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THE SKINNY ISSUE 37 :: OCTOBER 2008 :: FREE

.CO.UK

OW G S A O GL UNDEE T E L STY S OUT D UNCH S S E AINL N SOUND O.UK LA GAY! T S R THEI ID NOTIO RACKS.C US GLAS ORE G N I PL BR UR TIM ENT &M N T O E N YO KILL NEON

MUSIC | FILM | CLUBS | THEATRE | GAMES | BOOKS | EVENTS | ART | FASHION | LISTINGS

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK


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Welcome Editorial There's a great Doug Stanhope comedy sketch in which he implores his audience to ‘find your range'. His argument runs that 'the key to life is excess in moderation... You have to stretch it out every now and then to have any fun at all.' It's a sketch without many jokes in it, but you can tell he means to persuade people to his way of thinking: 'You can't play in the middle of the road if you've never seen the far curve – you don't know where the middle is really. Push yourself.' And, in classic underground comedy style, there are certain areas he focuses on more than others. 'Don't drink a couple of beers every night after work, pick one night out of the week – like tonight – and drink all the fucking beers at once, get completely shitty… Don't eat a mushroom stem and see colours, eat the whole bag and see God.' I'm not going to try to go for laughs here, but for all his clumsy bravado I think there's a lot to be said for the general scheme of Stanhope's attitude. I’m not talking about people’s rates of consumption here; no, but what I mean to say is that it's a shame that in this remarkably free society, people are too often unwilling to test themselves beyond the point of discomfort.

Recently refurbished and looking better than ever, Edinburgh’s sexiest club Opal Lounge appeals to those that enjoy that little bit extra. A selection of highly respected resident DJs lay down a sumptuous blend of classic tracks, current favourites and some party starters, while the lavish surroundings and exclusive drinks offers place Opal Lounge firmly at the cutting edge of the city’s late night scene. It’s not just the music — our bespoke table packages invite you to enjoy luxury brands, such as Finlandia vodka, in the comfort of the VIP area. With service that is second to none, your wish is our command… With Kate Moss and Kevin Spacey’s seal of approval, now all we need is yours.

For full information on the table packages please visit www.opallounge.co.uk —

Opal Lounge, 51a George Street, Edinburgh eh2 2ht T 0131 226 2275, F 0131 226 3275 info@opallounge.co.uk ̸ www.opallounge.co.uk

Keep your judgement pure. Drink responsibly. © 2008 FVW. All rights reserved. FINLANDIA and the Midnight Sun Reindeer are registered trademarks.

4 THE SKINNY

October 08

I’m not really one for absolute ideas, whether they’re of the realization of your ‘true self’ or total nihilistic freedom. But I would say in 2008 it seems to me we’ve lost a certain sense of adventure. Sure, we still go travelling in massive numbers, especially when we’re young. And sure, lots of people get wasted, whether in moderation or a lot. But it’s almost like these activities – and ones like them – are used as a way of putting the real adventure to one side, boxing it up and not having to worry about it. The real adventure is in facing up to challenge, the new challenge. Done with optimism and commitment, only good will come of putting yourself out there.

Following such speechifying (surely enough to put anyone off what I’m about to recommend), I'd like to draw readers' attention to the Kill Your Timid Notion festival on in Dundee this month. It is a genuinely rare opportunity to see a range of top-quality pieces and performances that will stretch your tastes and sensibilities. By this, I mean that there are likely to be parts of it that you actively don't like, or that just leave you cold. But it'll still be worth the trip, even if you don’t end up liking any of it. You need to give your gates a good battering, and that’s what KYTN is best at. That’s not to say you won’t enjoy it, though, because there’s a lot to find exciting, thoughtprovoking, and even inspiring in the content they have lined up. From workshops discussing the impact of auditory perception on our perception in general, to genuine artistic experiments, like L’Anticoncept, described by the curators like this: ‘60 minutes of absolutely the most hard ass minimal film you're likely to see, projected onto a weather balloon and accompanied by the inspired poetic rant of a visionary, and pretty pissed off Frenchman.’ Not exactly average, then. The festival itself runs from 10-12 October, and at £10 for a day ticket or £25 for the whole lot, the expense is no reason not to take it in. More info for the curious is on page 31. The other notable – massive in fact – festival on this month is Glasgay!. Containing an extensive theatre and film programme, there is coverage throughout the magazine. The general sense among us Skinny folks is that Glasgay! succeeds by appealing to both the mainstream and the subversive, and I’d like to add that this is entirely in keeping with the importance of adventure I’m seeking to promote in this half-arsed rant. Subversive, yes, because one of the very values of adventure is to subvert your current understanding, to show you new worlds. But mainstream too, because adventure isn’t for any kind of elite caste, the ‘special ones’, the artistes, or any of that bullshit. We all owe it to ourselves; and just as we all need to take the time to look after ourselves from time to time, so we all need to mess it up a bit too. If you don’t manage it this month, I hope you see something to remind you of the ‘infinite pleasures of the great unknown’. Things like that come by every so often, of their own accord. Just go out and keep your eyes open.

The Skinny Let us know what you think:

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comedy editor

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games EDITOR

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Showcase curator

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Contents


Contents

Issue 37 :: October 2008

EDINBURGH LIQUID ROOM WEDNESDAY 8TH OCTOBER

+RUARRI JOSEPH + KAT FLINT

Showcase

GLASGOW THE ARCHES THURSDAY 9TH OCTOBER

GLASGOW KING TUTS MON 6TH OCT EDINBURGH CABARET VOLTAIRE TUE 7TH OCT

Good Wives and Warriors.

LY K K E L I +Yoav

Heads Up

What Dundee sounds like. And get your pencils out, Dr. Sketchy is coming.

Slime & Reason out September 1st on Big Dada

Edinburgh Cabaret Voltaire Thursday 9th October

Fashion

We head to London Fashion Week as Vivienne Westwood arrives in Glasgow.

Christian Chambenoit

6 8 12 16 18 20 24 25 26 29 30 32 46 54 58 69

andy yorke

Food & drink

£11,000 for a coffee machine!?! plus reviews of Ashton Lane’s finest.

Vivienne westwood:: P14

Deviance

EDINBURGH VOODOO ROOMS SATURDAY 11 OCTOBER GLASGOW NICE‘N’SLEAZY SUNDAY 12TH OCTOBER

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, and is Slutty having doubts?

GLASGOW ARCHES SUN 12TH OCT Album ‘some people have REAL problems’ out now www.siamusic.net

Film

Tennessee Williams at Glasgay!, Tarsem Singh on his epic The Fall, and Africa In Motion 2008.

+ THE RULING CLASS

Games

Reviews and a look at digital distribution.

Books

The Scottish Book Trust wants your stories.

Kill your timid notion :: P31

Theatre

EDINBURGH, THE PICTURE HOUSE

INVERNESS, IRONWORKS

STIRLING, ALBERT HALLS

DUNDEE, FAT SAMS LIVE

PAISLEY, TOWN HALL

NEW ALBUM YOU CROSS MY PATH OUT NOW www.thecharlatans.net www.myspace.com/thecharlatans

SATURDAY 11TH OCTOBER

Merchant City Festival, No Limit People and previews.

TUESDAY 14TH OCTOBER

SUNDAY 12TH OCTOBER

comedy

MONDAY 13TH OCTOBER

Previews.

Juliana Hatfield

Art

Sorcha Dallas talks commercial galleries and Kill Your Timid Notion returns to the DCA.

Glasgow Oran Mor Sun 12th Oct

Music

Including album of the month from TV on the Radio.

Jenny lewis :: P34

Monday 27th Oct

“YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT YOUR GETTING YOURSELF INTO” - THE ALBUM OUT NOW

Clubs

Listings

glasgow school of art union saturday 1st november

Who what where when. Sort your life out.

Competitions

www.theskinny.co.uk

The Picture House Wednesday 22nd October

Marcel Dettmann and a guide to Halloween clubbing.

Featuring Uncle Finbarr’s Quiz Time.

+

Glasgow Oran Mor Edinburgh

Neon Neon, Shellac, Jenny Lewis and Lambchop. More besides.

Records

THURSDAY 16TH OCTOBER

TICKETS: 24HRS: 08444 999 990 & www.gigsinscotland.com Lambchop :: P40

IN PERSON: GLASGOW Tickets Scotland, EDINBURGH Ripping, DUNDEE Grouchos and all Ticketmaster Ticket Centres. ONLINE: www.ticketmaster.co.uk

October 08

THE SKINNY 5

Contents

DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…


THE SKINNYShowcase

Good Wives and Warriors are a creative partnership between Becky Bolton and Louise Chappell, who met while studying at Glasgow School of Art. Rebecca means ‘good wife’ and Louise means ‘warrior’, and together they create weird and wonderful illustrations and sprawling wall paintings. They have curated and participated in exhibitions in Sweden, Scotland, Belgium, the US and South America, and continue to work on illustrations using their experimental collaborative approach. Until recently the pair worked out of a small shed in the Studio Warehouse in Glasgow but the Fates intervened and now Becky is based in Melbourne. Not to be put off by a few time-zones, the collaboration is still going strong. This summer Good Wives and Warriors took their favourite black paint to the American continents, gathering imagery and ideas along the way to feed into their large, imageheavy paintings. The trip began with Euro Vision, a group show in San Francisco, passed through Peru, and then Bolivia, before finishing in Argentina where they spent all night painting a giant cock-rocket in front of a live, amused audience in Buenos Aires. The Skinny Showcase’s knack for picking the stars of tomorrow continues, as just this week we heard that Good Wives and Warriors have been selected for the YIA Young Illustrators Award, an international award and exhibition in Zurich in October. 20 illustrators/ artists are selected from around the world each year to receive the awards, so Becky and Louise are understandably pretty chuffed to have been chosen.


They are also currently working on a series of collaborative drawings for an exhibition in Glasgow’s ReCoat Gallery later this year. For more images and information, go to www.goodwivesandwarriors.co.uk


HEADS UP Scottish Mental Health Arts & Film Festival THE 2ND ANNUAL SCOTTISH MENTAL HEALTH ARTS AND FILM FESTIVAL PROVES IT'S GOT MORE THAN JUST A TONGUE TWISTING TITLE.

FIONA

JOHN

JENNIFIER

MARK

CIARAN

SOPHIE

Chances are you know someone who has had some kind of mental health issue effect their life, most of us do. Yet the perception of mental illness is still all about the stigma; enter the Scottish Mental Health Arts and Film Festival, the largest of its kind in the world, whose programme listings alone raise an eyebrow. You’d be forgiven for assuming a mental health arts festival might be full of gritty suicide films and bleak photos of run down hospitals; efforts to bring the issues about mental illness to the public have often erred on the side of grim. Good mental health, however, is more than just a lack of illness, it’s a welcome necessity, and this positive flipside ripples through the festival, evident in such events as songwriting workshops, green spaces to wander and a travelling art gallery in a bus. Spread all over the country, from Dumfries to Edinburgh to Perth, the diversity of events highlights the broad range of experiences that effect mental health - dementia, peer pressure, Down’s syndrome - and the films in particular also draw attention to the fact that mental health “issues” are often in the mainstream cinema, even when they don’t have a big red arrow pointing them out. So Little Miss Sunshine and In the Valley of Elah are included, dealing with general family dysfuntion and post-traumatic stress respectively in a non-direct, but no less significant way, than say the Lyceum’s Macbeth. It’s also refreshing to see that the organisers’ aren’t veering away from the idea that the whole issue can also be downright comical. Indeed, there’s a special comedy night at The Stand in Glasgow, as well as a one performance only return for David Benson’s much loved play My Life with Kenneth Williams. There’s plenty more than just films and plays: musicians, writers, comedians and multimedia artists, many creating pieces in collaboration with mental health service users, are all involved in coordinating many beautiful and fascinating events. Music Like a Vitamin, taking place over two nights at the ABC, Glasgow, has some of Scotland’s best musos doing their thing, including Fence Collective Artist Kenny An-

Gutter Talk THE MEAN STREETS OF DUNDEE

by Erin McElhinney

ROD JONES CLAIRE COX

derson, Rod Jones (Idlewild), Norman Blake (Teenage Fanclub) and the BMX Bandits; an excellent line up of Scottish writers take part in series of afternoon sessions in The Mitchell Library; and an International Women’s Photography Exhibit goes up in Dundee. There is an understated sense of integration in the programme. The writers, artists and film makers here are not separate from the ‘service users’ (the politically correct term for those that need mental health services), but have no doubt been or known someone who’s been a ‘user’ themselves. How they coped, and how their experiences are translated through their films or photographs or songs, demonstrates the important blurring of the lines between ‘us and them’, a line that never really existed in the first place. Oh, and did we mention that 99% of said events are free? Check it out. [Edward Whelan] WWW.MHFESTIVAL.COM

Dr Sketchy’s Anti-Art

Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School makes a triumphant return to Edinburgh next weekend, and very glad we are to see it too. The burlesque life drawing class came to the capital in 2006, and it’s been encouraging artists and amateurs alike to whip out their pencils ever since. First started in New York by the alarmingly talented illustrator and burlesque performer Molly Crabapple, Dr. Sketchy’s was a reaction against what she saw as inexplicably dull life drawing classes - it seems obvious that sitting around drawing naked people could be great fun, so why wasn’t it? She added in some good music, drawing competitions, a bit of humour and the playfulness of burlesque - and the result is an international phenomenon, now with 50 branches in 11 countries, including a very successful Glasgow offshoot which recently had a huge party to celebrate its first birthday. This session ties in with the ninth Big Draw - a UK-wide campaign running throughout October that aims to get everyone drawing - and in The Skinny’s experience there is nothing quite like Dr. Sketchy’s to encourage people to flex their artistic muscles. By actively welcoming people of all levels of ability it provides a non-scary spur for those of us who like to draw but never seem to find the time these days. There are silly competitions that tend to be judged on comedy value and the creative interpretation of themes more

8 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

FIONA BEATON, 24

JOHN ROUTLEDGE, 22

JENNIFER MCKINLEY, 19

YOU FIND £1000 IN THE STREET. WHAT'S THE FIRST THING YOU BUY?

YOU FIND £1000 IN THE STREET. WHAT'S THE FIRST THING YOU BUY?

YOU FIND £1000 IN THE STREET. WHAT'S THE

An electric piano; I'd really love to have one in my home, but it's too wee for a proper piano.

Er, er....I have no money at the moment, so am having to readjust my mind to the question! The Star Wars dvds, cos I've only got them on VHS and they're old and knackered.

WHO WOULD PLAY YOU IN THE MOVIE OF YOUR LIFE?

Tallulah Twist has returned as Dr. Sketchy Edinburgh’s organiser after producing its 5-star run at the 2007 Fringe, and the delightful Harlequin Kiss is taking over as the hostess with the mostest. This month’s session appropriately has a ‘Fresher’s Fair’ theme, with performer Gilda Lily - one of the highlights of the recent burlesque night Gypsy’s Tramps and Thieves - appearing as a sexy librarian. We all secretly lust after those horn-rimmed-spectacled minxes, right? ...right? Dr. Sketchy’s Edinburgh will be in residence at The Jazz Bar on the first Saturday of every month, starting Saturday 4 October, from 1pm-3pm; “late enough that you’ll have managed to emerge from the duvet and grab your pencils, late enough that you won’t feel *too* guilty buying a drink to toast our beautiful models with”. Don’t try telling me you have anything better to do on a Saturday afternoon... [Fergus Ray Murray] WWW.DRSKETCHYEDINBURGH.COM WWW.CAMPAIGNFORDRAWING.COM WWW.MYSPACE.COM/GILDA_LILY WWW.THEBIGDRAW.ORG.UK

Knickers. No, really, I love them. Socks too! Topshop's my favourite. WHO WOULD PLAY YOU IN THE MOVIE OF YOUR LIFE?

Angelina Jolie (contributed by friend Mairhi, as Fiona has gone mute. And bright red).

WHO WOULD PLAY YOU IN THE MOVIE OF YOUR LIFE?

WHAT SOUND DO YOU MOST ASSOCIATE WITH DUNDEE?

I want to say Colin Farrell , cos then women might fancy me. (Altogether now, 'Awwwwww')

WHAT SOUND DO YOU MOST ASSOCIATE

WHAT'S YOUR PORN NAME?

Planes. I've just moved to a flat right next

Sandy Warton. Very boring, I know. The next pet? A rabbit called Softy. Lets just stop there...

to the airport, I’m hoping I get used to it.

WHAT SOUND DO YOU MOST ASSOCIATE WITH DUNDEE?

him came Blackie. Wait, that’s worse!

Drunk people shouting. I work nights at The Rep Theatre, which has a fairly good crowd, but I drive home through people throwing plants and yelling.

WHAT WAS THE LAST SONG YOU CRIED

Seagulls! There's always lots of big fucking rat like seagulls flying around. Or if it was a sight - corny but true - it would be the beautiful pink sunsets over the rail bridge. WHAT'S YOUR PORN NAME? (First pet's name, plus your Mum's maiden name) Bimbo Brown. It's pretty good, although the name was chosen before I was even born. She was a beautiful black and white pussycat. WHAT WAS THE LAST SONG YOU CRIED TO? It was a song by Mary Black that reminded of holidays with my family, a member of which is now no longer with us. IF YOU COULD PASS ANY LAW, WHAT WOULD IT BE? That you're not allowed to put any tv adaptation photos on book covers. It steals away your chance to imagine it for yourself.

MARK DEAKIN, 22 than artistic talent as such, so the fact you may end up sitting next to art students or professionals is never a problem.

FIRST THING YOU BUY?

WHAT WAS THE LAST SONG YOU CRIED TO? The band was Alexis on Fire, but I can't remember the song; I was on the way back from the Reading Festival earlier this year after a stressful weekend with my ex, and it just brought it all back. IF YOU COULD PASS ANY LAW, WHAT WOULD IT BE? I'm a poor artist, so I'd create an art tax, so that funding for artists would be an everyday part of life.

YOU FIND £1000 IN THE STREET. WHAT'S THE FIRST THING YOU BUY? A wedding ring! That's what we're actually shopping for right now. The wedding is, er, 13 months today, apparently. WHO WOULD PLAY YOU IN THE MOVIE OF YOUR LIFE?

Audrey Tatou? I'm not French, but I'm small and dark!

WITH DUNDEE?

WHAT'S YOUR PORN NAME? Josh Brown. He was a labrador, and after

TO? Yesterday by Switchfoot; it's about people dying, and is really quite emotional. IF YOU COULD PASS ANY LAW, WHAT WOULD IT BE? There should be more candy canes. You can only seem to get them at Christmas, and I love them all year round.

SOPHIE URQUART, 20 YOU FIND £1000 IN THE STREET. WHAT'S THE FIRST THING YOU BUY? I'd get a really, really nice pair of expensive boots and shoes, give a chunk to my

CIARAN ROONEY, 19

boyfriend, and then save whatever's left.

YOU FIND £1000 IN THE STREET. WHAT'S THE FIRST THING YOU BUY?

WHO WOULD PLAY YOU IN THE MOVIE OF YOUR LIFE?

Girlfriend: Colin Firth, as he's my very own Mr Darcy.

I'd go straight to a music shop and buy the Oasis, The Beatles and a good John Lennon box set. And then I'd probably end up spending the rest of it in the pub!

WHAT SOUND DO YOU MOST ASSOCIATE WITH DUNDEE?

WHO WOULD PLAY YOU IN THE MOVIE OF YOUR LIFE?

WITH DUNDEE?

The sound of breaking glass! I'm studying drug discovery at the University of Dundee, and there's no worse sound in a lab.

It'd have to be a comedy because I'm a bit of a daftie, so...Will Ferrell!

Papua New Guinean, and when I'm over

WHAT SOUND DO YOU MOST ASSOCIATE WITH DUNDEE?

WHAT'S YOUR PORN NAME?

Him: Some old codger.

WHAT'S YOUR PORN NAME? Mummy Bunny Anderson; some rabbit breeders were selling off the elder mother rabbit, and I was only 2 years old… WHAT WAS THE LAST SONG YOU CRIED TO? I don’t think I’ve ever cried to a song. But I’m going to see Travis tomorrow night. IF YOU COULD PASS ANY LAW, WHAT WOULD IT BE? Get rid of the Tories. Crap, I should really try and suppress my political side. Er, Smarties for all!

The View! Their single 'The Don', in particular. It's Dundee, through and through. WHAT WAS THE LAST SONG YOU CRIED TO?

Oooh, Amy Winehouse. But only for looks, only for looks! WHAT SOUND DO YOU MOST ASSOCIATE It's a scent more than a sound; I'm half there I really miss chips and cheese.

I've never had a pet unfortunately, Plus, my Mother's name in English sounds like 'cow'! WHAT WAS THE LAST SONG YOU CRIED

The Other Side, by The Red Hot Chilli Peppers. It was playing when my brother came back from Australia. I was about 13 and really glad to see him.

TO?

IF YOU COULD PASS ANY LAW, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

IF YOU COULD PASS ANY LAW, WHAT

I'd make the Queen pay tax.

That women rule.

Stand by Me, by Ben E King. It always makes me think of my loved ones.

WOULD IT BE?

HEADS UP


Ten Tracks:

Tracks to the Future by Paul Mitchell

'At some point the music industry simply became the business of selling CDs in plastic cases, and that business will soon be over. But that's not bad news for music, and it's certainly not bad news for musicians. Indeed, with all the ways to reach an audience, there have never been more opportunities for artists.' – David Byrne, Dec 07 This month sees the launch of Ten Tracks, a new platform for the marketing and retail of music for which ten bands provide a track each per month. All ten are available to listeners for £1 per month (or £10 per year, with the added option of buying single tracks). So far, the site has signed up esteemed acts such as The Aliens, King Biscuit Time (Steve Mason’s dormant project revived), Black Affair (another Mason vehicle), the everfantastic Optimo, Broken Records, and the Joe Acheson Quartet among others. Musicians are paid 60% of the value of each of their tracks downloaded, and don’t hand over any of the ownership rights of their music. It is, according to its founders “a response to online music listening culture in a way that has not been achieved to date by the major music industry”. Well that sounds interesting, but what exactly does it mean? Ed Stack, co-founder, explains further: “The signing of bands that labels do not even intend to support long-term points to the idea that the musician, like anyone else, cannot and should not primarily rely on anyone but him/ herself to ‘make it’.. The terrain has changed; a successful service would have to be one that embraces and supports the success of ‘collective’ working, something that has worked well in Scotland and in various lively pockets around the UK, facilitated hugely by the social networking revolution.” So, Ed and the legendary Talking Heads frontman are in agreement: the terrain has indeed changed. It’s been a tough few years for the record industry, ever since they refused to deal with Napster and the threat of illegal downloading all those years ago, preferring to pursue their own methods of copyright protecting the work of their rostered artists. This approach has come to bite them on the ass, as they scrabble for ways to make their outdated model work for them in the face of compelling evidence that things will never quite be the same again. In the melee that’s followed the online revolution, the question of how copyright laws can work in the face of new technology is proving difficult to resolve. Yet some simple facts remain. Firstly, the internet is here to stay, and that major fact should not be forgotten when trying to devise new business models of music distribution. Secondly, almost everybody likes to listen to music (duh…allegedly it’s genetically entrenched in us and we’re probably not going to evolve away from that any day soon). Thirdly, artists and copyright holders need to be rewarded for their endeavours, otherwise, what’s the incentive?

The Aliens

Tim Simenon (he that is Bomb The Bass) in a recent interview he gave to The Skinny (read the full article on p.44), advocated such curatorial sites. “I shop online for my electronic music on Boomkat and Bleep.com. They have already taken out all the stuff I’m not interested in and they pay a percentage of royalties to the artist. I think it’s about finding portals where you are really into what these people are already selecting. Ten Tracks sounds like it’s heading in the right direction”. Having dallied with the major labels, local favourites The Aliens have reverted to producing their music independently, and are keen to advocate any service which can offer both creative control and a respectable slice of revenues generated. “If anyone can come up with a way that’s slightly different, so the money goes back into bands, we’ll support it.” According to John Maclean of the Fife-based trio. “I think if they realise any money they part with is going to be spent so bands can make another record then I think they will do so happily. Fans on our messageboards all buy a couple of the records because they know we’re getting the money and they feel like they’re buying into the whole cause.” So can Ten Tracks succeed in getting the general public to realise that free downloading will ultimately be detrimental to the quality of musical output available? BBC Radio 1’s Vic Galloway has made a career out of spotting the next big thing, and he has this to say about the project: “In these days of diminishing sales within a crumbling music industry, the innovative idea is king! How do musicians earn money, and music-lovers get a good deal? It seems like Ten Tracks have one

Broken Records Scott louden

kind of solution... and only absolute misers would complain about 10 tunes per month for £10 per year! I’m looking forward to the range of styles and genres Ten Tracks will provide each month, with established names sidling up to fresh, under-the-radar acts. To kick things off, they have those masterful ‘selectas’ and possibly the hippest DJs in the UK, ‘Optimo Espacio’ curating

the first batch. What a great start - all hail the new idea!” [Paul Mitchell] You’ll be able to judge www.tentracks.co.uk for yourselves following the site’s launch, on 10 October (10/10 - see what we did there?). For more information you can go to the site and leave our email address - we’ll get in touch at launch to give you the full lowdown. www.tentracks.co.uk

www.Davidlemm.co.uk

So, despite noble intentions, the question remains

as to whether or not such a model, despite the low sums involved, can compete in a download environment where countless people have amassed huge record collections for nothing? Ten Tracks’ other co-founder, The Skinny’s Editor Rupert Thomson, acknowledges that this may be a problem, but feels the service is pioneering a new direction and, importantly when it comes to music, a spirit of community. “I think it’s a strange stage we’re at - caught on a bridge between that time when people were happy to shell out on music, and an internet age where everything is potentially ‘free’. Ten Tracks is designed to work in both environments. It works versus the old model, because we give such a generous proportion of our takings to bands it’s still worth their while to release music with us. And it works in a hypothetical future where all music is free, because our selections are so shit hot - and our price so low - that we’ll be worth it as a curatorial service alone. It feels like an everyone-wins situation.”

10 THE SKINNY

October 08

Feature


Sat 4 Oct & 8 Nov 8pm

STOW SESSIONS

Traditional music students from Stow College in an informal jam session. FREE

Thu 9 Oct, 8pm

TO BE CONFIRMED Seasonal cabaret featuring poetry, stand-up and music. £5

Tue 21 - Sat 25 Oct, 9pm

THE QUIZ SHOW

Part quiz, part performance. Get a team together and compete to win! £6 (£5)

Sun 26 Oct & 30 Nov, 7.30

THE MANIFESTO POLITIKAL KABARET Tam Dean Burn hosts the monthly session of digital agit-punk with visuals from SonicSinema. £5 (£3)

Thu 30 Oct, 8pm

LICENCE PENDING Spoken work cabaret with a Glasgay! twist. £5

Wed 19 - Sat 22 Nov, 8pm

FOUR MEN AND A POKER GAME

Brecht’s short story performed by David McKay with live music from David Paul Jones. £10 (£7)

www.tron.co.uk 0141 552 4267 The Tron Theatre Ltd is a Scottish registered charity No. SCO 12081

www.theskinny.co.uk

October 08

THE SKINNY 11

Feature

VICTORIAN BAR CABARET MUSIC SPOKEN WORD THEATRE


FASHION es eans do

SKINNY J

by Lindsay West

AT LONDON FASHION WEEK, ONLY THREE THINGS ARE REQUIRED TO SURVIVE: A PRESS PASS, A PAIR OF ELBOWS, AND THE WILL TO USE BOTH AGAINST ANYONE STANDING BETWEEN YOU AND A SEAT. ALSO DESIRABLE IS A WATCH SET AT LEAST AN HOUR BEHIND GMT – WE’RE WORKING ON FASHION TIME HERE, SO ADD AN HOUR TO EVERY SCHEDULE TIME, AND YOU’RE PROBABLY STILL EARLY. WITH ALL OF THESE WEAPONS POISED IN THE ARSENAL, AND BRANDISHING A NOTEBOOK AND DIGITAL CAMERA TO RECORD ALL FINDINGS, SKINNY JEANS WENT OFF TO LONDON FASHION WEEK TO DO SOME SPRING/SUMMER 09 RECON. TEN HUT, QUICK MARCH; AND ON WITH THE SHOWS…

So, despite the fact that my ticket is in Edinburgh, and the Spijkers en Spijkers show is on a catwalk in South Kensington, I make it in through the front door scrum to a fairly respectable seat, right slap bang in the middle of proceedings, which are running only a modest half hour behind schedule. And just as the bears in the photographers’ pit begin to get grizzly, the roll of protective plastic is whooshed off the catwalk, a rig full of lights set to ‘blind’ bursts into life; and so, Fashion Week begins. Stomping down the runway, Spijkers en Spijkers’ Spring/Summer looks a lot like a Dallas dream sequence: wide brim, pool party hats, gauzy layers and silk playsuits, with tinges of lace and leopard paced throughout the collection. Very Valley of the Dolls; if Valley of the Dolls were set in the future… And before the Spijkers en Spijkers applause has fully died away, it’s time to up sticks and leg it across London for Charles Anastase. Set up in a packed-to-the-rafters ex-church hall, the good people at Charles Anastase have even thought to lay on a mini buffet consisting of cans of Red Bull and teeny, tiny pastel-coloured cupcakes, which of course, no one is eating. And though it’s Anastase’s first showing in London, he’s managed to draw in a very respectable quota of celebrities. A suited and booted George Lamb hangs out at the back, while Alexa Chung snaps shots for her wishlist in the front row, and the lovely Roisin Murphy, arriving late (even by fashion week standards), spends the show perched rather ridiculously on the end of the catwalk. By far one of the strongest shows of the week, Charles Anastase’s collection sounds like a piano recital, and looks like Degas’ ballerinas met the St Trinian’s girls and lent them a little class while borrowing a little mischief for themselves. Tough denims and leather are teamed with organza updates on the tutu, and visible suspenders contrast with angelic, neutral over-layers. With more than a few visible styling fingerprints from creative consultant, Valentine Fillol-Cordier (see: Linda Farrow glasses, loose hair and effortless layers), Charles Anastase’s clarity of vision makes him a definite one-to-watch for next season; and every season after that.

It is at Louise Amstrup that we learn a key Fashion Week anomaly: seat promotion. Hanging around long enough, or arriving late enough, can, in some cases, lead to a seat adjustment of epic proportions. Hence, a move here from stuck at the back, borderline rubbish view, to prime real estate in the front row, within spitting distance of the models. (Which I don’t, but could have, if I’d wanted to…) Reading in the PR materials that Louise Amstrup’s main inspiration is Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas, I’m half-expecting a collection full of pink mohair sweater dresses with blonde bobs atop. What shows up on the runway, however, are effortlessly sleek, futuristic silhouettes, body-con and asymmetric, with perhaps the only explicit nod to Wenders’ wardrobe choices being the bright fuschia lips. Skinny favourite Olanic is up next, and having been tipped off in advance by designer, Niki, that the show’s guiding light is the weather, it’s hard not to see the models’ asymmetric updos as a representation of old school BBC cut-out clouds, last seen on Michael Fish’s weather maps. This could just have been me, however. Olanic’s storming collection (sorry…), included an incredible bow-backed coat, a cropped sequin tux, and a high-collared leather jacket, all of which were furiously sketched into copious press notebooks as they sashayed past. Just beautiful.

12 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

Unable to infiltrate the impenetrable fortress of Christopher Kane, I do, however, manage to score a pass into the Topshop compound for Emma Cook, and promptly fall in love with everything that walks past (with the exception of Rolling Stone daughter, Leah Wood – who I’m sure is very nice, but not really my scene). Incredible see-thru raincoats onto which it’s been raining Swarovski crystals, tiered dresses in embellished and iridescent fabrics, fringing and printed silk; all teamed with next season’s Emma Cook for Topshop footwear. Stand. Out. Show. Back in the main tents, Eley Kishimoto is doing summer holidays 20s style, with smock dresses, drop waists and pudding bowl hats, set off with printed, bright tights. All a bit Gatsby in neon, with the exception of one look featuring an incongruous crash helmet, which gets the shutterbugs in the pit audibly excited. The day ends, as I like all my days to end, being serenaded in a warehouse in South-West London, by a perma-tanned man in a dinner jacket. Yes, as Antoni & Alison announce before the show starts, for Spring/Summer they’d like to take us on an ‘exotic’ voyage, which basically involves a rendition of Bali H’ai, followed by a showing of novelty banana print dresses. Not sure about the fashion, but we sure enjoyed the show, A&A.

At Jenny Packham,, the celebrity count is swelled by the appearance of long-term Packham devotee, Jamelia, in the front row. And as if the glamour can’t get any more intoxicating, I get chatting to a vaguely familiar blonde, who it turns out is the presenter of Channel 5’s copy of The Mint. Nice lady, actually. The show itself closes to the sounds of Pretty in Pink, and as a summary, it’s fairly accurate. Pinks of all descriptions, from neon to baby, prettified with irresistible Swarovski detailing and ethereal organza layers, sailing around models like hideously expensive, sherbet-coloured dry ice. All that was missing was the starlets and the red carpet – expect them to follow next season. After Packham wraps up, I head over to the Mulberry showroom on New Bond Street, for a presentation of what Spring/Summer has to offer. The answer is quite simply – bankruptcy, for anyone with any taste. Gorgeous models – including Heather Marks – march down a runway in a studio filled with gymkhana rosettes and butter soft leather, showing off a polished but uber-cool collection. From shrunken leather jackets in rich brights to patent ankle boots I’m not sure I’m going to be able to live without, Mulberry’s Spring/ Summer is made of seriously desirable stuff. And, judging by the way she was furiously asterisking items on the inventory, expect to see much of it on Alexa Chung in the months to come.

FASHION


FASHION Having been waiting around all week for fashion shows to show up - wouldn’t you know it, five come along at once, in the busiest day so far. Breakfast is with four-time Topshop New-Gen Award winner Bora Aksu, all grown-up in demure organza neutrals. Beautiful layered gowns made visible their immaculately constructed skeletons, in one of the mellowest, and most elegant shows of the week. Bora Aksu in the bag, it’s then off in the rather convenient BFC bus to Osman Yousefzada at the Serpentine, in Hyde Park. The woman who more or less brought me up, televisually speaking – Caryn The Clothes Show Franklin – is here, front row, for a show that is fairly average – lots of draping, punctuated by upside-down satellite dish hats. More exciting is a second hand sighting of Noel Gallagher in a soft top whizzing by outside. Actual conversation occurring by the bus: Her: That was Noel Gallagher. Him: What, in a Golf? Next is Ashish – to cool what Bora Aksu was to elegant (ie. very) – with a military theme and an abundance of sequins, from playing card adorned dresses to all-sequin camo print. Inexplicably making baseball caps and baggy plaid shirts high fashion, the shoes at Ashish are the main event, with models sporting black leather ankle boots adorned with gold wings by Tatty Devine. Heavenly. Scooping the prize for the week’s stupidest venue, the Modernist show struts its way through the middle of the second floor of Mango, Oxford Circus. Having fought our way through bemused members of the public, us now beleaguered members of the press assemble around the makeshift catwalk, and are thankfully greeted by some pretty slick tailoring and imaginative embellishments. And lots of purple. Last gasp of the day comes in the form of the Aminaka Wilmont show: an architecturally impressive collection filled with contradictory hard edges and soft fabrics. Leather and denim, juxtaposed with fine silks, are capped off with a selection of inexplicably engineered foot-less sandals, which get the shutterbugs all a-flutter. A little wave from a hand-in-hand Aminaka Löfvander and Marcus Wilmont; and that ought to do it for this season’s Fashion Week.

CLOSING NOTES: S/S 09 TREND SPOTTING COLOURS STRAIGHT FROM A PACKET OF RAINBOW DROPS – THINK MUTED LAVENDERS, BABY BLUES AND ORANGE SHERBETS. PLUS GREY. BOATLOADS OF GREY. GAUZY, TRANSPARENT LAYERS, OFTEN IN IRIDESCENT FABRICS ASYMMETRIC NECKLINES – ONE SHOULDER TOPS & DRESSES JUDGING BY THE AMOUNT OF SPELLING TROUBLE THE WORD “TIERS” PROVIDED – SCRIBBLED DOWN AT PACE, IN THE DARK, AND CONSISTENTLY INCORRECTLY INTO A TRUSTY MOLESKINE – TIERED LAYERS BEGAN TO LOOK MIGHTY LIKE A RECURRING S/S THEME.

PHOTOGRAPHS - LINDSAY WEST ILLUSTRATION - WWW.DAVIDLEMM.CO.UK

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 13


Viva la Viv!

WORDS: Kirsteen Connor Images: Kristopher Andrew Hamilton

The Dress: Anglomania pirate shirt dress £265 This pirate shirt is part of the Anglomania range. It’s so colourful and the print is beautiful. Although they are cut from the same fabric each one is slightly different. It’s nice that no two are the same; a lot of Vivienne Westwood clothes are like that.

The Tee: Innocent t-shirt £75 This is a vintage Vivienne Westwood print that has re-released and it comes in a purple and white too. I like the fact that she keeps old prints and restyles them. I like the idea of reviving old things. She’s updated this one by altering the cut of the t-shirt.

West-coasters are a notoriously eccentric and eclectic bunch, so it’s only fitting that Vivienne Westwood, the queen of eccentricity and eclecticism, the Grand Dame of Fashion herself, should choose to open her first Scottish store in Glasgow. Until now designer stores in Glasgow have not exactly been notorious for pushing boundaries, so the arrival of Vivienne Westwood in Princes Square is bound to shake things up a bit. Shop manager Erin believes the store will bring something different to Glasgow: “We do all the buying so we can really cater for our own market. A lot of designer shops are quite uncomfortable, you go in and you don’t want to touch anything, but I think this store has a nice environment, it has a fun atmosphere and a personal one too.” Vivienne Westwood is the real deal - a bona fide cultural icon with something to say. Her impact on British fashion has been huge and she has proved herself to be an innovative and visionary designer with a reputation for craftsmanship and tailoring. Erin believes Westwood’s enduring appeal lies in her tendency to break the rules: “I studied fashion and found that she was everyone’s favourite designer. She is almost anti-fashion: she’s rebellious and dares to do something different. I think people really admire that.” Never one to put up or shut up, Westwood is known for her political activism and her support of civil rights issues. Sales assistant Sheri believes that this makes her stand out from the crowd. “You can tell how intelligent she is and that she’s saying ‘this isn’t all I’m good at, there are so many sides to me’”. Erin agrees - “I think that it’s good that someone can use their status and their success to make a difference to the world.”

The Shoes: Vivienne Westwood and Melissa Mary-Jane shoes £100 I love these shoes! Melissa is a Brazilian brand who make shoes from sweat free plastic. These are a collaboration between Vivienne Westwood and Melissa, they’re a copy of the red t-bar Anglomania shoes. I love them because they’re so comfortable and the heel is a perfect size. The Bag: McBruce winter tartan bag £335 I like this bag because it’s a little bit different, the leather is unusual and the fabric is sturdy but nice and bright. It has lots of compartments too so it’s very practical. It’s very Vivienne Westwood because the tartan is so colourful and funky.

The Brooch: Vivienne Westwood

Diamante heart brooch £80

Unit 43, Level 1 Princes Square Glasgow (0141) 222 2643 www.viviennewestwood.com www.princessquare.co.uk With many thanks to all the staff of Vivienne Westwood, Glasgow.

Everyone loves this range; it’s been really popular. I love the colour of the red enamel on this brooch. When other items from the range, like the necklace and ring, sit against the skin they look amazing, because that red is so vibrant the colour really jumps out.

Left To right: LOUISE, ERIN & SHERI

14 THE SKINNY

October 08

Fashion


FOOD AND DRINK The Clover Coffee Machine:

Brewing up Trouble By Ruth Marsh

THIS IS THE CAFFEINATED WESTERNER’S VERSION OF A CHINESE TEA CEREMONY - IT SURE AIN’T TIPPING NESCAFE GRANULES INTO A CHIPPED FOREVER FRIENDS MUG. It’s the complex piece of machinery that US coffee connoisseurs fete as the greatest thing since sliced brioche with a pot of organic bilberry jam. Since the Clover first appeared in 2004 in indie brew shops across (where else?) Seattle, it has been spoken of in hallowed tones, revered in blogs and spoken of as the holy grail of coffee makers in the sort of deliriously anal online forums where claims like that are not made lightly. What the Clover does is break down the process of brewing a cup of joe into minute detail. This is the caffeinated Westerner’s version of a Chinese tea ceremony - ritualising the end product and, with brewing taking up to 5 minutes, reintroducing the art of waiting and salivating into a culture that impatiently taps its fingers on the counter when its latte and muffin to go takes a fraction longer than expected. It sure ain’t tipping Nescafe granules into a chipped Forever Friends mug.

system which can be altered to bring out the best characteristics of each individual bean. The grounds go into their Guantanamo-sounding ‘brew chamber’, are steeped for a computerdesignated amount of seconds and, finally, a vacuum is created by a rising and descending piston which draws the coffee through the grounds and deposits a cupload of perfection. This is a black coffee like no other. It’s not espresso–based, so no Americano-style short, sharp shock diluted in hot water. And it’s not decanted from a giant pot, left fermenting indefinitely on a hotplate. This is the antithesis of the chocolate caramel frappe with non-fat whipped topping and extra ice that 21st century coffee has become. Although the mythology around it smacks a little of smug I-know-which-plantation-this-beancomes-from-and-the-name-of-the-famer’s-cousin foodieism, what the Clover really offers is simply a good cup of joe. Milk would seem like mucking

What makes the Clover so unique and groundbreaking to java nerds is that it is essentially a single-cup brewing

it about - mention hazelnut syrup and you’re just asking for trouble. The Clover is a seriously pricey piece of kit, setting commercial retailers back around $11k. This is resolutely not a method that can be reproduced domestically. With punters now fetishising their George Clooney-endorsed, kitchen work surface Nespressos to be enjoyed (sadly sans George) in the comfort of their own homes, the Clover is reclaiming coffee as something to go out for and not to be dallied with by an amateur. For all its gourmet credentials, the Clover caused a stir earlier in the year when it was bought over in the US by omnipresent, all-seeing mermaid goliath Starbucks. Rumours abound as to whether this will mean a monopoly in its distribution and if the small coffeehouses that first started the buzz will now be unable to stock them. When the Guardian’s Ravi Somaiya wrote briefly about Clovers last September, he confirmed that Starbucks would be bringing them to their UK stores ‘soon’. However, we Scots have got one-up on expectant Londoners because, in typically unassuming style, the UK’s only commercial Clover sits innocuously next to the panini press and hot chocolate mix in Tinderbox’s Merchant City branch.

