of Thistly Cross Still cider in their Pork and Cider sausages which feature in this dish, and the business has also won multiple taste awards since 1974 for their high quality locally-scourced products. The festival culminates in a day long celebration at the Apple Pickers Ball on Sunday 24 October featuring an acoustic set from The 10:04’s and the first annual Thistly Cross and Three Sisters Apple Dookin’ Championship. For some yummy local food and drink and some wet t-shirt action, head along from midday. Three Sisters 139 Cowgate Edinburgh EH1 1JS www.festival-inns.co.uk 01316226801 Findlay’s of Portobello 116 Portobello High Street, Edinburgh, EH15 1AL www.findlaysthebutchers.co.uk 0131 669 4559

Photography: Michele D'Elia

Thistly Cross Cider Belhaven Fruit Farm, Dunbar, East Lothian EH42 1RG www.thistlycrosscider.co.uk

It’s autumn, and that means harvest. The combine harvesters are going full kilter, the lambs are all eaten, and there are hundreds of rosy cheeked women in floaty white blouses up trees picking wicker baskets of dewy apples. At least, that’s the image of the countryside that will be celebrated from 18 to 24 October at the Three Sisters in Edinburgh at the Thistly Cross Cider Festival. The Three Sisters will stock the full range of

Scotland’s only registered cider Thistly Cross, including Thistly Cross Original (7.2%), Original Still (7.2%), Red (4%), Ginger (4%), Gold (Whisky Chips), four of which have recently won Gold in the Great Taste Awards 2010. All of Thistly Cross’s ciders contain Scottish apples and are made with an East Lothian variation of a traditional English farmhouse brewing recipe that take around 6 months to achieve full flavour.

Food News October

Vino  Photography: Michele D'Elia

34 Comiston Road Edinburgh EH10 5QE 0131 452 8254 www.vinowines.co.uk www.twitter.com/vinowineshops

Edinburgh Gin & Fentiman's Rose Lemonade garnished with fresh strawberry

Edinburgh Gin & Fentiman's Tonic Water garnished with fresh lemongrass Distilled in a 200 year old Scottish copper pot still, Edinburgh Gin is a small batch, big juniper gin with a particular twist ...softer, Scottish, less pungent Scottish juniper, as well as heather, pine, and milk thistle. Available at: Bramble Bar 16A Queen St Edinburgh EH2 1JE 01312266343 mike@bramblebar.co.uk

www.spencerfieldspirit.com/EdinburghGin

36 THE SKINNY October 2010

Our long awaited third store is now open in Comiston and Vino would like to invite you to celebrate with us. Throughout October you can try from our range, some of our favourite products. The Grand Opening is on Saturday 2 October, 2pm - 6pm where Mark Obryen Master of Wine will run a burgundy and rioja tasting, Glengoyne’s Robbie Hughes will run a special malts tasting, plus we will have all the Octoberfest Biers in store to try. Throughout the month we also have events on Prosecco and Cava, Australian wines, gin and cocktails. Check us out online for more info on all our launch events and we hope to see you in the shop. Oishii  176 Rose Street  Edinburgh EH2 4BA  0131 225 5286 Lunch: £8 Dinner: £12 House wine: £13

On first entering Oishii sushi restaurant one can immediately see (from the sleek black décor) that this is a genuine Japanese restaurant, with influences from the izakaya style of dining, predominant in Japan.

This impression is confirmed by the appearance of the Japanese Head Chef Katsuo Honjigawa, skilfully crafting his sushi and sashimi to order, behind the marble bar. The extensive menu has a wide range of seafood, which varies with the seasons. A selection of rice and noodle dishes provide tasty alternatives, and the renowned Oishii Noodle Pot is available for take away if you are on the run. BrewDog BrewDog beer events perfectly emphasise what we are all about. We want every attendee to go away feeling they were part of something unique. We want to provide great beer to people who love beer and give them a memorable experience. When you make things that simple, you can’t go wrong. Like 22 September at Cloisters in Edinburgh: 1 beer launch, 6 draught beers, a dead stoat and an epic atmosphere. Four of the beers sold out in 2 hours but hey, if that’s a problem, its one we’re pretty happy about. Check out the website for upcoming events www.brewdog.com


REVIEW

FOOD & DRINK

Chop Chop

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Chop Chop Leith sits on Commercial Quay next to The Kitchin. With a first glance at the shiny red tables and melamine plates, you could perhaps be forgiven for thinking that this is an odd pairing; but in three months Chop Chop has easily proved itself worthy of its Michelinstarred neighbour. The simple, canteen-style decor is in fact a careful choice. It mirrors the unobtrusive style of its older partner in Haymarket – an Edinburgh institution for several years now – but is slightly sleeker and more polished. The ethos behind Chop Chop is what many might think of as tapas-style: a variety of small dishes are brought to your table, to share, as they are ready: aubergines pan-fried with fresh garlic and Chinese spices (my personal favourite), hot and sour soup, crispy shredded potato.

The Pelican Cafe New arrival in town The Pelican – over the road from Kelvingrove Museum – is the baby of Jason Harvie, a wine merchant by trade who wanted to create somewhere to eat well-sourced and well-cooked Scottish food that won’t break the bank. The Pelican is certainly incredibly reasonable, given the provenance of ingredients and the flair with which it’s served up – most mains will give you change from a tenner and all the wines from an (unsurprisingly) well-chosen list are available by the glass. The informal paper menu chats you up with a list of their suppliers up the road, from organic bakers to elderly fish smokers. To start, Orkney Gold beef makes for a top-notch, ruby-red carpaccio while chicken livers and tiny cubes of beetroot are a meltingly earthy marriage. The Pelican’s signature fish and chips are as far removed from a tepid post-pub greasetrap as is possible to conceive. Three types of seafood – sea bass, a firm chunk of hake and a few king prawns thrown in for good measure – are

Larger dishes are available for sharing too: the crispy northern lamb (or chicken/pork) is hot and sweet with good, tender meat, and the peanut and mustard sauce noodles are wonderfully rich, if a bit incongruous alongside the other, lighter, dishes. Then of course, there are their celebrated dumplings. These are of course delicious and come in a range of meat, fish and veggie flavours. They highlight that Chop Chop is most of all a fun restaurant: the dumplings would be worth it for the joy of creating your own dipping sauce alone and, if your stomach can cope, their sugar string desserts (available in apple, sweet potato or pancakes) are also a source of delight as you send strands of sugar flying across your table. With a plentiful variety of quality food, including great veggie and vegan options, the tale of Chop Chop’s brilliance will hold true for many years to come. [Liizie Cass-Maran] Around £35 for two. £18.50 a head for an unlimited buffet – the range of food you’ll get depends on how many of you there are, and it is indeed unlimited. Licensed, and also BYOB www.chop-chop.co.uk

encased in a light, tempura-style batter and dished up with a mountain of lusciously naughty goose fat chips and some homemade tartare. The only duff note is an overly-minted pea puree that smacks more of Aquafresh than allotment. My veal steak – brought to my plate via the Isle of Bute – was perfectly tender and intelligently teamed with sticky courgette ribbons and cubes of densely garlicky potatoes – no ‘one side fits all’ approach to veggies here. Throughout my meal I’d had the cold sweats of pudding anticipation, having eyed a warm chocolate fondant with pistachio ice cream. When the moment arrived, it didn’t disappoint – molten choc mixing in with green, marzipanscented ice. The Pelican has a reassuringly laid-back vibe, more caff than restaurant, and one of the quirkiest draught beer lists in town (Anchor Steam and Sierra Nevada both make an appearance). Pop in for a drink, end up staying for a blow-out dinner. [Ruth Marsh]  Dinner for two (with wine) around £40   www.pelicancafe.co.uk

October 2010

THE SKINNY 37


38 THE SKINNY October 2010


MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC HIGHLIGHTS

METAL COLUMN

TEXT: MARK SHUKLA

Scottish three-piece Hey Enemy have spent a lot of time listening to Melvins, Shellac and The Jesus Lizard and have songs with names like Johnny Fucko and Puppyhammer. Now you, dear reader, must use your skill and judgement to determine whether or not it would be a good idea to pay to see these young men perform... We thought so. Feel the weight at Edinburgh Henry’s Cellar Bar on 7 Oct, Dundee Dexter’s on 8 Oct and Glasgow Captain’s Rest on 9 Oct. Helsinki Seven support at all three dates plus Fat Goth in Dundee. Bona fide hip-hop legend KRS-One lands at Edinburgh’s The Liquid Room on 7 Oct. As a politically-minded and socially concious MC he’s been promoting positivity and spiritual awareness for nigh-on 20 years – and has often faced criticism from his peers because of it – but there’s no doubting his status as one of the genre’s most influential and talented practitioners. They don’t call him The Teacha for nothing. The Black Angels may be living in the past, sonically speaking, but they’re right at the front of the pack when it comes to delivering smoldering psych rock in 2010. Having just dropped the immense Phosphene Dream LP – a record that positively drips with acid-fried atmosphere and mind altering melodies – the band is all set for a classic gig at Glasgow Captain’s Rest on 9 Oct. Fans of The Warlocks, The Brian Jonestown Massacre or Spacemen 3 can’t afford to miss this. With a new über-poppy album in the bag, local twee-core behemoths Aberfeldy play a slew of dates this month. Check them at Aberfeldy Town Hall on 2 Oct, Dundee Duke’s Corner on 7 Oct, Glasgow O2 ABC on 9 Oct, Aberdeen Lemon Tree on 10 Oct, Edinburgh Liquid Room on 15 Oct and Inverness Ironworks on 16 Oct. Combining oceanic sonic textures, nervous punk energy and poppy song structures is no mean feat, but LA two-piece No Age (currently touring with a third member on electronics) have pretty much got it nailed. By the time you read this their new album will have dropped and all hell will have broken loose – I only wish I had some way of tipping you guys off earlier to buy tickets for their show at Glasgow Stereo on 9 Oct. Promising Psych-pop outfit Male Bonding will support. Chicago’s Maps and Atlases are a pretty exciting band. Mixing earthy, folky songwriting with choppy Don Cab-esque melodics and the kind of restless rhythms that recall prime TV on the Radio, this is a band with a whole lot of skill and more ideas than they know what to do with. Whatever you’re into, you’ll find something to enjoy at Glasgow Captain’s Rest on 10 Oct. Red Sparowes are a big, weighty band that make a big, weighty sound. Early ‘gwai, Godspeed, Isis and an unusual fondness for the ol’ pedal steel are the touchstones for their sound which, though occasionally flighty and graceful, will always come back to crush you in the end. Them’s the post-rock rules, son. Glasgow Stereo on 14 Oct. They’ve had a long and tempestuous career (including being banned from playing Glasgow due to a misunderstanding over a Nazi salute and temporarily relocating to Iceland in the early 80s in order to avoid the apocalypse) and Killing Joke aren’t about to throw in the towel now. With a new album on the racks, the agitpropin’ post-punk nutbars kick off their world tour with a gig at Edinburgh Picture House on 15 Oct. Should be interesting to say the least. On 18 Oct metal-faced hip-hop enigma DOOM makes his first trip to the land of whisky and haggis to rock Glasgow’s Arches. Super-creative rhymes, timeless beats and a large-than life persona are what make him special – this should be absolutely crazy. Having left Reading and Leeds festival crowds

Metal-faced hip-hop enigma DOOM makes his first trip to the land of whisky and haggis to rock Glasgow's Arches

spellbound and with their debut album dropping at the end of the month, LA four-piece Warpaint should be on top of their game when they play Glasgow Stereo on 22 Oct. And what a game it is: seductive webs of guitar tone; subtle, spectral harmonies and wonderful dub-influenced basslines all add up to one of the hottest prospects of 2010. Totally unmissable. Fearless pioneers in the psychology of sound or hokey, self-pitying dullards: whatever you think of Swans we bet you didn’t have Gira and co. down as the next group to cheerfully hop on the seemingly unstoppable reformation bandwagon. We didn’t either, but thankfully their new material sounds pretty fucking impressive. Witness the beast at Glasgow Arches on 25 Oct with support from twelve-stringed wonder James Blackshaw. Tweak Bird are a hard-hitting American pair who weld classic rock licks to a chugging metal backbone and top it off with some disarmingly mellifluous vocals. Nowt revolutionary but should be decent craic nonetheless; they play Edinburgh Sneaky Pete’s on 26 Oct.

DOOM

LIVE PREVIEW EASTERN PROMISE PLATFORM 1-2 OCT

FOUND

Platform’s Easterhouse-based cultural centre adds another string to its bow in October with Eastern Promise, a two-day festival boasting local talent alongside guests from further afield. Wounded Knee’s looping lullabies kick off Friday, followed by Josephine Foster performing Spanish folk backed by Victor Herrero and band. Feted pianists Rachel Grimes and Nils Frahm round out an eclectic first night, before Saturday ups the indie ante with King Creosote headlining above Malcolm Middleton’s intriguing new project Human Don’t Be Angry. RM Hubbert and recent Chemikal Underground signees FOUND conclude a robust and exciting first edition of a festival with a fair dollop of potential. [Chris Buckle]

The remainder of the year is about to serve up an uncivil barrage of ear-baiting terror, as if to coincide with the impending winter darkness. But rather than piss away the ol’ word count on seasonal musings, let’s get directly-the-fuck to it. The chances are, if you like your time signatures erratic and delivered with a fair share of guttural, bowel-churning riffage, you’ll want to see Architects (3 Oct) tear The Garage a new one. Then again, if you’re not one for rolling with the children, legendary Sub Pop grunge forerunners and all-out champions of distortion Mudhoney look to play the week out with a suitably fuzzed-out cacophony, knocking on the door of Aberdeen’s Tunnels (8 Oct) followed by The Arches (9 Oct). Mere days later, the original formation of hugely influential post-punk warriors Killing Joke make their much delayed return to Edinburgh at the HMV Picture House (15 Oct), arriving in support of the freshly unleashed Absolute Dissent. See you down the front, lighter aloft, for a teary sing-along to Love Like Blood. And if the old masters don’t pack enough punch to knock you straight to Hades, Dutch avant-garde punks The Ex are setting up shop for one slippery night in Stereo’s basement (21 Oct), while over in Dundee, Dexter’s will be left in thrall to the metalcore stylings of Acoda and Sacred Betrayal the same night. Their whistle-stop tour then continues to take in Edinburgh’s Bannermans (22 Oct) and Drummonds, Aberdeen (23 Oct). Thankfully, the bleak and utterly disturbed end of the metal spectrum is represented in the form of Bannermans’ Blood Of Christ all-dayer (24 Oct). Featuring Liverpudlian doom peddlers Lazarus Blackstar, local black metal quintet Haar and Barrow-in-Furness sludgers Volition all head up a day of destruction. Ever a painful pleasure to our ears – and industrial rock brethren at that – the newly ‘re-activated’ Swans and Justin Broadrick’s resurrected Godflesh descend on The Arches with just a few days between them (25 and 27 Oct respectively). Also of a theme, Avenged Sevenfold and Stone Sour embark on a night of circle pits and eyeliner at SECC (26 Oct); Against Me, Fucked Up and Crazy Arm entertain the new age punk lovers at QMU (27 Oct) whilst the mighty Dillinger Escape Plan make a visit to the Garage to head-fuck us all (29 Oct). And finally, New York hardcore heroes Madball and Sick Of It All make their way to King Tut’s (also 29 Oct) to show the posers how it’s done. [Ryan Drever & Clarence Boddicker]

KILLING JOKE

OCTOBER 2010

THE SKINNY 39


RECORDS

THE DIRTY DOZEN

Joined by comedian JOSIE LONG, Fence Collective stalwart, one half of Silver Columns and all-round good guy JOHNNY LYNCH takes on October’s singles INTERVIEW: DARREN CARLE PHOTOGRAPHY: MARKUS THORSEN

Mitchell Museum – Tiger Heartbeat (Electra French, 4 Oct) Johnny: This makes me want to get my skateboard out. Josie: Their press release is telling a really good story. You can’t help but want them to win. Johnny: I quite like it. It’s maybe not something I would buy, but... (He hears the bridge). Ok, maybe I would. Josie: I like it and I wish them every success. Thumbs up. Engineers – In Praise of More (Kscope, 11 Oct) Josie: I’m going to pretend in my head that this is a band formed from men who actually work as engineers, like a colliery band, and if that’s the case they’ve done very well. Johnny: If it was on in an indie disco – which I wouldn’t frequent – but if I happened to be there against my will, I still wouldn’t dance. It’s fine though. Thumbs in the middle.

EP REVIEWS RUSTIE

SUNBURST EP 4 OCT, WARP

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Southern Tenant Folk Union – Old Black Crow (Johnny Rock, 4 Oct) Josie: They’re nominated for the Mercury. Johnny: Really!? Josie: Yes, it says here...Oh, “unofficially nominated for the Mercury”. We’re all unofficially nominated for the Mercury! Johnny: At the beginning you’re thinking ‘ah, we’re in the Delta here’ and then... Cliff Richard! They’re a Scottish band, doing an American thing but actually sounding very English. Thumbs down? Josie: I’d prefer not to give it thumbs. I’d give it fingers. Admiral Fallow – Subbuteo (Lo-Five, 4 Oct) Josie: I like how Scottish he sounds. I like it when people properly sing with their accents. The problem is the melody is reminding me of Babylon by David Gray. But, you know, David Gray’s in a film that Kathy Burke’s in. It’s alright. Johnny: So that means this band are alright!? Josie: There’s been lots of fun little twists and turns. Johnny: Yeah, it’s quite a different record by the end. Thumbs up. Kelis – Scream (Interscope, 4 Oct) Josie: (20 seconds in) God I hope it has a good chorus, I’ll be so happy if it does. Johnny: If it goes really Euro-disco in a minute I’ll be quite happy. [It goes really Euro-disco] Johnny: (arms aloft) Oh my! Josie: You sir, are a prophet. Johnny: I should make her records. Actually I don’t need to. She’s doing a great job. Thumbs up. Carl Barât – Run With The Boys (Arcady, 4 Oct) Johnny: It’s a night out in London’s fashionable Hackney. He’s with the boys. He’s running. (Pauses to listen to the song) Well, slow jogging. Josie: If you’re middle class and you think ‘oh, I’m going to smoke crack’ then you’re a fucking cunt. Johnny: Yeah, Carl’s career has been tainted somewhat by his association with Doherty. So I find it hard to listen to this. Please stop it. Josie: Half-way through that song I remembered how much I like Pulp. Not that this is like Pulp, but I was thinking that everyone who wastes time listening to this could be listening to Different Class.

OFFSHORE

ANEURYSM EP 18 OCT, BIG DADA

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Dinosaur Pile-Up – Mona Lisa (Friends Vs Records, 27 Sep) Johnny: Promising name. It’s a bit like Ash. Josie: But Ash can write a catchier tune. Johnny: I want to hear vomit! If this ends in vomit, I’m with it. Josie: I forgot about that; the secret track on 1977! Johnny: Basically, if there’s no vomit, it’s getting a thumbs down. They’ve got twenty seconds to puke something up... No, I can’t do it, it was actually alright. It made me think of Ash so I quite liked it. Thumbs in the middle. Chapel Club – All The Eastern Girls (Loog Label, 11 Oct) Johnny: It’s slightly too earnest for me. I’ve a feeling they’ve got better songs. Josie: I agree. I listen to it and I wish it well but, yeah, the song itself isn’t that inspiring. Johnny: (unconvincingly) Middle thumbs? Ou Est Le Swimming Pool – The Key (Fire & Manoeuvre, 11 Oct) Josie: I can see this being really popular. Johnny: It’s reminding me a bit of the Mitchell Museum song. I like the keyboard bit – just like A-ha. (Later) I kept waiting for the chorus but I’m quite glad there wasn’t one in the end. It could have made it too anthemic. So, thumbs in the middle. The Bees – I Really Need Love (Polydor, 4 Oct) Johnny: This sounds like busking a little bit. Maybe that’s quite a good thing; buskers only really sing really massive songs. Josie: (clearly paying attention) Oh is this The Bees? I prefer this to their older stuff.

TEAM GHOST

CELEBRATE WHAT YOU CAN’T SEE EP 11 OCT, SONIC CATHEDRAL

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Rustie’s intermittent 12”s, remixes and guest spots have made him a minor sensation at ‘in the know’ club scenes around the globe, but with Sunburst he scales lofty new heights in the age of the post-J Dilla inspired producer pantheon. The EP opens with Neko, a prog behemoth of audacious synth-guitar, drum trills, and a monstrous bass line, with Rustie sounding like the evil twin of fellow weegie and Warp label mate Hudson Mohawke. The speaker-testing bass and stretched vocals of Dragonfly sit somewhere between his acclaimed Jagz The Smack EP and the twisted dubstep of Burial, while highlight Beast Nite is all arcade game vibes and militant vocal stabs; more than enough to get folks clamouring for the longplayer. [Martin Skivington]

Despite clocking in at under 15 minutes in length, Aneurysm still manages to display significant stylistic breadth. The title track brings together crisp crunk beats, a super-melodic Joker-style bass line and the kind of dramatic but cheap-sounding horn stabs that have recently been made ubiquitous by the likes of Gemmy and Guido. Very much of the zeitgeist then, but lacking the unique flair that make the aforementioned producers such one-offs. The rest of the EP is a lot less club friendly, instead displaying some interesting compositional ideas and plenty of atmospheric melodies but the well-worn VST sounds and familiar in-your-face production tics render the music rather unmemorable. It’ll be interesting to see how Offshore has developed by the time his full-length drops in 2011. [Mark Shukla]

Following on from this year’s earlier EP You Never Did Anything Wrong To Me, former M83 founder Nicolas Fromageau and ‘sparring partner’ Christophe Guérin beam in another extended player of other-worldly delights. It’s a subtler counterpart to the first record, dealing more in ebbing electro textures and synthesized celestial transmissions than the towering guitar crescendos that are perhaps Fromageau’s signature. High Hopes and Signs & Wonders do admittedly deliver on such a bedrock, but the latter is almost a distraction from the trance-like merits at the core of Celebrate What You Can’t See. After a confident first introduction, Team Ghost seem comfortable enough to reveal a little more of their elusive character. [Darren Carle]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/RUSTIEBEETZ

PLAYING DO IT! AT ORIGIN, ABERDEEN ON 10 DEC

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/TEAMGHOSTMUSIC

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/OFFSHOREBEAT

40 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010

Johnny: It sounds really seventies. It’s a great song but if you were busking it people would think you were singing Rod Stewart. That’s a thumbs up overall, though. Villagers – That Day (Domino, 4 Oct) Johnny: The stuff I’ve heard from them before sounded very Conor Oberst-y. This one sounds a lot less like that. I’m not really getting from his voice what he’s trying to put over. I don’t really know what I’m meant to feel. Now I do feel it sounds like Conor Oberst, 'cos that’s exactly how I feel after listening to him. Josie: At least Conor Oberst really hams it up. Needs more ham in this. Middle thumbs. SINGLE OF THE MONTH Badly Drawn Boy – Too Many Miracles (One Last Fruit, 4 Oct) Johnny: I think his voice sounds more like it did on his earlier stuff. Josie: There’s something so loveable about just hearing his voice, eh? Johnny: I like how he can make such a simple melody, or almost a lack of melody sound melodic in a good way. Josie: He’s gone back to what he really loves. Johnny: I really enjoyed that. It’s made me want to listen to his album. Thumbs up and Single of the Month. Carl Barât definitely lost. SILVER COLUMNS PLAY FENCE RECORDS HALLOWE’EN PARTY AT STEREO, GLASGOW ON 31 OCT HTTP://SILVERCOLUMNS.COM

ENFANT BASTARD MASTER DUDE 4 OCT, SL RECORDS

rrr In some ways chiptune is like a Lamborghini Countach: fun, dizzying and nostalgic for 80s cool – but it’s tough to think of either as a daily way to get around. However, one person getting in the driver’s seat regularly is Enfant Bastard, an inimitable changeling of Auld Reekie’s lo-fi scene. While his motives for trading in an acoustic guitar and self-conscious lyrics for a souped-up Game Boy remain his own, Enfant Bastard still seems adept at creating interesting music with Master Dude. Sounding like the score to a deranged cartridge classic that time forgot, these seven tracks offer a fine taster of the genre and its cadre of Edinburgh adherents. So while you might not get behind the wheel of Dude every day, it still makes for a decent spin every now and again. [Jason Morton] PLAYING ROXY ART HOUSE, EDINBURGH WITH SUPPORT FROM WOUNDED KNEE, THE LEG AND BIT FACE ON 2 OCT WWW.MYSPACE.COM/CAMMYJJNR


Òran Mór, 2 Sep

fever ray

Fever Ray O2 ABC, 6 Sep

rrrrr Wisconsin based Nika Roza Danilova – known tonight as Zola Jesus – takes to the stage for her third Scottish show in only 48 hours, yet the transition from the tiny Captain’s Rest to the vast hall of the O2 ABC doesn’t intimidate her in the least. For the entirety of the set her vocals never fail to amaze, her tiny frame belying the powerful, opera trained voice within. Flanked by a band which operates lo-fi drum machines and synths behind her, her sound is one that complements what will follow this evening: dark and well-crafted but still in its infancy. From within the near pitch blackness that envelops the stage, Karin Dreijer Andersson – AKA Fever Ray – is barely visible as she emerges to the opening bars of If I Had A Heart. Jaw-loosening low

PHOTO: crimsonglow

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frequencies that would have Sunn O))) weeping with jealousy emerge from the speakers, ushering in a collective gasp from the room as laser beams scan overhead in tandem with the music. This kind of synchronicity rules the night – surrounded by antique lamps that pulse in time with each song, lights flash behind the band, allowing only for silhouettes. It’s not until the aftermath of Triangle Walks that the grotesque costumes being worn by the band become clear, misshapen latex masks hang from their faces, contorting as their owners throw themselves around the stage and into their instruments. Closing the show with a fluid segue of Peter Gabriel’s Mercy Street into Coconut, the ABC is plunged into darkness without an encore, only the low chatter of a crowd enthralled by a visually stunning and beautifully crafted show.[Chris Duncan]

Back in April, off-hand comments from Jimi Goodwin suggested Doves’ then impending Greatest Hits tour would be their last. Though apparently misquoted, not every mind’s at ease tonight. “You’re too fucking good to split up!” cries one anxious fan, prompting protest from the stage. “No one said we’re splitting up!” Goodwin protests. “We still get on great – now can you tell the guitarist to turn it down; I’d tell him myself but we’re not fucking talking.” The opening run, despite featuring classics such as Sea Song, is peculiarly unremarkable, the set only kicking into gear when Black and White Town strikes up – though this too feels drained by the slackened pace and absent drums. Certainly, The Cedar Room scintillates regardless in this set-up, while Northenden excites long-term fans, but overall an uncharacteristic patchiness besets tonight. Let’s hope the banter doesn’t mask a cancer: tonight’s disappointments aside, another chance to see a plugged-in Doves at their most rousing and magnificent would be highly appreciated. It would be a shame if tonight’s stripped-back set did prove their Scottish swansong. Exiting the stage pre-encore they joke “you’ve been wonderful, we’ve been skin of our teeth,” but the self-effacement is awkwardly on the button. [Chris Buckle] Played as part of the Miller Filtered Music series.  www.doves.net

feverray.com

Mogwai Stereo, 29 Aug

mogwai

Minus the Bear Cabaret Voltaire, 31 Aug

rrr The Bear is slow to emerge from hibernation this Tuesday night, but the high octane combo of My Time/Secret Country from the Seattle group’s latest collection of hipster sex jams, Omni, finds them baring their teeth. Synth-heavy and ready for good times, their new music has the crowd heaving and swaying, though they don’t necessarily dominate the set. Peppering the set list with earlier math rock staples as often as their dalliances with prog from 2007’s Planet of Ice proves a little

problematic. For tracks like The Fix, with its otherworldly staccato guitar picking, they slow things down incrementally, impeding the immediacy of the songs. But they bring it home with Dayglow Vista Road, and then triumphantly break through the fourth wall of live performance. After announcing it as their last song – to the disappointment of the crowd – Jake Snyder holds a quick survey before suggesting the band forgo the ritualistic encore, instead ploughing through three more welcome cuts from a challenging catalogue. [Jason Morton] www.minusthebear.com

PHOTO: Crimsonglow

rrrrr There are things in life that you really need to have been there to appreciate; tonight’s low-key Mogwai show is undoubtedly one of those occasions. Opening with a new song may be a risky venture for some but they pull it off, the crowd appreciatively positive yet somewhat restrained at this chance to experience material from their forthcoming seventh studio LP hitherto untested. The same cannot be said of Hunted by a Freak, garnering an explosive response and reminding everyone here why they pulled out the stops to get hold of a ticket.

