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THE SKINNY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013-2014

INDEPENDENT

CULT U R A L

STUDENT HANDBOOK

J O U R N A L I S M


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Contents ACHIEVING MORE for…

Education Business Glasgow Scotland

YOU

Anniesland, Cardonald and Langside Colleges have merged to form an AMBITIOUS new college for Scotland. Find out how we can help you achieve more at glasgowclyde.ac.uk facebook.com/glasgowclyde @Glasgow_Clyde

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Ensure that you have at least one thing to do each month with our events planner for the year

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Learn a bit about your new home with our handy and highly serious guides to Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee

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We take a trip down Alphabet Street in our A-to-Z rundown of some of Scotland’s top bands and musicians

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Our Theatre editor runs you through your theatrical options in Glasgow and Edinburgh

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The Scottish spoken word scene comes under the microscope – what it is, who’s involved, and how best to use your words

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A look at Scotland’s film festivals, with everything from horror in Dundee to African cinema in the capital

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We sent our man on holiday on the cheapest flight we could find – see how he got on in Warsaw

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A look at life after university, with a bizarre tale of TEFL teaching in Korea

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Begin your clubbing education with our guide to some of Scotland’s top student nights

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Our Showcase section features some of this year’s graduates from the art schools in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee

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Make your technology work for you, with our guide to getting the most out of your smartphone or tablet at uni

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If you fancy living the good life, we have tips on getting vegetables brought to your door and brewing your own beer

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A one-page primer on Scottish outdoor sports for all seasons

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A look at the LGBTQ societies at Scotland’s universities – who you’ll meet, where you’ll go, and what to expect

Great Food Daily

48 Fashion with a difference, as our favourite canine chum models some student accessories

55 We give you a massive head start on the cultural scene in our three cities, with a comprehensive venue guide and handy maps of where to find everything

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Fred Fletch has devised a student quiz – prepare for questions about 80s action movies

2013–2014

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Editorial

A

s another academic year kicks off, we’re back with our annual Student Handbook. Consider this our equivalent of one of those induction classes unis and colleges try to make you sit through, but much, much more fun. Instead of hours of safety banter and mandatory reading lists we’ve got a comprehensive look at Scottish music, film, arts and lifestyle as well as loads of suggestions for what to do and where to go. We also have a dog dressed in fashionable student garb, but more on that in a bit. Yes, this Student Handbook is designed to get you up to speed on cultural life in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee. In music, we have an A-to-Z rundown of some of our favourite Scottish bands, even finding artists to fit those tricky letters like ‘Q’ and ‘Z’. Film fans keen to broaden their horizons have a whole host of film festivals from zombie horror to the best of African and Asian cinema to pore over courtesy of our Film editor Jamie, and we also take in the spoken word and student theatre scenes to find out what it takes to get up in front of people and be creative. This is a guide, so we’ve got hints on using your phone or tablet to get more done when you go to classes, advice on becoming a culinary mastermind, and a look at how to get started in the world of Scottish extreme sports. We also have dispatches from Warsaw, your new favourite student holiday destination, and South Korea, where our man tells us about life after uni. His story involves teaching and a man wetting himself. As well as all that, we have more than 20 pages of venue profiles and maps, with tips on where to go for good food and drink, the best live gigs and club nights, and the most interesting art, theatre, cinema and comedy. Oh, and we also have an action-packed quiz from our resident madman Fred Fletch, and that aforementioned dog fashion shoot, where our canine friend models local

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design which is also available in people sizes. It’s an action-packed 80 pages, folks, so you’d better get to work. There’s a whole lot of Scotland out there to explore. Oh, and remember: your nearest fire exit may be behind you. [Peter Simpson] Editor: Peter Simpson Designer: Kate Dowling Production Manager: Billie Dryden Contributors: David Anderson, Fiona Heather, Kate Ball, Jean-Xavier Boucherat, Darren Carle, Jamie Dunn, Fred Fletch, Bram E. Gieben, Ana Hine, Eric Karoulla, Ronan Martin, Rowena McIntosh, Euan Wallace Illustrators: Elena Boils, Kyle Smart Maps: © OpenStreetMap contributors, CC-BY-SA (openstreetmap.org) THE SKINNY Editor-in-Chief: Rosamund West Sales Director: Lara Moloney Sales Executives: George Sully, Tom McCarthy, Eddie Chung Publisher: Sophie Kyle Get in touch: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk T: 0131 467 4630 P: The Skinny, 3 Coates Place, Edinburgh, EH3 7AA The Skinny is Scotland's largest independent entertainment & listings magazine, and offers a wide range of advertising packages and affordable ways to promote your business. Get in touch to find out more.

E: sales@theskinny.co.uk All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the explicit permission of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within this publication do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the printer or the publisher.

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2013–2014

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Heads Up

NOVEMBER

The 20th edition of Glasgay! may begin in October but it’s still going well into November. The annual celebration of LGBT culture features comedy from the likes of Roisin Conaty and Craig Hill, film screenings from around the world, as well as theatre, talks and other events. 9 Oct-9 Nov

Compiled by: Peter Simpson Get ready to see buildings, hear music, watch films and do much, much more in our at-a-glance guide to the next 12 months

SEPTEMBER

If you’re new in town, whichever town that might be, then there is an easy, free and fun way to get up to speed. Doors Open Days throughout September let you take a glimpse inside some of the most important buildings in Scotland. You’ll be mumbling your way through conversations about which buildings were once churches in no time at all. Dundee 14-15 Sep, Glasgow 21-22 Sep, Edinburgh 28-29 Sep

Hogmanay

DECEMBER

December is a time to be with family and relax after exams. Except for the time around New Year, which should be spent partying like it’s 1999. Thankfully Edinburgh has you covered with the world-famous Hogmanay Street Party – tens of thousands of people, loads of live music and enough fireworks to blow a hole in space-time and skip 2014 entirely. 30 Dec-1 Jan

JANUARY Summerhall - Open Doors

OCTOBER

By this stage real life could be getting a bit too much, so why not take in some animation? Scotland Loves Animation roars into Glasgow and Edinburgh in October, showing off some of the best animation from the Far East. Glasgow 11-13 Oct, Edinburgh 18-20 Oct. Alternatively you can lose yourself in Sonica, Glasgow’s annual festival of sonic art goodness. 31 Oct-2 Nov

Craig Hill

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Ease into the new year with the help of Celtic Connections, the annual festival celebrating the best of Scottish music as well as bringing together artists inspired by the country. Expect a surprising mix of genres and styles and some left-field choices as well as the occasional oneoff event. 16 Jan-2 Feb. The Skinny will also be celebrating its 100th issue – details are still being confirmed so keep an eye out.

FEBRUARY

February sees RSA New Contemporaries take over the Academy on the Mound in Edinburgh to show off the work of the best art and architecture students from the class of 2013. 15 Feb-12 Mar. You can also catch a solo show in Glasgow’s CCA from Alexander Millar, winner of The Skinny Award from last year’s New Contemporaries, 3 Feb-1 Mar. And if art isn’t your thing, then the Glasgow Film Festival is bound to have something for you with its blend of Holywood crowd-pleasers and interesting flicks from around the world.

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MARCH

By March you might be ready for a laugh, so the Glasgow Comedy Festival couldn’t come at a better time. The programme is still being feverishly planned out as we write, but with Chris Ramsay, Richard Herring and Russell Kane already confirmed you'll find something to tickle your nowjaded soul. 13-29 Mar.

APRIL

JUNE

The Edinburgh Film Festival swings into Scotland’s capital in June, bringing a heady mix of red carpet glamour and unpredictable avant-garde cinema from around the globe. Recurring events to watch out for include the annual Surprise Screening, the various late-night strands, and the festival’s cosy relationship with Pixar that lets Edinburgh students cry at brilliant cartoons before anyone else.

April offers a bit of variety; in Edinburgh, the annual Science Festival brings the world of exploding chemicals and bunsen burner accidents to life with a huge range of events from whisky nights to gigs in planetariums. 5-20 Apr. Meanwhile in Glasgow the International Festival of Visual Art brings the work of some of the world’s top artists to your doorstep, as well as showcasing brand new pieces. 4-21 Apr.

JULY

Edinburgh International Science Festival

July would normally be dominated by T in The Park and the annual invasion of Balado by the nation’s gig-goers and bands from across the musical spectrum. 11-13 Jul. That said, the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games might just eclipse it this year. Two weeks of world-class sport is coming, with Festival 2014’s huge programme of theatre and art running alongside. 23 Jul-3 Aug

For the Glasgow students who feel sufficiently integrated into their new home, the Southside Fringe presents the ideal opportunity to get involved with some grassroots art, theatre and spoken word. Events across the south of the city are organised by a team of volunteers throughout May, with a focus on keeping things local, exciting and fun.

T in the Park

Photo: Eoin Carey

MAY

Photo: Chris Haikney

AUGUST

Queens Park The Glasshouse

2013–2014

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As a new university year appears on the horizon in August, it quickly gets blocked out by two huge cultural events. The Edinburgh Fringe will bring everyone who ‘went home for the summer’ back pretty sharpish, as there literally isn’t anything that can’t be seen or heard in Edinburgh in August. The city’s Book Festival adds to the excitement, with authors, actors, artists and others all here to entertain you while subtly reminding you that you’ll have to do some work again soon.

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Welcome to the (Concrete) Jungle One of the first things you will learn as a student is that real life is unpredictable. Still, at least you know what you’re getting from the locals in your new home in one of Scotland’s fine university cities, right? Do you see where we’re going?

E

dinburgh is a posh, crusty living museum whose inhabitants find it impossible to get anything done without blowing their budget and destroying small areas of the city. When they aren’t complaining about badly-planned engineering projects or humblebragging about bloody pandas, the people of Edinburgh have a number of key hobbies.

 “Edinburgh comes to life in August and December to give residents something seasonal to whinge about” They can be found repairing cobbles on their heritage-tastic streets, complaining about their rubbish collections, constantly referring to their city as ‘The Capital’ in case someone steals the title away from them in the night, complaining about the roads, and complaining about the trams some more. The city comes to life in August and December, primarily to give residents something seasonal to whinge about, as well as providing some art and music not to watch. The people of The Capital are a bit, well... fuddy-duddy. Fortunately, while many of the people of Edinburgh are completely full of shit, you won’t have to deal with them. You will be hanging loose with the massive student contingent, who come from all over the world, make up about 20% of the city’s population, and have no great emotional 2013–2014

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Words: Peter Simpson Illustration: Elena Boils

attachment to The Little Tram Line That Could, But Hasn’t So Far. Edinburgh students break down into nice neat tropes – the failed Oxbridge applicants in their tight chinos and oversize Gap shirts, the provincial Scottish moshers who eventually grow out of it because they’re in a real city now and don’t need to impress anyone, the Mediterranean hippies with their crap beards and drum circles on the Meadows, and so on – all of student life’s rich tapestry is here, on display in a living shortbread tin.  The student numbers mean that ‘the kids’ live and play across a vast expanse of the city from Morningside to Leith, but the whole place is so white and middle-class you’ll barely notice the difference until you fancy a curry and realise you’re completely surrounded by cafes and charity shops filled with blue-rinsed grannies. Don’t worry, they won’t bite – just prepare a brief tirade about the particulars of tram project management and you’ll fit right in. 

G

lasgow, now that’s a different kettle of fish altogether. Industrial, gritty, like a Shane Meadows film but with even more shellsuits. It’s full of knife-wielding maniacs, antagonistic football fans and pasty white people kitted out like extras from an NWA video. Glasgow, essentially, is Edinburgh’s hipper urban cousin. Well, it’s urban in a peculiarly Scottish sense; it’s one of the few locations in Scotland that doesn’t resemble the setting of a Disney cartoon about hobgoblins. The city is undoubtedly cooler than The Capital, with gig venues and clubs all over the place, and sights to see that aren’t hundreds of years old. If you want to see a touring band in Scotland, they will be in Glasgow. You don’t really have to check, just head west. The nightlife has a much more anarchic and authentic

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feel, and as an added bonus Glasgow is genuinely broken up into distinct areas. Turns out driving that motorway through the middle of the city was a good idea after all, Glasgow, sorry we doubted you! The City Centre is reserved for jakeys, with the great and good commuting in to do their shopping, gigging, and boozing before fleeing down Sauchiehall Street at 11:53 for the train station in fear of being stuck in town. The West End is home to many of your fellow students, as well as many of the things that students like (‘kooky’ bars, short-as-possible journeys to classes). The East End is where you go to get your iPhone unlocked and then sit on Glasgow Green for hours, and the South Side is where you head if you can’t afford to stay in the West End. While they have their differences, one thing binds all of the parts of the city together – the Glasgow banter. That’s not rudeness, or needless aggression, it’s just banter. That mental guy with the chib, just full of banter. Glaswegians like to behave, talk and dress as though they live in New York. They don’t – they live in Glasgow – but it doesn’t hurt to play along, especially because things aren’t going to get any more urban any time soon.

 “Glasgow is full of knifewielding maniacs, antagonistic football fans and pasty white people”

D

undee is famous for three things – producing cloth in the 1800s, housing a ship that went on Antarctic expeditions in the 1900s, and reigning as Scotland’s teenage pregnancy capital in the 2000s. Other than that, there isn’t a whole lot going on in Scotland’s fourth city. While Edinburgh and Glasgow would live on without the annual

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influx of spoilt teenagers eager to ‘learn,’ Dundee might very well float away into the North Sea if the students all left at once. It is a barren cultural wasteland, and not a patch on either of its rivals. Except... nah. Dundee is actually a perfectly passable student city, with a number of things going for it. For one, there’s the ‘big fish, small pond’ effect to consider. Go to Edinburgh and you won’t be noticed or appreciated, but go to Dundee and the locals will welcome you like a conquering hero. ‘Cords AND a hat,’ they’ll say, ‘that guy is cool. Let’s make him our new god.’ That, or they’ll throw suspicious looks in your direction as you stalk one of their 40 branches of Tesco.