Renowned Glasgow-based coffee roasters Matthew Algie (for whom Tinderbox is their glossy storefront) currently own the UK rights to Clover and have been happily trying their baby out on Glaswegian coffee lovers for the last six months. So does it live up to expectation? Certainly it’s presented in a serious manner, with a menu of single-estate, origin-centred coffees (Sumatra, Kenya, Ethiopia etc) to choose from and sommelier-style tasting notes - ranging from fruity to nutty to sweet - to guide your choice. The resulting cupful lacks none of the bitter aftertaste, chalky texture or eye-watering abrasion of regular black coffee and, with beans ground to order for every cupful, it’s as fresh and complex as you’ll ever get. Price-wise, we’ve got one up on our cousins over the pond. Whilst Tinderbox will fix you a fix for around the two quid mark, American aficionados are shelling out upwards of $8 for a cup of black gold. Tinderbox sell their Clover-friendly beans to take back home with you and they’ll no doubt brew up pretty good. But, unless you’ve got £6k lining your back pocket and a sizeable space in your kitchen, it’s best to leave it to the pros.

14 INGRAM STREET, GLASGOW G1 1EJ TEL: 0141 552 6907

e n i h c a M e e f f T he C lover C o 16 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

FOOD AND DRINK


SERGE, GLASGOW ASHTON LANE, G12 0141 342 4966

WIN A BOTTLE OF

THE UBIQUITOUS CHIP, GLASGOW

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ASHTON LANE, G12 0141 334 5007

Perched atop Ashton Lane’s Brel, the interior of Serge – Brel’s new tapas style venture - is all dark wood and candlelit red velvet. Very sophisticated, very French, but with an immediate warmth and homeliness. This is thanks largely to the staff, who shower us with loveliness. The menu tells it like it is: ‘small plates to accompany wines and spirits’. That booze is the main event here is evidenced further by the fact that the wine and beer list runs to several pages and includes a selection of North American and Belgian beers; while the food menu could be written on the back of a napkin. But the beauty of this little place is the - apparently successful - idea of food as an accompaniment without being an afterthought. Scampi fries and peanuts dare not show their face on this menu. Tactile and rustic, it includes casseroles and sea food, cold meats and cheeses. A wild boar pate even makes an appearance. We slurp first on mussels pickled in cider, vinegar and chilli oil. Richly flavoured with garlic, juicy and beautifully presented and impressively reasonable. Exactly how mussels ought to be. No less impressive was the lightly smoked sausage and pickle served with mustard. Both are finger food at its very best. The cold sausage and slightly tart pickle are the perfect compliment to the dry beer. The menu struck a bum note however with ‘stoemp’, which on arrival admitted to being mashed potato. Bland and out of place on a menu which otherwise makes cutlery obsolete. The bread, described as rustic, might better be described as a peasant portion. One slice with the mussels was not nearly enough for ripping and dipping. But with a little more bread, and a little less potato, seems like Serge may be on to something good. [Louise Loftus]

www.theskinny.co.uk

Already popular with bartenders in the know, Bulleit Bourbon has a smoky-smooth taste and stylish packaging which has made it a must-have for every drinks cabinet.

Ah, The Chip. Mothership of the Glasgow restaurant scene for over 30 years and proud parent of those other West End perennials Stravaigin and The Liquid Ship. An institution of the most unstuffy, warmly regarded kind, it has been championing locality, seasonality and sustainability in its menus decades before such traits became marketing gimmicks so overused even McDonald’s can plug its hoof-mulch with green fields, responsible bucolic farmers and quirky ukulele music with their tongues apparently nowhere near their cheeks. The Chip has certainly lost none of its celebrity pulling power- sadly, I arrived too late for Kylie and too early for Jay Z. Luckily, a swiftly dispatched silken espresso cupful of butternut squash veloute proved more rewarding than a hundred ironic covers of Wonderwall ever could be. Taste buds suitably perked up, I tucked in to three pearly, sea-sweet scallops nestling on a crisp swirl of potato rosti while my other half began what would be a series of worryingly borderline-orgasmic ‘oh my god’s’ with her fish and prawn sausage. This had the same pleasingly springy teture as Thai fishcake, but its apple mayonnaise gave it a distinctly comforting, Western feel. For mains, I plumped for what the menu sparingly dubbed ‘trio of lamb’. What arrived was an ovine extravaganza of rare roast fillet, sliced like a stack of pound coins, shoulder stuffed with coarsely chopped mussels and minced haunch, warmly spiced and baked in pastry, a creation which took the humble bridie to ethereal new heights. Holding the holy trinity together was a pile of crushed potatoes infused, thanks to some kitchen wizardry,

with the heady taste of the liqour that lurks at the bottom of a pot of moules. Across the table, an unapologetically rich dish of ruby Perthshire pigeon with a ying yang of game and wild mushroom sauces and nutty pearl barley risotto was polished off in record time. She scored the real showstopper dessert too, thanks to a Hendricks gin and tonic jelly. One of Scotland’s most delicious contributions to the cocktail world was set in a translucent ring studded with pink grapefruit and topped with cucumber sorbet - dazzling. My chocolate brioche pudding was the most conventional option on the menu but didn’t suffer for that, offering a crumbly bittersweet pud just the right side of stodgy. The epic wine list caters for both budget and blowout. We settled for a cracking Portugese red, smooth and hearty enough to cope with the mains and a real bargain, falling a few quid under the £20 mark. Many restaurants in the city struggle to reach a thirty month anniversary, but one visit to the Chip reminds you just why it’s still thriving. Its lush courtyard atrium brims over with chatter and playfulness, attributes which much fine dining seems to deliberately avoid. There’s no hushed voices, no sycophantic service - just top notch food to be enjoyed with the right amount of Glasgow gallus. [Ruth Marsh]

A true blend of taste, quality and heritage, Bulleit Bourbon is still inspired by the high rye content recipe, pioneered by Augustus Bulleit in 1830’s Kentucky. Aged for no less than six years, Bulleit Bourbon is full flavoured with hints of vanilla and honey, and there’s no fear of that classic whiskey burn. Try it on the rocks or simply add some cola or ginger ale for a longer refreshing tasting drink. For a chance to win one of five bottles of Bulleit, just answer the simple question below. If you’re not a lucky winner you can pick up a bottle from your local retailer, or why not enjoy a glass of Bulleit with friends at Serge.

How long is Bulleit Bourbon aged for? A) a minimum of four years B) a minimum of five years C) a minimum of six years Enter online at www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions by 30 October 2008 for your chance to win. You must be over 21 to enter. Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request. The BULLEIT BOURBON word and associated logos are trade marks of Bulleit Distilling Company. © Bulleit Distilling Company 2008

October 08

THE SKINNY 17

Food and Drink

BAR REVIEWS


DEVIANCE The programme for Glasgay!’s Tennessee Williams Festival (see the Film and Theatre pages) reads like a catalogue of gutwrenching heartaches, seedy hotel rooms, alcoholism and despair. And that’s just so much more compelling than a happily-everafter story. I’m more interested in seeing how other people tackle the repercussions of their own bad decisions, handle the hard times. In Williams’ plays, it’s not a simple case of gay men as heroes oppressed by a heterosexist society. Arguably, the drugs and the bad behaviour could be viewed as a wounded response to their subordination, but it still doesn’t make a character sympathetic. And that’s where critics came in, critics who wanted to see nothing but positive portrayals of gay people. You can appreciate why, given the generally homophobic era in which Williams produced his work; but he was intent on telling a more messy story, and that’s in part why his work survives. It wasn’t written to merely further certain political goals of the time. There’s something I really like about that stance, uncomfortable as it may make people (sometimes myself included). And bad decisions, heartbreak and seediness are universal themes. Plenty of straight people like Tennessee Williams, because you don’t have to be gay in order to relate. Likewise, I can’t find a whole bunch of queer women in his plays, but I’m not complaining. It’s about people, life, mistakes, humour and drama. Sometimes it doesn’t need to be any more specific than that. /Nine

PREVIEW GLASGAY! 2008 VARIOUS VENUES 1 OCT - 9 NOV

There is plenty of queer work these days that tickles mainstream tastes: like a larger than life character on Big Brother, or a token edgy storyline on your favourite daytime soap, sexuality is a useful signifier of exoticism that can actually work to exclude danger. Glasgay! is getting bigger, and certainly includes a blue-rinse factor. Suddenly Last Summer will certainly pull in the crowds who might not even know their L from their B. That’s okay - visibility was always part of the remit, and the festival’s success reflects the health of the scene. Fortunately, Glasgay! Director Steven Thomson is bold enough to have included a few works that rattle the jewellery. Down at Tramway, two veteran radicals are recalled, through Pacitti Company’s Civil and a showing of Blue. Respectively representing Quentin Crisp and Derek Jarman, both remember two men who lived in far less tolerant times and who, through the very way that they lived their lives, challenged heterodoxy and helped create the modern world. Glasgay! is a massive festival, covering plenty of bases - somehow the gentle observational comedy of Paul Sinha finds a place next to the committed revaluing of Tennessee Williams; even the clubbing section of the program ranges from Amy Lamé’s cute charm to Utter Gutter’s decadent nihilism in two images. Thank God that acceptance hasn’t watered down Glasgay's radical edge. [Margaret Kirk]

18 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore:

So Many Ways to Sleep Badly HOT ON THE HEELS OF AN EXPANDED SECOND EDITION OF THAT’S REVOLTING! QUEER STRATEGIES FOR RESISTING ASSIMILATION, MATTILDA BERNSTEIN SYCAMORE IS BACK ON THE SCENE WITH A NEW NOVEL. ALMA CORK JOINS THE DOTS. Imagine the scene: you’re taking part in a huge Pride march, an occasion where LGBT people can take to the streets, wave their rainbow flags, and celebrate being out and proud - a glorious gathering of gayness. Only, all of a sudden, the march is confronted with a roadblock made out of sofas and what appears to be a seven foot tall can of Budweiser that invites you inside it with the slogan “Vomit Out Budweiser Pride and the Selling of Queer Identities”. Yes, you’ve just stumbled across Gay Shame, and if you can’t make it to the Budweiser vomitorium then there are handy Gay Shame vomit bags being given out. You might wonder what is going on, but Gay Shame is a response to the over-commercialisation and ‘safe’ agenda that Pride has come to embody, and it questions the politics of assimilation and the loss of LGBT culture that goes with it. Gay Shame has come along to challenge the climate that says you can be gay - just as long as you’re not one of those scary gays. It challenges a world where your sexuality comes with corporate sponsors, a world where LGBT means assimilating and making yourself ‘unthreatening’, a world that only allows representation by the likes of Will & Grace and The L Word. Here’s your culture! Is that bland enough? One of the notable people behind Gay Shame’s creation is Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore. She’s an author, editor, activist, sex worker, and gender radical extraordinaire, who describes herself as “an insomniac with dreams”. So far, she’s edited four pioneering anthologies, beginning with Tricks and Treats: Sex Workers Write About their Clients. Following this, Dangerous Families: Queer Writing on Surviving was billed as “brutal, raw, cathartic and redemptive” by the San Francisco Chronicle. Then, That’s Revolting! Queer Strategies for Resisting Assimilation came as a suckerpunch wake-up call to the corporate face of mainstream gay politics and a call to arms for those who are ‘outsiders’. And Nobody Passes: Rejecting the Rules of Gender and Conformity is a beautifully vibrant collection of essays that explores the idea of belonging, with the cultural intersections and issues that we all have to face as we strive to ‘pass’. Mattilda has also published two novels, Pulling Taffy and her latest, So Many Ways to Sleep Badly. The latter is a blistering rollercoaster through one individual’s experiences and dreams, set against the backdrop of queer San Francisco in the early part of this decade. It was written in two-paragraph bursts when fibromyalgia made typing, or even holding a pen, a painful task for Mattilda. The novel careens along with a fragmentary zest - never coming apart completely even though thoughts, interactions and stories speed past in a blur of racing, disjointed narrative. Seemingly endless encounters with tricks, phone calls from friends that offer occasionally bittersweet insight into their lives, open relationships that seem like they should work even as they drift away, addictions to hooking up for sex over Craigslist, dancing to pounding beats, sex, sex, and more sex, coping with rebellious bodies and constant pain and the memories of sexual abuse, and random moments of shared understanding with strangers on the bus: they all flow over each other. All the while, we’re treated to a contemporary landscape of fragmentation: the spectre of war post-9/11 and the futility of the peace

MATTILDA BERNSTEIN SYCAMORE JEFFERY WALLS

EDITORIAL

demos; a ‘gay community’ that seems to be absent outside a collection of friends; and meanwhile the narrator’s apartment is taken over by mice, pigeons, rats, and a collection of cockroaches that seem to be fond of the electric toothbrush. Like life, the novel never seems to know where it’s going, but keeps on pulsing forward, always bustling, although its consistent narrative style makes it feel more like swimming against the stream.

and even though the book is certainly shocking, it is also at times extremely touching, and often hilarious.

But then only dead fish go with the flow.

Still, it’s nice to know that somebody is keeping us safe from the scary queers, isn’t it? Vomit bag, anyone?

Mattilda has taken a snapshot from the start of this decade, straight from the voices of queer realities in San Francisco, and distilled it into a glorious rant about surviving and dealing with life. With all this said, the book is never depressing. The narrator never dips into self-pity

By the way, you wouldn’t have been directly confronted with those sofas or the giant Budweiser vomitorium can. Volunteer Pride marshals wound up shoving Mattilda and company, eventually instigating the police against them. Two people were arrested. At another protest, LGBT centre staff called the police against a demonstration that Mattilda was part of, and then watched while the police beat them up. Meanwhile, in the Castro, wealthy gay residents protest the queer youth shelter, because it might affect their property values.

OUT 1 OCT 2008, PUBLISHED BY CITY LIGHTS, COVER PRICE £11.99 PAPERBACK. WWW.MATTILDABERNSTEINSYCAMORE.COM

DEVIANCE


DEVIANCE

Slutty McWhore:

Searching for the Exit

SLUTTY MCWHORE HAS HIT BURNOUT - IT'S TIME FOR A CHANGE.

I am an educated woman, so it would be ridiculous for anybody to suggest that I was forced into sex work. The choice was definitely mine but, nonetheless, student visa restrictions made it practically impossible for me to make a living in the US. I could have taken an illegal job in a restaurant perhaps but, even then, I would barely have scraped a living. Because I was living alone in the US, and had decided to cut off all contact with my toxic family, I felt comforted by the quick, ‘easy’ money and

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It is, however, clearer than ever now that a change has got to come if I want to hold on to my sanity. I’ve decided to start training to be an English teacher in January, and in the meantime, I’m looking for a ‘normal’ job. I initially hoped to give up sex work completely, but after scouring the local newspaper and the internet for teaching positions, it’s unlikely this will happen. The only jobs available are as teaching assistants in nursery or primary schools, and I have zero experience with little kids. Even if I had, the jobs are normally only parttime and the pay is shockingly poor. It’s really no wonder that women turn to sex work to make ends meet when the reward for such a mentally and physically demanding job is around £4.50 per hour!

BO YC E

Of course, there are plenty of sex workers out there who enjoy their job, or who, at least, don’t hate it, but I am now firmly convinced that it is emotionally damaging to work full-time in the sex industry for a lengthy period. Most of the successful ‘veteran’ sex workers I have come across are good at what they do because they have kept a ‘straight’ day job and worked only part-time in the sex industry. This way they’re not trapped by the work, and can give it up any time they want if they need a break. Most importantly, their day job connects them to the outside world, to ‘normality’. In my case, I spend all my days at home, trying to hustle up clients on the internet, and am completely isolated from real life.

financial security that sex work offered me. I became an erotic masseuse because I just didn’t have the emotional reserves to take a badly paid illegal job, and be broke as well as homesick and lonely.

AL AS DA IR

This month I can barely bring myself to write about erotic massage or my life as a sex worker. I’ve been working as a masseuse in the United States for well over two years now, and boredom and frustration have finally set in, so much so that it pains me even to write about my profession. There was never a point where I actually enjoyed the work – it was always just a way to earn money quickly – but these days I find myself taking more and more time off work, because I just can’t face it some mornings. I have become the most tragic of tragic figures – a broke, unhappy sex worker.

Despite the appalling wages, I do still want to be a teacher. I want to have a profession where I actually help people, and make a difference to society. Some women involved in the sex industry describe their work as a ‘caring profession’, but I don’t buy it. No matter how lonely and sad my clients may be, there are people in the world far more deserving of my time, energy and compassion. There’s no doubt about it – it’s time for me to swap ejaculation for education.

OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 19


Film

Falling for a Film The Fall is the latest film from Indian director Tarsem Singh, a fantasy epic over 20 years in the making and filmed across 24 countries. Best known as the director of 2000’s The Cell and REM’s Losing my Religion video, Tarsem tells Jonathan Melville that he’s happy that his film inspires both love and loathing in audiences… just as long as they don’t sit on the fence. Where did your inspiration for The Fall come from? I had the idea close to 24 years ago - to tell a story using a person’s body language. That doesn’t happen in cinema; it doesn’t happen when you write a story; it only happens when you literally tell it to one or 20 people. What you tell, what the person perceives and what the person remembers in twenty years time are three different things. That’s the idea I had, and when I saw a Bulgarian film Yo Ho Ho I thought I’d remake it when I had the money. But it took 15 years to buy the rights. I saw it again recently, having not intended to see it again because people talk about a film they saw twenty years ago as being so incredible but then halfway through rewatching it say “this is shit”, because they’ve evolved since they first saw it, maybe adding subtleties and scenes in their head that never existed. You can’t beat nostalgia. I spent 17 years location-scouting going around the globe, including Scotland, going here, there and everywhere. I looked at them, wrote about them, wrote the scenes up and then spent seven years looking for the child, not caring if it was a boy or a girl. The moment I found Catinca Untara I told my brother: “sell everything, this will be a different person in four months”. So in a four month period we had to shoot in sequence, wanting it to feel as real as possible for her. Did she know she was going to be in a film? She thought it was going to be a documentary so I changed the script, and nobody on set knew that [co-star] Lee Pace could walk. I told her that the hero of the fantasy, her father, was the lead and that the handicapped man couldn’t leave his bed. The first time she met him in the film was the first day she had met him in real life, the second day was the second time, and so on. We shot in sequence for about four months then spent four and a half years shooting around the world in 24 countries, wherever I thought the fantasy in her head would take her.

I just left them to talk about things, and I would turn off and turn over and leave them to wander in their discussions. The scene only took about four minutes to film and it’s a one shot thing, you can’t fake it.

helicopter shot. It’s all done in reverse.

And she didn’t know he wasn’t paralysed during that time?

Not really, it was a practical approach: a lot of people say it’s a real tip of the hat to silent cinema, but to me it isn’t. I had that structure from the very beginning. Originally I wanted to make the film contemporary but I couldn’t because I needed a child who hadn’t seen a film and had no experience of the cinema, but today there’s no child in the world who hasn’t had that experience. So it had to be set before cinema evolved so that she has no reference to John Wayne or anyone like that.

Not just her. The cameraman didn’t know. The lighting guy didn’t know. The production designer didn’t know. None of the actors knew. He’d been in one film at the time and so we changed his name and told everyone he was a stage actor from New York, keeping it quiet for twelve weeks.

Did you have the cast contracted to do those four and a half years?

Is it true that Catinca helped write the fantasy sequences?

No, it was just good will and handshakes! I didn’t know it would take four years – if it had taken ten years or fifteen years then that’s just the way it was going to be. Because the financing never fully fell into place I could never say how many countries I could film or for how long.

I had a structure in mind, but in the end I nearly didn’t bother with the locations, deciding to maybe just stay in the hospital. I know some critics think it would have been a much better movie if I’d done that. Then I decided I needed to do the fantasy world and discussed with Catinca what she thought would happen in the sequences. Some of the stuff she came up with was completely impractical and mad but it was driven by her naïveté and I took as much of her input as I could.

Where did you find Catinca? I found her in Romania. I wanted a child of about four, because after that age it’s more difficult to fool them and they start to act, and I wanted her to be natural. Catinca was six and didn’t understand English, so part of her reactions with Lee come from her wondering if she just doesn’t understand what he’s saying. There’s a brilliant scene… …my favourite scene, the Eucharist? That’s right. It’s a magical scene, you just know she’s trying desperately to understand him. She can’t hear the cameras, they’re hidden behind curtains, and

20 THE SKINNY

October 08

There’s a standout scene involving a butterfly island – was that real? That’s real, but it was an example of putting the cart before the horse. I would try to only shoot commercials where I could also shoot parts of my film, getting the actors to fly in to film their scenes before they went away again. At one point I was filming in Fiji and someone said to me you could film on Butterfly Reef. I asked why it was called that and they said that from the air it looked like a butterfly. So I decided to write another scene involving a butterfly that was filmed in Argentina and just matched it to the

Silent films play a big part in the film, especially at the end. Are you a fan of those movies?

To give herself a happy ending she has to assume that Roy did all the stunts, it had to finish there. If she wants a happy ending then there it is – but is it really a happy ending? What are the chances he made it out of that hospital and what are the chances that she thought she saw him? You do almost forget at times that this is actually quite a tragic story, with Roy trying to kill himself… …and he might have succeeded after she left. Or made it out alive. As far as she’s concerned he made it out and did those stunts forever. All the answers are there and I hope that when the DVD comes out people will freeze the picture to see whether it’s Roy’s face or not. Is it fair to say the critics have given the film mixed reviews? I’ve found critics are polarised with the film. The people who can’t get into this film just cannot get into it, they absolutely hate it and think it’s shit, while the next person comes in and thinks it’s the best thing since sliced bread! Both views are OK

with me, it’s just the people who are somewhere in the middle that bother me. So far in the UK the response has been fantastic. In America, the trade press, Variety and the Hollywood Reporter, killed it stone dead because we’d screened it in Toronto and missed New York and LA, so they toed the party line and had no interest in it. But the guys from Ain’t It Cool News saw it, and Ebert* saw it in Chicago and suddenly people embraced it and loved it. It’s done brilliantly in the local press around the US who saw it in a vacuum, wondered what it was and suddenly the local markets bought it. At its centre this is a very accessible story, a very simplistic story and I don’t know what film those people who tried to kill it were seeing but they just couldn’t get into it. Due to its sheer scale this is a film that really needs to be seen on the big screen. I agree, but for a while cinemas wouldn’t even screen it for free in America, so I decided I’d pay to put it in the cinema and had to work for another two years to afford to get it out there. What sort of reaction do you hope you get from the public? People like definitive answers and ask me “well, what happened?” Instead I ask them “What do you think happened?” If you’re optimistic, he made it, if you’re pessimistic, he didn’t, and if you’re sceptical you’ll be wondering about it. And if you’re a critic you don’t give a fuck!

*Roger Ebert, influential film-reviewer for the Chicago Sun-Times. The Fall is released in cinemas on 3 October 2008.

Film


Film

Africa In Motion 2008 Alastair RoY previews the highlights of 2008’s Africa in motion film festival

Democracy in Dakar

The Africa in Motion festival comes to Edinburgh for its third year, showcasing film from around the continent, free from BBC news reports and ranting pop stars. Over 40 films from 22 countries capture the kaleidoscope of forms, themes and styles that make up African cinema. Here are some of the expected highlights…

Retrospectives There are retrospectives of the work of Malian director Souleymane Cissé and Burkinabe director Gaston Kaboré, with both in attendance after screenings of their films to chat with audiences. Kaboré’s Zan Boko explores the threat posed to a farming settlement as a growing industrial city expands around it. To free up space for rich residents, the government forces the poor from their land, paving over traditions and ancestral heritage along the way. A journalist attempts to escape state censorship and tell one farmer’s story of injustice through urbanisation, as Kaboré paints a wider picture of how money threatens to dissolve a nation’s vital ties with the earth and social bonds with each other. Set in 13th century Mali, Yeelen tells the story of a son fleeing his murderous father and his “poisonous magic”. A sorcerer himself, Nianakoro helps warring tribes and battles sexual desire along the way. Beautifully shot, surreal and downright strange, Yeelen captures an African mysticism of old, while throwing light on enduring issues like family responsibility and the misuse of power.

Documentary Part of an afternoon of African documentary screenings at Edinburgh College of Art, African Underground: Democracy in Dakar follows the build up to Senegal’s 2007 presidential election, where the nation’s young hip hop artists have found a collective political voice. At first mimicking America’s hip hop stars, the documentary reveals how the Senegalese artists found a music that expresses their Muslim beliefs and disillusionment with their country. As thousands of Senegalese flee for Europe on rickety fishing boats to escape poverty and government corruption, these

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empowered musicians battle censorship at home to effect political change. Democracy in Dakar is a fascinating insight into a modern African country, told through interviews and freestyles to a hip hop soundtrack. At the Filmhouse, Nigerian-born, London-based filmmaker and writer Zina Saro-Wiwa will present her documentary This is My Africa. A nice inroad to the festival, as it covers some of the films on show, the documentary explores a group of famous London residents’ experiences and memories of life in Africa - its sights, smells, tastes and culture. Actors Colin Firth and Chiwetel Ejiofor speak of their love of Nigerian author Ben Okri’s The Famished Road, and news presenter Jon Snow tells of his enduring memory of Africa after rainfall.

Animation New to the festival are African animation shorts. Screened in two sessions (one for children and one for adults) cut-out, claymation, stopmotion and computer animation from around the continent are showcased. One highlight is include The Blackheart Gang’s The Tale of How. A giant octopus monster with a tree growing in its head devours the dodo birds who live there. A little mouse - Eddy the Engineer - rises up to save the day. A series of prints around which the 2D and 3D pastiche animation unfolds, The Tale of How is a beautiful, surreal, Terry Gilliamesque adventure narrated with operatic song.

Scares The AiM After Hours series offer late-night screenings over Halloween weekend of African horrors and experimental work. On show are Richard Stanley’s documentary following Haitian voodoo practice, The White Darkness, and Teco Benson’s pre-Nollywood shocker Highway to the Grave (those who turn up in fancy dress get £1.50 off their ticket price). Nollywood proper is represented by Bleeding Rose (winner of Best Nigerian Feature Film at the 2007 Lagos International Film Festival) with director Chucks Mordi present after screenings to discuss Africa’s love of the low-budget Nigerian video-film industry.

Africa in Motion runs from 23 Oct - 2 Nov 2008. www.africa-in-motion.org.uk

October 08

THE SKINNY 21


Glasgay! film program 2008:

THINGS THAT MAKE YOU GO BOOM!

Costumes, Comedy & Camp DJUNA BEE ON THE BEST FILMS TO CATCH AT THIS YEAR’S GLASGAY!

BOOM! IS A FILM ABOUT EXCESS, DECAY, LONELINESS, AND LOSS, WITH DIALOGUE AS WHIP-SHARP AS YOU’D EXPECT FROM ITS NOBLE SCREENWRITER

In one of her strips, American cartoonist and out lesbian Alison Bechel claimed she had a rule about whether she’d watch a film or not. The film must: 1.

Feature at least two women

2.

Who talk to each other

3.

About something other than men

When selecting your slice of Tennessee Williams cinematic majesty this Glasgay!, do Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, indulge in The Glass Menagerie, and drink in Streetcar; but how about talking a chance on Boom!? Going down in history as one of the best failed art films ever made, and universally panned by its contemporary critics, Joseph Losey’s Boom! is an outrageous, hysterical, shrieking diva of a movie, and just so happens to be Tennessee Williams’ own pick of his works’ movie adaptations. OK, so he did write the screenplay himself, but his rather noteable seal of approval suggests that all of Boom!’s excess, all of its howling ridiculousness and inflated melodrama, is not only intentional but offered up to be relished. We may be supposed to be laughing.

It’s a far-fetched idea for anyone who loves film, but she has a valid point: screaming heterosexuality is the norm, and if films are gay, they’re much more likely to be about gay men. Of this year’s programme, Bechdel’s Rule can certainly claim The Chinese Botanist’s Daughter, which sounds fascinating: the story of a beautiful orphan, Li Min, who goes to live with a renowned botanist and his daughter. The two women fall in love, but the prospects of a lesbian relationship in early nineties rural China in is fraught with difficulty. For those of us happy to dispense with Bechdel’s Rule (surely most of us), Glasgay! not only includes a small but perfectly formed buffet of its own films: but also for one year only it proffers a gluttonous feast of films based on the plays of Tennessee Williams.

As a Burton and Taylor extravaganza, verbal sparring abounds: with she the richest woman in the world, he the Angel of Death, and playwright Noel Coward installed as a character known only as The Witch of Capri. An adaptation of Williams’ 1963 play, The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore, Boom! essentially tackles the standard Williams thematics of isolation and estrangement - but abstracted, in headdresses, and (if set reports are to be believed) very, very drunk.

Before we get on to discussing some of the Williams offerings, though, it’s worth noting that top of the bill for Glasgay!’s film programme must be Love and Other Disasters, directed by In Bed With Madonna’s Alex Kashishian. Starring Brittany Murphy as a would-be cupid, and the brilliant Matthew Rhys as her hapless gay flatmate, Disasters claims to be a ‘mo-ed up version of Love Actually. If Kashishian has managed to entice out anything of Rhys’s character Kevin in the TV series Brothers and Sisters, this could, potentially, rock. Breakfast with Scot seems weirdly reminiscent of eighties sitcom My Two Dads, except the ‘Dads’ in question are both straight laced – and openly gay. However, when Scot’s mum dies and her brother and partner take him in, they’re completely unprepared for the fact that he’s a show-tune loving little blazer in the making. Bette Davis’ centenary was commemorated at this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival, and it’s only right that the high-priestess of camp should be celebrated once again at Glasgay! The Anniversary is comedy at it’s blackest, with Davis doing what she did best: ripping unlucky women to shreds with her whiplash of a tongue (in this instance her unlucky son’s fiancées, a new one of which he brings home every year). Sex, sex and more hot, sweaty, beastly sex – you don’t need to see it to feel its presence, and the

Hailed by John Hairspray Waters as “the ultimate drag queen role”, Taylor alternates between dying swan and hissy fit throughout, downing shots and dressed in a staggering array of Tiziani costumes and Bulgari jewels (highlights of which include a frankly jaw-dropping ‘kabuki’ outfit at the half hour mark with a planet-sized headdress, and a set of pear-shaped white shades more befitting of space travel). For Sissy Goforth is a character who knows that blood transfusions are always best undertaken whilst wearing maribou feathers.

BOOM!

tensions, frustrations and passions of men and women sear out of every play Tennessee Williams wrote. It was his calling card, his signature, and it translates perfectly into celluloid. And it helps that these films attracted some of the sexiest stars of the fifties and sixties. The scorching heat of the Southern sun helps bring Paul Newman and Liz Taylor’s relationship to complete meltdown in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and no-one who’s had their heart rate quickened by the young Marlon Brando (frankly the sexiest brute ever to grace the silver screen) in A Streetcar Named Desire could ever forget it. The list of classics goes on. Michael Douglas’ dad

Kirk plays the ‘gentleman caller’ in the achingly sad Glass Menagerie, a tale of delusion, fragility and fractured family life. Then there’s John Houston’s The Night of the Iguana, featuring an unlikely Mexican church group if ever you saw one: defrocked Reverend Richard Burton, granddaughter Deborah Kerr and old flame Ava Gardner, waging desperate battles of will and morality. These are only the better known films in a season of fourteen, any one of which will be a revelation to those who haven’t experienced Williams’ witchcraft before. Bechdel’s Rule has its place. But in the words of the playwright himself, “I don’t want realism. I want magic!”

Boom! is a film about excess, decay, loneliness, and loss, with dialogue as whip-sharp as you’d expect from its noble screenwriter, all of which you’ll find in the majority of the Tennessee Williams adaptations rightfully being returned to the big screen. But Liz Taylor sharing a meal of sea monster with Noel Coward? That you’ll only find in Boom!. [Lindsay West] BOOM! IS SCREENED ON 25 OCTOBER AT THE FILMHOUSE IN EDINBURGH, AND ON 28 OCTOBER AT THE GFT FOR GLASGAY!.

DVD REVIEWS CHEMICAL WEDDING

THE OXFORD MURDERS

SMART PEOPLE

STARS: SIMON CALLOW, KAL WEBER, LUCY CUDDEN

STARS: ELIJAH WOOD, JOHN HURT, LEONOR WATLING

STARS: DENNIS QUAID, ELLEN PAGE, SARAH JESSICA PARKER

DIR: JULIAN DOYLE

DIR: ÁLEX DE LA IGLESIA

DIR: NOAM MURRO

OUT NOW, CERT 18

OUT NOW, CERT:15

OUT NOW, CERT 15

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If Wayne and Garth got the budget to make a film, they’d probably make Chemical Wedding. It’s dire beyond belief, but... cripplingly, cringingly funny in parts. Infamous British occultist Aleister Crowley is reincarnated in the body of a Cambridge don, liberating not only the long dead Crowley, but also letting loose lead actor Simon Callow’s inner, rapturous, eye-rolling ham. Callow’s clearly having a whale of a time, and who could blame him? He’s dark lord of all he surveys in a film which ticks every clichéed box in the book of metalhead wet dreams: suave hero, damsel in distress, super computers, pop physics, good versus eeevil, gore, orgies with deformed people, willy worship, drugs, boobies, jobbies, LOUD music and gallons of power-jet wee. Co-written by Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson (last seen flying hapless XL holidaymakers back to the UK), Chemical Wedding is unrepentantly bonkers and inappropriately hilarious. Watch with pals, a winebox, and an expression of slack-jawed astonishment. [Cara McGuigan]

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Fresh faced Elijah Wood and craggy chops John Hurt come head-tohead in this murder mystery set against Oxford’s academic world. Wood plays Martin, a keen-eyed American student who crosses the Atlantic for the tutorage of philosophy lecturer Arthur Seldom (Hurt). Study is put on hold though with the death of Martin’s landlady - the first victim of a serial killer who mixes murder with mathematical theory. Martin and Seldom join IQs to deduce the killer’s next move, clashing over egos and love interests along the way. The Oxford Murders plays out philosophical and mathematical theories Sophie’s World style, as each death tests Seldom’s denial of the possibility of truth with Martin’s belief in a fixed order of all things. More Midsummer Murders than Se7en, this is an enjoyable if dry mystery that would have benefited from some of the dark comedy of director Álex de la Iglesia’s previous films. [Alastair Roy]

University professor and widower Lawrence Wetherhold (Dennis Quaid) ekes out a self-centred existence, blind to his children’s problems and students’ questions. Work on his academic book ‘You Can’t Read’ is put on hold when step-brother slacker Chuck (Thomas Haden Church) floats into his life for a hand-out. Wetherhold is thrown out of his comfort zone by former student Janet Hartigan (Sarah Jessica Parker), whose incredible falling in love with the professor can only be explained in a montage from director Noam Murro. Daughter Vanessa (Juno’s Ellen Page) can’t get her head around the couple either, as she vies for her father’s attention by mimicking his intellectual swagger. If anything, Quaid and Page play their over-intellectual characters too well, sapping any audience sympathy for their plights. Haden Church is deployed for some Sideways-style light relief, and though Smart People doesn’t have the comic crackle of that film, it is refreshing in its avoidance of Holywood character transformations.[Alastair Roy]

FILM


Film & DVD

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October 08

THE SKINNY 23


GAMES Digital Distribution Comes Home

THE SKINNY'S GAMES CONTENT IS PROVIDED BY SQUARE-GO

DAVE COOK WONDERS IF NEW DIGITAL DISTRIBUTION SERVICES ARE THE FUTURE OF GAMING When Microsoft launched Live Arcade on Xbox 360, it initially appeared as a bit of a mystery. Cheap, downloadable games that could be stored on your hard drive certainly appeared to be a nice and convenient way of doing things, with the service boasting a mix of retro remakes and new, innovative titles. Hours could be wasted playing simple puzzle games you could pick up for a mere fiver. Had old-school gaming reached the renaissance it so dearly needed? Soon enough, the Wii hit the scene with its Virtual Console, giving gamers access to loads of classic titles, without having to scour the depths of eBay, and the PS3 arrived late to the party, giving us the nevertheless awesome Playstation Store. All three services proved to be fun and reliable, with secure credit card options and points systems (except Playstation Store) that meant anyone could buy a game from the comfort of their armchair with relative ease. So now the focus is once again on original content as all of these manufacturers offer download services for new games. Nintendo have added WiiWare as a ‘ying’ to Virtual Console’s ‘yang’, offering ‘original and exclusive’ titles. Microsoft are now well-versed in their Live Arcade service, following their superb ‘Summer of Arcade’ promotion, which featured one top quality title a

week during the month of August. These include Geometry Wars 2, Braid, Castle Crashers, Galaga Legions and Bionic Commando: Rearmed. Each of these games were highly impressive and injected some life into what some critics regarded as a failing format - naysayers be damned! The Playstation Network is building up a great catalogue of games too. Perhaps most notable are the offerings from developer PIXELJUNK, who constantly release insanely addictive and sensiblypriced games for your pleasure. Sony have gone one step further here, however, as they continue to release full next-generation titles for download. Recently, they have begun releasing episodic games, with new chapters coming out each week in the form of new levels. Each instalment is cheap and keeps you on your toes as to what will happen next. Through digital distribution, developers have finally found the perfect method of keeping retro games accessible. The Wii’s Virtual Console boasts over two hundred games from eight platforms, including Super Nintendo, Mega Drive, Commodore 64 and even the Japan and US-only Neo Geo console. Sony and Microsoft have jumped on this idea too and in addition to retro titles offer games from Playstation One, Two and the original Xbox all at rock-bottom prices. Something interesting has happened in today’s

BRAID, ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING OF RECENT RELEASES

market. Suddenly what was once old is fresh and interesting again, as young and veteran gamers alike have fun playing these once tired or forgotten relics. It’s not just consoles either, as the number of digital distribution services available on PCs continues to grow. Perhaps most notable is VALVE’s Steam service, which offers everything from simple puzzle games to full-blown retail releases. It was originally hoped that the lower production and reasonable, but still not cheap, distribution fees of these games would bring about a return to the bedroom coder days of the eighties. This golden

age saw talented people make great games at home and sell them to mates or anyone else willing to pick up a copy. However, that dream seems pretty far-fetched as the only people making these games at present tend to be smaller teams within big developers. However, never say never, as developers are coming round to the reality that these services allow teams to make low-investment, low-risk titles, which grants their creative minds the freedom to wander as they see fit, without worrying about whether or not their game will make a lot of money. A punk approach to games-authoring might be just what the public are craving.

REVIEWS PASS THE PIGS THQ

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Pass the Pigs takes a peculiar turn-based game as it’s foundation, coats it in a surreal RPG-ish shell with a wry script, and throws pigs in hats into the mix just for the hell of it.

SPORE

EA GAMES

rrrrr Spore begins on the microscopic level. You create a wee cell-like creature, decide whether it eats meat or plants, then set it free in primordial ooze. This first section is basically a tutorial. It takes you through controls (basic point and click), survival (keeping fed and avoiding predators), and teaches you the basics of customising your species. The tutorial manages to be light hearted and fun while still instilling a real sense of urgency to get your arse in gear and grow some legs. Once free of the cell stage, you enter the creature stage. This is where the majority of Spore’s meat comes from, as you crawl on to land and try to make a name for yourself. This is also where a lot of the game’s customization and species development comes into play. You decide how your animal will look, what it eats, and whether it’s a social creature or a xenophobic murder machine.

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OCTOBER 08

Next comes the tribal stage. This is where your species starts to shine. You found a village then branch out to meet others. How you deal with these other creatures is left up to you. You can overwhelm them with your grace and finesse, or just plain overwhelm them. After you dominate the other tribes (or befriend them, you pansy), you move to the civilization stage. You design and build your cities, manage them, and continue to expand.

The ‘Classic Mode’ has the player slamming oscillating plastic pigs against a table, hoping they’ll land in a certain way to earn points. Get to a hundred points before your computer opponent and you’ve won! Slam the pigs too hard, and you might get a ‘Pig Out’ - and lose all the points you’ve accumulated. Knowing when to pass your go and quit while you’re ahead is key, as what initially seems like random luck turns out to be a porky equivalent of a gambler’s coin-toss. It’s a fun little distraction, one that’s perfectly suited to mobile gaming. Games are quick, and with each milestone (ie 50 points in one toss) you’re awarded special moves, extra levels and um... a new hat for your porker.

The final stage of the game is the space stage. The idea is to create new colonies, make new friends and expand. Again you cannot appreciate the true scale here unless you experience it — the world map is an entire universe populated by other players. The effect is utterly breathtaking.

Things get even more bizarre in the story mode ‘A Pig’s Life’, which has the player guide a trotter from piglet to old-age. The Pig’s Life mode sees the player making life-choices between love and money, amidst a sea of pig-puns; do you fancy being a selfish pig, or a magnanimous do-gooder?

Spore is an excellent title. It seamlessly blends many game concepts into one beautiful masterpiece. Anyone can play Spore. This is a game you’ll play over and over, each time finding new and interesting avenues to explore. This one’s worth it. [Kieran McSherry]

So we guide our precious pig along his life between idealism and individualism, intermittently playing the main Pass the Pigs game to collect either money or numerical love, and it’s strangely compulsive. Actually, its better than that: it’s clever, simple and quick to delve into, and the myriad of bonus features add a surprising amount of depth to an excellent little mobile game. [Dave Allen]

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GAMES


Ever Had a Day Like This? THE SCOTTISH BOOK TRUST AND BBC SCOTLAND HAVE TEAMED UP FOR A PROJECT CALLED ‘DAYS LIKE THIS’, INVITING MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC TO SUBMIT A STORY ABOUT A DAY THAT WAS SOMEHOW IMPORTANT IN THEIR LIVES. KEIR HIND FINDS OUT MORE. Here’s one from the department of phenomenally good ideas: The Scottish Book Trust and BBC Scotland have teamed up for a project called ‘Days Like This’, inviting members of the public - yes, that means you and me - to submit a story about a day, any day, that was somehow important in their lives. Grandly put, it’ll produce a body of writing showing what Scottish life has been like in living memory. So the plan is to get as large and diverse a selection of the public as possible to contribute, and there are a fair number of stories already up on the Book Trust’s website. All of the stories that are accepted (and they’re of a pretty high standard too) are hosted there, where they’ll all be judged by a celebrity panel (see picture). This fine mob will then select stories to be read on the radio, which will be followed by a book putting the best stories in print.

IRVINE WELSH PROVIDES TIPS FOR SCOTLAND’S BUDDING WRITERS

The idea was inspired by a project in America. Author Paul Auster asked listeners to National Public Radio’s All Things Considered programme to submit true stories which he’d then read on the air. Over the course of a year, he received over 4000. Recognising a good thing, he collected 179 of the best into a book, True Tales Of American Life, available in good bookshops everywhere

folks. Reviews were laudatory and, all things considered, the project was a fantastic success. The Days Like This project is following much the same plan as Auster was, with its own ground rules. Here, the story must be true, it must be less than 1000 words, and it must, obviously, be over the course of one day. If you fancy submitting, please do so – submissions will be open until 1 November. But before you start, please remember that there’s over 250 stories (at time of going to print) already on The Scottish Book Trust’s website, and reading a few is advisable before you begin your own. The Celebrity Panel have all submitted their stories – my favourite of which is Roddy Woomble’s, about his pet brick – and BBC Scotland presenters are submitting their stories too. But the real interest is in seeing what people you’ve never met write about. It’s fascinating to see what they choose to put on cyber-paper. Some people write about meeting their partners. One man wrote about the start of Queen of the South’s cup run last year, when they beat Peterhead 5-0. Lots of people, of all ages, write about their childhood, so much so that it’s one of the values of the website that it documents changes in the way folk grow up in

Scotland. Some are happy and, of course, some aren’t. One in particular begins “My mother unlocked the door and freed me from the attic…”. Don’t know what to write about? That’s okay, there’s tips on the website from Irvine Welsh about how to jog your memory to make a start, and then about how best to write down your story. It’s maybe a little daunting to put part of your life on show to the nation, but remember, it’s your tale, and you get to tell it your way. Odds are, if you’ve read this far, you’ve wondered what you’d write about. Am I right? Maybe you didn’t consider actually submitting your story, but think about it. It’s a challenge, and it can be all your own creation. At the very least it’s a talking point. And just think of the way that you could influence your audience. Basically, I just think this is a brilliant project. So… interested?