The New Pornographers

Jónsi

Òran Mór, 7 Sep

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O2 Academy, 5 Sep

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Tonight’s backdrop animations – woodland creatures; a wolf prowling the forest – make compelling viewing, affirming what television producers have long known: Jónsi’s voice and the timeless beauty of nature make apposite companions. Then the woodland combusts and the wolf explodes into paint, and it’s clear solo Jónsi is a more unusual creation than Sigur Rós have (so far) allowed themselves

For Freelance Whales, Postal Service is a name that will surely haunt any review. The whirring keyboard is there, and the unashamedly North American, adolescent singing. Importantly, though, so is the ear for a good melody, Hannah and Broken Horse channeling the living spirit of Ben Gibbard through a Ouija board of folk. The New Pornographers kick off their set with old favourite Sing Me Spanish Techno, new material – like Up in the Dark and Crash Years which follow – respectfully pepper the set without becoming overpowering. In the absence of alt-country crooner Neko Case, taking over tonight’s female vocal duties is newest pornographer Kathryn Calder. Her pipes aren’t quite as whiskey-stained as her predecessor, but she proves herself more than a placeholder, whether providing harmony or belting out the big ones, like Mass Romantic and The Laws Have Changed, two of the best received songs of the evening. Of the new bunch, Sweet Talk, Sweet Talk and Hands Together hit the spot, the first a fantastic example of their distinct brand of itchy-footed ballad, the second a sonic assault with angry guitar punctuating emphatic vocals. They finish with the ironically uplifting The Slow Descent Into Alcoholism, providing a euphoric climax well worthy of their name. [Oisín Kealy]

www.jonsi.com

jÓnsi

Isobel Campbell and Mark Lanegan O2 ABC, 8 Sep

rrrr Isobel Campbell and Mark Lanegan are a picture as they take to the stage, she in white and he in black. The angel-devil binary is so explicit they would look just as at home whispering advice from the shoulders of some morally conflicted cartoon character. Perhaps they’d be more at home; neither look particularly comfortable for the first part of the evening whilst showcasing the latest – and most cohesive – fruits of their curious union, Hawk. When Willy Mason comes to the stage as a special guest, Campbell’s demeanour changes entirely – giggling – engaging in inane banter and messing up

www.thenewpornographers.com

Their set continues flawlessly, one hand-picked wedge of beautifully crafted post-rock from their considerable career after another, everything performed with the unlikely pairing of a fastidious attention to detail and an overflow of emotion, amplified by anticipation. With set closer Glasgow Mega-Snake, Mogwai should be feeling pretty good about themselves but no, they return to the stage for an otherworldly encore of My Father My King, a mammoth of quiet/loud solemnity and feedback loops, shaking the very earth beneath Stereo and becoming something that can only be described in the same terms as this entire evening: epic. [David Bowes]

Wilco Barrowland, 16 Sep

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www.mogwai.co.uk

minus the bear

to be. Despite Goblin King garb, Jónsi opens low-key, but when the likes of Animal Arithmitic spread Technicolor wings, it’s clear how wide his horizons have grown. Later he’s alone on stage, foetal and wailing glitches and noise, transformed from Gaian entity to ghost in the machine. As finale Grow Till Tall builds, the screens fill with rain and the band flail as if buffeted by the winds. And for a moment you feel it too, till you realise the only tempest is the one swirling in your chest. [Chris Buckle]

There are presumably few more comfortable bed-rocks from which to launch a solo project than having Radiohead listed as a current employer. To make things simpler still, Philip Selway’s recent collaborations with members of Wilco likely facilitated tonight’s support slot. Radiohead have blurred bandroles for years (Jonny Greenwood’s increasingly-inaccurate ‘guitarist’ tag a case in point), so it shouldn’t be a surprise to hear such light percussion in the celebrated drummer’s solo venture. But it’s disappointing that his Grandaddy-lite creations never quite take off – until, ironically, the band abandon their instruments and take part in a mass-drumming finale. Wilco (the band) kick off with Wilco (the song): a cubed introduction to their overdue return

her lines adorably as they move through Townes Van Zant’s No Place To Fall, Campbell-written Cool Water and Mason’s own rollicking Nashville-fuelled number, quite different from his usual reflective, acoustic fare, like If It’s The End, which he plays for his own supporting set. Left by herself, Campbell revisits Saturday’s Gone, the maturation of her voice in the intervening years striking, still more air than earth, but now seductively breathy rather than an evanescent whisper. This sensuality produces the highlights of the evening, Come Undone, Back Burner and Come On Over (Turn Me On), pitting forest siren against the big bad wolf, and leaving a peculiar air of the supernatural lingering as they return backstage once more. [Oisín Kealy] www.isobelcampbell.com

to Glasgow. When a deprived fan corrects the claim they last visited two years ago (it’s been three years since Indian Summer, Jeff – we’ve been counting), Tweedy gravely intones “that is unacceptable”. By the close, no-one’s holding a grudge, with two cherry-picked hours more than sufficient compensation. Highlights are plentiful, and not always from anticipated sources: the epic I Am Trying to Break Your Heart, Via Chicago’s cacophonic meltdown and a breezy California Stars all feel like foregone conclusions, but less pre-assured are the likes of One Wing, which feels bigger and brighter than on record. Conversely, Jesus Etc – too poignant to be left to the congregation – underwhelms due to the decision to cede vocals to the crowd. But such a minor blip can’t detract from an iron-clad victory for the Illinois alt-stars. [Chris Buckle] www.wilcoworld.net

October 2010

THE SKINNY 41

PHOTO: Brian Vass

Doves

PHOTO: Edmund Fraser

LIVE REVIEWS


ALBUM REVIEWS

RECORDS

ALBUM OF THE MONTH: BELLE & SEBASTIAN WRITE ABOUT LOVE 11 OCT, ROUGH TRADE

rrrr If the near-five year wait since The Life Pursuit and last year’s brilliant brace of albums from Camera Obscura and Butcher Boy led you to question Belle & Sebastian’s standing as indie-pop kings of Glasgow, wait until you hear Write About Love. While arguably not as consistent as either of those disciples’ most recent triumphs, there are parts of Belle & Seb’s eighth studio album as great as anything they’ve done before. Fortunately, such moments are many: When The Light and lilting I Didn’t See It Coming is resurrected by the late arrival of starry synths and Stuart Murdoch pleading “make me dance, I want to surrender!”; when a fragile, metallic shimmer subtly emerges from

Come On Sister, and ecstatic male backing vocals less subtly burst from it later; pretty much the entirety of Northern Soul stomper I Want The World To Stop, and the surreally hilarious I’m Not Living In The Real World, a coming-of-age caper inspired by early The Who and Beach Boys. But perhaps the best of all is the final line of closer Sunday’s Pretty Icons: a simple, undramatic remark of devastating kindness that’ll leave you choking over the glistening organ outro. A glorious return. [Ally Brown] PLAYING BARROWLAND, GLASGOW ON 19-21 DEC WWW.BELLEANDSEBASTIAN.COM

SQUAREPUSHER PRESENTS SHOBALEADER ONE

THE FRUIT TREE FOUNDATION

BROKEN RECORDS

10 OCT, FRUIT TREE FOUNDATION

25 OCT, 4AD

18 OCT, WARP

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D’DEMONSTRATOR

rrr Whether or not its highly dubious back-story is a smokescreen (allegedly Shobaleader One is a band formed by Tom Jenkinson together with a bunch of RnB-loving metalheads), d’Demonstrator is a fucking odd record. Every song bar one features Jenkinson’s own vocoderfiltered vocals riding way up in the mix – the initial effect being almost as unsettling as walking in on your dad singing karaoke to a T-Pain track. Clearly this is Squarepusher’s own take on over-produced electronic pop, yet it’s disconcerting that much of it sounds like a watered-down Daft Punk or Ratatat, given that a decade ago he was making music like My Red Hot Car which demonstrated his ability to eviscerate a whole genre (UK garage) and make it sound like the future of everything in the space of a single track. Occasionally beautiful, frequently ridiculous, d’Demonstrator is another heroically unhip curveball from the ‘pusherman. [Mark Shukla] WWW.SQUAREPUSHER.NET

FIRST EDITION

LET ME COME HOME

It’s tempting to be abnormally lenient towards a record borne of a good cause, with lyrical ideas that deal with difficult, easily overwrought themes of introspection, defiance, love, conflict and sexuality, completed in a combined total of mere weeks. Thankfully, the team working as the Fruit Tree Foundation has bailed us out by delivering a musically diverse and entertaining record. Essentially a folk/indie collective, the extremely restricted timeframe seems to have aided the creative process. Production is necessarily unfussy but clever; lending imagination to potentially straightforward tracks. Well-crafted lyrics grounded in reality deal with the aforementioned themes deftly and intelligently. Music that shifts from straight up folk (although the traditional lament is given a 21st century reboot with a sordid twist on Beware Beware) to indie power pop is consistently engaging throughout, benefiting from, rather than being hindered by, the medley of personalities involved. All concerned should take a bow, for all sorts of reasons. [Paul Mitchell]

With its own sense of self-importance, Broken Records' debut album reached for the heavens but ended up leaving some listeners firmly grounded. At times second album Let Me Come Home seems similarly alienating. Opening number A Leaving Song hits a song-ending crescendo within a minute, before labouring back in on itself, with each subsequent ‘soaring’ chorus bringing diminishing returns. A Darkness Rises Up is another cut that seems too fussy with presenting the band as a burgeoning, ideas-strewn septet. However, repeated listens do reap rewards. Modern Worksong works as a more ragged, unfurling number that deploys tempo and off-kilter timings rather than pure grandiosity to hit the right buttons. Elsewhere, the more restrained tracks, such as the ghostly-beautiful waltz Dia dos Namorados!, work to best effect. It’s perhaps less consistent than its predecessor, but given how divisive that album was, Let Me Come Home should unite rather than split opinion. [Darren Carle]

EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE AT THE FORTHCOMING MUSIC LIKE A VITAMIN CONCERTS 1 OCT, HMV PICTURE HOUSE, EDINBURGH AND 2 OCT, O2 ABC, GLASGOW

PLAYING HMV PICTUREHOUSE AS PART OF MUSIC LIKE A VITAMIN ON 1 OCT HTTP://BROKENRECORDSBAND.COM

IAIN CAMPBELL

SUPERCHUNK

GLASSER

4 OCT, UNVERIFIED

4 OCT, ONE FOUR SEVEN

4 OCT, TRUE PANTHER SOUNDS

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ABSOLUTELY THE BEST ABBA SINCE ABBA

MAJESTY SHREDDING

RING

With numerous high-profile and high-concept multimedia performances and exhibitions now under his belt, the man formerly trading under the moniker +Do-NEIMAGI-Ne+ has moved his already leftfield sound even further into little-charted experimental territory (hence the ironic title). Interspersed with gathered recordings from everyday life, this album at times sounds like the fragmented, hallucinatory diary of a William S Burroughs-type figure struggling to distinguish features of the everyday through a wild haze of trippy, layered atonalism and atmospheric claustrophobia. Make no mistake, at least 90% of the music-buying public will find it utterly impenetrable. However what could easily lapse into whimsy is well-restrained and whilst it does occasionally get thoroughly bizarre there’s a permeating sense of musical aptitude (perhaps fuelled by the knowledge that Campbell is a founding and abiding member of cult Glaswegian alternative prog band Lapsus Linguae) which should endear it to adherents of other such acts of musical escapology. [Austin Tasseltine]

Having embarked on a decade-long sabbatical from the studio off the back of 2001’s Here’s to Shutting Up, grunge-era workhorses Superchunk have slowly drifted off the radar. This month sees their re-emergence from the world of one-off shows and token tracks with new LP, Majesty Shredding. It’s an album which feels immediately familiar – hinting that the quartet may have remained in stasis over their ten year hiatus – as Mac McCaughan leads with his ever endearing falsetto amidst the chant-along bounce of opening salvo Diggin’ for Something and My Gap Feels Weird. But the blissful balladry of Rosemarie and Fractures in Plaster’s stringsated crescendo bring about a refreshing touch; both providing a glimpse of a maturing act with the ability to evolve. Elsewhere, Majesty Shredding remains quintessentially ‘Superchunk’ – an album which will tweak the tear ducts of those who followed their halcyon day, but rendered a little retro in 2010. [Paul Neeson]

Glasser is Cameron Mesirow, a precociously gifted songwriter who, in crude splicing terms, evokes a Bat For Lashes/Dirty Projectors love affair on her revelatory debut album. Mesirow has both musical and intellectual ambition, with Ring named for its supposedly ‘chiastic’ (that’s fancy-talk for ‘ring’) structure – a literary technique Mesirow encountered in reading Homer in which ideas are symmetrical and reversible, leading “bi-directionally toward a central idea.” The phrase has an air of undergraduate pretence, and having messed with the album’s sequence a number of times, these ears aren’t convinced the concept’s been carried through particularly thoroughly – though as the fifth of nine tracks, T makes a splendidly crystalline central hub. But the actual music proves an odyssey of riches, deeply layered and baroque throughout. To offer Glasser her own chiastic epithet (well antimetabolic epithet technically, but let’s not quibble), the marvellous Ring rings in marvels. [Chris Buckle]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/DONEIMAGINE

WWW.SUPERCHUNK.COM

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/GLASSSSER

KURT WAGNER & CORTNEY TIDWELL PRESENT KORT

SHRAG

18 OCT, CITY SLANG

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INVARIABLE HEARTACHE

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LIFE! DEATH! PRIZES! 4 OCT, WHERE IT’S AT IS WHERE YOU ARE

BEN SOLLEE AND DANIEL MARTIN MOORE DEAR COMPANION 4 OCT, SUB POP

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As musical partnerships go, Kurts and Cortneys go together less like a horse and carriage than a horse and a grunge Yoko prone to worrying Twitter-spasms. Well no more: Kort represents a happier alternative: a honey-coated tribute to ye olde country and western, courtesy of Lambchop’s Kurt Wagner, solo chanteuse Cortney Tidwell and lashings of slide guitar and whiskey-pickled heartbreak. Tidwell employs her fine pipes in an appropriately conventional Americana style, but it’s Wagner’s idiosyncratic croon that steals the show. The album opens with his unadorned voice, echoing his day-job’s finest hour (2000’s Nixon, ushered in with similarly intimate fashion), while his precise enunciation of the lyric “little bitty tear” – all crisp consonants and debonair delivery – sounds slightly silly yet utterly charming. For every track straying too close to caricature there are a dozen moments of pleasure, making Invariable Heartache both a note-perfect tribute and self-contained delight. [Chris Buckle]

Shrag’s second album explodes into life with the panic inducing A Certain Violence, a post-punk bar-room brawl dragged along kicking and screaming by relentless guitar, and the ensuing tracks keep it just as sweaty. The B-52s Rock Lobster is reborn in the form of Stubborn or Bust, surf-pop guitar and grumbling bassline scoring a boy-girl call and answer both dizzying and thrilling, like a Ferris wheel rolled free from its axis. Unashamedly informed by new-wave and punk, Shrag channel everyone from Siouxsie Sioux to the Pixies and back again, while at the same time sounding very much of the moment. With jagged guitars and wide-mouthed, regional singing there is a lot they have in common with contemporaries Dananananaykroyd or Super Adventure Club. For all this, they remain an idosyncratic group, case in point being spoken word The Habit Creep. In the hands of another, a painfully art school misstep. Here, a genuinely sinister centrepiece. [Oisín Kealy]

Beginning life as an EP of songs meant to bring attention to the environmental impact of mountain top removal mining in their home state of Kentucky, under the encouragement of My Morning Jacket’s Jim James, Ben Sollee and Daniel Martin Moore’s Dear Companion became a full length exploration of the life and lifestyle under threat by this devastating practice. A good thing too, as it has produced an album with the mellow beauty of a dusty sunrise, somewhere between the innovative bluegrass of Old Crow Medicine Show and the yearning soul of Bon Iver. There is urgency in the title track, all sawed cello and prickly banjo, but Sollee and Moore are gentle rather than polemical in their approach. You Needn’t Say A Thing, Try and Only a Song seem to reassure rather than worry, celebrating a tradition in hopes of preserving it rather than prematurely bemoaning its loss. A distinctly warm-hearted collection. [Oisín Kealy]

WWW.KORT.CD

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/SHRAG

WWW.BENSOLLEE.COM

42 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010

PLAYING THE ARCHES, GLASGOW ON 6 DEC


WOLF PEOPLE

UNNATURAL HELPERS

ACTION BEAT

11 OCT, JAGJAGUWAR

4 OCT, HARDLY ART

11 OCT, TRUTH CULT

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STEEPLE

CRACKED LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS

Occupying the intersection between folk, rock, psychedelia and blues, you might be able to see why the name Wolf People appealed to this band. Seemingly halfway between man and beast, destined to be described in compounded noun-chains. Silbury Sands calls to mind The Black Keys taking on the Moody Blues or Pentangle: there is an appreciation for the drama and mystery of folk while an understanding that it needn’t be played on a lute; scuzzed out guitar soars over the song while choral harmonies launch themselves upwards. There’s something a little wild about this band, if not entirely lupine, certainly more than a bit hairy. Painted Cross’s determined, walking guitar and vocal interplay is deceptively simple, but contains an energy and confidence in its delivery that’s impossible to deny. It’s the funky flute riff of Tiny Circles, though, which makes the album an unlikely but astounding addition to their arsenal. [Oisín Kealy]

The most obvious starting point for new inductees to the work of Unnatural Helpers is that they are Mudhoney’s European tour support and what a very suitable pairing that is. Grimy, unfussy and buzzing with energy, this is contemporary garage rock at its most pure. The longest tune on Cracked Love... is a mere two and a half minutes and, given the garage vibe, it is generally important not to overstay your welcome. Periodically aping a number of Seattle past-masters from the early Sub Pop scene, Unnatural Helpers competently play the part of young, guitar wielding booze-hounds out for fun. What they don’t do however, is produce much that really marks them out as anything other than background scenery in the musical landscape they occupy. Brave Dumb Face and Head Collector are probably the best on offer, the rest is adequate but potentially intended for the more ardent garage disciple. [Chris Cusack]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/WOLFPEOPLE

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/UNNATURALHELPERS

SUPPORTING MUDHONEY AT THE TUNNELS, ABERDEEN ON 8 OCT AND THE ARCHES, GLASGOW ON 9 OCT

BEATINGS

The conceptual maelstrom that is this ever-evolving noise collective from Bletchley in England has to be one of the standardbearers for DIY ethics in the UK right now. Having steadily built their project up from its meagre beginnings outside Milton Keynes, these guys now spend four months at a time on the road. A new relationship with Truth Cult (and its benefactors at Southern Records) has exposed Action Beat to a much wider audience and they seem to be reaping the rewards. Given the hellish furore often taking place, production on this album is remarkably strong and crisp. Beatings skilfully combines some of Sonic Youth’s more rabid moments with the ugly clatter of early 90s Chicago noise. It is distinctly uncompromising and, as such, potentially very divisive. There are no singles. There are no dancefloor hits. Instead there are ten slices of cathartic, convulsive anti-rock that thoroughly deserves at least 36 minutes of your time. [Chris Cusack] PLAYING 13TH NOTE, GLASGOW ON 3 DEC WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ACTIONBEAT

GONJASUFI

JOHN LEGEND & THE ROOTS

THE PHANTOM BAND

4 OCT, WARP

18 OCT, COLUMBIA

18 OCT, CHEMIKAL UNDERGROUND

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WAKE UP!

THE CALIPH’S TEA PARTY

THE WANTS

Sumach ‘Gonjasufi’ Ecks is an esoteric vocalist whose excellent debut album A Sufi And A Killer, released earlier this year, saw him link up with major players from the alt-beats scene, including Flying Lotus and Gaslamp Killer. The Caliph’s Tea Party brings an equally subversive band of audiophiles on board to remix the entire album. There’s no lack of talent here – Bibio, Dam Mantle and Bear In Heaven all chip in – so the results are unsurprisingly impressive. Closest to touching the nocturnal, quasi-Eastern feel of the original album is Hezus’ take on My Only Friend, with its creepy, grinding organs and 70s psychedelic aura. Elsewhere, Shlomo’s remix of Change expertly blends dark, crackling drums with odd bursts of twinkling bells, while Broadcast & The Focus Group sacrifice Gonjasufi’s vocals completely for the left-veering title track. A worthy extension to a compelling album, running the gamut from dubstep to freak-folk. [Martin Skivington]

Few musicians seem to make overtly political records these days: the Iraq war moved few songwriters to sing out, and despite its catastrophic effects, there’s not much rhymes with “credit crunch”. John Legend and The Roots’ Wake Up! is a covers record featuring new versions of old soul classics like Donny Hathaway’s Little Ghetto Boy and Mike James Kirkland’s Hang On In There, among others, updated with Black Thought verses, though these songs’ themes of faraway wars and local poverty need no updating. It’s beautifully produced, so when those two songs and sole original Shine develop into galas of piano, organ, strings and bass, it’s like listening to peak-era Stevie or Curtis. A lethargic Wholy Holy can’t compare to Marvin Gaye’s original, and a 12-minute take of Bill Withers’ I Can’t Write Left-Handed is a good three minutes over-wrought; but Wake Up!’s lush recordings make it a treat for any soul fan. [Ally Brown]

Following on from last years’ blindsiding debut Checkmate Savage, feral Glaswegian sextet The Phantom Band have wasted precious little time in surfing the golden crest it produced with sophomore effort The Wants. Pitched somewhere between Leonard Cohen and Looney Tunes, album two is a darker affair, seemingly informed by classic literature as much as The Beta Band and Neu. Opening highlight A Glamour picks up its predecessor’s baton of synthesized ‘whoops’ and ragtag percussion before morphing into a chugging, riff-laden coda. The drip-fed, glockenspiel chill of Everybody Knows It’s True is another early gem, the band at their most inventive and, importantly, their most immediate. The Wants’ mid-section suffers a little in tempo but its end triumvirate, particularly Into The Corn’s deathly apocalyptic parable, stands as the lads best running streak yet. Truly, The Phantom Band should be up there with saltires and shortbread as a vital national export. [Darren Carle]

WWW.SUFISAYS.COM

WWW.JOHNLEGEND.COM

WWW.PHANTOMBAND.CO.UK

DJING AT THE ELECTRIC CIRCUS, EDINBURGH ON 16 OCT

WARPAINT

MAPS & ATLASES

CLINIC

25 OCT, ROUGH TRADE

4 OCT, FATCAT

4 OCT, DOMINO

rrr

rrr

rrr

THE FOOL

PERCH PATCHWORK

Court martial! On charges of worst band-related misnomer since Mogwai entitled a post-rock album Happy Songs for Happy People. Los Angeles all-lady four-piece Warpaint deserve the charge, for if there’s any kind of war on debut album The Fool then it’s only of the attrition variety. Picking up on the post-pub, post-club, post-smile vibe so recently nailed to the wall by Mercury champions The XX, The Fool is a slow grower, all atmospherics and barely-there ethereal female vocals, but with a grungy, dissatisfied angst at the bottom that encourages you to put in the listening time it demands. The three vocalists swoop and swirl, leaving chunks of melody and lyrical snatches lying like abandoned carrion. Eponymous track Warpaint sets the benchmark: aforementioned early-morning atmospherics, intelligent, ever-changing guitar work, and a dark, guilt drenched disco bit. Though undoubtedly subtle and clever, The Fool is too unwilling at points to get off its exhausted arse, and really make you care about it. [PJ Meiklem]

Chicago four piece Maps & Atlases have been the beneficiaries of a fair bit of hype and earned the strange and vague tag ‘math rock’ before even releasing a full length album. So, when debut Perch Patchwork is shoved in the CD player, curiosity is duly whetted. The following couple of minutes of aimless noodling on opener Will therefore can’t be anything but a disappointment. Then front man Dave Davison sings “I don’t think there’s a sound that I hate more than the sound of your voice,” in such a fragile, affecting and wholly human way that you can’t help but be a little seduced. What follows, never quite reaches that height, but it’s a fun ride. The experimental rhythms and sounds that provide the backbone can be as cloying as they are interesting, but the continual desire to do something different is always laudable even when difficult to follow. [PJ Meiklem]

PLAYING STEREO, GLASGOW ON 22 OCT

MAPSANDATLASES.ORG

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/WORLDWARTOUR

THE ORCHIDS THE LOST STAR

25 OCT, PEBBLE RECORDS

rrrr Veterans of the Glasgow scene, The Orchids cut their teeth twenty years ago with cult Bristol based Sarah Records, lending the kind of jangly indie credentials most bands would sell their fringe to secure. They have pulled off something special with this, their fifth album in two decades, still heavily rooted to their early nineties sound without sounding stuck in the past. Doot Doot (Till It Happens To You) might be a little Teenage Fanclub, the distorted guitar line snaking through the understated, sonorous vocals of James Hackett, while a little Beta Band filters through with Back To Your House. But the sound is their own, the relaxed chemistry of a band comfortable in their own skin. The emotions are simple, the music direct, but the effect immeasurable, like with the gently blooming oasis of Come Lay Down On My Bed, a simple request reiterated with the soothing repetition of waves on the shore. [Oisín Kealy] WWW.MYSPACE.COM/THEORCHIDSUK

BUBBLEGUM

Way back in the Britpop days there was always something vaguely sinister about Clinic: a gang of Liverpudlians in surgical masks who wanted to do twisted things to your young, innocent, Oasis-loving soul. Well those days may be gone but the menace lives on. Even though their sixth long player Bubblegum sees a softening of their sometimes challenging sound, there is a dark psychedelic menace waiting to spirit us away. The spiralling organ on The Lion Tamer is part of it, but so is the frankly bonkers spoken-word monologue on Radiostory, and the way the snatched Spanish refrain from that song returns and grows into the Una Astronauta En Cielo. Nothing’s too immediate, but that’s not a weakness – a true pop song here would stand out like a golfball-shaped tumour on the operating table. When Bubblegum finds its tripped out ending in Orangutan, you’re glad they’ve lasted the distance, surgical masks and all. [PJ Meiklem] PLAYING STEREO, GLASGOW ON 26 OCT

TOP FIVE ALBUMS 1 2 3

BELLE & SEBASTIAN

WRITE ABOUT LOVE

THE PHANTOM BAND

THE WANTS

KURT WAGNER & CORTNEY TIDWELL PRESENT KORT

INVARIABLE HEARTACHE

4 5

THE FRUIT TREE FOUNDATION

FIRST EDITION

GONJASUFI

THE CALIPH’S TEA PARTY

WOUNDED KNEE HOUSE MUSIC

OUT NOW, KRAPP TAPES

rrrr Drew Wright is an Edinburgh freak-folker whose work as Wounded Knee has thus far divided critical opinion at The Skinny, dazzling some while bemusing others. His latest, House Music is unlikely to change that; being composed of much the same jumbled stramash of mouth music, tape looping, human beatbox, chanting and shantying as before. It is, though, a more developed album than last year’s Shimmering New Vistas (which garnered a respectable 4-star review in these very pages), with Wright’s lo-fi, kitchen-sink production ethic translating snugly to cassette format. Meanwhile his songs take on a broader thematic spectrum: solemn, Gaelic-esque psalms, ‘fuck yous’ to the British National Party, plaintive folk songs and bluesy kazoo solos are all present, and without the constant clarity of song beginnings and endings, it’s easy to become absorbed in Wright’s homespun audio world. And it’s no bad thing, because it’s a fun – if fairly surreal – place to visit. [Martin Skivington] PLAYING PLATFORM, GLASGOW ON 1 OCT AND ROXY ART HOUSE, EDINBURGH ON 2 OCT WWW.MYSPACE.COM/IAMWOUNDEDKNEE

OCTOBER 2010

THE SKINNY 43


MUSIC

THE PHANTOM BAND CURATE: The Phantom Band's Andy Wake eulogises the late, great horror R&B show that was Uncle John & Whitelock to explain the origins of TUT VU VU WORDS: ANDY WAKE

I quiz Raydale Dower about Sun Ra and he confesses that “although Tut Vu Vu don’t really improvise in that way – we do work with compositions – there’s definitely something of the esoteric in there, so there’s something akin to the way Sun Ra saw things.” He elaborates, describing the way he viewed creating music as “like a kind of alchemy, where you make sounds with other people in a room and you create an object separate from the sum of the individuals, and eventually you can trust in the presence of that object and not think about it; not worry about what it might do.”

PHOTO: NEIL DAVIDSON

STARDUST FROM TOMORROW TUT VU Vu describe themselves as the love child of Anaïs Nin and David Lynch, and that’s a reasonable metaphor for the strange dark brew of Musique Concrète concocted by two thirds of deceased Scottish cult favourites Uncle John & Whitelock. Tut Vu Vu release their debut 7” in December via The Bonjour Branch, a home-made imprint cobbled together by Dave Maclean (Django Django), Craig Coulthard (Randan Discotheque) and myself. In 2002, while watching a smoke-filled gig, precariously performed high on a wobbly ledge above the partitioning of a King Street art gallery, I decided I’d probably seen the most exciting live band in Scotland – a band I later heard was called Uncle John And Whitelock and, later still, discovered was conceived in Dundee and involved Mattie Black, whom I vaguely knew from youth. A scattershot collective, they used the moniker of GFM (which bassist Raydale Dower – known as ‘Whitelock’ to almost nobody but singer Jake ‘Uncle John’ Lovatt – assures me “may or may not stand for Ganja-Force Massive, God Forgot Man, or Gasoline Firearms & Mescaline...”) to release records and host art events. For five years, UJ&W regularly provided similarly raucous, gravity defying and well-lubricated performances of their dark dirge-abilly or ‘horror R&B’ as they termed it, including a memorable single launch in McSorleys, where spasm-legged Lovatt appeared to launch himself backwards off the banister of the balcony, only to be left hanging upside down. But in the spirit of Scottish self-defeatism, after only one self-released album (albeit a much applauded 20 track epic) in 2006, There Is

44 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010

Nothing Else, plus some collectable vinyl singles, the band decided to wind up, just as they were seeing glimpses of a more overground success. A rumour circulated that several hundred copies of the album were edited with Tipp-Ex, after former drummer Andrew Hobson was non-consensually credited as ‘Hashfinger’, which I can imagine could take some of the fun out of being in UJ&W. The GFM studio continued as a centre of thisand-that, remaining a creative hub in some capacity: Raydale’s art studio doubling up as a rehearsal space cum skateboard workshop. After around a year, three bands emerged almost simultaneously from the ashes – Jacob Yates and the Pearly Gate Lockpickers, featuring Jake Lovatt, still with Jamie Bolland to his right on piano and Farfisa organ; Whitelock guitarist Dave Philp’s band, Adopted as Holograph, and Tut Vu Vu, also featuring Bolland alongside Mattie ‘Ovalbody’ Black (drums) and Raydale Dower (bass). Their understated debut at Low Salt, a mutating contemporary gallery of no fixed abode, seemed appropriate for the way Tut Vu Vu like to operate. We booked them for The Hot Club as their 2nd live outing. It became apparent to me that, when the estate was divided up, UJ&W had left most of the family heirlooms to Jacob Yates & The Pearly Gate Lockpickers. With Jake Lovatt’s inimitable drawl, the Lockpickers are inevitably tied stylistically to the band of he and Bolland’s past, which can’t be a bad thing. Saving only the underlay that bolstered the rhythm section, along with the odd curious harmonic knick-knack from the house clearance, Tut Vu Vu have ventured on a more experimental path; fusing dark, sleazy club jazz with that foreboding R&B

and somewhat progressive tendencies, through some other-worldly electronics; the progressive suggestion only confirmed by their performance of a quadraphonic show at Glasgow’s CCA, as part of Raydale Dower’s artist residency there. Dower regularly hangs up his electric bass – always played in an almost-vertical position, as if it were an upright – in favour of an Arp Odyssey synth, or a clarinet played through various effects. The stage is strewn with props which range from the eclectic and decorative cardboard cut-outs and banners of Glasgow artist Judd Brucke, to an array of old televisions appearing circuit-bent in their abstract display of sound signals and video feedback. The sound is as diverse as their stage setup would suggest; veering from spooky space-jazz to the pads and pulsating rhythms of Kosmische and Krautrock. Their 2009 tape cassette release Abracadabra Holmes even touched on machine-like improvised hip-hop. On stage, Tut Vu Vu tinkers with melody that dances just-around predictable scales; as playful as Thelonius Monk or Erik Satie’s subversion of familiar melodies, tip-toeing over the anticipated note with the cheeky half-grin of a malevolent teenager. Indeed, Bolland cites both Monk and Satie as influences, having performed a Satie tribute event at Dower’s temporary art cafe Le Drapeau Noir, during Glasgow International, 2010. When Tut Vu Vu began, Dower looked to the bass melodies of Mingus as a guide to the musical freedom he sought after UJ&W. Personally, it was my enjoyment of Sun Ra that helped reveal to me why, whilst doing their sound at The Hot Club, Tut Vu Vu managed to usurp Uncle John & Whitelock as my favourite live band.

It was my enjoyment of Sun Ra that helped reveal to me why, whilst doing their sound at The Hot Club, Tut Vu Vu managed to usurp Uncle John & Whitelock as my favourite live band

This is a Ra-ism if ever I heard one. But Dower goes on to explain how he comes at writing music from the opposite position to that of Sun Ra. Ra began his career as an in-house big-band composer, only pursuing the Omniversal experimentation that we know him for later on, once he had mastered a huge level of musical skill. Dower, however, believes that any semblance of musicianship he has today, he has acquired only whilst a member of performing bands – a position similar to my own. He goes on to talk of the importance of a band having a balance “between the trained and those who are just really keen to make a sound.” In his case, I’d guess the musically trained to whom he refers would be pianist Jamie Bolland and the recent lineup addition, Iban Perez, of Sparkling Shadazz. “Iban keeps asking what key things are in, but with us it’s all in G, F and M...Tut Vu Vu is just continuing a quest to play that M chord,” he chuckles. He goes on to explain his belief that a self-taught musician has the benefit of a more intuitive approach to melody. “Bassists write the worst basslines” and so on. “Music should be about being a bit bad,” he continues, “undermining things. Putting woodwind through electronic filters” and citing early Kraftwerk performances as an illustration. Not initially intending to draw parallel with his band, Raydale jokes about his girlfriend remarking that a press release he wrote made little sense, as it was just a list of adjectives. “Why can’t you start all your sentences with an adjective?” he asks me. He concludes our conversation that Tut Vu Vu might be such a fumblerule of obfuscation un-eschewed: “a sentence that starts and ends with an adjective; that’s us.” TUT VU VU PLAY THE TUNNELS IN ABERDEEN (WITH POLAR BEAR) ON 17 OCT AND EDINBURGH’S VOODOO ROOM ON 18 OCT RAYDALE DOWER IS CURRENTLY ARTIST IN RESIDENCE AT GLASGOW’S TRONGATE 103, AND A SOLO EXHIBITION OF HIS WORK AT STIRLING’S CHANGING ROOM GALLERY OPENS 9 OCT WWW.MYSPACE.COM/TUTVUVU


Got Milk?