 “Dundee is actually on the verge of being cool and interesting.” The size of the place is another bonus – Dundee is pretty titchy, and everything you’ll ever need is handily lined up along one street that leads directly into the City Centre. No dealing with the riff-raff! This does lead to Dundee students being slightly dismissive of moving anywhere out of sight of the Perth Road in case their friends forget about them and they end up starving to death, but it’s good to have a sense of community. The big one for Dundee is that it is actually on the verge of being cool and interesting. The Scottish outpost of the V&A is set to open on the waterfront in a couple of years’ time and the city is in the running to be UK City of Culture in 2017. Dundee could soon be the epicentre of the Scottish cultural landscape (discounting Glasgow, of course), but with a subplot of polar exploration. Dundee could be the cultural equivalent of the episode of the Mighty Boosh set in the Arctic tundra where Noel Fielding dances with a lonely polar bear, and what student wouldn’t want to be involved in that?  Other cities (Aberdeen, Stirling) are also available

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JACK DANIEL NEVER KNEW HIS BIRTHDAY.

SO THE ENTIRE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER SEE MED LIKE A REASONABLE COMPROMISE. Blame it on lousy record keeping or forgetful parents. For some reason, Jack Daniel never knew what day he was born. But he did know which month. And in the long run, that proved a more rewarding option. Raise a glass to the man and his Tennessee Whiskey. And celebrate Mr. Jack’s birthday all September long.

Make Mr. Jack’s birthday a memorable one. Please drink responsibly. ©2013 Jack Daniel’s. All rights reserved. JACK DANIEL’S and OLD NO. 7 are registered trademarks.

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Now & Then: An A-Z of Scotland’s Music Scene Words: Darren Carle

Django Django

A

fter some arm-twisting, a fair amount of chinstroking and the occasional mild disagreement, we've put together this alphabetical list of some of the best bands and artists Scotland has to offer. It isn't exhaustive by any means, so head to the website to see even more of our suggestions and to let us know who's been overlooked...

Admiral Fallow

Indie folk sextet Admiral Fallow have been furrowing away since 2007 under the guidance of singer-songwriter Louis Abbott. His heart-onsleeve confessionals formed the basis of debut album Boots Met My Face, which, in turn, met with considerable acclaim including an album of the year plaudit from venerable Scottish music blog The Pop Cop.

Photo: Gemma Burke

Consider this your musical crib sheet— our A to Z guide to the Scottish music scene. As ever, Wet Wet Wet fans should prepare for disappointment

Boards of Canada

Almost certainly the most elusive and singular act on this list, Boards of Canada have stoked a cultlike following. Their stunning debut, 1998’s Music Has The Right To Children, set their inimitable template of woozy field recordings, sampled filmstock vignettes and analogue electro that still resonates to this day. An essential starting point.

CHVRCHES

This Glasgow trio showcased a master-class in hype last year on the back of debut single Lies. The resultant hoopla caused by three minutes of glam electro pop was fairly astounding but the three-piece have delivered more goods with this years’ Recover E.P. and are gearing up to drop debut album The Bones of What You Believe. CHVRCHES play Glasgow’s O2ABC on 11-12 Oct

2013–2014

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Django Django

Guthrie, Robin

We named Django Django’s eponymous debut as the second best album of 2012 and we’ll stand by that today. Taking the baton from fellow wonk-pop exponents The Beta Band, the Edinburgh-formed quartet crafted a glorious work of day glo, dustbowl anthemia that’s been lending a sparkle to all manner of televisual fodder ever since. Detach yourself though and you’ll find one of the most playful and satisfying albums in some time.

Along with vocalist Elizabeth Fraser, Robin Guthrie formed the core of the hugely influential Cocteau Twins. Within Guthrie’s effects-heavy guitar work and Fraser’s distinctive ethereal vocals embryonic traces of shoe-gaze can be gleaned, whilst Kevin Shields of My Bloody Valentine has admitted the group’s influence on his own work. Both Guthrie and Fraser continue to record separately but it’s together you’ll find their best work. There’s no accepted entry point into the Cocteau’s catalogue, so we’ll recommend 1983’s Head Over Heels.

Eagleowl

Given that they took some eight years to deliver debut album This Silent Year, it’d be rude not to single out Edinburgh trio eagleowl in our rundown of who’s who. Having been tided over with a couple of equally great EPs, their long-awaited debut cemented the sleepy folk outfit as one of Auld Reekie’s understated musical treasures.

(RM) Hubbert

Robert McArthur Hubbert has been part of the underground Scottish music scene for over two decades now. Previous to this solo venture he was best known as part of post-rock group El Hombre Trajeado. That’s certainly changed now though as Hubby’s second solo album Thirteen Lost & Found picked up this year’s Scottish Album of the Year Award. A slow-burning success then, much like the man’s own flamenco-infused, sombre output.

eagleowl play Glasgow’s Grand Ole Opry on 8 Sep

Frightened Rabbit

With their 2008 heartbreak album The Midnight Organ Fight, we fell in love with Frightened Rabbit. Since then, the rest of the world has been muscling in on our affair as the folk-rock outfit have steadily risen in popularity. Latter albums including this year's Pedestrian Verse have seen the band bolster their sheen but we’re sticking with the more rustic and bare Organ Fight as your best route in.

RM Hubbert plays Edinburgh’s Electric Circus on 26 Sep and Glasgow’s St Andrews in the Square on 29 Sep

Idlewild

Frightened Rabbit

2013–2014

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Photo: Derek M Chapman

Frightened Rabbit play Glasgow’s O2 Academy on 16 Nov

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(RM) Hubbart

Photo: Ashley Good

On hiatus since 2009, a swift reunion would see Edinburgh quintet Idlewild greeted with open arms by well-rounded music lovers. Operating outwith any particular scene, they flourished from noisy garage punk into folk-tinged indie during the last decade and were all the better for it. Second album 100 Broken Windows should form a bedrock of any discerning indie collection.

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The Jesus and Mary Chain

Steve Mason

Mason, Steve

They may not have released a new album since 1998, but even if they had broken up after hugely influential 1985 debut Psychocandy, The Jesus and Mary Chain would undoubtedly still hit this list. Bobby Gillespie was on drumming duties at the time before quitting to form Primal Scream, lending the album an even greater Scottish resonance. Subsequent albums fared well enough but Psychocandy remains their finest moment.

As founder and lead-singer of The Beta Band, Steve Mason had already left his mark on Scottish music when they disbanded in 2004. Mason began steadily releasing music under the pseudonym King Biscuit Time but has been finding wider acclaim since putting down the bourbons, releasing the highly acclaimed albums Boys Outside and this year's Monkey Minds in the Devil’s Time under his own name.

King Creosote

Steve Mason plays Edinburgh’s Liquid Room on 26 Oct and Glasgow’s O2ABC on 27 Oct

The nom de plume of Fife singer-songwriter Kenny Anderson, King Creosote has been a huge influence on many layers of the Scottish music scene. From an exhaustive list of self-released albums to setting up the much-loved Fence Records, along with a couple of brushes with mainstream appeal, it’s difficult to think of another figure so entrenched in the Scottish music scene as ol’ Kenny. Try 2007’s Bombshell as an excellent all-round introduction to his oeuvre.

Lord Cut-Glass

Though Lord Cut-Glass’s 2009 eponymous debut was a fine slice of Scots baroque grandeur, we’re really celebrating the man behind the Napoleonic cosplay here. Alun Woodward was not only a member of much-loved lush indie popstrels The Delgados, he, along with the band, also formed Chemikal Underground Records. Without such we may never have known the likes of Arab Strap, Mogwai, The Phantom Band and many others. Alun, in line with your preferred style of dress-up, we salute you. 18

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Photo: Alex Woodward

Photo: Sarah Roberts

King Creosote

Nina Nesbitt

We’re not averse to a nice bit of pop here at The Skinny, and rising Edinburgh star Nina Nesbitt is certainly that. Breakthrough single Stay Out has been accosting daytime radio playlists and followup release Way In The World seems likely to follow suit. Having made a splash at T in the Park this year look out for the debut album soon.

Orange Juice

OK, so we’re cheating to include Edwyn Collins here rather than his long-defunct guitar pop band Orange Juice, but that’s just a measure of the man’s influence. Collins’ well-documented health problems may have refocused attentions but obvious cuts like Rip It Up or globe-straddling solo pop hit A Girl Like You remain timeless and belie a rich back catalogue worth investigation. Try 2003’s A Casual Introduction for starters.

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The Phantom Band

Fittingly for their name, Glasgow sextet The Phantom Band appeared seemingly from nowhere with their blind-siding debut Checkmate Savage in 2009. A year later saw follow-up The Wants manage to better it, so The Skinny is getting all frothy for a potential third album (c’mon guys). In the meantime, frontman Rick Redbeard’s strippedback folk album No Selfish Heart is an excellent curveball. Rick Redbeard plays The Pleasance Sessions alongside Siobhan Wilson on 12 Oct

Monica Queen

Admittedly not one of the most current names on this roster, Monica Queen was nonetheless lead vocalist with indie rockers Thrum back in the early nineties. After disbanding, Queen stepped into the limelight again, providing vocals to Belle and Sebastian’s single Lazy Line Painter Jane before moving on to a solo career. Since then, Thrum have reunited, releasing second album Elletorama in 2011.

Remember Remember

The one time solo endeavour of Graeme Ronald, Remember Remember have gradually evolved into an amorphous troupe of multi-instrumentalists. 2013–2014

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Photo: Euan Robertson

The Twilight Sad

2008’s eponymous debut set their blueprint of gentle, looped guitar lines and cyclical woodwind trimmings bolstered by deft, glitch electronic. 2011’s The Quickening upped their game considerably, leading to local DJ Vic Galloway crowning it his album of the year.

Stafford, Adam

Despite critical acclaim, Falkirk band Y’all Is Fantasy Island endured ten years of miniscule commercial success before disbanding in 2011. Thankfully, lead singer and guitarist Adam Stafford hasn’t completely thrown in the towel, releasing his latest solo effort Imaginary Walls Collapse earlier this year. It’s also shaping up to be Stafford’s highest profile release yet. Not a moment too soon say we.

The Twilight Sad

Back in 2007 we anointed The Twilight Sad’s debut Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters as our album of the year. Combining singer James Graham’s dense Scottish brogue with layers of shoegaze guitar noise, there’s been little like if before or since. Third album No One Can Ever Know was a return to a very different form, opting for cold, towering synths but with equally splendid results.

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United Fruit

Unlike the former banana traders they’ve named themselves after, United Fruit have built up something of a positive reputation both live and on record. Despite their heritage, the quartet sound a world away from their Glasgow hometown, with 2011 debut album Fault Lines using the hardcore template of ...Trail of Dead and At The Drive-In as a jumping off point for their own incisive and guitardriven white noise.

The Vaselines

Yes, the leg-up afforded to The Vaselines by Kurt Cobain will forever be associated with them, but the core duo’s original output, encapsulated nicely with 2009 retrospective Enter The Vaselines, is cause enough for them be included here. Still going strong after 2010 comeback Sex with an X, The Vaselines remain relevant to this day.

We Were Promised Jetpacks

We first saw We Were Promised Jetpacks supporting Frightened Rabbit at the diminutive Caves venue in their Edinburgh hometown back in 2008. Last month, the young quartet supported Bon Jovi at Hampden Park. But don’t let association with the perma-mulleted rock gods put you off; WWPJ deserve every bit of that mercurial rise. Debut album These Four Walls marks a promising start but 2011’s In the Pit of the Stomach is where The Jetpacks really start to, ahem, lift off.

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Zoey Van Goey

Photo: Justin Moir

Photo: Emily Wylde

We Were Promised Jetpacks

The Xcerts

Aberdonian trio The Xcerts have been slowly burning on the music scene for over a decade now, finally releasing debut album In the Cold Wind We Smile in 2009 and quickly following it with 2010’s more confident sounding Scatterbrain. A scrapped support slot with Guns N’ Roses last year may have been a disappointment for the lads but we’ll wager the young chaps will bounce back soon enough with a new album.

Yorkston, James

Like fellow Fife-resident King Creosote, James Yorkston has cultivated quite a reach across the underground Scottish music scene. His 2011 book It’s Lovely to be Here: The Touring Diaries of a Scottish Gent says it all in the title and is worthy of a read whatever you make of his music. Any of Yorkston’s ‘main’ releases on Domino are worthy starting points. We’ll opt for 2006’s The Year of the Leopard.

Zoey Van Goey

As a quartet they may be of mixed nationalities, but having formed in Glasgow in 2006 and being signed to Chemikal Underground, we’re going to claim fey indie popsters Zoey Van Goey as our own. By encasing their sometimes big subject matter within twee, playful folk gems they’ve managed to eke out their own path. 2009’s debut album The Cage Was Unlocked All Along is a sensible first stop here.

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23/08/2013 12:29


As Old As Time: A Look at Student Theatre While university is mainly about academics, the extracurricular activities you take reflect your personality and your interests. If you enjoy the theatre, or even being behind the scenes, why not join a theatre society?

Words: Eric Karoulla

dinburgh and its universities benefit from Bedlam. Bedlam Theatre has been around since the early 1980s, when the building became home to the Edinburgh University Theatre Company (EUTC). One of the oldest student-run theatres in Britain, it also lays claim to one of the longest running improvised comedy troupes, The Improverts (more affectionately known as The Imps). Their shows are heavily based around improvisation games, with suggestions from the audience, so no two Improvert shows are the same. One of the only student societies with its very own building, Bedlam Theatre use it wisely. Aside from putting on shows, they also have workshops on acting, writing, and to train up techs for performances. Going along to a tech workshop means you can learn how to deal with pretty much all the things that go on backstage during a production, like lights and sound. Furthermore, the Improverts have workshops every Saturday in the cafe, which allow them to teach and select new Imps. The best way to get involved in any student society is during Freshers’ Week. With 17 shows and workshops already lined up, the Bedlam crew are ready to welcome new members. The highlight of the week tends to be the Freshers’ play – a short play devised within the week – where those hoping to join Bedlam showcase their talents. Bedlam’s Lisbeth Mills has one tip for Freshers’ week: “Come in and don’t be afraid to talk to people and get involved.” During the Fringe, Bedlam maintains its student identity through putting on works by the EUTC and hosting the Improverts every night. Of course, as with any healthy community, the student theatre scene of Edinburgh is not exclusively limited to Bedlam and the Improverts, but rather involves strong ties with other performance societies, like the Edinburgh University

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Bedlam

Photo: Kim Traynor

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Savoy Opera Group (EUSOG), the Edinburgh University Footlights, the Edinburgh University Shakespeare Company, and Theatre Paradok. Turning west to Glasgow, the corresponding institution is Student Theatre at Glasgow (or for short, STaG). Glasgow University’s very own theatremakers, STaG – like Bedlam – isn’t limited to just actors, or just students. It’s one of the oldest and largest student theatre societies in the country, having existed in one form or another for over 90 years. STaG’s prerogative is inclusivity, taking in everyone regardless of their background. They run new talent nights as term begins, and consider all-comers as they put together a production in the first three weeks of term. While the society doesn’t have its own building, it has access to various spaces including the Gilmorehill Theatre and the 62 Oakfield Avenue studio, reflecting the flexibility and adaptability of student theatre. There’s something for everyone in the world of student theatre, so the main thing is to give it a go. After all, plenty of others have tried it too. www.bedlamtheatre.co.uk www.studenttheatreatglasgow.com

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For more info and to register for this event visit

www.eusa.co.uk/whatson

Entry with valid student ID or 16+ YoungScot card. Alcohol strictly only sold to those 18 and over.