YOU CAN READ SUBMITTED STORIES, AND EVEN SUBMIT YOUR OWN, AT: WWW.SCOTTISHBOOKTRUST.COM. GUIDELINES CAN BE FOUND ON THE WEBSITE, AND THE DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS 1 NOVEMBER. WWW.SCOTTISHBOOKTRUST.COM

REVIEWS THE GARGOYLE ANDREW DAVIDSON

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HOMICIDE: A YEAR ON THE KILLING STREETS DAVID SIMON

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INDIGNATION PHILIP ROTH

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The Gargoyle is a contemporary gothic love story, made like a mosaic from pieces of fairytales and love stories from the ages. An epic debut by Andrew Davidson, the story is related by a nameless narrator who, prior to being burnt beyond recognition in a hellish fire, was a beautiful, drug addicted porn star. As he (yes, he) recuperates in a burn ward, he is visited by a mental patient, Marianne, who tells him stories, one of which is the story of star crossed lovers in medieval Germany, a story of their shared past life, their love. While he remains sceptical to her claims, he nonetheless falls in love and their contemporary story begins to parallel their medieval story, continuing where their first story could not. As he recounts her tales, the contemporary story gains momentum in the background, and though it’s piecemeal, the final effect is seamless. Davidson’s writing captivates from page one, with the harrowing burn process followed by the medical savvy with which he details life in the burn ward, but it is his love stories which are his trump. Some questions are left hanging, but given the conviction with which Davidson writes, they can be left quite safely. [Renee Rowland]

Wire fans, this is where it all began. David Simon, who (if you don’t know) is the creator of The Wire, was once a journalist for the Baltimore Sun. He was a crime reporter for years before taking a leave of absence to follow the Baltimore police for a year. This book was the result, and when it was first released it sold, in Simon’s words, “about 11 copies” in the UK. Slightly higher, actually, but not by much. But somehow it’s survived to be reprinted (a succesful HBO series helped) and it’s a pleasure to read. The book, like The Wire, follows a large number of characters, but unlike The Wire, it’s focused on the lives of the police almost exclusively. The TV show has a wider scale, examining society and the system the police work within. Here we are seeing things, as the title suggests, mostly from street level. That’s not an easy angle – there were over two hundred murders in Baltimore that year, and we’re plunged into the sort of situation that creates that figure in this book. Yet it’s a fascinating, and somehow still humane book. Watch the 650 pages disappear as you race through it. [David Agnew]

Philip Roth’s latest book seems to return to themes in his first, Goodbye Columbus. Columbus dealt with the problems society’s restrictions caused a young man in late 50s America, and Indignation deals, broadly, with the same theme in early 50s America. It’s narrated in flashback by Marcus Messner, a Jew from Newark in New Jersey (much like Philip Roth) who goes to study in Winesburg College, Ohio. He’s fleeing an over-protective father who is terrified that Marcus will be sent to his death in Korea. College means exemption from the draft, and so it’s vital that Marcus stays there. But though he’s an almost embarrasing over-achiever academically, his social life in the college conspires against him, with the Dean of Students expressing concern over minor problems like his changing dorm rooms twice. The fuss over such problems inevitably causes them to escalate – but there’s a few narrative twists here too, which dramatically change the way this book reads. It’s a short book, but it’s all the more powerful for being short, like Roth’s second-to-last book Everyman. And like that book, it has an obsession with death… It’s a retread of some familiar Rothian themes, but it’s a fantastically well written book nonetheless. [Keir Hind]

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OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 25

BOOKS

BOOKS


THEATRE EDITORIAL In last month’s editorial, I suggested that while performance might not be damaging to the social structure, it is, at best, morally neutral. This position could be seen to undermine the purpose of art - after all, if it is just pretty shapes and sounds and movements, how can it be taken seriously? If it makes no impact, what's the point? Fortunately, many performers disagree with me, and much of this month’s work has explicit intentions. Glasgay! has always had a political edge and its imaginative programming is both a testament to queer visibility and the possibilities of engaged aesthetics. Over at the Traverse, two new plays bid for contemporary relevance. Cockroach exposes the social implications of Darwinism while Midsummer, by David Greig, is a fragmented modern romance. And returning to the revitalised Tron, The Quiz Show merges quiz night and live art, as the host - there really is a quiz - hopes to involve his audience in a game show that will hide his increasingly chaotic emotional life. As the recent Arches Live! season demonstrated, actors and dancers are still looking to provoke and entertain. Sometimes this can be formal - a quick subversion of a genre’s clichés or the intrusion of some crass audience participation - other times emotional. My personal love for Belgian work is based on the almost relentless exploration of the unspoken and the excluded, which is always delivered with profound compassion and energy. Arches Live! proved that Scotland does have young artists who are willing to respond to this challenge.

TOP 5 EVENTS THE EMOTIONAL LIFE OF FURNITURE

LITTLE THEATRE, DUNDEE (8 OCT) AND THE TRON (10-12 OCT) Part of the mental health arts festival, this one sees a performance artist infiltrate a psychiatric ward as part of their practice. An interesting idea that will hopefully explore the space bewteen artistic representations of madness, the allure of psychosis for cutting-edge performers and the grim meat-hook reality of psychiatric institutions.

AN IDEAL HUSBAND

HIS MAJESTY'S, ABERDEEN 13-18 OCT Peter Hall directs Kate O'Mara. West End style, sumptous production, top names: very different from The Skinny's usual enthusiasms but both popular and classy.

ROMEO AND JULIET

THEATRE ROYAL, GLASGOW 28 OCT- 1 NOV There is too much Shakespeare on the stage - at least of the popular plays. The RSC ought to be able to find something original- or at least ensure crafted performances.

THE GREAT CONCERTOS: OSBOURNE PLAYS BRAHMS EFT (17 OCT)

The RSNO are offering bargain tickets to under 25s: this triple bill includes the second piano concerto by the late and austere romantic.

THE PERSECUTION & ASSASSINATION OF JEAN PAUL MARAT TRAMWAY, 23-35 OCT

Theatre Workshop are always value for money: this is another work with Nabil Shaban, a performer who is always willing to strike out for the most extreme heights of scripted theatre. Expect revolution, bloodshed and theatrical trickery.

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OCTOBER 08

The New and the Nuanced GLASGOW STRIKES AGAIN WITH ANOTHER FESTIVAL. GARETH K VILE MEETS UP WITH GLASGAY! DIRECTOR STEVEN THOMSON TO TALK ABOUT ITS EXCITING THEATRE PROGRAMME Glasgay! has flickered across Glasgow’s venues and galleries with increasing vigour and accessibility over the past five years, and under the cunning direction of Steven Thomson it has bridged the gap between the underground and the mainstream to great effect. This year it offers an additional festival within the festival - a celebration of Tennessee Williams which exposes the dramatist’s most personal works alongside some of his more celebrated plays. Aside from the film season, The Tron is presenting Andy Arnold’s direction of Suddenly Last Summer, along with three short early pieces; there are also four works, only recently published, that examine the writer’s sexuality and anxieties. Steven Thomson decided to produce these only after some initial reservations. “The New York publisher came to Glasgow and sought me out. He told me that the plays were going to be published, and would I be interested in producing them? At the time I thought - Tennessee Williams - who can be bothered?” After all, Williams is an American classic, familiar from school and cinema. “But when I read them, I thought - wow!” Thomson noticed a modern note in the plays that seemed absent from his established canon. “I came across this anecdote in his memoirs - when they came out, the press slated him, because he was regaling us with stories of his sordid past. He was walking down seventh avenue - late 70s and he bumps into a young red-headed southern boy and within about two seconds Tennessee had decided to take him home - because his name was Tom Williams. And that was the depth of his decision making. I thought: there is the contemporary angle. There is the choice that we make, that whole flightiness, that we make those stupid decisions which could be the best or worst thing that could happen to us.” The four plays - The Parade, And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens, The Chalky White Substance and The Municipal Abattoir lack, as Thomson makes clear, that full Southern, steamy feel. They are much more subtle dramas, more interpersonal dramas. They are like scenes from your own life. They could be stories set at any time.” Echoes of Williams’ life can be heard throughout these stories. “The gay characters are not made to be victims, they are all fairly well and upstanding. They are questioning whether they can be accepted for who they are, as Tennessee himself was not accepted - and he attracted fairly violent lovers. Here is a story other than the classic fey male with the overbearing mother: he

AN OCEAN OF RAIN

invests them with so much more identity.” The Parade, as just one example, hints at Williams’ early affair with Joe Hazan. Outside of the Williams Festival, Glasgay! is holding up its reputation for engaging new work. “The real shift in direction is that we are considered a production company”, Thomson acknowledges. “Rather than doing one big production, we can spread our funding across new artists - we are no longer a festival that puts on outside work: we are building a network with local artists and new writing.” Highlights to look forward to in this category are likely to include the effervescent company Cryptic’s take-over of the Tramway with An Ocean of Rain, a timely meditation on love, sex tourism and violent weather. Meanwhile, the traditionally fascinating Boutique season at the Q! Gallery has studies of childhood abuse (To Kill a Kelpie) and French literary stardom (Colette). Uniquely, Glasgay! offers treats for the subversive and the populist. Tramway audiences will recognise Pacitti Company - who are able to generate an almost sacred intensity and intimacy - while Arnold’s Suddenly Last Summer is likely to attract audiences that haven’t even heard of Glasgay! This is what makes Glasgay! so impressive - it represents the range of Glasgow’s theatre, and includes the extremes. On these terms, the decision to include a second festival makes perfect sense: it appeals to the mainstream, but also sheds new light on an established - and perhaps over-familiar artist. The depth and detail afforded to Williams has

PARADE

not excluded the expected performances, and the commitment to local directors and performers has obviously been recognised in the respect of funding bodies. Thomson is delighted to boast that Glasgay! has secured support for the future, and that he is able to plot future years: his enthusiasm is contagious. “The great thing is to get a coup like this! No-one else is doing it. There are four Williams festivals this year - we are the only one outside of the US. It is a really strong programme, the culmination of five years’ work!” GLASGAY! RUNS 1 OCT - 9 NOV WWW.GLASGAY.COM

STEVEN THOMSON ON HIS KEY PLAYS And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens presents this young gay man who is a fashionable boutique owner, who also owns property. He is kind of obsessed with straight men, and he meets a sailor looking for a meal ticket, who becomes quite interested in him. This was written around the time that Williams with hanging out with Warhol - the name of the character is based on Candy Darling. He calls her an ageing drag queen - she’s 35! He picks up the sailor, washes him, dresses him and they slowly become fascinated by each other’s sexuality.

The Parade was written in 1940. It is almost prophetic - he creates a character, an ageing playwright, a New York hack who is wondering how to revivify his career. A lesbian friend comes along and says there is this lovely young choreographer you should date: but the choreographer is having none of it. It’s a bit of a dance of the seven veils: as the friend is trying to get them into bed together, the playwright is concerned about the appropriateness of the relationship. It was written while he was fairly young, but was already worrying whether his relationships were appropriate.

Cryptic - behind new work An Ocean of Rain - is the brand name for the productions of Glasgowbased maverick Cathie Boyd. Having brought together choreographer Ben Duke, video artist Julia Bardsley, Ensemble Mae, writer Daniel Danis and composer Yannis Kyriakides, she unleashes a story of life and death, set in Haiti and threatened by the rising sea. Boyd is known for her lavish sets, powerful collisions between genres and adept manipulation of multiple media - as well as her cunning choice of collaborators. Tramway is the perfect venue for Cryptic: it is one of the few spaces monumental enough to contain their vision.

THEATRE


Theatre

Something Exciting this Way Comes Michael Cox seeks out the evil that children will love.

Catherine Wheels Theatre Company is attempting what many thought Disney failed to achieve two decades ago: to successfully bring the novel Something Wicked This Way Comes to life. Directed by Gill Robertson, artistic head of Catherine Wheels, and co-produced with the National Theatre of Scotland, Something Wicked is an ambitious production that is aimed at families with children over the age of nine. Originally published in 1962 by American writer Ray Bradbury, Something Wicked tells the story of two boys, both nearing the age of 14, who find adventure and peril when a travelling carnival comes to town. Led by the sinister Mr Dark, the carnival lures people with magical promises that come with heavy and frightening consequences. With its good vs. evil premise, the story mixes aspects of horror and fantasy with themes of friendship, maturity and father-son dynamics. “It’s a fantastic rites-of-passage novel,” says Robertson, who read the novel 15 years ago and instantly fell in love with it. “It’s a great kids book, but it’s also a great adults book.” Carnivals are a recurring theme in Bradbury’s work, as he credits a childhood experience with a carnival attraction as being the driving force behind his becoming a writer. It was also his desire to work with cinema legend Gene Kelly that led to the story’s creation. Bradbury wanted Kelly to film a short story he’d written called ‘The Dark Carnival’. Kelly reportedly had keen interest but could not secure the needed funding. Instead of being deterred, Bradbury expanded the concept into a novel. Bradbury himself adapted the script which Robertson is now using. “It’s a script that’s close to his heart,” Robertson said. Indeed, when the play premiered in Los Angeles through his own theatre company, it was Bradbury who performed the play’s prologue. Although unable to travel to Scotland, he remains in touch with Robertson,

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offering edits and cuts that maintain some of the story’s philosophical debates while primarily focusing on the adventure tale. Robertson speaks candidly about some of her influences for this production, most notably the recent National Theatre family shows staged in London, which she declared “some of the best nights I’ve had in the theatre”. She enjoyed directing The Wizard of Oz at the Lyceum last year and now wants to challenge herself further. Robertson hopes to successfully stage “some of the things that really are unstageable” from the book by using such grand theatrics as live music, masks, film, choreography and complicated aerial acrobatics. Also key are the magical carousel and mirror maze, without which the production wouldn’t work. Robertson acknowledges that, without NTS’s backing, the production would have been too ambitious for Catherine Wheels alone to accomplish. “I think people will come along… and not know what to expect. It’s wild, really.” Robertson is keen for quality family productions to be performed throughout the year, and not just at Christmas. She also hopes that the production will appeal to and entertain everyone. “I think it will be a really good night out. That’s what I’m hoping.” Something Wicked This Way Comes - performances: Byre Theatre, St Andrews, 27 Sep Dundee Rep Theatre, 1 Oct - 4 Oct Macrobert Arts Centre, Stirling, 7 Oct Eden Court, Inverness, 11 Oct Royal Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh, 15 - 18 Oct Tramway, Glasgow, 29 Oct - 1 Nov www.tramway.org www.byretheatre.com www.dundeereptheatre.co.uk www.macrobert.stir.ac.uk www.eden-court.co.uk

October 08

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Previews

Delicate and Beautiful: Needcompany’s Porcelain Project Tramway, 3 - 4 Oct 2008

I saw Needcompany’s Isabella’s Room two years ago. They had the best part of an anthropological museum on stage and unfolded a story that spanned the twentieth century, post-colonialism, the joys and pains of aging, mortality and parenthood, wrapped in a compassionate humanism with a catchy theme tune. In turn, new production The Porcelain Project is quirky and achingly moving, using experimentation as an expressway to the audience’s hearts and minds. Needcompany have a special relationship with Tramway. Grace Ellen Barkey, choreographer and co-founder, suggests that “as a place where visual art, performances and workshops take place, Tramway has an energy that is close to the energy of Needcompany.” Their work captures the qualities associated with the Southside space - it challenges boundaries, blurs genre and uses multiple media. This radicalism is their foundation. Barkey continues, “Our dream was to create a space where artists can meet and work together or separately in performances and visual art. Art has to redefine itself always: by offering time and opportunity

we create freedom for the artists.” This Project’s genesis is idiosyncratic. “It started with a porcelain installation by Lemm & Barkey. A sort of puppet theatre with porcelain objects on strings. We pulled the strings and the porcelain became alive.” From gallery exhibitions, “we enlarged and it became a world on his own.” Barkey has resisted the wretched realism that passes for energy in many modern productions, realising a utopian vision that hopes to inspire the audience.

The Porcelain Project will entertain and provoke, be idealistic and break hearts. With Victoria, C de la B and the whole Frans Brood stable, Belgian theatre has claimed the aesthetic high-ground for twenty years, infusing the stage with warmth and vibrant spirituality. In an isolating world lurching towards relentless individualism, you need Needcompany. [Gareth K Vile] 8.00pm, Tramway 1, £10/£6 www.tramway.org www.needcompany.org

Light Falling: Janis Claxton Traverse, 17 - 18 Oct 2008

“Elegant, lyrical, musical, earthy, gutsy, sensuous, visceral, with a definite tinge of classicism”; this is how Janis Claxton defines her choreographic style. With such a delicious description of her dance, audiences will be drawn to watch Falling Light, opening this month at the Traverse Theatre. Comprising three works set to Bach, Gorecki and a contemporary piece by the Australian ensemble Waratah, Claxton and her cast of international dancers will also be joined by the Edinburgh String Quartet, who will be accompanying them live each night. Those who enjoyed Enclosure 44 – Humans at the Edinburgh Fringe can expect a more structured dance show. And, of course, one performed at a theatre rather than a zoo. Claxton is excited to be performing at the Traverse. “It’s wonderful to be premiering at such a fantastic venue in Edinburgh; the Traverse is a great venue for dance.” While very different to Enclosure 44, the new piece set to Bach Partita no. 2 still shares its genesis with the former: “it originated with my research at Edinburgh Zoo and the relationship of human to animal gesture and play” says Claxton. “I’m interested in the formality of the music and the formal structures that humans exist within, how these

relate (or not) to the animal kingdom and how these structures remain and disintegrate as the human animal emerges”.

Falling Light also sees the return of Claxton’s acclaimed piece Rinne. She describes this piece as “an extremely precise musical work that requires an intense physical and mental stamina and is very uplifting to observe… The dancers seem to ‘sing’ the music with their bodies”. Claxton explains that Gorecki’s String Quartet no. 3 was the inspiration for her third piece Songs Are Sung. “This is an exquisite score which embodies the agony and ecstasy of the human condition in almost every note. It’s richly layered, deeply textured and emotionally compelling.” Claxton promises the “piece will be full of juicy, luscious fully-felt dancing”. With such dance and Gorecki’s music played live, it’s a premiere definitely worth checking out. [Susannah Radford] 8.00pm, Fri 17 Oct, £8/£5 8.00pm, Sat 18 Oct, £8/£5 if bought before 11 Oct, various prices thereafter www.traverse.co.uk www.janisclaxton.com

reviews

MacBeth Royal Lyceum Theatre, run ended

Scottish Ballet, We Dance to Radiohead Too

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There are no bells and whistles in Macbeth, opening this season of Edinburgh’s Lyceum Theatre. There are no clever tricks, no contemporary adaptations, no Brooklyn accents or tasers. It is a sincere production prioritizing the elements so intrinsically crucial to a successful performance of Shakespeare, yet so often buried: talent… and words.

Scottish Ballet pulled out all the stops in their Autumn triple bill, enrolling the best in choreography, music and costume. Opening the show was Steven Petriono’s Ride the Beast : dancers thrashed onto the stage, inviting the audience to, unusually, rock out to the music of Radiohead. Costumes were provided by Benjamin Cho, a mix of metallic hotpants, tassles, tails and Cho’s renowned woven intricacy, with bursts of bright colour; the dancers sprung and soared across the stage like birds. The music and dance grew in intensity as the piece progressed, climaxing to The National Anthem (Radiohead tune, low on pomp and circumstance). The whole thing was extremely cool: full of precision, detail, energy and delicacy, and to an imaginative soundtrack.

Liam Brennan’s performance as Macbeth is breathtaking, as he brings the audience inside the mind of a very real, tortured man. Brennan’s interpretation of the role places his Macbeth in a struggle between Hamlet and Richard III : he fluctuates between anguished self-reflection and numb absence, humility and ambition. Brennan moves gracefully through the character’s contradictions as we witness his journey from a loyal soldier to a murderous tyrant. While Allison McKenzie’s Lady M perhaps lacks the complexity that the character demands, the scenes between her and Brennan are charged and compelling. The entire cast is very strong, with highlight performances by Martin Ledwith as Banquo and Christo-

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October 08

Theatre Royal, run ended

DOUGLAS MCBRIDE

pher Brand as Macduff. Jimmy Chisholm bestows a welcome moment of levity and humour with his role as the Porter, and in the briefest of scenes, Claire Brown as Lady Macduff, charms enough to make the audience grieve her subsequent absence. Director Lucy Pitman-Wallace has clearly imparted her own deep understanding of the text onto everyone involved, and creates a well-paced and moving performance of Shakespeare’s dark and bloody tale. The ambiguously classical setting, realized through simple yet haunting costumes and set, allow the language to reach forward in its relevance and poignancy. [Melissa Trachtenberg]

twisted like lost, sexless souls. The finale was the world premier of Pennies from

Heaven, an upbeat, nostalgic depiction of love and glamour, set in a 1920’s dancehall. Fastpaced and fun, with tongue-in-cheek humour and complete silliness at times. A visual, vintage treat of tailcoats and pearls, sailors, bellboys and a singing quartet of cowboys to finish, set against a digital, changing backdrop. A fantastically fun way to close the show, and perhaps a happy medium between the two acts that preceded it. Scottish Ballet has produced an eclectic mix that challenges in terms of music, costume and dance. The dancers were stretched to their absolute

Second on was MG: The Movie, by acclaimed choreographer Trisha Brown. The piece contrasted hugely against Ride the Beast : nude costumes, subtle movements and slow paced, trickling music, interlaced with gunshots, rattles and screams. It had an unsettling atmosphere, the audience both recoiled and drawn in, as the dancers wove and

capacities, as was the audience at times, who witnessed an array of visuals, emotions and tastes. This will hopefully ensure a widened audience for the Scottish Ballet, and is certainly a leap in the right direction. [Mhairi Graham] www.scottishballet.co.uk

Theatre


Theatre

Comedy Elizabeth and Raleigh: Late But Live Eden Court Theatre, 26 Oct 2008 Here’s one especially for the Highlanders: hit Edinburgh Fringe show Elizabeth and Raleigh: Late But Live is currently on tour around the UK, with a Scottish date at Eden Court, Inverness on Sunday 26 October.

Elizabeth and Raleigh is the second in a series of the Late But Live format (let’s hope for more), which brings historical figures hurtling into the modern day with the cunning aid of Microsoft Powerpoint. Hurling a further two centuries back form their previous show, Johnson and Boswell, Elizabeth and Raleigh features the perfect balance of tights, wigs, and mashed potato. Written by Stewart Lee and starring Miles Jupp and Simon Munnery, this is the distilled essence of some of the finest talent in 21st century comedy, performing a xenophobic cross dressing riot of 16th century history. With four and five star reviews coming out of their breeches for the Fringe run at the Udderbelly ( Three Weeks called it ‘pure showmanship and brilliant entertainment.’), there can be no excuse for missing this show as it heads north.

On the very day the clocks go back and signal in the dreary dark winters on the banks on the river Ness, what could cheer you more than this gloriously silly comedy – and the sight of an Englishman, in boxers, with his head on the block? [Lizzie Cass-Maran]

www.eden-court.co.uk www.latebutlive.com

October Comedy Highlights

emma pollock Brendan Burns? I don’t know why a drunken Aussie such a speciality in the UK when there are thousands of them in Australia. He’s not even attractive, but maybe you got a ticket to his special gig at The Stand last month and actually found the usual pile of slurry bollocks that comes out of a drunken Aussie’s mouth funny. Good job you. Do it again at the Lemon Tree, Aberdeen on 3 October at 8pm. Tim Minchin is another Aussie, he - like Burns - also has particularly bad hair. Minchin also has a gig at the Lemon Tree, Aberdeen on 23 October: he’ll probably make you laugh and set you back about £15, though don’t worry about coming home with

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an empty wallet as the Lemon Tree are brewing up their own funny ha-has by closing the bar when the gig starts. What the fuck?! If you don’t manage to keep it down up north, The Stand in Edinburgh hosts The Wicked Wenches, consisting of Sarah Millican, A L Kennedy, Maureen Younger and Susan Calman. It’s on 7 & 8 October from 8.30pm and they’ll be harvesting giggles for around £5. If you don’t fancy girls try the male and gorgeous Danny Bhoy on 17 October at the Rep Theatre, Dundee. Guaranteed to give your granny the fanny-gallops and a laugh, he also has great hair, and face. [Penny Green]

A D EM

t o r o c o to roc

Fri 7 Nov 7.30pm Carnegie Hall, East Port, Dunfermline KY12 7JA Tickets £7.50 01383 602302 www.attfife.org.uk All tickets available from www.ticketweb.co.uk

Scottish Charity no: SCO38704

To Rococco Rot + Laki Mera Wed Nov 5 Aberdeen The Tunnels promoted by IMP and Thur 6 Nov Glasgow nice n sleazy promoted by PCL October 08

THE SKINNY 29


ART EDITORIAL

Sorcha Dallas:

I was in Paris for a couple of days last month, having a bit of a moment in front of some Monets. I seem to have become a bit cuttingedge-contemporary of slant of late, so it was a pleasant change to go to a city where the art is the art of art history, where the works have been granted well beyond the minimum thirty years’ lapse required for objective analysis.

AS SORCHA DALLAS PREPARES TO TAKE HER WARES TO THE FRIEZE ART FAIR, ROSAMUND WEST CATCHES UP WITH HER TO TALK ARTISTS’ REPRESENTATION, COMMERCIAL GALLERIES AND THE GLASGOW SCHOOL.

So, Monet. I’m quite ambivalent about him as a rule. His paintings have been reproduced on so many chocolate boxes, rulers, T-shirts, etc, they’ve become as culturally dislocated as a Vettriano, and as over-exposed as Britney’s ass. But his vast waterlily canvasses, the ones that hang in the Orangerie in Paris, were the first artworks to truly astound me, at the tender age of ten, and indeed the first I ever wrote about (in a What I Did On Holiday essay. My P7 teacher was most impressed, my mother astonished to discover I had actually looked at the canvases in between scowling in entrenched pre-teen angst). Seeing them again, I was surprised to be again astounded, and oddly exhilarated. Looking at them in the hindsight of a century’s subsequent art, a narrative seems to emerge. Close up, they’re like abstraction’s missing link; the intensity of the pigments, in particular the blues, makes me understand why Yves Klein patented International Klein Blue; their vast scale, the immersive effect they create, the light of the room suffused with a reflected pale blue – is this hanging an installation? Such a powerful effect, from works I’d dismissed from years of looking at reproductions. The moral of this story? You can’t really experience an artwork without going to see it. Eyes and minds open, people. /Ros

TOP 5 EVENTS 1. KILL YOUR TIMID NOTION DCA, DUNDEE TIL 12 OCT

Art, music, film, trampolining... An extravagant series of events and screenings all concentrated into the weekend of 10 – 12 October. I normally only like free things, but there’s too much here to miss.

2. NEVILLE RAE

SIERRA METRO, 22 WEST HARBOUR RD, EDINBURGH 11 OCT – 1 NOV

A new space, a new gallery outwith the confines of the city centre, the offer of sculptures of armless sailors... Surely demands the trip to the seaside.

3. ALEX FROST

COMPASSION FATIGUE

SORCHA DALLAS, GLASGOW, 11 OCT – 15 NOV

New artworks derived from the raided medicine cabinet.

4. LILA DE MAGALHAES

NEW WORK SCOTLAND PROGRAMME COLLECTIVE GALLERY, EDINBURGH 27 SEP – 25 OCT

2008’s programme kicks off with the first solo show from the video artist. Expect dark humour emerging from the everyday.

5. LITTLEWHITEHEAD

NOTHING EVER HAPPENS HERE SWG3, GLASGOW 3 – 5 OCT

Bespoke sculpture with a performative element from the Glasgow-based duo currently exhibiting in the Bloomberg New Contemporaries in Liverpool.

30 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

A Post-Graduate Survival Guide Part II Firstly I’d like to ask you about how you got here, what the steps were that you took to own your own commercial gallery just a decade after leaving art school? Well, I graduated from drawing and painting at Glasgow 10 years ago, and about six months later set up Switchspace with another graduate, Marianne Greated. We were both really interested in using non-traditional spaces for exhibitions, so it was conceived as a nomadic project. Back then things weren’t really happening in Glasgow in the same way they are now. Starting it up in my flat was quite easy: we didn’t have to rent the space, costs were kept to a minimum. But it was difficult in terms of funding; we didn’t get funding up until the final year because the Arts Council at the time had 2 categories: either you were a permanent gallery like Transmission, or you did a one-off project. They couldn’t understand a permanent gallery being nomadic, continually doing one-off projects. So we didn’t get the funding, which was in some ways difficult, but in others gave us the freedom of not having to conform to anything. So, after Switchspace you decided to create a space with more permanence? Yes. I did Switchspace for six years, and then towards the last year and a half of it I was thinking about opening a permanent space. It felt like a good time to end it: other initiatives like Mary Mary had started, and I think it’s important to hand those things over, leave them to other people to develop. As a commercial gallery, you provide both exhibiting space and artists’ representation. How did you select the artists you wanted to work with? I think it grew quite organically. Initially, there had been three artists I’d worked with on Switchspace who’d really inspired me to start a commercial venture. They were all quite different, but all really fascinating, dedicated artists in their own right. There was Henry Coombes, Craig Mulholland, and Alex Frost. I’d also seen and loved Kate Davis’ and Clare Stephenson’s work. So we started out with five artists, and it quickly expanded so that now I have fifteen, which is

KATE DAVIS’ OUTSIDER (TO REFLECT MY) @ SORCHA DALLAS GALLERY

probably about enough for this size of operation. When you were selecting the additional artists, were you actively going out on a talent spotting mission, touring the degree shows and so on? No, no. Not at all. I think it’s really important to develop the relationship slowly, to make sure you understand one another, and basically get on as people. It’s not just about liking someone’s work, you have to know you can work with them. Representation is a long term commitment, you have to like each other.

While selling the work is important, I also try to help the artists get exhibitions, get residencies. It’s almost like sitting down and figuring out what it is they want to do, and ways in which I can support them. So, was this all part of a long term plan? No, when we started out we had about 3 shows booked, and the thinking was: ‘let’s give it a go, if it works and people like it then good, if not we haven’t lost anything’. Then we did them and there was this sense in the wider community of people wanting it to keep going, and so it grew into what it was. And then kept growing.

What exactly does representation entail? Essentially the main way I work is to try and create exhibiting, commissioning, purchasing opportunities with the people I work with. On the local level there isn’t a large market for contemporary art, so from the start I’ve been going to international art fairs, maybe 5 or 6 a year.

SORCHA DALLAS WILL BE AT FRIEZE ART FAIR, LONDON WITH KATE DAVIS, FIONA JARDINE, ALASDAIR GRAY, ALAN MICHAEL, HENRY COOMBES, ALEX FROST, CRAIG MULHOLLAND, 15 –19 OCT COMING UP: ALEX FROST - COMPASSION FATIGUE SORCHA DALLAS, 11 OCT – 15 NOV WWW.SORCHADALLAS.COM

REVIEW

KATE DAVIS @ SORCHA DALLAS 23 AUG - 27 SEP 2008 rrrr A series of framed drawings runs across the two rooms of Sorcha Dallas gallery. In the first, a magazine page ground into gravel by a passing tyre, the words “I want” outlined upon the top, backwards. On the other side of the room stands a glass-fronted box in which lie certain objects belonging to the artist. Walking into the other room, three more drawings, similarly pencil drawn and framed, accumulate to form the artist’s statement. The prior “I want” and now “everything I make”, “to reflect my”, “whole life”. In these reversed statements of drawing-text-drawing Davis succinctly encapsulates the latent narcissism of the artistic endeavour, and throws open a dialogue

on the inclusion and reflection of self (intellectual and corporeal) in her own work, and, by extension, in that of all artists. It is teasing to come upon this statement of intent latterly, after an inspection of the first vitrine has caused the unconscious mental analysis of her belongings – clothes, utensils, books, CDs – all acting as signifiers to be automatically assessed and judged to deduce personality, character and, ultimately, essentially, compatibility with the observer. A life in this consumer age becomes the accumulation of stuff, the assumed intellectual choices behind the selection of possessions now standing for as much as did previously a personal philosophy, moral code or indeed faith. We see a hand blender – she makes her own soup?

Second hand books – she values the content over the caché? Multivitamins, but not a known brand – she buys into the legend of healthy living, yet is unswayed by brand advertising? I see her, I see her now... In all, Davis creates an intriguing, meditative show, complemented by the Gi-commissioned publication of a dialogue between her and the grande dame of feminist art, Faith Wilding. She aims to ask more questions than she answers, and this she does, challenging in ways which last long after you’ve exited the gallery doors. [Rosamund West] WWW.SORCHADALLAS.COM

ART


Art

pReviews Neville Rae @ Sierra Metro 10 Oct - 1 Nov 08

2008 is starting to feel like a year of new beginnings in Edinburgh’s art world. First The Embassy were cruelly evicted from their gallery (to make way for some rather more profitable studio spaces, if rumours are to be believed); then we had the launch of the new Ingleby, raising the bar on what it is to be commercial in this city; and now we are treated to the launch of Sierra Metro, a new exhibiting space with plans to be commercially viable located out on the periphery, in the old Lighthouse Studios in Granton. Started by new curating partnership Martin Minton and Janine Sproule, Sierra Metro aims to give exhibiting opportunities to early-career artists, providing them with a warehouse-alike space far beyond those normally afforded them in terms of both scope and scale. The inaugural show has been given to Neville Rae, a Glasgow-based artist whose impressive exhibiting pedigree belies his comparative youth; since graduating from GSA in 2005, Neville has taken his A Town For Tomorrow show from Edinburgh’s Inverleith House to Dusseldorf’s Kunstverein gallery. For the Sierra Metro exhibition Neville plans to depart from Cumbernauld, his previous subject of choice, and present work dealing with the site-appropriate theories and practicalities of waterfront regeneration. At the time of going to press he was still unwilling to divulge exactly what the work involved, only that it would possibly be to do with cast concrete sculptures that have been abandoned by the community, and possibly to do with models of

proposed sculptures for the Leith / Granton area, each based on a weird local occurrence: “Headless swans, digestive biscuits, sailors with no arms...” he says. Whatever the outcome, it’s bound to be intriguing. The gallery itself is a brave move, and one which is surely essential to the artistic development of Edinburgh as a city. The notion of a commercial gallery showcasing interesting, young art, and not a watercolour in sight, is one which was until very very recently completely at odds with the city’s modus operandi. This particular development seems almost the intellectual partner of the ten-til-ten curating partnership, currently operating a warehouse in Tradeston and endeavouring to promote artistic dialogue between the two cities. By choosing a Glasgow-based artist for their first exhibition, Sierra Metro avoid the parochial, thawing inter-city relations and taking another step down the road to a Scottish art scene. On a more basic level, they’ve got a great space, and great plans for giving opportunities to young artists while working out of an area that is as yet unconventional for the display of art. Well worth the trip to Granton. [Rosamund West]

Getting to Sierra Metro from the City Centre is actually a cinch: just get the number 16 bus from Princes Street, and jump off at Granton Square. www.sierrametro.com

Kill Your Timid Notion @ DCA 19 Sep - 12 Oct 08

Arika, the team behind Glasgow’s Instal festival, return to Dundee with another helping of Kill Your Timid Notion. For those who have missed the previous instalments, the festival is a weekend-long series of events, film screenings, performances and exhibitions in DCA. The conceptual starting point of this melange of art, music and film lies in the desire to explore and inhabit the faultlines between what you hear and what you see. The organisers enticingly offer the following roundup: “It features tiny rice paper weather vanes that ripple in the imperceptible movement of air, blindfolded listening experiences and sculptural metal trays, filled with water and vibrated by the sound of 23 thunderstorms. And much more besides...” The much more besides, from a visual art viewpoint, includes a variety of ingeniously composed one-off events and longer-term installations. Most imagination capturing must surely be the dual live performance and simultaneous synched video projection of former chorister and performance artist Aileen Campbell. At half five on Sunday afternoon she will to be found singing Vivaldi to live accompaniment while bouncing on a trampoline in Gallery 2, as a video feed presents the very same performance at the very same time in Cinema 1. Campbell is interested in the effects of the extremes of environment upon her classically-trained

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singing, and in this work also seeks to offer a chance for comparative experience of the live show versus the cinema version, presenting both formats simultaneously in a bid to remove any hint of privilege or hierarchy between the relevant media. (Aileen Campbell: Sunday, 17:30, Gallery 2 & Cinema 1) Also of particular interest over the weekend is the new work by Luke Fowler and Lee Patterson. They’ll be performing a new live audio visual work inspired by La Monte Young’s 1960 instruction score “draw a straight line and follow it.” Their response to this was to find a straight road in Dundee and follow it, documenting the experience in film and sound and picking up souvenirs in the form of natural objects and man-made detritus as they journeyed on their merry way. (Luke Fowler & Lee Patterson: Friday, 21:30, Gallery 2) As previously stated there is also much, much more besides... Tickets are available on daily or weekend rates, with Arika having taken the remarkably egalitarian policy of offering no discounted prices, instead trying to keep the costs as low as possible for everyone. Their reasoning? No offence, but they know lots of rich students, and lots of their pals are on low incomes but don’t get offered any discount. A fair point, say I. [Rosamund West] www.arika.org.uk

October 08

THE SKINNY 31


MUSIC EDITORIAL

Shellac:

Whoah! The record buying (yes, buying) public appear to be going insane, regressing, turning the clock back, going fran-tic-tic-tic-tic-ticTOCK! OK, maybe just the metallers. As I write this, Metallica - the band that accidentally helped diversify the way that fans could steal their music - are sitting at the top of the UK album chart for the third week running with the fastest selling album of the year so far.