BLUES EXPLOSION

MUSIC

MUSIC

THE PHANTOM BAND CURATE:

Ah Milk. Great source of calcium, won Sean Penn an Oscar… er, hang on, something’s off. Google has failed me – guys, you’ll have to introduce yourselves…

The Phantom Band's Gerry Hart recalls the night he fell challenge each other, taking our disparate inspirations Text Chriswith Bucklecult Edinburgh quartet in love MYSTERY JUICE and finding ways to harmonise them. We enjoy sifting Photo www.ryanmcgoverne.co.uk WORDS: GERRY HART

“I think it would be fair to say that we began this at odd angles, and so the approach has been to try and

through the noise.” When the sifting is finished, nuggets of Lizard King stargazing, smooth 80s grooves, moody atmospherics, deadpan humour and crowd mental (obviously were warmed up by prog-squiggles remain. Thethey unorthodox blend slips us. Ahem!). through genres like cow lactose through fingers. “We This is how gigs should – and every time I converge in strange places,”be they acknowledge. see them it is. And don’t think I’m over-egging this. Milk confound classifi cation in part through tactical It must surely impossible to goand to lower-profi a Mystery le shyness. Their be low-profi le moniker Juice gig and constitute last a couple of their songsto without web presence a genuine attempt avoid finding yourself dancing, or at leastacts wanting to the pigeonholing that rubberstamps straight dance atwomb. some Milk pointare – and at that said from the leaving theirjuncture, options open dilemma is then in your hands. and keeping followers guessing. So let’s recap: so good them? “We’re still in thewhat’s formative stagesabout of playing thisTo put it plainly: they’re an amazing band,the playing music together, so anything that allows freedom some ofon thecreative most incredible youthey will ever to go off tangents ismusic a must,” hear. They’re a band giving one of the best live explain. “The name gave us the blank slate. If you performances you as willa ever see. And they then look treat a band’s name statement of intent, wonderful into thetobargain. All this Refreshingly, on our own ours remains open interpretation.” doorstep in Auld Reekie.a MySpace background in an age where choosing Tim the singer also distorted,‘to wah-wah, sits uncomfortably highplays on new-starts’ do’ lists, freakout violin solos.inIcultivating repeat – distorted, wahthey’re uninterested a potentially-straitwah, freakout solos. amazing! jacketing onlineviolin persona. “WeFreakin want the opportunity and have I mentioned that they often play toOh surprise others and ourselves.” gigs inthey the former Union, wherepass people Live, don’t letSoviet such opportunities themfire machine guns in the air in celebration of their very by. But what about recordings? Any releases on the presence? you know, even in my horizon? “InAnd this regard,” they assert, “wepeacereserve the loving that sounds like the perfect to right tomind, remain mysterious.” Seems Milk willway be whetcelebrate theira little sound. ting appetites longer yet.[Chris Buckle] WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MYSTERYJUICE

MILK SUPPORT FOUND AT THE ELECTRIC CIRCUS, EDINBURGH ON 7 AUG AS PART OF THE EDGE FESTIVAL

Clockwise from top left: Pablo; Callum; Michael; Sam

www.theelectriccircus.biz www.theelectriccircus.biz

“CALLUM, up in the crow’s nest, is all guitar-cradling and neckerchief-wearing, while Sam will go down Iwith OFTEN wonder: if there is a last God, he have the ship, laughing to the at does his cockpit of a Mystery Juice tattoo? We may never know, keyboards,” collectively explain Glasgow (viabut Fife)we can comfortably say that men, women and children quartet, Milk. “Michael plays at drums and dressing the worldinover sleep at night safe in the knowlup down the can engine room, and Pablo stands at edge thatfull Mystery Juice walk the And when I the prow, of windy rhetoric andearth. last night’s say walk I Any reallyroom mean a few inches above while leftovers.” forfloat a celebrity endorsement on us mereAfter mortals clumsily stumble along,has dragging board? all, that ‘Got Milk’ campaign done our feet through gum phlegm. wonders for dairychewing sales over theand years – want to We first across Mystery in 2006 for co-opt anycame Milk-the-Drink lovers asJuice spokespersons when we supported them in Henry’s Cellar Bar, in Milk-the-band? Edinburgh where they’re I was quiteand happy “Can we breed them? If sobased. we’ll take the lithe with my lot – it wasofaIsabella good gig, we played insatiable sexuality Rosellini, couple itwell, with were tight and loud and generally let rip a small the high-society histrionics of Elton John, andon marry sweaty stage. was good. that off with theLife future-race breeding of the Olsens and Then life just got better.cial-cow 10.30pm arrivedofand we the ruthless art-as-a-sacrifi ambition James entered o’clock. Cameron.”rock Finally, this sexual, ambitious future-race Four men stride on stage, lookingà la sharp progeny would be “wrapped in plastic, Joan and Rivers.” effortlessly cool.sounds I thought ‘okay you’ve my If their creation elaborate and messy,got it fits attenti…’ Kaboom, and we’re off. The nextarticulate 40 their musical identities; if their answers sound minutes shake,itrattle, grind, – that’ssmarts. right yet obfuscating, reflects their groove crafty, cultured they groove, as too a rule of thumb “We think that which bands are readily vilifiedScottish for not nailbands usuallysound,” shouldn’t their set away.toAus feeling ing a signature they– argue. “It seems that of elation, awe andcan jealousy floods my interesting brain and using a broad palette produce the most body as this menacing gang of awsomeness and enjoyable results.” Their particular palette reaps power theirof way throughmusical an incredible mix of the rewards a four-way input that doesn’t rock’n’roll, funk and rockabilly, driving the necessarily flr’n’b, ow naturally in the same direction.

films worth talking about

HOME OF THE EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

recommends this month... The Secret in Their Eyes 13 Aug to 9 Sep Directed by Juan José Campanella and showcasing two of Argentina’s biggest stars, this is a riveting thriller spiked with witty dialogue and poignant romance. Receiving rave reviews and awards, it was also the surprise winner of this year’s Oscar® for Best Foreign Language Film, beating off stiff competition from The White Ribbon and A Prophet.

Five Easy Pieces 13 Aug to 19 Aug A key work from an era that’s now considered the last Golden Age of American cinema, Bob Rafelson’s superlative character study established Jack Nicholson as the foremost actor of his generation. One of the few honest American films about social class, family and alienation. Don’t miss this wonderfully restored classic.

London Lesbian & Gay Film Festival On Tour 10 Aug to 2 Sep Highlights from this year’s hugely successful two-week festival, which took place in March at BFI Southbank. The season includes LLGFF Closing Night Gala Children of God, a fascinating and politically bold study of sexuality in the Bahamas; lesbian comedy And Then Came Lola; erotically charged crime thriller The Fish Child; acclaimed Argentinian drama Plan B; and two programmes of shorts, one for the girls and one for the boys!

August 7th-14th

It’s a Guaranteed Party

DAVID BAERSDAES LLA ST RTER FRANK N FU

• Tour Edinburgh's dramatic radical past • Investigating Rebus's Edinburgh

• Photographic exhibition 'The Bad and the Beautiful'

MON 8 - SAT 13 NOV BOX OFFICE 0844 871 7648

Get your free Filmhouse Loyalty Card supported by THE SKINNY Sign up for FREE!

• Film premiere of 'Morticia' by Nabil Shaban

Collect loyalty points and spend them on FREE tickets and DVDs!

• 3rd Annual Hamish Henderson memorial lecture • Aid for Afghanistan - a concert

• Why the finest comics in Edinburgh end up in Gorgie (BKG FEE) • Drama from SpartaKi Theatre Company

www.ambassadortickets.com/glasgow (BKG FEE)

FILMHOUSE 88 LOTHIAN ROAD EDINBURGH Box Office 0131 228 2688 BOOK ONLINE at www.filmhousecinema.com

WE NO LONGER CHARGE BOOKING FEES

See www.edinburghpeoplesfestival.org for further details and tickets OCTOBER 2010

AUGUST 2010

THE SKINNY 45

THE SKINNY 51


CLUBS

PREVIEWS Oni Ayhun, Oneohtrix Point Never & Veronica Vasicka Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club 30 Oct

We’re not going to lie, when Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club took a hiatus from hosting events in Glasgow a stab of pain ran through us. Like trying to cope with a bad break-up we promised that whatever the issue was, we could change, just please stay here and things can be different. Time heals all wounds apparently, but no sooner had we moved on than Huntleys and Palmers returns to Stereo in Glasgow on 30 Oct with some very impressive bookings indeed. Headlining the night is the mysterious Oni Ayhun, the minimal-techno-non-Fever Ray-half of a well known Scandanavian electronic outfit whose productions draw parallels to the melodic elements of Border Community, the bleepy techno of Ivan Smagghe and the more stripped back sound of Detroit. Wink wink, nudge nudge and all that. Oneohtrix Point Never has become a bit of a synth poster boy of 2010 – with The Wire and FACT Magazine enthusing over his recent output. He’s recently released on Tom, Konx Om Pax’s label and his track Returnal has been rereleased with an amazing remix featuring Antony & The Johnsons on vocals. Veronica Vasicka created her Minimal Wave label almost a decade ago and Stones Throw Records liked it so much they asked her to curate a brilliant, if not imaginatively titled, compilation going by the name of The Minimal Wave Tapes Volume One. Lastly, Numbers resident The Village Orchestra joins Huntleys and Palmers host Andrew Thomson on deck duties for what is likely to be the best night of the month.[Chris Duncan]

Oneohtrix Point Never

Oliver $ Kollektiv, 5 Nov

Following a successful first night Kollektiv returns to The Universal with a guest appearance from Oliver $. Hailing from Berlin, Oliver $’s unique take on house has gained mass support and regular play from the likes of Luciano, Ricardo Villalobos and Claude VonStroke. The tripped down vintage Chicago beat that lies within the A side of his iHope EP sets the scene, while B side Ginger Ale is like an audio equivalent of time travel, with elements of swing, jazz, smoky bars and happy dancing people. Yet again Oliver $ demonstrates his ability to take on any genre of music originating from anywhere in the world, build on what he needs and diligently translate his findings into forward thinking fresh house music, always with a cheeky twist. A perfect ambassador for modern house sounds. [Anna Seale]

Death Disco's favourite fellow Erol Alkan returns to fill The Arches to breaking point

Words: Chris Duncan Illustration: francesca waddell

11pm-3am, £5/£7

11pm-4am, £10/£12.50

www.clubkollektiv.com/

Floating Points ft. Fatima

Magnetic Man

Departure Lounge, 8 Oct

Mixed Bizness, 30 Oct

Classically trained musician and producer Sam Shepherd arrives at this month’s edition of Departure Lounge with a suitcase stuffed with what are formally known in the industry as “a bunch of dope-ass beats”. The contents of his luggage shift fluidly between Prins Thomas space disco and cascading waves of UK funky, all anchored by grooves that push Floating Point’s bassy, hip-hop and jazz flecked influences to the fore. Quite a mixed bag, then. Fatima, a frequent Floating Points collaborator, shares top billing, and for good reason – the Swede’s thick, syrupy vocals offer a seamless foil for Floating Point’s eclectic palate. Other treats on offer include Digital Jones, an Edinburgh duo that deal in jazz-informed rhythms, with a few flourishes of funk and minimal techno. Alongside the 8-piece ensemble line-up that Digital Jones will boast, residents Astroboy, Jiminez and Mr Zimbabwe complete the evening’s entertainment. Mind your passports. [Ray Philp]

While there was something inevitable about the formation of Magnetic Man given that dubstep’s popularity, relatively speaking, has already approached terminal velocity, the idea of a supergroup might well stick in the throat amongst many of the genre’s notoriously publicity-shy figureheads. Err, perhaps not the best way to introduce Benga, Skream and Artwork as the trio that make up Magnetic Man, but the aforementioned caveat thankfully doesn’t ring true of the threesome’s refreshing jig of neon laced 90s rave alongside more traditional dubstep signatures; ones that, thankfully, never threaten to veer into the wobble fixation of clownstep territory. Featuring alongside Magnetic Man on their visit to the Sub Club will be Katy B (you’ll likely ken her from Magnetic Man’s latest single, Perfect Stranger) and Boom Monk Ben, a long-standing pillar of the community and all round good egg thanks to his popular Mixed Bizness nights at Glasgow Art School. [Ray Philp]

10pm-3am, £10/£8

7.30pm, £12

Derrick Carter

Carte Blanche

Telefunken, 15 Oct

HYP?, 29 Oct

Derrick Carter’s pioneering sound has marked him out as one of the most influential people in the Chicago house scene, a true pillar of the community. In spite of being around longer than most other DJs it is his recent work on Classic that deserves a mention. As co-owner and close friend of the company, his musical and conceptual input has resulted in Classic becoming one of the leaders in the world of deep house. His first release was as Rednail with I Think of You, followed by Nu Pschidt and Hope under his own name. He combined woven scatting with sleepy minimal beats on Dreaming Again and skilfully cast his own low, sexy drawl over his trademark Carter grooves to form Boompty Boomp Theme, described by acid house legend Andy Weatherall as “the greatest house record of the year, if not the next two years.” High praise indeed. [Anna Seale]

For HYP? third birthday celebrations the talents of one of their favourite guests from nights gone by has been recruited as well as his newest partner in crime. Parisian Club king DJ Mehdi returns to HYP? after his awe-inspiring stint back in April 2008 alongside production master Riton, bringing their explosive joint DJ set to Glasgow for the first time. Having established themselves as two of the most respected and exciting names in electronic music, individually they have brought countless dance floor essentials courtesy of Ed Banger, Modular, Turbo, Get Physical and Phantasy Sound and have collaborated with Chromeo, Uffie, Primary 1, Soulwax and Justice to name a few. Their recent Black Billionaires EP is as good as it gets and has seen their stock continue to rise as well as the volume on our boomboxes. Not to be missed. [Anna Seale]

11pm-3am, £12

11pm-3am, £10/£12

46 THE SKINNY October 2010

Hello Old Friend

Erol Alkan probably doesn’t need any introduction to regular readers of this column. Known for his endless tours, tight productions, popular remixes and lanky frame, Erol Alkan rose to fame thanks largely to his former night Trash. Running into its final night in January 2007, Trash mixed various genres and aimed to remain at the forefront of electronic music at all times, drawing comparisons with Optimo Espacio for its ethos and school night debauchery. His remixes of Alter Egos’ Rocker and Mylo’s Drop The Pressure became the hits of 2004 and his re-rinses of Bloc Party, Death From Above 1979 and The Chemical Brothers followed shortly after. But it was his Glam Racket Rework of Franz Ferdinand’s Do You Want To that proved to be most effective, as it impressed the group so much that they incorporated elements of the remix into their live tour. 2006 also saw the beginning of studio collaborations with The Long Blondes, with Erol Alkan stepping into the producer’s role for the first time in his life. Asked to work on their debut single for Rough Trade, the session delivered Fulwood

Babylon, a melancholic record that gained admiration from The Mystery Jets, who approached Erol to collaborate on their new work. Later in 2006 Erol supported Madonna at KoKo in London and Daft Punk at Global Gathering, before being voted Mixmag’s DJ Of The Year, as well as Best International DJ. For years now, on the odd nights of the year that he’s not being Erol Alkan, he has been known to don the mantle of Mustapha 3000 and dabble in the mysterious rites of Beyond The Wizard’s Sleeve – described (on his site at least) as a “warped balearic psychedelic brotherhood... Part folk astronauts, part electronic necromancers”. They’ve remixed artists including Midlake, Tracey Thorn, Goldfrapp and completed their first major work, a four part series of EPs. Death Disco takes place at The Arches on 16 Oct, 10.30pm-3am, £14/£7. Erol Alkan appears alongside South Central, Monarchy and DD residents Plus on Fri 29 Oct at the Arches, Death Disco presents a Halloween Special with Jamaica LIVE) + Mopp (LIVE) + DD Residents. £8. 7pm doors.

The Arches, 253 Argyle Street, Glasgow 0141 565 1000 www.deathdisco.info


CLUBS

HIGHLIGHTS Monox calls it a day and the Wee Chill hosts its party in the Glasshouse this month as we run down the best both cities have to offer

COMEDY AT THE KING’S

WORDS: ANNA SEALE Assuming that you’ve lifted this issue on the very day that it arrives on the streets, you may just be in time to catch yet another treasured Glasgow night bow out on a high. Drawing to a close after ten years of cutting-edge bookings, Monox collapses in on itself on 1 Oct with a set from the inimitable DJ Funk. Ladies, consider this your warning. Monox’s brother in arms Numbers is thankfully showing no signs of slowing down, instead this month has them expanding their operation into the capital. Numbers begins its bi-weekly Edinburgh residency at Sneaky Pete’s on 15 Oct in suitable style with music from the formidable tour de force that is Jackmaster and Nelson. New weekly venture I AM takes place in the Sub Club every Tuesday evening with residents Beta and Kappa being joined on an almost weekly basis with a whole host of local talent. 26 Oct has both Delusions of Grandeur and Sister Saviour making their Subby debuts alongside the I AM boys. Pressure’s early outing at the Arches in October hosts a Drumcode label showcase, with residents Slam playing alongside Alan Fitzpatrick and Adam Beyer on 1 Oct, whilst Slam's Return To Mono night takes place on 8 Oct in the Sub Club with an exclusive set from Pan Pot. Over in Edinburgh, Substance celebrates its fourth birthday at the GRV on 9 Oct with an appearance from Leftfield’s Paul Daley, whilst 11 Oct sees DJ Zinc appear at Cabaret Voltaire. Meanwhile, Melting Pot goes back to its disco

roots on 2 Oct with a set from Greg Wilson, no doubt armed with his reel-to-reel machines and a puzzled look towards any laptops running Serato in the vicinity. After giving up the prestigious spot of Thursday nights at the Art School, RPZ has moved to Stereo and evolved into a monthly party. 29 Oct has Hushpuppy overseeing a Halloween themed event with the possibility of secret guests remaining a fairly safe bet. Slabs of the Tabernacle returns to La Cheetah on 2 Oct with an Abstract Records showcase featuring a DJ set from Deixis and live sets from Morphology and Arne Weinberg. Maintaining the same party music policy as Slabs of the Tabernacle, Highlife focuses on “future sounds from the across the black Atlantic diaspora – everything from Chicago house, Detroit techno and disco to Cumbia, UK funky and Afrobeat” and is hosted by Brian D’Souza of Slabs and Andrew Thomson of Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club – a meeting of two greater minds you couldn’t hope to meet. Look out for further dates to be announced at La Cheetah throughout October and November. Finally, September’s Wee Chill has been moved to 23 Oct, taking place within the Glasshouse in Queen’s Park. Full line up has yet to be announced but with stages being hosted by Optimo and Sensu and after parties taking place in the Admiral and Sub Club until the wee hours, it’s bound to be a date to remember.

STEWART LEE

VEGETABLE STEW

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October 2010

THE SKINNY 47


REVIEWS October Events

FILM

From 8-10 Oct head to Glasgow Film Theatre for Scotland Loves Anime, a showcase of Japanese animation preceded by short films made in Scotland. Guests include the director and producer of Trigun Badlands Rumble, Satoshi Nishimura and Shigeru Kitayama. The selection of films include the latest adventure of Nintendo gaming character Professor Layton (Professor Layton and the Eternal Diva, 9 Oct) and Redline (10 Oct), in which a man must win a high stakes illegal car race. If you can’t make it to Glasgow, the Filmhouse in Edinburgh is also hosting the event from 15-17 Oct. Throughout October, the Filmhouse is the place

the hunter

The Hunter

Buried

Director: Rafi Pitts

Director: Rodrigo Cortés

Starring: Rafi Pitts, Mitra Hajjar Released: 29 Oct Certificate: 15

Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Ivana Miño, Stephen Tobolowsky, Samantha Mathis Released: 29 Sep Certificate: 15

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Having just been released from Iranian prison, Ali Alavi (Rafi Pitts) attempts to settle into family life by taking a job as a night watchman and spending time with his wife and young child. One day, tragedy strikes at the hands of the authorities – something snaps and Alavi embarks on a mission for revenge. He clearly already harbours a pre-existing grudge. State machinery has taken a hard toll on him, although whether he is a political dissident or common crook is not certain, but he is treated with disdain and inflexibility at every turn. Pitts’ filmmaking is formally accomplished, whether evoking all-consuming grief in night-time shots by the highway, painterly compositions in forested landscapes, or the most unsensational yet gripping car chase. The Hunter boasts phenomenal sound design, with a score manipulating environmental noise, unnerving drums and ear-piercing gunshots. Carefully paced, mute and primal, this is a quietly affecting cinematic gem. [James P. Campbell]

From the first minute of Buried to the last, we are stuck inside a wooden coffin alongside Paul Conroy (Ryan Reynolds), an American truck driver being held for ransom in Iraq. Director Rodrigo Cortés never cuts away to the outside world, which is the film’s masterstroke, as any glimpse of daylight would have surely punctured the almost unbearable tension it so carefully cultivates. Instead, Cortés focuses on finding the most inventive ways to shoot his protagonist’s ordeal, utilising outstanding contributions from his cinematographer (often lighting scenes with just a mobile phone or small flame) and the exceptional sound design to maintain a sense of sweaty, gut-wrenching intensity. At 95 minutes, the film is nicely paced. Screenwriter Chris Sparling times his various narrative developments well, even if some of the storytelling is awkward and a couple of twists come off as a little too cruel. Nevertheless, Buried grabs the viewer and rarely lets its hold slip, playing on our universal fears with great skill. [Philip Concannon]

Restrepo

Mary and Max

Director: Tim Hetheringon, Sebastian Junger

Director: Adam Elliot

Released: 8 Oct Certificate: TBC

Starring: Toni Collette, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Eric Bana, Barry Humphries Released: 22 Oct Certificate: TBC

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Considering the controversy surrounding last year’s Associated Press photograph of a dying US marine (deemed appalling by the disgusted and insightful by the agency), it’s a shock to see Restrepo’s cameras pick up and hold in sight a fallen American soldier. While upsetting, it is just one of Restrepo’s numerous brave inclusions, which together constitute fresh insight into the lives of soldiers fighting in Afghanistan. The anguished tears shed by the deceased’s brothers in arms highlight something frequently missing from war documentaries; a genre all too often preoccupied with either celebrating machismo or demonising and deploring their subject (this despite co-director Sebastian Junger’s tendency towards a gung-ho, adrenalised style in his written work). These soldiers aren’t adverse to knuckleheaded cultural insensitivity, nor uncomfortably joyous violence; moreover, the film itself provides little space for the Afghan perspective. But Restrepo gazes unflinchingly on those at the heart of a contentious conflict and renders their experience viscerally and – most importantly – humanely. [Chris Buckle]

A very unusual friendship forms the heart of Mary and Max, Adam Elliot’s enchanting stopmotion animated debut feature. Mary (Toni Collette) is a lonely 8 year-old living in Australia who strikes up a pen pal relationship with Max (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a middle-aged, Jewish man with Asperger’s Syndrome from New York. As it charts this friendship over the course of two decades, Mary and Max emerges as a tale that’s both funny and sad, with Elliot’s screenplay finding a perfect emotional pitch throughout. The film’s animation style is distinctive and hugely imaginative, employing a wonderful use of colour (Mary’s gifts introduce bright hues into Max’s grey world) and some great visual gags, but it ultimately succeeds because of its resonant central story. Mary and Max is a touching portrayal of two lonely souls finding an unlikely connection, and it presents us with two of the year’s most memorable film characters, who are brought to vivid life by Collette and Hoffman’s outstanding vocal performances. [Philip Concannon]

Peeping Tom

Jackboots on Whitehall

Director: Michael Powell

Director: Edward McHenry, Rory McHenry

Starring: Karlheinz Böhm, Anna Massey Released: 29 Oct Certificate: 18

Starring: Ewan McGregor, Rosamund Pike, Timothy Spall, Richard O’Brien, Alan Cumming, Richard E. Grant Released: 8 Oct Certificate: TBC

rrrrr Fifty years after its notorious debut, Peeping Tom returns to cinemas in all its creepy and lurid Technicolor glory for audiences’ voyeuristic pleasure. It’s the kind of release that this tragic film, which destroyed director Michael Powell’s career, was unjustifiably denied in its own time. Vilified by contemporary critics who branded it as merely a perverse snuff film, Peeping Tom is a complex ‘film about film’, wrapped up in a portrait of a damaged mind. The viewer is immediately, sympathetically aligned with Mark, an abused and juvenille man, whose occupations include film studio cameraman, seedy erotic photographer and obsessive serial killer. Mark’s method of killing is highly disturbing – his camera has a spike for impaling and a mirror so that his victims can witness their own grizzly deaths. A fearless interrogation of the murderous voyeurism of cinema, Peeping Tom is more relevant today in our image-obsessed, screen-saturated society than ever before. [Rachel Bowles]

48 THE SKINNY October 2010

rr A British film with an all-star voice cast, including Timothy Spall, Ewan McGregor and Richard E. Grant, Jackboots on Whitehall offers an alternative version of WWII history, in which the Nazis invade London. Realised through animated puppets it will inevitably be compared to Team America:World Police, a likeness that does it no favours. Whilst both are political satires and feature a cast of dolls, Team America is far superior in its script and style, leaving Jackboots feeling like little more than a poor imitation, right down to the PG-rated doll sex scene. After focusing the ridicule firmly on non-British characters (the Germans, a dense American and stereotypical Frenchman), the film’s few jokes quickly run thin, until the English are forced to relocate to Scotland. Here, thankfully, Jackboots ends on a high note, with a tongue-in-cheek cameo from Stephen Merchant and some subtitled Scottish heathens to save the day. [Becky Bartlett]

Summer Wars

to be for any fans of surrealism, with Screening Surrealism, a season of some of the most iconic and important films of the genre. Included in the programme is Jean Cocteau’s Blood of a Poet, one of the most influential surrealist films in the history of cinema, on 5 Oct and Dreams that Money Can Buy on 19 Oct, a film featuring dream sequences by artists and filmmakers including Man Ray, Max Ernst and Hans Richter. Make the most of this rare opportunity to see these films on the big screen.

Blood of a poet

In Glasgow, Document 8 returns to the CCA from 26-31 Oct. The only dedicated human rights film festival in Scotland, Document’s programme is still to be announced, but one can expect a packed few days of hard-hitting documentaries from around the world, as well as panel discussions, Q&A sessions, exhibitions, events and more. Keep an eye on their website for further details. Glasgay! is returning from 14 Oct – 13 Nov. The annual celebration of queer culture has an eclectic film programme, including John Waters’ controversial cult classic Pink Flamingos showing on 15 Oct, which catapulted the director and his lead, Divine, to stardom on its initial release in 1972. The festival also boasts films from Greece and Argentina, as well as Sally Potter’s adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando (26 Oct). Finally, music fans can head to the Cameo in Edinburgh on 11 Oct for Keith James: The Great Canadian Song Book, in which James interprets the music of Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen and Neil Young in a special solo concert. The event will also screen a special documentary on Joni Mitchell. [Becky Bartlett]

keith james


FLIM

DVD REVIEWS NO IMPACT MAN

NIGHT OF THE DEMONS

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

DIRECTOR: LAURA GABBERT, JUSTIN SCHEIN

DIRECTOR: ADAM GEIRASCH

DIRECTOR: OLIVER STONE

STARRING: COLIN BEAVAN RELEASED: 25 OCT CERTIFICATE: 15

STARRING: SHANNON ELIZABETH, EDWARD FURLONG, MONICA KEENA RELEASED: 11 OCT CERTIFICATE: 18

STARRING: HUGO CHAVEZ, EVO MORALES, OLIVER STONE, TARIQ ALI RELEASED: 4 OCT CERTIFICATE: E

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No Impact Man documents the year in which writer Colin Beavan and his family attempted to reduce their carbon emissions to zero. They begin by recycling, giving up powered transport (including elevators) and eating only local produce, and work their way up to turning off the electricity in their New York apartment. Along the way Colin becomes a minor celebrity, alternately praised and vilified by an American media that is obsessed with the fact he has made his family give up toilet paper. These experiments in living occupy a murky area where sincerity and self-promotion bleed into each other, and are inevitably so arbitrary that they succeed or fail on the personality of their protagonist. Sadly, Colin has none of the garrulous humour or charisma of a Morgan Spurlock, and emerges as a control freak with little to say that we don’t already know. And he never tells us what he uses instead of toilet paper. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

Leading with footage of Fox News and its right-wing cohorts acting foolish, South of the Border seems to aim for populist agitprop a la Michael Moore. But Moore, for all his faults, is rarely sycophantic, and though this avoids Comandante’s chummy pointlessness, Oliver Stone does little to restore his blunted reputation. If Stone’s aim was to counter US attempts to characterise an uncooperative southern hemisphere as a threat, then he succeeds. But painting Hugo Chavez with the depth and nuance of a Che T-shirt hardly does the subject justice, nor do encounters with other South American leaders, so brief there’s barely time to patronisingly ask Argentina’s Kirchner how many shoes she owns or film Evo Morales playing football. We learn Chavez’s baseball position (pitcher) and bed-time (3am), but the elephant in the room – Venezuela’s human rights record – is ignored with a shrug that Colombia’s is worse; perhaps, but that doesn’t absolve Chavez, nor does it absolve Stone of missed opportunities. [Chris Buckle]

THE LOSERS

BROTHER

LAST TRAIN HOME

DIRECTOR: SYLVAIN WHITE

DIRECTOR: TAKESHI KITANO

DIRECTOR: LIXIN FAN

STARRING: JEFFREY DEAN MORGAN, ZOE SALDANA, CHRIS EVANS, IRIS ELBA, JASON PATRIC RELEASED: 11 OCT CERTIFICATE: 12

STARRING: BEAT TAKESHI, OMAR EPPS RELEASED: 4 OCT CERTIFICATE: 18

STARRING: SUQIN CHEN, CHANGHUA ZHAN RELEASED: 11 OCT CERTIFICATE: E

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A crack commando unit are framed for a crime that they didn’t commit and have to go on the run to clear their names. If you can find them … Cue brass section. Oh, hang on. It’s not The A-Team. It’s The Losers. With the saturated colours and attention deficit direction of a pop promo, this comic book adaptation (yer another) is long on pyrotechnics and quips, and notably short on plot and characterisation. Yet by shunning stars in favour of an ensemble of lesser known actors the movie is able to deliver its laughs and thrills with an amiable efficiency. This is undercut by a disconcertingly coy attitude towards violence – no doubt to gain a younger audience share – which only serves to raise comparisons to a certain Saturday afternoon kids’ show again. In an underwritten role, Jason Patric camps it up as a globe-trotting evil genius in a white suit, The Man from Del Monte gone bad. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

‘be aware, you are missing something of a minor classic’

“You Japanese are so inscrutable”. It is a relief when a character says this in Brother for Beat Takeshi always has me reaching for the thesaurus to avoid the dreaded I-word. In this crosscultural gangster tale Takeshi, his granite features troubled by only the merest tic, plays a Yakuza exiled to LA. Once there, he wastes no time in showing his younger brother’s team of incompetent pushers how to do violence the Japanese way, and in the process builds a criminal empire. Cheerful stereotyping abounds – Italian mobsters sip wine and listen to opera while the Yakuza are never happier than when chopping off fingers or disembowelling each other. Takeshi’s story-telling (he also writes and directs) is as opaque as his acting, favouring a mix of violence, slapstick and curiously redundant scenes. While this has proved intriguing in his Japan-set films, it suffers from the move to Holywood movie territory where we expect more plot and less whimsy. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

Screening across Scotland from 8 October

Each year China’s 130 million migrant workers travel home to celebrate Chinese New Year with their families. These arduous journeys from smog-shrouded cities to ancestral villages populated only by the young and the old represent the world’s largest human migration. They are also the only occasion when many parents will see the children that they have left in the care of grandparents. Last Train Home follows a single family as they negotiate both the tumult of a transport system stretched to breaking point, and the vast emotional gulfs that have been opened up between generations by China’s embrace of consumer capitalism. With a camera that has an almost supernatural ability to penetrate situations which are both physically terrifying (a stampede at a railway station) and emotionally overwhelming (a father’s despair), this wonderful documentary is both an intimate study of human relations and a sobering portrait of a society being pulled apart by the centrifugal forces of unfettered development. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

Yvonne Rainer: Dance and Film 5-10 October 2010 www.tramway.org 0845 330 3501

Yvonne Rainer, Trio A, performed by Rainer at the Portland Center for Visual Arts, 1973

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TV Bomb

Freddy vs Jason veteran Monica Keena does well in this low rent remake of the 80s sex ‘n’ splatter classic, but it’s Edward Furlong as a strung out gatecrashing drug dealer who steals the show. Bug-eyed and swollen, the former T2 actor looks like he’s crawled out of his own career grave moments earlier to make the gig and brings some hardcore reality to an obviously daft plot that has the hordes of hell possessing the usual teenage suspects at an exclusive Halloween party in a New Orleans mansion with a dark history. Despite the nudity, sex and some occasionally impressive gore this isn’t nearly as extreme as the original and sags too often to stop a horror fan’s attention wandering. But the cast are having a good time, Keena and the desperate Furlong especially, and it’s hard to really dislike something so totally unafraid to be what it is: shameless horror trash. [Scotty McKellar]

THE WORK ROOM

OCTOBER 2010

THE SKINNY 49


ART

REVIEWS

Studio Projects 22 & 23 Market Gallery 12 Sep - 9 Oct

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The two concurrent studio projects at Market Gallery this autumn address how we represent reality. There is something of the slavish will to reproduce our surroundings in all its intricate hyperreality in these two large-scale installations. They contain the very futility of the Sisyphean act of replicating the world around us, and hold up a mirror to our ineffectuality in the face of nature. Firstly, Kari Stewart covers an entire wall with an image of what looks like a rippling sea or a rolling desert. Painstakingly reproduced in graphite or charcoal, the image goes slightly off kilter as the surface undulates to the right. This clear distortion of the picture plane seems to reference the original image, perhaps a photograph, from which the likeness is taken. It wants to expose its irreality, that it is a representation of a representation.