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23/08/2013 12:31


Word on the Street: Live Literature in Edinburgh & Glasgow Are you the kind of person who longs for the chance to speak your mind? One of the richest and most diverse spoken word scenes in the UK is waiting in Glasgow and Edinburgh for you to explore

Words: Illya Kuryakin

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achel McCrum, who co-runs Rally & Broad, identifies a rich tradition of spoken word in Scotland. The country has “a history of storytelling, bards, oral tradition and ballad poetry. When people employ that, as well as working to discover and perform in their own unique poetic voice, something quite special happens.” Slam poetry originated in Chicago in the 1980s. When London-based poet Jem Rolls brought his Big Word events to Edinburgh in 1996 poetry readings were far from a new thing, but competetive poetry, where writers battle it out to win the title of Slam Champion, was new to Scotland. The rising popularity of slams led to the creation of a wealth of new spoken word nights. Harry Giles runs Inky Fingers, catering to “poets, fictioneers, experimenters, storytellers and more.” Each event has an ‘open mic’ section as well as a selection of established performers. “We’re proud of working to be the friendliest and most supportive space for open mic possible,” says Giles, who also runs writers’ workshops. Giles also co-runs ultra-cool devised performance night Anatomy at Summerhall. Blind Poetics offers a 20-minute featured artist spot, ‘introducing’ spots and a vibrant open mic. It’s a place to spot the best up-and-coming talent. “We probably get the highest number of new/unknown/first timers at any open mic in Edinburgh,” says Alec Beattie, who co-runs the night with Roddy Shippin. One of Glasgow’s longest-established nights, run by performance poet Robin Cairns, Last Monday at Rio features a whopping 20 open mic spots alongside a showcase from a high-profile local, national, or international poet. “The event is aimed at working writers who want to show off or try out their new material,” says Cairns, adding

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Jenny Lindsay & Rachel McCrum, aka Rally & Broad

“It's a small country with an intimate scene... there is a lot of support for fellow artists, as well as lively discussions around the artform itself” Rachel McCrum

that it “doesn’t matter whether they have a grand pedigree or not.” Cairns also runs the annual Glasgow Slam, and small press imprint SilkScreen.

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Neu Reekie!

Photo: Jassy Earl

A recent addition to the Glasgow scene, Fail Better is a night rich with political and sociallyconscious writing, mixing music and performance in with the poetry. Student-run outing The Verse Hearse offers a space for page poets and performance poets to meet, read their work and exchange ideas. Catering to a younger, intellectually and politically adventurous crowd, both these nights are at the cutting edge of Scottish spoken word. Rally & Broad is half literary salon and half decadent cabaret. Organisers Jenny Lindsay and Rachel McCrum frequently welcome the absolute cream of Scotland’s literary scene, with writers such as Ewan Morrison and Alan Bisset gracing the stage next to musicians and avant garde performers. Jenny Lindsay took over the stewardship of Big Word after Jem Rolls left Edinburgh to tour internationally, and is the lynchpin of the city’s spoken word community. McCrum describes Lindsay’s work as “engaged, funny, astute, generous and utterly beautiful.” McCrum herself was instrumental in setting up Inky Fingers with Harry Giles, and co-runs a thriving small press imprint, Stewed Rhubarb, which this year won the Calum MacDonald Award for pamphlet publishing. You may not be able to sign up for an open mic at Rally & Broad, but if you are asked to perform at one of their coveted ‘Introducing’ spots, opportunity might well beckon. They re-launch on 18 October. Lindsay namechecks William Letford, and Kirstin Innes (who ran her own brilliant live literature event, Words Per Minute, in Glasgow in recent years) as some of the best that Scotland has to offer. McCrum is equally enthusiastic: “It’s a small country with an intimate scene, but I’ve found that means there is a lot of support for fellow artists, as well as lively discussions around the artform itself.” Writers’ Bloc shows are carefully curated around specific, sometimes topical themes, and feature a tight core of prose writers working together to create new and engaging performances. Bloc have participated in the Edinburgh Book Festival and Science Festival, and count noted SF authur Hannu Rajaniemi and critic, editor and writer Andrew J. Wilson among their number. Bloc shows offer a spectacle not to be missed, at the bleeding edge of live literature. Illicit Ink, run by writers Barbara Melville and Ariadne Cass-Maran, is “aimed at everyone who likes the sinister, the witty and the weird.” Melville continues: “Our focus is on a sense of

mischief and playfulness. We’ve had everything from heartfelt stories about relationships to silly stuff about ghost chickens.” From September on, their regular events will re-launch as Illicit Ink: Underground at the Bongo Club and Illicit Ink: Skyground at the Scottish Storytelling Centre. Perhaps the most venerated spoken word night in Scotland, Neu! Reekie! is run by poet Michael Pedersen and writer, publisher and activist Kevin Williamson, founder of Rebel Inc. Press, the first publisher to introduce the world to Irvine Welsh. Their events mix poetry, performance, music and film, and with a list of past guests that includes the Scots Makar Liz Lochhead, respected novelist Alasdair Gray and actor Tam Dean Burn, you are always guaranteed an evening of topnotch entertainment. The above represents a fair selection of the best spoken word nights Edinburgh and Glasgow have to offer, but in an ever-changing and wildly diverse scene, there is always more to see. Get yourself down to an open mic or a slam, get stuck in, and explore for yourself. Open mics: Inky Fingers: inkyfingersedinburgh.wordpress.com Blind Poetics: www.facebook.com/pages/BlindPoetics/173754889340723 Last Monday At Rio: www.robincairns.com/rio.html Fail Better: www.facebook.com/FailBetterGlasgow The Verse Hearse: www.facebook.com/ groups/457327344286964 Showcase events: Rally & Broad: rallyandbroad.wordpress.com Writers’ Bloc: www.writers-bloc.org.uk Illicit Ink: illicitink.net Neu! Reekie!: neureekie.tumblr.com

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Big Screen Education Uni is the perfect place to refine your cinema tastes: join a film society, raid the uni library’s DVD collection and seek out your local art-house theatre. And for those who want to go deeper into film culture, look towards Scotland’s many film festivals

The old one

I’ll say one thing about Edinburgh International Film Festival (June): it has stamina. Held in Auld Reekie each year since 1947, it’s the longest continually running celebration of cinema in the world. Don’t assume that means EIFF is stuck in its ways, though. Under the stewardship of its current artistic director, Chris Fujiwara, Edinburgh can lay claim to some of the most exciting film curation happening in the UK at them moment, with a particular focus on filmmakers emerging from Asia. What to expect: American indie, documentary, world cinema, British cinema, red carpets and awards, short films, artists’ films, a director focus, genre cinema, director and cast Q&As, industry events Don’t miss: its world class retrospectives

The up-and-coming one

The Scottish press love to pit young whippersnapper Glasgow Film Festival (20 Feb-2 Mar) against the grand old dame in Edinburgh, but the 28

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Words: Jamie Dunn Illustration: Kyle Smart

truth is they’re quite different. Firstly, Glasgow’s curation is more crowd-pleasing – the majority of its programme is made up of the highlights from other international festivals and films soon to be released. The imaginative form the festival’s screenings take more than compensates for any predictability of the programming, with venues as varied as an underground station, a 19th century cargo ship and a swimming baths playing host to events in recent years. What to expect: European cinema, American indie, the best of the festival circuit, Scottish cinema, classic hollywood, artists’ films, documentary Don’t miss: its eclectic music and film strand

The horizons-broadening one

If you’re under the impression that great cinema doesn’t come out of Africa than I put it to you that you simply haven’t seen enough films from the continent. And the reason you haven’t seen enough is that distributors in the UK seem blind to the excellent cinema emerging from the African nations. Africa in Motion (24 Oct-1 Nov) offers you

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one of the few arenas in which to watch cinema from the youngest filmmaking continent. What to expect: contemporary and revival cinema from Africa, African art and music Don’t miss: Africa in Motion’s always excellent opening night party

The youthful one

Glasgow Youth Film Festival (2-12 Feb) is Scotland’s most innovative film festival. Each year the trusting folks over at Glasgow Film Theatre’s learning department take a group of local teens, aged 15-17, and hand then the keys to the cinema for two weeks to programme a festival aimed at young people, leaving them to curate, coordinate and hosts its events. What to expect: coming-of-age movies, animations, family screenings, comedies, late night cult movies Don’t miss: the sometimes awkward post-screening Q&As where the greenhorn programmers ask their interviewees exactly what’s on their mind

The right-on ones

Take One Action (27 Sep-12 Oct) and Document (Oct) are festivals with a social conscience. Rather than placate their audiences, they ask them to get angry and ask “How can I make a difference?” Both festivals bring together the best documentary and narrative films that tackle the various political, social, economic, and environmental problems facing the world. What to expect: films exposing injustices, post screenings discussions and debates Don’t miss: TOA’s annual bike-powered screening

The short film one

Some of the most exciting cinema being made in the UK today is happening in short form, and Glasgow Short Film Festival (13-16 Feb) gives short film lovers a rare chance to see these small films on the big screen. The meat of the festival is its two competitions, one looking at local talent, the other open to the best short filmmakers from across the globe, while the rest of the festival is an eclectic mix of short film retrospectives, parties, and industry events. What to expect: short films from Scottish and international talent Don’t miss: late-night music and film mashups

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The scary ones

Gorehounds are spoiled for choice in Scotland. Not only does Frightfest take over the final weekend of Glasgow Film Festival for two days of blood soaked cinema, we’ve two excellent homegrown horror festivals as well: Dead by Dawn (Apr) and Dundead (May).  What to expect: horror, blood, gore, scares, classic scary movies Don’t miss: Dead by Dawn’s all-nighter Spawn of the Dead or Dundead’s lovingly programmed double-bills

The queer one

Thanks to great distributors like Pecadillo Pictures, the odd film concerned with LGBT themes make it into cinemas, but there are still many gay films that struggle to make it to the big screen, even in cosmopolitan cities like Glasgow and Edinburgh. Praise be, then, for Glasgay! (9 Oct-9 Nov), Glasgow’s annual celebration of gay culture, which offers a strand of LGBT cinema. What to expect: contemporary queer cinema and camp classics Don’t miss: its wild late night cult film screenings

The animated one

Scotland has a surprisingly dedicated anime following. Seriously, they’re intense. And Scotland Loves Anime (11-13 Oct) has, for the last three years, been sating these anime-nuts with a whole host of UK and International premières of the latest animations coming from Japan. What to expect: contemporary and classic Anime; Studio Ghibli Don’t miss: its epic back-to-back screenings of animated television series on the big screen www.edfilmfest.org.uk www.glasgowfilm.org/festival www.africa-in-motion.org.uk www.glasgowfilm.org/festival/information/festivals_within_ the_festivals/gyff www.takeoneaction.org.uk/documentfilmfestival.org www.glasgowfilm.org/festival/information/festivals_within_ the_festivals/gsff www.deadbydawn.co.uk/twitter.com/Dundead www.glasgay.co.uk www.lovesanimation.com

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23/08/2013 15:52


Warsaw Rising Words: Bram E. Gieben

Warsaw

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tepping off a £40 Ryanair flight into Warsaw’s sweltering 40-degree heat, the horizon is dominated by glass skyscrapers – an ultra-modern cityscape, very different to the ubiquitous tourist shots taken in the Old Town (Stare Miasto). The Skinny’s cab driver assures us this is the hottest summer since World War Two, establishing something of a theme for the break. After checking in at our absurdly cheap hostel, we head out to Stare Miasto, all sun-bleached walls in pastel colours, slate roofs and church spires. Tourists applaud a newly-married couple walking the cobbled square, and local film-makers re-enact a scene from the Warsaw Uprising of 1944, running out of a building in period costume. If Stare Miasto resembles a film set, perhaps that’s because of the history – established in

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Photo: Kyle Taylor

You deserve a holiday, but we’re guessing money’s tight. With that in mind we stuck our staff writer on the cheapest flights we could find to see the sights, check out the culture and meet the people without spending all our cash

the 13th century but razed and destroyed by the Nazis, Stare Miasto was faithfully rebuilt with its original stones, but it’s a little too perfect. The Palace of Culture and Science dominates Marszałkowska and the surrounding skyline. The 231-metre high tower contains two theatres, restaurants, a nightclub, multiplex cinema, two museums, and countless offices and conference rooms. The view of Warsaw from the 11th floor terrace is breathtaking, and a trip up will only set you back 18 zloty (about £3). We head to Łazienki Park, a 76-hectare stretch of shaded walks, lush grass, former royal palaces and architectural extravagances. It’s a beautiful place to spend a few hours, and the perfect place to go when you’re in a new town and don’t want to blow the budget. At RozdroŽe, we