GIVEN THEIR UNPREDICTABLE TOURING HABITS, SHELLAC'S UPCOMING SHOW GLASGOW GIG IS KIND OF A BIG DEAL. JORGE MARTICORENA CATCHES UP WITH RECORDING ENGINEER AND MUSICIAN BOB WESTON FOR A TALK ABOUT HIS LIFE IN AND OUT OF THE MINIMALIST ROCK TRIO

No Free Lunch, Still

Now, Lars Ulrich is bound to be sitting at home in a room full of shite art with the baffies up roaring 'result!', but this is fair proof that the demise of the album as an artifact has been exaggerated. Queue 'the big four' record companies and their announcement of the 'SanDisk' (AKA ShanDisk) as an attempt to bridge the gap between the tangible and the digital. Sadly, it sounds like a 'Laserdisc (tm)' waiting to happen - the idea that a single pre-recorded album delivered on a characterless wee memory card that'll swiftly disappear down the side of the sofa is a better idea than, say, a USB disc, is a Del Boy initiative if ever there was one. Where's the incentive? I never thought i'd say this (after a little piece of my inner thrasher died the day St. Anger came out) but if this is the alternative physical format, I'd rather stick with Lars and rip discs to MP3 until the world turns Johnny Mnemonic. / Dave

A MUSO’S TOP 10:

AARON

NORTH

As well as procuring the usual track list for a desert island mix-tape, this month we asked former Icarus Line and Nine Inch Nails axe man Aaron North to envisage a post-apocalyptic future where he chooses the opponents and selects the conditions for celebrity fights in a Thunderdome-styled death match arena: “I’d like to see Bobby Gillespie really, really high on speed and Amy Winehouse really, really high on crack. Bobby would be so high on speed that the rules of hitting a woman are out the window – it’s no holds barred. Winehouse has got those really long nails, and of course Bobby can barely see because he’s got those sunglasses on. The consequences there could be disastrous.” “Anyway, this is what I’ve been listening to over the last couple of days:

1. THE LAS – I CAN’T SLEEP 2. BOB DYLAN – GATES OF EDEN 3. FUNKADELIC – MAGGOT BRAIN 4. THE BIRTHDAY PARTY – DEEP IN THE WOODS 5. NEIL YOUNG – L.A. (“I LIKE HIS VERSION BETTER THAN SOME SHITTY BAND WHO BUTCHERED IT!”) 6. THE WHO – AMAZING JOURNEY / SPARKS 7. THE DOORS – CELEBRATION OF THE LIZARD (“IN ITS ENTIRETY!”) 8. NICK DRAKE – HORN 9. BEETHOVEN – SYMPHONY NO. 7 (“AGAIN, IN ITS ENTIRETY!”) 10. GUNS ‘N’ ROSES – ESTRANGED “By the way, I will stand up and defend Guns n’ Roses for as long as Izzy Stradlin was in the band. Izzy’s one of the most underrated songwriters, the dude wrote 75% of the music and a lot of the words too. Mr. Brownstone? That was him.” READ AARON’S THREE PART STUDIO DIARY ON HIS NEW BAND, JUBILEE, EXCLUSIVELY AT WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

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OCTOBER 08

Shellac’s all about timing. If the timing’s right, then Steve Albini, Bob Weston, and Todd Trainer become Shellac. Kind of like a total solar eclipse. Except that it usually doesn’t take an average of 400 years (though to some it may feel that way) and the music is generally better. “We only practice and tour for something like 30 days per year on average,” says bassist/vocalist Bob Weston, “though it’s been more in 2008 for some unknown reason.” The reasons are generally varied and arbitrary, but Shellac’s scattered activity always comes down to their reputable work ethic, which is, basically, to tour and record whenever they want. Their standards are often cost-inefficient: they use no promotional gimmicks, as much as seven years have passed between records, and tours rarely coincide with record releases. It’s also a matter of necessity, considering these dudes have got other things going on in their lives. Albini and Weston are both experienced (and estimable) recording engineers. And this is not to mention their own pet projects, such as Weston’s involvement with Bostonian post-punk legends Mission of Burma. Weston also has a full-time job as the co-founder of Chicago Mastering Service, an analog/digital audio mastering facility. “Yeah, this is my job. I am here working almost every single day. I am a procrastinator by nature so I’m always falling behind in my work here and thus increasing my stress level... always playing catch-up. Our mantra at CMS: ABC (always be cutting).” This is where Shellac comes in. After all, we all need some sort of diversion from our regular day jobs, be it traveling, fishing, taking a long

walk on the beach, or playing in a noise-rock/ post-hardcore trio. Whatever works. “When I’m on tour with Shellac or Burma, it’s truly relaxing and invigorating,” suggests Weston. “As soon as I leave CMS for a tour, I am able to release all the stress of running a business, since I can’t do anything about it when I’m not there. It’s easy for me to let it all go until I return. Plus, I have an excellent business partner [Jason Ward] at the studio, which allows me to no have any worries while I’m away. Serenity now.” It’s amusing to think of Shellac as some sort of serene therapeutic escapade, given the noisy, aggressive, and erratic texture of their music. Their sound is highly distinct, due in large part to Albini’s affinity for aluminum-based Travis Bean guitars, and the way their repetitive, minimalistic song structures stray so far from tradition. However, it’s all much more effortless than it sounds. “We write songs that come to us naturally. Any ‘style’ we have is derived from the songs we come up with. As opposed to writing songs that cater to a specific style. We just play what we like. But what we like includes experimenting, tension, absurdity, catharsis, etcetera. I’d say it’s about one hundred per cent brain and one hundred per cent heart.” Though Shellac are often as abrasive as they can be, their tone stretches far and wide, from irony to sincerity to cynicism to geekiness. Contrary to the band’s earlier claim, their songs aren’t all about baseball and Canada (good one, guys). Their lyrical output can be as obscure as it can be commonplace. “It’s pretty random,” says Weston of the process. “Whatever is on my mind the most when I’m writing, like any songwriter I’d imagine. Situations I find myself in, fictional situations, non-sequiturs,

absurd ideas, things/people/politics/behaviors that annoy or amuse me, tributes or quotes relating to my friends’ bands or other artists and bands that I admire, talking about books or TV or movie stories that I liked. Cats.” Cats? Yes, why not. They also have a song called Shoe Song and another called Squirrel Song. This is the great thing about Shellac — the carelessness. There’s definitely a not-so-subtle “we don’t really give a fuck” byline running across virtually everything they do. The refreshing thing is that it’s actually genuine. This is a band that recorded an instrumental album called The Futurist for a modern dance troupe - which was deemed unfit for proper release by the band itself - which they pressed a limited run of 700 copies of for friends and family, with the names of every recipient (and each owner’s name encircled) on the front cover. In 1995, they printed a couple of thousand copies of a 7”, only to give it away to a German audience during a show. They shun promotions, with their press releases typically exclaiming the words ‘no free lunch’. They tour spontaneously, going to places they haven’t been to before, playing on river boats or for whiffle ball tournaments. Clearly, Shellac isn’t a job. They practice and record with no schedules or expectations, stopping before it gets old and picking up again when it feels fresh. It’s all a very laid-back middle finger to the wiles of the music industry and everything it represents. The kids really need to catch on to Shellac’s stride here: “Last time I was bored was at a rock show,” says Weston. “So many young bands are terribly boring. It’s sad. Bring it on, kids!” SHELLAC PLAY ABC, GLASGOW ON 2 NOV WWW.MYSPACE.COM/SHELLACOFNORTHAMERICA

MUSIC


MUSIC

Drever, McCusker and Woomble:

Folk to the Power of Three

KRIS DREVER, JOHN MCCUSKER AND RODDY WOOMBLE TALK TO PAUL MITCHELL ABOUT CHANCE MEETINGS, MOODY ROCK KIDS AND HOW TO MAKE FOLK GO POP Kris Drever explains his view of the differences between musicians from the “folky scene” (his words), and those who ally themselves to the rock/pop world. “There’s a general camaraderie among folk musicians; a lot of shenanigans as we essentially meet one another at various points around the globe throughout the year. Sooner or later you have a pint and a night out with just about everyone.” Sounds like effective networking, but why are the rock kids any different? “ Some people that I’ve met whose livelihood depends on the rock or pop world, well, they don’t really hang out with other bands much. They tend to stick with their own camp and don’t seem to communicate with one another. I don’t really know why that is. I suppose in the folk world, if you start acting up like a big shot, you’re going to get shot down in flames.” The Skinny is speaking with Orkney-born guitarist Drever (a member of experimental folk act Lau), multi-instrumentalist and producer John McCusker and long-time Idlewild frontman Roddy Woomble on the release of their collaborative album Before The Ruin. The record has been warmly received, attracting applause not just for the allure of the softly spoken compositions within, but also the suggestion that it was put together in a very short space of time. McCusker makes it sound so: “We just started meeting up in my flat and wrote a few songs together over the course of maybe ten or twelve days.” Woomble however, suggests that the reality is otherwise. “The actual process of completing the songs and recording them, fleshing them out, that took a long time and getting all the guests in and putting all the parts together. The record doesn’t sound like something that was knocked off in the afternoon, it’s quite an accomplished piece of work because it has so many different shades lots of instrumentation.” In this remark he is paying tribute to the production work of McCusker, who was charged with taking the source material and polishing it up (“but not too much, we all agreed that overdoing it would not be a good thing” adds Drever). McCusker drew upon his high standing in the scene to bring in guests as accomplished as Radiohead drummer Philip Selway (whose solo album he is producing), Teenage Fanclub’s Norman Blake

Just the Three of Us THE COMING TOGETHER OF DREVER, MCCUSKER AND WOOMBLE INSPIRES A BRIEF LOOK AT THE RECENT (AND NOT SO RECENT) HISTORY OF THE THREESOME. NO SEXY STUFF, UNLESS YOU COUNT THE CHARMED ONES... 1. The Supremes: Hands up who’s ever heard of a four-piece girl band called The Primettes? No? Well that’s who The Supremes were before trimming to a svelte trio (it’s the magic number y’see) and becoming the most successful group ever in all of Motown. Of course there’s always one who thinks they’re better than the rest. In this case, the band had to endure a name change to Diana Ross & The Supremes until the leading lady departed the scene for a hugely successful solo career as an airport staff-botherer. 2. The Bee Gees: Manc brothers Barry, Maurice and Robin Gibb looked on in awe as the Beach Boys wowed the world with their jaunty tunes and incredibly tight harmonies. Determined to

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take things to the next level, they tightened their trousers and embarked on a strict diet of oestrogen, culminating in a falsetto so high-pitched it was outwith the audio range of anyone over 30. No matter, they soundtracked the 70s (well, Saturday Night Fever... close) and managed to make disco hugely popular. 3. Bros: Twins Matt and Luke formed this act (pronounced ‘Bross’, rhyming with both their surname (Goss) and more aptly ‘Dross’) in the late 80s with Kirkcaldy man Craig Logan. Ludicrously popular for a nanosecond, over-produced pap-pop single When Will I Be Famous is credited with starting both the boyband cult and this country’s current celebrity obsession (cheers guys). Logan left to become a producer and the twins eventually called it quits in ‘92. Luke carved out a niche in horror films while Matt got engaged to MTV babe Daisy Fuentes. Nothing good lasts forever though, and the boys recently announced they’ll be going down the Take That / Boyzone route and reforming. Fuckers! 4. George, Tony and Saddam: George Jnr: “Yo Blair, my Daddy tells me that Camel Fucker in eye-rack’s got some weapons of mass distraction hidden under all those lovely oil fields. Let’s beat him up!” Tony: “Anything you say your highness, now would you like me to go a little lower?” Saddam: “That’s a new one to me. I only ever

learned the Windsor. What’s it called? A slip knot you sa…” And so the 21st Century’s Marx Brothers held court on the world stage for far too long. When it became apparent that not everyone got their humour (we all know that feeling), Saddam, in true rock n roll fashion, departed the scene ‘tragically young’. Tony forged a lucrative but low-key solo career and George took up his rightful residence at the Boston Zoo tea party.

and Irish singer Heidi Talbot. The project, initially slated as Woomble’s next solo offering to follow 2006’s My Secret is My Silence (produced by McCusker), quickly became one in where the chief protagonists just, as Drever remarks, “threw our hats in the ring and started playing ideas at each other”. So, with all agreeing there was no definitive plan from the outset, lyricist Woomble explains how he grasped the opportunity to develop his songwriting. “I was interested in exploring themes which I normally wouldn’t write about myself. I suppose the loose theme of the record is man’s relationship with the sea. The sea is one of those metaphors which can be used for lots of things. I was quite interested in writing about the islands, particularly Orkney. Before the Ruin is reference to standing in front of the sea. It can pull you in; you can discover other countries.” McCusker admits that he played it by ear when putting the finishing touches together. “We didn’t know if it would sound like Teenage Fanclub with bouzoukis, whether we were going to make a poppy sounding folk record or something in between. It seems sometimes like there’s a guy inside of me who wants to be in Teenage Fanclub, but I play the tin whistle so it doesn’t get to pan out that way. Instead of rocking out we found that it turned out to be quite gentle, and hopefully the listeners will be able to get drawn into the record and find new things with every listen.” The camaraderie Drever mentions is genuine. The trio are generally effusive in their admiration for the work of the others without going overboard with generic platitudes. McCusker explains the air of mutual respect that pervades. “We met in Sandy Bells about ten years ago. I went over very drunkenly having watched him play the double bass and said ‘We have to be friends now’. I’m pretty sure that’s how it happens all the time really”. DREVER, MCCUSKER AND WOOMBLE PLAY: THE IRONWORKS, INVERNESS ON 2 OCT ROYAL CONCERT HALL, GLASGOW ON 3 OCT QUEENS HALL, EDINBURGH ON 5 OCT BEFORE THE RUIN IS AVAILABLE NOW VIA NAVIGATOR WWW.RODDYWOOMBLE.COM

evil demons, unreliable hormones and (particularly in Phoebe’s case) a wardrobe which left little to the imagination. Invariably, they emerged victorious (bar Pru, who tragically died of Toxic Shock Syndrome) proving unequivocally that nothing, yes nothing, beats the Power of Three. [Wilbur Kane]

5. The Charmed Ones: Phoebe, Piper and Pru (who was later replaced by Paige) were three witches with very special magical powers. Together, they were the unstoppable Charmed, living in San Francisco in this faintly ridiculous sci-fantasy TV romp of the same name. Inherently ‘good’ (as opposed to ‘not very good at all’), the sisters did their level best to defeat OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 33


Jenny Lewis:

Born to Do It From Hank III to Hayseed Dixie, subverting the old model of country music is no new phenomenon, nor is the rhetoric of the traditionalists who can’t get their heads around it. Rilo Kiley's frontwoman tells Dave Kerr how she cut her own path... “People always call into question your authenticity,” frowns Jenny Lewis. “I refer them to the great tradition of bands like the Stones doing country songs. Fuck it, you just have to sing the songs that come from your heart and soul. I’m not writing for anyone but myself.” Speaking to Lewis as she tours the U.S (“It’s great, my band is shit hot!”) and prepares to release her second solo LP - Acid Tongue – she already seems keen to play down the inference of the name she gave it. There’s a simple line on the title track where she coos ‘I’ve been down to Dixie and dropped acid on my tongue.’ I ask whether she has encountered any knee-jerk disdain from the old guard for trading in the standard props of chewing tobacco and moonshine. “More often than not you hear a cheer from the audience. Every night when I play Acid Tongue, when that line comes up people scream from the audience. And it’s funny, because I’m not a fan of LSD, nor did I ever set out to become a poster child for it.” The suggestion that she might be making little of it on the off chance that her dad – Eddie Gordon, a reputed harmonica virtuoso in his own right - could be reading this piece is met with a laugh; after all, he appears on the record. Besides her father’s bass harp cameo and backing vocal duties from sister Leslie, also of no small note are the contributions from Elvis Costello, Chris Robinson (Black Crowes), Paz Lenchantin (A Perfect Circle) and Zooey Deschanel (She & Him), who helped complement the two bands Lewis formed (“Band A for the rockier songs, Band B for the softer soul ballads”) to take part in the album’s whirlwind recording sessions at the start of the year. Music and family are intrinsically bound for

Lewis. “My parents had a lounge act in Las Vegas in the 70s and my first true introduction to it was where my mother went into labour with me on stage,” she recounts, “that really set the tone.” Literally born into it then? “Exactly, literally – and my mother is a fantastic singer. I just grew up trying to emulate her voice. When my parents got divorced the band broke up and she never really played music again, so I feel like I’m kind of carrying the torch for her, because she wasn’t able to really do it.” It’s well documented that Jenny lived her formative years in front of a camera as a TV commercial, sitcom and film actress. “I was doing stuff that I knew wasn’t very good, for the most part. From a very young age I had very specific tastes: I was watching art films and listening to my mum’s cool records, so I knew that selling steak sauce wasn’t really my calling.” Or jelly? “Actually, you really can’t go wrong with jelly,” she laughs. ”I’ll sell that some more. But it was another part of my life,” she continues, finding a distance from the ‘live fast’ syndrome that has so infamously wrecked the later careers of those child actors who haven’t quietly faded into obscurity. “I think of myself as an entirely different person. I’ve done alright so far, but there’s still time for me to buy crack on the corner and get busted for it.” It took a little time for Jenny to take her true calling seriously, but she says the epiphany hit her during a concert experience almost 20 years ago. “It’s when I saw The Pixies and The Cure at Dodger stadium. I’d never heard of the Pixies before. They were opening up and I got there halfway through the set and saw Kim Deal on stage. I thought ‘ooh, crap, what’s that girl doing up there?’ It truly is that moment when I thought ‘wow, women can really do this

thing.’ I really didn’t know. You can play an instrument in a band and crush.” Back in the here and now, fans of Jenny’s usual gig in Rilo Kiley might be slightly concerned about the future of the band with all this solo project talk, but rest easy; the constituent parts of the band are just enjoying a brief sabbatical, having recently wrapped up an extensive tour in support of last year’s Under the Blacklight. “We’ve always done that,” Lewis confirms. “Blake from Rilo Kiley started another band many years ago called The Elected. Once he did that it really opened things up for us all. It was at that time I realized I could make a record on my own, which I’d never considered before – the band was always my main focus. But there’s always a danger when you start moonlighting with the mistress that you might end up marrying her.” Which immediately presents the question: is she happy to keep up with this Rilo-solo love triangle? “Yeah, but the sex is infinitely better with the mistress.” When speaking about those studio sessions with the ‘mistress’, Lewis rationalises her appreciation for the analog recording aesthetic. “I wanted all the mistakes to remain on this record, and I really wanted to sing live. All of my favourite records that I grew up listening to were made in this way. If you think about music and listen to popular music of the last ten years, the overtones are so harsh sounding - it feels like there’re just too many tracks. For me it’s about taking the form and using the lyrics as a way to modernize the songs. I don’t ever want to be too nostalgic. I know at times you might run the risk of that when you record the way that we did, but I always hope that the lyrics update the sound a little bit.”

With the forthcoming presidential elections on everyone’s lips, the conversation moves from studio habits to Lewis’s recent appearance at the Denver Democratic Convention. But before we can even get there, she recalls how she was accosted, quite bizarrely, by Kanye West in the airport lounge. “He didn’t know who I was. He said ‘Excuse me, would you mind listening to my new track?’ and put his headphones on me. I guess he was doing research.” West recently pledged his support for Barack Obama by contributing a track to Obama’s Yes We Can compilation, alongside soul legend Stevie Wonder and schmaltz rocker John Mayer. But it’s going to take a lot more than camaraderie captured on a compact disc to swing the vote. “It’s closer than you would think out here,” Lewis suggests. “I think with the whole Paleontology topic things are shifting around. I don’t want to consider it a win at this point. I hope for everyone’s sake that things change – it’s time for a change in this country and it’s time for us to get a makeover internationally. Over the past eight years, traveling abroad, if you’re American, people are so mad, so angry at you. It would be nice to have a beautiful representative such as Barack to put people at ease.” Jenny winds up the conversation on that unbeatable note: she’s off to “wander around the streets of Kansas.” My IMDB-sense recalls that she was once in a film called The Wizard, and there’s definitely a bad joke in there; but something tells me she’s heard them all before. Jenny Lewis plays QMU, Glasgow on 18 Oct. Acid Tongue is out now via Rough Trade. www.myspace.com/jennylewismusic

“I’ve done alright so far, but there’s still time for me to buy crack on the corner and get busted for it.”

34 THE SKINNY

October 08

Music


Communication Breakdown

MUSIC

Foals:

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SIX MONTHS AFTER THE RELEASE OF THEIR DEBUT LP, FOALS FIND THEMSELVES DODGING A TANGLED WEB OF MEDIA-FUELLED DISINFORMATION WHILE THEY KEEP THEIR HEADS DOWN TO NAIL IT ON STAGE, AS EDWIN CONGREAVE EXPLAINS TO TOBIAS KAHN

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strange to think that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a mere matter of months since the release of Foals debut album, Antidotes. The Oxford based quintet have enjoyed a stratospheric level of hype for some time now; such things as albums donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to be necessary to conďŹ rm a bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existence in the hearts and minds of the indie world these days. Foals arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fazed by all of the attention, or if they are, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing a good job of hiding it. Did the continual intrusions of the music media affect the creative process? â&#x20AC;&#x153;No not at all, most of the songs were written before we even got signed,â&#x20AC;? explains keys man Edwin Congreave, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and this hype, if you can call it that, was at the end of the last year after we recorded the album. Well, I guess it was an ongoing thing that just built and built but by the time weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d gone into the studio it was only present really to us, it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t difďŹ cult at all. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m pretty sure that in the future if hype weighs on us it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be hard. We look in on ourselves; we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look out that much. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in the music world or what people are saying about us.â&#x20AC;? I call his bluff and ask whether the band actually does read its press. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, obviously we do,â&#x20AC;? Congreave contradictorily asserts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know any musicians that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read reviews. We try to take it into context, how people describe us, because they usually are quite a way off from how weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d describe ourselves and keeping that distance enables you to have more room to make what you want to make rather than what people are saying youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making.â&#x20AC;? The outside worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skewed take on the band

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop at the music in Congreaveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes. When asked about a recent post on the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website in which he declared that Foals ofďŹ cially endorsed Senator Barack Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bid for the American presidential nomination, he becomes irritated: â&#x20AC;&#x153;None of our songs are remotely political,â&#x20AC;? he snips. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our blog is more of a joke, I get really frustrated with how seriously we get taken and unfortunately that post prompted a lot of people to generate ofďŹ cial news items about it. I care, in that I think the election is interesting, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not political.â&#x20AC;? It seems Foalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; main focus is on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immediately within their threshold. At its heart, this is a live act, which Congreave readily admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we play live itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only exercise that we get and by the end of the show youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re totally locked in and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of anything else. Our guitarist has a habit of vomiting purely because of physical and mental exhaustion -itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not like he eats badly. In New York he vomited at the end of the show all over my suitcase that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d carefully put behind my keyboard. This was on stage. He had to take a break for one song and vomited up steak and a lot of liquid. It was a shower of vomit, it was amazing.â&#x20AC;? Brollies at the ready - youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been warned. NEW SINGLE, OLYMPIC AIRWAYS, IS RELEASED ON 6 OCT VIA TRANSGRESSIVE. FOALS PLAY THE MUSIC HALL, ABERDEEN ON 4 OCT (SUPPORT FROM WILD BEASTS AND MAPS & ATLASES). EDWIN DJS AT THE SKINNY DIP, MOSHULU, ABERDEEN ON 4 OCT. THEY ALSO PLAY BARROWLANDS, GLASGOW ON 5 OCT (SUPPORT FROM DANANANANAYKROYD AND HOLY FUCK).

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OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 35


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NEON NEON MAY NOT HAVE WON THE MERCURY MUSIC PRIZE, BUT OF TIME-TRAVELLING CARS (IF EMMETT ‘DOC’ BROWN HAD HIS WA HANGING FROM THEIR NECKS, THE ECCENTRIC DUO COULD NOT COLOURFUL, BUT NICK MITCHELL HEARS THAT IT TOOK REAL CR Boom Bip and Gruff Rhys have differing memories of the DeLorean DMC-12, the fabled supercar that moonlighted as a time machine in Back to the Future. Bip (real name Bryan Hollon) recalls that, in the American Mid-West of his youth, “it was always like every town would have about one. It was very rare to spot them, but you did.” But in 1980s Bethesda, a Welsh quarry town on the edge of Snowdonia, Rhys was not so lucky: “I didn’t actually see one til this year. I remember there was one TR7, which was the cheapest car that looked vaguely like a sports car.” Over the past few years, however, the duo who call themselves Neon Neon have centred their combined creative energies on the car’s creator, John DeLorean, and capped their obsession by rolling up at last month’s Mercury Music Prize ceremony in two surviving examples of the gull-winged vehicle. It wasn’t enough to sway the judges, but Rhys and Hollon couldn’t have been too disappointed that their album Stainless Style lost out. After all, it had been listed as “a 20/1 outsider” by bookmaker William Hill, its profile had already been boosted by the nomination, and, considering the Mercury rewards British and Irish talent, they were lucky to qualify, given that Hollon hails from Cincinnati, Ohio. Despite missing out on the £20,000 cheque, the pairing of Rhys, the revered pied piper of Cardiff’s evergreen psych-pop troupe Super Furry Animals, with Hollon, the respected LA-based electronic producer signed to Warp Records in his own right, still stands as one of the most intriguing collaborations of recent times. Coincidentally, the seed of Neon Neon was sown way back during the tour for Rhys’ only other Mercury-nominated album, 2001’s Rings Around the World, with Boom Bip opening for the Super Furries on some of their North American dates. After the tour, Hollon agreed to contribute to the Super Furries’ remix album Phantom Phorce, in exchange for Rhys singing on a track from Boom Bip’s 2005 album Blue Eyed in the Red Room. Down a phone line from Los Angeles, Hollon recalls that “it was kind of a barter system and it seemed to work out really well.” A couple of days after my chat with Hollon, I call Rhys in Cardiff, and ask if throwing himself headfirst into Neon Neon was a risk. “I don’t think it was a risk but it was fun doing something completely different,” he says. “Bryan asked me two or three years ago about making a whole al-

36 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

bum, and his brief was that it would have to be complete unlike any Boom Bip record or any Super Furry record. We had this policy of going where our instincts told us no to go.”

This transatlantic treaty would eventually suit the subject matter very nicely, but the idea to make a concep album about John DeLorean - the chaotic, womanising, engineering genius - actually came about during the recording, as Hollon reveals: “We never thought of Back to the Future once as we were making this. It was more that the music I made in the demos inspired the theme.” Rhys continues the story: “We borrowed a house from someone at Lex Records and set up the studio there for a couple of weeks. Will from Lex has a lot of amazing book – the 1980s are his specialist period – and he’s got a lot of synths, so we were sitting around all day playing with these synths and replica guns and reading glossy books about cars. Bryan was doing all these demos and the one I was excited about sounded really glossy. I picked them up and built the basic tracks for songs like Raquel. I had to come up with lyrics that would sit with that kind of music and I couldn’t find anything with my own life that fitted in with that level of glamour, so within two or thre days I had become obsessed with John DeLorean. His lif story is so inspiring. Not necessarily in a good way.”

Indeed, Delorean’s biography is a classic tale of the Amer can Dream turned sour; a rags-to-riches story of stunnin cars, stunning women, the Rat Pack, drug trafficking, a FBI sting, and even the Northern Irish troubles. I mention to Hollon that it sounds like prime biopic fodder, and if it does make it to celluloid, that it now has a readymad soundtrack. “It’s funny because a good friend of mine is a video editor here in Los Angeles,” he says. “He works wit this director and he gave him a copy of the record and th director loved it and was like, ‘why hasn’t anyone done a film on this guy?’ So he went into some talent agencies and talked to them about it and strangely enough there is a script around Hollywood right now being discussed, about a DeLorean film. The name George Clooney was being thrown around for being DeLorean himself. But can you imagine that film?” an enthused Hollon continues. “You know, make it really good and grimy. Starting in Detroit and getting wrapped up in the Hollywood scene, and then the disco scene, going to Studio 54, and then becoming this hustler, and travelling around the world on a private jet, and hustling from South America

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druglords, to Sammy Davis Jr and Frank Sinatra and all these people he hustled money from. Then eventually going over to Britain, talking to the Thatcher administration and building the Belfast plant and showing his rise, with the car getting ready to come out - and then it just completely flops. He bombs his own factory and blames it on the IRA. It would be the best movie ever, right?” I feel compelled to agree. And in inadvertently creating the soundtrack for the best movie ever Hollon and Rhys had to radically rethink their whole approach to musicmaking. For Hollon, this meant rewinding his studio skills 25 years, for that 1983 effect: “That proved to be really difficult, to dumb myself down and strip it back. I couldn’t use a lot of tricky MIDI programming like I’m used to, so instead I tried to use a lot more step sequencers, more presets and different patches on older synthesizers and keyboards, which was really difficult for me because I really steer away from that with the Boom Bip stuff. There were certain clichés that I was hitting with the music, like with space-toms and really cheesy synths.” For Rhys, it meant betraying his adolescent self and embracing 80s cheese: “The stuff I listened to as a teenager in the 80s was independent guitar pop and American hardcore and some hip hop, and what I hated was glossy pop music with saxophones and backing vocals. So in a way this record was revisiting music I hated and coming to terms with it,” he laughs. “I can listen to a Rick Astley track now and appreciate the innocence of it, whereas at the time it would make me feel nauseous.” Rhys and Hollon were wise to ignore their inner taste monitors, because aside from the Mercury nomination, Stainless Style has not just received glowing reviews but has added another dimension to both artists’ careers. So is it the start of a beautifully neon-lit friendship? Hollon: “We definitely have plans to carry on with this. It’s not a one-off, but I think we’ve exhausted the playboy engineer genre.” Rhys agrees: “We’ve set up a way of working now so we just need the spark of an idea in the future. I think it would have to be extremely different. We’ve milked John DeLorean for all he’s got.” NEON NEON PLAY ORAN MOR, GLASGOW ON 6 NOV. STAINLESS STYLE IS OUT NOW VIA LEX RECORDS.

MILO MCLAUGHLIN PICKS UP FROM WHERE HE LEFT OFF LAST ISSUE WITH AN ENTIRELY RATIONAL FLURRY OF FENCE LOVE

KING CREOSOTE

Last month’s issue featured an interview with Kenny Anderson aka King Creosote, but the first podcast in this two part special on the Fence Collective cruelly left out any of his tracks. This month we make up for it with an absolute belter of a tune called Don’t Ask Me How My Weekend Went which is from a collaboration between KC and one of the Collective’s more elusive members, HMS Ginafore. Ginafore, aka Jenny Casino, was born and bred in Anstruther, and her beautiful vocals grace many of James Yorkston’s best tracks. This new LP, Love, Hate, Hate consists of 12 tracks where lead vocals alternate between our two main protagonists. Whether or how Ginafore was involved in this track is unclear at this point as Kenny’s vocal takes centre stage (unless she is the one doing the Cher style vocoder bits), but I’m sure the album itself will feature more obvious evidence of her undoubted talent. Also from KC on this month’s podcast, but from his own forthcoming album with the scifi-tastic title of They Flock Like Vulcans to See Old Jupiter Eyes on His Home Craters, are the excellent tracks On Esther’s Planet (again with the sci-fi!) and Houston Tharoule”, the latter showcasing his more experimental side.

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/NEONX2

Out this month and reviewed elsewhere this issue, Rozi Plain’s debut album Inside Over Here is a worthy addition to the Fence canon. Last month we heard her cover of James Yorkston’s Lang Toun; this month you can have a taste of two of the loveliest tracks from her latest release, Stolen Shark and Roof Rook Crook Crow. Finally, if last month’s interview with Johnny Lynch, aka The Pictish Trail, and the inclusion of the stunning I Don’t Know Where to Begin on the podcast wasn’t enough to persuade you to part with a tenner, then we’ve got another brilliant tune from his Secret Soundz Vol.1 album for your listening pleasure: Into The Smoke. LISTEN AND SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST AT WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK AND ON ITUNES. WWW.FENCERECORDS.COM

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 37

MUSIC

I HEAR

RECORDS SPECIAL

ARRIVING FOR THE EVENT IN A PAIR AY) WITH LEGO-BRICK MEDALLIONS BE MISSED. THE ALBUM IS EQUALLY REATIVE DISCIPLINE TO MAKE IT.

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Go Zoey, Go Go Go...

SPONSORED BY:

ALLY BROWN SITS DOWN FOR A PINT WITH ZOEY VAN GOEY, ANOTHER INTERNATIONAL BAND BASED IN GLASGOW THAT WE CAN CLAIM AS OUR OWN TO STRENGTHEN THE TEAM Like the eligibility rules for international football that see Nigerians playing for Poland, Englishmen playing for Scotland, and Brazilians playing for just about everyone, the conventions for deciding where a band originates from are haphazard at best. Garbage are Scottish only because their singer is; Snow Patrol are apparently Scottish because the Northern Irishmen met in Dundee; Franz Ferdinand are Scottish despite only the drummer being born here; and Rod Stewart is Scottish because he says he wants to be, in his sharp cockney tongue. Meet Zoey Van Goey, the latest international band who we’ll claim as our own to strengthen the team: Kim from down south, Matt from Canada, and Michael John from Ireland.

As careless as missing REM is, seeing the Zoeys instead is a fine substitution to make. That they’re all talented enough to regularly swap instruments on-stage is impressive, but of secondary importance to the simple ability to write good pop songs. Cities explode, the apocalypse is coming, hostages are taken, but Zoey couch it all in such charming and graceful folk that it’s comforting, not troubling. Kim’s gorgeous airy vocals are a key part in that, but the boys lend their distinctive voices too, giving songs like Two White Ghosts an extra dimension. While lightweight indie bands like Belle & Seb and The Postal Service are precedents to an extent, Kim’s vocals and their electronic dabbling make it less easy to draw parallels.

“Kim and I both studied at Glasgow Uni, and Matt studied at Stirling Uni but towards the end of his time there he moved to Glasgow,” Michael John tells me in a noisy Edinburgh bar. Matt continues: “On St Patrick’s Day I randomly met Michael John on the street and he was looking for a drummer, and – I’m a drummer! Within days we were jamming”.

But at this current rate of recording, we’ll get the London Olympics, Chinese Democracy, and maybe even Chinese democracy before an album comes out, eh? “We just finished recording it with Paul Savage [The Delgados], and it’s about 80% done,” Matt assures. “We still need to tweak a few things and get it mastered, get the artwork done and that stuff. Early next year is our plan [to get it out].” They have a provisional name, which we shan’t divulge, but it alludes to the depths of their superficially positive sound. “It’s just a working title, it’s quite ambiguous, I feel that runs through the lyrics of a lot of the songs we do. You’re not sure whether you should be happy about it or not.”

But that quick gestation hasn’t continued to prolific output: after forming in 2006, the Zoeys released a debut single, produced by Belle & Sebastian’s Stuart Murdoch, in 2007, and another single dropped this year. Most importantly, this year has seen their star grow as they’ve performed at six summer festivals, including a headline slot on T in the Park’s T Break stage. “We missed REM,” Michael John laments about unexpectedly headlining. “Weirdly enough we got quite a big crowd, and they were all very into it. Obviously they just couldn’t find their way to REM! They actually started a chant for us, they were like “Zoey! Zoey! Zoey”! Or it might’ve been a “Goey! Goey!”, or even a “Go away! Go away!””.

That’s true. Zoey Van Goey’s elegance could make any story sound good. The cities could be exploding, but if it was the Zoeys who broke the news, we’d barely notice a bump. Aye, let’s claim them for Scotland: they could soon be key players. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ZOEYVANGOEY

ANDREW MOORE

Eagleowl’s Gentle Invasion

SPONSORED BY:

FROM CUTTING EPS TO PUTTING ON LOCAL FESTIVALS, AULD REEKIE'S EAGLEOWL TELL EMMA SMITH HOW THEY DO IT ALL THEMSELVES With all the majesty and wisdom that their title evokes, Eagleowl create stripped back, modernised folk tunes of a quiet intensity. Their sparse yet warmly atmospheric sound is the culmination of varied instrumentation: double bass, violin, ukulele and mandolin, all forged together by an understated sensitivity. The trio provide an alternative to the multitude of acts who wouldn’t dare stray from the more standardized rock set up. “It was just a case of writing around whatever instruments were available to us,” guitarist and vocalist Bart explains. “We never intended to be ‘the band without a drummer’. I now like having that restriction, as it helps the writing process. You have to think ‘how do we put together a 30-40 minute set without any percussion, but still keep it dynamic and hold the audience’s attention?’” It’s a challenge that Eagleowl have met well, considering they’re still reeling over the successful launch of their first EP in August, a gig held at the Scottish Scullery featured as part of the Retreat! Festival, which Bart also helped put together. “In the end the gig sold out – the crowd, despite being packed in, were very respectful and appreciative. The venue was amazing. It was all just a very special evening.” Hailing from what they believe to be a strong

38 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

network of musicians working with various independent promoters and labels based in Edinburgh, Eagleowl affiliate themselves with a group of like-minded artists called the ‘Fife Kills’ collective. “It’s based on folk, but I think the most important thing is that everyone has their own idea of what that word means. Folk is really just the starting point, and everyone has their own take on it – I think we’re called folk more for our instrumentation than our actual songs. But it’s fine – I’ve been trying to find an accurate way to describe our music since we started, and I still struggle.” Fuelling a healthy appetite for collaboration and investment in a diverse musical community is the band’s interpretation of the DIY ethos, demonstrated by the handmade, screen-printed packaging of their new release. Bart’s own endeavours as an independent promoter under the moniker ‘The Gentle Invasion’ are also testimony to these beliefs. “I think the DIY thing has really helped the band,” he enthuses. “It feels like whatever success we’ve had, we’ve created ourselves. Of course we’ve had help and support from a lot people, but I feel proud that we’ve been able to retain control over what we’re doing. It also means we have quite a close relationship with the audience. You see the same faces at the shows, and we’ve made some really good friends just from that.”

With the development of such tight knit communities the danger would be that such ‘scenes’ might project an image of insularity or exclusivity, with the potential to harbour less friendly feelings of rivalry amongst wouldbe peers. Bart sees no such problem. “The thing I like most about Edinburgh is that there’s no bullshit or ego. Music shouldn’t be a competition — if a band are successful, it’s not to the detriment of anyone else. There’s a shared outlook. It’s not even necessarily the same kind of music we’re making, but I guess it’s more about embracing that DIY ethic. No one is sitting around waiting for a major label to come calling – we’re just getting out there and making music, without necessarily having that expectation that it needs to lead to bigger things.”

JACOB BEE

Fortunately, it seems that with their combination of intelligence, enthusiasm and a knack for beautiful song writing, this may well be on the cards for Eagleowl. EAGLEOWL’S EP, FOR THE THOUGHTS YOU NEVER HAD IS OUT NOW VIA FIFE KILLS: RECORDS. THEY PLAY: THE GRV ON 2 OCT (SUPPORTING DE ROSA). FAT SAM’S ON 23 OCT (SUPPORTING MALCOLM MIDDLETON AND LOS CAMPESINOS!). OXJAM FESTIVAL, ASHTON LANE, GLASGOW ON 26 OCT. WWW.MYSPACE.COM/EAGLEOWLATTACK

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Lambchop:

The Dude Abides

Lambchop have been attributed the tag of "the most consistently brilliant and unique American group to emerge during the 1990s". Finbarr Bermingham had a word with the head honcho and found out that he really is "just a dude" A conversation with Kurt Wagner is a lot like listening to him sing. His voice wavers between a deep throaty growl and a gentle higher pitched whisper, depending on how interested he is in the question. From time to time he’ll get excited, but since undergoing surgery to remove a cancerous growth from his throat a few years back, it’s doubtful he’ll ever be able to replicate the joyous falsetto that graced Nixon and Is A Woman. Instead he just laughs straight from the gut. Wagner in 2008 seems a happier man than back in ‘06, for plainly obvious reasons. I refer him to the closing track from Lambchop’s last album Damaged, The Decline Of Country & Western Civilisation, in which he seemed to have a pop at some of his more illustrious peers. “Certainly I threw a few punches out in that direction, but I think it was more about how frustrated I was then. You know, here’s a guy who’s just got diagnosed with all these problems and one of the things that happens is that you just lash out. It’s one of the stages you go through. One of them is anger, one of them is denial, then self-pity. I was so young and I was having to deal with this shit that I didn’t think I’d have to worry about for a long time.” Lambchop have been making music for 20 years. What started out as a hobby amongst drinking buddies in Wagner’s Nashville basement gradually gathered momentum, with the band enjoying popularity in Europe and the UK long before they’d established themselves in the States. When asked why they don’t seem to attract the same veneration at home, he is nonplussed. “I’ve yet to figure out a fucking answer!” he laughs, “Maybe then we could change things a little bit!”

Throughout the first decade of Lambchop, Wagner balanced his musical pastime with a job laying wooden floors, taking time off to play European shows on his own. It’s this background that has instilled a certain work ethic and modesty in the songwriter. “I can’t afford myself the luxury of thinking I’m worth more than I actually am. Everyday I’ve gotta look in the mirror and I’m like, ‘Come on guys!’ If I did, then I wouldn’t be me.” All the while Wagner’s words are embellished with long wheezy bursts of laughter. “I’m still amazed that people show up at all. Man, I’m just a dude doing my thing!” When it comes to his music, however, there’s a firm self-assuredness lurking beneath the modest exterior. Lambchop’s new album OH (Ohio) is one Wagner is particularly pleased with. “I don’t wanna blow my own trumpet, but it’s a good record. I’m really happy with it,” is his succinct recommendation. The title of the album stems from the air of uncertainty in the USA around the time of recording. “Ohio is a swing state, but I’m not trying to be overtly political or anything, that’s just what was happening.” Wagner’s concern regards the recent surge in support for Republican nominee, John McCain. “I haven’t been there since this big shift happened. I’m walking around here wondering what the hell’s going on, I guess like you. I don’t know what I’m going back to.” He rounds the sentence off, as ever, with a trademark laugh - only this one is a little bit more nervous than the others. Lambchop play ABC, Glasgow on 31 Oct. OH (Ohio) is out on 6 Oct via City Slang

Steve Gullick

www.lambchop.net

Late of the Pier:

A Band O’ The Times

Having received a profile boost from the double-edged sword that is an NME cover, Late of the Pier are dividing opinion already. Nick Mitchell argues that you should leave any pre-conceived ideas at the door through blaring influences and genres, from the 70s camp rock of Queen and Bowie to the primitive electronics of Gary Numan, with echoes of 90s computer games and snatches of modern house.

Late of the Pier’s introduction to the mainstream last month was likely to have caused one of two reactions. Either ‘rush out and buy the album’ excitement (if you’re under 21, easily swayed by hype and still possess an open mind) or dismissal along the lines of ‘not another bunch of Klaxons clones’ (if you’re over 21, averse to hype and bullishly cynical).

now. After all, it had nothing to do with the band, according to bassist Andrew “Faley” Faley: “You don’t get any say with the NME. They use and abuse you, but at the end of the day they can do a lot of good, even if they’re using you. The new rave tagline was something that was bound to happen with them and there was nothing we could really do about it.”

That’s because the introduction came courtesy of an NME cover, which pictured the youthful Leicestershire band in the midst of a messy tribute to Jackson Pollock (sound familiar?), above a strapline that shouted: “What new rave did next”. But, dear readers (of all ages), please try to forget that image for

Well, they could have said ‘no thanks’, but let’s give them the benefit of the doubt, because Late of the Pier have conceived one of the most imaginative, ambitious debut albums of the year so far. Fantasy Black Channel is a glorious mess; an unrestrained, unclassifiable, unexpectedly triumphant romp

40 THE SKINNY

October 08

As such, it isn’t particularly coherent – the tracks jostle for attention rather than recline together easily – but it’s a statement of huge musical intent from such an inexperienced band. So just how did it happen? “Em... accidents,” Faley sheepishly answers. “None of us have ever really had any training. I think Sam had drum lessons for two hours once. I used to play piano a bit but I was never really passionate about it. But apart from that none of us have done anything. Sam just sat in his room from the age of 12 making music and he slowly learnt his craft that way, and with the instruments it’s just been a case of teaching ourselves. It’s always about trying something new. The music’s just a big array of everything, literally everything. In music pretty much everything’s been done at some point but for us, since we didn’t live through those eras, there’s still something new and magical and fresh. It’s reusing old ideas with newer influences. It’s just accidents a lot of the time.” The band weren’t just relying on their own spongelike musical tastes and sheer chance though; they also had the input of Erol Alkan, the much-feted London DJ turned record producer. Alkan came to one of their gigs and promptly declared them “not just the most exciting new band out there at the moment, but THE most exciting band around.” The flattery obviously seduced the band, because Faley reveals that they’re already working on a new EP with Alkan for a January release: “We’re taking bedroom recordings into the studio and refining it

and tweaking it with Erol, turning it into a more presentable package. I think we’ll be working with him for a long time.” Why another release so soon after the album? “We’ve just got a lot of ideas,” Faley says. “Most of the album was old songs that we were getting sick of, so we’ve been waiting to work on new songs. And there is that second album syndrome when a band comes out so exciting and the second album comes out a year and a half later and there’s just not the same excitement. We’re still excited about what we’re doing at the moment so hopefully other people will be.” And with an evident habit of naming their music in cryptic, wordy fashion, have they got any title ideas yet? “No, but I’m sure I could think of 20 bad ones though. We’re really bad at names - really, really bad at it, and so we end up just picking one at random or just picking one up. Even the band name just fell together because there wasn’t anything else that sounded that good. It does have a reference but it doesn’t really make any sense. One idea we had for the album was Peggy Patch and her Sequenced Dress.” OK, so it’s probably best that they don’t make all their ideas public. With half the music-loving nation still grimacing at the unfortunate new rave reference, dodgy album-naming could be the equivalent of career suicide for Late of the Pier. All that remains to be said is this: just listen to the music.