Next door Kate V Robertson has installed a huge boulder in the centre of the room. Grey and craggy it sits stout and inert; how it got there is little understood. Wedged between floor and ceiling, its muted tones complement the gallery’s subdued interior. On circling the work one begins to see the flaws in the rock’s surface, that like Stewart’s work Robertson’s rock is an outright fake, brazenly flaunting itself as a forgery. What’s more, Robertson’s sculpture brings to light the ongoing crisis within art, that we can no longer represent the world by appealing to outmoded notions of reality. She seems to illustrate the very distance between the world and our representations. Is it perhaps too pretentious to suggest that here lies the inherent sadness of the human condition: the insurmountable gap between us and the world around us? [Andrew Cattanach] www.marketgallery.org.uk

films worth talking about

HOME OF THE EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

50 THE SKINNY October 2010

Robert Barry: Words and Music The Common Guild 4 Sep - 6 Nov

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It’s perhaps no coincidence that The Common Guild, housed in a building owned by Douglas Gordon, has decided to exhibit Robert Barry, one of Gordon’s biggest influences. Barry’s use of text and minimal gestures has had a profound effect on a whole generation of artists that includes Martin Creed and Ian Hamilton Finlay, as well as the aforementioned Gordon. In this, a new work made specifically for The Common Guild, Barry has made what he calls a ‘word space’ in direct response to the gallery, plastering the walls, floor, ceiling and windows with words that relate to their surroundings. An uppercase, sans serif font in silver foil, the text strikingly resonates with the cool domesticity of the gallery, a grand tenement building in Glasgow’s wealthy Park Circus. The play of light and colour reflecting off the lettering slightly disorientates, at times giving a false sense of depth and transparency.

Formally, there is a delicate dialogue between the gallery and the work, with the two intermingling in a play of mutual reflection. Nonetheless, the words chosen give the exhibition a slightly twee flavour. MEANING, ENCOUNTER, DESPAIR, BEYOND are just a few of the words used, each seeming to allude to a depth of meaning and profundity while simultaneously remaining completely anodyne. Included is a new video work in which Barry has filmed the American artist William Anastasi playing the piano – badly. The image of the seated pianist is obscured by similarly insipid words in the same font as those on the gallery’s surface. The image is poorly framed and the monitor chosen by Barry creates a homely feel that runs counter to that of the installation. There is something strikingly dated about the earnestness of Barry’s work that might leave the younger, more cynical viewers blushing. Under the aloof, minimal façade lies a true belief in the power of words.[Andrew Cattanach] 21 Woodlands Terrace, Glasgow www.thecommonguild.org.uk


REVIEWS

READING

A LIFE IN PICTURES BY ALASDAIR GRAY

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A Life in Pictures is just that, and a treat it is too. The book is a beautifully produced selection of Gray’s art over 300 pages, with extensive text by Gray himself to explain a little about the pictures, and his life at the time they were painted – it’s as close to an autobiography as we’re likely to get. It’s frankly excellent, and even Gray’s long time critical foe Sidney Workman says as much on the flyleaf. That’s that review done, so I’ll spend the rest of this space by asking if you’d kindly consider the post-postscript of the book, in which Gray makes a sales pitch. What, you say, has Gray sold out? No, dear reader, he’s advertising a book for charity. Nellimeg’s Book is a charitable venture designed to raise funds for Enable Glasgow, one of the charities that supports people like Helen Margaret (Hence ‘Nelly –meg’) Hind, the disabled daughter of Gray’s friends Archie and Eleanor Hind. Gray has been drawing pictures for her for years, and this book is a selection of them. It’s £10, and, though short, is for a good cause, which this reviewer chooses to highlight for probably obvious reasons. Details can be found at www. alasdairgrayfoundation.org. [Keir Hind]

DIGITAL

RELEASE DATE 7 OCT. PUBLISHED BY CANONGATE. COVER PRICE £35

THE LONG GLASGOW KISS

PUFFIN BY DESIGN

BY CRAIG RUSSELL

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rrrr “If there’s one thing I can say about your veiled threats, Superintendent, it’s that they’re all threat and no veil.” The cynical, wise-cracking private eye has a long tradition in the US – think Chandler, Spillane and Hammett – but Craig Russell is one of few British writers to have successfully transplanted the concept into a milieu still largely overshadowed by Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie. This second novel to feature the Glasgow-born Canadian and Second World War veteran Lennox, it remains an effective introduction for a man who doesn’t really like himself but understands how well-suited he is to his current environment, with Russell skillfully filling in whatever back story you need to know. With some remarkably light strokes, he also puts you right beneath that ‘ship-iron sky’ that overshadows the ‘mend-and-make-do’ city that was 1950s Glasgow – as near a Wild West as you can imagine with vicious crime kings, stupid thugs and just as nasty cops. Full of sharply defined characters, this gripping tale of murder, boxing, missing persons and big criminality is equally involving as a portrait of a Second City of the Empire that really was another world – a mere 60 years away. [Paul F Cockburn] OUT NOW. PUBLISHED BY QUERCUS. COVER PRICE: £12.99

PHORM AND PHUNCTION Is fashion case-deep?

BITE-SIZED TECH NUGGETS WITH ALEX COLE

THE FEED

A friend of mine and I were talking over a pint about how other people buy phones – by other people, we meant non-nerds. He knew someone who’d bought a cheapo phone three generations old and guaranteed to break in a year, and he asked her why she’d bought that, instead of an iPhone or Android mobile. “None of the other phones came in pink,” she said. There was a time when people had to dial up the internet on their phone lines (it sucked, but never mind). Since only the nerds really played with it, it didn’t really matter what it looked like. Nerds cared about the processor and operating system, not the colour. Now we get this internet business over the air (better!) and the internet is the playground of every 14 year old with an abiding love of Justin Bieber or X Factor. Now, computers live in more pockets than desks, and now everybody has one. And everybody could care less about the processor inside a phone. They only care if it looks cool. And for nerds, that’s just nonsense talk. The iPhone took the mobile world by surprise not because it did anything new (it didn’t), but because it made smartphones shiny. Mobiles weren’t just bits of plastic, they were fashion statements. For every person who said they’d never need the internet on their phone, Apple showed them how cool they’d look if they did. But for nerds who can still put a computer together from spare parts, form follows function. We like looking cool, sure, but to our minds

BY PHIL BAINES

Penguin and Puffin books have been celebrating their 80th anniversary this year, and this lovely little book is a tribute to the design of the Puffin Books range over the years. There’s also a Penguin by Design book, but this one is probably the more evocative, because it deals with books that will jog childhood memories. The book is mostly arranged chronologically, and so there’s great pleasure to be had in flipping through and seeing how book design has evolved over 80 years – especially book design for kids, which has the most judgmental audience, but also the most appreciative when done right. Sure, it’s the guilty pleasure of judging books by their covers, but it’s a small guilt. Many will be recognisable, either from personal ownership, or in many people’s cases, from school libraries that retained aged books for differing reasons. Some are particularly amusing, like the ones from the seventies or eighties with photographic covers, revealing bad fashions of the time, and some are simply classic, like Quentin Blake’s illustrated covers for Roald Dahl. The casual browser will be well entertained by this comprehensive volume, while anyone with an interest in design will probably enjoy every page. [Ryan Agee] OUT NOW. PUBLISHED BY PENGUIN (WHO ELSE?) COVER PRICE £20

HALO: REACH PUBLISHER: MICROSOFT GAME STUDIOS RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW CONSOLE(S): XBOX 360 PRICE: £36.99

rrrrr Halo is so closely linked with the first person shooter genre that it’s hard to imagine what shooters were like before it. The series did so many things right, from intuitive controls to good weapon balance to adding a real sense of atmosphere to an already stale genre, enough so that the succeeding games didn’t have to reinvent the wheel to make it fun. And here we are with Bungie’s last run at Halo, jumping back before the main saga and putting you in the role of a Spartan soldier joining up with a veteran squad, tasked with holding a planet against the evil Covenant aliens. The story does a

NOVGOROD THE GREAT BY ANDREW DRUMMOND

rrr Andrew Drummond’s Novgorod the Great is an intriguing historical novel set primarily in Russia, but ambitiously broad in scope. In 1833, two travellers meet at an inn in the city of Novgorod the Great. This chance meeting between Ksenia, a young widow and Horatio, a merchant and former slave, produces a night full of tales about love, life and death between them and the numerous characters they meet. This is the most successful part of the novel, as the tales range into entertainingly bizarre areas. A second narrative in the novel follows the story of Ksenia’s deceased husband, John Dundas Cochrane, a former Royal Navy commander, as he reminisces with his disinterested father, Colonel Andrew Cochrane-Johnston, about his world travels and epic journey across Russia. At times Novgorod the Great lacks pace, especially when the story drifts into long internal monologues, and Drummond can also overuse adverbs in his writing. However, the main characters are well written and it is quite comedic at times – chapter titles such as, ‘Never mind London, he said, help me to piss,’ emphasise this. Overall, Novgorod the Great tells a good story and is an enjoyable read. [John G. Fagan] OUT NOW. PUBLISHED BY POLYGON. COVER PRICE £9.99

killer job of making your squaddies real people you care about, and giving the missions in the game some purpose and meaning. Flat dialogue aside, there’s a real sense of place that sets the Halo series apart from other FPSs. But Halo isn’t Halo without multiplayer, and here the re-worked map and voting systems let everyone have a say in how a game gets made. Armour customisations give you an interesting choice of abilities to match your play style, and while this is still Halo to the core (which comes with pre-pubescent snots calling everything and everyone gay), there’s a whole lot of options to explore in maps and level design that gives a real sense of depth to the experience. Bottom line, this is Halo at its best. If you like this kind of game even a little, you’ll have fun with it, but then, you’ve probably already pre-ordered it anyway. Fanboy. [Alex Cole]

a slick-looking handset that doesn’t have 3G and can’t run Twitter is a waste of cash. Nerds love the newest generation hardware because it’s new, because it does just a few more things, and just a little better. Who cares what colour it comes in? Thing is, lusting for new touchscreens or pretty looks are still, at the end of the day, following fashion. Something that changes all the time, and, nerd or normal person, we’re never satisfied with last season’s model. Especially if it comes in pink.[Alex Cole]

TWITTER GETS A MAKEOVER, COMPLAINERS FEEL ODD TWEETING THEIR DISLIKE • APPLE RELEASES ITS DEATH-GRIP ON HOW PEOPLE MAKE APPS (JUST A LITTLE) • NEW HTC ANDROID PHONES DEAD SLICK, MAY ALMOST MAKE PEOPLE SEE SOMETHING OTHER THAN IPHONE • UK COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND ISPS SETTLE PIRACY BILL FOR WHO PAYS FOR COURT CHARGES, STILL SUCKS FOR EVERYONE • MICROSOFT PREVIEWS NEW VERSION OF INTERNET EXPLORER, SURPRISINGLY UN-HORRIBLE • A COMPUTER WORM PROMISING FREE PORN VIDEOS CRIPPLES BIG BIZ, KARMA REJOICES

OCTOBER 2010

THE SKINNY 51


PERFORM

Venue of the Month:

Tron

More than a theatre words: Gareth K Vile When Andy Arnold moved from The Arches to The Tron, he was arriving at a very different theatre to the one he left. While The Arches has a reputation for new work, and an atmosphere that converts every show into a site responsive extravaganza, The Tron has a classic theatrical arch and has drifted between the populist and the experimental. Arnold has not so much redirected the Tron as found a surer balance between the populist and experimental: the return of DC Jackson’s popular dysfunctional family in The Chooky Brae this year has been countered by an increased use of the smaller Changing House for a series of challenging plays, while his Mayfesto was a brave attempt to revive an old Glasgow festival with a political edge. Equally, The Tron has been open to outside influence: the competition in association with the NTS, Open Stage, may not have found any new voices, but it has led to the development of three new plays from established authors – including CARS award winner Rob Drummond –  and winner Sea and Land and Sky from Abigail Doherty, which is premiered this month. Directed by Arnold himself, SLS looks back to WWI for a story of love, loss and dark humour. Although Arnold did not select the winner himself, the play has the classic Arnold combination. Fascinated by sparse, terse scripts – he is a master director of Beckett – it has a strong cast, an emotive background and the potential for serious dialogue and revelatory climaxes, plus the guy who played Winston in Still Game, Paul Riley.

Blood Sweat and Tears @ dundee rep

photo: Bill Cooper

Having showcased the duet at Edinburgh Fringe, sometime Scottish Dance Theatre confederate – she choreographed their elegant Luxuria – Liv Lorent brings her Blood Sweat and Tears to the Dundee Rep. “Much of my work has an autobiographical perspective,” she notes. “This piece was influenced by becoming a first time mother two years ago. The experience was so overwhelming to my life in every way I could not help but put that into work.” Meditating on themes of unconditional love, as well as the very real impact a child has on the parents’ lifestyle, Blood Sweat and Tears features a full cast of seven, and follows Lorent’s characteristic aesthetic. “I suppose that what I love about the

52 THE SKINNY October 2010

Dirty Paradise, a monologue based on a story by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, is a fine example of how Arnold has opened up the building to other groups: it is part of The Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival, and directed by Alison Peebles. Peebles, fresh from David Leddy’s Sub Rosa and currently working on Panic Patterns for Glasgay! has a good claim to be the hardest working woman in Scottish performance: this one hander, that deals in magic realism and hallucination, is both written and performed by Leann O’Kasi, who superbly directed Top Dog/Under Dog at the Citizens last year. The smaller spaces at the Tron are equally open to exciting events: the Victoria Bar regularly hosts The Supper Club Cabaret, alongside Club Sublime – led by Blind Girl and the Crips, this monthly special is curated by the ever imaginative Sounds of Progress – with Lost in Digression joining them from October. Dedicated to anti-heroes, riot grrls, nancy boys and anyone who has never quite managed to find their way back, Lost is a salon for the post-burlesque cabaret. As the latest posters advertising the season suggest, the Tron is attempting to be far more than just a theatre: the various rehearsed readings, the arrival of Traverse hit Midsummer and the visits from community poetry slammers Word Factory all combine to generate an atmosphere of constant activity and creativity. It may not be The Arches in audience or intention, or atmosphere and continuity, but Arnold’s Tron is finding a logical direction for a traditional theatre space to break the mould. Leann O'Kasi in Dirty Paradise www.tron.co.uk

subject matter of the arrival of a new baby and its impact on a couple's relationship is that it is a very dramatic and yet very common experience,” she continues. “I seek empathy of experience in other artists' work in whatever discipline, and equally that is what I want to offer.” The taster at the Fringe revealed a choreography that focused both on the technique of the dancers and the fragmenting of the emotional connection between mother and father, as the baby moves between them. Over the three stages of Blood, Sweat and Tears, the struggles, defeats and victories are given a more comprehensive study, and Lorent’s distinctive use of sound, light and costume promise an immersive, seductive parenthood. [Gareth K Vile] Dundee Rep Theatre, 6 Oct, 7.30pm, from £10 www.dundeereptheatre.co.uk

Alvin Ailey @ Edinburgh Festival Theatre Although it may lack the familiarity of Swan Lake or Giselle, Revelations is the most viewed piece in modern dance. Having been the signature work of Alvin Ailey’s company since its creation in 1960, it still retains an emotional intensity and instant accessibility over twenty years after Ailey’s untimely death. Alvin Ailey’s vision of a dance company that would bring African-American cultural expression and the American modern dance tradition to the world began with the foundation of the company in 1958: Revelations was an early fusion of African American Spirituals, contemporary dance and a fierce social conscience. Looking back at the days of slavery, but also celebrating

elegance, style and faith, Revelations is a rare example of contemporary dance that is resistant to changing fashions. That its political engagement has not been dulled by the years is either testament to Ailey’s vision or a sad comment on how little has changed. Following Ailey’s death, the company has both cherished his classics, and developed new work. Also on the bill at the EFT is another signature piece, Judith Jamison’s Hymn – itself a tribute to Ailey – and a new commission from Christopher Huggins, Anointed. Through these three works, the company demonstrate how they remember their founder, celebrate his legacy and move forward. [Gareth K Vile] Edinburgh Festival Theatre 19- 20 Oct, 7.30pm Various prices www.alvinailey.org


COMEDY

In Profile: Zoe Lyons

Book Romeo and Juliet and The Importance of Being Earnest together and you’ll SAVE £10!*

SPECIAL OFFER

Introducing a new series profiling some of the best acts gigging around Scotland in the coming month words: Jen Lavery ILLUStration: Missy McCullough

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22 October– 20 Novembe r

October 17 September–16 Despite having swiftly become one of the best known and most successful female comedians on the stand-up circuit, Zoe Lyons has described herself as a ‘world class procrastinator’ and it was only at the age of 32, after both a degree in psychology and training at drama school that she decided stand-up was where her heart truly lay. Lyons became so anxious before her second performance that she briefly lost the sight in one eye. Undeterred, she gigged solidly and went on to be a finalist in both So You Think You’re Funny? and the BBC’s New Talent competition, and came top in the Funny Women awards just seven months after her first gig. Lyons is up in Scotland this month for gigs at the Glasgow Stand, including at Swinging Sunday Sparkler as part of Glasgay!. In fact, she’s been promoting gay and gay friendly comedy since beginning Bent Double – her own night at Komedia Brighton. She was made a matron of the Pride Festival in 2007 and has featured in The Independent’s ‘Pink List’. However, Lyons eschews the label of ‘lesbian comedian’ and, like many other comedians of both sexes, tires of the ongoing ‘Are women funny?’ debate. Lyons attracted controversy in 2008 when Dave awarded her the Best Joke of the Fringe for the line “Amy Winehouse – I find her so

irritating, I don’t know why that woman has to selfharm. I can’t believe she can’t find someone to do it for her.” This attracted criticism from Germaine Greer,who described Lyons as “having the potential to be astonishingly vicious.” In response Lyons accused Greer herself of misogyny and narrow-mindedness: “Germaine said it was a joke that she thought most women would find extremely unfunny. ‘Women’ would find it extremely unfunny? That’s just not true and an incredibly patronising thing to say… It angered me, because if a woman takes the piss out of another woman she’s just being a bitch. How dare she! Does she not know how vulnerable we are? But if a man takes the mick out of another guy he’s just ‘being a bloke’.” With a lovely, friendly style, Lyons mixes bemused comment on being denoted an ‘influential lesbian’ with more random anecdotes from her life. Watch out for her at The Stand, Glasgow this month and at the Glasgow International Comedy Festival next March. See Zoe at The Stand, Glasgow, 14-17 Oct, including Glasgay’s Swinging Sunday Sparkler on the 17th at 8:30 (doors open 7:30), £6(£5) Also look out for her show at the Glasgow International Comedy Festival 2011 www.zoelyons.co.uk/

New Act of the Month:

Stuart Mitchell Aget: 27.  Based in: East Kilbride. First gig: February 2009, Laughing Horse New Act of the Year [given special mention by the judges]. Number of gigs: Over 150. Best gig? To 900 people at the 02 Academy at a benefit for Spirit Aid in August. I was the only new act on the bill – it was a great experience. How did you get into comedy? I saw a course advertised at Metropolitan College, run by Charlie Ross. It sounded fun, and I did well at the showcase. Then I decided about three months ago that this is what I really want. I went part time to focus on gigging all over the country, down in England as well as Scotland. I’m up every day at 6am to focus on writing. How would you describe your comedy?  It’s almost going down the old school route – very laugh-per-minute stuff, mixing one liners with observational humour. It gets dark at points, but I make sure I’ve got the audience on my side. I’ve been changing my persona recently – becoming

2010

*This offer is valid for Stalls and Grand Circle and only on full price tickets. Both shows must be bought at the same time. No refunds on previously bought tickets. Offer ends 16 October 2010.

BOX OFFICE: 0131 248 4848 GROUPS 8+: 0131 248 4949 www.lyceum.org.uk Company No. SC062065 Scottish Charity Registered No. SC010509

T H E

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7 NIGHTS A WEEK

333 Woodlands Road, Glasgow STUART WITH TIM VINE

less deadpan and breaking down the fourth wall, being more real. Who are your heroes on the Scottish comedy scene?  Stu Who? is a prodigy of Scottish comedy and one of the most supportive people to new acts. He’s sort of an idol and I’ve love to gig with him. [Lizzie Cass-Maran] See Stuart at gigs around Scotland this month, including Paisley Arts Centre on the 7 Oct and SNAFU, Aberdeen, on 19 Oct

0870 600 6055 5 York Place, Edinburgh

0131 558 7272 www.thestand.co.uk

October 2010

THE SKINNY 53


COMPS

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54 THE SKINNY October 2010

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Glasgow music Tue 28 Sep

Folk fae Fife

Example (Devlin, Yasmin, Ed Sheeran)

Music from the ‘Kingdom’.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

British rapper.

This Will Destroy You Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £10

Ambient thrash, if you will.

Grinderman Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £25

Nick Cave fronted rock.

Open Mic Oran Mor, 19:30–00:00, Free

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Martin McLaughlan, The Dandawrs, Restless Sinners, Amy Ledger

Ruby Culture

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Experimental types.

Lacuna Coil, Slaves To Gravity King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £14

Alternative rock.

Czech One Two (Evil Kin Evil, Citagazi) Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Rock and metal.

New bands showcase.

Music Like A Vitamin Presents O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

Butterfly Strategy Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Acoustic acts; local and far-flung.

Frankie and the Heartstrings, Summer Camp

Groove Armada

Alternative and indie-electro.

Mice Parade, Silje Nes

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £7

Mon 04 Oct

Deadstring Brothers

Kelis (Natalia Kills)

Rock, blues and country ballads.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £20

Mono, 19:30–22:30, £7

Glasgow Americana Festival (Brian Houston, Yvonne Lyon)

Scottish supergroup. Part of Scottish Mental Health Arts & Film Festival.

R’n’B singer/songwriter.

Simple Minded (M77)

Open mic with a karaoke twist.

Americana mini festival.

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £6

The Baseballs

Laurel Collective, I Like Where I Live, The Dirty Demographic

Simple Minds tribute.

Open Mic Night Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, Free

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Brel, 19:30–22:30, £8

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £21.50

Big beat electro.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8.50

Indie and alternative acoustic.

Butterfly Fridays Butterfly & Pig, 19:00–03:00, Free

March Her To Norway, Jericho Bay, Echodeck, The Influence

San Fran and the Siscos

Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Dan Managan

Admiral Fallow, Washington Irving

Canadian indie-folk singer.

Alternative electro.

Bloc+, 23:00–02:00, Free

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

New acts showcase.

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

TEETH King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

Resident bands and DJs.

Acoustic folk pop.

Punk with a capital ‘P’.

West Oompah Band West, 19:30–22:00, Free

Sun 10 Oct

Adam Bomb (Dangerous Candi)

Pre New, Cash For Cars

Glasgow Americana Festival (Gurf Morlix)

NY guitar player.

Live music. Part of Oktoberfest.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £tbc

Brel, 15:30–17:30, £10

Experimental types.

Americana mini festival.

Tuesday Music Club

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £5

Forevervoid

Open mic night.

DIY instrumental.

Sivert Hoyem

Upbeat Beatdown, Catcher, Mellifluous, So Much For Circus

Hurts

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Alternative rock.

Pop, punk, indie and rock.

Eastern Promise (King Creosote, Human Don’t Be Angry, FOUND, RM Hubbert)

80s-inspired electro-pop.

Kevin Kennie

Needtobreathe

JumpersKnee (Draymin, Crossover, No Rearview)

Michael Simons

Unsigned talent.

Alternative rock.

Platform, 19:00–23:00, £10 (£15 weekend)

Folk and blues fingerstyle guitar.

Openmiking

The Virginmarys

Local mini fest, with return bus from Mono.

A Storm Of Light

Turn up and do your thing.

Hairy rock three-piece.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £3

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £20

Guitarist and music producer.

Random Hand, Escape To Victory

Walter Trout

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6.50

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £17.50

Psych-pop and punk.

Wed 13 Oct

Tuesday Music Club

Ricky Warwick, New York Alcohol Anxiety Attack

The Last Of The Free, Would You Like Fries With That, Waking Inertia, The Clang

Americana hard rock.

Ska metal and hardcore punk.

Glasgow Ska Train Present

Oxjam: Soundwave (John Condron, The Only Jones, Dirty Cannon, Fool On)

The Birthday Massacre, Raggedy Angry

Acoustic session, hosted by Ross Clark.

Magic Carpet Cabaret Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Singer/songwriters night.

Still Flyin’, Wake The President

Curved Air The Ferry, 20:00–00:00, £14.50

Progressive rock.

The Travels, Augusta Fireball, Galoshins, Kontroband, Eightball 13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

Experimental showcase.

The Pete Walter Band

Fri 01 Oct

New wave pop and indie folk. King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £6.50

Lyrical rock.

Traditional Sessions Folk and traditional.

Butterfly & Pig, 20:30–12:00, Free

Mark Ronson & The Business Intl.

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £9

Tim Robbins Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £13.50

Actor-cum-singer.

French Wives, Male Pattern Band Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £4

Indie pop types.

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

Open mic night.

Acoustic rock and garage psych.

New bands showcase.

Oxjam Battle of The Bands

Scarlet Fever Burlesque

Numbuzz

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £10

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6

Local faves battle it out.

Burlesque shenanigans.

Powerpop.

The Glasgow Slow Club

How to Swim, Over the Wall, The Low Miffs

The Craybees, The Schemes, Innocent Civilian

Bloc+, 21:00–02:00, Free

Relaxed night with guest musicians.

Wed 29 Sep The Magic Numbers (Danny And The Champions Of The World) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Jingly jangly indie.

MANIC STREET PREACHERS (British Sea Power) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £26.50

Classic rock.

PVT Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8

Progressive house.

Dirty Noise: 1st Birthday Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Electro-punk, with disco stylings.

Live Jazz Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £11

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £8

Sparrow and the Workshop, Fists, Kitty and the Lion King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £6

Lovely folk pop.

Playing at Pharoahs, My Music Myth, Pamela Quinn, George Tucker, Kenny McColl Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

Anything goes musical schedule.

Mumford & Sons

Crocodiles, She’s Hit

Acoustic Open Mic

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, sold out

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–01:00, Free

Stereo, 20:00–22:30, £7

Single Skin Promotions Present

Brel, 15:00–17:30, Free

Butterfly Strategy

Indie, rock and pop.

Aberfeldy

Acoustic acts; local and far-flung.

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Openmiking

Platform, 19:00–23:00, £10 (£15 weekend)

Indie, rock and pop.

Local mini fest, with return bus from Mono.

Butterfly Fridays Butterfly & Pig, 19:00–03:00, Free

Resident bands and DJs. West, 19:30–22:00, Free

Brel, 19:30–22:30, £5

Tony Allen

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

Marcus Bonfanti (The Mode)

Scratch, comedy, live music and poetry.

Blochestra Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Minimal and experimental pop.

Bring an instrument and join in.

Preacher, The ASPS, Sons Of Liberty

Tue 05 Oct

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £5

Halt Bar Hijack Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Underground band takeover.

The Lions Rampant Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Garage blues.

Two in Two, David Makes Noise, Fool On

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £9.50

Level 42 O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £25

Bella Rebel Thursdays

Sun 03 Oct

New music showcase.

The Broadcast (2 Thirds of Youth, Try This At Home!, Wolves at Heart) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, Free

John Hinshelwood Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Brel, 19:30–22:30, £5

Tribute act.

Czech One Two (Hounds of Audio Prime, Perduramo, Blackened Ritual, Black Lights)

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Open Mic

Exposure

Oran Mor, 20:00–00:00, Free

Acoustic session, hosted by Ross Clark.

Tuesday Music Club Butterfly & Pig, 20:30–12:00, Free

Kepi Ghoulie, Andrew Jackson Jihad, The Murderburgers

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Ace City Racers (Sonny Marvello)

New wave, pop and rock.

Fyfe Dangerfield

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

Electro-pop misfits.

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Indie rock.

The Delaneys, Da Flava Boyz, The Gift Horses

The Glasgow Slow Club (The Seventeenth Century)

Eddy and the T Bolts

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Anarchic punk rock.

The Barents Sea

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £tbc

Capital ‘X’, Jehuniko

Live dance riot.

Sat 02 Oct

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

The Vertigos (Trade)

Iain Carleton

Lev and Nigel

Hip-hop and experimental beats.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Garage pop, grime and pop punk.

Relaxed night with guest musicians.

Wed 06 Oct Downfall, Blacklights

Alternative folk.

Sheryl Crow SECC, 19:30–22:30, £25-£35

Cafe Cossachok, 21:00–23:30, £6

Indie types.

Gordon Arnold

I Am Kloot

Bloc+Jam

Glasgow Americana 2010 (Eilen Jewell) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12

Americiana roots festival.

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Muso (Alan Panther & The Energy Treadmill, Mechanical Smile, Terry Balfour) Buff Club, 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

The Arches, 19:30–22:30, £9

Country rock popstress.

Live indie pop and DJs.

Vinyl Night

The Arches, 19:30–23:00, £15

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £3

Acoustic singer/songwriters.

The Fonetics, The Last Gaps, Battle For Second Place Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Experimental indie-pop and grunge.

Black Angels

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

The Paradox, Without Reason, Counterbalance

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Hip-hop, mod, funk and ska.

Thu 14 Oct Blue Expedition, Devour Doors, Blood Red Visions Ivory Blacks, 18:30–22:00, £tbc

Metal, rock and thrash.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

Kate Nash (Brigitte Voutsa)

Brel Sessions

Indie affectations.

Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

Red Sparowes

Open Mic

Progressive indie.

Riffage, rhymes and raw indie. Bring an instrument and jam.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £10

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £10

Oran Mor, 20:00–00:00, Free

Psych-rock.

Vendor Defender (Peter Parker, Mammals)

Hand-picked new acts.

Acoustic session, hosted by Ross Clark.

Codes

Grass Widow, Trash Kit, Golden Grrrls

Acoustic Open Mic

Single launch.

Alternative types.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–01:00, Free

DJ Crackle

Psych and powerpop.

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £17.50

Blochestra Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Jazz, blues, country and novelty 78s.

Tue 12 Oct

Counterparts, The Lost Generation, The Influence, Stab Wound

Professor Green

Hardcore metal and hip-hop.

Socks Off!

Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

A Genuine Freakshow Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Experimental rock.

Fri 08 Oct

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £7

Focus Dutch prog-rock.

Glasgow Ska Train Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £8

Ska and northern soul.

Yorkhill Santa Cause (Val Verde, B Movie Junkies, Blue Nova)

Microphone free-for-all.

Bring an instrument and join in.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £10

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Hip-hop and grime.

Darwin Deez, Little Comets

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £8

Brandon Flowers

Alternative pop.

Halt Bar Hijack

Killers frontman.

Midge Ure

Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Glaswegian-born musician.

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £6

Underground band takeover.

General Fiasco Indie rock from Northern Ireland.

Island Life: The New Breed

Former Cell Mates, The Red Eyes, Crossfire

Island Records showcase.

Rock, dub reggae and glam metal.

Dead Sea Souls (Vigo Thieves, The Dead Generals, Marillo) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £5

Indie scamps. Indie pop.

Jazz guitar and violin.

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Live photography, visuals and DJs.

Doll and the Kicks

Jazz man and pals.

Acoustic jam. Good with toast.

Hillhead Bookclub, 20:00–00:00, Free

Ivory Blacks, 18:30–22:00, £tbc

Indie rock.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Super Adventure Club, Bronto Skylift, Carnivores

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

New music podcast.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8 (£5)

Alternative, grunge and psych.

Alternative rock riffs.

Burning Sunrise

Detour

Stewart Traquair, Paul Sneddon, Matt Hickman, James McLeod

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £13.50

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

The Shee

Yuck, A Grave With No Name, Barn Owl

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £8

Halt Bar, 20:30–23:00, Free

Turn up and do your thing.

Open mic with a karaoke twist.

Cult grunge rock.

Imaad Wasif

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Mini punk festival.

Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, Free

ReGenesis: 40th Anniversary

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £7

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

Joe Strummer Foundation charity tour.

Open Mic Night

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £10

Indian music on sitar and flute.

Psych and alternative indie.

Strummerville Tour

Acoustic psych.

Yaman

Alternative electronica.

Andre of Herman Dune.