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Warsaw's Old and New Towns

Photo: Flickr/Unit03

try our first Polish cuisine. Red borscht – a spiced beetroot soup with meat pierogi, or dumplings – is absolutely delicious, while jadło drwala, a potato pancake filled with spicy ghoulash stew and topped with sour cream, is ridiculously filling, but probably better suited to a cold winter day than a 40-degree scorcher. Keen to try something beyond the ubiquitous Zywiec (Poland’s answer to Tennents) we go in search of beer with the help of some enthusiastic locals. Marcin, Asha, Boris, Marek and Bartos take us first to Beirut on Poznanska for delicious middle-Eastern tapas and drink Noteckie, an independently-brewed pale ale with some flowery notes. Opposite Beirut is Tel-Aviv, another restaurant – Boris says the the pair’s close proximity tells us a bit about the Warszawa sense of humour. Then it’s on to Koszynska, a former covered market converted into a bar. It’s packed with a hip, young crowd; everyone seems to know each other. The story’s the same at Plan B, on Rondo Romana Dmowskiego, known locally as ‘hipster square.’ Drinkers lounge on the grass outside. A DJ spins hip-hop in the narrow bar, staffed by tattooed waitresses, the walls covered in graffiti and paste-ups. “I come here at 2 in the morning when I really need a beer after work,” says Marcin. “There’s always someone to say hello to.” Next morning, breakfast is at a boho, out-ofthe way café, Posłaniec Uczuc, on Glogera Street. It’s hard to find, but well worth it, with a great allyou-can-eat breakfast on Sundays for just 20 zloty (about £5). Equally tasty fare is available across town at Kawiarnia Fawory on Mickiewicza Street – paintings adorn the walls, and by night they put on bespoke gigs and serve Polish craft beer, like the delicious, dark-hued Juraskje, and wickedly strong imperial ale Pinta Imperium Atakuje. At just 10 zloty (about £2.50) a bottle, it’s no more pricy than bog-standard cooking lagers like Tyskie. Then we move on to Bufet Centralny for modern twists on classic Polish fare, yet more beer, and vodka shots laced with lemon juice and sugar. Appetite sated, it’s time to tackle the city’s often tragic history. The monument to the Warsaw Uprising, with its blocky, brutalist style, is incredibly kinetic – young soldiers burst from brick walls clutching machine guns and bombs, while in the foreground, priests mumble and pray. Across the city at the Uprising Museum (free entry on Sundays), we explore a three-floor examination of this complex and vitally important moment

in Polish history, which saw the Warsaw people take on the better-armed, better-equipped Nazi occupiers. It is a story of a fiercely proud, indomitable people, utterly essential to understanding modern-day Warsaw. As we watch a 3D-reconstruction of a flight over the bombed out city of 1944, the skyscrapers begin to make sense – this is a place whose destruction was almost total, and whose reconstruction was hard-won. Later, as we sneak through narrow alleyways off upmarket Nowy Swiat, we enter a venal system of nameless bars with dim lights, graffiti-covered walls and a young, trendy crowd. Scratch beneath the surface, and you’ll see that Warsaw is a great place for a student holiday. It’s as exciting and cosmopolitan as Berlin or Amsterdam, it’s a city on the rise that’s strongly connected to its history, and appropriately for you students, it’s got its gaze fixed firmly on the future. Flights found on skyscanner.net Hostels from £5 a night for a dorm bed on booking.com Best beer: 10 zloty (£2), Pinta Imperium Atakuje Reading matter: China Miéville - The City & The City

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Starting a New Korea “What’s it like in Korea as a TEFL teacher?” “Good” has never seemed like a sufficient response for our man in the Far East – it’s a question that needs a lengthy answer. So here it is, urinating bosses and all

Words: Euan Wallace

Photo: Micro Cosmic

place to live to the point where you can get by without even understanding the language. I know people who have lived here for 3 years and can’t order food in a restaurant. While social life is relaxed and stress-free, the same can’t be said for work. Korea is a popular location for English teachers because it offers experience and good pay without loads of qualifications, but it’s notorious for stories of nightmare bosses, unreasonable demands and squabbles over money. None of these are as funny or disturbing as the events that befell two friends of mine, ‘Billy’ and ‘Becca.’ The first sign of trouble: they turned up to work and their boss told them they had two weeks to save their jobs. They looked through their contracts, trying to find some justification for this, and all seemed hopeless until they got drunk with Busan, South Korea the boss and asked him nicely not to fire them. If that sounds a bit unconventional, what came to Korea in 2011 to ‘teach English’ with followed was arguably worse. Regular companyvery little idea about what to expect, and fewer wide boozing is a feature of Korean work culpointers. I ‘knew’ about Korea’s love of dog eating ture and a few weeks later Billy and Becca were (as characteristic a feature of Korean cuisine as again drinking with their boss. The atmosphere lettuce is of Scotland’s), it turns out TV channels was soured when the boss ordered them back dedicated to online strategy game Starcraft, and to school to finish lesson plans... at 1am. Their the national hero status of equine dancing sensa- boss then drunkenly followed them home before tion PSY. Oh, and apparently I would tower over collapsing in Billy’s bed and urinating. That said, the locals – I’ve since met an unsettling number of provided you can avoid any serious disputes or twelve year olds who are taller than me. bed-wetting, working in Korea can be an enjoyable It’s therefore unsurprising that the first few experience. weeks came with a steep learning curve. It’s easy As well as asking what it’s like to live in Korea, to attribute something to cultural differences or people often comment on how ‘brave’ I am for to be painfully aware when you’ve made a monuworking in a country as foreign as Korea, but the mental balls-up in a social situation, but it’s near truth is it’s embarrassingly simple. I’m convinced impossible for that awareness to become instinct. that anyone could do this. The differences beA rough crash course: bow, take off your tween Asia and Europe are largely cosmetic. I love shoes before entering a room, and don’t disagree the life here but it doesn’t seem foreign to me – with anyone older than you. Oh, and titles are except for the urinating bosses. favored over names. This means calling your boss ‘boss’ and not ‘Ms Kang.’ TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) courses run at Fortunately for foreigners, Koreans make alvarious locations across Scotland For more info visit www.tefl.org.uk lowances on the etiquette, making Korea an easy

I

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DANCE | DRAMA | COMEDY | MUSIC | OPERA | FAMILY

See more live shows for less!

ÂŁ10 Student Standby

Available in person after midday on the day of the performance with valid student ID.

edtheatres.com

Tickets

*

*Subject to availability. Not available for all shows.

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Registered Charity SC018605.

23/08/2013 12:36


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Clubbing 101 Words: Ronan Martin

Substance

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idweek clubs are tailor-made for students and, thankfully, the number of quality options seems to be increasing all the time. So if the lure of inexplicably cheap doubles and familiar faces at the student union begins to wear off, there should be plenty to keep you occupied elsewhere. Long-hailed raving institution the Sub Club plays host to I Am and Sub Rosa, both offering choice cuts and the chance to see big name acts on Tuesday and Wednesday nights respectively. I Am have hosted a combination of international names and local favourites such as Dan Monox and Ben Martin (High Sheen) alongside residents Beta and Kappa in recent months, while Rosa invited the likes of Mia Dora and James Hillard of Horse Meat Disco to the Sub Club’s famous DJ booth. In Edinburgh, Juice at Sneaky Pete’s takes care of Thursday nights with an intoxicating mixture including disco, juke, dancehall and hip hop. In recent months the night has hosted Rinse FM crowd pleaser Oneman, Chicago juke figurehead DJ Rashad, and Hyperdub Records’ Scratcha DVA. In terms of monthly outings worth dipping

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Photo: Ross Fraser McLean

Student loan in, lecture slides downloaded, ‘must attend’ seminars on Russian Agriculture booked in. All that remains is to hand over your evening schedule – your line-up of some of Scotland’s top club nights

into the book budget to finance, the choices are endless. In Glasgow, relative newcomers Offbeat always bring a mix of DJs and often make their nights free before 12, even when their able residents are joined by international guests. Over the past year or so, the crew have certainly made their mark, continually inviting top DJs to La Cheetah’s basement. Recent months have seen the visit of Italo disco purveyor Skatebård and the man behind the brilliant Sex Tags Mania label, DJ Sotofett. While you might not always be familiar with the names on their flyers, Offbeat can be relied upon to bring you a connoisseur’s selection of underground electronic sounds. Other recommended Glasgow events are Melting Pot, which serves up the best in disco, funk and house, Jak which tends to offer murky analogue techno and electro, and Naive which delivers house from the deeper end of the spectrum. Edinburgh night Substance is an ever-reliable option and celebrates its seventh birthday in October with the visit of Moderat, the critically acclaimed collaboration between Modeselektor and Aparat. Such high profile nights have become

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a hallmark of the event over the years, with resident Gavin Richardson holding his own alongside some of techno’s legendary figures – the likes of Jeff Mills, Surgeon and Neil Landstrumm have all graced the capital in recent years and Substance remains one of the best nights on offer. Elsewhere, Jackhammer can also be relied upon to bring the biggest names in techno to the capital, while Xplicit has long served the city’s drum ‘n’ bass heads with top names taking to the decks alongside residents Eno, Dom Y2D, Dissonant and DJ Blaze.   Of course, this is just a brief summary of some of the extra-curricular delights on offer. Browse The Skinny’s detailed monthly listings to find out what’s on where and keep an eye out for club profiles and features in the magazine and online. In the meantime, let us finish by offering a few general dos and don’ts to get the most out of your nights out...

quiet night hoping to get in but find that it’s in fact full, or head out early for a night that looks set to be packed, only to find you and your friends are the only people there apart from one 40 year old rave relic who keeps asking you for drugs.

DO be sure to follow as many venues and club promoters on Facebook as your news feed can handle. Things can change at the last minute and social media updates are often the main method used to deliver last minute ticket info, surprise guest announcements or the crushing yet somehow predictable news that ‘International DJ Extraordinaire’ Terrence Parker will not be able to play his set as planned... AGAIN.

DO make the most of your nights out while the grim prospect of careers and increased responsibility remains somewhere off on the horizon.

DON’T pay much notice to the number of people allegedly going to nights on Facebook event pages. Chances are you’ll wander down to a seemingly

For the latest on Scotland’s club scene, go to theskinny.co.uk/clubs

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Photo: Callum Barr

The Arches

DO attempt to go to the odd night which isn’t necessarily your preferred choice in music. Some of the best clubbing experiences you will have will be at nights you may otherwise have ignored. DON’T expect to be able to see everyone you want to see in a given month (and live to tell the story). With new nights popping up all the time, and with a steady stream of ‘unmissable’ guests booked in Glasgow and Edinburgh each month, it’s important to plan your clubbing wisely. Some guests are here every other month, so prioritise or risk decimating your liver and your bank balance with 3 day benders every weekend.  

DON’T blame The Skinny if you end up with an unexpected 2:2 in your chosen subject and an unshakable 4/4 rhythm stuck in the centre of your brain, forever.  

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Squid & Whale www.squidwhale.com 372 - 374 great western road, glasgow, g4 9ht

Mexican Kitchen

FREE

BURRITO So if it isn’t clear enough, you can get one FREE BURRITO with this voucher. All you need to do is buy any drink. Then cut it out along the wee dotted line and bring it in. But don’t keep it forever, the offer runs out on the 30th November 2013. SquidBurrito2

Byres Rd Glasgow Renfield St Glasgow Strathclyde Student Union Glasgow Hanover St Edinburgh www.tacomazama.co.uk

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The Skinny Showcase Every month The Skinny devotes a double page spread to displaying the work of early career artists practising in painting, sculpture, illustration, design and photography. We aim to select at least one artist from each graduating year from DJCAD, ECA and GSA – here are our picks from 2013

Mikey Cooke graduated from Glasgow School of Art in 2013 with a BA (Hons) Fine Art: Painting and Printmaking

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Dennis Reinmuller graduated from Edinburgh College of Art in 2013 with a BA (Hons) Sculpture

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Flo Gordon graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design in 2013 with a BA (Hons) Fine Art

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The Pursuit of App-iness

If you’re reading this, you almost certainly own a smartphone or tablet. Well, here’s a selection of software that can help you get to lectures on time, send covert messages to friends across the hall, and have a dog do your background reading

Trello

gu.ide

Notability

F

Words: Peter Simpson

notes and other course material together in neat little bundles. The best part is that Notability can also record audio of your lecture and synchronise it with your notes, meaning that if you drift off in class you can find out what you missed when you started drawing a cock on that vector diagram. If you’re the group-leading rather than cockdrawing type, then Trello (multi-platform, free) is the app for you. Trello lets you organise group working by dividing the tasks in your project into ‘cards.’ Use it correctly and you can divide up the entire project into little pieces, see who’s doing what and when, and jazz things up with the occasional .gif left smack bang in the middle of everyone’s work. Speaking of unexpected online deliveries, we aren’t going to recommend everyone’s favourite obscene photograph delivery system Snapchat. We are going to recommend Voxer (iOS and Android, free), because it can turn your phone into a walkie-talkie. You’re welcome. Voxer lets you send voice, photo and location messages to your friends over WiFi, allowing you to alert all of your new university friends at once to the fact that you are in a playpark at 4am, while also providing a photograph and precise GPS location of said playpark. And if you really want to see some bizarre images sent from an app, then grab an iPad and download gui.de (iPad, free). It’s a news app – add your favourite sites, sources and articles to its feed, and then choose from a dog or a robot. gui.de’s gimmick is that the web is read to you by a creepy disembodied head that sounds a little like Stephen Hawking, with your head options ranging from small animated animal to Japanese anime man to the robot from that Bjork video. That’s the future you’re helping to create, students – a world where dogs read the news.

irst thing’s first, you need to get to class on time. Enter Studious (Android, free), a timetable app with a few neat twists. Set up a weekly class on the app and not only can your phone remind you of what to take with you and when to leave, but it can automatically turn off your lowquality Kings of Leon ringtone for the duration of the class. Never again will Caleb Followill shouting about how his sex is on fire interrupt a lecture on the Salem witch trials. Notability (iPad, £1.49), meanwhile, takes the classic act of in-class doodling into the 21st If you’re into your fancy technology, you can ‘follow’ us on century. The app lets you annotate and amend any ‘Twitter’ @theskinnymag and ‘Like’ us on ‘Face Book’ kind of document you can think of, then link your

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Food: A Beginner’s Guide Fight the temptation to exist solely on frozen pizza and suspiciously clear cider and actually make some food and drinks with our handy guide

Words: Peter Simpson

ooking is a bit of a hassle sometimes, we get it. Everyone loves a takeaway (it’s like having a badly-dressed food-obsessed butler), and we all know chips are better than potatoes. That said, your student loan won’t last forever, and neither will you if you end up with scurvy because you haven’t eaten any fruit in weeks and no that bag of Haribo does not count towards your five a day even if you just eat the fizzy cherries. What you need is some fresh food, but without the inconvenience of hunting it yourself. If only there was a service that could bring fresh fruit and veg direct to your door... Good news! There are numerous services that will bring fresh fruit and veg direct to your door! In Edinburgh, East Coast Organics can hook you up with their own vegetables, fruit, eggs, milk, and anything else you might find on a farm. Glaswegians are served by Glasgow Veg Box (selfexplanatory) and the Little Veg Company (little company, not little vegetables), while the good people of Dundee can get their produce from the likes of Bellfield Organic or the Blairgowrie Farm Shop without ever having to brave the outside world. Each of these offer a host of box options – all fruit for those afraid of vegetables, small all-inone boxes for the people with unhelpful flatmates, and the ‘create-your-own’ box for people who really, really like courgettes. All the farm fresh goodness with none of the outside interaction, perfect. If you fancy something a bit more dramatic and scientific, with tasty end results and a small chance of explosions, then making your own beer is the way to go. Homebrewing isn’t just for old boys who look like Captain Birdseye anymore; homebrewing is cool. It’s really perfect for students – you like the occasional beverage, have a bit of spare time, and desperately want to be cool (come off it, you do). Thankfully, homebrewing is also fairly straightforward if you’re patient and know the difference between a teaspoon and tablespoon.