Late of the Pier play the Arches, Glasgow on 2 Oct and Barrowlands, Glasgow on 17 Oct. New single, Bathroom Gurgle, is released on 20 Oct. Fantasy Black Channel is out now. www.lateofthepier.com

Music


Run for Cover, He’s Gonna

Bomb The Bass

Tim Simenon explains to Paul Mitchell that perfection just can't be hurried

“He just showed up with Damien Hirst of all people, they both started dancing around the studio for a bit then buggered off.” Thus Tim Simenon describes his first and only meeting with David Bowie, whose brooding track The Heart’s Filthy Lesson (as featured in the closing titles of David Fincher’s 1995 film Seven) the Londoner was remixing at the time. As one of the more successful producers of the nineties, Simenon gained recognition working not only with Bowie, but Bjork, Gavin Friday, Sinéad O’Connor, Neneh Cherry and Depeche Mode among others. On this occasion however, he is speaking to The Skinny under the guise of his umbrella title Bomb The Bass, having just released his first full new album (Future Chaos) for thirteen years. In the latter part of the 80s a musical revolution was taking shape. Acid house was generating serious momentum and in February of 1988 a track titled Beat Dis landed at number two in the UK charts. Comprised of a simple bass line and drum track, over which were layered a reputed 72 different samples from areas as diverse as hip-hop, funk, classical and dialogue from TV shows, it proved a revelation. Bomb The Bass were rightly cast as pioneers driving DJ culture to the forefront of public perception. Simenon rode the crest of that wave throughout the first half of the nineties up until the release of 1995 album Clear. In 1997, suffering from mental and physical exhaustion, Simenon decided to take a break from the industry. Emerging refreshed in 1998, he began to conceive of Future Chaos… …Yes, that’s right…1998! The clever album favourably reviewed by The Skinny last month began its gestation a whole decade ago! So, Tim, what was that all about? “It’s not like it was ever my intention to take ten years,” he admits rather sheepishly. “This is probably the fourth version. Believe me, it’s been a fucking struggle. I suppose at one point I was trying to reinvent the wheel and the record found itself becoming very polished. It became a science, a maths project

where everything was in its right place. It lacked for soul and spirit. When I decided I wanted chaos to be a theme, to me that meant involving an element of randomness. I’d somehow managed to iron out all the randomness, so it took me a while to rework it to this version.” Simenon is at pains to stress that his current reappearance under the Bomb The Bass moniker is not an attempt at exploiting any potentially lucrative nostalgia trip which may exist. “I’m not too worried that it will be received like that. I’ve made a record which has been quite a personal challenge for me but at the back of my mind I was always confident it would be a work of progress. Finishing it has given an immense feeling of closure.” Future Chaos doffs its hat to vintage sounds, courtesy of his love affair with the minimoog (“a monophonic synth which emulate drums, bass, leadlines, wind instruments, all that kind of stuff really well; it’s just my ideal keyboard really”) yet somehow manages to sound thoroughly fresh. In many senses, it is just as innovative as the track he made as a precocious graduate all those years ago. More than that, he feels, it is an acknowledgement of the diversity of music in general , and how much it makes sense to try and appreciate everything that’s going on. “There’s so much choice now, no matter what genre you’re listening to, be that hip-hop or drum ‘n’ bass or whatever. I used to go out and the scene would entail having a few b-boys on my right hand side, and pub rockers on my left, but they were all together listening to the same music. Killing Joke would be played one minute, and next would be Afrika Bambaataa. It doesn’t seem to happen like that these days. Each genre has so much going on that you’re more likely to have a night of just, say, grime or d’n’b - which is fine because I’m sure that people like that. Personally I would like to have a bit of variety, because generally that is what I listen to. You can see that from my musical taste and that’s reflected in the new album. I mean you’ve got Mark Lanegan next to

Wouter Van Vaerenbergh

Band... I mean

Fujiya and Miyagi. And for me a good tune is a good tune regardless of genre.” For now, Simenon is content to have an album that has been ecstatically received by the critics, but he naturally harbours fears as to whether the public will follow suit. “I’m not going to tour if there’s no desire and people don’t want to see it, but at this moment I feel very inspired and have actually started writing the next album.” So 2018 for the next Bomb The Bass release then? “I hope not (laughs), maybe within the year. But I remember saying the same thing when I started Future Chaos.”

Future Chaos is out now on !K7

Banned

Thank god (or whatever) for freedom of expression! Pity the repressed denizens of countries under the influence of communism or dictatorships! Thankfully our ‘liberal’ society has no truck with such restrictions eh? Oh, hang on, have you met my Auntie Beeb? Apparently, she’s quite puritanical really, and interferes… a lot. Out of hundreds of banned artists/songs, here are some of the highlights. Sex ‘Relax… when you want to come’, but not all over our airwaves Frankie! Oi! Jane Birkin! That sounds suspiciously like you’re having an orgasm. And Serge Gainsbourg, you naughty boy! I speak French and know that ‘entre tes reins’ means ‘between your kidneys’. Au revoir, Je ne t’aime pas! Profanity Too Drunk to Fuck by the Dead Kennedys? Well that’s just an average Saturday night out is it not? What about those naughty Super Furries, when the Man couldn’t give a fuck over 50 times a song… pretty sure Fatboy Slim’s Fucking in Heaven (f-word x 100) was only banned cos it’s shit though. War / Politics ‘Queen’ rhyming with ‘Fascist Regime’? Schoolboy poetry really, but all you Sex Pistols can get to detention right now. Meantime, during the first Gulf War a huge plethora of songs/ artists were ‘unofficially’ struck off the playlist to avoid the potential of sedition. These acts included Bomb The Bass (yeah, cos that’d have given us ideas) and Massive Attack who were referred to simply as ‘Massive’ while the crisis was ongoing. Other tracks discouraged included The Cure, Killing an Arab (it’s a pretentious Camus reference), Abba’s Waterloo, Blondie’s Atomic and Lulu’s Boom Bang a Bang… Really, no comment needed!

Wouter Van Vaerenbergh

42 THE SKINNY

October 08

Music


Music

Jacopo Carreras:

Somnambulism & Sofas Jacopo Carreras’ From Bed To Couch is one of the most complex and challenging electronic albums of recent years. Liam Arnold asked him what gets him out of bed in the morning.

It would have been all too easy to dismiss Lan Muzic as another Berlin techno label pumping out tracks for the Watergate: 12”s by Touane, Philip Sherburne and label bosses Exercise One offered little more than familiar shuffling rhythms and fractured arpeggios, even if they were damn solid floor movers. However, with Jacopo Carreras’ debut album, From Bed to Couch, Lan have well and truly broken the mould. Despite the lethargic title, From Bed to Couch is a whirlwind of a record, swerving seemingly randomly across the musical plane, displacing every element. At the eye of the storm, it’s still techno though, and Manky and Gentle Touch power forward with the kind of hard-nosed beats that flood the floor at peak time, whilst Carreras builds from this base to explore minimal composition, rock, breakbeats and wonky trip-hop. Carreras’ eclectic tastes go some way to explaining the multi-faceted power of From Bed to Couch; he cites SunElectric, Efdemin and Modeselektor as favourites, but just as happily references Hendrix, the Beatles and his childhood piano lessons. “As I said and as I believe, every piece of music we listen to, even Ms Aguilera, leaves a piece in each one of us”, he tells me. He later expands on this idea when discussing the influence of Berlin and Lan Muzic: “All my musical friends really influence me. Probably the closest are the ones who reach more into me. From Lee Jones, to the Exercise One crew (whose live set I can’t even think of not experiencing), to every single DJ/performer I heard - whether I liked it or not. I would say it is an ideological heart contribution. As in all art scenes everyone gives, everyone receives. I hope I manage to give too!” Along with musical taste, Carreras’ biography is represented on From Bed to Couch. As an occasional DJ, former rock bassist and jazz musician, he’s able to inculcate the kind of driving, electro-punk that Killing Joke have been trying to recapture for the past decade (Rox Tox), the springy kick drums and repetitive riffs of Amê (One Sentence), and splintering electronics a la AFX (Manky). However, this is not merely a collection of external influences and memories. Indeed, From Bed to Couch was created using custom-designed software, patches of which are included with the

www.theskinny.co.uk

album. So why did he choose to start with custom software? “The first reason I did it was pragmatic: do by yourself what others won’t do unless you pay a lot of money,” he responds, “The second, but of greater importance, is ideological; defining my own spaces is as important as defining where you want to go.” As with Kraftwerk or Monolake, Carreras reinvents the methodology behind music production and in doing so, creating an entirely new contextual framework to work around. Carreras exhibits none of Kraftwerk’s legendary inscrutability with regard to his tools though, and includes a number of his custom software patches along with the CD version of From Bed To Couch. Giving away the mechanics behind his work seems contrary to the very idea of individual spaces, as each use of the software further crowds the ‘individual space’ with skewed reflections. However, Carreras disregards individual ownership of his programs, seeking more to engage with the evolution of technology and music as a whole. “I am so convinced that software awareness is the focal point of a new individuality we are heading for, that I had to put it in practice, somehow” he explains. “I needed to share my experience and I don’t really care if someone else uses the distortion from Anarko-F, or Acute’s guitars. I would actually be very, very happy for this!” It’s refreshing to encounter an artist so in touch with the philosophical concepts surrounding their creativity, and Carreras happily states that “I could go on for days!” discussing ideas of individuality and an artist’s ‘ownership’ over their work. The kinds of musicians willing to engage with these concepts are usually either smugly incomprehensible art snobs obsessed with method, or reclusive techno artists prone to spectacular hissy-fits and very occasional remixes. However, Carreras stands out not merely for his philosophy of interaction between art and artists, but the fact that From Bed to Couch is bloody entertaining and hugely catchy. It can be enjoyed on every level, from critical appreciation to philosophical debate, to technological study. Quite simply though, there’s nothing like the dirty, overdriven bass of Rox Tox to leave you crawling between horizontal positions the next day. www.myspace.com/jacopocarreras

October 08

THE SKINNY 43


SINGLES

THE DIRTY DOZEN

BY NICK MITCHELL

If this was the mid-90s and Oasis were in their pomp, The Shock of the Lightning (rr, Out Now) would be an album track at best, and certainly not the lead single from a new album. But that says more about what they’ve become than it does about the track, which tries to hide daft lyrics (“love is a litany, a magical mystery”) behind Noel’s bludgeoning guitar barrage. At least Arctic Monkeys’ Alex Turner knows when people are getting tired of the same-old. The Last Shadow Puppets, his side-project with the Rascals’ Miles Kane, attempts to recapture the lush orchestral pop of the 1960s with some success, yet My Mistakes Were Made For You (rr, 20 Oct) is still strangely underwhelming. Another band with an eye on the past are Attic Lights. Wendy (rrr, 6 Oct) is further proof of these Glaswegians’ harmony-heavy talents, but it doesn’t quite hit the dreamy heights of July single of the month Bring You Down. Following in Noel and Alex’s footsteps before them, the Ting Tings can lay claim to being the most hyped band of the year, but will they sustain the adoration of the mainstream with this fourth single? Well, probably, and it doesn’t matter that Be The One (rrr, 13 Oct) is nothing like as brainlessly infectious as their preceeding efforts. It’s easy to see why Fight Like Apes are currently sup-

ANOTHER MONTH, ANOTHER MOTLEY MÉLANGE OF LADROCK VETERANS, ZINGY POP TARTS, MOODY RAPPERS AND LOCAL UPSTARTS. NICK MITCHELL WADES IN...

porting the Ting Tings on their sold-out UK tour, because Jake Summers (rr, 20 Oct) is just the kind of disposable, sugar-rich indie-pop that their audeince digs with a JCB. CSS were sorta like the Ting Tings of 2007: their dumb-butfun electro-pop injected a shot of colour into our cloudy British summer. But judging by the frankly rubbish Move (r, 13 Oct) it looks like Brazil’s best musical export since Os Mutantes have misplaced their former charm. You can’t beat a good song title, and Brave Bulging Buoyant Clairvoyants (rrrr, 13 Oct) is a classic. It’s a pleasure to hear the singer of the band responsible, Wild Beasts, strain his falsetto around this tongue-twister, so who cares what it means? Edinburgh’s Kid Canaveral meanwhile prefer to focus their energies on crafting old-fashioned indie-rock. Second Time Around (rrr, 27 Oct) keeps it simple, down to the chugging beat, ragged riff and chorus of (something like) bah-bada-bah-bah-badaaa-bah-bah-bada-bah. Ace. In the history of unlikely cover versions, Tricky taking on Kylie Minogue is up there with Johnny Cash doing Nine Inch Nails. Slow (rrr, 13 Oct) isn’t as disastrous as you might imagine, with the Knowle West Boy’s custom growl adding a

layer of menace to the Minogue gloss. Staying urban for a second, we turn our attention to hyped Chicago hip hop duo The Cool Kids. Mikey Rocks (rrrr, 20 Oct) is a good snapshot of their crystal-clear beats and inventive rhyming. One of the best things about sifting through a pile of circular plastic every month is when you come across a sublime little tune from a relative unknown. Moscow State Circus (rrrr, 27 Oct) by young Liverpudlian Eugene McGuinness is one such tune, packed full of haunting Midlake-style chord shifts and priceless lines like “I’m as subtle and as playful as a hammer-headed shark.” Lastly Dananananaykroyd, Glasgow’s best syllable-heavy thrash-pop act, who can already retire happy having met Bill Murray on a plane recently, and also finally winning the coveted Dirty Dozen single of the month. Pink Sabbath (rrrr, 6 Oct) is a full frontal assault of sinew-stretching shouts and fingerbleeding guitars. Oh, and B-side Chrome Rainbow might just be even better. DANANANANAYKROYD PLAY CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 4 OCT (WITH JOHNNY FOREIGNER) AND THE BARROWLAND, GLASGOW ON 5 OCT (WITH FOALS). WWW.MYSPACE.COM/DANANANANAYKROYD

REVIEWS BEAR HANDS GOLDEN EP

27 OCT, GORILLA MUSIC

rrrr

BSS PRESENTS: BRENDAN CANNING

COPY HAHO

13 OCT, ARTS & CRAFTS

13 OCT, TEENAGE LUST

HIT THE WALL

CUTTING OUT THE BAD/YOU ARE MY COAL MINE

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For those to whom the phrase ‘debut EP’ conjures up the notion of a tinny or fuzzy handful of half-baked songs, you’re sure to be disappointed with Golden by Brooklyn upstarts Bear Hands. The band show off a number of genres as influence on these four songs and none of which rub the wrong way. A Siamese Dream-like riff permeates Long Lean Queen, a track that, along with most of the album, demonstrates modern indie’s propensity for dance beat take-offs. Later, Sickly Brunette recalls contemporaries The Helio Sequence with its spaced-out, caterwauling guitars. In short, Golden is a competent amalgamation of expansive indie and alternative rock, an admirable debut and reason enough to anticipate what comes next. [Jason Morton]

Broken Social Scene Presents: the other bloke from Broken Social Scene. And with a whole host of ‘Socialites’ - including co-honcho Kevin Drew on board for parent album Something For Everyone, you have to wonder what all this is about. Weird prefixes aside though, Hit The Wall is a tasty little indie-pop morsel, built on a cyclical guitar riff, a nicely understated chorus that, somehow, brings The Klaxons to mind, before ending with some requisite BSS brass codas. In fact, it’s not too far removed from Canning’s more pronounced work with the expansive Canadian troupe really. No bad thing in these books. [Darren Carle]

BEAR HANDS SUPPORT THE HOLLOWAYS AT THE GARAGE, GLASGOW ON 25 OCT

WWW.ARTS-CRAFTS.CA/BRENDANCANNING

DEAD OR AMERICAN A BORDER CROSSING 6 OCT, PREDESTINATION

rrr

Moving from their old post-hardcore stomping ground to more melodic pastures, the second Dead or American single to be released from their forthcoming Thaumaturgy LP is less a song on its own terms and more a collection of the best bits of other bands. Kicking off with a minimalist guitar line that seems reminiscent of Quicksand, the vocals oscillate between Conrad Keely and Cedric Bixler without quite reaching the intensity of the former or the unhinged shrillness of the latter. Poor production and mixing mean that the end result is both undercooked and muddy, sounding demo-ish instead of lo-fi and rendering this a so-so offering from an arse kicking live band. [Ewen Millar] DEAD OR AMERICAN LAUNCH THEIR NEW ALBUM AT CAPTAIN’S REST, GLASGOW ON 1 NOV AND PLAY HENRY’S CELLAR BAR, EDINBURGH ON 22 NOV.

Since 2005, Copy Haho have been sweet words on many a Scottish music critic’s lips, despite a seemingly slow build for the Stonehaven four-piece. This latest release, however, could very well reach beyond merely critical acclaim as Cutting Out the Bad perfectly demonstrates the band’s ability to carve out melodic rock songs that are charming and poppy, yet amazingly non-cheesy. Sounding equal parts Dinosaur Jr and Broken Social Scene, second A-side You Are My Coal Mine is a frenetic burst of melody and unlikely romantic sentiment (‘I’m the shit on you shoes, you are the shit on mine’) as endearing as it is catchy, and equally hard to ignore. [Ryan Drever] AVAILABLE VIA WWW.TEENAGELUSTLABEL.COM COPY HAHO PLAY: CABARET VOLTAIRE, EDINBURGH ON 17 AND 24 OCT

EAGLEOWL

FOR THE THOUGHTS YOU NEVER HAD EP OUT NOW, FIFE KILLS

rrrr Edinburgh’s eagleowl are notoriously slow workers, but it’d be missing the point somewhat to wait for a full-length debut album to emerge when this EP has everything but the duration. Their slow-burning, fragile folk refuses to betray youthful energy, instead moving with care to preserve the peace behind each song. Most impressively, eagleowl know exactly how to construct a collection of songs that flows from first second to last: the fourth track of five Blackout is entirely instrumental, but feels essential in its context. Holding For The Thoughts... all together as one is the violin, which takes on such vivid character through its journey as to wrestle the EP’s emotional focus from both the male and female singers. From its terrible melancholy on the title track, to its cautious step forward in Blanket, to its cheerful resolution in final track Motherfucker, it’s the violin’s personality that makes this record sing. [Ally Brown]

KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 18 OCT, CAFE DRUMMOND, ABERDEEN ON 20 OCT

FOUND

YOU’RE REALLY QUITE THE CATCH 31 OCT, FENCE

rrrr

It feels like rasping Found frontman Ziggy, the drinking man’s Paolo Nutini, scrawled this inappropriately acerbic anti-love ballad to an unsuitable girlfriend at the arse-end of a long, desperate session. Comparisons with fellow morning-after melancholists Arab Strap are inevitable, but Found’s freeform approach to composition and a bottomless music-box of inspiration give them an unexpectedly optimistic humour. Based on their patchwork of seemingly misplaced strums, beeps and clattering drums, You’re Really Quite The Catch sees them reshuffling divergent ideas into their most coherently catchy and approachable work yet. Take notice – Found have found their sound, and it’s really quite the catch. [Euan Ferguson] FOUND PLAY THE MILL @ THE CAVES, EDINBURGH ON 2 OCT AND SUPPORT JAMES PANTS AT VOODOO ROOMS, EDINBURGH ON 9 OCT

HOLD FIRE

MAX TUNDRA

UNITED FRUIT

27 OCT, TRIGGER CLUB

29 SEP, DOMINO

6 OCT, SELF RELEASED

POWER CUTS

rrr

WILL GET FOOLED AGAIN

rrr

SHAKE

rrrr

On their debut single, Brighton four-piece Hold Fire blend experimentation with an instinct for big pop choruses. Hyperactive crunchy guitars propel Power Cuts forward with stop-start tension, while Clark Maides’ vocals recall, simultaneously, Gruff Rhys and Matt from Busted. Although their stylistic itchiness seems unintentional - the result, perhaps, of having too many little bits that sounded cool - it renders Hold Fire slightly more interesting than your usual high-school-hangover rock band. However, bonus cut You’ll Never Know summarises the flipside to their youthful energy: its bythe-numbers stadium indie and he-says-she-says lyrics prove that they’re still a work in progress. [Gillian Watson]

Max Tundra has had a short two-album career so far, but you’d imagine that the carnage of old Amiga 500s ripped apart to be here is sizeable. More 16-Bit deathbeds seem inevitable with forthcoming album Parallax Error Beheads You, at least if Will Get Fooled Again is indicative of it. A disarmingly simple down-stroked guitar riff introduces a sweetly sung melody that name-checks E-Bay, Google and MySpace (finger on the pulse there Max) before hitting home the extraordinary line “she baked a pie of very shy laboratory mice”. It’s all fed sideways into a knackered child’s Casio keyboard, spewing out the other end like aural Playdoh. Good clean fun. [Darren Carle]

As any attendee at one of their many recent Glasgow performances will tell you, United Fruit’s rapid realisation of their potential, especially live, has been nothing less than remarkable. Shake captures them at their feral best, thanks in no small way to some nice work by the infamous Chem19 studios in Hamilton. It’s a boorish stomp, initially more paced than much of their other material, but eventually escalating into barely restrained fury. B-side Eye Hell View is a trans-European interpretation of Sonic Youth and could arguably have been a strong single in its own right. Very promising stuff. [Austin Tasseltine]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/WEAREHOLDFIRE

MAX TUNDRA SUPPORTS HOT CHIP AT GLASGOW ACADEMY, 2 NOV

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/UNITEDFRUITBAND

44 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

RECORDS


RECORDS

FatCat:

The Purr-fect label

NOW ONE OF THE UK’S MOST EXCITING AND ECLECTIC LABELS, FATCAT RECORDS HAS COME A LONG WAY SINCE ITS EARLY VINYL SHACK DAYS. BILLY HAMILTON CAUGHT UP WITH CO-FOUNDER DAVE CAWLEY TO DISCOVER HOW HE KEEPS THE OPERATION PURRING

JUMPIN’ HOT CLUB PRESENTS

FRIGHTENED RABBIT DAVID GOURLEY

If variety is the spice of life then FatCat Records are piquant enough to have even the most resistant tastebuds burning. Established almost 20 years ago by Dave Cawley and Alex Knight, the label has developed into one of the UKs finest purveyors of musical eclecticism, etching out a pathway to success for the likes of Sigur Ros, No Age and Animal Collective. The FatCat story began in the West Sussex town of Crawley where Knight and Cawley established an electronica-based record shop inspired by the House-bound sounds of Chicago and Detroit. Quickly realising the shop’s niche-filling potential, the duo upped sticks to London’s gold-plated streets where, over seven years, they built-up an awesome reputation amidst the movers and shakers of the capital’s music community. When The Skinny catches up with co-founder Cawley it discovers FatCat’s transformation from distributor to label owes much to the efforts of a certain Icelandic songstress: “We’d gained some really good contacts during our time in London and one of our most valued customers was Bjork,” recalls Cawley. “She’d come down and we’d hook her up with a lot of electronic people; she’s really good like that, a kind of artistic Hoover. One day she mentioned there was a spare desk at the offices of [renowned Indie label] One Little Indian and, well, that’s really where the idea for the label started.” The concept of setting up on a whim seems preposterous in the regimented confines of today’s music industry but it’s clear that the now Brighton-based FatCat has been marching to an entirely different beat from the beginning: “We wanted to set out with the label because we wanted to reflect our constant search for new, great music,” says Cawley. “I didn’t want a record label that people just bought, we wanted people to put our records on and either love or hate them. We wanted to provoke the sort of extreme reaction

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

where the person who’d bought the record went ‘wow’ when they heard it.” The ‘wow’ factor’s certainly prevalent when you cast a glance over the artists who’ve sheltered in FatCat’s sanctuary down the years but, as Cawley explains, the difficulty lies in retaining a healthy roster when cash-splashing Majors come a-knocking: “Money is the bottom line. A lot of people may be creative and talk it up but everyone has a price and that’s taken me a long time to understand because my main goals were never about money, it was to expose talent and to let it reach the most people possible. I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t have a price but what I have found is that, no matter who goes, there’s always another band, another side to the coin.” Having recently lost both Animal Collective and No Age to larger stables, Cawley’s optimism could be mistaken for post-traumatic delusion, but with The Twilight Sad and Frightened Rabbit stepping up to the plate it seems the label’s main strength lies in this steadfast belief in the new, no matter what the current scene-du-jour may be: “What’s really important to us is to not lose sight of who we are and who we’re championing,” Cawley declares. “Trends or ideas that end up in the mainstream always start on the periphery and they have an incredible effect that ends up making its way out there to the public... we’ve been on the brink a number of times; we’re a small label and we’ve been in debt but we’re very, very lucky. We’ve had incredible new bands who have pulled us out and given us a new lease of life and hopefully that’ll continue for years to come.”

BOSS SOUNDS

R E G G A E F E S T I VA L

SLY AND ROBBIE MISTY IN ROOTS THE PIONEERS EASY STAR ALL STARS NATTY SKA CUBANO SYMARIP YESKING MARK RAE JERRY DAMMERS IRATION STEPPAS ALPHA + OMEGA

OCTOBER 18TH - 19TH NEWCASTLE CARLING ACADEMY NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE www.jumpinhot.com

THE TWILIGHT SAD PLAY ABC, GLASGOW ON 9 OCT FRIGHTENED RABBIT SUPPORT DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE AT CORN EXCHANGE, EDINBURGH ON 14 NOV FAT-CAT.CO.UK

OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 45


ALBUMS ALBUM OF THE MONTH: TV ON THE RADIO - DEAR SCIENCE OUT NOW, 4AD

rrrrr It could have gone horribly wrong of course; the widespread acclaim and

We’re treated to funk (Crying), soul (Stork and Owl), moody electronica (su-

subsequent confidence given to TVOTR by 2006’s seminal Return to Cookie

perlative opener Halfway Home) and much more besides, but TVOTR make

Mountain (our album of the year, no less) might have led to indulgence and

the whole exercise of listing genres track by track utterly futile; instead they

self-aggrandisement which would have spoiled the party not long after it got

invite you to pay homage to their superior musicianship, insightful lyricism and

started. Thankfully, multi-instrumentalist Dave Sitek, vocalist Tunde Adebimpe

wonderful production, until you’re overcome by the realisation that you’re

and co. appear far too clever to fall into that trap. The myriad of stylings on display here are breathtakingly vast, yet mercifully understated; moulded into a collection of songs which run the gamut of experimentation without ever disappearing up the nearest available posterior.

dealing with what will surely be recounted as a classic in future years. [Paul Mitchell] WWW.TVONTHERADIO.COM

A SILENT FILM

ATTIC LIGHTS

BONNIE ‘PRINCE’ BILLY

6 OCT , XTRA MILE

13 OCT, ISLAND

20 OCT, DOMINO

THE CITY THAT SLEEPS

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FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

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IS IT THE SEA?

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The 11 doses of well-spoken, middle-class melodrama contained herein immediately bring to mind the likes of Coldplay and Morning Runner. A Silent Film’s take on the subject is thankfully a little more adrenalised than most of their contemporaries though; mixing the schmaltzy, over-blown English romanticism of Keane with the compelling modality of Antennaera Cave-In. That said, The City That Sleeps sees the rolling emotional thunder of Robert Stevenson’s piano meet with the polished prog-pop of the aforementioned Bostonian metallers’ later career to surprisingly good effect. Feather White and You Will Leave A Mark hit the spot, though are ultimately outnumbered by lesser fare, whilst forthcoming single Thirteen Times The Strength is crying out for a Richard Curtis film to attach itself to. In short, it’s a safe bet these guys will be in Q magazine’s top 20 albums of the year. Make of that what you will. [Chris Cusack]

There is nothing unduly complicated on Attic Light’s debut LP, and it’s a trait the band evidently prides itself on. But it’s within the easy, blissful melodies that lies the appeal. For a harmony-loving nostalgia-fuelled band like this, reference points are always going to be simple: think a sugared-up Thrills, a skinnier Hal, a sunnier Teenage Fanclub (Francis MacDonald produces and manages the band) and naturally, a not so ground-breaking Beach Boys. Singles Wendy and Never Get Sick Of The Sea have already had remixes commissioned to the likes of Mogwai and The Vaselines and accordingly those are two of the most immediate tracks on the album. But it’s the two most downbeat offerings here that stick out like a pair of sore thumbs: piano ballad Dark Eyes and excellent closing track Winter On. Sure, Friday Night Lights won’t win any awards for innovation, but it’s the familiar things in life that hit that sweet spot in your soul. [Finbarr Bermingham]

What makes a good live album? That chance shout from the audience between songs, such as the famous ‘Judas!’ at Dylan’s 1966 Manchester gig, recaptured in the Bootleg series? Or simply an artist at the height of their powers, such as Neil Young’s Live at Massey Hall, recorded between After the Gold Rush and Harvest? With Is It The Sea?, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s 2006 concert at Edinburgh’s Queen’s Hall, it is the latter. In place of normal audience interaction there is a palpable sense of bewitched reverence, even retrospectively on this CD. Performing with local trad talents Harem Scarem (on vocal harmonies, fiddles and flute) and Alex Neilson (drums), Will Oldham sings rousing versions of older tracks like A Minor Place, traditional standards like Molly Bawm and previews of his then upcoming album The Letting Go, most notably the majestic Cursed Sleep. In true B’P’B style, this album is a real slow-burner, but it only adds to Oldham’s reputation as a modern Dylan or Young. [Nick Mitchell]

A SILENT FILM PLAY NICE ‘N’ SLEAZY, GLASGOW ON 23 OCT

ATTIC LIGHTS PLAY ABC, GLASGOW ON 25 OCT

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/PRINCEBONNIEBILLY

OKKERVIL RIVER

COMET GAIN

DEADMAU5

13 OCT, JAGJAGUWAR

28 OCT, MILOU STUDIOS

4 NOV, ULTRA RECORDS

THE STAND INS

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What now comprises The Stand Ins was originally intended to be the second disc of a double album with The Stage Names, which was instead released last year on its own. Possessing neither the brash melodic agility of that record, nor the dizzying lyrical depths of Black Sheep Boy before it, The Stand Ins won’t be received quite so well; but don’t dismiss this as an off-cuts album. With character portraits as vivid as these, Okkervil River simply couldn’t have kept The Stand Ins off the stage. Will Sheff is mostly concerned with the troubled minds of those on the fringes of fame, and thanks to tracks like Singer-Songwriter, where he gleefully dissects the faults of a self-obsessed muso, and On Tour With Zykos, where he depicts the regretful hurt of a rock star’s latest disposed one night stand, it’s difficult to think of a current indie-rock lyricist who can match him. [Ally Brown]

OKKERVIL RIVER PLAY ORAN MOR, GLASGOW ON 9 NOV WWW.OKKERVILRIVER.COM

BROKEN RECORD PRAYERS

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RANDOM ALBUM TITLE

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Imagine a rain-dampened Go-Betweens, or the C86 bands at their least poptimistic, and you’ll be close to the essence of the “A&B sides, new songs, session tracks and stray dogs” collected on Broken Record Prayers, Comet Gain’s decade-spanning career retrospective. The music stumbles between indie-pop (You Can Hide Your Love Forever) and punk (Orwell Liberty Dance) like someone frantically trying the locked doors of a burning house, while bandleader David Feck’s keenly observational lyrics evoke the emptiness that follows the dashing of romantic hopes, mining distinctly Gedge-ian territory. Yet vocalist Rachel Evans’ declaration that “We have torn ideals/Comet Gain has torn ideals” presents itself as a defiant statement of artistic intent rather than a humdrum complaint, and there’s a sense that the group find a singularly awkward release in performance. This kind of catharsis can prove a challenging listen over 74 minutes, but in small doses it’s terrifically potent. [Gillian Watson]

Festival-goers may have been a little freaked out this summer when faced with what appeared to be a deranged Mickey Mouse spinning tracks behind the decks. This giant red rodent was no illusion, but the trademark costume of Canadian producer Deadmau5, who regularly sports his giant scarlet Mau5head on stage. But beneath the “quirky” album title and gimmicky fancy-dress shines an album packed with twinkling brilliance, a subtle fusion of minimal house, trace and techno. Contradicting his name and appearance, the mau5, seems to shy away from anything cheesy, instead producing a smooth collection of slow-burning masterpieces. The deep swelling melody of Slip and Complications, with it’s strange life suport machine like beeping, tie in perfectly with the now well known singles like Not Exactly and Faxing Berlin. The beauty of Random Album Title lies in its apparent simplicity, but the alluring, enveloping intensity that underpins each track means it’s not hard to believe that the man and his mask could be headlining those festival freak outs soon. [Emma Kilday]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/THECOMETGAIN

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/DEADMAU5

DEERHUNTER

DESALVO

FUCKED UP

27 OCT, KRANKY / 4AD

6 OCT, ROCK ACTION

13 OCT, MATADOR

MICROCASTLE

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MOOD POISONER

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THE CHEMISTRY OF COMMON LIFE

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With their second full-length LP this Atlantan art-punk quintet can still conjure up an image of Christopher Walken in a headband - carelessly waving a revolver at his own temple - but the difference now is that Deerhunter seem a little more concerned about the consequences of pulling the trigger. That’s not to call this a restrained effort necessarily, but Bradford Cox’s troupe have truly come to harness the melancholic mania of last year’s Cryptograms ; opener Cover Me (Slowly) is a lush ballad, seamlessly wrought with the perfect ratio of sad/happy while Agoraphobia is like a magic eye picture for anybody without the patience to fall for My Bloody Valentine’s squall. And so they carefully steer Microcastle; shedding the reverb and refining their songwriting to a point where they sometimes barely resemble the gang who endured the turbulent sessions of their first record to produce a striking amalgam of all that they have learned so far, [Dave Kerr]

As with so many contemporary records depicting ball-gagged nuns making lurid advances on porcine livestock, Mood Poisoner isn’t one for the dinner party. It is however one for the Bret Easton-Ellis-inspired orgy afterwards, as silk bedsheets are knotted between limbs, smearing blood across the swollen flesh of innumerable bodies of indeterminate sex. Botch, Jesus Lizard and Converge all have questions to answer to DeSalvo’s parents, I’m sure, but in the meantime we can all enjoy an overdue but extremely well-realised debut album from one of Scotland’s most prominent sociopathic hardcore acts. The hideous, staccato chug of Latrine Lizard is a definite highlight, as is the accruing bile of Get Black. Fiendish closing number Cock Swastika makes its point too, in typically subtle style. Next time you’re entertaining then: red wine - check; Mood Poisoner - check; tie-wraps - check; coathangers - check; tub of salt - check. And don’t forget the binliners. [Chris Cusack]

The Chemistry Of Common Life opens with a little flute solo (or maybe a clarinet—the point being, an instrument that doesn’t belong in a Fucked Up album) playing in the background, delicately, soothingly, and pastorally. Of course, when you start thinking “wtf?” a trace of feedback kicks in and soon enough your speakers are struggling with lead-singer Pink Eyes’ nearly unintelligible growls and bellows. It’s the same old Fucked Up sound—but a bit more epic. The songs are unified by running motifs of birth, death, living and re-living. The hardcore edge is offset by eerie female voices (guest musicians Katie Stelmanis and The Vivian Girls), and the whole thing is ironically scientific. The title is taken from a 19th century book of the same name, which delves into the hallucinogenic properties of certain plants and mushrooms. It’s pretty trippy, yes, but never strays too far from the dirty aggression Fucked Up exude only too well. [Jorge Marticorena]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/DEERHUNTER

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/DESALVOLAND

FUCKED UP PLAY KING TUT’S, GLASGOW ON 16 NOV

46 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

RECORDS


GREGORY & THE HAWK

HERMAN DUNE

6 OCT, TEMPORARY RESIDENCE

13 OCT, FATCAT

13 OCT, CITY SLANG

DOOMSDAYER’S HOLIDAY

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MOENIE AND KITCHI

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NEXT YEAR IN ZION

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Former long-term residents of the Neurot ranch, Grails have always had something of the misfit about them. Their albums balance accessibility and eclecticism, generally not requiring the kind of esoteric suspension of disbelief behind the success of many of their peers. Latest opus Doomsdayer’s Holiday changes all of this. The eponymous opener rolls steadily in from a blackened horizon before crashing, hellishly, onto our beaches, illustrative of its ominous title. The gentle, if sinister, string work and resulting comparisons to Dirty Three evident on the classic Redlight album quickly become but distant memories. Immediate Mate and X-Contaminations embark into a droning, swirling wilderness, making sizeable demands of the listener and by closing number Acid Rain they have virtually morphed into Wish You Were Here-era Pink Floyd. Certainly there are moments of brilliance throughout Doomsdayer’s Holiday, but it’s a marked, misanthropic lunge away from the the tone of their previous rapturous output.[Chris Cusack]

Young New Yorker Meredith Godreau may have named herself Gregory & The Hawk to avoid being stereotyped as ‘another female singer-songwriter’, but the secret will get out somehow. Much in the style of a singersongwriter, Meredith sings songs that she writes too. Whoops. But let’s let another secret out of the bag: Gregory (ahem) has a stunning voice, like a less affected variant of Joanna Newsom’s lightweight whisper, which could seduce bankers while announcing a stock market crash. Falsetto’d over songs like Wild West and Stonewall, where her guitar is gently embellished with crashing drums, it’s breathtaking. Ghost also benefits from a fuller band sound and a rare burst of energy, while Harmless gives a nod to PJ Harvey’s intimate neuroticism. But if the album as a whole doesn’t quite take off, she’s indicated some potential; and if the music career never takes off, she’d make a fine new talking clock. [Ally Brown]

David-Ivar Herman Dune claims that this is the first album he’s recorded when he was happy, and the instrumentation bears him out: upbeat brass bubbles under the surface, Dave Tattersall of the Wave Pictures contributes clean, virtuoso lead guitar lines and bandmate Neman’s clip-clopping percussion would give Eeyore a spring in his step if someone surreptitiously added it to his iPod. Yet this is a record characterised by absence: brother André has gone off to start a new life as Stanley Brinks and with him have gone “the dots from the u”. The lead track is named My Home Is Nowhere Without You and the mournful Someone Knows Better Than Me, with its naive disappointment at ready-made Ingmar Bergman obituaries, seems like it might also be a disguised eulogy. On its predecessor, Giant, André’s songs were the dark, brooding counterpoints to David-Ivar’s home-sick, lovestruck but playful Dylan/Cohen wordplay. On Next Year in Zion there is only the latter, and enjoyable as that is, the absence is felt. [Milo McLaughlin]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/GRAILSONGS

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/GREGORYANDTHEHAWK

WWW.HERMANDUNE.COM

LAMBCHOP

MADLIB

CATZ ‘N’ DOGZ

6 OCT, CITY SLANG

20 OCT, BBE

6 OCT, MOTHERSHIP

OH (OHIO)

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Ohio: not the most inspiring of US states. This is a perfect breeding ground for Lambchop’s peculiarity-driven song writing; always seeking wonder in the mundane. In this case Ohio could be anything, anywhere. From the merits of a favourite pencil (A Hold Of You) to Sharing A Gibson With Martin Luther King Jr – a sublime hybrid of ideas, fusing an obscure dream with feelings of disillusionment - Wagner’s idiosyncratic household voyeurism rarely fails to charm. Having faced and dealt with personal tragedy, OH marks a step away from 2006’s esoteric Damaged. Kurt Wagner’s back “smoking on the patio” and has resumed centre stage. Whereas Damaged was crafted around the piano of Tony Crow, OH was written to be performed solo and reflectively, and the compositions sound stronger for it. The lilting arpeggio of Slipped, Dissolved And Loosed is the highlight of an outstanding record which preserves Lambchop’s lackadaisical blueprint, whilst sounding decidedly reinvigorated. [Finbarr Bermingham]

WLIB AM: KING OF THE WIGFLIP

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STARS OF THE ZOO

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US hip-hop producer Otis Jackson Jr. (more commonly known as Madlib) showcases his abstract style on WLIB AM: King of the Wigflip, the last album in BBE’s Beat Generation series. The self-styled Beat Konducta’s contribution marks a fitting end to this succession of producer-driven discs which began with J Dilla, the late rapper-producer who was Jackson’s closest contemporary. Yet setting aside this symbolic significance, accidental or not, and King of the Wigflip stands as a strong effort, melding crunchy funk and old-school soul samples with found vocals and illustrious guest spots from the likes of Talib Kweli and Prince Po. The overall vibe is obtuse humour with a darker edge, reminiscent of …Is Dead-era De La Soul. But there’s a certain 21st-Century edge to proceedings that allows Madlib to claim a place of his own alongside Prince Paul, that band’s guru, and Jay Dee himself, in the pantheon of hip-hop’s great producers. [Gillian Watson]

Better known for their work as 3 Channels - with releases on Crosstown Rebels, Trapez, Pokerflat and pretty much every other underground techno label - Poland’s finest producers assume the Catz ‘n’ Dogz moniker for an excursion into deep and tech-house territory. There are plenty of cross-over elements, though; 2 and My Zoo is Your Zoo are firmly rooted in Detroit fanboy territory, albeit with live percussion and instrumentation softening the mechanistic edges. These drum breaks and live synths add a cinematic, widescreen quality to Stars of the Zoo, and Sunset in the East closes the album by fully indulging this - segueing from European minimal tech into pure blaxploitation funk. Though not reconfiguring the universe, Stars of the Zoo combines house, techno and soul to great effect, and is an stalwart addition to Three Channels’ high-quality output. [Liam Arnold]

WWW.KINGOFTHEWIGFLIP.COM

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/3CHANNELS

LAMBCHOP PLAY ABC, GLASGOW ON 31 OCT WWW.LAMBCHOP.NET

ROZI PLAIN

INSIDE OVER HERE 6 OCT, FENCE

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There is a problem when trying to review an album like this, which woos you with its easy charms, which stills your spirit with its banjos rippling like a bubbling stream. Rozi Plain’s catherine wheel vocal harmonies set your mind awandering and you begin to recline into the sound of her voice and melodies like you would a warm bath surrounded by candles and shared with a lover. Plain, the latest signing to Fife’s Fence Records, has made an album of such charm that there lies a problem in critiquing it effectively. Let me bathe in it, instead, let me reflect. Oh OK then, some facts: it was produced by a handful of folk including Fence brothers Kenny and Gordon Anderson, and a few friends from her native Bristol where she’s from; and it’s bloody good. There, now let me close my eyes and chill. [Milo McLaughlin]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/ROZIPLAIN

THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES TAIL SWALLOWER AND DOVE 6 OCT, SUICIDE SQUEEZE

rrr Forged from parts set adrift after the disbandment of post-hardcore heroes Botch and Kill Sadie, These Arms Are Snakes suggest they’re still searching for the middle ground between the fury of the first and the melody of the latter with album number three. Calling to mind the aesthetic that At the Drive-In preached as they encouraged punk kids to dance rather than slam each others faces into the dirt, this Seattle-based quartet specialise in making stuttering basslines collide with amphetamine fuelled Hendrix riffs. However, Tail Swallower and Dove trades in much of the immediacy of its predecessor – 2006’s Easter – for a progressive bent that has more in common with the Mars Volta. There’s the odd moment when all this mercurial weirdness turns into tedium - as heard in the listless, ambient meandering of Long and Lonely Step - but it’s the only lingering stinker on an album that otherwise transcends an unfocussed dirge to become a fine modern rock record that will pay dividends to persistence. [Dave Kerr] THESE ARMS ARE SNAKES PLAY STEREO, GLASGOW ON 17 NOV

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK

SHAWN LEE AND CLUTCHY HOPKINS

THE ALL NEW ADVENTURES OF US

21 OCT, UBIQUITY RECORDS

6 OCT, ONE LITTLE INDIAN

CLUTCH OF THE TIGER

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BEST LOVED GOODNIGHT TALES

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Clutchy Hopkins is something of a self-made enigma, replete with a somewhat unlikely backstory that belies his chilled grooves. It has fuelled rumours that he is actually one, or all three, of the Beastie Boys mucking about. On this collaboration with musical handyman, troubadour, and sometime video game sound-tracker, Shawn Lee, it’s easy to hear why such rumours have taken shape, particularly if you take the Brooklyn trio’s The In-Sound From Way Out as a reference point. Clutch of the Tiger is entirely instrumental, funky in its toe-tapping jazzy ways and is indeed effortlessly cool. Unfortunately it’s also largely forgettable and unless this really is your bag, it’s all too easy to let it wash over you as you begin to wonder what you’ll have for tea. However, its second-half fares better, with Bad Influence’s quivering vocal-violas stretching things out of a perceived comfort zone. All in, it’s fine within its field, but this Tiger, whoever he is, could do with baring some more teeth. [Darren Carle]

Having never met the seven members that comprise Southampton’s The All New Adventures of Us personally, it is perhaps unfair to surmise that they are a lovely bunch of polite, well-read and privately educated upstanding young people, but that’s exactly what this record suggests. In fact, forget fairness: singing about holding hands and making shadow puppets - would it be rude to stab a guess that these guys are all still virgins? Probably. However there is a definite childlike naivety and innocence to their sound which, when combined with lyrics of such wide-eyed hope as “Does anyone remember laughter?/Does anyone remember love?” it is difficult to hold in a patronising “awwww”. That or to get the boke a bit. The very English, irritatingly spokennot-sung vocal delivery is the only aspect that would set it apart from the uber-emotional tear-jerking of Dashboard Confessional. [Emma Smith]

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/SHAWNLEEMUSIC

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/TANAOUMUSIC

ONLINE REVIEWS METALLICA DEATH MAGNETIC ROLO TOMASSI HYSTERICS

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JENNY LEWIS ACID TONGUE

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THE SPINTO BAND MOONWINK

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JAY REATARD MATADOR SINGLES '08 KEYBOARD CHOIR MIZEN HEAD TO GASCANANE SOUND LARGE PRO MAIN SOURCE

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THE WALKMEN YOU & ME rrr

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THE ALL NEW ADVENTURES OF US SUPPORT THE SPINTO BAND AT ORAN MOR, GLASGOW ON 29 SEP

TOP 5 ALBUMS 1. TV ON THE RADIO DEAR SCIENCE 2. MADLIB WLIB AM: KING OF THE WIGFLIP 3. DEERHUNTER MICROCASTLE 4. LAMBCHOP OH OHIO 5. DESALVO MOOD POISONER OCTOBER 08

THE SKINNY 47

RECORDS

GRAILS


Live Reviews

- a hell of a month for gigs, where were you?