Punktoberfest (Good Knives, Tragic City Thieves, First Step To Failure, Captain Kidd’s Boneyard)

Mudhoney (Unnatural Helpers)

Folk and traditional music night.

As part of Oxjam presents.

Mon 11 Oct Cherry Ghost

Hazy folk with Jose Gonzalez.

Paper Crows

Lovely acoustic pop.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Junip (Olympic Swimmers)

Indie crossed with jazz.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

Detachments, The Side, Inner Sight

Indie pop. In ABC 2.

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £8

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

New bands showcase.

Toronto Gosh

Fenech Soler, Indian Red Lopez

Seditionaries

Brel, 15:00–17:30, Free

Blank Dogs

The Hollowtin Sorrows, Destroy White Baby Dolls, Waiting For Go, Goosedubbs

Russian and Klezmer folk music.

Country-tinged songwriter.

Open mic night.

Indie and pop.

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Indie rock showcase.

Powerpop and grunge.

Cafe Cossachok, 21:00–23:30, £6

Experimental types.

Hardcore rock and punk.

Post punk and electro showcase.

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Creation Studios Night

Metal and rock showcase.

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £10

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £10

Alternative electro.

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

New Age Jam No Age, Male Bonding

Funked up bass loops.

Heavy Smoke, Sintonic, Circle of Tyrants, As Darkness Falls

Lovely and twee folk pop.

Dave Dominey

Jazz funk from the 80s.

Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £10

New music showcase.

Electro-pop.

13th Note, 20:00–23:30, £tbc

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £23.50

Groove jazz.

Metallic rock and thrash.

Trad’N’Test (Jill Hepburn, Fiddleguitar, Andrew Huggan)

NME Radar Tour (Hurts, The Joy Formidable, Chapel Club)

Ocean Colour Scene

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Tribute night.

James MacKenzie & The Aquascene (The Cracks in the Concrete)

State Bar, 20:00–23:00, £4

Acoustic indie-rock.

Indie rock.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £3

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £14

Deer Tick (Caitlin Rose)

Acoustic blues and Americana.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £10

Jorn, Attica Rage, Komatoze

Psych-rock.

Lee Patterson, Craig Hughes, Martin McLaughlin

Girlyman (The Porch Song Anthology)

No Comet, Anderson White Duo, David Singer

Rock and powerpop.

Bleak country.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

Britpop rockers.

Blues and folk.

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £8

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £16.50

Ivory Blacks, 18:30–22:00, £tbc

Pop and electro.

Hand Cannon, Scarlet Shift

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Stanley Brinks (freschard)

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £2 (£1)

Shoegaze electro and acoustic.

Southern rock.

From Russia with Lev

Acoustic jam. Good with toast.

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Capitol, 19:30–22:30, £4

Experimental pop.

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Jazz classics and modern standards.

Liquid Jazz

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £17.50

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

Live Jazz

Bloc+ Jam Bonanza

Indie, rock and pop.

Dance Nation: Basshunter (Angel City, Fugative, Fragma, Nordic Stars)

Maps & Atlases

Sat 09 Oct

Eastern Promise (Josephine Foster with The Victor Herrero Band, Nils Frahm, Rachel Grimes, Wounded Knee)

13th Note, 20:00–23:30, £5

Fremsley, Mr Wroe’s Hoes, Jack The Wolf

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £15.25

Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Indie rock.

Metallic punk rock.

Crusty hard rock.

Future Islands, Tattie Toes, Fur Hood

Acoustic niceness.

The Imagineers, The Stagger Rats, Suspire

Guillemots man goes solo.

Thu 07 Oct

Darwin’s Way, Vegas Nights, Pose Victorious, Freaky Jesus

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £12

Acoustic folk.

Afro-beat legend.

Metalcore collision.

Screamo on the turntables.

Hopeless Heroic Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

Delays

Y&T

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £9.50

Openmiking

Bury Tomorrow, Burn The Fleet

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Rock, indie and metal.

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £15

Industrial electro.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Battle of the bands.

Thu 30 Sep

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Hip-hop, mod, funk and ska.

Death By Misadventure, Coward (Martin Keith)

Maggie May’s, 19:45–01:30, £5

Panda Su (Rachel Sermanni)

The Arches, 19:30–22:30, £15

Hip-hop, mod, funk and ska.

Vinyl Night

Ska night, with live guests adn DJs.

O Children

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Relaxed night with guest musicians.

Dub, reggae, techno and rock fusion.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £9

Beat pop.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £5

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Buff Club, 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Live indie pop and DJs.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £5

The Ferry, 19:00–22:00, £8

Blues rock foursome.

The Glasgow Slow Club (Andy Lucas)

Everything Everything

Experimental pop.

Vinyl Night

Muso (The Winter Tradition, The Clyde, Tragic O’Hara)

Gladiator guitar hero.

King King

Mini punk festival.

Chris Helme (Raoul Duke, The Stolen Sundays, The Angies)

Single Skin Promotions Present

Live indie pop, Freshers special.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

Thundering guitars and beats.

Initial itch

Open Swimmer

Buff Club, 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Halt Bar, 20:30–23:00, Free

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £6

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Acoustic indie folk.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £7

Muso (Dear Stars, Mistake Face, What The Dead Know)

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £5

Punktoberfest (The Arteries, One Track Minds, The Stay Gones)

Dreadzone

Live music. Part of Oktoberfest.

Alternative metal and garage rock.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £10

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Metallic rock.

Butterfly & Pig, 20:30–12:00, Free

Microphone free-for-all.

Tiffany Page

Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Pop, electronica and alternative rock.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Alternative and post punk.

The Patriots, Pensioner, Innocents Civilian

Turn up and do your thing.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £5.50

Rock, blues and electronica.

West Oompah Band

Halt Bar, 20:30–23:00, Free

Maybeshewill

Rock, pop and electro folf.

Jazz classics and modern standards. Bubblegummy rock.

The chaps who covered Rihanna. In ABC 2.

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £7

Fundraiser hosted by Jim Gellatly.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, sold out

Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £7

Creation Studios Night Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, Free

New music showcase.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £8

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £14.50

Czech One Two (Monica and the Explosion, Battle for Second Place, Pulse) Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Rock night.

October 2010

THE SKINNY 55


Glasgow music Socks Off!

Wishbone Ash

Steve Mason

Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £13.50

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Hand-picked new acts.

Legendary rock four-piece.

Punktoberfest (The Skints, Anti-Vigilante, Sinister Flynn)

Oxjam Glasgow Takeover

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £6

Mini punk festival.

Halt Bar Hijack

Ed Wood Jr

Underground band takeover.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £8 (£6)

Unsigned bands in aid of Oxfam. Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Plaintive voice and placid rhythms.

Tricky (Terry Lynn) The Arches, 19:00–22:30, £17.50

Black Hand Gang

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Blochestra

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £20

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Alternative rockabilly.

Folk pop.

My Passion, Dead By April, Summerlin

Library Tapes

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £8

Trip hop lyricist.

Punk, rock and metallic pop.

Creation Studios Night

The Chantel McGregor Band

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, Free

K.T. Tunstall

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

The Glasgow Art Club, 19:30–23:00, £7.50

Bring an instrument and join in.

Tue 26 Oct

Ambient experimental.

The Last Republic

The Rudiments

Indie rock.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £6

New blues.

Acoustic folkiness.

Clinic (Spectrals)

Monthly jazz session.

Czech One Two (SFD, The Massacre Cave, Gruesome Green Fever, Shanty Moses)

Raoul Duke

Pop, experimental and big beat.

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £3

Electro funk.

SUSH, Charly Houston, B-MovieJunkies, Cherri Fosphate, Stockholme Syndrome

Deadlight Red, The System, Skinny Villains

The Cuthbert Abernethy Quartet

Rock, done good and proper.

Van Morrison

US folk rock singer/songwriter.

Socks Off!

Irish singer/songwriter.

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Puressence

New bands showcase.

Otherpeople

Hand-picked new acts.

Three Blind Wolves

Indie rock and pop.

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Gum Takes Tooth, Sexy Entourage, Fever Fever

New music showcase.

Fri 15 Oct

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Indie punk.

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £5

Country blues.

LK Audio, Cyster Scalpel, From Sorrow To Serenity, Partisan, The Modests

Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Indie and rock.

Bloc+, 23:00–02:00, Free

Sun 17 Oct Catfish Keith The Ferry, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

Guitar blues.

Butterfly Fridays

Dangerous Candy, Daedalus, Concept of Time, Switchblade Scream

New bands showcase.

Butterfly & Pig, 19:00–03:00, Free

Resident bands and DJs.

The Cinnamons (Be Like Pablo) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £3 (£2)

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Rock, metal and progressive.

The MOBO Tour (Skepta) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £10

EP launch.

Grimey beats.

The Strange Death of Liberal England (Finding Albert)

Bowling For Soup (Forever The Sickest Kids, The Dollyrots)

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £18.50

Experimental indie folk.

Pop punk jokers.

Detroit Social Club (Sound Of Guns)

The Unwinding Hours

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £9

Indie blues.

Islet

Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £8.50

Quiet/loud epic rock.

Jo Mango Brel, 19:30–22:30, £5

Experimental types.

Acoustic set in aid of Yorkhill Charity.

The Tennessee Three

Restless Sinners

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £6

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £18.50

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Johnny Cash’s backing band.

Alternative fare.

Ace City Racers

Jim Jones Revue, Selective Service

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

Electro-pop misfits.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £11

Punktoberfest (Drag The River, Graveyard Johnnys, Austin Lucas, Cory Branan)

Big beats and serious riffs.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Wide-ranging jazz guitar.

Mini punk festival.

Counterbalance, New Fiction, Maggie Killed Me, Supermarionation Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Rock and blues.

Sat 16 Oct Dias Quartet Brel, 15:00–17:30, Free

South American jazz rhythms.

Oxjam Glasgow Takeover Classic Grand, The Admiral, Sloans, Sub Club, Stereo, 18:00–23:00, £8

From Bach to Be-Bop Cafe Cossachok, 21:00–23:30, £6

Bloc+Jam Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Acoustic jam. Good with toast.

Butterfly Strategy Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Acoustic acts; local and far-flung.

Tuesday Music Club Butterfly & Pig, 20:30–12:00, Free

Open mic night.

The Glasgow Slow Club (Amber Wilson, Debbie Kate) Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Eliza Doolittle, Joe Worricker Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £11.00

Soulful pop.

Hayseed Dixie The Ferry, 19:00–22:00, £13.50

Bluegrass rock.

The Mighty Diamonds (Captain Slackships Mezzanine Allstars, Selector Robigan, Arganout Sounds) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £10

70s root reggae.

Red Hot Chilli Pipers Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £19.50-£37

Underground rock jokers.

Pipers, guitarists and drummers.

The Pretty Things

DOOM

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18

The Arches, 19:30–22:30, £19.50

Garage blues.

Sharp-as hip-hop.

Tom McRae

Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Hip-hop and electronica.

The Suzukis (Blue Nova, Green Door Clinic, The Jix) Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £8

Brel Sessions Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

Bring an instrument and jam.

Acoustic Open Mic Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–01:00, Free

Alternative punk rock.

Microphone free-for-all.

Shush, Casino, Hiroshima Blackout, Only Guilty Man, Pettybone

Koolaid Electric Company, The Cosmic Dead

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £7

Psych rock.

Rock, indie, punk and metal.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Blochestra

Rock, done good and proper.

Various singer/songwriters and bands.

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

Experimental rock and pop.

Halt Bar Hijack Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Underground band takeover. The Arches, 20:30–22:30, £6.50

Sun 24 Oct

Indie rock. In ABC 2.

West Oompah Band

Yeasayer (Suckers)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £13.50

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Egyptian Hip Hop Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £6

Experimental four-piece.

Trad’N’Test

Hallowe’en Special (The Partiots, We Are Jawbone, No Fxd Abode)

Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

Hand-picked new acts.

What’s That Noise 13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Three up-and-coming bands.

Fri 29 Oct

Tuesday Music Club

Aames (The Janes) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £5

Open mic night.

Rock four-piece. In ABC 2.

The Glasgow Slow Club

Kontra Band Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £7

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Punk and alternative rock.

El Guincho Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7.50

Experimental pop.

Young Rebel Set King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

Indie folk with punk tendencies.

Stephanie Manns, Fireside Kicks, Revelry, Ampersand Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £5

Relaxed night with guest musicians.

Glaswegian rock.

New music showcase.

Psychedelic Furs

Halt Bar Hijack

Wed 27 Oct

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

New wave punk.

Underground band takeover.

Zion Train

Get Loose Promotions

Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

New bands showcase.

Jeff Beck

Experimental pop and the like.

Dillinger Escape Plan (Rolo Tomassi)

Dress to Kill, The Liberty Club, Escort Knights

Rock legend.

Joe Satriani

Francis Dunnery

Creation Studios Night

Progressive rock.

Guitar rock.

Wiley (Fugative)

Beauty School Dropout, Shatterhand, The Day I Snapped

Mimas, Union Sound, Trapped In Kansas

Grime star.

SECC, 19:30–22:30, £36.50

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, Free

New music showcase.

thepuregallus

Hummingbird, 19:30–22:30, £7

SECC, 19:30–22:30, £27.50-£33

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £18

Indie rock.

Attack! Attack!, Straight Lines, That Sunday Feeling, Make Sparks

Wing and a Prayer

Erskine Fundraiser (Threshold Sicks, Senzafine)

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

Punk, indie rock and pop.

Blues-influenced singer/songwriters.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £5

Punk and alternative fundraiser.

Glasgow Rock Charity Gig

Power of the Accordian

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

New bands charity showcase.

Lost In Audio (Audio Model, Johnny Barr)

Virtuoso accordionist Georgie Gajjic.

Maples Leaves EP launch.

Halt Bar, 20:30–23:00, Free

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Singalong tributes.

Muso (Jack The Wolk, Acrylic Iqon, Jen) Buff Club, 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Live indie pop and DJs.

Vinyl Night Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £4

Cafe Cossachok, 21:00–23:30, £6

Bloc+Jam Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Pop and rock clash.

Acoustic jam. Good with toast.

Mike Peters

Butterfly Strategy

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £14

Acoustic rock.

Sonic Hearts Foundation 13th Note, 20:00–23:30, £4

Guitar noise four-piece.

Ace City Racers

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

Electro-pop misfits.

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Acoustic acts; local and far-flung.

Mon 25 Oct I Like Trains O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £7

Alternative post-rock.

Train O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Poppy rock.

Amy MacDonald (Alan Pownall) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £22.50

Acoustic popstress.

The Ex, Desalvo Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £7

Experimental trance and metal.

Tue 19 Oct

Dosh, Theapplesofenergy

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £9.50

RSAMD, 19:30–21:30, £10

Country Americana.

Live Jazz Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Butterfly & Pig, 19:00–03:00, Free

Resident bands and DJs.

Celilo

Sun 31 Oct

Brel, 19:30–22:30, £5

Fence Records Hallowe’en Party (Silver Columns)

Crowded Hoose

All day label spookfest.

Indie five-piece from Portland.

Stereo, 14:00–01:00, £25

Jazz classics and modern standards.

Tribute band.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Psyko Dalek

Bedouin Soundclash

Maeve O’Boyle

Hallowe’en gig special.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £10

Soulful dub.

Tweak Bird, Holy Mountain Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £6

Rock, punk and hardcore.

Single Skin Promotions Present

West, 20:00–22:00, £tbc

Folk rock. Part of Oktoberfest finale.

Ska Fever Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

The Easpak Antidote Tour (Sum 41, Veara The Black Pacific, The Riverboat Gamblers) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18

Ska and punk showcase.

Rocking mini tour.

Men

Indie, rock and pop.

Live dance outfit.

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £6

The Replay (Casino City, Neon Hero)

Openmiking

Sick Of It All, Madball

Alternative four-piece. In ABC 2.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £15

Suzanne Vega

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Halt Bar, 20:30–23:00, Free

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

Folk-inspired loveliness.

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Dumfries rock nine-piece.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

The John Knox Sex Club

Sat 23 Oct

The 80s Rocked! (Tyketto, Thunder, Krokus)

Latecomers

Helter-skelter art rock.

The Arches, 21:00–22:30, £9

Experimental, indie and psych.

Jazz Main

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £14

Old-school rock.

Muso: Hip-Hop Special

Jazz four-piece.

The Duke & The King

Live hip-hop showcase.

Brel, 15:00–17:30, Free

Pivo Pivo’s 10th Birthday Party!

Pivo Pivo, 18:00–23:45, Free

Secret line-up of bands.

Cock Sparrer (Major Accident, Fire Exit) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £20

Punk noisemakers.

Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £12.50

Vinyl Night

Swans (James Blackshaw)

Hip-hop, mod, funk and ska.

Glam NY soul-folk quartet. The Arches, 19:30–22:30, £20

New York no-wave.

Yaman Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Indian music on sitar and flute.

Hayseed Dixie

Pontiak

Part of their mini tour.

Psych thrash.

Kiuas

The Wombats

Metallic noisemakers.

Punk pop scamps.

One Night Only

Ten, Betamin

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £9.50

Buff Club, 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £6

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £13

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Thu 28 Oct

Three up-and-coming bands.

Death Trap City, Meet the Public, Rah Rah Cavaliers Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Sat 30 Oct

String Driven Thing Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £8.50

Down-tempo electronica.

The Angies

Brel Sessions

The Black Keys (The Walkmen) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £16

Thrash electro.

Experimental folk rock.

Alternative four-piece. In ABC 2.

Bring an instrument and jam.

Alternative rock.

Marionette

Ozric Tentacles

Ruby Culture

Acoustic Open Mic

Maceo Parker

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Plan B (Clare Maguire)

Hip-hop and electronica lyricist.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 20:00–01:00, Free

Microphone free-for-all.

The Arches, 19:30–22:30, £18 (£12)

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, sold out

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Leather Strip

Young indie rockers.

Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

Alternative indie.

Long-running indie spectacular.

70s folk rockers.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

Frock and Cock

Indie electronica.

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £13

Funk and jazz.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

The Riot Lights

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alternative electro.

Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £20

Acoustic pop loveliness.

Indie and alternative.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, Free

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £9

Lauries Bar, 20:15–23:00, Free

A Band Called Quinn (The Low Miffs, Dead Boy Robotics)

Acoustic pop.

New music night.

Butterfly Fridays

Bloc+, 21:00–02:00, Free

New music podcast for Hallowe’en.

Finding Albert

Fuzzy indie folk.

Alternative rock.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £4

Detour Hallowe’en

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £15

Acoustic electro-pop.

The Vortex, The Vice, Pete MacLeod

Thu 21 Oct

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £5

The Dirt

Ellie Goulding (Sunday Girl)

Hardcore metal.

Open mic with a karaoke twist.

Lost City Lights

The Arches, 19:00–22:30, £20

Box, 21:00–00:00, Free

Indie and alternative.

Turn up and do your thing.

Open Mic Night

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £14.75

The Garage, 19:00–22:30, £14

Hardcore heavy metal five-piece.

Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, Free

Jay Brannan

Hip-hop, mod, funk and ska.

Genre-straddling hip-hop lyricists.

Experimental metal.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

Godflesh (Zeni Geva)

Rock, pop and punk.

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £5

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £6

Odd electronic from Ayrshire.

Crystal Castles (Health)

56 THE SKINNY October 2010

Socks Off!

The Cat Empire

Alan Pownall

Rock. In ABC 2.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6

Eclectic pop rockers.

Folk and traditional music night.

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Magazine Gap

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Butterfly & Pig, 20:30–12:00, Free

Flying Duck, 19:30–23:00, £6 (£5)

Live funk.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £7

Rock, indie and garage psych.

Dark metal.

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £12

FNUK: Rub Some Funk On It

Electro-acoustic indie single launch.

Compositions from Adams, Byers and Jackson

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

The Frank Vignola Trio

13th Note, 21:00–23:30, £tbc

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £7

Chorus-heavy indie pop.

Barrowlands, 19:00–23:00, £6

New bands showcase.

Dub reggae.

Chirpy alternative rock.

Red Note Autumn Tour (Red Note)

Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Metallic rock.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £6

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £10

Bring an instrument and join in.

The Subordinates, Tasty Jailbait, The Dirty Violets, Good Bad News, The Beagle

SECC, 19:30–22:30, £27.50

The Answering Machine

Punk rock. In ABC 2.

Former Libertine solo tour.

The Arches, 19:00–22:30, £7.50

Avenged Sevenfold, Stone Sour

Rock with a capital ‘R’.

Jodie Has A Hitlist

I Blame Coco

Chiddy Bang

Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £10

Magic Carpet Cabaret

Resident bands and DJs. West, 19:30–22:00, Free

Eat Meat, Communicator, Crafty Bison, The Mathletics Team, Polar Haze 77

The Chap, X-Lion Tamer

Butterfly Fridays

Butterfly & Pig, 19:00–03:00, Free

Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £5

Guitar band.

So Many Animal Calls , Quarter Inch Jacks, Local Town Heroes

Psych-pop from California.

Screaming Females

Lissie

Czech One Two

Alternative rock.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Alternative punk beats.

From jazz to bluegrass.

The Ferry, 20:00–23:00, £20

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Punk pop.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, Free

Running Riot, Onfile Warpaint

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Alternative rock showcase.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £9.50

New music showcase.

Kellermensch

Rock and alternative.

Mystery Jets (Is Tropical, French Wives, Tribes)

Creation Studios Night

Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

New bands showcase.

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Shakey Shakey Promotions

Music from the ‘Kingdom’.

Dinosaur Pile Up, Turbowolf

Alter Bridge

Electro-pop, and daughter of Sting.

Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Indie rock.

Pounding metal.

Experimental indie.

Folk and blues fingerstyle guitar.

Guitar ballads.

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14.85

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £8.50

Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Tchai-Ovna, 20:00–22:00, £2

Blacktzar

Acoustic singer/songwriter.

King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £7

Hayfest Dixie

SECC, 20:00–22:30, £45-£75

Folk fae Fife

Live music. Part of Oktoberfest.

Carl Barat

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:30, £17.50

Indie rock.

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £3

Indie and powerpop.

Hallowe’en Metal (Kritikill Mass, Lets Play God, Overtone, Contact Lost, One Day Remains)

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £10

Hot Hot Heat

Acoustic Tribute Night

Forever Never

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Wed 20 Oct

Cathouse, 19:00–22:00, Free

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

Fri 22 Oct Feeder

Rockefella, Frontline, Lost Weekend, Kalatara

Turn up and do your thing.

Robyn

Brel, 20:00–00:00, Free

Part of the Hayseed Dixie mini tour.

Openmiking

Open mic with a karaoke twist.

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Relaxed night with guest musicians.

Mon 18 Oct

Swedish pop.

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £19.25

Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £4

Experimental melancholic Americana.

Open Mic Night

Six-venue 30-band take-over. Ivory Blacks, 19:00–22:00, £7

Gus Stirrat

Johnny Reb, Oscar Charlie, Los Tentakills

PIN UP NIGHTS Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, £5

Marco Cafolla Quartet Brel, 15:00–17:30, Free

Driving jazz funk.

!!! (chk chk chk) Classic Grand, 19:00–22:00, £14

Loose pop.

Blackberry Jacks (Johns Weans, The Schemes, The Mode, The Clyde) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

Single launch. In ABC 2.

Maggie May’s, 20:00–22:30, £5

Figure 5, Death By Misadventure Captain’s Rest, 20:00–23:00, £5

Alternative noisemakers.

Performance King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £5

Alternative pop.

Hip-Hop Hallowe’en (Volition) Pivo Pivo, 20:00–23:45, £5

Hip-hop Hallowe’en celebration.

Lev and Friends Cafe Cossachok, 21:00–23:30, £6

Violin favourites.

Bloc+Jam Bloc+, 21:00–00:00, Free

Acoustic jam. Good with toast.

Butterfly Strategy Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–12:00, Free

Acoustic acts; local and far-flung.


EDINBURGH MUSIC TUE 28 SEP THE UNION CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £10

Indie rock.

LEITH FOLK CLUB (SARAH MCQUAID) THE VILLAGE, 19:30–22:45, £6

Earthy-voiced singer/songwriter.

WED 29 SEP

MANIC STREET PREACHERS

TUE 05 OCT

SOUL FOUNDATION

Alternative rock.

THE BOY WILL DROWN (THE BRIDAL PROCESSION, GHOSTS OF ELYSIUM, HEIGHTS)

Soul singalong.

CORN EXCHANGE, 19:00–22:30, £26.50

MARCH HER TO NORWAY, ENTER EMPRYEAN, THE LAST NIGHTS, MICHAEL DODDS ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:30, £5

Local band showcase.

MAX RAPTOR (DESERTERS DESERVE DEATH, HUNDRED METRE CLUB)

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £TBC

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £6

Techy experimental grindcore.

LEITH FOLK CLUB (SHONA MOONEY, AMY THATCHER) THE VILLAGE, 19:30–22:45, £8

Fiddle, accordian and clog dancing!

VOODOO ROOMS, 21:00–01:00, FREE

EVOL THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

Alternative, indie and rock.

THIS IS SICK (LEE MORTIMER, LAST JAPAN) CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £9

Bass-fuelled house and dance.

Indie rock.

BETH NIELSON CHAPMAN

TONY ALLEN

SAT 09 OCT

Sweet country melodies.

BRUNCHEON!

WED 06 OCT

OUT OF THE BLUE DRILL HALL, 11:30–15:00, FREE

COMPLY OR DIE, THE VEXED

LIAM CLARK, DECO ARCADE

THIS IS NOT A TOGA PARTY (RUN/LUCKY/FREE, PEOPLE PLACES MAPS, MATT NORRIS AND THE MOON, EDWARD AND THE ITCH)

Hook-laden alternative pop.

Indie and rock.

Student fun night.

AARON NAZRUL AND THE BOOM BOOMS, DIZRAELI, BABA BRINKMAN, CHEMICAL POETS, MR SIMMONDS

STEVE IGNORANT

WALTER TROUT

FYFE DANGERFIELD BONGO CLUB, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Guillemots lead man goes solo.

MONUMENTS SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £TBC

Brutal mathy hardcore.

SOUNDTRACK FOR DAYDREAMS, SUNSET STRIPS (KID FIRE) BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £4

HENRY’S CELLAR, 20:00–01:00, £5

Latin soul and folk.

INDIGO

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:30, £15

Afro-beat master.

ENFANT BASTARD

ROXY ART HOUSE, 19:00–23:00, £5

EP launch.

THE GRV, 19:30–22:00, £TBC

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £14.50

YASHIN (MIND SET A THREAT, AS AUTUMN FALLS, YOUR FIRST MISTAKE)

RHOMBUS, DEAD EYES OPENED

Electronica and rock.

Dirty psychedelic bluesy rock.

INDIGO

ANY COLOUR BLACK (SCRAP BRAIN, STORM IN A D CUP)

STUDIO 24, 19:30–10:30, £8

NO FUTURE UK

Electro-pop whizz kids.

IT’S ALL FICTION, NEW DELUSION

ALY BAIN, PHIL CUNNINGHAM QUEEN’S HALL, 20:00–22:30, £16-£19

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£1)

WORLD PREMIERE QUINTET

HEARD IT THROUGH THE BASSLINE (JAMES BLAKE, BEN UFO, ECLAIR FIFI, COLEBS)

FOR THOSE ABOUT TO ROCK, LIVEWIRE AC/ DC, LIMEHOUSE LIZZY Rock tributes.

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Sex Pistols tribute.

THE CAVES, 23:00–03:00, £6

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:30, £17.50

Hand-picked jazz five-piece.

New electronic.

OCTOBER CASINO CABARET (GRACE UNDER PRESSURE, ELVIS IS IN THE BUILDING)

THU 07 OCT

WOODENBOX WITH A FISTFUL OF FIVERS

DOLL AND THE KICKS

Experimental folkiness.

Shouty indie-pop.

DREADZONE Dub and electronica.

THE JAZZ BAR, 20:00–23:00, £4 (£3)

THE GUILTY LILY, 21:00–00:00, FREE

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £7

MAN AND SUPERMAN

SHARON KING

SCO: TICCIATI CONDUCTS DON GIOVANNI

Alternative country.

Orchestral performance.

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £4

VERSUS VOODOO ROOMS, 20:30–01:00, £TBC

On-stage musical mash-up.

THE FREAKY FAMILY THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Groove funk four-piece.

FRI 01 OCT THE MINE PRESENTS (DEATH TRAP CITY, ART OF PRIVILEGE, DECO ARCADE) WEE RED BAR, 19:00–22:00, £4

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £15

GEOFF ACHISON WITH THE SOUL DIGGERS

ITSY’S KABARETT 2ND BIRTHDAY

KRS-ONE (SUPERNATURAL, DJ PRIME)

VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–22:00, £10

Late night cabaret fun.

Hardcore hip-hop and rap.

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £14

GENTICORUM European folk trio.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:30–03:00, £6

Australian bluesman.

QUEEN’S HALL, 20:00–22:30, £12 (£10)

SUN 03 OCT

CORINNE BAILEY RAE

MARK MORRIS

Sweet-voiced singer/songwriter.

Bluetones man does solo acoustic.

THROAT CUTS NOT BONUS CUTS

WORLD PREMIERE QUINTET

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:30, £5

STEVEN MILNE

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £5

The Little Kicks main man.

MUSIC LIKE A VITAMIN

BBC SCOTTISH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Scottish supergroup ensemble.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:30, £6

USHER HALL, 19:00–22:30, £9-£27

NOBLES BAR, 21:00–01:00, FREE

Three up-and-coming bands. HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:30, £6

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £TBC

Indie rock.

Elvis tribute, burlesque and Black Jack.

Fuzzy lo-fi rock

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £10

Indie, pop and alternative.

Indie rock.

HENRY’S CELLAR, 20:00–22:30, £4

BONGO CLUB, 19:00–22:00, £5

THE ARCHIE BRONSON OUTFIT (VICTORIAN ENGLISH GENTLEMENS CLUB)

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:30, £7

CONSTANT STATE (19 FOLDS, PSYCHIC HEARTS)

Blues and rock jam.

MIKE KEARNEY KA-TET

THU 30 SEP

Ska-tinged punk.

Indie guitar.

Accordian and fiddle.

FENECH SOLER (EPIC 26, MOPP)

HENRY’S CELLAR, 19:00–22:00, £5

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £17.50

Emotive hardcore.

Original blues and funk.

MAGGIE’S CHAMBER, 19:00–23:00, £2

Brunch and live music in the cafe.

Punk rock from ex-Crass man.

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£1)

Indie and alternative.

QUEEN’S HALL, 20:00–22:30, £22

USHER HALL, 19:30–22:30, £10-£26

QUEEN’S HALL, 19:30–22:30, £19.50

THE VIRGINMARYS BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £7

Full-on hairy rock.

THE JAZZ BAR, 20:00–23:00, £4 (£3)

ROXY ART HOUSE, 19:30–23:00, £5 (£4)

Hand-picked jazz five-piece.

Found poetry, guitars and techno.

ECLECTIC MUD (FUZ ‘N’ LEE, VIC GALLOWAY)

RANDOM HAND, TAKING CHASE, SCHEME

Lounge funk.

NOBLES BAR, 21:00–01:00, FREE

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

SUN 10 OCT

THE RING OF FIRE

HELSINKI SEVEN, HEY ENEMY

MEADOWS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Hip-hop showcase.

Johnny Cash tribute.

Heavy alternative rock.

YOUR LOYAL SUBJECTS

ROSIE NIMMO

NOBLES FOLK NIGHT

Album launch.

Gentle folk.

STEG G AND THE FREESTYLE MASTER, LOKI, RP, FACTORY BABYS SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £3

ROXY ART HOUSE, 19:00–23:00, £5

Uncompromising rock album launch.

THE ILLUMINATE BAND THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £5

Young violinist Vilde Frang plays.

VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–23:00, £12

VOODOO ROOMS, 19:30–01:00, £TBC

COMMONWEALTH JAZZ GROUP

THE JAZZ BAR, 20:00–23:00, £5

Alternative types.

Specially-formed jazz group.

COLLAR UP

MAYBESHEWILL, WHAT THE BLOOD REVEALED, A TORN MIND

HENRY’S CELLAR, 19:30–22:30, £4

Indie pop.

RSNO: THE EMPEROR

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Ska-metal, pop and rock.

HENRY’S CELLAR, 20:00–23:45, £5 (£4)

NOBLES BAR, 21:00–01:00, FREE

BUY WHAT YOU HEARD

QUEEN’S HALL, 15:00–17:30, £11 (£9)

Orchestral performance.

LONNIE LISTON SMITH THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £15

Soul, funk and jazz keyboard.