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These are vegetables - time to learn how to use them

Photo: Martin Cuthrae

C

Brewstore in Edinburgh and Inn House Brewery in Glasgow can hook you up with all the kit you’ll need, and once you’ve dug into the student loan to buy your mixing bucket and other essentials for about £50 the savings come thick and fast. Cider and beer kits can cost as little as £15, and it makes 40 pints. £15, for 40 pints. And if you really want to test your new cooking skills and your flatmates’ patience, then why not follow our lead and make your own bacon. It’s not as tricky as you might imagine – it essentially involves getting large pieces of meat, leaving them in salt for a couple of weeks, then slicing them up and enjoying the spoils. Okay, it’s a bit more complicated than that, and your flat might smell quite badly of pork. But think of it this way – if you fancy this cooking lark, just threaten to home-cure some meat and your flatmates will be helping you bring in the veg box in no time. Find out more about bacon-making at theskinny.co.uk/food/phagomania Tell us your favourite food places in our annual Food Survey at tinyurl.com/foodsurveyscotland

STUDENT HANDBOOK

THE SKINNY 23/08/2013 12:41


The Great Outdoors Words: Kate Ball

Bein Glas Summit

W

ith artificial slopes in both Edinburgh and Glasgow, you are but a bus ride away from a skiing adventure. Midlothian Ski Centre (formerly known as Hillend) on the outskirts of the capital boasts two main slopes, and a couple of nursery slopes, while those in the west can head to Xscape at Braehead. The massive indoor facility lets you test out your skills on real snow without the inconvenience of wind or rain. You can hire everything you need when you get there but remember to wrap up warm as it will be around -4° inside. Once you’ve dabbled in the cities it’s time to head north. There are five ski resorts in Scotland: Glenshee, The Lecht, Nevis Range, Glencoe and Cairngorm. Again, they offer everything you need in the way of equipment, and you can also book into a lesson or hire an instructor for some one on one tuition. On a bad day, taking to the Scottish slopes can feel like an endurance test. But if you hit the resorts in good conditions, there’s nothing quite like it. Mountain biking is currently the fastest growing sport in Scotland, and this rise in popularity has spawned an entire industry dedicated to making it easy to get you on a bike. Trail centres are the best place to get a feel for the sport – they are essentially ski resorts for bikes. You can hire the equipment, book in for a lesson and then brag about it with your mates over coffee later. Glentress, near Peebles in the Scottish Borders, is the country’s most popular centre.

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Photo: Chris Ball

If you’re looking for a new hobby now you’re at uni, why not try an outdoor sport? Here’s our guide to learning the ropes in skiing, mountain biking and surfing

Having just undergone an £8m makeover, it now boasts everything you could possibly need to enjoy a day out on the bike. For those travelling from Edinburgh, there’s even Bike Bus Glentress – a dedicated bus service that will take you and your bike straight to the action. For those in the west there’s Cathkin Braes, just six miles from Glasgow city centre. The purpose built facility was created to host the 2014 Commonwealth Games cross-country course, but it’s already open to the public. Surfing in Scotland is booming – there are estimated to be 2000 regular surfers in the central belt alone. The east coast is awash with surf spots with Pease Bay, Coldingham and Belhaven beaches all great playgrounds for learners. Surf shops within Edinburgh and Glasgow will hire you all the kit you need – but obviously if it’s your first time either book a lesson or tag along with someone who knows what they’re doing. Learning to surf is hard; lots of people don’t manage to stand up on their first time, which can be a little tough to swallow, much like the several gallons of seawater you’ll consume in the process. There will be frustrations along the way, and it’s inevitable you’ll upset more experienced surfers by getting in their way. But if you stick with it the hard work is bound to pay off sooner or later, and you’ll begin to see what all the fuss is about. For more info on Scotland’s outdoor sports go to theskinny.co.uk/travel/sports_supplement

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dancebase.co.uk Student_Handbook_V2.indd 46

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23/08/2013 12:42


Embrace The Rainbow: Your Guide To Uni LGBT Societies From GULGBTQ+ at Glasgow University to BLOGS in Edinburgh it’s the time of year where you walk past the rainbow flags at the societies fair and think about joining. But why would you want to join your LGBT university society in the first place?

Words: Ana Hine

I

t seems there are three main reasons to join your uni LGBT society: to get laid, to make friends, and to fight for gay and lesbian and bisexual and transgender rights. Let’s break it down. So you’ve suffered your way through school as the only gay in the PE class, you’ve left the quiet homophobia of home behind and now you want to actually shag someone of the same sex without having to apologise to anyone. Good for you! You’ve definitely come to the right place. The key thing to remember if you’re joining your LGBT society to get laid is that LGBT is an umbrella term. You may be a gay man, but the society may include lesbians, bisexual women and transgender students, and it’s their society as well. Be gracious and remember that lesbians and gay men are perfect wing-people for each other. Your society can serve as a ready-made group of people happy to escort you to the club, dance with you until you spot someone cute, and pile you into a taxi if it all gets too much. Happy shagging!

I want to make friends!

Maybe you already have a long-term partner or maybe your type is sooooo specific that you’re not going to find them in the whole of Stirling (with its one gay bar). Maybe you’re trans and for the moment you’re more interested in being in a supportive environment than getting your rocks off. If so, the film nights, coffee evenings, and numerous social events are where you should be. DU LGBT (the Dundee University society) has been known to go lazerquesting, and what better way is there to bond than to run around an indoor fake-warzone shooting at each other? For the bisexuals and trans kids these early social evening events are good for bringing a straight partner along to, but try to avoid bringing your straight 2013–2014

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Photo: Esparta Palma

I want to get laid!

friends along to the late night gay clubs. For many gayz The Scene is home to the only places they can get their same-sex loving on and heteros can be viewed as tourists. And no-one likes a tourist.

I want to fight to LGBT rights!

As LGBT folk have gained more equal rights our university societies have become less politically focused, but a society is as political as its members. It often comes down to individual presidents (society leaders) how politically active your society will be, as the vast amount of event organisation and responsibility lies on them. However, you can do your part by bringing campaign issues along to meetings, especially the Annual General Meeting (or AGM). Planning a protest for gender-neutral toilet provision around campus can be a great way to socialise, as can taking your equal marriage placard to the summer Pride marches as part of your uni group. In the run up to the referendum there’s an explicit LGBT arm of both the Better Together and Yes Scotland camps too, so you can really get stuck in if you’re interested in discussing LGBT politics. Or if you’re more into sexual health you can join up with Stop Aids or Sexpression, many of which have a presence on Scottish uni campuses.

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Strike a Paws Edinburgh fashion designer Fiona Heather produces a wide variety of garments including beautiful collars, capes and bow ties, available in various outlets including the capital’s Totty Rocks, and her online shop. She has kindly created special miniature versions of her people clothes for this shoot, which are modelled here by Daisy the Dog

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£5

An 80 piece orchestra, LIVE on your doorstep, for only a fiver.

STUDENTS CAN BOOK ANY SEAT FOR JUST £5* AT OUR THURSDAY NIGHT GLASGOW CONCERTS. CITY HALLS BOX OFFICE: 0141 353 8000

bbc.co.uk/bbcsso *Terms and conditions apply. £5 deal applies to Thursday Night concerts in Glasgow only. Proof of student status required. Venue booking fees may apply.

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Collar, cape and bow tie by Fiona Heather (www.fionaheather.co.uk); all other clothes model’s own Photographer: David Anderson (www.dnanderson.co.uk) Photographer's assistant: Rosamund West Dog Wrangler: Jessica Stuart Shot on location in Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop

2013–2014

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THE STAND COMEDY CLUB 5 York Place | Edinburgh | 0131 558 7272 333 Woodlands Road | Glasgow | 0844 335 8879 www.thestand.co.uk

StandEdinburgh

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NEW COMEDY FO R Edinburgh: Mond £2 a Glasgow: Tuesda ys ys

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Venues Here's our comprehensive guide on where to go in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee. 21 pages of places to eat, drink, be entertained and go partying, as well as handy maps to help you find everything

2013–2014

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Illustrations: Elena Boils

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Edinburgh

FOOD & DRINK

4. The Blue Blazer

1. Joseph Pearce

23 Elm Row 01315564140 By day, Joseph Pearce is a relaxed Swedish café on Leith Walk with free Wi-Fi, top-notch coffee, home-style Scandinavian food and kooky decor. By night it’s a bohemian bar with a cool crowd powered by aquavit-based cocktails and Swedish cider. Entertainment comes from the regular art exhibitions, live music, DJ sets, and a weekly jogging club.

2. Brass Monkey

5. BrewDog

14 Drummond St 01315561961 Tucked between the Pleasance and the Bridges, Brass Monkey matches a great location with a truly unique atmosphere. Much of that atmosphere comes from the mini-cinema in the back room, packed as it is with comfy mattresses and enormous cushions. Daily films at 3pm make this a great place to while away the hours between lectures, with a vibe that might make you reluctant to leave.

143 Cowgate 01312206517 Stripped-back brick walls and comfy couches make for a great setting in which to settle and start exploring the Fraserburgh craft giants’ vast collection. There are almost eighty bottled beers packing out the fridges, plus five BrewDog draughts and at least as many guest ales. If you get carried away with their Scrabble board or Pop-Up Pirate and lose track of time, there’s pizza, cheese and meat boards all served until closing time.

3. Whistlebinkies

6. Bannermans

4-6 South Bridge 01315575114 If you like some music with your drinks then Whistlebinkies in the centre of town is a good choice. There’s always something going on, be it a punk covers band or some old Scottish folkies wailing on acoustic guitars. As a bonus Whistlebinkies is open until 3am, so if you don’t want to head home but don’t fancy the clubs you know where to go. 2013–2014

17:20

2 Spittal St 01312295030 The Blue Blazer is a traditional Edinburgh pub, in the best possible sense of the term. Boasting one of the finest selections of real ales, whiskies and rums in Edinburgh, the Blue Blazer’s knowledgeable and friendly bar staff welcome grizzled regulars and beardy art students alike. Former titleholder of Edinburgh Pub of the Year, The Blazer’s cosy fire, wooden pews, and small back room offer a happy Tollcross hang-out for all comers.

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212 Cowgate 01315563254 A semi-underground Cowgate pub, Bannerman’s is one of the favourite night spots of the city’s rockers. The windowless gig room in the back is one of Edinburgh’s more interesting places to take in a gig, but the main bar is much more laid-back and friendly. It’s cheap, there’s plenty of space, and it’s literally in the centre of town. You can see why it’s a favourite now, can’t you?

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7. The Auld Hoose

23-25 St Leonard’s St 01316682934 A brilliant cross-breed of ‘old man pub’ and ‘rock bar’, this Newington pub covers both bases in style. Cool old wooden furniture contrasted with 1990s heavy metal makes for a good base for a night out, and the ridiculous bowls of nachos will keep everyone ticking over no matter how many friends pile along for the ride. Seriously, they’re less bowls of nachos and more small cauldrons filled with chilli and guacamole.

8. Finnegan’s Wake

9B Victoria St 01312263816 There aren’t many pubs that we know of that name-drop James Joyce in their titles, and even fewer that will do you a pint for £2. Finnegan’s Wake does both from its Victoria Street home, and the strong Irish influence ensures that the place is always busy and full of atmosphere. There’s Irish sport on the TV for homesick ex-pat students, and regular live music for the rest of you.

9. Cloisters

it a great place to meet up for a night out, as noone’s going to get lost on the way.

12. The Blackbird

37 Leven St 01312282280 The Blackbird is one of the latest examples of the ongoing revival of student favourite Tollcross. While the complete loss of one of the area’s top ‘old man pubs’ wasn’t ideal, the replacement isn’t half bad - the decor is trendy but links back to the area’s past, the beer list is comprehensive, and the beer garden remains with new decking and snazzy covered seats.

13. Villager

49 George IV Br 01312262781 ‘Shabby chic’ before that was even an expression, Villager is packed with brilliant details. There are enormous fans in the ceiling, stencils of robots on the distressed walls, and an outrageous cocktail list filled with Anchorman quotes. The tap water even comes with watermelon, mint and cucumber. When that much attention goes on the tap water, you’re in the right kind of place.

26 Brougham St 0131 221 9997 Cloisters sits on the edge of the Meadows, and offers the perfect spot to finish a day of sitting in the park. Set into the side of a church, the pub is packed with period features like the snazzy ceramic bar taps. A huge selection of beers and ales and lively atmosphere make Cloisters a great spot for a few with friends, and the spiral stairs to the toilets will help you figure out when it’s time to go home.

14. Under the Stairs

10. Bar Kohl

19 Blair St 0131 220 0125 If you’ve ever dreamt of going to an American diner in the 1950s, well you can’t. Luckily, The City Cafe will make do as a pretty faithful consolation, with its chessboard-style floor and leather and chrome booths. The oversized bar houses a wide range of drinks, and even if you just fancy a coffee City Cafe has you covered, with cool branded mugs and a coffee machine that looks like the back of a Cadillac.

54 George IV Br 0131225693 The striking, modern design and great location of Bar Kohl are important, but really this place is all about the cocktails. The drinks list is outrageously long, with hundreds of options to work your way through, all served up by bar staff who enjoy coming up with mad new ideas.