James Murphy

Calexico

THE TENNENTS MUTUAL: The Caves, 21 Sep

The Queen’s Hall, 11 Sep

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Shapeshifting between climactic post rock, ethereal progginess and otherworldly psych folk, Canadian octet Woodpigeon draw a wayward line between Godspeed!, Espers and Kate Bush. Their soundscapes are nothing if not epic: the whispered harmonies and monastic choral samples knitted together by the omnipresent centrepiece; the violin. Their debut album translates superbly in the Queen’s Hall tonight. Calexico are seasoned veterans by comparison, yet their zeal for what they do remains unwaning. For a band that emerged from the barren Arizona desert, they’re decidedly evergreen. The band’s latest album, Carried To Dust, is a return to their horns ‘n all indie-Mariachi songwriting and tonight’s performance signifys a triumph in this respect. Joey Burns waxes lyrical about the acoustics of the venue, but there’s a sneaking suspicion that, on this form, Calexico would sound good in a garden shed. From Feast Of Wire, Across The Wire and the frenzied Güero Canelo an illustrious past is represented, whilst new tracks Man Made Lake and Two Silver Trees sound equally potent. But it’s their decision to include a cover of Love’s classic Alone Again Or that sums Calexico up best: culturally diverse and melodically supreme, pushing boundaries without ever sacrificing their undoubted ability to entertain. [Finbarr Bermingham]

The underlit crags of The Caves’ interior make it a uniquely beautiful setting to watch live music in; a venue where gazing at the walls isn’t necessarily indicative of a pharmaceutical malfunction. Unfortunately, the height of the main chamber and all those rough edged surfaces seem to throw Frightened Rabbit’s sound around tonight: muddled within each other, each instrument is difficult to pick out. Still, Selkirk’s finest are in top form, particularly in the storming selfdeprecation of The Modern Leper and Keep Yourself Warm’s massive, pounding finale. Half an hour’s just not enough. We’re staring at the walls again as James Murphy gets his disco-not-disco DJ set underway, but only because we never knew a projected image of a smiling child could look so disturbing. Eventually Murphy gets into a groove with the crowd and we don’t let it go. The clattering beats and alien vocals of Liquid Liquid’s version of White Lines is an early highlight, showcasing the leftward bent of Murphy’s choices tonight; an extended but restrained mix of the Bee Gee’s You Should Be Dancing is by far the most mainstream it gets. We are, brothers Gibb, can’t you see? Nobody’s looking at the huge gurning faces now: we’re splaying our feet and arms, singing along with Ceronne, and wishing that this wasn’t a bloody school night. [Ally Brown] www.tennentsmutual.com

Carried To Dust is available now via City Slang. www.casadecalexico.com

James Murphy Markus Thorsen

Meshuggah

Bowerbirds

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Nobody likes it when a band cancels, not even the band. So when Meshuggah vocalist Jens Kidman tells a packed Garage how happy the Swedish experimetal quintet are to be here tonight - for the first time since 1995 - after having to cancel that tasty tour they’d planned with Dillinger Escape Plan last year, you can take it to the bank. Instantly the crowd is thrust into a frenzied sea of uniformed head banging as the band - led by the grimacing, metronomic head butts of Kidman - let off riffs like shotgun blasts in slow motion, unconditionally blowing away this horde of awestruck metal-heads. From the opening roars of Perpetual Black Second, to the manic vocoder solo in closer, Future Breed Machine, this is a full-on assault of technical riffage at its most brutal. Newer songs such as Bleed and Electric Red- from the excellent ObZen - are met with rabid fervour but it’s the firm favourites Rational Gaze and Straws Pulled at Random that quite simply tear the place apart. Truly epic. [Ryan Drever]

It’s on nights like this you notice the gumminess of pub floors. The viscous peel of soles off the hardwood surface is amplified exponentially when pitted against tonight’s gentle stirrings. Jo Mango’s soft keyboard and acoustic guitar murmur sweet optimism as coins crash against coins in the cash drawer of the Gods; bar transactions thrusting their philistine fingers into the ears of a small but appreciative audience. Fortunately, both the sweetly affected Ms Mango and the North Carolinan headliners maintain focus throughout their respective sets of brilliantly executed, modern folk-pop. Given their fondness for the much-maligned accordion, a healthy ratio of tuneful accessibility to rustic Americana is observed by the latter trio. Gathered round a backbone of nylon-stringed guitar, Bowerbirds rotate round the assembled instruments, using the kick drum much like a bodhran and weaving in winsome threads of violin. It’s a virtually flawless showing. Be there next time. [Chris Cusack]

The Garage, 8 Sep

The Admiral Bar, 8 Sep

www.myspace.com/meshuggah

meshuggah shiona walker

www.myspace.com/bowerbirds

Wire

Shearwater

Die! Die! Die!

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rrr

rrrr

It’s “Pink Flag!” over here and “Pink Flag!” over there—all through the night. Nostalgia is a delicate thing at a rock show. There’s a certain unspoken tension between an audience and a long-loved band still operating—strongly, I might add—after 30 years. So yes, as expected, it’s a push and pull tonight between the past and the present—we erupt into applause after every new Wire song not only because we enjoyed it but also because we might hear an old Wire song next. So it goes. But let’s be adults here: it’s not 1977 anymore, this isn’t a paltry reunion tour, Wire are a different band, and they’re soaring through their later material with undeniable energy and precision. That said, honestly, something off of Pink Flag or 154 would really hit the spot. Please. And there it is: the band rips into the familiar bass-stomp and half-spoken bellows of Lowdown. Soon after, the spasmodic Two People in a Room and the eerie pop of The 15th put a reminiscent smile on everyone’s faces. Sorry Wire, we’re like children, I know, but it’s because we look up to you. [Jorge Marticorena]

Shearwater’s most recent two albums, Palo Santo and Rook, both benefit from a production aesthetic that values each quiet second equally with each loud second, forging a real sense of space. Unfortunately, tonight, something in the room making a noise like a camera film rewinding for the entire duration of the set makes it hard to appreciate the quiet moments so much. Still, that just means the songs have to hold our attention in more conventional ways, and they do. Jonathan Meiburg, formerly a member of Okkervil River, has a tremendous voice, that switches between a forceful yell and a tender falsetto, exemplifying Shearwater’s dynamic strength. Opening number On The Death Of The Waters eventually builds into a swirling crescendo, but it’s the song’s delicate opening passage, as well as I Was A Cloud’s exquisite unwinding, that really captivate this audience. The encore is a Talk Talk recreation: all things considered, it seems Mark Hollis is finally getting the idolisation he deserves. [Ally Brown]

If I know anything about Kiwi band managers - and having watched an awful lot of Flight of the Conchords, I’d say I’m pretty clued up - it’s that they can’t find their bands an audience for toffee. It’s the only way to explain why New Zealand’s Die! Die! Die! are playing to a halfempty room on this, their fourth trip to the city. Tonight’s support set from Glasgow’s Hyena manage to fill the empty space between bodies with a solid cacophony of Rival Schools-esque punk rock played at eye socket rattling volume, a not-so-subtle but nicely effective salvo for the bombardment that follows. Die! Die! Die! take to the stage, politely request we move forward a little and suddenly singer/guitarist Andrew Wilson is everywhere; careening around the room, hitting himself and collapsing to his knees with body-shaking howls. By their final song of melodic ferocity a la Trail of Dead he’s lying with his head tucked inside the bass drum, feedback squealing from his discarded guitar while the bass rumbles on. Hopefully by trip five there’ll be more present to weather their visceral fury. [Chris Buckle]

www.shearwatermusic.com

www.myspace.com/diediedienz

The Arches, 11 Sep

www.myspace.com/wirehq

48 THE SKINNY

October 08

Captain’s Rest, 15 Sep

Bowerbirds Sarah Roberts

Captain’s Rest, 9 Sep

die! die! die! derek M chapman

Live music


Records

The Mill Presents:

Ross Clark and dBass

From opposite ends of the musical spectrum, Ross Clark & the Scarfs Go Missing and dBass are up and coming Scottish acts with shared interests at heart. Finbarr Bermingham profiles both acts ahead of their respective performances at The Mill this month

Ross Clark & the Scarfs Go Missing Who are Ross Clark & the Scarfs Go Missing? With Clark himself hailing from Clydebank (“home to greats like Wet Wet Wet and the Krankies”) and his band-mates coming from the Southside, it’s fair to say their roots are firmly in the Glasgow area. “A kind of glass bottle of Irn Bru band,” Clark poetically offers, far more succinctly than The Skinny could have mustered. Having set out writing songs to escape the Blink 182 leanings of his childhood chums, MySpace offered Clark the window of opportunity to meet his current colleagues. “I wanted to play my songs louder and when I met the guys I soon realised that they were my key to getting the new sound that was going in my head.” They sit now as a quartet: Clark the songwriter on vocals and guitar, backed by a two man rhythm section and an additional axe-man. What do they sound like and where do they fit in? Despite admitting that all he wanted to be as a kid was part of Nirvana, the band’s sound is strangely drenched in tones of country and western… or “fucked up, loud, loud country,” to be precise. “I’m a huge Neil Young fan,” the front man admits. Musical influences aside, Clark’s songwriting constitutes fragments of the world at large. “It changes all the time,” he says, “I’m quite an excitable young man and if I hear a band I like or a bit of news, it’ll inspire me to write a song.” Clarke is inspired by his Scottish musical associated, but choose not to make too much of what’s going on. “Pretty much all I listen to these days is Scottish music. The likes of Frightened Rabbit, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Twilight Sad, Wooden Box and My Latest Novel all mean a lot to me, but to talk about a scene is bullshit. It’s an excuse for divisions within cities.” What role does a country rock band from Glasgow have to play in today’s tumultuous society? Clark is refreshingly more upbeat than some of contemporary music’s more celebrated artists. “Music has always been important, ever since day one,” he explains. “The world isn’t crumbling around us at all. You have look at the

world and just take in what you want to. Look outside: we live in Scotland and there are loads of awesome things to be happy about.” With his happy-go-lucky attitude, it’s unsurprising that the dark realms of modern day politics have yet to infiltrate his music. “I haven’t been following the US election but it all seems to be a bit of a soap opera. We have Take The High Road for that. We’re not a political band at all. We’ll let the politicians worry about politics we’ll just keep the tunes going.” Where can we hear the band? The debut single Silversword was released in June and attracted kind words of praise within these very sheets. “A raucous, joyous, full band with horns blitzkrieg,” it’s available from local record stores and via the band’s MySpace. “We are full time musicians really, we just don’t make any money,” explains Clark. So we can expect plenty of upcoming gigs, beginning with their slot at The Mill in October, which the man is understandably chuffed with. “It’s cool how The Mill is supporting new bands. More organisations should do this. They are giving loads of bands the coverage they deserve.”

dBass

dBass

electronica feature heavily in their sound, but Hall is hard pushed to nail down one communal influence. “Special mention to the late J Dilla,” he offers. The subject of their Scottish peers is a little clearer. “Thankfully more than I can list, and it’s still growing,” Hall enthuses, his gratitude at the healthy diversity of the Scottish scene today evident. “Special shouts to 17th Letter extended crew, Lucky Me family, Boom Monk Ben, Underling, Live Science, Joe Acheson Quartet, Deej Malik, Bluhnt, EOTM, Das Contras, The Remedie.”

Who are dBass? The artists formerly known as Debass have been active in their current state for some years now. Originally formed for a one-off jazz gig, they soon dropped the ‘e’ from their name and began a period of sustained productivity. “A new spirit was born,” according to collective founder member, Matt Hall. “From this point we haven’t looked back and continue to gain strength, and have fun en route,” he beamed as The Skinny caught up with him recently. With members flung as far afield as New York, London, Berlin and New Zealand, the collective unsurprisingly don’t get to play together as often as they’d like, but the band assure us it just makes them relish it more when they do. What do they sound like and where do they fit in? “Pure inspiration is an omnipresent factor in all,” muses Hall rather cryptically, “music, art, design, photography, film, love, life, people....style can be found in everything. Communicating that is the challenge.” As to be expected from a group with such floating clientele, dBass’ inspirations are diverse. Hip hop, jazz, drum n bass and

Don’t dBass get frustrated at the continued dominance of indie bands on the Scottish scene? Well, yes and no, it would seem. “I think the diversity and acceptance of all styles is what makes Scotland, well the Central Belt at least,” says Hall. The industry itself though, is a different matter. “In a business sense it can become fairly frustrating, yes. Most of the big shows and A+R focus is indie related and with the state of the music industry as it is there has never been a stage where a return on investment is so important. At the same time ‘non-indie’ outfits, for lack of a better term, in Scotland need to better understand the business side and how it works. They need to create a fan base as well as a return on self-investment or funding before anyone else really takes notice. Glasgow has an unrivalled history of indie so it’s easy for new bands of that style to know what to do and how to achieve it. ‘We’ don’t have the luxury of this template, but hopefully the next generation might.” Where can we hear the band? Hall has just put the finishing touches to a dBass

Ross Clarke

record, Qoral Reef. The record will be released on Collective Records and features Natasha Nixon, AKA Lady K on vocals. He describes the single as a trip-jazz effort. But just to keep us on our toes, he offers: “In our collective spirit the next single will be the polar opposite. Stay tuned kids.” dBass will also be playing at The Mill this month, a slot Hall hopes will provide them with a new audience. “Tapping into the well-established demographic of brands and networks of those involved behind the scenes is a definite advantage.” Ross Clark & The Scarfs play The Mill glasgow on 2 Oct. dBass play The MillGlasgow on 8 Oct and The Mill Edinburgh on 9 Oct www.themill-live.com

Sign up to The Mill’s website (www.themill-live.com) to enter for an opportunity to score tickets to their upcoming events. GLASGOW: Wed 1 Oct Pearl & The Puppets, We See Lights Wed 8 Oct Dbass, Underling Wed 15 Oct Baillie & The Fault, Lions Chase Tigers Wed 22 Oct Alto Elite, The Velcro Quartet Wed 5 Nov Ross Clarke & The Scarfs Go Missing, Gdansk

EDINBURGH: Thu, 2 Oct The Ads, Found Thu 9 Oct Underling, Dbass Thu 16 Oct Ten Stories High, Kiddo Thu 23 Oct The Debuts, Alto Elite

Thu 30 Oct Ross Clarke & The Scarfs Go Missing, Callel

www.theskinny.co.uk

October 08

THE SKINNY 49


Live Music

Highlights by Ted Maul

SUPERHOTRIGHTNOW THREEPIECE JOHNNY FOREIGNER DEAL IN ADRENALIN-SOAKED SCUZZ POP AND THEIR GIG AT EDINBURGH’S CABARET VOLTAIRE IS ONE OF THIS MONTH’S HOTTEST TICKETS

LIVE MUSIC PREVIEWS NOAH AND THE WHALE FAT SAM’S, 24 OCT

Judging them on a purely cosmetic level, one could make the mistake of thinking Noah and the Whale had somehow crossed into the third dimension from a classic kids cartoon: The group consistently dress in similar outfits - eye-catching blue-and-yellow - and those exposed to the duo-chromatic crew’s music are unlikely to shake their sugary melodies. However, those expecting a carefree folk-pop love affair may be in for a surprise, as the Whale’s recently released debut album treads serious ground. “It’s meant to be written as an optimistic record, even though there’s some bleak subject matter,” frontman Charlie Fink says of Peaceful the World Lays Me Down. Starting off two years ago in Greater London, and swelling from a three-piece to a live entourage of seven, the group has garnered radio airplay, and with the charted singles Shape of My Heart and 5 Years Time – the latter featuring fellow folkie and sometime member Laura Marling – have become one of the most talked-about British bands of 2008. Listeners to the band’s debut may note the perennial themes of death and recurring mentions of love, which Fink agrees are main points of the LP. “The album should be a coherent piece, and the songs should all relate somehow. I’m not saying that’s the best method, but that’s the way I like to do it. There are themes and vocabulary that are consistent.”

JOHNNY FOREIGNER BLAIR MCNEIL

With a sound that is only slightly edgier than Bob Holness in oven gloves, much touted Sheffield lads Little Man Tate nevertheless look set to provide a polished set of crowd-pleasers at Fat Sam’s in Dundee on 3 Oct. Bouncy riffs, cheeky lyrics, yada yada yada. As straightforward as Tetley’s and just as enjoyable. Superhotrightnow threepiece Johnny Foreigner deal in adrenalin-soaked scuzz pop and their gig at Edinburgh’s Cabaret Voltaire on 4 October is one of this month’s hottest tickets. With their breakneck almost stream-of-consciousness boy/girl vocals, filthy guitar sound and deceptively complex song structures, it’s pretty obvious why so many people are so excited about this band. You may not have read that much about Maps & Atlases before but for our money, their show at Glasgow’s Captain’s Rest on 8 Oct will be one of the month’s most special gigs. Their hard-to-describe sound is at once languid and frenetic, paring unusual, snaking vocal and guitar lines with unorthodox bass and a very high level of technical skill. These dogs be thar real deal, yargh! Probably Fife’s finest purveyors of celestial psych rock, The Aliens will play Edinburgh’s Liquid Room on 9 Oct. With Beta Band comparisons now largely unneccesary, it’s now clear that The Aliens are a force to be reckoned with - as their burgeoning catalogue of weird, poppy and hugely enjoyable songs testifies. Glorious, brilliantly melodic stuff, this. Another definite highlight in a rather splendid month for gigs.

All the way from Portland Oregon, alt-country (bleugh!) daddy-Os Blitzen Trapper will deliver a spirited, melodic set to Glasgow’s King Tuts on 9 Oct. With a distinctly Wilco-ish spring in their step, their dreamy compositions and western twang will satisfy those with a thirst for old-time Americana. They’ve got a song called Crushing The Wheat, fer Chrissakes! Skinny faves and Glasgow locals Errors will play Glasgow Oran Mor, our very own ‘Skinny Dip’ at Aberdeen Moshulu and Dundee Doghouse on 10, 11 and 12 Oct respectively. If you’ve not caught them yet then October offers a hat-trick of opportunities to luxuriate in their shimmering web of loops, guitars and electronics. A band of real substance, and one of the most interesting outfits on the Scottish scene. Two further manifestations of the musical group known as The Fall are predicted to occur on 10 Oct at Aberdeen Lemon Tree and 12 Oct at Edinburgh Queens Hall. Having dropped a corker of an album earlier this year, expectations will be high for these gigs and no doubt Smith will oblige with a set of semi-coherent rambling and gloriously disruptive ‘live mixing’. The month is rounded out by Tilly and the Wall (aye, that band that has a tap dancer instead of a drummer) who play King Tut’s on 23 Oct. Look past the novelty however, and you’ll discover a fantastic pop band with an infectious enthusiasm and a great stage show. Definitely something different.

LIVE MUSIC PREVIEWS FRANK TURNER MOGWAI CORN EXCHANGE, 22 OCT

ORAN MOR, 23 OCT

There’s probably someone out there that hasn’t heard about Mogwai. Some bearded, shuffling hermit, dragging behind him a shopping bag full of old newspapers. As for the rest of us, there’s really no excuse to be in any doubt about the potential of any Scottish Mogwai concert. Regardless of their infamy and success across the planet they are, above all things, Scottish – and proud of it. Thus it’s a special occasion for both the band and the audience when the two are reunited. With a new and entirely instrumental album The Hawk Is Howling already in our midst, we probably have some idea of what to expect. Yet, with the best part of 15 years of music to pick from and especially given the devastating power of last opus, Mr Beast live, it’s hard to imagine where Mogwai are going to make room in their set for the new material. Not a bad problem to have. [Chris Cusack]

Formerly of hardcore upstarts Million Dead, Frank Turner has spent the last three years touring and refining his punk-folk sound across the UK. And while songs with titles like Thatcher Fucked the Kids suggest a pottymouthed Woody Guthrie, Turner himself is wary of those attempting to brand him a ‘political songwriter’, writing in his blog “I’m not their little pet protest singer, ready to parrot idiotic platitudes about leftism at a moment’s notice. Fuck off.” Quite. While he may be unlikely to close with The Internationale, his live performances share the rousing fieriness of professional remonstrators like Billy Bragg, inbuing songs about hangovers (The Real Damage), lovelorn reminiscences (Romantic Fatigue) or, indeed, the negative social legacy of Thatcherite policies which fostered a generation of disillusionment (um, three guesses…) with equal passion. Go along and sing yourself sore. [Chris Buckle]

7PM, £17.50 WWW.MYSPACE.COM/MOGWAI

50 THE SKINNY

OCTOBER 08

7.30PM, £8

Though all of the Whale’s songs go through the aforementioned triumvirate at the hub of the band, plus bassist and harmonium-tender Matt Urby, Fink principally generates much of their written repertoire from his own life experiences. Now that these feelings and emotions are committed to an album, “It’s a cheesy thing to say,” he admits, “but if I could play those songs to the person I was just before writing them – when I was struggling with those issues – they could have changed my perspectives, relieved me of some

NOAH AND THE WHALE SHANNON MCLEAN

of those fears.” It’s apparent in talking to Fink that he takes his music seriously, and though infectious singles like 5 Years Time and a snappy wardrobe may lure in fans, it’s a good bet the Whale’s deeper waters will be what keeps them biting. [Jason Morton] 7PM, £8. ALSO PLAYING THE ARCHES, GLASGOW ON 25 OCT AND THE

CUPAR ARTS FESTIVAL VARIOUS VENUES, 10-26 OCT

Fife has always been on the map. It’s that little bit between the Central Belt and the Highlands, and was once, as Fifers never tire of pointing out, the site of ancient Scotland’s capital. On the musical map, however, it took a bit longer to make its mark, unless you remember Nazareth (or the mighty Skids! - ed). In recent times, however, the Kingdom has woken up to the talent it has been incubating within. As proof of the new pride the county has in its home-grown musicians, the Cupar Arts Festival launches this year between the 10th and 26th of October, showcasing some of the best in local talent along with a few carefully selected international acts.

When talking about music in Fife, it is actually illegal now not to use the words “King Creosote” and “Fence Collective”, so naturally they are well represented with a show at the Cupar Corn Exchange. Other Scottish acts include bluesman Tam White, Cajun ceilidh king Robbie Mack, and harpist Savourna Stevenson. Giving the festival a more worldly feel are the bossa beat outfit Zuba, and Los Trios Gringos with their rock blues. Not just for Fifers, the CAF is an impressive new event in Scotland’s burgeoning festival scene. [Euan Ferguson] WWW.CUPARARTS.ORG.UK

BLACK KIDS ABC, 26 OCT

Arriving earlier this year amidst a furore of hype, Reggie Youngblood and his Jacksonville cohorts’ debut E.P. Wizard of Ahhhs mixed up Robert Smith styled sadeyed pop with some dastardly dance floor moves, and set hearts racing with its fresh potential. Sadly, when the very same tracks appeared on debut album Partie Traumatic, it transpired that producer Bernard Butler had somewhat exorcised them of their soul during the recording process, leaving a sound suitably prepped and polished for prime-time MTV consumption but far

less thrilling for it. He can’t touch them live, however, and their forthcoming appearance at Glasgow’s ABC affords them an opportunity to ruff themselves around the edges and remind us why the Wizard of Ahhhs sounded so damn fine to begin with. Given the live pedigree and the unquestionable notion that their songs were written to be partied to, these kids should be more than alright on the night. [Paul Neeson] 7PM, £10 WWW.MYSPACE.COM/BLACKKIDSROCK

TUNE UP 2008/09

VARIOUS VENUES THROUGHOUT SCOTLAND

With the four major cities in Scotland blessed with vibrant music scenes, it’s easy to assume that the quadrant that exists between The Lemontree, The Barrowlands, The Doghouse and The Liquid Room represents the nation-state for all that is currently interesting in local music. Peeking beyond the horizon of this microcosm quickly reveals that the Highlands and Islands have always had their progressive edges, crosspollinating with Scandinavia, Canada, Central Europe, and even further afield. Reflecting this, the Scottish Arts Council has, since 2003, funded the Tune-Up initiative to support bands touring around areas that are not normally on the beaten track. Commencing this month, the 2008/09 touring line-up includes Skye-

based folksters Injuns out on the road with Denmark’s trad-pop Claes Clem, Latin Jazz outfit Rumba Caliente, Afro Latin Soul Orchestra Tour, fiddler Catriona Macdonald, the Scottish/Norwegian jazz-folk trio Arild Andersen, Paolo Vinaccia and Tommy Smith, plus the folk-supergroup Under One Sky (featuring Teenage Fanclub’s Norman Blake, Idlewild’s Roddy Woomble, and Battlefield Band’s John McClusker). If you fancy broadening your musical horizons, further information (including full tour dates as they develop) can be found on their website [Ewen Millar] DATES, TIMES, AND PRICES VARY WWW.TUNEUP.ORG.UK/SECTION/TOURS/

LIVE MUSIC


Records

Metal up your ass! by Austin Tasseltine

October: the one month when resplendent devil horns carry added significance and a time to embrace your ironic appreciation for Satan and his vast collection of fallen rock’n’roll icons. Yet it also appears to be the one month when activity on the metal circuit slows down. Fortunately Halloween isn’t the only string to autumn’s bow. After a slow start, the 6th of October marks the Day of Bad Omens, according to Roman tradition. Fittingly it is followed by comedy metal geniuses Disturbed, superbly pastiching the metal genre with their flat riffs and macho posturing (7 Oct). Some have suggested that Davey Draiman and co are in fact the real deal – as serious as cancer. To them I say tish and fipsy. It’s cutting satire. Laugh knowingly at the Carling Academy. The 10th brings the equally subtle Dragon Force to that same Carling stage. If you can tear yourself away from the Old Michaelmas Day celebrations, why not marvel at the frantic fingerings of this London power metal sextet? Though rumours persist that they have no songs, when guitarists are playing approximately 6 billion notes per minute, whilst drinking beer with the other hand, who’s really going to notice? For those of us not fooled by rampant tapping, This is Our Battlefield collective delivers a gig of some substance that same night, as Gainesville’s Young Livers play the 13th Note. Their gruff take on melodic-hardcore, not to mention

www.theskinny.co.uk

support from the excellent Citizens, makes for a healthy alternative. Orange Goblin, those infamous cockney booze-hounds, swagger onstage at Ivory Black’s in Glasgow (12 Oct). It may be Aleister Crowley’s birthday, but there’s plenty of time for satanic meditation afterwards. Sleeves optional. Denim mandatory. Residents of Auld Reekie can enjoy the same sounds at Studio 24 (13 Oct). Having flirted with obscurity, Corby heavyweights Raging Speedhorn return to kick the shit out of King Tut’s (15 Oct) with support from the Mirimar Disaster and Glasgow’s downright notorious Take A Worm For A Walk Week. Things go quiet for a week or so, with only St Luke’s Day and the consequent customary whipping of stray dogs to entertain you. Thankfully, the 25th serves up another rock monster when hard riffing bass-haters Lords destroy Nice ‘N’ Sleazy’s. There’s a dilemma presented when The Bronx make a cokefuelled trip to ABC2 (29 Oct) the same night as Doomriders (featuring Nate of Converge) play Ivory Black. Finally, having sat out most of October, Auld Reekie makes a last stand as Februus play Henry’s Cellar Bar on Halloween. What better way to glorify the occult than gothic metal and a glass of red wine?

Take a worM for a walk Week John Lewis

October 08

THE SKINNY 51


Clubs

Dettman goes Off The Record Staple of Glasgow’s Soundhaus and just shy of their 5th Birthday, house and techno night ‘Off The Record’ welcome Marcel Dettman this month Colin Chapman caught up with him Marcel Dettmann was born in the Berlin satellite town of Fürstenwaldem, not the most stellar of origins by any means. But the recent release of his debut mix CD, Berghain 2 (which offered a musical snapshot of his residency at the famous German club), confirmed the rising stock of the DJ/producer. “I was fourteen when the brother of a friend gave me a techno CD” he says, describing his first exposure to the sound. “Prior to that I’d been listening to a lot of synth pop like The Cure, Depeche Mode, Kate Bush and also bands like Front 242 and Nitzer EBB”. That same year, a trip to legendary techno palace Tresor gave him his first introduction to clubbing, inspiring him to buy a set of turntables soon after. It wasn’t long before he was promoting and playing parties in the cities of Dresden and Frankfurt. The success of these nights helped establish Dettman as a respected DJ on Germany’s techno scene and earned him a residency at Berlin’s Ostgut (Berghain’s predecessor) in 1999, aged only 21. Over the past nine years, Dettman has developed a strong affinity for firstly Ostgut and subsequently Berghain, not to mention a pride for what is arguably the best club in the world at present. “Berghain is all that techno means to me… futuristic, anarchic and uncompromising. It’s inimitably authentic… there’s no borders and each night is like a trip… every time it’s different”

Since 2003 he’s also worked in Berlin’s Hardwax record store, which over time has developed into an influential hub for the city’s electronic music scene, highlighted by the fact that it gave birth to one of techno’s most revered acts, Basic Channel; Moritz Von Oswald and Mark Ernestus forming a production partnership while working behind its counter. “For me it was always a dream to work there. As with Berghain, Hardwax shares my philosophy on electronic music. Working there, you get to know a lot of interesting artists and the music is allowed to speak for itself… there’s no marketing gimmicks involved”. In 2005, Marcel began working on his own productions, resulting in ‘Dawning/Deadmann’, which was actually a collaborative effort with fellow Berghain resident, Ben Klock. Released on the OstGut Ton label to critical acclaim, it scored a number two placing in Groove Magazine’s Top 50.

Though not featuring any of his own productions, there’s no doubt that his well-received Berghain 02 mix will improve his position among the global techno fraternity and indeed, he describes it as his “business card”. Featuring output from some of today’s most respected producers such as Redshape, Deetron and Radio Slave, it also contains Marcel’s Chicago and Detroit favourites from yesteryear, resulting in a mix showing respect for both the classic techno template and its more contemporary counterpart. “My intention for the Berghain 02 CD was to choose tracks which are current but have a timeless appeal, integrating them with others that have accompanied me through years”, he explains. “I also asked artists that are good friends of mine for their unreleased tracks; people I work with every day and who also give me inspiration”. So, what of the future? Well, Dettman has no plans to rest on his laurels.

Since then he’s established his own MDR imprint, releasing work on it and also OstGut Ton as well as remixes for Ellen Alien, Mr G and Par Grindvik, amongst others.

“I’ve remixes for Deetron, Modeselektor and Scuba to come and right now I´m working on a new MDR Track, another for OstGut Ton and a shared effort with Norman Nodge”

“Inspiration is everything”, says Dettman, describing his musical approach without giving too much away. “There are a lot of producers who’ve influenced me over time, each in their own their special way. My sound combines these inspirations but also incorporates my own style”.

To feel a bit of Berlin magic on your Saturday night, there’s only one place to be this month. Happy days for the Soundhaus. The Soundhaus, Saturday 4 Oct 11pm - 4am, £12/10 www.otrmusic.co.uk

Capitals Apart But Moving Closer Forget what you think you know about top European locations for electronic music - Berlin, Barcelona, London, Paris... Alex burden discovers that bringing up the rear and fast approaching is Zurich With the highest number of clubs per capita in Europe, Zurich is also rated as having the best standards of living in the world, and continually drives money and resources into cultivating itself further. There is a culture of reclaimed spaces: disused breweries, factories and even an electricity generator in the industrial district of Zurich West have been converted into bars, clubs, and restaurants, brought up to modern spec with new floors, lighting, equipment and furniture. Aesthetics are overshadowed by reinvention and originality, and it’s no surprise that as well as producing worthy artists, it’s attracting talent from top labels and clubs from up and down the continent. Edinburgh couldn’t resist grabbing a slice of the action: Cabaret Voltaire’s We Are... Electric are having a Swiss night, with nary a cheese wheel in sight, featuring DJs and producers Kalabrese and Zwicker, and video art from Ivan E. Kalabrese, the DJ, producer, and co-owner of Zukunft, one of Switzerland’s edgiest clubs, hit acclaim with the Rumpelzirkus album (2007) and his interesting folk and jazz take on house with the Rumpel Orchestra. I asked him how it felt to have been tipped as one of the ‘top artists to watch in 2009’, and whether he thinks that puts any pressure on him? “I don’t know about that. I’m not thinking in categories,” he says. “I want to bring my music and myself further, and compose as long as I can - I want to do interesting collaborations with musicians from other cultures... if it works and people buy my records then it’s

52 THE SKINNY

October 08

nice, if not, I’m not sad. I go my own way.” What sort of message do you hope to communicate about Zurich and its music scene? “Do your own thing, be unique in what you do, and do it with it with heart. I hope that a younger generation starts to do parties and concerts: it would be nice when one day, my kids will go out in good clubs too.” For the event he’ll be bringing a mix of the old and new from the best of techno, house, afrobeat, disco and funk, and he’ll do his best “to bring the sound of Rumpelzirkus to the club.” Nice. Graduating with a film music diploma from Berklee College of Music in Boston, Zwicker has gone on to full-time tv and film music composition, making time for hotly received music production and DJing as (properly) glorified hobby. His style is refreshing, a change from the stripped back sounds coming out the UK and Berlin. Instead, electronics are punched out with a mixture of disco, funk, electro, and house, helping him to become a regular on Germany’s Compost Black. Zwicker first came to light with his Fathorn release, using the lesser-manipulated Swiss Alpine horn: “I was pretty sure I wouldn’t be copied by anyone in Scotland!”, he laughs, “It can do drones and squeals which tend to fit dance music well.” “The strength of the music from Zurich is that it’s more mellow, while still being fresh and danceable,” he tells us. “I think the electronic music from Zurich is a bit more soulful than most

Kalabrese

from equally cool, but bigger cities like London and Berlin. On the other hand, Zurich hasn’t been able to start a real music trend like dubstep or similar, because the talented producers have an individual sound without following a specific trend: it makes the individual artist great, but it also makes us a bit difficult to market as ‘the sound from Zurich’.” Ivan E will add ‘found’ visuals and real time graphics to the night as a self-proclaimed visual scientist. He’s worked in electronic clubs across France, Switzerland, Italy, Germany and Austria, but you can occasionally catch him doing out of the ordinary visuals, such as those for the Dresdener Musikfestspiele and their symphony orchestra. To top it all, he can also lay claim to

producing and directing several music videos and feature films, including the Swiss sci-fi movie (coming 2009), Cargo. It’s another top end booking for We Are Electric, so even if you head out for a quiet one there’ll be enough on show to keep you thoroughly entertained. One for the diary. Check out our online feature on Zurich clubbing culture and the artists behind it for a deeper look into why the Swiss can do more than chocolate and finance. Zwicker, Kalabrese and Ivan E @ We Are... Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, Edinburgh, 22 Oct, 11pm-3am, £0 before midnight or members / £2. Kalabrese: www.myspace.com/kalaspatz Zwicker: www.myspace.com/zwickermusik www.thecabaretvoltaire.com

Clubs


Club Previews Sunday Circus The Courtyard, glasgow, 26 Oct

Holding a passion for deep, profound electronic sounds, Stuart Geddes took inspiration from such respected DJs as Derrick Carter, Kerri Chandler and Murk when he decided to programme his own parties, bringing about his Mulletover events across London. Quickly gaining a reputation as one of the capital’s most well-respected underground nights, Mulletover went on to host an arena, three years running at TDK’s Cross Central Festival, to takeover the Discoteca room at Ibiza’s ‘We Love…’ Space in summer 2006, and to have a presence at a number of international festivals. Earlier this year it celebrated its 4th Birthday. As a producer, Geddes has forged a reputation for dubby, ethereal productions under the Rekleiner guise alongside Audiofly’s Anthony Middleton and Luca Saporito, with releases on Moodmusic, Tsuba and Connoisseur, amongst others. This year he launched his own Murmur label, which has already seen output from fresh talent such as Nick Curly, Tom Demac, Bearweasel, as well as his Rekleiner project. [Colin Chapman] 2pm - 11pm, tickets £7 in advance available 13 Oct from: www.tickets-scotland.com Tickets Scotland, 239 Argyle St, Glasgow 50 Tickets available on the door www.myspace.com/sundaycircus

Magnetic Man

Fortified Sessions 2nd Birthday The Art School, Glasgow, 17 Oct

From their small beginnings at Blackfriars Basement the Eliminators have introduced the hypnotic sounds of dubstep to Glasgow, and procured the genre’s most illustrious DJs and producers including Skream, Benga, Hatcha and N-Type, slowly seducing Scottish dancefloors with a Pied Piper effect. For their second birthday they once again pull it out the record bag, and present to you the world’s first dubstep ‘band’ ‘Magnetic Man’ who only until only recently, remained a shadowy figure who occasionally dropped spectacular dubstep tracks out of nowhere. ‘Magnetic Man’ was later revealed to exist in deepest darkest Croydon, as a three-pronged collaboration between heavyweights the ‘Afro Warrior’ Benga, Artwork, and the ‘Wunderkid’ Skream. Together they pack enough power to slay an audience with their experimental Abelton Live shows. A three mannned improvised ping-pong like game of bass squelch, beats and visuals. Extra sound will be provided by the mighty Bass Warrior System. Wear your best bassface. [Ema Johnson] Glasgow School Of Art (Main Hall) Tickets £9 in advance - available from Ticket Scotland, Rub A Dub and The Vic Bar. www.myspace.com/bengabeats www.myspace.com/skreamuk www.myspace.com/theelectriceliminator

Marco Bailey

The Basement, Soundhaus, Fri 3 Oct

Berlin, Edinburgh, 4 Oct

You gotta have soul when the hard-grafting Moovn fam’ invite you to their first birthday and make no mistake, it’s BIG. Cue the legendary Paul ‘Trouble’ Anderson, who has made an indelible mark on the club scene for over 20 years. His fan base exploded when he joined the ranks of the then pirate Kiss FM in 1985, and he’s remixed everything from No 1 hits, Nomad’s (I Wanna Give You) Devotion, to artists including Blaze, Pet Shop Boys and Soul II Soul,. Now a global phenomenon, he rocks parties all over the world - his night in Edinburgh will be a memory to bank. Also joining the celebrations is Birmingham’s supreme slo-mo-disco peddler Mark E, who will make his Edinburgh debut. Moovn residents Craig Smith, Steven Willison, Andy Baker and Guy Lonie will also be on hand to whip you up into a frenzy. Expect cake, jelly and fresh ice cream, it’s a proper party! [Ema Johnson]

Friday 3 October, 10:30pm - 4:00am, £5 before 11:30pm, £8/9 thereafter www.myspace.com/marcobailey

Recloose

Snafu (Aberdeen) & MacSorleys Music Bar (Glasgow), 29 Oct, 30 Oct New Zealand producer, Matt ‘Recloose’ Chicoine makes appearances in both Aberdeen and Glasgow on consecutive nights this month. Promoting the release of his recent, third album Perfect Timing, the Detroit-born producer will show off his DJ style, which in his own words is “all over the show”. However, when pushed he admits to playing “… boogie, funk disco and the modern day derivatives… this is what makes me want to move and hopefully that enthusiasm translates to the audience”. Since his move down under in 2001, Chicoine has moved away from the largely electronic feel of his Cardiology debut and embraced the opportunity to work with many of New Zealand’s talented musicians and vocalists to create a more song-driven sound. Although he’s toured with a full band, on this occasion he’s spinning records, and unlike many DJs also likes to get on the mic: “It’s not exactly a revolutionary idea, but I think the crowd really appreciates a bit of tasteful and encouraging dialogue… It’s funny how many DJs have forgotten that’s how it all started”. [Colin Chapman] ‘Mom The Video Broke’ @ Snafu, Aberdeen, 29 Oct, 10pm late, free entry before 12am, £3 After Sub Club Presents... Recloose (Sonar Kollective) – DJ set Ali Herron (Ooft Music / Five20East), 30 Oct, 9pm – 1am, MacSorleys Music Bar, Jamaica St, Glasgow £3 entry (free entry with a Giles Peterson ticket from Friday 17 October) - www.myspace.com/macsorleys www.clubsnafu.com

Ultragroove 9th Birthday

Edinburgh’s longest running house night, Ultragroove celebrates its 9th Birthday in style this month with a triple-whammy of top notch guests. Germany’s Âme should need little introduction by now: the duo of Kristian Beyer and Frank Wiedemann are currently one of the most respected pairings on today’s house scene, recently cementing their reputation with the release of their much-praised contribution to the Fabric mix series. Manchester’s Trusme burst onto the scene with Nards, which took disco-sampling to the next level. He was later confirmed as one to watch with release of his debut album Working Nights, on his own Prime Numbers imprint, and has since gone on to work with Amp Fiddler and Paul Randolph - collaborations which will see the light of day on his forthcoming full length follow-up.

1. Tokyo Blackstar - Game Over (Locodice remix) (Innervisions)

6. Inxs - Need You Tonight (Je Davu edit) (bootleg)

Fantastic remix from the Locodice/Buttrich camp for our own label Innervisions; it's a journey.

Very good edit of this classy 80s dance production, still sounds fresh as hell.

2. Leonid Nevermind - Away (Squonk)

7. Mike Dehnert - Minimum (Fachwerk)

Killer record from this new artist out of Valencia, clear Detroit sound.

3. Koljah - House to Go (Vidab) Demo I got sent to by this very talented guy from Berlin,

4. Timmy Regisford - Bubble Track (restricted access)

9. Robert Dietz - Jaszu EP (Cecille)

Showing the maestro's love for more old school sounding Chicago trax.