They play records, you buy ‘em.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 21:30–00:00, £TBC

HOUSTON SYMPHONY GRAND GALA CONCERT

FRI 08 OCT

The Planets recital, backed by outer-space images.

CODES

THIS IS TURIN, IDIFY

Alternative electronic quartet.

Death metal.

KING KING

THE BEAU NASTIES Footstomping Celtic folk.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 19:00–22:00, £9

USHER HALL, 19:30–22:30, £15-£35

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

USHER HALL, 19:30–22:30, £10-£24

Experimental and progressive rock.

ACID DROP, FACE HANDLE, DADDY NO, THE MURDERBURGERS

BLACK LANTERN MUSIC 1ST BIRTHDAY (MORPHAMISH, CHURCH OF WHEN THE SHIT HITS THE FAN, KROWNE)

Blues fronted by Alan Nimmo.

Punk, rock and hardcore.

Hip-hop, electro and dubstep.

JAZZ BAR QUARTET

THE BEAU NASTIES

Alternative rock and electronica pairing.

O CHILDREN (DEAD EYES OPENED)

KULT

Romantic goth reborn.

Black metal.

VENDOR DEFENDER, CANCEL THE ASTRONAUTS

Beethoven piano concerto.

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £5

THE JAZZ BAR, 20:00–23:00, £4 (£3)

Modern jazz four-piece.

BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS

HENRY’S CELLAR, 20:00–01:00, £4

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Footstomping Celtic folk.

THE CAVES, 19:00–22:00, £10

CHARALTANS, SHAUN RYDER HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 19:00–22:30, £23.50

THE LIQUID ROOM, 19:30–22:00, £18.50

NOBLES BAR, 21:00–01:00, FREE

MON 04 OCT

NICE AND EASY (RSNO)

EVOL

CAPITAL-X (JEHUNIKO, BRENT LEE REGAN)

Big band lounge favourites.

Alternative rockabilly.

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

Alternative, indie and rock.

SAT 02 OCT

SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £5

Conscious hip-hop from the US.

THE LIONS RAMPANT, BURN THE EVIDENCE

THE LEG, PINEAPPLE CHUNKS, DESERTERS DESERVE DEATH, THE YOUNG SPOOKS, ZED PENGUIN, CHINSTRAP HENRY’S CELLAR, 20:00–03:00, £5

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

New bands showcase.

GLAMOUR & THE BAYBES

ANDY TUCKER & THE SCATTERED FAMILY

SON OF PORTSLADE, JULIA’S DAUGHTER

Bluesy rock and metal.

WEE RED BAR, 19:00–22:00, FREE

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Electro-folk and alternative.

USHER HALL, 19:30–22:30, £12-£32

Jazz-rock electric four-piece.

NOBLES BAR, 21:00–01:00, FREE

Country pop.

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

MON 11 OCT SNEAKY PETE’S, 19:00–22:30, £6

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–22:30, £3

Alternative indie pop.

SCOTTISH ENSEMBLE QUEEN’S HALL, 19:30–22:30, £9-£27

With Peiter Wispelwey on cello.

NOISY NIGHTS (RED NOTE) TRAVERSE, 20:00–22:30, FREE

bar / live music / club / private karaoke rooms

MONDAYS 11.10 Vendor defender, CanCel The asTronauTs 7pm, 18+, £3 25.10 dinosaur Pile uP & guests 7pm, 14+, £7

TUESDAYS 7pm CirCus arCade Music & pop culture quiz with up to £100 cash for the winning team weekly + musical bingo!

WEDNESDAYS Wire Wednesday Social 9-1am, free entry Come and unwind to new Scottish Sounds with DJ Craig Jamieson (Wire/Modern Lovers)

THURSDAYS 07.10 Born To Be Wide A & r Music Seminar 7pm - 11Ppm Weekly: MoVeMenT 10pm, £2/3 Catch brand new indie releases and the best contemporary music

FRIDAYS SpecialS: 22.10 We luV Musik present LOSt CIty LIGHtS, eMeLLe 7.30-10pm, £7 Weekly: 5pm losT Weekend free entry till 10.30pm/£5 after. Monthly live music and dj residencies with Ivory Acoustic, Black Diamond express & HP (fresh Air) 10pm liVe Bandaoke Come and sing live onstage with our house band, the Bearded Ladies Midnight – 3am eVeryBody 1960s-2010: pop/rock/indie/rave/party

SATURDAYS LIVE – all 7pm doors 02.10 09.10 16.10 23.10 30.10

yrOCk presents: March Her to norway, with guests, enter empryean, the Last knights & Michael Dodds. £6 Df COnCertS present WOODenBOX & A fIStfUL Of fIVerS. £7 PCL present JIM JOneS reVU & guests. £7 LOSt In AUDIO SInGLe LAUnCH. £6 GInGer MUSIC PrOMOtIOnS: the fire & I ,the Little Doses, We Are Lady north. Over 18’s, £5

SATURDAY CLUBS – all £5 before midnight/£6. 10.30-3am 02.10 iTsy kaBareTT 2nd BirThday LAte nIGHt eXtrAVAGAnZA twisted Late night Cabaret with burlesque headliner Missy Malone & host Dee Itsy. 2nd Week eVery MonTh: his & hers the best indie & alternative 3rd Week eVery MonTh: Wire With guest DJs tHe PHAntOM BAnD 23.10 eleCTriC CirCus presents; The silenT disCo lasT saTurday of MonTh: MaGiC nosTalGiC Only the wheel knows what you’ll dance to.

SUNDAYS 03.10 17.10 31.10

MArk MOrrISS & GUeStS 7pm, 18+, £5 yrOCk presents electric Secrets, the Bang, kudos, richard Cobb. 7pm, 16+, £6 DOGS, tHe 10:04’S & GUeStS 7pm, 18+, £8

08444 77 1000 : www.ticketweb.co.uk ripping records : tickets Scotland Open tue - Sat every week

MidWeek drinkS FrOM £1.50

Red Note Ensemble kick it quartet style

theelectriccircus.biz

A MACHINE DIVINE, REQUIEM

36-39 Market Street, edinburgh eh1 1dF 0131 226 4224

BANNERMAN’S, 20:00–23:00, £TBC

Metal of the death variety.

OCTOBER 2010

THE SKINNY 57


Glasgow CL U B S

EDINBURGH music Glamour & The Baybes

The Dangerfields

The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Jazz-rock electric four-piece.

Alternative rock.

Tue 12 Oct

Haight Ashbury Love Music (Miyagi)

Twilight Sad, Errors

Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, £3

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £12

Alternative live music night.

Double-headline tour.

Soulacoaster

Leith Folk Club (Stringjammer)

Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, £tbc

The Village, 19:30–22:45, £6

New soul.

Mon 18 Oct

Mount Kimbie (Dam Mantle, Brothers Grimm) Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £8.50

English rock legend.

Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The OK Social Club, Dirty Modern Hero, Epic 26

Evol

Usher Hall, 19:30–22:30, £40 (£35)

Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £10

Catfish Keith

Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £12

Three-band line-up for Oxjam.

Alternative, indie and rock.

Blues Hall of Fame inductee.

Dan Managan (French Wives, Three Blind Wolves)

Killing Joke Aftershow Party (The Incendiary Bats, Glassface, Fireside Aliens)

Hopeless Herois, Vega’s Loft

Henry’s Cellar, 22:30–03:00, £3

Glamour & The Baybes

Bongo Club, 19:30–22:00, £14

Sat 16 Oct

Fozzy (Symphony Cult) Studio 24, 19:30–10:30, £12

Heavy metal fronted by Chris Jericho.

Simply Big Band Usher Hall, 20:00–22:30, £28.50

Marionettes, Curators, Lady North Henry’s Cellar, 19:00–22:00, £5 (£4)

Indie misfits.

Samba Scene, Diwan Bongo Club, 19:00–22:00, £8

Music, song and dance.

Funky afrobeat.

The Arteries, The Human Project

The Pat McManus Band

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Former Mamas Boys star.

Punk and blues.

Monica and The Explosion Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–23:45, £5

Punk/country crossover. It works.

Indigo The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£1)

Indie, pop and alternative.

Thu 14 Oct Wild Palms Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, Free

Alternative four-piece.

African Music Night Roxy Art House, 19:30–22:30, £8 (£5)

Scottish-based African musicians.

The Shee Bongo Club, 20:00–22:00, £10

All-female folky bluegrass.

Eternal Idol, Man Made Organ Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Grime metal.

Weeping Sons, Trapped Mice, Hiva Oa Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–23:45, £4

Indie folk.

Laptop Lounge Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, Free

Contemporary electronic.

Nobles Folk Night Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £10

Islet Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £6

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Metal and rock.

The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Jazz-rock electric four-piece.

Tue 19 Oct Cachín Cachán Cachunga! (Evan Greer, Ingo, K Anderson, Miss Leggy Pee, Zorra, Lily)

The Street, 19:30–22:30, £5 (£3)

Queer night of dance, poetry, film and music.

Henry’s Cellar, 19:30–23:30, £6

Wed 20 Oct

Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:30, £20

Minimalist classical.

Stiff Little Fingers HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £17

Punky powerpop.

Way To Blue: Songs Of Nick Drake Usher Hall, 19:30–22:30, £19.50£24.50

Guests include Vashti Bunyan, Robyn Hitchcock and Teddy Thompson.

Ghost Of A Thousand, Lavotchkin, Hush, Horrors That You’ve Seen Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Hardcore showcase.

WORLD PREMIERE QUINTET The Jazz Bar, 20:00–23:00, £4 (£3)

Hand-picked jazz five-piece.

Instant Whip Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Alternative Saturday tunes.

Sun 17 Oct

Tue 26 Oct

Balkan orgy with belly dancers.

Evol The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, Free

Acoustic pop and psych-folk.

Lost In Audio Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £5

Nils Lofgren American rock guitarist.

Whole Lotta Led HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £12

Led Zeppelin tribute.

Sat 02 Oct

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £6

Voodoo

StiillMarillion

Wednesdays

Heavy drums and stoner riffage.

Leith Folk Club (Brigid Kaelin) The Village, 19:30–22:45, £8

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Disco house Brooklyn duo.

Wed 27 Oct Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5

Shapeshifter

Punter iPod playlists.

Slabs of Tabernacle (Deixis, Morphology, Arne Weinberg)

Human beatbox master.

Ska noisemaker.

Jackdaw (Crowbar)

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Punky folk-rock.

Bastard Child Death Cult, Rat Attack Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Hardcore punk.

Meet The Public Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–23:45, £4

Indie rock from England.

Industrial punk rock godfathers.

Aberfeldy The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £10

Folk pop par excellence.

Fri 01 Oct

Melting Pot (Greg Wilson)

Rockabilly types.

Piece Together Sound System

Electro, boogie and funk.

Gentle and intricate songwriting.

Dylan & Kim Accordion Songs, The Stark Palace

Classic and underground disco.

Hand-picked jazz five-piece.

Young Rebel Set

Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

It Often Takes A War, Hosemox

Folk rock.

Garage psych.

WORLD PREMIERE QUINTET The Jazz Bar, 20:00–23:00, £4 (£3)

Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–03:00, £5

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £7.50

RSNO: John Lill Usher Hall, 19:30–22:30, £10-£32

Tchaikovsky recital.

Scottish National Jazz Orchestra Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £16.50 (£10)

With jazz bassist Arild Andersen.

Fri 29 Oct

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £7

Indie rock and folk at its best.

Acoda (Sacred Betrayal, The Kingsbury Run) Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Bannerman’s, 16:00–23:00, £8

The Caves, 19:00–22:00, £8.50

The Beau Nasties The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Footstomping Celtic folk.

Mon 25 Oct Library Tapes, Euan McKeekan, Matthew Collins

CRANACHAN

Great Junction Music Studios showcase.

Mature folk mini tour.

Classic rock covers.

Hidden Door II

Dinosaur Pile-Up

Lethal Tender The Beau Nasties The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Footstomping Celtic folk.

58 THE SKINNY October 2010

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Orderly Disorder

Electrolick (Dirty Basement, Twonko & Pasty)

Thumping tech and dirty beats.

Live bands party.

Electro beats.

Italo, disco and house.

Fresh Lick (Frederico Milani, Worx, Dersonna)

Rock Club

We Are Knuckle Dragger

Cross art-form weekender.

Queen’s Hall, 19:45–22:30, £10 (£7)

Pure rock.

Pop, dance and hip-hop.

Hallowe’en Special (Jump: Press A, A Fight You Can’t Win, Fatalists, Hagana)

Red Dog Music night.

Monsters On Movie Posters, Brightside, The Deep Red Sky, Blues Alive

Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–23:45, £4

Funky disco and soul.

Unsigned Edinburgh bands night.

Roxy Art House, 13:00–20:00, £10

Henry’s Cellar, 19:00–22:30, £4

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5

Ambient experimental and indie.

Meursault (Port-Royal, Enfant Bastard) The Caves, 19:00–22:00, £6.50

Strawberry Ocean Sea Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, Free

Audio Kandi

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£4)

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Classic heavy rock.

Subculture (Kink, Neville Watson) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£12 after 12)

Dubbed-out electro.

The Rock Shop

Indie, rock and punk.

Rock, metal and indie. Resident DJs.

Foals

Classic Fridays

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Rock, indie and metal.

Aternative rock, metal and punk.

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Pandemic

B-Movie Junkies

Cross-genre danceathon.

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £8

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £14

Oxford minimalist pop quintet.

Our Ladies of Sorrow Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £5

Roxy Art House, 19:00–00:00, Free-£5

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Bloc+, 23:00–02:00, Free

Filth pop.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Sun 03 Oct

Blink (Mark Storie, Nino, Mofo, Avon Kyyd)

Sunday Sound Library

Special guests and residents night.

Vinyl records social club.

Club 69, 23:00–03:00, £8

Hillhead Bookclub, 17:00–20:00, Free

Macabre art and music.

Festival Friday

Button Up

Mystery Jets

Hallowe’en Party

Friday night party.

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–03:00, £tbc

Sleazy R’n’B, jump jive and exotica.

Monox: Last Ever! (DJ Funk)

Cathouse Sundays

Last ever Monox.

Request night plus hip-hop bar.

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £12.50

Pop and punk.

Live guests and DJs.

Mitch Benn & The Distractions

Vintage Hallowe’en Party

Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:30, £13 (£11)

Live music and vintage fun.

Musical satirist.

Rolled Up 20’s, Escort Knights, Velvet Audio Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alternative showcase.

Red Note Autumn Tour (Red Note)

Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–03:00, £3

Blues ensemble.

Techno and electro.

Power Tools

Macabre art and music.

Lo-fi indie pop.

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £22.50

Soundhaus, 22:00–03:00, £12 (£10 members)

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Ballbreaker/Vice

Dogs, The 10:04s

Death Weekend

Cross art-form weekender.

Traverse, 19:30–21:30, £10

Soundhaus, 22:00–03:00, £12 (£10 members)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Vocal house and mash-ups.

Death Weekend

Nostril Flashback, Tinnitus Transfer

Compositions from Adams, Byers and Jackson

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Eagleowl transformation.

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £6

Roxy Art House, 19:00–00:00, £10

Henry’s Cellar, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Funk, soul and jazz.

Roxy Art House, 19:00–00:00, Free-£5

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £10

Crash

Alternative indie blues.

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £7

Nu Skool

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £6

Metallic punk.

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £4

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, Free (£8 after 11)

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

The Caves, 21:00–03:00, £5

Hidden Door II

Judie Tzuke

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, Free

The Jazz Bar, 20:00–23:00, £4 (£3)

Sun 24 Oct

Acoustic folk and rock.

Punishing hardcore.

Plaintive pop songstress.

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Spiders Web, 20:30–22:30, £8.00

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £16.50

Atmospheric songwriting.

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Jack Rabbit Slim

Popfest: Ballboy, Withered Hand, The Leg, Randolph’s Leap

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £20

Rock and punk.

Catherine Feeney and Come Gather Round Us

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Acoustic rock.

Tom McRae

Funk and R’n’B.

Saturday night disco.

Fri 22 Oct

Killing Joke

Gin Goblins Hallowe’en Show!

Thu 28 Oct

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £17.50

Live music showcase.

Cathouse Saturdays

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Love Music

Chantel McGregor

Indie rock.

Soul Glo

Inimitable singer accompanied by live flamenco.

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Underground electronic.

Cross art-form weekender.

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Pop, punk, metal and rock.

Hand-picked jazz five-piece.

Gentle folk.

Kudos, Electric Secret, The Bang, Richard Cobb

Emo, punk and metal. Resident DJs.

Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:30, £15 (£12)

Whabang!

Maceo Parker, Dennis Rollins

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £5

Absolution

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

WORLD PREMIERE QUINTET

Roxy Art House, 18:00–00:00, £10

Jump: Press A (Cancel The Astronauts, Underclass)

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Indie, pop and alternative.

Usher Hall, 19:30–22:30, £19.50£26.50

Hidden Door II

With Bruce Foxton from The Jam.

Yoyo Saturday

Skint/Vengeance

Rafael de Utrera

Jump: Press A, A Day Overdue, Six Storeys High, A Fight You Can’t Win

Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

La Cheetah, 22:00–03:00, £8

Abstract Forms label night.

Pop classics and hip-hop.

Indie, rock and pop.

The Dog (The Banana Sessions, The Black Diamond Express, Stanley Odd, The Horndog Brass Band)

Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, £tbc

Shake It Up

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £15

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sun 31 Oct

Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–23:45, £tbc

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Indie night.

Soundhaus, 21:00–03:00, £8

Dance, R’n’B and chart.

Nobles Folk Night

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5 (£4)

Usher Hall, 19:30–22:30, £10

Rubbermensch

Silent film screening, accompanied by organ.

Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Post pun and new wave.

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–03:00, Free

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £7

Gentle folk.

TV21, Ian Shaw, Shock & Awe

Live music from the residents.

Bombskare

Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Feel My Bicep

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £12.50

Nobles Folk Night

Hardcore types.

Butterfly Saturdays

Beardyman

The Deadly Winters, Hoochie Fig, Alan Davidson

Weekend Nacho’s, Cyness, The Afternoon Gentlemen

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

90s nu-metal.

Hardcore techno guest edition.

SCO: Mozart at the Piano

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £9-£27

The Ferry, 21:00–02:00, £10

Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Chaotic post-hardcore from London.

Unique piano concerto.

50s vibes and showgirls a-go-go.

I.DJ

Alternative indie.

Alternative rock.

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Counterfiet

Macabre art and music.

All-day rock out.

Corn Exchange, 19:00–22:30, £20

The Fire & I, Lady North

VEGAS!

Experimental indie.

Monthly jam session.

From The Jam

Electro popstress.

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £3

Colours Streetrave (Sasha)

Arrested Development Soulful hip-hop.

R’n’B and dirty chart.

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £15

Electronic sounds.

Acoustic rock.

This Familiar Smile, A Simple Disguise

Ellie Goulding

Brunswick Hotel, 21:00–02:00, £10

Roxy Art House, 19:00–00:00, Free-£5

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £15

Fri 15 Oct 70s folk rock.

Deep and soulful house.

Yann Tiersen

String Driven Thing (String Driven) The Caves, 19:00–22:00, £7.50

Satisfaction

Hardstyle, tech-trance and dance.

Jammin’ at Voodoo

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:30, £15

Melodic rock.

Deep house and slo-mo techno.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Caves, 19:00–22:00, £16:50

Wishbone Ash (Phat Tap)

Elements of Soul (Halo)

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Death Weekend

Blood Of Christ (Lazarus Blackstar, Burial, Battalions)

Gentle folk.

Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Cryoverbillionaires

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Doom synth.

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Emo, punk and hardcore.

The Black Lights

Demons (Sick Llama, Wraiths)

Thursdays

Sabado

Rocky rock.

Thu 21 Oct

Dub, reggae and live electronics.

Saturday @ Bookclub

Thursdays

Castrovalva, Mojo Fury

Indie, pop and alternative.

Thu 30 Sep

Punk spook-out.

Ancient Japanese taiko drumming.

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£1)

Bongo Club, 19:00–22:00, £13

Infexious

Kodo Drummers

Indigo

Synth funk and urban jams.

Zion Train

Cathouse, 16:00–21:00, £6 (£3 members)

Rock, metal and indie. Under 18s.

Ghetto

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£1)

Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Marillion tribute.

Heavy soul and D’n’B.

Indigo

Acoustic indie rock.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Alternative rock.

Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £6

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

80s sleaze, house and disco.

Nine-piece rhythm band.

Keava

Henry’s Cellar, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alternative rock and experimental.

Bongo Club, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Fitkin Band

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Student fun night.

The Trade, The Joe Mangles

Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:30, £10 (£7)

Punk, rock and soul.

Tweak Bird

Experimental indie.

Adam Wilson Hunter, Adam Donen

Wed 29 Sep Octopussy

Sat 23 Oct Cross art-form weekender.

Damaged Goods

Rock types.

Christiane Roesinger

Roxy Art House, 18:00–00:00, £10

Electro clash, 80s, and disco.

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5

Art Of Privilege, Driller

Alternative, indie and rock.

Hidden Door II

Funk and soul launch night.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:30, £25

Folk and country.

Teengirl Fantasy: Late Show!

Studio 24, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£10)

Superfly

Mary Chapin Carpenter

BALKANARAMA

Folky Americana.

Alternative, indie and rock.

Tue 28 Sep Killer Kitsch

Sat 30 Oct

Alternative Americana.

From folk ballads to bluegrass.

Bellini, Forkeye

Jazz-rock electric four-piece.

Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:30, £28.50

The Village, 19:30–22:45, £6

Jim Jones Revue SCO: New Romantics

Daccordianna

Single launch.

Math rock.

Garage rock.

Live music and DJ mash-up.

Leith Folk Club (Stairheid Gossip)

Instrument-swapping freakout. Electric Circus, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Usher Hall, 19:30–22:30, £10-£32

Limbo (The Chap, Black Spring DJs)

Mercury nominated post-jazz.

Indie rock singer/songwriter.

RSNO: Bach to Elgar

Robert Plant

Polar Bear (Tut Vu Vu)

Thea Gilmore

Sweet reggae harmonies.

Electronic post-dubstep.

Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Progressive new wave.

The Mighty Diamonds

Symphony perfomance.

Chilled blues.

Canadian singer/songwriter.

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

The Liquid Room, 19:30–22:00, £10

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £10

Wed 13 Oct

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:30, £7

Evol

The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Hardcore indie.

Folktronica blues and jazz licks.

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Glamour & The Baybes

Electric Circus, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Alternative rock.

Early Grey & The Loose Leaves

Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £6

Lost City Lights (Emelle)

The Boxer Rebellion : The Domino State

Progressive freak-out.

Andy Lang & The Well Nobles Bar, 21:00–01:00, Free

Acoustic folk rock.

Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–01:00, £7.50

CRANACHAN Bannerman’s, 20:00–23:00, Free

Classic rock covers.

10 Wizards, Walk in Humidor, Edward and the Itch Henry’s Cellar, 20:00–01:00, £tbc

Acoustic Hallowe’en spookiness.

The Beau Nasties The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Footstomping Celtic folk.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Old Skool

Flat 0/1, 21:00–02:00, Free

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Hung Up (JG Wilkes, Jackmaster)

Only Fools and House

Optimo-curated weekly party.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

House, disco and electro.

Shedkandi

Pressure: Drumcode Party (Slam, Adam Beyer, Alan Fitzpatrick)

House and R’n’B.

Special edition.

Soul, disco and house.

Riot Radio

Get Sleazy

Indie, rock and roll.

Dirty house and dubstep.

Funk, soul and disco.

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £14

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£7 after 12)

Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Sin City Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £5


Glasgow CLUBS Mon 04 Oct Burn (Krafty Kuts) Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Riot Radio Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Indie, rock and roll.

Disco, funk and electro.

The Cave

Tue 05 Oct

Garage punk, sleaze and rock.

I Am (Beta, Kappa) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4

Eclectic house and techno.

Killer Kitsch (Detboi) Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Garage guest DJ.

Wed 06 Oct

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3-£5 after 11)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £2

Goth rock, disco, and synth-pop.

Wed 13 Oct

Voodoo Cathouse, 16:00–21:00, £6 (£3 members)

Thursdays

Synth funk and urban jams.

Sat 09 Oct Voodoo Cathouse, 16:00–21:00, £6 (£3 members)

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

In About It

Rock, metal and indie. Under 18s.

Techno and disco.

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £tbc

Thu 14 Oct Thursdays

Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Butterfly Saturdays

Satisfaction

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–03:00, Free

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £3

Wednesdays

Live music from the residents.

R’n’B and dirty chart.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Yoyo Saturday

Cloak & Dagger

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £3

R’n’B and dirty chart.

Feel My Bicep Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

80s sleaze, house and disco.

Ghetto Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Electronic sounds.

Hispanic Panic Goes to Africa Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Salsa, kumbia and kuduro,

I.DJ Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Punter iPod playlists.

Misbehavin’

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Pop classics and hip-hop.

Absolution

Feel My Bicep

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Pop, punk, metal and rock.

Cathouse Saturdays Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock and punk.

Sabado Byblos, 22:30–03:00, Free (£8 after 11)

Dance, R’n’B and chart.

Half My Heart Beats Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £4

Current and classic indie-pop.

Love Music O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £7

Saturday night disco.

Monkey Business (Shaun Mac, David Hefford, Chall, Snicker, Craid Leckie) Soundhaus, 23:00–03:00, £5

Party beats.

Nu Skool

Rubbermensch

Funky disco and soul.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Indie night.

Shake It Up Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Indie, rock and pop.

Skint/Vengeance

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Power Tools Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Italo, disco and house.

Rock Club Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Classic heavy rock.

Emo, punk and metal. Resident DJs.

Subculture (Harri, Domenic, Slam)

Soul Glo

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£10 after 12)

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Funk and R’n’B.

Dubbed-out electro.

Thursdays

Supernova (Stephan Bodzin)

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £12

Emo, punk and hardcore.

German techno legend guests.

Cheap ‘n’ Nasty

The Rock Shop

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £tbc

Disco, indie and electro.

Fri 08 Oct Piece Together Sound System Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Classic and underground disco.

Common People

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Rock, indie and metal.

Wrong Island Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Hillhead Bookclub, 17:00–20:00, Free

Flat 0/1, 21:00–02:00, Free

Sleazy R’n’B, jump jive and exotica.

Cathouse Sundays Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Request night plus hip-hop bar.

Audio Kandi

Optimo-curated weekly party.

Pop classics and hip-hop.

Absolution Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Pop, punk, metal and rock.

I.DJ

Rock and punk.

Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Punter iPod playlists.

Rubbermensch

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Sabado Byblos, 22:30–03:00, Free (£8 after 11)

Dance, R’n’B and chart.

Indie night.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Death Disco (Erol Alkan, South Central, Monarchy)

Shake It Up

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £14 (£7)

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Indie, rock and pop.

Skint/Vengeance

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Emo, punk and metal. Resident DJs.

Soul Glo

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Funk and R’n’B.

Thursdays

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Emo, punk and hardcore.

Teenage Lust

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £2

Indie and punk mutant disco.

Fri 15 Oct Joshua Radin (Justin Nozuka, Rumer) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £13

Acoustic indie.

Piece Together Sound System

Special guests a-go-go.

Love Music O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £7

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£6 after 12)

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Italo, disco and house.

Rock Club Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Classic Fridays

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Aternative rock, metal and punk.

Dubbed-out electro.

The Rock Shop Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Rock, indie and metal.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Hillhead Bookclub, 17:00–20:00, Free

Flat 0/1, 21:00–02:00, Free

Request night plus hip-hop bar.

Hung Up (Mount Kimbie, JD Twitch) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£8 after 12)

Optimo-curated weekly party. Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Sin City

Rubbermensch

Dance, R’n’B and chart.

Love Music O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £7

Skint/Vengeance

Thursdays Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Emo, punk and hardcore.

Best in Show Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £2

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Classic and underground disco.

Crash Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Ballbreaker/Vice Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Lock Up Your Daughters

Italo, disco and house.

Rock Club

Underground electronic.

Love Music

Classic heavy rock.

The Pump Club

Saturday night disco.

Singles Night

Electronic workout.

Modern Lovers (Vic Galloway)

Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £3

7” singles all night long.

Subculture Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£10 after 12)

Wee Chill after-party edition. Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Highlander: Ibiza Reunion (Michael Paterson, Marco Loco) The Arches, 23:00–04:00, £10

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

House, disco and electro.

Precision (Waptek, MC Amense, MC Dazzo, Daddy G, Angryboi)

Old Skool

I Am (Beta, Kappa)

Riot Radio

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Wed 20 Oct

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4

Funk, soul and disco.

Eclectic house and techno.

Indie, rock and roll.

Only Fools and House

Killer Kitsch

Thankyou Frankley (The John Knox Sex Club)

Grandmaster Flash (Profisee, Capitol 2012 Soundsystem, Big Taj)

Club night with live bands.

Extra special guest.

Oran Mor, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sub Club, 21:00–03:00, £13.50

Ivory Blacks, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Classic heavy rock.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£10 after 12)

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Vinyl records social club.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£6 after 12)

Optimo-curated weekly party.

Shedkandi Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

House and R’n’B.

Sin City Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Disco, funk and electro.

Tue 26 Oct I Am (Beta, Kappa) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4

Old Skool

Funk, soul and disco.

Riot Radio

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sleazy R’n’B, jump jive and exotica.

Indie, rock and roll.

Pressure

Hallowe’en: Part 2 (Nicola Walker, Mythic)

Party night.

Prizes for best costume.

Sat 30 Oct

A Riot in the Rock Shop Hallowe’en Special

Voodoo

Spooky rock and indie special.

The Arches, 23:00–04:00, £tbc

Cathouse, 16:00–21:00, £6 (£3 members)

Rock, metal and indie. Under 18s.

Sensu Vs Sunday Circus

Student fun night.

Wednesdays Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Barkan orgy with belly dancers.

Stereo, 21:00–01:00, £8

Thu 28 Oct

Butterfly Saturdays

Thursdays Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Deep house and slo-mo techno.

Cathouse, 22:30–04:00, £7

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Cathouse Sundays Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Request night plus hip-hop bar.

Colours: Hallowe’en Party (Sidney Samson)

Mixed Bizness (Magnetic Man, Boom Monk Ben)

Electro-house guest DJ.

Sub Club, 19:30–03:00, £12

Saturday @ Bookclub

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Flat 0/1, 21:00–02:00, Free

Sub Club, 17:00–23:00, £tbc

All-day Hallowe’en special.

Killer Kitsch

Octopussy

Hillhead Bookclub, 17:00–20:00, Free

Button Up

Live dubstep.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Sun 31 Oct

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

House, disco and electro.

Eclectic house and techno.

Balkanarama

Live music from the residents.

Rock Club

Only Fools and House

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Synth funk and urban jams.

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–03:00, Free

Rock, metal and indie. Resident DJs.

The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £7

Sunday Sound Library

Eclectic house and techno.

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Deep house Hallowe’en special.

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Funk, soul and disco.

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Ballbreaker/Vice

Cathouse Sundays

Wed 27 Oct

Saturday @ Bookclub

Revenge of the House Nerds (Milton Jackson, HiRO)

Special birthday edition.

Voodoo

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£4)

Rock, indie and metal.

Flat 0/1, 21:00–02:00, Free

I Am (Beta, Kappa)

Electro clash, 80s, and disco.

Vocal house and mash-ups.

Sleazy R’n’B, jump jive and exotica.

Old Skool

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Italo, disco and house.

Button Up

Electro clash, 80s, and disco.

House, disco and electro.

Audio Kandi

Power Tools

The Rock Shop

Sat 23 Oct Cathouse, 16:00–21:00, £6 (£3 members)

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Pop, dance and hip-hop.

How’s Your Party?: 3rd Birthday (Mehdi, Riton)

Tue 19 Oct

Rock, metal and indie. Under 18s.

Crash

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Dubbed-out electro.

Mon 25 Oct

Indie and electro for dancing feet.

Funky disco and soul.

Nu Skool

Friday night party.

Burn (The Slips)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Classic and underground disco.

Hillhead Bookclub, 17:00–20:00, Free

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Black Tent

Northern soul, garage and psych.

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Festival Friday

Riot Radio

Soundhaus, 23:00–03:00, £6

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£6 after 12)

Subculture

Soul, disco and house.

Indie, rock and roll.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £7

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Soundhaus, 23:00–03:00, £6

D’n’B special.

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Piece Together Sound System

Aternative rock, metal and punk.