11. 99 Hanover Street

99 Hanover St 01312258200 First things first - your friends will never have any excuse for not finding this New Town pub. Once you get inside it’s a cosy, comfy spot with plenty of range behind the bar and a good mix of people in front of it. It’s right in the heart of the action just off Princes Street and George Street, making 60

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3A Merchant St 01314668550 Easily missed if you don’t know it’s there, Under The Stairs is exactly that – a comfy little bar/cafe tucked under the stairs on Merchant Street. With wooden floors, exposed brickwork, ever-changing exhibitions and mismatched comfy armchairs and sofas, it manages to show off both shabby hipster chic and homely coziness all at once.

15. The City Cafe

16. Eteaket

41 Frederick St 0131 226 2982 If you like tea, then prepare to spend a lot of time in Eteaket. The Frederick Street tea room is all about the tea and cakes. There are literally dozens of loose leaf blends on offer, all blended

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Looking for the perfect study break, somewhere to take the parents or for the perfect treat after the night before, try our fabulous Tea Room.

Award Winning Teas & Coffees Bubbly,Wines & Beers Delicious Cakes, Breakfasts & Lunches Free Wi Fi

eteaketAfternoon Teas

41 Frederick Street, Edinburgh, EH2 1EP 0131 226 2982 | hello@eteaket.co.uk | www.eteaket.co.uk

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park your arse for a pleasantly raucous time 3a Merchant St. Edinburgh, EH1 2QD 0131 466 8550 info@under thestairs.org 2013–2014 under thestairs.org Student_Handbook_V2.indd 61

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specifically for Eteaket and packed with all sorts of mad and exotic ingredients, and the cake situation is much the same. Too many types of tea and cake – that’s a good problem to have.

17. Artisan Roast

57 Broughton St 07956355054 | 138 Bruntsfield Pl 07517 471033 We once heard someone compare the Artisan baristas to die hard Star Wars fans, their knowledge straddling the limits of what is socially acceptable. Well yes, Artisan Roast is serious about its coffee, but for that you will be very grateful as you sip a sumptuous chilli mocha or one of the best flat whites Edinburgh has to offer. If you’re not, then you clearly belong to the dark side.

18. Black Medicine Coffee Co.

2 Nicholson St 01315576269 | 108 Marchmont Rd | 7 Barclay Ter The three outposts of the Black Medicine empire can each offer the same welcome combination – cool furniture, switched-on staff, free Wi-Fi and brilliant coffee. No wonder the cafes in Bruntsfield, Marchmont and at the Bridges are always filled with students and real folk alike.

19. Hula

103-105 West Bow 0131 2201121 One of our readers’ favourites in our 2013 Food and Drink Survey, Hula presumably came out on top because it reminds us all of the summer. Bright and breezy, Hula does a great line in fresh fruit juices with exotic and outrageous blends that you never would have considered, as well as great coffee and exciting food on the menu. Good choice, readers!

20. Lovecrumbs

155 West Port 01316290626 The ‘pubic triangle’ behind the Art College might not be the first place you’d think to go for cake and a chat, but then Lovecrumbs is one of those places that defies sense. An inventive cake menu that changes by the day, tables made from old pianos, and a literal window seat give Lovecrumbs an anarchic air that makes the act of going for coffee into an adventure.

21. Brew Lab

6-8 South College St 0131 6628963 Central locations and stunning interiors are one thing, but can anyone match Brew Lab in the ‘best 62

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coffee machine name’ stakes? We can’t think of any challengers to ‘The Slayer,’ imported from Seattle for this genuinely exciting coffee house. They brew their own custom espresso blend and match it with outrageous sandwiches and soups, plus cakes and teas from some of Edinburgh’s best producers.

22. Mums

4A Forrest Rd 01312609806 This retro diner is the ultimate place for comfort food. A whole range of twists on bangers and mash, pies, burgers and milkshakes can save you from the fiercest of Tuesday afternoon hangovers. And unlike real mums they won’t pull a passiveaggressive scowl when you leave your veg, or even ask for help with the dishes.

23. Illegal Jack’s

113 Lothian Rd 01316227499 Illegal Jack’s is a simple beast; go on a weekday lunchtime, head to the counter, select the filling for your monstrously large burrito, hand over a fiver, and grab a drink on the way to your seat. This Tex-Mex joint serves up tasty grub in a canteen-style atmosphere, and the speed of service combined with the plentiful seating means that tasty but messy Mexican goodness is never more than minutes away.

24. Wannaburger

8 Queensferry St 01312200036 Wannaburger serve arguably the best burgers in the city, and certainly offer the most bang for your buck. Locally-sourced meat is the key to Wannaburger’s success, and their ludicrously tasty milkshakes just add to the appeal. As does the modern design, and the hard-to-find American sport on the telly. Oh, and the 15% student discount helps as well.

25. Vittoria

113 Brunswick St | 19 George IV Bridge 01312251740 One of the few Edinburgh landmarks without its own postcard, Vittoria is a genuine institution. The outside seating areas feel a bit optimistic for these climes, but punters at the restaurants on Leith Walk and George IV Bridge aren’t going to let that stop them. Vittoria is the place to go when the ‘rents are in town, with great Italian food, reasonable prices and waiters who can liven up even the most stilted of evenings.

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26. Mother India’s Cafe

3-5 Infirmary St 0131 5249801 Nothing beats a good curry, but when there’s loads of dishes you fancy but can’t decide on a favourite aren’t you a bit stuck? Not at Mother India, where the tapas-style dishes mean that the breadth and variety of your dinner is limited only by your ability to share with your friends. And they’re your friends, so if you ‘accidentally’ elbow them out of the way for the prawns they’ll understand.

27. Kismot

29 St Leonard’s St 0131 6670123 You may be aware of Kismot due to their dangerously spicy Kismot Killer (finish it all and it’s free!), but their regular menu is pretty exciting too. Great home-cooked curries from a mum and dad duo, the on-the-bone chef’s special is our particular favourite. A BYOB policy makes for an inexpensive meal, and the occasional bit of competitive eating gives you some entertainment with your dinner.

28. Negociants

45 Lothian St 01312256313 The student’s best friend, Negociants disappeared for a while but is now back better than ever. The outside seating area has a canopy to protect from the elements, and the prices were clearly worked out with a student’s bank balance in mind. A good shout for lunch, dinner or drinks, or all three, especially if you can nab one of the wingback armchairs.

29. Stack Dim Sum

42 Dalmeny St 0131 5537330 In our Food Survey, readers reckoned that Stack in Leith knew how to make a tasty dim sum, and it’s an opinion shared by FOUND’s Tommy Perman. He rates the dim sum at the low-key restaurant as the best he’s had in the world, and he’s literally been to China. If that isn’t enough incentive to try it out, then the low prices should be.

30. Chop Chop

248 Morrison St 01312211155 Cheap, cheerful and charming Chinese food that more than lives up to the growing hype and endorsements from angry celebrity chefs. Their entire menu is made, from scratch, on the premises – it comes across in the food, but isn’t reflected in the student-friendly prices. Fast becoming a 2013–2014

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brilliantly unpretentious local legend, with some of the best dumplings this side of the Great Wall.

Culture 31. The Stand

5 York Pl 01315587272 It might not look like much from the basement steps outside, but The Stand is the undisputed permanent residence of Edinburgh comedy. The schedule is always packed with big-name comedians as well as up-and-comers, and their Red Raw beginners’ night is the place to go for undiscovered and brand-new talent, or to try your hand yourself if you’re feeling saucy.

32. Forest Cafe

141 Lauriston Pl 01312294922 It’s true what they say about artistic types – you just can’t keep them down. Having been booted from their former home on Forest Road, the Forest crew have taken up residence in Tollcross (‘Edinburgh’s Times Square’ according to poet and regular Forest-goer Ryan van Winkle). Expect art, music, poetry and anything else that comes to mind in the freest arts space in the city. 

33. Bedlam

11B Bristo Pl 01312259893 An entirely student-run operation, this ramshackle but endearing space is finally free of the ugly scaffolding outside and able to show off its imposing facade. Inside expect award-winning student theatre all year round, as well as regular laughs courtesy of Edinburgh Uni’s improv comedy group the Improverts.

34. Cameo

38 Home St 01312282800 Famed for its atmosphere and charm, the Cameo shows everything from mainstream hits to arthouse fare to retro cult classics. The cosy bar and homely foyer give the place a glow of old-school movie magic, and their student tickets are some of the cheapest around. Look out for their allnight horror marathons and one-off live events. 

35. Dominion

18 Newbattle Ter 01314474771 In the student suburb of Morningside, this familyrun cinema blends Hollywood fare with nostalgic pomp and circumstance. It can seem a little on the pricey side, but it’s well worth checking out

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for two reasons: the outrageously comfy leather seats, and the complimentary snacks rolled into the ticket price. A far cry from your average multiplex.

36. Filmhouse

88 Lothian Rd 01312286382 From challenging European cinema to Woody Allen retrospectives to the best of modern Hollywood, the Filmhouse truly shows it all. Their £3.50 Friday matinees are unmatched anywhere in the city, and offer students the chance to experience everything the world of cinema has to offer for the price of an underwhelming supermarket sandwich. 

37. Traverse

10 Cambridge St 01312283223 Widely considered to be the top writing theatre in Scotland, ‘The Trav’ is the place to go for exciting new productions by the country’s best theatrical talent. As well as producing, Traverse plays host to a whole range of visiting theatre groups, and runs regular workshops and Q&A sessions for those of you looking for a bit of inspiration or advice on your journey to theatrical stardom. 

38. Out of the Blue Drill Hall

36 Dalmeny St 01315557100 An old TA Drill Hall might not seem the most likely place for a bustling arts community, yet Out of the Blue is just that. A working hub of creativity with near-constant exhibitions during the week, the army past gets even more distant when the place is transformed into one of the city’s best flea markets once a month. Come early and rifle through all the arty nick-nacks Leith has to offer.

39. Summerhall

1 Summerhall 08458743000 With a venue the size of the former Dick Vet school, it takes a lot to fill it. Thankfully Summerhall has the right idea, packing the place with lots of little goings-on. There are exhibition spaces, regular gigs, two cafes, an onsite microbrewery which runs regular tours and tasting events, and the building even has its own online TV station, Summerhall TV.

40. Fruitmarket Gallery

45 Market St 01312252383 The Fruitmarket Gallery is hard to miss, situated slap bang beside Waverley Station’s side entrance 64

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at the foot of the Old Town. It’s just as well, as missing out on the great art, compact but wellstocked shop and brilliant downstairs cafe just wouldn’t be right. With free exhibitions taking in everything from painting to light installations, the Fruitmarket isn’t just hard to miss but difficult to get away from.

41. Collective

38 Calton Hill 01315561264 It’s been on the go for 29 years, so it’s fitting that Collective has just moved into a big new home. The former City Observatory on Calton Hill now plays host to the gallery’s collection of challenging and powerful visual work. With local and international art on show, Collective is always looking to bring new work to the art community’s attention, and to start a debate. 

42. Edinburgh Printmakers

23 Union St 01315572479 The clue is in the name: Edinburgh Printmakers make prints. Besides the making and teaching of lithography to all comers, Printmakers run regular exhibitions by artists from all over. Their window into the print studio from the exhibition space gives a first hand look at the craft for any interested art students or lovers of printed tote bags.

43. Dancebase

14 Grassmarket 01312255525 Take it from us, it can be tricky to keep up the whole exercise thing when you’re a student. Not to worry though, as Dancebase’s range of classes can help you keep fit and learn a brand new skill. Ballet, tap, salsa, hip-hop and all points besides – if it’s a kind of dance, they’ll teach you how to do it, and give you a student discount as well.

Club & GIG Venues 44. Studio 24

24 Calton Rd 01315583758 The Studios have been around for as long as some of you lot have been alive. A well-loved and eclectic venue, it’s a wee bit out of the way, but if you’re looking for something a little different then it’s well worth a look. Nights range from Balkanarama – a Balkan musical orgy (we kid you not) – to 60s night The Go-Go with its occasional live Beatles tribute bands, and all points in between. 

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45. Wee Red Bar

74 Lauriston Pl 01312216000 The Wee Red Bar may be located on ECA territory, but don’t be put off by the thought of asymmetrical haircuts and awkward conversations about trips to India, for this isn’t your average student disco. A near-constant stream of gigs take up the evenings, and the wide range of clubs keep things interesting until the early hours. 

46. The Hive

3 Niddry St 01315560444 The wild and cavernous Cowgate haunt is a notorious student haunt for good reason. It’s open every night of the week, grabs 5am licences whenever it can, and serves up everything from hip electro to chart ‘classics’ from the late 90s. Oh, and their roaming photographers are always on hand so you don’t even need to bring a camera. 

47. The Liquid Room

9C Victoria St 01312252564 Following a brief fire-enforced absence, The Liquid Room is back and better than ever. With impressive live music and clubbing credentials, The Liquid Room plays host to touring bands and DJs as well as an array of weekly club nights. The addition of The Annexe just adds to the fun at the Edinburgh institution. 

48. Cabaret Voltaire

36 Blair St 01312474704 Deep in the heart of the Old Town, Cab Vol is one of the city’s most iconic clubs. A recent refit turned the upstairs room into a trendy cafe and meet-up point for during the day, while downstairs has kept much of its sweaty former glory. A new soundsystem has upped the noise level, and a range of club nights from electro to dub give the DJs a chance to put it to good use.

49. Opal Lounge

51 George St 01312262275 George Street by day is all about vaguely posh country-inspired shopping, but by night its basements turn into some of Edinburgh’s swankiest clubs. Opal Lounge might be the pick of the bunch - managing to be both dark and shiny inside, it’s a fun place to go for a different kind of club night from the old town haunts, with student nights like Mansion drawing big crowds from across the unis.

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50. Picturehouse

31 Lothian Rd 01312212280 A constant fixture on Lothian Road over the years, the Picturehouse’s latest incarnation is as one of the best gig venues in the city. Nicely kitted out and capable of holding so many more people than other city venues, it plays host to touring bands that avoid Glasgow’s powerful orbit. Their enormous student-friendly indie club nights which run all weekend aren’t too shabby either.

51. Henry’s Cellar

8 Morrison St 01312211288 The stage is tiny, and appears to be lit solely by fairy lights. The PA is at least three times too loud. Take a wrong turn out of the toilets and you’ll end up in the building next door. That said, Henry’s puts on the kind of low-key, grassroots gigs and club nights you just won’t find elsewhere, so the need to carefully retrace your steps is a small price to pay.