5. Koss - Earth (Âme remix) (Mule Electronic) Our own remix is now finally out: it's one we're still very excited about.

Headway

The Reading Rooms, dundee, 3 Oct

Serving up the finest in house and techno for the last four years, Dundee’s Headway have a Scottish exclusive this month in the shape of Dutchman, Tommy Largo. Discovering house music in the mid-eighties, after originally being drawn to crate-digging for disco records as a cash-strapped youngster (a story familiar to many of today’s producers),

£10/£8 NUS, 11pm -3am

Doors 22:30 - late, entry £8 / £10

www.moovn.com

www.ultragroove.co.uk

www.club-headway.co.uk

October 08

Refreshing house, on the label from Mannheim which reminds me in its best moments to Mood 2 Swing.

10. DJ Hell - Angst (Henrik Schwarz remix) (International Deejay Gigolos) Two old friends meeting again after all the years - massive work by Henrik!

Optimo @ Metropolis

Origin, aberdeen, Sat 18 Oct

www.myspace.com/craighardensmith

54 THE SKINNY

8. unknown - Subway to Cologne (story) New mysterious white-label out of Cologne, with a heavy Theo Parrish/Trackmode touch

Linkwood is Bristol-born, Edinburgh-based Nick Moore, who aside from releasing tracks on Trusme’s Prime Numbers has also had productions on Edinburgh’s lauded Firecracker label, his work earning plaudits from the likes of Gilles Peterson, Theo Parrish and Derrick May.[Colin Chapman]

www.myspace.com/paultroubleanderson

Tresor resident Dehnert with a brilliant Detroit techno record.

future house music at its best.

Tommy’s gone onto secure residencies across the Netherlands. He’s also taken his jackin’ house sound the world over, playing numerous international dates, and has released tracks and remixes on labels such as Herbal Essence, Phood, Lost My Dog, Nascent, Control Recordings, Kolour Recordings, Guess Who and Guesthouse, with his productions appearing on Mark Farina’s recent Fabric 40 mix and his earlier Farina’s House of OM. [Colin Chapman]

www.myspace.com/mark_e_jisco

Âme

Marco Bailey’s productions frequently appear in the setlists of Carl Cox, Chris Liebing, Jeff Mills and Sven Vath, but don’t let the list of big names mislead you: although ambitious, he is a self-made man on a mission to unite people with a love of pure techno music. And that’s exactly what you’ll be getting here: a dancefloor on the brink of ignition, fuelled by Bailey’s unique blend of underground sounds and funky techno. He has spent 15 years of hard work, sacrifice and dedication on his cause, and following recognition from Carl Cox, one of the world’s top DJs, Bailey is now in the top league of techno artists worldwide. If you like it hard and funky, then checking out Belgium’s number one DJ is a must.[Michael Slevin]

Cabaret Voltaire, Edinburgh, 19 Oct

Moovn 1st Birthday

t r a h C J D

This deserves a good mention on a couple of counts. First up, the Optimo duo of JD Twitch and JG Wilkes bring a party soundtrack to the club experience that frankly shits on many a sycophant promoter, and secondly their presence will hopefully be the catalyst of something very special for Origin, and Aberdeen. We need choice and variety in the city, so if it takes a couple of Glaswegians to truly get the ball rolling at this menacing, hypnotic venue then I’ll support that. Not that the efforts of Origin haven’t gone un-noticed thus far, far from it. A glance at their scheduling takes in genres and styles with names that’ll keep the OED in work ‘til the 3rd millennium. But back to the music in question tonight: yes, it’s house and techno rooted, but to say that Optimo are eclectic doesn’t even slice into it. When I tell you they’re are going right back to their roots with an October appearance, in London, alongside heroes and influencers Liquid Liquid, then you may have some more clues to go on. [Jaco Justice] info tba, see www.optimo.co.uk

Clubs


Clubs

Halloween Clubbing

www.edwardmcgowan.com

You reach an age where knocking on old ladies’ doors and shouting “TRICK OR TREAT!?” stops being cute and starts to run the risk of landing you on Crimewatch. But don’t dismay – there are plenty of other reasons to adorn yourself with fangs and fake blood and hit the town on Halloween. Both Edinburgh and Glasgow provide guys with a wide range of legitimate excuses to wear their mum’s makeup, while girls can dress as slutty as they want whilst claiming it’s all in aid of the “discount entry price in fancy-dress”. The spooky celebrations kick off early in Glasgow with the Club Noir Halloween Nightmare on 25 October, promising a decadent night of Burlesque fun with live shows and a crowd who are always dressed to kill. The same evening sees The Arches host the Inside Out Halloween party with house techno and trance from Super8 + Tab, Marcus Schossow, Kamui and Frase. If you don’t quite have your costume prepared that far in advance then fear not, later on in the week Octopussy hosts a ‘Neon Halloween’ party full of scary surprises including an 18 foot pool of blood for apple ducking. Things could get messy; but you shouldn’t wear your smartest outfit anyway, as the entry price will be reduced for clubbers who make a fancy dress effort. On Halloween itself the Soundhaus welcomes Sin’s ‘Zombie Uprising’ night. Expect ear-bleeding noise in the form of metal, classic rock and alternative sounds. The Research Club hosts a Halloween Hootenanny with bawdy and gaudy rock ‘n’ roll, rhythm ‘n’ blues and psychedelia. Clubbers of a more electronic musical persuasion could do well to check out Green Velvet, Oxia and Slam at Pressure on the 31st. Fancy dress isn’t essential but you probably won’t get stared at if you do rock up in full costume. In the capital things are looking just as lively…or deadly (sorry) with Edinburgh clubbers having a vast array of Pagan-inspired festivities to choose from. On 30 October is Halloween Sick Note at Cab Vol which offers free entry from 11pm and drinks prizes for the best costumes. Also on the 30th LuckyMe team up with Big Toe’s Hifi for a fancy dress Halloween bash at the Wee Red bar, featuring live music from The Blessings. On October 31st Boombox, one of Edinburgh’s finest trance nights, presents ‘Boobox’ (see what they did there?), a Halloween special at Luna nightclub. They welcome back special guest Richard Durand, bringing his upfront tech-trance all the way from Amsterdam. Arguably one of the spookiest venues in Scotland, The Caves, is also throwing a special Halloween Party on the 31st. ‘Wicked Wild West’ will be a casino club night with cowboys, saloon girls and bandits dancing to the sounds of Vegas DJ Lenny Love. The £15 ticket price includes food and gambling chips and all proceeds will go to charity. In Dundee the Reading Rooms’ brand new sister club, Club Okupa, boasts Radioclit on the 31st while in Aberdeen scrare-seekers can head to Snafu on the 27th for the Black Tooth Halloween Ball. Look out for magicians, tarot card readers, fire jugglers and burlesque performances with tunes courtesy of New York legend Adam Bomb. The fancy dress theme is ‘Glam Rock’ so expect to see even more big hair and skin-tight trousers than usual.

www.theskinny.co.uk

It seems you really are spoilt for choice when it comes to Halloween partying, now the hard part is choosing your costume. There’s always that eternal Halloween dilemma: finding an impressive costume without looking like you’ve tried too hard. Cutting eyeholes in your bed sheet to be a “ghost” is lazy. Duct-taping your legs together and then individually gluing on 20,000 real fish scales to make yourself “The Little Mermaid” is really a step too far. If all else fails, douse yourself in glitter-glue and pretentiously announce you’re dressed as something abstract like “harmony” or “love”. Halloween should really be given more credit – it’s far more fun than Christmas. There’s nothing more surreal than grooving on a dancefloor packed with witches, devils, werewolves and Amy Winehouses and, even better, you don’t have to buy anyone presents. Having this many options for nights out also makes it easier to lose your tasteless friend who decided to dress up as Myra Hindley… which is probably just as well. Happy Halloween! [Emma Kilday]

Glasgow Club Noir Halloween Nightmare @ The Carling Academy, Glasgow Sat 25 Oct 9pm – 3am Tickets: £14 Special Halloween event with two burlesque shows throughout the night. Octopussy ‘Neon Halloween’ @ The Arches, Glasgow Wed 29 Oct, 11pm-3am Reduced entry price with fancy dress. Inside Out Halloween Party @ The Arches, Glasgow Sat 25 October 10.30pm-3am Tickets: £12 Banging house and techno from Super8 & Tab, Marcus Schossow, Kamui, Frase. ‘Hallow’een Hootenanny’ @ The Research Club, Glasgow Fri 31 Oct, 9pm-2am, tickets £3, costume prizes Pressure @ The Arches, Glasgow Fri 31 October, 10pm-4am (tbc), tickets: £18adv Featuring Green Velvet live, Slam, Oxia live, Marco Passarani and Paul Ritch 50/50 Vamps Night @ The Soundhaus, Glasgow Thurs 30 Oct 7.30pm - 12am, tickets: £5 for members £6 for guests FREE ENTRY for clubbers dressed as vampires! Indie and wierdo rock with the Jiezuber band, Sons of the Morning Star, The Verdict and more. Sin - Zombie Uprising @ The Soundhaus, Glasgow Fri 31st Oct 9pm - 3am Tickets: £5 for members £6 for guests Featuring 3 metal acts, Dawnamatrix and Industrial Harlot Edinburgh Halloween Sick Note @ Cabaret Volitare, Edinburgh, Thu 30 Oct, 11pm – 3am, free entry. Drinks prizes for the finest fancy dress. Big Toes ‘Spooky’ HiFi vs Lucky Me Halloween Bash @ Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh, Thu Oct 30, 10:30 - 3am, tickets: £5 Costumes fo’ Shizzle! Boombox Presents BooBox Halloween Special @ Luna, Edinburgh Fri 31 Oct, 10.30pm – 3am, tickets: £8 in fancy dress/£9 NUS/£10 Trance music featuring Richard Durand. Wicked Wild West @ The Caves, Edinburgh, Fri 31 Oct, 7.30pm - late, tickets: £15 - including food and gambling chips. Wild West themed casino night featuring music from DJ Lenny Love. All proceeds to Maggies Cancer Caring Centres and CLIC Sargent. Dundee Radioclit @ Clob Okupa, Dundee, Fri 31 Oct, 10pm – 3am, tickets: £10 Aberdeen The BlackTooth Halloween Ball @ Snafu, Aberdeen, Mon 27 Oct, 9pm-3am, tickets: £3/£2 or get your free passes from the Moorings and Retro Rebels or on the street from the Black Teeth. Enchanting night featuring live bands, burlesque performances and black magic. Music from Adam Bomb. Dress code: glam rock…make-up, big hair, the lot! Skinny ad October.indd 1

October 08

25/9/08 2:51:22 pm

THE SKINNY 55


The

TENNENT’S

18 Oct

Glasgow

23 Oct

Dundee

Glasgow School of Art

Fat Sams

Motherwell

24 Oct

Edinburgh

24 Oct

30 Oct

30 Oct

31 Oct

2 Nov

8 Nov

9 Nov

12 Nov

Starka

Dumfries

Aberdeen

Ayr

Inverness

Fort William

Aberdeen

Paisley

gigs

TL251 FridgeMagnets_335x265 Skinny [WC22/09].indd 1

The Tunnels

MALCOLM MIDDLETON

Town Hall

BA Club

GLASVEGAS

TEENAGE FANCLUB

KING CREOSOTE

The Forum

HOT CHIP

THE PICTISH TRAIL

PLUS SUPPORT

SONS & DAUGHTERS

Town Hall

created

KING CREOSOTE

by

you

for

£10

8pm

FREE

7.30pm

£12

£10

7pm

ZOEY VAN GOEY

7.30pm

£10

SOLD OUT

7pm

LAURA MARLING

LAURA MARLING

7.30pm

PAT NEVIN (DJ SET)

WITHERED HAND

LITTLE KICKS

£12

7pm

EAGLEOWL

WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS

MALCOLM MIDDLETON

The Venue

TIMES NEW VIKING

SLEEP MODE

COPY HAHO

TEENAGE FANCLUB

Ironworks

NO AGE

LOS CAMPESINOS!

LOS CAMPESINOS!

Tollbooth

Presents

YELLOW BENTINES

KIDDO

Fat Sams

Stirling

28 Oct

LOS CAMPESINOS!

MALCOLM MIDDLETON

Cabaret Voltaire

Dundee

27 Oct

MUTUAL

CHRIS “Beans” GEDDES

MALCOLM MIDDLETON

ROB ST JOHN

7.30pm

CHRIS “Beans” GEDDES

7.30pm

7.30pm

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SOLD OUT

£16

9pm

£10

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MY LATEST NOVEL

7.30pm

£12

you

24/9/08 18:04:05


Wed 01 Oct What The Blood Revealed, Predestination Records,

Bloc, Massive metallic post-rock, 20:45–23:30, free

Pearl and the Puppets, We See Lights, The Mill, The Mill

Glasgow @ ñran M—r, Weekly live music in a specially created venue space., 20:00–23:00, Free Casino Brag, 13th Note, Alternative rock, 21:00, £tbc

The Hold Steady, The War on Drugs, ABC, American blue-collar

rock, 19:00, £ 14.00

Cajun Dance Party, Swanton Bombs, King Tut’s Wah Wah

Hut, Indie Pop, 20:00, £ 9.00

Pearl and the Puppets, We See Lights, The Mill, Oran Mor, Folk pop, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

Thu 02 Oct Concrete Campfire, Brel,

Acoustic night., 20:00–00:00, Free

Violet Violet, Jesus H Foxx, French Wives, Rugcutting,

13th Note, Alt-pop, 21:00, TBC Killing Joke, ABC, Anthemic post punk and metal legends, 19:00, £18.50 Ladyhawke, ABC, Electro pop dancefest, 19:00, £ 7.00

The Harps, The Doledrums, The Mix Ups, The Little Black Hearts, Box, Rock from the

garage, 21:00, TBC

St Jude’s Infirmary, Brel, Acoustic session of local talent, 20:00, Free Strike Anywhere, Cathouse, US punk rock, 19:00, £ 8.00 Amanda Palmer, Zoe Keating, Jason Webley, King Tut’s

Wah Wah Hut, Singer/pianist of the Dresden Dolls, TBC, £ 12.00 Langhorne Slim, Nice N Sleazys, Peppy bluegrass from Brooklyn, 19:30, TBC

Ross Clark and the Scarfs Go Missing, There Will Be Fireworks, Oran Mor, Locally acclaimed singer/songwriter, 19:30, £ 5.00

Late of the Pier, Midnight Juggernauts, Cocknbullkid, The Arches, New new wave, 22:00, £ 10.00

Fri 03 Oct DJ Frank Popp, Eyes Wide Open, The Twisted Wheel, Garage,

psych, freakbeat, rock n roll., 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Kick to Kill, The Phaetons, The Hallions, Flowers in the Dustbin, 13th Note, Moody guitar

rock, 21:00, TBC

The Common Empire, Swearbox, Stowawayable, Labels, Best of Barrowland 2, Bar-

rowland, Rock showcase, 19:00, £ 6.00 Codeen, Box, Soaring indie, 21:00, TBC Bodies of Water, Captains Rest, Folk rock, 20:00, TBC

Gogobot, Pablo Eskimo, Punch and the Apostles, Kirs Jannsen, Carling Academy,

Alt-rock showcase, 19:00, £ 7.00

Stuck Mojo, Vendetta, Piledriver, Cathouse, Hip hop conscious

metal, 19:00, £ 12.00

White Lies, The Joy Formidable, Post War Years, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Synthy rock, TBC, £ 7.00 Pivot, Nice N Sleazys, Progressive rock, 19:30, £ 6.00

Dance Lazarus Dance, Over the Wall, Oran Mor, Electronics-ac-

cented pop punk to raise the dead, 19:30, £ 5.00

The Luchagors, 1000 Hertz,

Psycho Dalek, Barfly, Poppy and punky, featuring a WWE lead singer, 19:00, £ 10.00 The Streets, Barrowland, Accomplished urban poet, 19:00, £ 17.50 Ampersand, Come On Gang, Stewart Forbes Quartet,

Indian Ink, Young States, Box,

Box, Metal-conscious rock, 21:00, TBC

Brel, Scotland’s leading saxophonist and crew, 15:00, Free

Tigers on Vaseline, Hot Love, Gallus Cooper, Flares, Carling Academy, Tributes to

Bowie, T-Rex, Alice Cooper, 19:00, £ 9.00

Melee, Meg and Dia, Lights and Sounds, King Tut’s Wah Wah

Hut, Carefully crafted melodic pop, TBC, £ 9.00

Transfer Audio, The Deletes, Eye Contact Leads To É, Daybreak, Nice N Sleazys,

New wave for shoegazin’, 19:30, TBC

Jeans Team, Findo Gask, MandaRin, Stereo, Techno-inspired

electro, 19:00, £ 9.00

Sun 05 Oct Circle of Tyrants, Nebukadnezza, Chewin Druids, River Freshney, 13th Note, Thrashy

metal, 21:00, £ 5.00

The Wisers, Shoot the Messengers, Icon 66, Chargrilled Squirrels, Exit Tour Left, Barfly, Southern Italian punk band, 20:00, £ 5.00

Foals, Barrowland, New indie sensa-

tion, 19:00, £ 13.50

The Gary Miller Blues Duo, Blackfriars Bar, Blues, one would think, 21:00, Free Sam Isaac, Yaya Club, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, DIY acoustic, TBC, £ 5.00

The Black Out, From First

to Last, Queen Margaret’s Union, Screamo-weamo, 19:00, £ 11.00 Steve Winwood, The Arches, 70s and 80s easy rocker, 19:30, £ 25.00

Mon 06 Oct Sanchez, Maxwell’s Dead,

Lovvers, Grozny, Abandon Ship, 13th Note, Snotty noise pop and post

punk, 21:00, £ 5.00

Exit Calm, The Sweet Leaves, Exit Music, ABC, Soaring psychedelia, 19:00, £ 7.00

The Courteeners, Barrowland, Poppy indie rock, 19:00, Sold out, £tbc The Bottleneckers, Blackfriars Bar, 50s-styled rock ‘n’ roll, 21:00, Free Disturbed, Shinedown, Indestructible Tour, Carling

Academy, American nu-metal heavies, 19:00, £ 17.50

Random Hand Vs Mike TV, The Terrors, The Murderburgers, Ivory Blacks, Pop punk and

ska/metal, 19:15, £ 6.00

Rosalita, The French Wives, Nixons, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Indie and new wave, TBC, £ 5.00

Ross Clark Acoustic Session, Oran Mor, Open Mic Night, 20:00, Free

Moskitoo, Filfla, Stereo, Japa-

The Mill Glasgow @ ñran M—r, Weekly live music in a specially created venue space., 20:00–23:00, Free Spiritualized, ABC, Venerated experimental rock, 19:00, £ 16.00

nese electropop, until , £ 4.00 20:00, £ 6.00

The Theory, The Smoking Sundays, Griever, Catcher, The Bridges, 123s, Future of Rock, The Arches, New music showcase,

20:00, £ 6.00

The Stranger, The Campsies, Coconut University, The State Bar, Folk/Americana/Country, 20:00, £ 4.00

Dbass, Underling, The Mill,

Jeremy Jay, The 17th Century, The Carreras, Barfly, Pop

rock, 20:00, £ 7.00

Jeremy Warmsley, Peggy Sue and the Pirates, John Rush, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Singer/ songwriter, TBC, £ 7.00

Dbass, Underling, The Mill,

Sat 04 Oct

Oran Mor, Hip hop, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

Spookey, We Rock Like Girls Don’t, 13th Note, DIY rock ‘n’ roll, 21:00,

Thu 09 Oct

Dirty Pretty Things, ABC, Indie rock heavyweights, 19:00, £ 15.00 The 4/5s, ABC, Psychedelic rock, 19:00, £ 6.00

Acoustic night., 20:00–00:00, Free

TBC

www.theskinny.co.uk

Concrete Campfire, Brel, Always Read the Label, Fights and Fires, Anavris,

13th Note, Progressive alternative, 21:00, TBC

SECC, The band that had that song in ‘Wayne’s World’, 18:30, Sold out, £tbc

Devil Sold His Soul, Fei Comodo, Rinoa, King Tut’s Wah Wah

Queen and Paul Rodgers,

Innerpartysystem, Furthest Drive Home, Barfly, Dance

Acoustic session of local talent, 20:00, Free

Blitzen Trapper, Absentee, Ordinaryson, King Tut’s Wah Wah

Hut, Layered US indie pop, TBC, £ 7.50 Heaven’s Basement, Nice N Sleazys, Insert riff here’, 19:30, TBC

Elliot Brood, The Sweetheart Revue, Le Reno Amps,

Stereo, Uptempo folk rock, TBC, TBC Roots Manuva, The Arches, Hiphop, 19:00, £ 13.50

Fri 10 Oct Francisco, Huntleys & Palmers Audio Club presents, Hetherington Research

Club, Popular American folk from Boston, 22:00–02:00, £10

Young Livers, Citizens, The Cost of Living, This is Our Battlefield, 13th Note, Gruff punk

and hardcore, 21:00, TBC

King Creosote, Emma Pollock, Kenny Anderson, Future Pilot AKA Vs Concerto Caledonia, Strike the Colours, The Phantom Band, Kim Edgar, Music Like a Vitamin, ABC, Folk and rock showcase, 18:30, £ 3.00

Surreal Knights, Barfly, Gritty rock, 20:00, £ 6.00

Ready to Fall, Ellis Island Rejects, Talking to Strangers, Guitars Don’t Fly, Zener Diode, Barrowland, Rock

rock, 19:00, £ 6.00

Enjoy Destroy, Canterbury, Lights. Action!, Barfly,

Alternative rock, 20:00, £ 6.00

The Easy Orchestra, Blackfriars Bar, Lounge lizards, 21:00, Free The Zonules of Zinn, Box, Electronic-inspired indie pop, 21:00, TBC Godamn Superstar, Capitol, Marilyn Manson tribute, TBC, £ 6.00 Orange Goblin, Ivory Blacks, Groove-heavy metal, 23:00, £ 11.00 Julianna Hatfield, Oran Mor, Alt-rock heroine, 19:30, £ 12.50

Jer, Shane and Stevie, Grozny, The Gummy Stumps,

Stereo, Local rock talent, TBC, TBC Sia, The Arches, R&B and jazz, 19:00, £ 14.00

Mon 13 Oct The Bishops, Eight Legs, Synesthesia, Barfly, Melodic indie, 20:00, £ 6.00

Scorpion, Carling Academy, You will be rocked not unlike a hurricane, 19:00, £ 35.00 Yashin, Ivory Blacks, Screamocore, 19:00, £ 6.00 We Smoke Fags, The Child Echo, Must Be Something,

showcase, 19:00, £ 6.00

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Electro punk tricksters, TBC, £ 5.00 Acoustic Night, Nice N Sleazys, Local acoustic talent, 20:00, Free

Box, Gruff-voiced pop rock, 21:00, TBC

Tue 14 Oct

Carling Academy, Metal sensations, 19:00, £ 14.50

Temperatures, A Middle Sex, Beyond Good and Evil,

Sol Diablos, Sneaky Pete, DragonForce, Turisas,

Life Among People, Pinpim,

Tue 07 Oct

The Creeping Nobodies, The Ballad of Mable Wong, Weenliz, Wounded Knee, Ivy

Driving indie, 21:00, TBC

Esperi, Eddie Beggan, Brel,

Andy Yorke, Ruarri Joseph, Kat Flint, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut,

Stripped-down acoustic jams, TBC, £ 7.00 Acoustic Night, Nice N Sleazys, Local acoustic talent, 20:00, Free

You Can’t Eat the Word

Sun 12 Oct

The Subways, Twin Atlantic, ABC, Friendly pop rock, 19:00, £ 12.50

Food, Nice N Sleazys, Jangly indie pop, 19:30, TBC

20:00, £ 6.00

Scottish Chamber Orchestra, City Halls, Classical, 19:30,

13th Note, Indie rock, 21:00, TBC

Wed 08 Oct

Catcher, The Arches, Indie guitar rock,

and pop showcase, 18:30, £ 3.00

Das Wonderlust, We are Trapped in Kansas, Zener Diode, Barfly, Self-described ‘wrong pop’,

Martin Taylor and Allison Burns, Oran Mor, Jazz guitar, 19:30, £ 15.00

Sons and Daughters, Twilight Sad, Norman Blake, Music Like a Vitamin, ABC, Rock

13th Note, 21:00, TBC

Bar, Tuneful Canadian post-rock, 20:00, £ 4.00

Hut, Melodic metal, TBC, £ 8.00

Ross Clark Acoustic Session, Oran Mor, Open Mic Night, 20:00, Free

Adnan Sami, SECC, Merging western and Asian musical styles, 19:30, £20-£30

Cyndi Lauper, Carling Academy, 80s pop diva, 19:00, £ 25.00

Glen Tilbrook and the Fluffers, Classic Grand, Pop rock, 19:30, £ 15.00

K Anderson, The Quiet Riot, Drawing Room Bar, Alternative acoustic tunes, 20:00, Free

Alan Tyler and the Lost Sons of Littlefield, The Gilded Angels, Dave Arcari, Grand Ole Oprey, Classic-sounding country/ western, 20:00, TBC

Team Waterpolo, Defend

Wed 15 Oct Hawnay Troof plus support, Nuts and Seeds, 13th

Note, Off-the-wall electro pop, 21:00, TBC Thomas J Speight, Box, Minimalist acoustic ditties, 21:00, TBC The Hoosiers, Carling Academy, Radio-friendly pop rock, 19:00, Fancy dress preferred, £ 17.50 Gabriella Cilmi, Classic Grand, Soulful pop chanteuse, 19:30, £ 12.50

Raging Speedhorn, Bossk, Take a Worm for a Walk Week, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Hard-

core punk, TBC, £ 7.50

Baillie and the Fault, Lions. Chase.Tigers, The Mill, Oran

Mor, Thoughtful pop and rock, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free The Musical Box, SECC, Genesis tribute, 20:00, £30-£35.50

Moskow, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Synthy indie, TBC, £ 6.00

Danny Wylie, Chris Clarke,

Nice N Sleazys, Guitar pop, 19:30, TBC The Maddisons, PJ Champs, Indie/ alternative rock, 20:00, TBC Kids in Glass Houses, Queen Margaret’s Union, Pop-rock with punk influences, 19:00, £ 9.00 Michael Bolton, SECC, Vocal pop, sadly sans mullet, 19:30, £ 38.50

Fri 17 Oct Adele Sande, Barfly, Promising soul,

20:00, £ 6.00

Kaiser Chiefs, Barrowland, Don’t act like you don’t know these guys, 19:00, £ 25.00

Must Be Something, Kung Fu, Box, Progressive alt-rock, 21:00, TBC 3 Doors Down, Carling Academy, American alt-rock, 19:00, £ 18.00

Thu 16 Oct

David Ferrard with guest, The Acoustic Affair, City Halls,

Concrete Campfire, Brel,

Acoustic night., 20:00–00:00, Free

We Were Promised Jetpacks, The Little Kicks, is this music?, 13th Note, Alt-pop,

Scotland’s answer to Rufus Wainwright, 20:00, £ 10.00

Magnetic Man feat. Skream, Benga, Fortified, Glasgow School of Art, Dubstep, 23:00, TBC

21:00, TBC

Acusis, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Indie

£ 7.00

Johnny Flynn, Amy Lavere,

Last Gang, Barfly, Punk pop, 20:00, Deltasound, Bloc, Guitar-heavy dance rock, 20:00, TBC

The Last Corinthians, Box,

Poppy indie, 21:00, TBC

Punch and the Apostles,

Brel, Acoustic session of local talent, 20:00, Free

rock, TBC, £ 5.00

Nice N Sleazys, Bluesy folk, 19:30, £ 8.00 The Jamm, Oran Mor, Jam tribute, 19:30, TBC aRe wE theM?, Rockers, REM tribute band, TBC, TBC

Plaaydoh, Peter Parker,

Stereo, Snotty pop proprietors, TBC, TBC

£11.00-£24.00

Classic Grand, Chugging post-hardcore, 19:30, TBC Arts Centre Band Night, East Kilbride Arts Centre, Monthly local talent showcase, 20:00, £7.00/£6.00

Koolmorf Widesen, Integra TV, Lyall Anderson, Tronic, Ivy Bar, Live electro, TBC, £ 5.00

John Power, The Ronelles, Electric Drugstore, King

Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Singer/songwriter with the common touch, TBC, £ 10.00 Fram, Nice N Sleazys, Rock, 19:30, TBC Errors plus support, Oran Mor, Glasgow’s celebrated math rockers, 19:30, £ 7.00 James Blunt, SECC, Hearthrobby pop rock, 18:30, £ 30.00 Whitehills, Stereo, Heavy psych rock, 23:00, TBC

Syrach, Achren, Stab-

wound, Stereo, From the looks of things, this’ll get heavy, TBC, TBC Curved Air, The Arches, Classic folk rock, 19:30, £ 16.00

Sat 11 Oct Sindre Bjerga, Hoh, Noma,

13th Note, Norse experimental and noise, 21:00, TBC British Sea Power, ABC, Do you like (indie) rock music?, 19:00, £ 14.00

Ded Hot Chilli Peppers, Live! Planet, ABC, Red Hot Chili Peppers tribute,

19:00, £ 10.00

Yellow Bentines, Washington Irvie Band, Ross Baird, Kinetic Friends, Barfly, Alternative

rock, 20:00, £ 6.00

The Leads, Butterhook, Castro, Modern Faces, Best of Barrowland 2, Barrowland,

Rock showcase, 19:00, £ 6.00

The Digzys, Boycotts, The Dials, Kiddo, Box, Crunchy indie, 21:00, TBC

Jazz Main, Brel, Jazz, from smooth to blues, 15:00, Free

Ben Strurrock with guest, The Acoustic Affair, City Halls,

Inspired by Ray Lamontagne, Van Morrison and Paul Simon, 20:00, £ 10.00 Vibrators, Ivory Blacks, Seminal punk band, 19:15, £ 9.00 Natty, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Reggae and dub, 20:00, £ 8.00

October 08

THE SKINNY 57

Listings

Glasgow gigs


Glasgow gigs

Edinburgh g Noah and the Whale, The

Arches, Colour-coordinated indie folk, 19:30, £ 8.00

Sun 26 Oct Kevin Shields, Caldera Lakes, Married in Berdichev,

13th Note, Experimental noisecore, 21:00, TBC Black Kids, ABC, 2008’s dance-pop phenomenon, 19:00, £ 10.00 Iain Forbes, Blackfriars Bar, Jazz, 21:00, Free M83, The Domino State, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Soaring and acclaimed French pop, TBC, £ 10.00

Kodiak, The Paul Cuthbert Band, Nice N Sleazys, Heartfelt acoustic, 19:30, TBC

Mon 27 Oct Taste of Chaos feat. Atreyu, As I Lay Dying, Story of the Year, Mucc, Horse the Band,

Sat 18 Oct Shout Bamalama, Blackfriars

Basement, R&B & soul., 23:00–03:00, £5

Simon Fisher Turner, Black Sifichi, Blue, Tramway, A one-off

screening of Derek Jarman’s Blue with a live performance of the score by its composer Simon Fisher Turner and sound artist Black Sifichi., 20:00–23:00, £9/5

Kaput, Barn Owl, Drive Carefully Records, 13th Note, Pop and rock showcase, 21:00, TBC

Funeral for a Friend, ABC, Welsh post-hardcore, 19:00, £ 15.00

Young States, ABC, Glawegian indie popsters, 19:00, £ 6.00

Satellite Tears, Electrolite, Box, Sultry pop rock, 21:00, TBC Marco Cafolla Quartet, Brel, Driving jazz funk, 15:00, Free

Shakes, Playtone, Someone’s Son, Mode, Sneaky Pete, Blue Rozes, LaFontaines, Down and Outs, Box presents Next Big Thing, Carling Academy, Rock showcase, 19:00, £ 10.00

Bring Me the Horizon, The Legacy, Deez Nuts, Red Shore, Garage, Heavy, speedy and

screamy, 19:00, £ 11.00

Hot Club de Paris, Sky Larkin, Copy Haho, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Experimental rock, TBC, £ 7.50

Come On Gang, Vendor Defender, The Soviets, The Mix Ups, Nice N Sleazys, Dancy art rock,

19:30, TBC

The Soviets, Dicelines, Nice N

Sleazys, Blues-informed indie rock, 20:00, TBC Jenny Lewis, Queen Margaret’s Union, Indie pop from Rilo Kiley frontwoman, 19:00, £ 11.00

Punch and the Apostles plus support, Stereo, Baroque and

Belle Reve, The Barnets, The Almos, State of Affairs, The Sweet Leaves, De Jour, Future of Rock, The Arches, New

music showcase, 20:00, £ 6.00

Mon 20 Oct Convoi Exceptionnel plus support, 13th Note, Minimalist rock,

21:00, TBC

Zebrahead, Cathouse, Punky SoCal

pop rock, 19:00, £ 9.00 Liferuiner, Ivory Blacks, Hardcore

punk, 19:15, £ 7.00

Bromheads Jacket, Let’s Wrestle, The King Hats, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Vintage-tinged rock, TBC, £ 8.00 Acoustic Night, Nice N Sleazys, Local acoustic talent, 20:00, Free The Research, Stereo, Head bobbing indie pop, TBC, £ 6.00

Dub Side of the Moon, Radiodread, Easy Star All Stars, The Arches, Reggae and dub, 19:30, £ 12.00

Tue 21 Oct Kunt and the Gang, The Mix Ups, The Murderburgers,

13th Note, Electro pop-punk, 21:00, TBC One Night Only, ABC, Indie pop, 19:00, £ 10.50

James Hunter, Congregation, ABC, Blues and soul, 19:00, £ 10.00 Seasick Steve, Barrowland, Lo-fi

blues troubadour, 19:00, £ 17.50

The Bottleneckers, Blackfri-

ars Bar, 50s-styled rock ‘n’ roll, 21:00, Free Indian jewelry, Nice N Sleazys, Lo-fi experimental rock, 19:30, TBC

Ross Clark Acoustic Session, Oran Mor, Open Mic Night, 20:00, Free

Pause.Break.Riot!, Pivo, Pivo, Jilted

night, 20:00, TBC

electro-pop, 20:00, TBC Fallout Boy, SECC, Pop punk, 18:30, £ 22.50 Olafur Arnalds, Stereo, Soft Icelandic pop, 20:00, TBC

tribute, 19:00, £ 12.00

Wed 22 Oct

eclectic rock, TBC, TBC

Tigers on Vaseline, The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, The Admiral Bar, Charity band Nearly Dan, The Arches, Steely Dan

Sun 19 Oct

Sluts and Bolts plus support, 13th Note, Perve punk, 21:00, TBC You me at Six, ABC, Radio-ready pop

Deadeye, Alter the Ancient, Syndicate 13, 13th Note, Metal,

punk, 19:00, £ 9.00

Towers of London, ABC, A mix of

merly of M People, 19:00, Date change; original tickets still valid, £ 22.50

21:00, TBC

punk and hard rock, 19:00, £ 9.00

Bloc Party, Magistrates,

Barfly, Indie rock heavyweights, 19:30, £ 10.00 The Gilded Angels, Blackfriars Bar, Up tempo country and bluegrass, 21:00, Free The Primary School, Box, Hoparound indie, 21:00, TBC

Blood Red Shoes, Rolo Tomassi, 1984, King Tut’s Wah Wah

Hut, Guitar-heavy pop, 20:00, £ 7.50

Mossy Rock, Senor Snazzy,

Nice N Sleazys, Upbeat folk pop, 19:30, TBC

Emma Hale, The David Farrell Jazz Orchestra, Oran

Mor, Supporting The Marie Cure Cancer Care BIG BUILD Appeal, 19:30, TBC Stephen Stills, SECC, 1/4 of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young, 19:30, £ 30.00 David R Black, Stereo, Hard alt-rock, TBC, TBC

58 THE SKINNY

Heather Small, ABC, Soul singer, forThe Last Shadow Puppets,

Carling Academy, Alex Turner’s latest project, 19:00, Sold out, £tbc

Kittie, Losing Sun, Symphony Cult, Cathouse, Grinding alt-metal, 19:00,

£ 11.00

Deadstring Brothers, The Scuffers, The Balladeers, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Detroit rock city, TBC, £ 9.00

Velcro Quartet, Alto Elite, The Mill, Oran Mor, Guitar and pop rock,

19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

Thu 23 Oct Concrete Campfire, Brel,

Acoustic night., 20:00–00:00, Free

Kevin Walls, The Yacominis, Rebbecca Orr, Two Hillbillies and a Guitar, 13th Note,

Alternative rock, 21:00, TBC

October 08

Terrorvision, ABC, Rock. Reunited. Again., 19:00, £ 16.00

Bombay Bicycle Club, Ones to Watch, Barfly, Fresh indie, 20:00, TBC

Solveig and I, The Sea Kings, Brel, Acoustic session of local talent, 20:00, Free

Strung Out, Dirtbox, Taking Chase, Cathouse, US punk stalwarts, 19:00, £ 10.00

Tilly and the Wall, Slow Club, The Moth and the Mirror, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Melodie

indie pop, TBC, £ 10.00

Frank Turner, Chris T-T, Emily Barker, Oran Mor, Folk balladry, 19:30, £ 8.00

The Only Jones plus support, Stereo, Pop rock, TBC, TBC

Fri 24 Oct George Borowski and the Fabulous Wonderfuls, The Electric Hellhounds, Equal an Opposite, 13th Note, Indie rock,

21:00, Album launch, TBC Alphabeat, ABC, Danish pop, 19:00, Sold out., £ 11.00 Feeder, Barrowland, Indie guitar rock, 19:00, £ 22.50

ABC, Tattoos, black hair and screaming, 18:30, £ 17.50 Francis Dunnery, Barfly, Singer/ songwriter, 20:00, £ 15.00 The Datsuns, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Rock ‘n’ roll over, TBC, £ 10.00 Acoustic Night, Nice N Sleazys, Local acoustic talent, 20:00, Free

Does It Offend You, Yeah?,

Oran Mor, Punk-inspired indie, 19:00, £ 10.00 Bryan Adams, SECC, Summer of ‘69: Still a classic, 19:30, £ 37.50

Tue 28 Oct The Bottleneckers, Blackfriars Bar, 50s-styled rock ‘n’ roll, 21:00, Free Throw Me the Statue, Captains Rest, Seattle indie popsters, 20:00, £ 6.00 Jersey Budd, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Singer/songwriter, TBC, £ 7.00

Wed 01 Oct

Sat 04 Oct

Out of the bedroom, The

The Perrys, Dirty Modern Hero, The Statler Project, Blank Canvas, Bannermans, Indie

Canon’s Gait, Open Mic Night, 20:00–00:00, Free

Your First Mistake plus support, Bannermans, Emo-punk,

21:00, £ 4.00

Johnny Foreigner, Dananananakroyd, Cabaret Voltaire,

Voltaire, Bluesy guitar rock, 19:00, £5.00/£4.00

The Remnant Kings, Yuill Scott and the Haight, The Ex Men, The Planes, Henry’s Cellar

The Little Black Hearts, The Remnant Kings, Black Arrows, Ewan Butler, Cabaret Half Man Half Biscuit, Drop Kick, Liquid Room, Humorous and unique,

19:00, £ 15.50

Immanis, Dog Tired, Arcane Corps, The Ark, Metal, 19:30, £ 4.00 Ruby Turner, The Jam House, Soul,

TBC, £ 15.00

Thu 02 Oct The Young Fathers & Friends, Young Fathers present PANDA!, Wee Red Bar, Hip-

Hop, dancehall, electro, R&B., 22:30–03:00, £tbc

The Ads, FOUND, The Mill,

The Mill Edinburgh @ The Caves, Weekly live music in a specially created venue space., 20:00–23:00, Free

fangs, dead boy robotics, your loyal subjects, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4)

The Big Hand, Go Go Bot,

Herriot Watt Student Union, Ska and rock, 21:00, Free

Little Man Tate plus support, Liquid Room, Indie from Sheffield, 19:00, £ 10.00

Ross Clark Acoustic Session, Oran Mor, Open Mic Night, 20:00,

Blues night with Missing Cat, The Ark, Blues, 19:30, £ 3.00 De Rosa, EagleOwl, Kid Canarveral, Woodenbox, A Fist Full of Fivers, Rubix, The

Essay for the Ordinary, Pivo,

The Ads, Found, The Mill, Harmoni-

Free

GRV, Showcase of unsigned talent, 20:30, £ 5.00

Diwan, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, Jazzy dance grooves from Senegal, 23:00, £5.00/£3.00

Sun 05 Oct Injuns, Claes Cem, The Black Diamond Express, Fanattica, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Lo-fi

indie pop, 19:30, £ 5.00

Stiff Little Fingers, Combat Rock, Liquid Room, Seminal punks from

Belfast, 19:00, £ 14.00

Kris Drever, John McCusker and Roddy Woomble, Queens Hall, Local folkies who need no introduction, 20:00, £14.00-£16.00

The Levings, Honey Bug, more TBC, The Ark, Local indie pop,

19:30, £ 4.00

Mon 06 Oct We are the Ocean, Medic

Tue 07 Oct

rock, 19:00, £ 12.50

The Murderburgers, The Wisers plus support, Banner-

The King Blues, Barfly, Fist-pumping

Thu 30 Oct

The Whisky Works, Bronto Skylift, Hey Vampires, 13th

Acoustic night., 20:00–00:00, Free

19:00, £ 16.50

ganza, 19:30, £ 7.50

Fri 03 Oct

The Bronx, ABC, A blend of hardcore and

Sat 25 Oct

You Can’t Eat the Word Food, ID Parade, The Vox Populi, Andrew Jackson, Headhunter Records, ABC,

Paul Lamb and the Kingsnakes, The Caves, British blues extrava-

21:00, TBC

Stone Roses Experience,

Paul Heaton, Cerys Matthews, ABC, Acoustic singer-songwriter,

Hard rock, 23:00, £ 4.00 Latif Bolat, Quaker Meeting House, Turkish mystic Sufi music, 19:30, £10.00/£8.00 Scottish Ensemble, Queens Hall, Classical, 19:45, TBC

ing Chase, The Hive, Pop punk and ska-metal, 19:00, £ 5.00

Marvel Heights, Marmajuke, Variety Suite, The Cliftons, 13th Note, Powerful pop rock,

Fangs, Dead Boy Robotics, Your Loyal Subjects, Limbo,

Ivory Blacks, Hard rock feat. Nate of Converge, 19:15, £ 8.00 Detroit Social Club, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Garage punk, TBC, £ 5.00 Beth Rowley, Oran Mor, Bluesy soul ballads, 19:30, £ 13.50

Note, Emo and hard rock united, 21:00, TBC

Ram Bam Thank You Mam, We Are Empire, Henry’s Cellar Bar,

The Voodoo Rooms, Glam and New Wave with snazzy haircuts, 20:30, £5.00/£4.00

Wed 29 Oct

Grand, Hip hop legend’ may be an understatement, 19:00, £ 14.00 Esser, Micachu, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Looped and sampled pop, TBC, £ 8.00 Universal You, Nice N Sleazys, Classic sounding rock and roll, 19:30, £ 6.00

Grand Master Flash, Classic

Bar, Groove-filled indie rock, 19:30, £ 4.00

ous rock and pop, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

Pivo, Snotty ska/punk, 20:00, TBC

mans, Pop Punk, 21:00, £ 5.00 Plaaydoh, Fast, Bongo Club, Lo-fi pop kids, 23:00, £5.00/£4.00 Ladyhawke, Cabaret Voltaire, Electropop dance-fest, 19:00, £ 7.00