Hung Up (Prince Language, JD Twitch)

Only Fools and House

Fri 29 Oct

Sun 24 Oct

Old Skool Funk, soul and disco.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £2

Classic Fridays

Request night plus hip-hop bar.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £4

Psych, drone and sleaze rock.

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Straight-friendly gay club.

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Banging house, techno and trance.

Vinyl records social club.

Burn

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Special live guest night.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Whabang!

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Classic Fridays

Dance night with video game theme.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4

Funk and R’n’B.

Inside Out: Hallowe’en Musical Madness

Sunday Sound Library

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Cathouse, 22:30–04:00, £7

Prizes for best costume.

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Rock, metal and indie. Resident DJs. Aternative rock, metal and punk.

Hallowe’en: Part 1 (Muppet, Billy)

Soul Glo

Emo, punk and hardcore.

Funk and R’n’B.

Classic Grand, 22:30–04:00, £tbc

Huntleys & Palmers Audio Club (Oni Ayhun, Veronica Vasicka, Auntie Flo)

Emo, punk and metal. Resident DJs.

Power Tools

Mon 18 Oct

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £15

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Skint/Vengeance

Festival Friday

D’n’B party.

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Indie, rock and pop.

Thursdays

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Dance, R’n’B and chart.

Hallowe’en fun and games.

Techno and electronic goodness.

Soul Glo

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, Free (£8 after 11)

Shake It Up

Indie, rock and pop.

Emo, punk and metal. Resident DJs.

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Hallowe’en Party 2010

Indie night.

Nu Skool Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Saturday night disco.

Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Videobuzz (Foliage, Jon Dom, Matt Lygate)

Disco, funk and electro.

Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, Free (£8 after 11)

Shake It Up

Soul, disco and house.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Punter iPod playlists.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £3

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sabado

Vocal house and mash-ups.

Tue 12 Oct

Electro clash, 80s, and disco.

Sabado

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£10 after 12)

Teenage techno DJ sensation.

House, disco and electro.

I.DJ

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

House and R’n’B.

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock and punk.

The Hot Club

Epic 80s club night re-lived.

Roots, reggae and dancehall.

Rock and punk.

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£4)

Shedkandi

Argonaut Sounds Reggae Soundsystem (Robigan)

Electronic sounds.

Audio Kandi

A Splash One Happening Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £2

Cathouse Saturdays

Subculture (Harri, Domenic)

Button Up

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Cathouse Saturdays

Party night, Ibiza-style.

Vinyl records social club.

Rock, metal and indie. Resident DJs.

Ghetto

Pop, dance and hip-hop.

Classic heavy rock.

Pop, dance and hip-hop.

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£4)

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Pop, punk, metal and rock.

Rock, indie and metal.

Crash

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Pop classics and hip-hop.

Our Appreciation Society (Polymath, Dersonna, Elbodrop)

Sunday Sound Library

SWG3, 22:00–02:30, £4

80s sleaze, house and disco.

Funky disco and soul.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Aliens-themed party.

Absolution

Piece Together Sound System

Power Tools

Soundhaus, 22:00–03:00, £12 (£8 members)

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Yoyo Saturday

Pop classics and hip-hop.

The Rock Shop

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Counterfiet

Feel My Bicep

Fri 22 Oct

Funky disco and soul.

Into the Void Hallowe’en Party (Camouflage, Pussypower)

90s nu-metal.

Rubbermensch

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, £5

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £3

R’n’B and dirty chart.

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Punter iPod playlists. Indie night.

Satisfaction

Yoyo Saturday

Nu Skool

Killer Kitsch

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Soundhaus, 22:00–03:00, £17 (£15 members)

New techno scenesters.

Saturday night disco.

Only Fools and House

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

I.DJ

Elevate (The Advent, Industrialyzer)

Indie, electro and pop.

Disco, funk and electro.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Electronic sounds.

One-off warehouse party.

Soul, disco and house.

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £5

Ghetto

Friday night party.

Jungle Nation (Chase & Status, Nero)

Muck (Clouds)

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

80s sleaze, house and disco.

Sun 17 Oct

Sin City

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Feel My Bicep

Festival Friday

Nerd Party

Burn

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £3

R’n’B and dirty chart.

Indie, post-punk and twee.

Aternative rock, metal and punk.

Mon 11 Oct

Satisfaction

Cry Parrot Warehouse Party (Naked on the Vague, Prayer Rug, Button Up DJs)

Classic and underground disco.

Friday night party.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Deep house and slo-mo techno.

Bottle Rocket

House and R’n’B.

Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

Synth funk and urban jams.

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Classic Fridays

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £5

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Cathouse Saturdays

Vocal house and mash-ups.

Friday night party.

Yoyo Saturday

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Electronic sounds.

Shedkandi ( )

Festival Friday

Live band death pop, disco and horror.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Hung Up (JDH, Dave P)

Cathouse, 22:30–04:00, £6 (£5)

Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3 in fancy dress)

Ballbreaker/Vice

Pop, dance and hip-hop.

Nerd-theme. Dress un-cool.

Way Of The Tomb

Cathouse Sundays

Button Up

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Live music from the residents.

Sleazy R’n’B, jump jive and exotica.

AV (Animal Farm, John Donaghy)

Byblos, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£4)

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–03:00, Free

Vocal house and mash-ups.

Vinyl records social club.

Shed, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Ghetto

Butterfly Saturdays

Sun 10 Oct Sunday Sound Library

Crash

80s sleaze, house and disco.

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Audio Kandi

Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, Free (£3-£5 after 11)

Electronic, visuals and vintage film.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Saturday @ Bookclub

Fresh electronic.

90s hits in the kitchen bar.

Glasgow School of Art, 22:00–03:00, £5

Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Electro, house and hip-hop.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Electro, dance and dirty pop.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wednesdays

60s psych, new wave and sleaze.

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Satisfaction

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Deep house and slo-mo techno.

Halt Bar, 20:00–00:00, Free

Wednesdays

Thu 21 Oct

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Deep house and slo-mo techno.

Student fun night.

Upside Down

Sat 16 Oct

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Octopussy

Thu 07 Oct

Scottish exclusive DJ set.

Student fun night.

Saturday @ Bookclub

Thursdays

The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Kino Fist

Rock, metal and indie. Under 18s.

Synth funk and urban jams.

Octopussy

Sub Club, 23:00–04:00, £10

Wholesome beats.

Flying Duck, 19:00–23:00, Free

Student fun night.

Sensu 6th Birthday (Reboot)

Octopussy

RUMBLE IN THE JUMBLE Jumble sale.

Danse Macabre

Hillhead Bookclub, 21:00–00:00, Free

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Butterfly Saturdays

Butterfly & Pig, 21:00–03:00, Free

Live music from the residents.

Club Noir: Hallowe’en

O2 Academy, 21:00–03:00, £15.50

Hallowe’en goes burlesque.

Soul Kitchen

Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, Free (£3-£5 after 11)

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £12.50

Hung Up: Espookio Hallowe’en Party Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

Optimo-curated weekly party.

Shedkandi Shed, 23:00–03:00, £2

House and R’n’B.

Sin City Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Soul, disco and house.

Trash and Burn Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Glam and hair metal classics.

Der Supermax Love Machine (Billy Woods)

Wefunk Hallowe’en Special (The John Knox Sex Club, Battle For Second Place)

Rock’n’roll discotheque.

Funky Hallowe’en party.

Soul. In the kitchen bar.

Brunswick Hotel, 22:00–02:00, £5

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £4 (£3)

October 2010

THE SKINNY 59


EDINBURGH CLUBS 9c Victoria Street, Edinburgh | 0131 225 2564

TUE 28 SEP

INKLING (MC SILVER TONGUE)

CIRCUS ARCADE

Funk beats. In Speakeasy.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–23:00, FREE

SATURDAY 2ND OCTOBER £14.50 + BF OVER 18’S

WALTER TROUT WEDNESDAY 6 OCTOBER TICKETS £17.50 ADV OVER 18’S

Heavy bass, breaks and house.

Rock, metal and punk.

THIS IS MUSIC

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

Indie and electro.

OCTOPUSSY

SOUL JAM HOT

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

SPLIT (DC BREAKS)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

£15 + BF | OVER 18’S

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Driving funk and swirling soul.

WED 29 SEP AXIS

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

WE ARE...ELECTRIC (SLAM)

WE IS ECLECTIC

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£2 AFTER 12)

Freshers Week edition.

EVERY WEDNESDAY FROM 11TH AUGUST

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Chart, indie and electro.

FRISKY

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

BRINGING UP BABY

WEE RED BAR, 22:30–03:00, £4 (£3)

Indie and pop.

1 9 9 1

THE LAST SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH 10:30PM TIL LATE

www.liquidroom.com TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM TICKETS SCOTLAND & RIPPING RECORDS

60 THE SKINNY OCTOBER 2010

Chart, indie and retro.

TEASE AGE

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

Indie, rock and soul.

BEEP BEEP YEAH!

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £3

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £5

Electronica student party.

DUB KAOSS

CITRUS CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 12)

D’n’B and dubstep.

WE GOT SOUL

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Funk and soul beats.

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£5 AFTER 12)

Twee pop special guests.

MOVEMENT

HENRY’S CELLAR, 23:00–03:00, £3

House and techno.

THE EGG

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 11.30)

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

THE MISSION

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Alternative special with rollergirls.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

VOLUME

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Freshers Week edition, with surprise guest.

Alternative metal and rock.

FRI 01 OCT

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

COALITION

Dubstep, breaks and D’n’B.

HYBRID (PEOPLE PLACES MAPS, YOUR NEIGHBOUR THE LIAR, THE BIRDMAN RALLIES)

ADVENTURES IN SOUND

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 12)

Indie and alternative.

LOST WEEKEND

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 17:00–03:00, FREE (£5 AFTER 10.30)

Live music, DJs and bandaoke.

MISFITS

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

THE CAVES, 22:30–03:00, £8.00

Jazz, hip-hop and Afrobeat.

PLANET EARTH

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

FURBURGER

Lesbian night.

HOT MESS (SIMONOTRON)

Weekly indie institution.

THE MISSION

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

SUN 10 OCT THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Alternative metal and rock.

Retro from 1970 to 1999.

COSMIC: 3RD BIRTHDAY

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Pychedelic trance and house.

NUMBERS

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, £3 (MEMBERS FREE)

Bass institution play Edinburgh set.

SKUNKFUNK (GO-GO FUNK, DC ELLIS BAND)

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Live funk and soul, plus DJs.

SOULOCO (JAMIE MCKENZIE, KIRK DOUGLAS, CHRIS GRAHAM)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 12)

Underground house. In Speakeasy.

COALITION

TELEFUNKEN (DERRICK CARTYER)

Dubstep, breaks and D’n’B.

6th brithday special.

TUE 19 OCT

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–01:00, FREE

NU FIRE

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Hip-hop to dubstep.

TUE 12 OCT CIRCUS ARCADE

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–01:00, FREE

Pop quiz and musical bingo.

TWILIGHT SAD & ERRORS AFTER PARTY (STUART BRAITHWAITE)

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:00–03:00, FREE

ANNIE MAC PRESENTS FELIX DA HOUSECAT, CASPA + MC ROD AZLAN, ADO OCEAN TERMINAL, 21:30 - 3:00, £18/£20

Massive house, electro and dubstep Beat Control

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£5 AFTER 12)

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

GREEN DOOR

Rock, metal and punk.

WED 13 OCT

Saturday night party.

MELTING POT

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

TEASE AGE

Glam techno with a twisted Disney theme.

WED 06 OCT

DIRT (JD PYZ, NEIL TEMPLAR)

BANGERS AND MASH

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 11)

Electro, rock and cheese.

MISFITS

Twisted disco.

UNPOP!

WEE RED BAR, 22:00–03:00, FREE

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£4)

Retro from 1970 to 1999.

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 11)

Lesbian night. In Speakeasy.

WIRE (PHANTOM BAND)

AXIS

Electro, fidget and bassline house.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 AFTER 12)

BASICS

HENRY’S CELLAR, 23:00–03:00, £5

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

OCTOPUSSY

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Chart, indie and electro.

MUMBO JUMBO

Funk, soul and disco.

SATURDAY NITE FISH FRY (THE SOUL FOUNDATION) THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Funk and soul.

THE EGG

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 11.30)

THE MISSION

MOVEMENT

Classic rock and metal.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

New tracks and dancefloor killers.

SCREAM! (JAKWOB)

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £8

Electronica student party.

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

ULTRAGROOVE (FRANK TOPE)

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

BEARS NIGHT

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5

Alternatvie fun.

FOUR CORNERS

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 AFTER 12)

Funk, jazz and reggae. Resident DJs.

SKUNKFUNK (THE PRIVATES) THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Live funk and soul, plus DJs.

THIS IS MUSIC

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, £3 (MEMBERS FREE)

Indie and electro.

SAT 23 OCT

BEAT CONTROL

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£5 AFTER 12)

Indie and alternative.

BUBBLEGUM

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

Chart, indie and retro.

SUN 17 OCT

Guest DJ edition.

11th birthday special.

ANIMAL HOPSITAL

ROCK SHOW

Dance and techno guest DJ.

Minimal and techno.

Alternative metal and rock.

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

PLANET EARTH

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£8 AFTER 12)

MUSIKA (STEVE LAWLER)

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £15

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 17:00–03:00, FREE (£5 AFTER 10.30)

BANGERS AND MASH

VELVET (TRENDY WENDY, JEREMY)

Weekly indie institution.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 AFTER 12)

Indie and alternative.

Indie, rock and soul.

Comedy sketch show where you get to vote on who’s best.

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Alternative indie, past and present.

FRI 22 OCT

ADVENTURES IN SOUND

Indie-pop. Free for Popfest ticket holders.

Chart, indie and 90s hits.

HIS & HERS

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Funk and soul beats.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£2.50)

BUBBLEGUM

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

WE GOT SOUL

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

FRISKY

Chart, indie and retro.

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Selection of cross-genre DJs.

RADIO FORTH FLOOR FILLERS

Funky soul and disco.

SOUL JAM HOT

SNEAKY PETE’S ALL-STARS

Live music, DJs and bandaoke.

Live music club night.

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

D’n’B and dubstep.

STUDIO 24, 22:30–03:00, £4

THU 14 OCT

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £7

DUB KAOSS

LOST WEEKEND

Chart, indie and retro.

BEAT CONTROL

ANTICS

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

VOODOO ROOMS, 21:00–01:00, FREE

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Chart, indie and 90s hits.

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 12)

THIS IS MUSIC

SOUL SPECTRUM

FRISKY

BUBBLEGUM

Indie and alternative.

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 20:00–01:00, FREE

Chart, indie and electro.

CITRUS CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 12)

D’n’B evolution.

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

Pop quiz and musical bingo.

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

SAT 16 OCT

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Electro, rock and cheese.

Indie and alternative.

THU 21 OCT

OCTOPUSSY

Electronica student party.

SAT 09 OCT

TUE 05 OCT

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £4

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 AFTER 12)

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£5 AFTER 12)

JUNGLEDUB

MON 11 OCT

NU FIRE

Hip-hop to dubstep.

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Electro, fidget and bassline house.

SCREAM! (FILTY DUKES)

XPLICIT

R’n’B and northern soul.

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

AXIS

Vintage tunes for dancin’.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £TBC

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, £3 (MEMBERS FREE)

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 11)

Electro, rock and cheese.

Dance music, old and new.

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Soul swing, funk and doo-wop.

WED 20 OCT

BANGERS AND MASH

New tracks and dancefloor killers.

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £4

Music/arts collective take-over. In Speakeasy.

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

VINTAGE VIOLENCE

Rock, doo-wop and free cake!

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5

SOUL JAM HOT

KILLER KITSCH

SOUL JAM HOT

ONE DROP

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

MOVEMENT

LAB PROJECT

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

ANTICS

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

JUNGLEDUB

Techno, electro and rave.

Residents and guest night.

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 11.30)

PLANET EARTH

Indie and electro.

CIRCUS ARCADE

THE GRV, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£4 AFTER 12)

Pop quiz and musical bingo.

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

Hip-hop, urban and R’n’B.

BUBBLE (BRAINSTORM, THE BILL)

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5 FANCY DRESS)

MISFITS

The fun continues with guest DJs.

SOULSVILLE

Retro from 1970 to 1999.

CIRCUS ARCADE

Live music, DJs and bandaoke.

WEE RED BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

MON 04 OCT

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 17:00–03:00, FREE (£5 AFTER 10.30)

Disco, electro, Italo and house.

FUSE (KISSY SELL OUT, THE SQUATTERS, DECIBEL, EATS EVERYTHING)

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

THE EGG

Hip-hop, urban and R’n’B.

Live funk and soul, plus DJs.

MIXED UP MONDAYS

Funk and soul.

DEPARTURE LOUNGE (FLOATING POINTS, DIGITAL JONES, ASTROBOY, JIMINEZ, MR ZIMBABWE)

Dance music, old and new.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 21:00–03:00, £TBC

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

MIXED UP MONDAYS

SKUNKFUNK (TERRY SHALTIEL)

New Scottish sounds.

SATURDAY NITE FISH FRY

Twisted disco.

KILLER KITSCH

WIRE WEDNESDAY SOCIAL

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£7 AFTER 12)

Sweet reggae rockin’.

ROCK SHOW

Reggae, dub and funk

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

MESSENGER SOUND SYSTEM

FRI 08 OCT

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, £3

Live band club night.

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Classic rock and metal.

Live music, DJs and bandaoke.

PLANET EARTH

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £5

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–05:00, FREE

ROCK SHOW

CONFUSION IS SEX

FOR FULL LISTINGS GO TO

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

SICK NOTE

WEE RED BAR, 22:30–03:00, £5

IT’S ALL GOOD (TONYKEO, CLAUDIO, GREGSTA)

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Hip-hop to dubstep.

LOST WEEKEND

SCREAM!

GHQ, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

POTTERROW, 22:00–03:00, £10

Breaks and basslines.

NU FIRE

Indie and alternative.

BUBBLEGUM

SUN 03 OCT

Dubstep spectacular.

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, £3 (MEMBERS FREE)

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 12)

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Hip-hop, urban and R’n’B.

Indie and alternative.

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

XPLICIT (DJ MARKY, EMALKAY, STAMINA MC)

BASS SYNDICATE

FRI 15 OCT

ADVENTURES IN SOUND

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Hip-hop and electro.

Twisted disco.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £TBC

Special guest edition.

MON 18 OCT

MIXED UP MONDAYS

New tracks and dancefloor killers.

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Garage and bassline.

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE (£4 AFTER 11)

BARE SATURDAY (NERO)

Funk and soul beats.

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Dance music, old and new.

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

Retro from 1970 to 1999.

MISFITS

Indie, rock and soul.

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Northern soul and Chicago blues.

Freshers Week edition.

Varied electronic.

CITRUS CLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£6 AFTER 11)

KILLER KITSCH

MOVEMENT

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£5 AFTER 12)

ULTRAGROOVE

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 17:00–03:00, FREE (£5 AFTER 10.30)

WE GOT SOUL

BEAT CONTROL

DUB KAOSS

ADVENTURES IN SOUND

TEASE AGE

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

Rock, metal and punk.

Electro, rock and cheese.

RIDE

Dubstep, breaks and D’n’B.

Twisted disco.

Retro from Tall Paul and Big Gus

D’n’B and dubstep.

D’n’B and dubstep.

THE GRV, 22:30–03:00, £12

LAND OF 1000 DANCES

T.R.L.

CITRUS CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 12)

Extra special guest.

House and electro. In Speakeasy.

THE GO-GO

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

COALITION

CITRUS CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 12)

Chart, indie and 90s hits.

House, electro and dubstep.

THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £TBC

DUB KAOSS

SAT 02 OCT

Weekly indie institution.

LANE NIGHTCLUB, 21:00–03:00, £12

h e d b l i s e s t a

ELECTRIC CIRCUS, 19:00–21:00, £3 (£2)

Music seminar with Hannah Brodie and Stuart Henderson.

SUBSTANCE 4TH BIRTHDAY (PAUL DALEY)

FRISKY

SCREAM (THOMAS GANDEY)

LOST WEEKEND MASSIVE GUEST DJS EVERY WEEK FROM THE WORLDS OF HOUSE, ELECTRO, DUBSTEP & TECHNO.

BORN TO BE WIDE

OCTOPUSSY

Indie and alternative.

10.30PM - 3AM

Chart, indie and electro.

Disco to soul.

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£3 AFTER 12)

THURSDAYS

HMV PICTURE HOUSE, 11:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

DEVIL DISCO CLUB (FUTURISTIC RETRO CHAMPIONS)

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

IS BACK!

THU 07 OCT

THU 30 SEP

THE HIVE, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£3 AFTER 11)

£16 + BF | OVER 18’S

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

DAPPER DANS

BANGERS AND MASH

SUNDAY 14TH NOVEMBER

THE JAZZ BAR, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Live funk and soul, plus DJs.

JUNGLEDUB

Non-cheesey retro. In Speakeasy.

Indie, pop and dance.

BELLOWHEAD

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, £8

SKUNKFUNK (SNAKE DAVIS BAND)

Chart, indie and 90s hits.

SUNDAY 10TH OCTOBER

TOKYOBLU (GRAMOPHONEDZIE)

Freshers Week edition.

Freshers Week guest edition.

Lonnie Liston Smith aka - Yehudah

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, £3 (MEMBERS FREE)

TUESDAY HEARTBREAK

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE (£2 AFTER 12)

SATURDAY 9TH OCTOBER £15 + BF | OVER 18’S

STUDIO 24, 23:00–03:00, £10

Freshers Week guest edition.

BONGO CLUB, 23:00–03:00, FREE

TICKETS £14

Electro, fidget and bassline house.

SPACE BALL

JUNGLEDUB

THURSDAY 7TH OCTOBER

SNEAKY PETE’S, 23:00–03:00, FREE

ANTICS

Electro, fidget and bassline house.

LEGENDARY HIP-HOP PIONEER

AXIS (JOKERS OF THE SCENE)

Pop quiz and musical bingo. THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

STEVE IGNORANT

CABARET VOLTAIRE, 23:00–03:00, FREE

THE HIVE, 22:00–03:00, FREE

BASS SYNDICATE (PLUMP DJS) THE LIQUID ROOM, 22:30–03:00, £TBC

CLUB 10-86

LANE NIGHTCLUB, 22:30–03:00, FREE (£5 AFTER 12:30)

Deep house and techno.


DUNDEE MUSIC His & Hers

Misfits

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 after 12)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 11)

Alternative indie, past and present.

Tease Age

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Indie, rock and soul.

Twisted disco.

Planet Earth Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Retro from 1970 to 1999.

Definition

She-Bang Rave Unit: A Hallowe’en Ball Special (Tokyo Bitches, Penny Pornstar)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Wee Red Bar, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5 in fancy dress)

Heavy Gossip (Aeroplane)

Eclectic tunes, fancy dress and tricks.

Big ‘N’ Bashy (Eclair FiFi) Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Reggae, grime and jungle.

House, techno and minimal.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Special guest edition.

Join The Dots

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

New beats and obscurities. In Speakeasy.

Saturday Nite Fish Fry (Skamel)

The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Funk and soul.

The Egg

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 11.30)

Confusion Is Sex Hallowe’en

Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Freaky Hallowe’en ball.

Modern Lovers (Chris Geddes)

The GRV, 23:00–03:00, £6

Northern soul, funk and pop.

Skunkfunk (Die Schneiders) The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Live funk and soul, plus DJs.

Weekly indie institution.

Sugarbeat (Doorly, Purpl Pop)

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Mission

Classic rock and metal.

Sun 24 Oct

Rock Show

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative metal and rock.

Coalition

Electronic melting pot.

This Is Music

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Indie and electro.

Sat 30 Oct

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Beat Control

Killer Kitsch

HMV Picture House, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£5 after 12)

Dubstep, breaks and D’n’B.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dance music, old and new.

Indie and alternative.

Mon 25 Oct

Ocean Terminal, 21:00–03:00, £15

Mixed Up Mondays

VEGAS!

50s vibes and showgirls a-go-go.

Tue 28 Sep

Fri 15 Oct

Thu 30 Sep

Wishbone Ash

PLASTIC SOUL

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £17

Hip-hop, reggae and house.

CCA

Fri 01 Oct

Imprints

HEADWAY

Indie-ska and rock.

Underground techno.

A physical theatre piece about a couple and how they cope when the woman develops Alzheimer’s disease.

Thu 30 Sep

Renegades

Cryptic Nights

Sat 16 Oct

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Errors, Twilight Sad

Electro, funk and trip-hop.

The Animals and Spencer Davis

Sat 02 Oct

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £17.50

Fever

A cryptic theatrical tale of two lovers told via Twitter stream. Clues to locations and the prospect of iPods to be won. Music by Peter Gregson and a far better explanation at www. cca-glasgow.com

Doghouse, 20:00–22:30, £12.50

Experimental pop.

Wed 29 Sep The Barents Sea, Alburn Doghouse, 20:00–22:30, £5

Indie and rock.

Doghouse, 20:00–22:30, £12

Scot tish co-headline tour.

Fri 01 Oct

Pop quiz and musical bingo.

Antics

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Rock, metal and punk.

Soul Jam Hot

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Funk, soul and hip-hop.

Wed 27 Oct

Bangers and Mash The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 11)

House and techno monster special.

Madchester Hallowe’en Party

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

80s and 90s beats.

Magic Nostalgic Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£6 after 12)

From 60s soul to Britpop.

Tease Age

Electro, rock and cheese.

Axis

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Indie, rock and soul.

Electro, fidget and bassline house.

JungleDub

Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dub, dubstep and jungle.

Thu 28 Oct

Octopussy

HMV Picture House, 11:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Chart, indie and electro.

42/82 Hip-Hop (Big Taj, Nasty P)

Dare!

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £5

Electronic dance. In Speakeasy.

Karnival

Optimo

Sat 02 Oct

Eliza Doolittle

Sleazy electronic.

Buck Rogers

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £10

Soulful pop.

Thu 07 Oct

The Mighty Diamonds

Tigers On Vaseline (Cha Cha Heels)

Reggae harmonies.

Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £8

Acoda, Sacred Betrayal

Sun 03 Oct

Metallic rock and hardcore.

David Bowie tribute.

Chris Helme, Eh!, James McKay

Electric Circus, 22:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

New tracks and dancefloor killers.

Scream! (Carte Blanche) The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £9

Electronica student party.

Dub Kaoss

Citrus Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 12)

D’n’B and dubstep.

Ride (Men)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Le Tigre offshoot play live.

We Got Soul

Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Electric Circus, 17:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 10.30)

Live music, DJs and bandaoke.

GLITCH (Jimpster)

Reading Rooms, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

House and techno.

Weekly indie institution.

Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £7 (£5)

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £10

Eh!, Nobody Else Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £4

Doghouse, 20:00–23:45, £7

Alternative folk.

Thu 07 Oct Fl ashguns Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £6

Bluesy punk.

Oxjam new bands showcase.

The Ray Summers, Figure 5, Selective Service Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Psych-pop and alternative.

Sat 23 Oct Amy MacDonald Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £25

Fri 08 Oct

Acoustic popstress.

Fat Goth, Hey Enemy, Helsinki Seven

Sun 24 Oct

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £4

Acoustic, alternative and rock.

Sweet Jamaica (Selective Service) Soul Club, 22:30–02:30, £5

Ska, dub and reggae.

Transmission Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Reading Rooms, 21:30–03:00, £10

Asylum

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Alternative rock, metal and punk.

Thu 14 Oct Drop

Indie, pop, math and metal.

Alternative rock.

The Cundeez (Eh!, Fintry Lovechild) Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £5

Fusion punk.

Sun 10 Oct Wilder Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £5

Tennessee Three Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £18.50

Johnny Cash’s backing band.

Sun 31 Oct

The Strange Death of Liberal Engl and

Alternative metal and rock. Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Killer Kitsch

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £5.50

Indie folk.

Woodenbox With A Fistful Of Fivers Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £5

Folk rock.

Dance music, old and new.

Thu 14 Oct

Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Azriel, Hopeless Eric, To Kill Achilles

Samhuinn

Beltane Fire Society Hallowe’en party.

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Full metal racket.

08:00PM, Multiple dates, meals from£10

Live dance as you eat.

Oran Mor A Play, A Pie and A Pint

01:00PM, 28 Sep—31 Oct, £10–£12

Reggae and dubstep.

Fri 15 Oct

Paisley Arts Centre

Erol Alkan

Such A Bloke/ Watch It!

Felt

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Indie, electro-pop and rock.

Sat 16 Oct

Various times, Wed 6th, Thu 7th, Thu 21st, £8–£10

Poem in October 07:45PM, 22 Oct—30 Oct, not 24th, £8.50

Dylan Thomas, lost love and memory.

Lost in Digression 08:30PM, 23 Oct, £4

Post cabaret cabaret.

Midsummer 07:30PM, 19 Oct—30 Oct, not 24th, 25th, from £10–£14.50

A play with songs and Cora Bisset

Theatre Royal Swan Lake 07:30PM, 28 Sep—02 Oct, from £10.50

All-male bird.

Shed 07:00PM, 06 Oct—09 Oct, £10

From the Ragged Trousered Philanthropist to the Southside.

The Arches

Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Such A Bloke/ Watch It!

Beartrap

Hip hop creativity from Tony Mills.

Art rock, indie and punk,

07:30PM, 26 Oct—29 Oct, £8.50

07:30PM, 05 Oct—09 Oct, from £10

07:30PM, 29 Sep—02 Oct, £14

07:30PM, 08 Oct—09 Oct, £16.50

A selection of choreographies from the celebrated dance radical

The True Story of John Webber 07:30PM, 15 Oct, £7

Dance, memory, language and radical sex change

Whistler Part 2 07:30PM, 22 Oct—23 Oct, £8

Bedlam Theatre

Various times, 06 Oct—21 Oct, £8–£10

Chromotherapy

Colours and slam poetry.

A psychological drama with a twist of romance. 07:30PM, 12 Oct—16 Oct, £5

The Complete Wrks of Wllm Shkspr (Abridged)

Soul Club, 10:00–22:00, £tbc

Sat 30 Oct

Live bands all-dayer.

07:30PM, 26 Oct—30 Oct, £5

Marber’s dark debut play about the comically absurd underbelly of poker.

Playhouse Spamalot 07:30PM, 18 Oct—23 Oct, from £16

The Bridge

Pythonesque medievalism

Oklahoma

Various times, 26 Oct—30 Oct, £8.50

7.30pm, 13 – 14 Oct, £10

The Briggait Courtyard Return 2 You Dance Theatre

7.30pm, 23 Oct, £10

See above at the Arches

The Tron Theatre

07:30PM, 26 Oct—30 Oct, from £16

... where the wind runs free...

07:30PM, 05 Oct—09 Oct, from £18.50

Cuban comes to Autumnal Edinburgh.

Sunshine on Leith 07:30PM, 12 Oct—16 Oct, from £13

07:30PM, 19 Oct—20 Oct, from £10

African American dance to move and soothe the soul.

Blaze 07:30PM, 21 Oct—23 Oct, from £11.50

Doghouse, 20:00–23:45, £tbc

Asylum

The Supper Club

The Adventures of Pinnochio

Spooky shenanigans.

Alternative rock, metal and punk.

An evening of no-holds barred cabaret.

Opera gets a long nose.

Hallowe’en fancy dress gig.

The Heatwave

Doghouse Hallowe’en Party

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Traverse Week long runs of new plays - lunchtime theatre with bite.

Orlando

Dirty Paradise

07:45PM, 01 Oct—09 Oct, not 3rd, £8.50

08:30PM, 01 Oct—02 Oct, £10

07:30PM, 05 Oct—09 Oct, from £14

Tales from a man who left rural Wales and amazed the world with his stories 08:00PM, 11 Oct, Free

The Bookie 07:30PM, 13 Oct—16 Oct, from £14

Gangsters, glamour an late night musical vibes

Midsummer 07:30PM, 19 Oct—30 Oct, from £10–£14.50

A play with songs and Cora Bisset

Red Note Autumn Tour 07:30PM, 21 Oct—22 Oct, £10

Compositions from Adams, Byers and Jackson

Chekov Shorts 07:30PM, 28 Oct, £14

Two mini comedies from the tragic genius: Romance with a Double Bass is an instant classic sketch 07:30PM, 29 Oct—30 Oct, from £10

Dancehall fare.

Disco, funk and soul guest edition.

A handbag?

Spring Awakening

Based on a Marquez short story, and part of Scottish Mental Health Film and Art Festival.

Soul Club, 22:00–02:30, £8

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

07:45PM, Multiple dates, from £12.50

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre

Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Club Xtra (Tommy Largo)

Royal Lyceum The Importance of Being Earnest

Proclaimers’ musical soap.