52. Electric Circus

36 Market St 01312264224 Tucked away behind Waverley station, Electric Circus gives you a bit of everything: the club space doubles up as an intimate gig venue, the private karaoke rooms with dedicated bar staff are your next birthday party, and the retro clubs like Beep Beep, Yeah! give you the chance to windmill around to Motown classics in a modern and quirky setting.

53. Bongo Club

66 Cowgate 01315588844 Having been driven from its longtime home on Holyrood Road, the Bongo is back (11 months of the year) in the centre of town in the space that you may have seen dressed up as the Underbelly during the Fringe. The Bongo is still home to everything from jungle nights to burlesque evenings to ping-pong tournaments, filling some of the gaps in Edinburgh’s nightlife. 

54. Sneaky Pete’s

73 Cowgate 01312251757 It’ll make your flat seem like a palace, but what Sneaky’s lacks in area it makes up for with volume. A huge range of weekly and monthly club nights, from electro to house to funk, the kind of sound system normally found in a club four times the size, and an ever-present crowd make Sneaky’s a great shout every night of the week.

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FOOD & DRINK 1. The Butterfly and the Pig

153 Bath St 01412217711 Going to The Butterfly and the Pig is a bit like visiting your Granny’s: kitschy decor, mismatched but incredibly comfortable couches, oversized portions of home-style food. A casual and extremely friendly bar with a regular schedule of house bands, open mic nights, and a rather fine pub quiz.

2. MacSorley’s

42 Jamaica St 01412488581 As the huge white lettering on the outside of the building shows, the folk at MacSorley’s are not for subtlety. But then who needs subtlety when you have over 100 spirits behind the bar and your own house ale? A music bar with a great atmosphere that’s been built on for over a century, right in the heart of town.

3. Lebowskis

1008 Argyle St 01415647988 If you don’t get the reference, do yourself a favour and watch The Big Lebowski. If you’re still here, you’ll know that a bar called Lebowskis should specialise in White Russians. The good news is that Lebowskis serve up dozens of varieties of the milky cocktail – go for anything else and you’re missing the point, man.

4. The Flying Duck

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– bingo, club nights, cult film showings, and regular drawing classes are just some of the events going on at the Duck. However, if you just fancy a drink and a nice sit-down then the Duck has you covered.

5. The Squid and Whale

372–374 Great Western Rd 01413395070 A recent addition to the Glasgow food and drink scene, The Squid and Whale serve up South American and Mexican grub alongside dishes from the deep south. Local ingredients and fresh seafood are on the menu, as well as a great drinks selection. That their name reminds us of a cracking Noah Baumbach film just makes things better.

6. Saint Judes

190 Bath St 01413528800 From its ivy-clad exterior it becomes clear that Saint Judes isn’t your standard nightspot. A glamorous basement bar and restaurant, the cocktails are the real draw here. Prepare for some exciting and exotic combinations, which will in turn prepare you for the intimate but well-equipped club room.

7. Hillhead Bookclub

17 Vinicombe St 01415761700 One of the more bohemian Glasgow nightspots, Hillhead Bookclub ticks all the ‘hip’ boxes. Vinyl soundtrack – check. Quirky decor – check. Eclectic range of drinks and nostalgic comfort food – check. They haven’t even named it after what it is, which is actually handy when you fancy a trip to the pub but need to bluff that you’re studying.

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8. Mono

12. McPhabbs

103 King St 01415532400 We know what you’re thinking: it’s a record shop. Well while Monorail next door punts all manner of music to trendy types with thick beards and thicker glasses, Mono is a top-drawer all-vegan cafe and bar which wears its meatlessness as a badge of honour. The variety is impressive, and the execution is brilliant, while the music from next door gets an airing as you eat.

23 Sandyford Pl 01412218176 We’ve done the research, and it turns out that the only thing better than a beer garden is two beer gardens. McPhabbs has outdoor drinking space round the back and out the front, meaning that even if the crowds (which tend to be a good mix of students and genuine locals) have rushed out into the sun you’ll still find a bench.

13. The Glad Café

9. Bloc+

1006a Pollokshaws Rd 01416366119 Based in a converted printworks in the Southside, The Glad Café hosts gigs at night but serves as a great cafe during the day. Local coffee from Dear Green Roasters is always on the go along with a varied food menu. A great place to people-watch, and one of the central points of the creative community in the south of the city.

117 Bath St 01415746066 Bloc+ is the kind of place that makes Edinburgh students deeply, deeply jealous. They may have a castle and some pandas, but do they have a cafe/ bar which plays host to its own orchestra and boasts a ‘no bams’ policy? No, no they don’t. A great place for a night out, with loads going on including the laid-back Slow Club music nights and the aforementioned orchestra.

14. The Drake

1 Lynedoch St 01413327363 At the fringes of Kelvingrove Park, The Drake sits between the bustle of the city centre and the calm of the West End. As a venue too it lies in two camps; it’s a gastro-pub with an emphasis on great local food and interesting drinks from all over the world, but it’s also the kind of welcoming local pub that we all love.

10. The Art School

468 Sauchiehall St 01413534531 The Glasgow School of Art student union proves that arty types know how to party. The Art School is a fun, welcoming and engaging space for meeting any of your various groups of friends at any time of the day or night. Food and drink prices are ridiculously low, there’s always something going on, and it’s right in the heart of the action.

15. The Sanctuary

59 Dumbarton Rd 01413340770 Sitting pretty in the West End, The Sanctuary is another Glasgow venue with many strings to its bow. If you want a drink and a catch-up, then it's a chilled-out place to meet folk. If you need some food then pop-up barbecue merchants Smoak will keep you happy, and if you want a dance then there are two separate rooms and a 3am licence.

11. Inn Deep

Bloc+

2013–2014

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Photo: Kim Campbell

445 Great Western Rd 01413571075 Run by the folks at the William Brothers brewery, this riverside bar combines outside drinking glory with craft beer loveliness. Expect the entire Williams’ range to pop up on the taps along with the best from the rest of Scotland’s top craft breweries, while the hearty pub grub – including some cracking burgers – will keep you going.

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16. Moskito

200 Bath St 01413311777 A trendy basement bar just round the corner from the GSA, Moskito has everything that a city centre bar needs. Great location, good drinks deals, friendly staff to awkwardly attempt to banter with, and regular DJs and late-night food service for when a couple of drinks turns into a full-blown night out.

17. Cocktail and Burger

Photo: Tom Manley

Tchai Ovna

Avenue G

20. Tchai-Ovna House of Tea

42 Otago Ln 01413574524 Haunt of students, artists and tea lovers, TchaiOvna draws you in with promises of a relaxed and calming vibe and a delicious vegetarian menu. Oh, and loads and loads of tea. 80 different varieties and blends are on offer, and once you’ve chosen your brew the array of mismatching armchairs, wicker furniture and floor cushions allow plenty of space for lounging around.

323 Sauchiehall St 01413530953 Set in a moody basement beneath Sauchiehall Street, C&B push out some of the best burgers you’ll find in the west. Keeping things simple but doing them well is the script, with a short menu to keep you from spending all day trying to pick your toppings and drinks. The food is well worth a visit, and the constant 2-for-1 deals on the food may encourage you to make a few of them.

21. Tinderbox

18. Lucky 7

22. Avenue G

19. Artisan Roast

23. Where the Monkey Sleeps

166 Bath St 01413316227 In our 2013 Food Survey, Lucky 7 was recognised by readers of The Skinny as one of Glasgow’s best places for when a hangover threatens to get the best of you. This had a lot to do with the great food and cool diner-style vibe, but the incredibly simple pricing (all the lunches are exactly £5) sealed the deal. After all, everyone loves nice scran, but nobody wants to do maths. 15 Gibson St 07776428409 The heart of Artisan Roast’s operation, and the place where the magic happens. When grabbing a coffee at the Glasgow shop you’ll probably catch a glimpse of the roaster where their brilliant brew comes to life. Shabbily cool inside, the coffee is as good as you’d expect from people who literally make it from scratch. It’s very good. 2013–2014

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118 Ingram St | 189 Byres Rd 01413393108 Tinderbox are a reliable option when you need a quick pick-me-up, having been firing out cappuccinos in Glasgow for years. They know what they’re doing, and now they have an outpost in the city centre as well as their original West End home, so you’re never going to be far away from a top-notch coffee. 291 Byres Rd 01413395336 The guys at Avenue G say they have three main goals: serving up good coffee, making good food with local ingredients, and making sure you lot have a “jolly good time.” They have the first two sorted, and if you like good food and coffee in a great location served up by people who want you to enjoy yourself, then we’re sure they’ll manage with that third thing. 182 West Regent St 01412263406 It’s a rock sandwich shop! We know, sounds crazy, but a trip to the Monkey will open your eyes. Massive sandwiches with brilliant names (The Man from Iran and Mr Bolland’s Cutlass are two of our favourites) are the order of the day in one of our readers’ favourite lunch spots. After all, there aren’t many places where the sentence ‘I’ll have a

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Lovely Nancy’ will get you anything other than an odd look.

24. Piece | {Another} Piece

1056 Argyle St 01412217975 | 387 Great Western Rd For those new to town, a ‘piece’ is a sandwich, which leaves you in no doubt as to what’s going on in this award-winning deli. As it turns out, Piece’s sandwich menu is ludicrously comprehensive, with more than 20 carefully-crafted sarnies on the go. A great option, with branches either side of Kelvingrove Park.

25. Taco Mazama

6 Renfield St 01412488940 An outpost of Southern Californian cuisine in the heart of the city, Taco Mazama is all about the burrito. All the usual fillings are on offer, with the pulled pork a particular favourite. If you fancy your Mexican food in a different configuration, tasty tacos, enchiladas and quesadillas are also on the menu.

26. The Banana Leaf

105 Albert Dr | 86 Old Dumbarton Rd If you fancy an authentic curry that won’t destroy your bank balance then the Banana Leaf is a good place to start. For those of you who feel like heading out, the Albert Drive restaurant is a simple, unpretentious place devoted to authentic Indian food, while the rest of you who want to stay in can grab a takeaway from the original branch on Old Dumbarton Road. There, everyone’s happy.

27. Hanoi Bike Shop

Ruthven Ln 01413347165 Vietnam might not immediately come to mind when you feel peckish, but the Bike Shop is here to change that. Tucked away off Byres Rd, the dishes that fly out of the kitchen are authentic,

accessible, and packed with flavour and colour. The cut-price lunch time sandwiches packed with Vietnamese ingredients are a great way to get started on your new favourite cuisine.

28. Asia Style

185-189 St. George's Rd 01413328828 Asia Style seem to be going for the superhero stance of hiding in plain sight – widely touted as one of Glasgow’s top Chinese and Malay restaurants, they are sticking to their guns on the fairly harsh decor. The food is worth it though – an authentic and broad menu with a huge variety of dishes to choose from, and prices that won’t hit your wallet too hard.

CULTURE 29. Glasgow Film Theatre

12 Rose St 01417787773 The GFT, as most know it, has been part of Glasgow’s cultural scene since 1939. The building itself is famous for its art deco design and having a fair bit more charm than your average cinema. The two screens show a range of international releases, rare and late night screenings, as well as acting as the hub of the Glasgow Film Festival every spring.

30. Grosvenor Cinema

Ashton Ln 01413398444 While it may have lost some of its alternative charm, the regular classic movie marathons and the generally solid programming give it a strong appeal. The quaint Ashton Lane backdrop doesn’t hurt either, and makes grabbing a pre-film bite or pint an enjoyably cobbled affair.

31. Tron Theatre

63 Trongate 01415524267 The Tron Theatre stands out in its city centre

Hanoi Bike Shop

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Transmission

Nice 'n' Sleazy

location, and the theatre it hosts stands out too. Additionally, it plays host to many of the city’s arts festivals such as Glasgay!, Celtic Connections and the Merchant City Festival. As well as all that, the 16th century building also hosts exhibitions in the Long Gallery and boasts a swanky theatre bar.

stocking a range of art books, catalogues, publications and periodicals. As well as running gallerybased exhibitions, The Common Guild is responsible for the direction of 2013’s Scotland pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

32. Theatre Royal

282 Hope St 08448717627 The oldest theatre in Glasgow, the Theatre Royal screams tradition. A grand auditorium with plush seating and an ornate ceiling is just the place for Scotland’s resident companies – Scottish Opera and Scottish Ballet. If those don’t appeal, then the occasional appearances by big-name comedians might see you take a visit.

28 King St 01415527141 Founded in 1983 by GSA graduates, Transmission Gallery continues to fulfil its original mandate to offer exhibition space and opportunities for young artists. Transmission encourages interaction between its members to create an inspirational atmosphere. The gallery also hosts film screenings and an annual exhibition of members’ work.

33. Tramway

37. Centre for Contemporary Arts

34. GOMA

38. The Lighthouse

25 Albert Dr 01412760950 Few venues are more rooted in Glaswegian history than Tramway, having operated as a tram depot, a transport museum, and now as a performance and exhibition space. Tramway 1 hosts performance-based events including theatre, contemporary dance, gigs and much more, while Tramway 2 is the primary gallery space. Royal Exchange Sq 01412873050 Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art houses a collection of contemporary Scottish art as well as an extensive library and a programme of exhibitions featuring big hitters from the international art world. Centrally located, it has traditionally been a haven for emo kids on a Saturday afternoon so if you haven’t grown out of it yet, fire away.

36. Transmission Gallery

350 Sauchiehall St 01413524900 A multi-functioning arts venue, CCA plays host to a dynamic programme of contemporary film, music, performance, and the odd painting as well. It houses the bookshop Aye Aye Books, studio and gallery space for collaborative workshops, and the Saramago cafe bar with its delicious tapas, quality beers and outdoor terrace. 11 Mitchell Ln 01412765360 The Lighthouse is the perfect place to start learning about Glasgow’s most famous architectural son, Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Visit the Mackintosh Interpretation Centre on the third floor to learn about the man and the sights to see around town, and check out the architecture and design exhibitions in the rest of the building.