In advance of November’s Breakin’ Convention, a fusion of slick production and street dance. It remains to be seen whether b-boying can survive the mainstream, and PANdADDY’s production is the latest exhibit for the defence.

Make Sparks

Appropriate musical reminder for the burlesque generation

Red Note Ensemble kick it quartet style

Funky disco guest.

Soul Club, 21:00–02:30, £tbc

07:30PM, 26 Oct—30 Oct, from £10

Dealer’s Choice

Club Wonka Hallowe’en Burlesque

Fancy dress party.

07:30PM, 18 Oct—23 Oct, from £14

Noisy Nights

Havana Rakatan

Oxjam All-Dayer

Nappies and songs

Various times, 20 Oct—21 Oct, £4

Hilarious and fast-paced. Exactly what it says on the tin.

Installation meets dance theatre, supported by DanceHouse and Tony Mills: Watch It! Skinny favourite Tony Mills makes his claim to be the hardest working b-boy in Scotland as he tours this double whammy of intelligent street dance.

Club Infexious Hallowe’en

07:30PM, 12 Oct—16 Oct, from £10

07:30PM, 30 Sep—02 Oct, £16

Disappear

Autodisco (Horse Meat Disco)

Sun 31 Oct

Motherhood: The Musical

01:00PM, 28 Sep—31 Oct, £10–£12

Sat 30 Oct

Fri 29 Oct

Ayckbourne’s masterful old school sex comedy

E D I N BURG H

Festival Theatre

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

07:30PM, 11 Oct—16 Oct, £14 – £26.50

A Play, A Pie and A Pint

Return 2 You Dance Theatre

Alternative rock, metal and punk.

Bedroom Farce

With guests StopGAP and Mark Brew

Eclectic sonic soundscape.

Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Bawden’s heart-warming, funny and evocative coming-of-age tale in a magical and beautifully staged production.

Gypsy

Hiphop meets choreography

Becoming an adult is never easy.

30s-themed modern burlesque.

07:30PM, 05 Oct—09 Oct, from £14

Tramway

07:30PM, 15 Oct—16 Oct, fro £10

Club Slack (CB Radio)

Asylum

Carrie’s War

Interiors

Blaze

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Cowboy romance

Based on the first book of Flora Thompson’s trilogy of semiautobiographical novels, this heart warming play was first performed at London’s National Theatre in 1978 and was nominated for two Olivier Awards.

Cirque skills meet ice action

We Are Zero

Soul Club, 22:30–02:30, £5

07:30PM, 05 Oct—09 Oct, from £10

Lark Rise to Candleford

Evolution

Sat 23 Oct

Experimental types.

Calamity Jane

Tennessee Williams’ timeless drama of sexuality and faded ideals.

The Likes of Us

Indieand experimental.

Rehearsed reading

Proclaim the joy and singalong.

Compositions from Adams, Byers and Jackson

07:30PM, 21 Oct—22 Oct, £10

Asylum

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

02:30PM, 16 Oct, £4

07:30PM, 28 Sep—02 Oct, £10.50

The Wonderfull World of Hugh Hughes

Electro-funk.

Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £14

Plume

Sunshine On Leith

A Streetcar Named Desire

RSAMD

Soul Club, 19:00–22:00, £6

Alternative rock, metal and punk.

Fun for the young

Grammar school rebellion.

Red Note Autumn Tour

Acoustic guitar.

Mike Peters

01:30PM, 12 Oct—13 Oct, £6

07:30PM, 28 Sep—02 Oct, from £14.00

Kathy Boyd directs adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s trans classic

Devil Disco (X-Lion Tamer)

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

White

King’s Theatre Punk Rock

02:30PM, 06 Oct—07 Oct, From £3

Hip hop creativity from Tony Mills.

Jon Gomm (Esperi, Xander Duffy, Courtney Stuart)

Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£7 after 12)

World War drama, winner of the Open Stage competition.

Yvonne Rainer: Dance and Film

Week long runs of new plays - lunchtime theatre with bite.

Reading Rooms, 21:30–03:00, £15

07:30PM, 07 Oct—23 Oct, not 10th, 17th, from £6.50

Intimate and tragic award winner.

Reading Rooms, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Electro master.

Sea and Land and Sky

Louise Welsh’s latest commission.

Bellydancing

Punk and new wave.

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

07:30PM, 19 Oct—30 Oct, not 24th, 25th, £12.50

Underground techno four-hour set.

Wed 13 Oct

Rock Show

Panic Patterns

Indie rock.

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Studio 24, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Jeremy Raison’s final show with the Citz revisits Anthony Burgess’s dystopian meditation on free will and violence. Marking the end of an era at the Southside theatre, Orange is an adaptation that is familiar, but lays claim to a punk heritage.

Fenech Soler (Vial)

Alternative acoustic.

The Mission

The Underground

13 Oct – 6 Nov 2010, 7.30pm, £10

Mirch Masala

Indie rock.

Classic rock and metal.

A Clockwork Orange

Slam

Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 11.30)

The tale of a local betting shop bookie.

One Night Only

Danceable beats.

The Egg

07:30PM, 29 Sep—02 Oct, £10

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £5

Joe Carnall & The Bookclub, The Brackets

Funk and soul.

Part of Glasgay! starring Stage Award nominee Laurie Brown.

Sat 09 Oct

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £23.50

Special house selection.

07:30PM, 19 Oct—22 Oct, £8.50

Fri 22 Oct

The Charl atans

Dubstep, breaks and D’n’B.

Lost Weekend

Fri 08 Oct

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Fri 29 Oct

Indie and alternative.

Rock and roll party night.

Playdate

Coalition

HMV Picture House, 11:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 12)

Reading Rooms, 23:00–03:00, £3.50

Fri 29 Oct

Funk and soul beats.

Adventures In Sound

Fever

Sat 09 Oct

Frisky

Movement

Reading Rooms, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

SPACEBALL

Residents and friends Hallowe’en party.

The Jazz Bar, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Chart, indie and 90s hits.

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Kage, 23:00–03:00, £4

Fri 22 Oct

Saturday Nite Fish Fry (The Leonard Jones Potential)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Reading Rooms, 20:00–22:30, £10

UP

The Bookie

Thu 21 Oct

Punk rock.

08:00PM, 07 Oct, £5

Alternative rock, metal and punk.

Doghouse, 20:00–23:45, Free

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

02:00PM, 02 Oct, Free

Citizens Theatre

Hip-hop lyricist.

Video launch premiere.

GLASGO W

Asylum

Acoustic rock.

Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–03:00, £5

Hip-hop, plus breakdancers.

Fat Sam’s, 19:30–22:30, £15

Soul Club, 22:00–02:30, £6

Ginger Clubmix (Hooly V’s)

Kassidy

The GRV, 22:30–03:00, £5

Rock and roll party night.

Pl an B

Alternative indie.

Chart, indie and retro.

Electric Circus, 20:00–01:00, Free

Art Bar, 18:00–23:00, £tbc

Residents party night.

Tue 05 Oct

Circus Arcade

60s nostalgia.

Wed 20 Oct

Nu Fire

Tue 26 Oct

Soul Club, 22:30–02:30, £5

Reading Rooms, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Dexter’s Bar, 20:00–23:00, £5

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 11)

JakN 7th Birthday Hallowe’en Party (Electrikal Sound System)

The Mighty Joe Viterbo, Comeback Jack

Mr Booblae: 1st Birthday

Experimental foursome.

Hip-hop to dubstep.

Acoustic rock.

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £3.50

The Draymin (Lost City Souls, Pose Victorious)

Bubblegum

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

T H E AT R E

British Sea Power

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Hip-hop, urban and R’n’B.

DUNDEE CLUBS

Various times, 27 Oct—30 Oct, from £15

Classrooms, sexual awakenings and metaphors for life

D U N D EE Dundee Rep Blood Sweat and Tears 07:30PM, 06 Oct, from £10

Dancing through the pain of a baby.

A Doll's House 7.30pm, 19 Oct -6 Nov, from £10

Resit in the 1950s, the classic harbinger of women's liberation makes a return through Dundee's lively home team.

October 2010

THE SKINNY 61


COMEDY WE NEED A NEW CLUBS EDITOR Here at The Skinny we want our clubs section to be a must-read for clubbers in Scotland and beyond. Are you passionate about your music, eager for the next album releases and constantly seeking the most interesting nights out each month? Can you have a big night out and still remember enough the next day to write about it?

GLASGOW

TheThursdayShow(RegDHunter, ZoeLyons,GerryMcDade,JeffO’Boyle)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbyRaymondMearns.

Red Raw (Gus Tawse) New talent and new material showcase.

Wed 29 Sep

Best of Irish Comedy (Johnny Candon, Colm O’Regan, FJ Murray) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£6/£3)

Hosted by Michael Redmond.

Thu 30 Sep

The Thursday Show (Phil Nichol, Parrot, Colm O’Regan, FJ Murray) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Hosted by Susan Morrison. Doors open 7:30.

Fri 01 Oct

Highlight Comedy (Mike Milligan, Susan Calman, Jason John Whitehead, Richard Morton ) Highlight, 21:00–23:00, From £12

Comedy showcase.

The Friday Show (Phil Nichol, Parrot, Colm O’Regan, FJ Murray)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbyRaymondMearns.

Sat 16 Oct

TheSaturdayShow(RegDHunter, ZoeLyons,GerryMcDade,JeffO’Boyle) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbyRaymondMearns.

Sun 17 Oct

Glasgay’s Swinging Sunday Sparkler (Zoe Lyons, Rebecca Donohue, Stephen Callaghan) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5)

Part of Glasgay! Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

Mon 18 Oct

Senior Moments (Patrick Rolink, John Gillick, Phil Differ)

Mon 18 Oct

Fri 01 Oct

The Friday Fix (John Gavin, Craig Campbell) Voodoo Rooms, 18:00–01:00, £9

Comedy and live bands mash-up.

The Friday Show (Craig Campbell, Johnny Candon, Rebecca Donohue, Tony Basnett)

Sat 02 Oct

Live comedy fundraiser.

Highlight Comedy (Mike Milligan, Joe Heenan) Highlight, 21:00–23:00, From £13

Live comedy showcase.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

Sun 03 Oct

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Highlight, 21:00–23:00, From £15

Whose Lunch Is It Anyway?

Wed 20 Oct

Freeimprovisedstand-up.Hotfoodavailable

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbySusanMorrison.

Live comedy fundraiser.

Sun 03 Oct

Thu 21 Oct

Glasgow Kids Comedy Club The Stand, 15:00–17:00, £4

Best for 8-12 year olds. No under fives or unaccompanied children.

Lee Nelson?s Well Good Tour The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

Another chance to see this Fringe show.

Mon 04 Oct

The Thursday Show (Jo Caulfield, Daniel Sloss, Elaine Malcolmson) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

Fri 22 Oct

The Friday Show (Jo Caulfield, Daniel Sloss, Elaine Malcolmson) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Benefit in Aid of the Women’s Support Project

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5

TheSaturdayShow(WithJoCaulfield, DanielSloss,ElaineMalcolmson)

Live comedy fundraiser.

Tue 05 Oct

Red Raw (Teddy) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

NewtalentshowcasehostedbyBillyKirkwood.

Wed 06 Oct

Wicked Wenches (Shazia Mirza, Maeve Higgins, Jay Lafferty, Caroline Robertson) All-girl comedy. Hosted by Susan Calman.

Thu 07 Oct

The Thursday Show (Dave Fulton, Shazia Mirza, Bruce Fummey, Davey See) The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbyBillyKirkwood.

Fri 08 Oct

The Friday Show (Dave Fulton, Shazia Mirza, Bruce Fummey, Davey See) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbyBillyKirkwood.

Sat 09 Oct

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Sun 10 Oct

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service (Stu & Garry, Elaine Malcolmson, Chris Henry)

Sat 23 Oct

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

Sun 24 Oct

Ed Byrne

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £13

Support from Jason John Whitehead.

Mon 25 Oct

How Do I Get Up There?

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£2.50)

Sketch comedy hosted by Jeff O’Boyle.

Wed 27 Oct

Best of Irish Comedy (Ian Coppinger, Paul Tylak, Niall Browne) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£6/£3)

Irish comedian showcase. Hosted by Michael Redmond.

Thu 28 Oct

TheThursdayShow(IanCoppinger, GraemeThomas,PaulTylak,VivGee) The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Joe Heenan.

Fri 29 Oct

TheFridayShow(IanCoppinger, GraemeThomas,PaulTylak,VivGee) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Wed 13 Oct

Calie Comedy Flying Duck, 19:00–00:00, £2

Six live acts.

Greg Davies: Firing Cheeseballs At A Dog The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

Another chance to see this awardnominated Fringe show.

Wicked Wenches (Shazia Mirza, Maeve Higgins, Jay Lafferty, Caroline Robertson) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3)

All-girl comedy. Hosted by Susan Calman.

Wed 06 Oct

Doors open 7:30. Hosted by Susan Morrison.

Sat 23 Oct

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Sun 10 Oct

Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Freeimprovisedstand-up.Hotfoodavailable

TheSundayNightLaugh-In(NickDavies,BobGraham,JasonArnstein)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£1)

Red Raw

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

New talent showcase hosted by Stu Murphy.

Tue 26 Oct

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £13

Wed 27 Oct

Best of Scottish Comedy (Mark Nelson, Andrew Learmonth, Martin McAllister) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3)

Showcase special. Hosted by Billy Kirkwood.

Thu 28 Oct

The Thursday Show (Simon Bligh, David Ward, Niall Browne, Daniel Webster) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Doorsopen7:30.HostedbyRaymondMearns.

Fri 29 Oct

Mon 11 Oct

Fridaynightspecial.HostedbyRaymondMearns.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

Sat 30 Oct

Sun 31 Oct

Another chance to see this awardnominated Fringe show.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

10:00AM, Multiple dates, Free

Three Scottish fine art printmakers exhibit in group show.

Martin Creed: Down Over Up

Various times, 02 Oct—31 Oct, not 4th, 11th, 18th, 25th, Free

School of Art

Restore Us and Regain

Various times, 02 Oct—30 Oct, not 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th, Free

Market Gallery

11:00AM, 30 Sep—09 Oct, not 4th, 5th, 6th, Free

Kari Stewart and Kate V Robertson show new work in adjacent rooms after a one month residency.

Mary Mary

Nick Evans: Anti Autonome

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

The Saturday Show (Simon Bligh, David Ward, Niall Browne, Daniel Webster) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Saturday fun. Hosted by Raymond Mearns.

Sun 31 Oct

Whose Lunch Is It Anyway?

New sculptural work.

Royal Glasgow Institute: Annual Show

Long running Institution has its annual show.

Recoat Gallery

Susie Wright: Observations 12:00PM, 28 Sep—03 Oct, Free

New solo show from the illustrator.

SWG3

Giles Round: The Form of the Book

12:00PM, 29 Sep—16 Oct, not 3rd, 4th, 5th, 10th, 11th, 12th, Free

First Scottish solo show by London based artist.

Sorcha Dallas

Babett Mangolte - Yvonne Rainer: Testimony to Improvisation 1972-3 11:00AM, Multiple dates, Free

Tie-in exhibition with Tramway’s Yvonne Rainer show.

Street Level Photo Works Francis McCourt: Carbeth

Various times, 28 Sep—31 Oct, not 4th, 11th, 18th, 25th, Free

Portraiture by Scottish based photographer where subjects look oddly statuesque.

Spooky Sunday Night Laugh-In (Parrot, Ed Patrick, Lucy Oldham) Hallowe’enspecial.HostedbyBillyKirkwood.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Sat 02 Oct

10:00AM, 28 Sep—31 Oct, Free

Oil paintings and watercolours by celebrated Scottish artist.

DUNDEE

Drill Hall

10:00AM, 01 Oct—14 Oct, not 3rd, 10th, Free

In Dialogue

10:00AM, 01 Oct—14 Oct, not 3rd, 10th, Free

Exhibition of work produced by Outlook students for the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival.

Life Drawing Drop-in class 02:00PM, Sun 3rd, Sun 24th, £7-£10

Taught by Edinburgh-based artist Leigh Chorlton.

Rhubaba

Rhubaba’s First Birthday 07:00PM, 09 Oct, Free

Open studio party event.

RSA

RSA New Works

Various times, 28 Sep—10 Oct, Free

Five artists who participated in the 2009 RSA Residencies for Scotland programme.

Scotland and Rome

10:00AM, 28 Sep—30 Sep, Free

A celebration of the links between Scotland and Rome.

St Margaret’s

Various times, 28 Sep—03 Oct, Free

Starting Points

10:00AM, 09 Oct—23 Oct, not 10th, 17th, Free

WordsprovidetheinspirationforthethirdexhibitionbytheEdinburghtextilesgroupFrayed Edges,withguestartistJeanetteSendler.

12:00PM, Multiple dates, Free

DUNDEE

Robert Barry: Words and Music

Modern Institute

Various times, 28 Sep—23 Oct, not 3rd, 10th, 17th, Free

New work by Turner Prize winner.

Tramway

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–23:00, £9 including free nightclub entry

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Weekend laughs.

New film commission shot in Tramway main theatre.

Saturday fun. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

Nat. Gallery Complex

William McTaggart (1835-1910)

The Common Guild

Corin Sworn: Lens Prism

Scottish showcase. Hosted by Scott Agnew.

A selection of abstract paintings and works on paper by the American artist.

TEXTiles @ Patriothall Gallery

Just Laugh Dundee (Mark Nelson, Gary and Stu Improv, Wee Man)

TheSaturdayShow(RobDeering, Teddy,SeannWalsh,AilsaJohnston)

10:00AM, 28 Sep—03 Oct, Free

Various times, 28 Sep—13 Oct, Free

Sat 16 Oct

Best of Scottish Comedy (Susan Morrison, Andy Sir, Phil Differ, Derek Johnston) The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3)

The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Fri 15 Oct

Friday night special. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

Inverleith House

Joan Mitchell

Artist duo make work about religion.

Richard Wright

Wed 29 Sep

A solo exhibition in celebration of the artist’s 60th birthday.

Agroupexhibitionbyedge:textilesscotland.

Hole in My Pocket: Second Coming

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£1)

TheFridayShow(RobDeering,Teddy, SeannWalsh,AilsaJohnston)

10:00AM, 02 Oct—30 Oct, not 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th, Free

The Arches

Doors open 7:30. Hosted by Bruce Devlin.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10

Ingleby Gallery

James Hugonin

Rage-fuelled, painful grotesqueries, it would seem.

EDINBURGH

Examining the world’s worst literature.

Various times, 28 Sep—31 Oct, Free

Mid-career show by British heavyweight.

Various times, 28 Sep—31 Oct, not 4th, 11th, 18th, 25th, Free

Victor Albrow

Free improvised stand-up.

Robin Ince’s Bad Book Club

Fruitmarket

Peter Mann: Wiz Dark, But No’ A ‘Dark’ Dark

TheThursdayShow(RobDeering, Teddy,SeannWalsh,AilsaJohnston)

Tue 28 Sep

Group show of cutting edge digital prints.

Photos of the Scottish village of Carbeth exploring its contrasting nature.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£1)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Printmakers

3D 2D: Object and Illusion in Print: Prints from the Centre for Fine Print Research in Bristol

Philip Reeves, Scott Campbell and Abigail McLellan

Conceptual Art pioneer creates a new installation conceived especially for the gallery.

Thu 14 Oct

First instalment of this year’s NWS with Jacob Kerray and Shelly Nadashi.

Featuring video installation, photograph and artwork from Black and minority ethnic groups. Part of the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival.

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (Gary Little, Chris Henry, Garry Dobson, Dee Custance )

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Jeff O’Boyle.

Tue 12 Oct

11:00AM, 16 Oct—31 Oct, not 18th, 25th, Free

Various times, 28 Oct—31 Oct, Free

Freeimprovisedstand-up.Hotfoodavailable.

The Friday Show (Simon Bligh, David Ward, Niall Browne, Daniel Webster)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£1)

Print Studio

Collective Gallery

New Work Scotland

Equally Connected

Support from Jason John Whitehead.

Saturday fun. Hosted by Joe Heenan.

Drawing class with a backdrop of DJ beats and a bar to the side.

Paintings rooted in the traditions of Western Figurative Painting.

Mitchell Library

Fri 08 Oct

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

08:00PM, Multiple dates, £4

10:00AM, 28 Sep—30 Sep, Free

The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Doors open 7:30. Hosted by Joe Heenan.

Sat 09 Oct

All The Young Nudes

Axolotl Gallery

Kenneth Le Riche

Sun 24 Oct

Whose Lunch Is It Anyway?

Ed Byrne

The Saturday Show (Addy Van Der Borgh, Stu & Garry, Maeve Higgins, Ben Verth)

Flying Duck

ED I N B U R G H

12:00PM, Multiple dates, Free

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Glasgow based artists respond directly to the gallery space, its history and architecture.

Studio Project 22 & 23

Fridaynightspecial.HostedbySusanMorrison.

Mon 25 Oct

Thu 07 Oct

11:00AM, Multiple dates, Free

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

The Friday Show (Nick Revell, Gary Little, Carly Baker, Dee Custance)

LivecomedyfundraiserhostedbySusanMorrison.

The Thursday Show (Addy Van Der Borgh, Stu & Garry, Maeve Higgins, Ben Verth)

CCA

Tatham and O’Sullivan: Direct Serious Action is Therefore Necessary

Tommy Grace, Ged Quinn and Tony Swain exhibit in a group show that looks at archaic landscapes.

Sunday laughs. Doors open 7:30.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5)

G L A S G OW

Fri 22 Oct

Women onto Work Benefit

Greg Davies: Firing Cheeseballs At A Dog

Hallowe’en special. Doors open 7:30pm

NewtalentshowcasehostedbyGraemeThomas.

Tue 05 Oct

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Tue 12 Oct

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

NewtalentshowcasehostedbyKeirMcAllister.

NewtalentshowcasehostedbyScottAgnew.

Fast paced improv show.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Saturday fun. Hosted by Susan Morrison.

Sat 30 Oct

Michael Redmond’s Spooky Sunday Service (Mark Nelson, Teddy, Danny Angelo, The Wee Man)

The Thursday Show (Nick Revell, Gary Little, Carly Baker, Dee Custance)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

Red Raw (Derek Johnston)

Red Raw (John Ross)

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Joe Heenan.

Thu 21 Oct

Mon 04 Oct

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Joe Heenan.

Mon 11 Oct

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£5)

The Saturday Show (Nick Revell, Gary Little, Carly Baker, Dee Custance)

Doors open 7:30pm. Hosted by Stu Murphy.

Friday night special hosted by Joe Heenan.

Sunday fun. Doors open 7:30pm.

Red Raw (John Ross)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£1)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

NewtalentshowcasehostedbyRebeccaDonohue.

TheSaturdayShow(IanCoppinger, GraemeThomas,PaulTylak,VivGee)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £4 (£2)

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (Keir McAllister, Barry McDonald, Jim Park, Ben Verth)

Tue 26 Oct

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£1)

Improv Wars (Garry Dobson, Stu Murphy, Chris Forbes, Billy Kirkwood)

The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

The Friday Show (Addy Van Der Borgh, Stu & Garry, Maeve Higgins, Ben Verth)

Red Raw

Wed 20 Oct

Doors open 7pm. Hosted by Scott Agnew.

NewtalentshowcasehostedbyChrisForbes.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£5)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£6/£4)

Benefit in Aid of Edinburgh Women’s Rape & Sexual Abuse Centre

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

Red Raw (Daniel Sloss)

Benefit in Aid of The Medical Foundation

Tue 19 Oct

Comic perspective on later life.

Highlight, 21:00–23:00, From £10

Doors open 7pm. Hosted by Scott Agnew.

The Saturday Show (Phil Nichol, Parrot, Colm O’Regan, FJ Murray)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £2 (£1)

New talent showcase hosted by Siân Bevan.

Trio of live comedy.

Tue 19 Oct

Live comedy showcase.

Red Raw

Senior Moments (Patrick Rolink, John Gillick, Phil Differ)

Sat 02 Oct

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£6/£4)

The Stand, 12:30–15:00, Free

Freeimprovisedstand-up.Hotfoodavailable

Highlight Comedy (Angie McEvoy, Nick Revell, Susan Calman)

Highlight Comedy (Quincy, Gary Little, Cole Parker, Smug Roberts, Andrew Learmonth)

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbyBillyKirkwood.

62 THE SKINNY October 2010

TheFridayShow(RegDHunter,Zoe Lyons,GerryMcDade,JeffO’Boyle)

Hosted by Scott Agnew. Doors open 7:30.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

The Saturday Show (Craig Campbell, Johnny Candon, Rebecca Donohue, Tony Basnett)

The Saturday Show (Dave Fulton, Shazia Mirza, Bruce Fummey, Davey See)

For more Skinny jobs including roles in Digital Editing go to www.theskinny. co.uk/jobs

Fri 15 Oct

Sun 17 Oct

Whose Lunch Is It Anyway?

Comic perspective on later life.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5)

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3)

If this sounds like something you can do, send a CV, some samples of writing and a brief vision of how you believe you can improve The Skinny Clubs content to jobs@theskinny.co.uk by Monday 11 October 2010.

The Stand, 20:30–23:00, £8 (£7/£4)

Thu 30 Sep

The Thursday Show (Craig Campbell, Johnny Candon, Rebecca Donohue, Andrew Learmonth)

Doorsopen7:30pm.HostedbySusanMorrison.

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £13

Are you: • A confident writer • A keen reader of clubs journalism • Good at working to tight deadlines • Experienced in working with PRs/ music promoters • Able to delegate, manage and develop a team of writers • Skilled in editing content

Thu 14 Oct

Tue 28 Sep

ART

12:00PM, 28 Sep—17 Oct, not 4th, 11th, Free

WASPS Studios

11:00AM, 29 Oct, Free

Generator Projects

Robin Thomson: By the Light of the Moon 12:00PM, Multiple dates, Free

Video artist shows new work following an extended residency

DCA

Similar Variance / the floating world, Sara MacKillop / Mary Redmond Various times, 22 Aug - 10 Oct,

Recession-friendly work embodying themes of make-do-and-mend, exploring ideas around cultural value and production.


CRYSTAL BAWS

STARTER FOR ELEVEN:

Mudhoney

WITH MYSTIC MARK

Mudhoney's Mark Arm and Steve Turner do battle over a quiz that charts the ages of our musical heritage for a glorious haggis supper prize QUIZMASTER: DAVE KERR 1. Which group famously burned £1,000,000 on a remote Scottish island in 1994? Bonus point for the name of the island or the Scottish musician involved in that group. Steve: Would that have been Primal Scream? Mark: Oh God, they wore hoods and shit, right? It was three letters, initials...KDM? A: The KLF, Jura, Bill Drummond 2. Vic Galloway asks: What were the Edinburgh beat group The Thanes originally known as? Steve: Jeez, I don’t know, The Thanes have been around since the mid 80s right? We played with them in 1989. Mark: I have no idea, but we did play with The Thanes. A. The Green Telescope. Steve: Wait, they were The Green Telescope? I have a flexi of theirs somewhere. 3. Which punk rock band from Dunfermline (formed in 1977) had a hit called Into the Valley and a lead singer who went on to become a film director? Steve: I know that song...were Simple Minds Scottish? What were they called before... no, that was Johnny and the Self Abusers! I’d have to be down in my record room to get this. I have this Killed By Death compilation of purely rare Scottish punk records, but I can’t think of any of the names right now. Mark: Is it Alex Cox? I am stumped. A. The Skids Steve: The Skids? I didn’t even know they were Scottish; I have their single, a four song EP! I didn’t even realise a few of them became Big Country. They went away pretty quick, right? Mark: I didn’t realise they were Scottish either. 4. Eugene Kelly (The Vaselines) asks: What was the name of the record store Mudhoney had a signing at on the day of your first Glasgow show? Steve: I don’t know, but thanks for putting me up that night Eugene! Mark: Haha, was it Records R Us? A. Realistic Records. 5. Which internationally successful Scottish group was originally known as Johnny and the Self Abusers? Steve: Hahaha, I’m on this one – Simple Minds! A. Simple Minds Mark: All I really know is that they’re on that Iggy Pop record, Soldier...never paid any attention to them other than that. But hey, Don’t You Forget About Me!

6. Which garage rock ‘supergroup’ from Edinburgh debuted with the single Just Like Me in 1995? Steve: Would that be The Wildebeests? A. The Wildebeests Steve: Death Molecule is an awesome album, one of my favourites. 7. Craig & Charlie Reid (The Proclaimers) ask: Can you name the Scottish guitarist who spent a spell as a roadie with Nirvana and ended up playing electric guitar on a few of their live shows? Mark: John from The Exploited, also played with Goodbye Mr MacKenzie. A. ‘Big’ John Duncan, of The Exploited. 8. Name the cult Edinburgh label which put out albums by Josef K and the Fire Engines?  Steve: Ah, Postcard! Mark: Oh, Postcard! A: Postcard Records. 9. Which Scottish band of recent times features a lead singer known to work under the guise Richard “The Turd”? Steve: I have no idea, that’s too hard. I can’t even think of a contemporary Scottish band...Vaselines? How about an English contemporary band – Arctic Monkeys? Mark: I have no idea. Richard The Turd? Hahaha. A. The Phantom Band Mark: Such a Phantom Band that I’ve never heard of them! 10a. Andy Brown (Divorce) asks: Which legendary Scottish group most recently signed to Sub Pop? Steve: Was that The Vaselines again? Mark: Mogwai! Steve would have never guessed that one! A. Mogwai Steve: Mogwai signed to Sub Pop huh? Every so often they ask us to open up some big show of theirs but they never give us time, like three weeks advance notice. I think they’ve asked us a couple of times and we’ve said no – nothing personal, we’d love to play with them. Dude, we need like six months warning at this point! 11. For half a point, which record store did you do a signing in for your last Edinburgh show? Mark: Oh, Avalanche. A. Avalanche. Final score: A respectable 5.5 points between the godfathers of scuzz – worthy of a chip buttie, but not quite the full supper. Mudhoney play The Tunnels, Aberdeen on 8 Oct and The Arches, Glasgow on 9 Oct www.myspace.com/mudhoney

ARIES 21 MAR – 20 APR There will be significance in the pattern appearing as Chris Moyles’ splayed guts hit the floor steaming after your machete attack, perhaps leading to a lottery win.

a

TAURUS 21 APR – 21 MAY Balloons are lucky for some reason.

b

GEMINI 22 MAY – 21 JUN You are still wondering how your dog died last night aren’t you? Don’t let it upset you too much. Take another bath tonight and relax.

c

CANCER 22 JUN – 23 JUL There is a new energy about you this month, like every month, until you begin to eat less, shrivel up and die.

d

LEO 24 JUL – 23 AUG The RPG you purchased on eBay proves its worth as you dead-eye that million dollar shot through the windshield of James Corden’s St. George’s flag sprayed Ford Focus. Don’t be disappointed if you kill him instantly, a senior minotaur awaits him on Acheron’s banks, equipped with a diamondstudded arse paddle and a pure sulphur strap-on.

e

VIRGO 24 AUG – 23 SEP Your love planet Pluto will explode in October meaning you’ll be hung like a radioactive stallion, forever.

f

g

LIBRA 24 SEP – 23 OCT Silk is extra silky this

SCORPIO 24 OCT – 22 NOV Flirtation with a friend at work could blossom into romance. Play your cards right and you’ll both be Leatherfacing your way through ITV security with chainsaws towards Piers Morgan like two rabid love-bats of death.

h

i

SAGITTARIUS 23 NOV – 21 DEC

If you fall asleep you may dream about corn or wheat products being pummelled very fast by large machines.

j

CAPRICORN 22 DEC – 20 JAN

Ask yourself this question: Does Saturn really give a flying shit about your meaningless existence? AQUARIUS 21 JAN – 19 FEB October will be an important month for you as a terrifying ball of rock, hitherto unseen by our telescopes, comes hurtling through the zenith towards your house.

k

PISCES 20 FEB – 20 MAR Those wild boar sure do look hungry! Screeching for any leg, arm, or face meat that gets even near the paddock. Did you lower the last of the blood-soaked mannequins in last week? And you fasted them since then? Except for the crystal meth? Well remember, lower her in slowly. The boar are gonna be going at SJP’s legs super hi-octane, so follow their example, be a pro.

l

month.

it's good for the skin

October 2010

THE SKINNY 63


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The Skinny October 2010