35. Common Guild

21 Woodlands Tce 0141 428 3022 Housed in a beautiful Victorian building, the Common Guild holds exhibitions as well as 2013–2014

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Skinny_Student_Handbook_2013 22/08/2013 10:09 Page 1

DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS… DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS… DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS…

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The Garage

CLUB & GIG VENUES 39. The Barrowlands

244 Gallowgate 01415524601 If you’re in Glasgow for any amount of time then the chances are you’ll end up at a gig in this Gallowgate institution. It’s truly one of the greatest venues anywhere in the UK with incredible acoustics, a ridiculous starry façade and a sprung dance floor that allows Barras crowds to genuinely jump higher and go crazier than anyone else.

40. Stereo

22-28 Renfield Ln 01412222254 One of Glasgow’s most prominent gig spaces, expect bigger promoters, DIY outfits and curious independents all to appear. You might see some locally sourced avant-garde stupidity one night, and your favourite ageing post-hardcore act the next. Club nights often take the form of gig afterparties, but some of Glasgow’s finest DJs have been known to hijack the place.

41. Nice ’n’ Sleazy

421 Sauchiehall St 01413330900 Aidan Moffat got it right when we asked him to sum up Sleazy’s in five words: “Very, very difficult to leave.” That’s not to say you won’t want to – the Sleazy’s basement can be hellishly claustrophobic, but Sleazy’s is home to the city’s most intelligent, open-minded gig bookers, who regularly hand the stage over to acts that others would barely consider music.

42. Broadcast

427 Sauchiehall St 01413328100 Standing on the site of the former Captain’s Rest, Broadcast puts on gigs split down the middle between established acts and underground local talent. Gigs take place down in the basement, while the upstairs bar makes for a good hangout 2013–2014

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The Barrowlands

between sets, and the location couldn’t be much better for making a night of it (provided it hasn’t been too sweaty a gig).

43. O2 Academy

121 Eglinton St 08444772000 The kind of venue that makes Glasgow Scotland’s music hub, the Academy represents the middle ground between an intimate gig and an enormotour. Formerly an Art Deco cinema, the large capacity allows for established acts from home and abroad, and pleasingly the Academy don’t stick to one musical genre, and offer a real mix of shows.

44. O2 ABC

300 Sauchiehall St 01413322232 Once home to Scotland’s first cinema, the ABC is now one of Scotland’s top gig venues. Well, it’s actually two – there’s the main concert hall with its grand art deco features and even grander giant disco ball, and the smaller ABC2 with a more intimate, club-style vibe. Expect to see top bands from across the globe here, and prepare to return for the student-friendly club nights too.

45. King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut

272a St Vincent St 01412215279 A niche-defying institution, King Tut’s is both a homely basement bar with pool tables and food, and an upstairs gig space with an incredible reputation and a track record for booking great bands. Provided you don’t get stuck behind the pillar at the top of the stairs you’ll see just why this is one of the best small venues in the city.

46. 13th Note

50 King St 01415531638 Standing tall amid the creative decay of the city centre’s eastern end, The 13th Note has cemented its reputation as an uncompromising believer in, and supporter of, live music in Glasgow. The

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absurdly cheap overheads allow all manner of mentalists to have their way with the bar’s crumbling cellar. Expect hardcore, drone, noise, and some plain silliness.

47. Sub Club

22 Jamaica St 01412484600 Frequently cited as the best club in the country and one of the best in Europe, this dance music mecca is home to some of the finest DJ talent around. That has a lot to do with the soundsystem, which will take your face clean off if you aren’t braced for it. The history and community vibe around the Subbie, built up over 20-odd years, adds something extra to go with the oomph.

48. The Arches

253 Argyle St 01415651000 The Arches’ location in caverns underneath the West Coast mainline comes as a surprise to newcomers and some of the performers, but there’s no doubt that it’s one of the city’s largest, most creative venues. A not-for-profit organization, The Arches invests much of what it makes back into programming, allowing promoters to bring in acts and DJs you might not expect.

49. The Buff Club

142 Bath Ln 01412481777 While some of Glasgow’s other clubs can be a little esoteric at times, The Buff Club’s music policy is designed with one thing in mind: to get you dancing. Classic hip-hop, funk, R&B and soul all come pumping out on a regular basis, while regular night Killer Kitsch lays down electro and EDM tunes that you may well have heard before. Sounds crazy, right, but go along with it.

50. SWG3

100 Eastvale Pl 01413577246 Just shy of the Clyde’s industrial wasteland is Studio Warehouse Glasgow. As a venue, it’s come a long way since its days as a rotting, semi-legal hipster’s wet dream. The bleak interior has been transformed into a sleek, haunting auditorium. SWG3 itself is home to all manner of graft-dodging creative types, many of whom have been involved in the highly innovative events you’ll find there.

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51. The Glue Factory

22 Farnell St Sitting canalside, this former production plant at Spiers Lock hosts gigs, mini-fests and club nights within its unsettling, labyrinthine interior, and many of them make creative use of the space. Just watch yourself on the homebrews – they’re cheap, delicious, and some of Glasgow’s most dangerous concoctions.

52. Flat 0/1

162 Bath St 01413316227 Think of a ‘student flat;’ doesn’t seem like an ideal nightclub, does it? Flat 0/1’s shabby style works though, with mismatched furniture and a bike in the corner giving it a homely vibe. Cheap and quirky drinks (White Russians and supermarket cider amongst others) and a mix of club nights and live music make this the perfect house party spot, without any of the cleaning up afterwards. 

53. The Berkeley Suite

237 North St 01412373235 The Berkeley Suite is grander than your average club. Spread over two floors, the Art Deco flourishes make this an interesting place to be regardless of what’s on. Luckily, the events match the venue’s special air pretty well. Expect big club nights, exciting launches, and a range of other diverse events from music to film to art.

54. The Garage

490 Sauchiehall St 01413321120 The Garage is open every day of the year, and its size and scope makes it one of the most popular student venues in the city. Constant gigs, a steady stream of club nights, a steadier stream of drinks promos and three rooms with a range of musical styles on offer make The Garage a venue that has something for everyone.

55. The Faktory

17 Byres Rd 01413348888 The Faktory offers the solution to a common problem - fancying a night out, but not wanting to take to the Clockwork Orange and head into town. Ostensibly a sports bar serving up great value food and drink during the day, and a full-powered student club by night, Faktory manages to be all things to all men (and women) and its location means you don’t need a commute to get there.

student handbook

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Join us! We’re always looking for writers, illustrators and photographers to contribute. Find out more at: theskinny.co.uk/about/ get_involved Illustration: Joachim Sperl

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STUDENTS GO FREE ALL NIGHT! EVERY FRIDAY AT BAMBOO!

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Get The Skinny in your inbox Here at The Skinny we send out a weekly e-newsletter – affectionately called the ‘Zap!’ – direct to email inboxes every Thursday morning. In it, we lovingly whittle down the best of that week’s events across Scotland into a digestible, tick-’em-off-as-you-go top 10. You’ll find boutique music festivals, pop-up art shows, vintage fairs, ice-cream tastings, DIY film screenings, spoken word battles, eight-hour clubbing marathons, and even speed dating in a dungeon (seriously, that was in there once). To find out more and sign-up, visit www.theskinny.co.uk/zap @theskinnymag

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FOOD & DRINK

4. Duke’s Corner

1. Art Bar

140 Perth Rd 01382227888 The Art Bar is... well, it’s a bar for Dundee’s art types. Within touching distance of Duncan of Jordanstone art school, the small but atmospheric basement is always fairly lively thanks to the DJs, open mics and regular live music. Drink prices are student-friendly, and the outside area is perfect for getting some inspiration for your latest work.

2. Tonic

141 Nethergate 01382226103 While Tonic may be famous for its choice of burgers (fair enough considering they’ll serve up ostrich without even blinking), it’s also a great bar in its own right. A good atmosphere, decent drinks prices and comfy chairs add together to make for a great spot; the fact that they serve a 24oz burger is just an added bonus.

3. Drouthy’s

146 Perth Rd 01382202187 Drouthy’s like to keep things simple, and it’s a policy that works well. Whether you’re heading in for a hangover breakfast or settling down for a long and lazy post-lecture evening, expect hearty grub with a few nice twists and a grand behindthe-bar selection including a load of interesting beers you might not have heard of but should probably try out.

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13 Brown St 01382205052 Duke’s Corner does things properly – 30 bar taps pumping out a whole host of ales and craft beers, high-quality pub grub all day long, and a focus on live music that sees bands playing most nights of the week. Throw in the beer garden out back and it becomes clear why this place is so popular.

5. The West House

2 West Port 01382525205 A fairly new addition to Dundee’s eating and drinking scene, The West House’s striking interior helps it stand out. White walls, snazzy tables and quirky flourishes make the House a nice place to be, and the interesting Italian-inspired food menu is filled with intriguing dishes. Oh, and there’s a whole load of cocktails and fancy beers on the go too. Thought we should mention that.

6. Clarks Bakery

Unit 3, Annfield Row 01382665082 A 24-hour bakery on an industrial estate doesn't exactly scream 'student party', but ask anyone who's studied in Dundee and they'll tell you all about Clarks. Fresh-baked cakes and pastries, burgers with literally everything on them (ask for a Helicopter and prepare for a coronary), and a livelier crowd than most nightclubs make this a cult favourite of the city's students.

7. Ketchup

10 South Tay St 08451666020 With the feel of a 1950s American diner, Ketchup makes a welcome change from other Dundee restaurants. 2-for-1 offers and lunch deals help

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keep the prices manageable, and the comfortable booths and retro decor give the place a relaxed and laid-back vibe, as do the friendly staff who won’t laugh when you get mustard all over yourself.

CULTURE 8. DCA

152 Nethergate 01382909900 With a two-screen cinema, excellent cafe-bar and regular high-profile exhibitions, the DCA is the place to be for Dundee’s art community. There’s professional printmaking equipment, as well as a gallery shop for gifts and exhibition materials, and the place is interesting just to be in. The best place for the city’s art students to go people-watching.

9. The McManus

Albert Sq 01382307200 After a major refurbishment the McManus Galleries shows off the city’s past in impressive fashion. Packed with artefacts and pieces from all over the world, it’s a great way to learn a bit about the city as well as getting one’s art on for free. Bonus points have to be awarded for the giant whale skeleton and the regular contemporary exhibitions.

10. Dundee Rep

Tay Sq 01382223530 Home to one of the country’s most-renowned theatre companies, the Rep also hosts the best touring theatre to be found in the city. It isn’t just serious theatre that’s on show though, with dance, stand-up and live music all featuring as part of an eclectic programme with something for everyone.

11. Generator

Unit 25-26 Mid Wynd 01382225982 Generator is a not-for-profit Dundee exhibition space aimed at providing both new and established artists with a place to show off their work. Generator is lead by a team of artists who each stay for up to two years, and funded by gallery members who are kept up-to-date on new projects as well as given the opportunity to exhibit in the gallery.

2013–2014

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Music & Clubs 12. Kage

4 St. Andrew’s Ln Kage is the best place to get your fix of metal and rock in Dundee, acting as a second home to the city’s alternative music fans. It isn’t the biggest, but that’s all the better for the regular gigs, and it just means that you’ll get to know the easy-going and like-minded crowd at the weekend club nights all the sooner.

13. 20 Rocks

15 Ward Rd 01382690057 Formerly known as The Doghouse, 20 Rocks is a reliable location for those of you who fancy some live music. Up-and-comers, local acts and touring bands all swing through its doors, and if you fancy getting on stage but haven’t found the rest of your soon-to-be-huge band yet then the Guitaraoke nights can let you flex your musical muscles.

14. Underground

25 South Tay St 01382200399 We would tell you what Underground is like inside, but we can’t be sure. Currently in the midst of a refurb as we go to print, expect a shiny new interior to go along with the mixed music policy, predominantly-student crowd and decent prices at the bar. Other than that, we’ll just have to leave you to find out yourselves.

15. Fat Sam’s

31 South Ward Rd 01382228181 One of Scotland’s biggest clubs, Fat Sam’s serves up a range of club nights for students and ‘real people’ alike. Wednesday is the dedicated student night, but the place is always full of scholars taking a well-earned break from their studies / drinking cocktails out of fishbowls.

16. Reading Rooms

Blackscroft 01382228496 Intimate, loud, and adorned with army-style camouflage roofing, the Reading Rooms is a popular choice among Dundee’s trendier music-lovers. It can fill up quickly, especially on big nights such as electro and disco night Book Club and when bigname guest DJs are in town. A truly unique club for Dundee.

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Student Quiz Tests, from maths quizzes to STD checks, are exciting. Show our quiz that no one learns harder than students

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Psychology was the most popular course in universities this year, so our future shelf-stackers will probably be piling up biscuits between calls from the Mayor to help profile and capture elusive space-criminals. What was the second most popular course this year? Education doesn’t come cheap, but thankfully supermarket value noodles are both economical and a convenient way to tell your colon to go fuck itself. If you have £5 and spend £2.59 on a loo-brush, how many packets of everyday value chicken noodles could you buy with the change? While in the queue for a club, some hipster is loudly thrown into the street by doormen. Since pretty much everyone around you was filming it on their goddamn iPhones, he will be on YouTube within the hour. What would you search for it under? a) 'Screaming pussy in lensless glasses' b) 'Son, I'm divorcing your mother as 18 years ago she clearly had an affair with the concept of disappointment' c) Sarcastic excuse for a Doctor Who costume gets his ass kicked Sure, you’re working towards a Bioscience degree and may one day unlock the cure

to cancer, but it’s still fun to get loaded on Jägerbombs and steal a traffic cone. Which statue in Glasgow famously and routinely displays the pedestrian and cone-based sense of humour of local students? Thanks to a ‘Are You Smarter than a Ten Year Old’ marathon, you’ve completely forgotten to do that essay. But it’s fine, you have the internet. Using Wikipedia, detail the quickest ‘6 degrees of separation’-style route from slightly racist, fat suit comedy Big Momma’s House 3 to your chosen university subject. Since everyone agrees that we are two bank crashes and a Megaoctopus away from Armageddon, your bachelor’s in Art History is going to be less than useless in our Mad Maxstyle future. Switch to law, and tell us which of the following rules will be legally enforced in the Thunderdome: a) TWO MEN ENTER. ONE MAN LEAVES. b) BREAK A DEAL, FACE THE WHEEL. c) TWO BIG MOMMAS, ONE BIG COMEDY. Of every ten students who study Parapsychology, how many go on to become full time Ghostbusters?

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The Skinny Student Handbook 2013