Disciples of the Zep, 19:00, £ 7.00

Dancy pop rock, 19:00, £ 6.00

Droid, Cabaret Voltaire, Melodic hardcore, 19:00, TBC Mari Wilson, Queens Hall, Neasden Queen of Soul, 20:00, £ 16.00

punk anthems, 20:00, £ 7.00 Vampire Weekend, Barrowland, Afro-beat infused indie darlings, 19:00, Sold out, £tbc First step 2 Failure, Box, Melodic punk, 21:00, TBC Cascada, Carling Academy, Clubby dance pop, 19:00, Sold out, £tbc

Sinister Flynn, 4 Day Weekend, Box, Jazzy funk-ska, 21:00, TBC Levee Breakers, Cathouse,

rock, 21:00, TBC

Doomriders, SSS, Tortua,

Concrete Campfire, Brel, Tourist, Kurai Kotoro, The Bridges, Y Rock, Barfly, Jangly

rock, 20:00, £ 5.00

Fighterplanes plus support, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Thoughtful instrumental rock, 19:30, £ 4.00

Liquid Room, Stone Roses Tribute, 19:00, £ 8.00

Forth Valley Chorus - “”Be-

dazzled””, Queens Hall, Scotland’s leading ladies barbershop chorus!, 19:45, TBC The Bevvy Sisters, The Voodoo Rooms, Harmony vocal trio, 19:30, TBC

Random Hand, Mike TV, Tak-

Andy Yorke, Kat Flint,

Ruarri Joseph, Cabaret Voltaire, Stripped-down acoustic jams, 19:00, £ 7.00 Modus plus support, The Ark, Indie retro-pop, 19:30, £ 4.00

Wed 08 Oct Out of the bedroom, The

Canon’s Gait, Open Mic Night, 20:00–00:00, Free Elrey plus support, Bannermans, Rock, 21:00, £ 4.00

The Seven Deadly Sins, Time Bomb Soldiers, Ram Bam Thank You Mam, Cabaret Vol-

taire, Singer/songwriter, 19:00, £ 3.00

Roots Manuva plus support, Liquid Room, Reggae-influenced hip

The Shellsuit Massacre, Dave Courtney, Wee DJs, The Loons, Avenging Force, Tribute to Stephen Edgar,

after 18 years, 19:30, £ 18.75

Wee Red Bar, Rock and electro paying tribute to Edinburgh photographer, 19:00, Donations encouraged

indie rock, 19:30, £ 4.00

hop, 19:00, £ 13.50

Curved Air, Queens Hall, Reunited Dancing Mice, My Late Travels, more TBC, The Ark, Grooving

Rock and pop showcase, 19:00, £ 4.00

Answers on Postcards,

Barfly, Pop rock, 20:00, £ 6.00 Autosafari, Box, Riff-heavy power pop, 21:00, TBC JazzCo, Brel, A mix of jazz and funk standards, 15:00, Free Dub Pistols, Classic Grand, Hip hop/ dubstep, 19:00, £ 12.00 Vice Squad, Ivory Blacks, Punk rock, 19:15, £ 9.00 Onra, Pursuit Grooves, Ivy Bar, Hip hop and soul from New York and Paris, TBC, Free

Port O’Brien, We Were Promised Jetpacks, King Tut’s

Wah Wah Hut, Folkish indie, TBC, £ 7.00 Lords, Vom, Plates, Nice N Sleazys, Grooving rock (from UK, not US), 19:30, TBC Jonathan Coulton, Oran Mor, Spirited folk pop, 19:30, £ 15.00 Mystery Jets, Queen Margaret’s Union, Playful indie rock, 19:00, £ 11.00

New Scottish Choir and Orchestra, SECC, In Christ Alone,

19:30, £10-£15

Listings


Thu 09 Oct Underling, Dbass, The Mill, The Mill Edinburgh @ The Caves, Weekly live music in a specially created venue space., 20:00–23:00, Free

james pants, found, penpushers, Limbo, The Voodoo

Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4)

RBRBR, Hanney, Yoshi, Mayfield Drive, The Ark, Experimental pop

Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4)

Jazz Bar, Jazzy dancefloor electronica featuring guest performers, 23:00, £5.00/£3.00

Slicks Kitchen, Rocket Salad plus support, Banner-

Sun 12 Oct

The Dyad, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Experi-

The Smoking Sundays plus support, Bannermans, Indie rock,

Life Among People, Pinpim,

Lykke Li, Cabaret Voltaire, Sweet

Black International, Rollor plus support, Henry’s Cel-

21:00, £ 4.00

Swedish pop, 19:00, £ 8.00

Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Greyfriars Kirk, Classical, 19:30,

£20.00/£16.00

Stroszek, After Me, The Flood, The Blessed Order of Fallen Stars, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Live electro, 20:00, £ 4.00

Underbelly, Zoey Van Goey,

Herriot Watt Student Union, Bookish pop rock, 21:00, Free

The Aliens plus support,

Liquid Room, Upbeat psych pop, 19:00, £ 12.50 Jaleo Flamenco, Queens Hall, Flamenco and Andalusian dance, 20:00, £12.00£15.00 Underling and dBass, The Mill, Hip-hop, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

James Pants, Found, Penpushers, Limbo, The Voodoo

Rooms, New Wave meets old skool hip hop/R&B, 20:30, £5.00/£4.00

Fri 10 Oct Miyagi, The Electric Ghosts, Jennifer Concannon, Al Shields, Slow Train Records showcase, Bannermans, Acoustic, pop and rock, 21:00, TBC

Das Wanderlust, Dirty Summer, Cabaret Voltaire, Fun pop rock tunes, 19:00, £ 6.00

Global Parasite, Down to Kill, Anti-Virus, The Begrudgers, Henry’s Cellar Bar,

Hardcore from Wales, 19:00, £ 5.00

Ded Hot Chili Peppers, Black Velveteens, Liquid Room, Red Hot Chilis tribute, 19:00, £ 10.00

Clare Teal, Queens Hall, Singer/

songwriter and Radio 2 personality, 20:00, £14.00£16.00

Little Doses, Bohemond, Denied Sons of Iglesias, Irregular Company, The Ark,

No-frills rock ‘n’ roll, 19:30, £ 4.00

Jocasta Sleeps plus support, Wee Red Bar, Catchy pop rock fae Glasgie, 19:00, £ 6.00

Sat 11 Oct The Brent Flood plus support, Bannermans, Post punk, 21:00, £ 4.00

The Green Apple Sea, Curators, The Kays Lavelle,

Henry’s Cellar Bar, German indie pop, 19:00, TBC Illuminate, Liquid Room, Inspirational music, TBC, Free

Arty McGlynn and Noillaig Casey, Queens Hall, Irish traditional,

19:00, TBC

Dividing the Line, All Forgotten, Lioness, Bury Your Senses, The Last Phixx, Studio

24, A night mixing pop-rock and screamo, 18:00, £ 6.00

Thu 16 Oct

The Joe Acheson Quartet, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The

rock, 19:30, £ 4.00

Bannermans, Chugging post-hardcore, 19:30, TBC

lar Bar, Punk-influenced hard rock, 20:00, TBC

CSS plus support, Liquid Room, Dance pop from Brazil, 19:00, £ 13.50

The Fall, John Cooper Clarke, Milophobia, Queens Hall, “”Always differ, 19:00, £ 18.00

Wilson Noble plus support, The Ark, Folky acoustic, 19:30, £ 4.00

Los, Ram Bam Thank You Mam, The Hive, Hard rock, 20:00, £ 2.00 Andy Lang and the Well, Inge, Dream Tobacco, The

Voodoo Rooms, Album launch for acoustic Andy, 19:30, Free

Mon 13 Oct Chris Garneau, My Kappa Roots, Amy Duncan, Cabaret

Voltaire, Heartwrenching fragile melodies, 19:00, £ 6.00

Anni Rossi, Rollin Hunt, Horsebreaker, Henry’s Cel-

lar Bar, Organ-heavy baroque pop, 20:00, £6.00/£5.00

Orange Goblin, Alabaster Suns, Man of the Hour, Jackie Treehorn, Studio 24,

Groove-heavy stoner metal, 19:00, £ 10.00 Face Off - Punk, The Hive, Punk competish, 19:00, TBC

Cheeky Cheeky and the Nosebleeds plus support, Wee Red Bar, Freaked out and fired up indie, 19:00, £ 6.00

mans, German punk rock, 21:00, £ 4.00

mental jazz, 20:00, £5.00/£3.00

Terra Diablo, The Strands,

Herriot Watt Student Union, Alternative rock, 21:00, Free Ten Storeys High, Kiddo, The Mill, Semi-acoustic night, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

Fri 17 Oct Ceilidh Dance feat. HLI and Ken Gourlay, Assembly Rooms,

Kilt-core, 20:00, £10.00/£8.00 adv.

Prairie Dugz, Drongos for Europe plus support, Banner-

mans, 77-style punk, 21:00, £ 5.00

Godamn Superstar, Bannermans, Marilyn Manson tribute, TBC, £ 6.00

Hot Club de Paris, Cabaret

Voltaire, Experimental rock, 19:00, £ 7.50

Goodbye Lenin, Sebastian Dangerfield, Whale Engineering, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Poppy indie rock, 20:00, £ 4.00

T-Love plus support, Liquid

Room, Old school Polish rock band, 19:00, TBC

The Escape, Carla’s Chin Job, Precious and Grace, Acts of Anger, Studio 24, Pop and

indie rock, 18:00, £ 5.00

Little Amber, World is Static, more TBC, The Ark, Punchy

alternative rock, 19:30, £ 4.00

Alan Tyler and the Lost Sons of Littlefield, Blueflint, The Village, Classic-sounding

country/western, 19:30, £ 6.00

Her Name is Calla, The Kays Lavelle, Wee Red Bar, Morose and dramatic rock balladry, 19:00, £ 5.00

The Maddisons, Whistlebinkies,

Tue 14 Oct

Indie/alternative rock, 20:00, TBC

Nizlopi, Cabaret Voltaire, Mixing Celtic,

Sat 18 Oct

jazz and hip hop sounds, 19:00, £ 10.00

Listings

gigs

The Jamm, Bongo Club, The Jam

A night with 7VWWVW aka

Mammal, Wee Red Bar, Cracked local electronic experimentation, 19:00, £ 5.00 Deltasound, Whistlebinkies, Guitarheavy dance rock, 20:00, TBC

Sun 19 Oct The Dead Certs, The 48, The Scalies, The Little Extras,

Bannermans, Poppy rock-punk, 21:00, TBC The View, Cabaret Voltaire, Dundee rock city!, 19:00, Sold out, £tbc

Vessel, Vom, Mills and Boon, The Betamax, Henry’s Cellar Bar,

Psychedelic metal, 20:00, £ 4.00 Matt Monro Jnr, Queens Hall, Matt Monro tribute songs, 20:00, £15.50-£17.50

In Reason, The Placid Casuals, Keiko Avi, The Ark, Acoustic

infused pop rock, 19:30, £ 4.00 Nearly Dan, The Voodoo Rooms, Songs in the vein of Steely Dan, 20:00, £ 12.00

and Djed, 19:00, TBC

hardcore and metal, 19:30, £ 5.00

Mon 27 Oct

Driller Killer, Defcon Zero, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Swedish Elliot Minor plus support,

Red Light Company, Cabaret

Scottish Chamber Orchestra CPE Bach, Queens Hall, Classi-

The Black Seeds, Trouble DJs, Liquid Room, Roots reggae thunder

Liquid Room, Pop rock with teeth, 19:00, £ 12.00

cal, 19:30, £ 26.00

Electrolite, Jay Brown, Autosafari, The Ark, Expansive indie

sounds, 19:30, £ 4.00

The Debuts, Alto Elite, The

Mill, Pop rock with electro bits, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free Popup, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, Soulful pop rock, 20:30, £5.00/£4.00

Fri 24 Oct

tribute, TBC, £ 10.00

Goodbye Lenin, Autosafari, Paper Beats Rock, Bannermans,

Firebrand Superrock, Fury UK, Kill Heathen, Toxic,

Mon 20 Oct

singer/songwriter, 19:00, TBC Skullflower, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Experimental post rock, 19:00, £ 8.00

Takacs Quartet, Queens Hall,

Los Campesinos, Copy Haho,

Bannermans, Classic rock-inspired metal, 21:00, TBC Last Gang, Cabaret Voltaire, Punk pop, 19:00, £ 6.00

Kirsten Adamson, Helen Currie, Antonia Sidgwick,

Henry’s Cellar Bar, Countryfied acoustic pop, 20:00, £ 4.00

Kids in Glass Houses plus support, Liquid Room, Pop rock with a

punk influence, 19:00, £ 9.00

Mayhew, Whisky Galore, Muddy Face, Sophie Ramsay,

The Ark, Sullen acoustic folk, 19:30, £ 4.00 Big Tuna, The Jam House, Modern and classic rock covers, 18:00, TBC Catfish Keith, The Voodoo Rooms, Cutting-edge blues, 20:00, £ 12.00 David Donnelly and Band, The Voodoo Rooms, Acoustic folk and bluegrass, 20:00, TBC Creeping Nobodies, Wee Red Bar, Tuneful post rock from Canada, 19:00, £ 5.00

Gavin Moore, Cabaret Voltaire, Irish

Medicinal Purposes, 96 Tears, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Acoustic pop, 23:00, £ 5.00

Scottish Chamber Orchestra Adventurer - Elegies, Queens Hall, Classical, 19:30, £ 12.00

All Day Event feat. White Boys for Gay Jesus, Tangora, With Scissors, Sectarouge, Chickenhawk, Beasts, Take a Worm for a Walk Week, Errander, Friday Night Gunfight, Studio 24, Demented metal and thrash fest, TBC, TBC

Mozart, Bartok and Schumann, 19:45, TBC

Simon Kempston, Tiny Mouth, The Rolling River, Antonia Sidgwick, Jym Ponter, The Ark, Rootsy blues, 19:30, £ 4.00 Brand New Heavies, The Voodoo

Rooms, Groove/funk veterans, 20:00, £ 20.00

Cabaret Voltaire, Literate indie pop, 19:00, £ 10.00

No Drive Home, Filed Under Dihonesty, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Pop

punk, 19:00, £ 3.00

The Dias Quartet plus support, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Latin funk and jazz, 23:00, £ 5.00

from Down Under, 19:00, Original tickets still valid, £ 12.50

New Music for Scotlan,

Queens Hall, Opening concert for ECAT’s 29th season, 19:45, TBC

Tue 28 Oct DJ Rita Ray + Sweet E + Samba Sene and Diwan, Afro-Scottish Connections Club Night, The Bongo Club, 09:30–03:00, £8/6

Cascada, Corn Exchange, Clubby

dance pop, TBC, £ 22.50

Through Solace, Jackie Treehorn, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Welsh hardcore, 20:00, £ 4.00

Dr John, Queens Hall, Voodoo funk and R&B, 20:00, £20.00-£25.00

Funkspiel, Innes, Trixster, The Ark, Catchy electropop gadgetry, 19:30, £ 4.00

Wheatus (unplugged), Jakil,

Wed 29 Oct

Tue 21 Oct

Carol Kidd - “Dreamsville”,

support, Bannermans, Melodic hard rock, 21:00, £ 4.00 Metronomy, RBRBR, Cabaret Voltaire, Fill the gaps with your imaginings’, 19:00, £ 7.00 Flamboyant Bella, Cabaret Voltaire, Lo-fi indie pop, 19:00, £ 6.00

German dance pop, 19:00, £4.00/£3.00

Mogwai, Corn Exchange, Rock Action!, TBC, £ 17.50

Wed 22 Oct

Trio Valore, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, Old school funk

21:00, £ 4.00

and soul, 23:00, Advance tickets available, £5.00/£3.00

Poppy indie rock, 21:00, £ 4.00

Voltaire, Alternative rock, 19:00, TBC

Pollyester (Love in C Minor), Operator, Wee Red Bar, Fashionable

The Fabulous Corvettes, Distant Soul, Who’s Your Mama Now?, The Ubiquitous Kings of Rhythm, The Ark, Rhythm

and Soul (and Blues), 19:30, £ 4.00

Time Travellers, Children’s

Classic Concerts, Queens Hall, Family entertainment, 15:00, £6.00-£10.00 Essay for the Ordinary, Whistlebinkies, Snotty ska/punk, 20:00, TBC

Wed 15 Oct

Liquid Room, Intimate set from iconic US band, 19:00, £ 9.00 Queens Hall, Jazz vocalist, 20:00, £16.00£19.00

Theives in Suits plus support, Wee Red Bar, Melodic, danceable indie, 19:00, Free

The Scruffs, Angel Seattles, Venetia and the Voltage, Bannermans, Alternative rock,

Sat 25 Oct

Kunt and the Gang, The Gorms, Rodent Emporium,

rock, 21:00, £ 4.00

Henry’s Cellar Bar, Playful Casio pop, 20:00, £ 5.00

Alphabeat plus support,

Liquid Room, Loveable Danish pop, 19:00, £ 11.00 Bobo Stenson Trio, Queens Hall, Jazzy piano, 20:00, £12.00-£15.00

The Homecoming String Band, The Jam House, Bluegrass and country to dance to, 18:00, TBC

Thu 23 Oct NOT SQUARES, DIRTY SUMMER, DANCE LAZURUS DANCE, DAMN SHAMES, DJ sets from Fast, I Fly Spitfires, This Is Music, Black Tape, Dance Disaster Collective, Sick Note, Clash!, Jerk Alert! and Dogtooth., Indie Club Together, Cabaret Voltaire, A

quartet of live bands unite for an 8-hour marathon presented under the banner Indie Club Together Ð an event that’s one part gig and one part club night., 19:00–03:00, £5 (£4) Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4)

The Zonules of Zinn, Kirst plus support, Bannermans, Indie

rock, 21:00, £ 4.00

www.theskinny.co.uk

Not Squares, Dirty Summer, Dance Lazarus Dance, Damn Shames, Indie Club Together, Cabaret Voltaire, Indie live

The Hostiles, Esperanza, Root System, Bannermans, Ska and

Elliot Morris, Type 23 plus

Kosmos Kollectif, King Bear, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Experimental

rock, 20:00, £ 4.00

Grand Magus plus support,

The Hurricanes, Tie for Jack, The Idles, Cabaret Voltaire,

Studio 24, Epic heavy metal, 19:00, £ 12.50

Khuda, Higher Council of Mars, Hitcher, gasgiant,

19:30, £ 4.00

Indie rock, 19:00, TBC

Henry’s Cellar Bar, Trudging prog-metal, 19:00, TBC

Forth ‘One to Watch’ Finals,

Liquid Room, Up-and-comers competition, 19:00, £ 5.00 Seasick Steve, Queens Hall, Lo-fi blues troubadour, 19:30, £ 17.50

Commercial Break, Tourettes, Svengali, Jump: Press A, The Ark, Angular indie rock,

19:30, £ 4.00

Sonorous Breaks plus support, The Ark, Moody alternative rock,

Thu 30 Oct Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4) Bonnevilles plus support,

Bannermans, Garage blues two-piece, 21:00, Beth Rowley, Cabaret Voltaire, Bluesy soul ballads, 19:00, £ 13.50

Ross Clarke and the Scarfs Go Missing, Callel,

Voodoo Rooms, Soul and funk, 20:00, £ 12.00

The Mill, Part acoustic rock, 19:30, Visit The Mill’s website for tickets, Free

Sun 26 Oct

Fri 31 Oct

Crazy Daze, Landon, The Ellis Island Rejects, The Placid Casuals, Bannermans,

Foetus Boy, Ram Bam Thank You Mam, Look Left Again,

The New Mastersounds, The

Alternative rock and metal, 21:00, £ 4.00 The Sadies, Cabaret Voltaire, Country rock and psychedelia, 19:00, £ 12.00

United Fruit, Bronto Skylift, Munchkins, The Fatalists, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Heavy alt-rock, 20:00, £ 4.00

Noah and the Whale plus support, Liquid Room, Colour-coordinat-

ed folk pop, 19:00, £ 8.00

Bannermans, Hard rock Halloween, 21:00, Fancy dress, £ 4.00

Penny Blacks, Dead Good Villians, Hot Lips, Amber, Cabaret Voltaire, Punk/rock showcase, 19:00, £ 3.00

Februus, Hand Cannon,

Henry’s Cellar Bar, Industrial rock, 19:30, TBC Metalica UK, Liquid Room, Metallica tribute, 19:00, £ 10.00

October 08

THE SKINNY 59


aberdeen gigs Wed 01 Oct

Tue 07 Oct

Fri 10 Oct

Mon 13 Oct

Sun 19 Oct

Fri 24 Oct

Tall Firs + Greater The Shadow + Alastair Brown, Vocoustics presents:, The

The Blackout + From First To Last + We Are The Ocean + The Medic Droid, Moshulu, hard

The Fall, The Lemon Tree, Legendary post-punk rockers support their 27th studio effort, Imperial Wax Solvent, 21:00–15:04, £18.50

Life Among People + PinPim + Bloodnut, Black Tooth Rock Lounge, Snafu, Live rock +

Chris T-T and the Hoodrats, Vocoustics presents:, Snafu,

Elliot Minor, Moshulu, Rock/pop

Tunnels, Tall Firs are a 3-piece folk indie rock band from Brooklyn, NY featuring Sonic Youth’s sound engineer and At the Drive-Ins former drummer. Around for 18 years they deliver dark, slow, sparse electric folk., 20:00–15:18, £5

STEVE DOOLITTLE, Robot Rock, Moshulu, Indie, electro punk weekly

WITH DJ STEVE DOOLITTLE. Student Friendly, 22:30–02:00, free

Thu 02 Oct RSNO 08:09 - A Flying Start,

The Music Hall, Stephane Deneve conducts Mahler’s 5th symphony, 19:30–14:45, £8-19

Fri 03 Oct Tigers on Vaseline, Tigers on Vaseline, CafŽ Drummonds, A

tribute to David Bowie stargazers!, 22:00–13:05, £tbc

Stiff Little Fingers, Stiff Little Fingers, Moshulu, Pop/punk

from the Belfast legends., 20:00–13:08, £15

Residents Giles Walker, A La Fu + Kid Proquo, Mixtape,

Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–03:00, variable Duke Dumont, Mixtape, Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–15:54, tbc

Sat 04 Oct Little Man Tate + Right Hand Left, Little Man Tate + Right Hand Left, Moshulu, Live indie/rock from 2 bands riding high., 19:30–13:11, £10

Mon 06 Oct Fudge DJS + bands galore, Black Tooth Rock Lounge,

Snafu, The BLACK TOOTH ROCK LOUNGE is a concept-based clubnight featuring a rock/ alternative soundtrack, electric cabaret and black magic. With the assistance of Fudge Promotions, this night has established itself rather well!, 21:00–02:00, £3/2 (free passes in Mooorings)

rock / alternative, 19:30–13:14, £11 Boy George, The Music Hall, One of pop’s most iconic singers performs hits including Karma Kameleon, Do You Really Want to Hurt Me and Help! I’m Being Burgled!, 20:00–14:47, £25

Natasha Gilmore ÐThe Blank Album, danceLive! 2008, The Lemon Tree, Dance literally rocks

in The Blank Album! A flamboyantly rock Ôn’ roll music and dance comedy from Natasha Gimore, ÔThe Catherine Tate of contemporary dance’,and Quee MacArthur of Shooglenifty., 19:00–15:29, £10 / 8

Wed 08 Oct Big Pauper + Cars & Trains + Lamplighter, Interesting music presents:, Snafu,

Big Pauper + Cars & Trains + Lamplighter. BP offer glitchy psych-drenched orchestral hip-hop, 19:30–14:18, £5

Pumajaw, Kathreyn Sawyers, Interesting music presents:, The Music Club, Psche-

dellic, electronic folk in a lovely new venue., 20:00–14:21, £tbc Jaleo Flamenco, The Music Hall, Fusion of acoustic guitar, rhythm, songs, handclapping + ignitable dance., 19:30–14:53, £15-17

STEVE DOOLITTLE, Robot Rock, Moshulu, Indie, electro punk weekly

WITH DJ STEVE DOOLITTLE. Student Friendly, 22:30–02:00, free

Thu 09 Oct Live: Isosceles, Jack Butler, Steven Milne (DJ), Dirty Hearts Club, Snafu, Live music from Isosceles + Jack Butler joining host Steven Milne for the best indie-rocking-social in town., 21:00–02:00, £3

Scottish Ballet, danceLive! 2008, His Majesty’s Theatre, From ground-

breaking American choreographer Stephen Petronio comes Ride The Beast - a celebration of raw energy and creativity. set to music by rock band Radiohead and featuring designs by ubercool New York fashion designer Benjamin Cho., 19:30–00:00, £12.50-20.50

Natasha Gilmore, The Lemon Tree, Frantic rock ‘n’ roll music, dance & comedy, 19:30–15:06, £10 Scottish Ballet, danceLive! 2008, His Majesty’s Theatre, From groundbreaking American choreographer Stephen Petronio comes Ride The Beast - a celebration of raw energy and creativity. set to music by rock band Radiohead and featuring designs by ubercool New York fashion designer Benjamin Cho., 19:30–00:00, £12.50-20.50

Residents Giles Walker, A La Fu + Kid Proquo, Mixtape, Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–03:00, variable

Streetlife DJs, Mixtape, Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–15:50, £tbc

Sat 11 Oct Errors (live), Moshulu, Brilliant live exponents of a deeper electro sound., 22:30–02:00, £6

Todd Gordon, The Lemon Tree, Top jazz & swing singer performs songs by Cole Porter & Duke Ellington., 19:00–15:07, £14

Scottish Ballet, danceLive! 2008, His Majesty’s Theatre, From groundbreaking American choreographer Stephen Petronio comes Ride The Beast - a celebration of raw energy and creativity. set to music by rock band Radiohead and featuring designs by ubercool New York fashion designer Benjamin Cho., 19:30–00:00, £12.50-20.50

Dexplicit, Giles Walker, Hush Hush, Origin, Grime/4x4/Bassline with Dexplicit and host Giles Walker, 23:00–16:57, £6

Sun 12 Oct Eddie Reader, The Music Hall, Former vocalist with The Fairground Attraction embarks on a solo tour, 19:30–14:55, £21 + bf

alternative with Life Among People + PinPim + Bloodnut. Hosted by Fudge DJs., 21:00–02:00, £3

Aberdeen Chamber Music Club - Auer String Quartet,

The Cowdray Hall, Classical sophistication in an inspiring setting, 19:30–14:32, £9 / 3.50 (conc)

Wed 15 Oct Moshie’s Bagel, The Lemon Tree, High energy mix of Eastern European dance music, Middle Eastern rhythms and virtuoso performances, 19:30–15:09, £12

STEVE DOOLITTLE, Robot Rock, Moshulu, Indie, electro punk weekly

WITH DJ STEVE DOOLITTLE. Student Friendly, 22:30–02:00, free

Thu 16 Oct The Creeping Nobodies, The

Tunnels, Canadian band expose experimental + rock angles via da punk., 19:30–14:24, £5 The Hoosiers, The Music Hall, The eccentric 3-piece bring their unique brand of “”odd-pop”” to Aberdeen, 19:30–14:56, £17.50

Fri 17 Oct The Underkills, Eskimo Blonde, The Confidantes & Ricoshay, Indie-Cent Exposure, The Lemon Tree, Showcasing the

finest in local indie & rock talent, 20:00–15:10, £5

Residents Giles Walker, A La Fu + Kid Proquo, Mixtape,

Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–03:00, variable

Sat 18 Oct Glasvegas + Friendly Fires,

Moshulu, Band of the moment bring the hype up north. (Sold Out), 19:30–13:42, n/a

Zane Lowe DJ Set + Special Guests, MTV2 Gonzo Tour Aftershow Party, Moshulu, Zane

takes to the decks for one of his legendary sets with some surprise performances thrown in for good measure., 23:00–02:00, £5

Sunday session in indie/alternative/folk from the English songwriter. All in the newly refurbed surroundings of Snafu. http://www.myspace.com/ christtuk, 20:00–23:30, £5

Ksenija Sodrova, Romano Viazzani, Bruce Millers European Accordion Festival, Aberdeen Arts Centre, The 19-year-old Latvian classical accordion player, Ksenija Sodrova, tops the bill in a programme of traditional, jazz and classical accordion music. Other headliners include British based Romano Viazzani (classical and jazz) and the Under 16s Scottish Accordion Champion Craig Paton. Local artists Lauren Hart (vocalist) and Ben Sinkie (piano) add to the jazz element of the evening’s entertainment while Tom Orr and friends perform a Scottish set., 19:30–19:29, £12.50

Bromheads Jacket + Lets Wrestle, Moshulu, Rock ‘n’ roll storytelling from the Sheffield 3-piece, 19:30–13:52, £8

Hayley Westenra - River of Dreams Tour, The Music Hall,

Critically acclaimed classical singer has sold over 4 million albums and won numerous awards, 19:30–14:58, £24.50

Mon 20 Oct White Boys For Gay Jesus + Tangaroa + Ablach, Black Tooth Rock Lounge, Snafu, Live rock + alternative with White Boys For Gay Jesus + Tangaroa + Ablach, 21:01–02:00, £3

Wed 22 Oct Olafur Arnalds + Finn, Interesting music presents:, The Tunnels, Fresh from supporting Sigur Ros throughout Europe this summer, Arnalds combines classical instrumentation with an indie rock aesthetic, 20:00–14:10, £tbc

STEVE DOOLITTLE, Robot Rock, Moshulu, Indie, electro punk weekly

WITH DJ STEVE DOOLITTLE. Student Friendly, 22:30–02:00, free

Thu 23 Oct Seasick Steve, The Music Hall, Music’s favourite hobo puts his unique stamp on the blues, 19:30–14:59, £17.50

with a classical influence., 19:30–13:54, £12

Residents Giles Walker, A La Fu + Kid Proquo, Mixtape,

Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–03:00, variable

Sun 26 Oct The Music, Moshulu, The Music are back in support of their 3rd album, Strength In Numbers, 19:30–13:56, £13

Southern Tenant Folk Union + The Black Diamond Express + Smokin’ Catfish, Vocoustics presents:, The Lemon Tree, Southern Tenant Folk Union + The Black Diamond Express + Smokin’ Catfish, 19:30–15:22, £7.50

Wed 29 Oct Charlie Landsborough, The Music Hall, Charlie and his 5-piece band play numbers spanning the genres of folk, country, rock ‘n’ roll & gospel, 19:30–15:00, £17 / 15

Oldseed, Vocoustics pres-

ents:, The Music Club, Downtempo country and folk from the well-versed Canadian band, 20:00–15:26, £tbc

STEVE DOOLITTLE, Robot Rock, Moshulu, Indie, electro punk weekly

WITH DJ STEVE DOOLITTLE. Student Friendly, 22:30–02:00, free

Thu 30 Oct Seth Lakeman, The Lemon Tree,

New folk hero hits the road to celebrate his top 10 album, Poor Man’s Heaven, 20:00–15:13, £16

Fri 31 Oct Martin Kershaw, The Cowdray

Hall, 10 musicians perform new music by saxophonist Martin Kershaw, 20:00–14:30, £10

Residents Giles Walker, A La Fu + Kid Proquo, Mixtape,

Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–03:00, variable Sinden, Mixtape, Snafu, Dirty, twisted electronica showcasing the biggest global acts in dance music., 23:00–15:56, tbc

Dundee gigs Thu 02 Oct Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Fri 03 Oct Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Fest’n’furious Session A9 &

the Young Trad Tour, Caird Hall, Described as ÒScotland’s Supergroup’’, Session A9 were originally formed by Charlie McKerron of Capercaillie fame as an album project and include Adam Sutherland, Gordon Gunn and Kevin Henderson on fiddles, Tim Edey on melodeon/guitar, Brian McAlpine on keyboads and Iain Copeland on percussion., 20:00–09:14, £17.50 / £15

Sat 04 Oct Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

Fest ‘n’ Furious - Cappuccino Concert - Concerto Caledonia, Caird Hall, Fest’n’Furious is very proud to bring Scotland’s finest early music group to Dundee. David McGuiness’s Concerto Caledonia will be performing one of their infamously diverse sets using the Wighton Harpischord in their set up... The group’s seven CD recordings include Robert Burns’s songs in their original versions, classical symphonies from Fife, early Scots fiddle music, and the unique sound of 18th-century Scottish-Italian crossover., 10:30–09:17, £8 / £5

Duo Lisme: Lunchtime Concert, St Pauls cathedral, 13:00–09:23, £3.50 / £2.50

fest’n’furious, alt.folk showcase, Number Twenty-five, Two of Dundee’s finest, Elliot from the West and Mondo Mimmo, will be coming together for an afternoon of acoustic and electronic music. Expect some surprises and enjoy! It will be special., 15:00–09:26, free

60 THE SKINNY

October 08

fest’n’furious - Koshka, Caird Hall, Founded by virtuoso Gypsy violinist Oleg Ponomarev, Russian classical violinist Lev Atlas and Scots guitarist extraordinaire Nigel Clark, the trio have been enchanting audiences throughout the UK, Europe and Ireland with their innovative ÒWorld Gypsy MusicÓ, a heady cocktail of gypsy tunes from all over the world, spiced with elements of jazz, rock, folk and flamenco., 20:30–09:32, £12.50 / £10 concessions | Book this event online at the booth

Sun 05 Oct Fest ‘n’ Furious - Choired for Sound: The Big Sing, Caird Hall, All the participating choirs in Choired for Sound get together for a rousing performance at The Big Sing. Performances by Loadsawimminsingin, Feile womens singing group from Belfast and Dundee Gaelic Choir - expect a few surprises., 15:00–09:29, £2

Thu 16 Oct Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Fri 17 Oct Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Sat 18 Oct Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

Thu 23 Oct Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute

Tue 07 Oct

Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

PEATBOG FAERIES, The Rep Theatre, Based on the Isle of Skye, the Peatbog Faeries have been described as Ôthe future of celtic dance music’. They incorporate many influences which take them from traditional jigs and reels through jazz, hip hop, reggae and more. This is high octane Celtic dance music so be prepared to dance!, 20:00–08:59, £tbc

Fri 24 Oct

Thu 09 Oct Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute

Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Sat 25 Oct Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

Fri 10 Oct

Thu 30 Oct

Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic

Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Sat 11 Oct Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute

Fri 31 Oct Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Listings


Glasgow Clubs Wed 01 Oct

Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fri-

Gerry Lyons, After Hours,

The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3 Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Residents, Octopussy, The Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

JD Twitch, Residence, The

Flying Duck, 22:00–03:00, £6, £5 b4 12am

DJs Madame S & CeeNiven, Unherd! & Afraid of the Dark, Classic Grand, Electro, dirty-

house, disco-sleaze, punk-treats & technobeats., 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

days, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £6 Craig McGee, Horrorshow, Firewater, Indie, rock, punk,

electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Gordie & Jack, Old

School, The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666, The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s, CafŽ Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

DJ Patrick Wolf, Glasgow Glam Bangers, Sonny Marvello and Peter Parker, Pinup Nights, The

Thu 02 Oct

Flying Duck, Indie, punk, soul, pop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Throbb, The Falconi Bros, Von Trapp, The Pump Club,

Monox, The Sub Club, Ghetto house., 23:00–03:00, £10

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £2

A La Fu, Mixed Bizness, Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock,

indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2) Clatty Pats, ñran M—r, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers) Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3 Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00, Free Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar,

DJ HOUZ’MON, Numbers Vs. Jack De Marseille, Hell, Byblos, House & techno., 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Sat 04 Oct The Tennessee Hotshots & Gus’s Rockin Ukulele, All Tore Up, Blackfriars Base-

ment, 1950’s record hop, R&B, rockabilly and rock n roll., 22:00–03:00, £6 Ooft Music, The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk, rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Andrew Ingram, Hobbes, Brian d””Souza, Slabs Of The Tabernacle, The Twisted

Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6 Noj, Mark and Kris, Pandemic, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Indie, 60’s

garage, soul, rock n roll., 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Jeans Team, Findo Gask, MandaRin, Dolly Mixture, Stereo, Past & present tunes, 19:00–23:00, £9

Sun 05 Oct MOGG & NAUDASCHER, Optimo, The Sub Club, Diverse music

policy., 23:00–03:00, £9 (£8)

Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, ñran

M—r, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4 Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Fly-

ing Duck, Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk &

rock, 16:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Sound Service, ñran M—r, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house,

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition

DJ Normski, Zero Thurs-

days, Boho, Funk, electro & house, 23:00–03:00, £3 Audiophile, Maggie May’s, Eclectic., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) DJ Fiona J, Michelle Marsh and Suzie McGuire, Hang The DJ, Byblos, Student

anthems., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Ross Whitten, Destroy the Decades, Classic Grand, Current & classic indie rock, electro., 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 12am

Fri 03 Oct Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students Damaged Goods, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Upstairs - Punk, noise, pop.Downstairs - disco, funk, rock n roll., 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Marco Bailey, The Basement, Soundhaus, Techno, electro & house., 22:30–04:00, £9, £5 b4 11.30pm

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae

Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am Lone, The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays, ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious, Stereo, Yesterday’s sound

of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum, Brel, Retro soul,

21:00–01:00, Free

Children of the 80s, Classic

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3) Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Greg Wilson, CHRIS DUCKENFIELD, Melting Pot, The

Admiral, Cosmic, disco, house, 23:00–03:00, £10

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House

and smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students Bob’s Full House, ñran M—r, Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8

SASHA, GRAEME PARK, DANNY RAMPLING, PETER HOOK, Colours Streetrave, The

23:00–03:00, £5

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

21:30–03:00, £3

Mon 06 Oct 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage,

Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

Tue 07 Oct

Arches, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

21:00–01:00, Free

culture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb, house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop, Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk., Marcel Dettmann, Off The Record, Soundhaus, Techno, minimal, 23:00–04:00, £10 (£8)

Orlando Voorn, Bleep, Stereo, Live techno, 23:00–03:00, £8

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot,

Glasgow School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

Dirty Pretty Things Aftershow/DJset, Bunker Sessions, The Bunker Bar, Indie bits, rock picks and student anthems., 21:00–02:00, Free

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5) Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks, Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip

Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco, 21:00–01:00, Free Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip

hop classics, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock,

indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2) Clatty Pats, ñran M—r, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers) Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3 Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00, Free Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar,

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Classic house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Blanket, RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

HARRI & DOMENIC, Subculture, The Sub Club, TRIPTYCH special,

Sleazy, Dreampop, indie, psych, rock n roll., 23:30–03:00, Free

Jackmaster, Mixed Bizness, Glasgow School of Art,

Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo,

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms,

industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN, Classic Grand, Metal, rock,

Is this (club) music?, Nice ‘n’

Disco electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

Disco electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

Wheel, Techno, Detroit, disco, basement party, 22:30–03:00, £5

Thu 09 Oct

Shazza Halliwell, AudioAndy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & coming folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Wed 08 Oct Gerry Lyons, After Hours,

The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3 Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Residents, Octopussy, The Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

DJs Madame S & CeeNiven, Unherd! & Afraid of the Dark, Classic Grand, Electro, dirtyhouse, disco-sleaze, punk-treats & technobeats., 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house,

23:00–03:00, £3

Audiophile, Maggie May’s, Eclectic.,

KOOLMORF WIDESEN, iNTEGRA TV, LYALL ANDERSON, Tronic, The Ivy Bar, Electronic., 21:00–00:00, £5

Fabbotoir, The Twisted Wheel,

21:30–03:00, £3

Sat 11 Oct

Mon 13 Oct

Hush Puppy, Saavedra & Define Define, One More Tune, Blackfriars Basement, Techno,

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk, rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

HARRI & DOMENIC, SubculIan Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

mism/Rocktimism, The Garage, Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN, Classic Grand, Metal, rock,

industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

ture, The Sub Club, TRIPTYCH special, 23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House

and smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students Bob’s Full House, ñran M—r, Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8 Keep Up DJs, The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop, Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk.,

anthems., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Arches, 22:30–03:00, £15

Current & classic indie rock, electro., 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 12am

Fri 10 Oct Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays, ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students dj Jaseface, Derriere, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am Spitfire, Blackfriars Basement, Motown to punk., 21:00–02:00, £4

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious, Stereo, Yesterday’s sound

of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Radiomagnetic Soundsystem, The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar,

DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum, Brel, Retro soul,

21:00–01:00, Free

Symbiosis, Soundhaus, Drum & bass., 22:30–03:00, £tbc Children of the 80s, Classic Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3) Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

21:30–03:00, £6

Craig McGee, Horrorshow, Firewater, Indie, rock, punk,

electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Gordie & Jack, Old School, The Buff Club, Old school

tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666, The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s, CafŽ Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

DJ Skurge and Fulgeance live, Ballers Social Club, Glasgow School of Art, Techno, electronica, hip hop., 22:00–03:00, £10

23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition

playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers Octogen, Autokrat, Barfly, House, techno, electro, 23:00–03:00, £5 Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

21:00–01:00, Free

Ross Whitten, Destroy the Decades, Classic Grand,

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

Pop & indie, 23:00–03:00, £4

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

DJ Fiona J, Michelle Marsh and Suzie McGuire, Hang The DJ, Byblos, Student

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

23:00–03:00, £5

ULTRABEAT, N FORCE, BREEZE Vs. LOST WITNESS, Clubland Live Tour, The MAXIME DANGLES, Sleaze, Soundhaus, House, electro, techno., 22:30–04:00, £10 (£9)

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot,

Glasgow School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5) Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks, Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco,

21:00–01:00, Free

Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip

hop classics, 22:30–03:00, £tbc Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6

Dirty Larry and Teamy, Wrong Island, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy,

Techno, beats, electronica., 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Friday Street presents Afterglow, The Twisted Wheel,

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Popti-

Tue 14 Oct Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Shazza Halliwell, Audio-

culture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb, house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2) Andy Wilson & DJ Kash,

All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & coming folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Wed 15 Oct The Hoosiers, Tongue In

Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Gerry Lyons, After Hours, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3 Residents, Octopussy, The Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

DJs Madame S & CeeNiven, Unherd! & Afraid of the Dark, Classic Grand, Electro, dirty-

house, disco-sleaze, punk-treats & technobeats., 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Thu 16 Oct Cheap ‘n’ Nasty, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Baltimore, funk, techno, hip-hop, old fashioned party tunes., 23:30–03:00, £2 Boom Monk Ben, Mixed Bizness, Glasgow School of Art,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Mod, northern soul, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Clatty Pats, ñran M—r, Eclectic,

Sun 12 Oct

Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The

JD Twitch & JG Wilkes, Optimo, The Sub Club, Diverse music

policy., 23:00–03:00, £9 (£8)

Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, ñran M—r, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4

Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff

Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket, RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Dominic Martin, Kash &

Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo, Classic house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric Jumblesale Sounds, It

Sure Beats Waitin’, The Flying Duck, Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk &

rock, 16:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Sound Service, ñran M—r, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers)

Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3 Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00, Free Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar, Disco electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night

for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house,

23:00–03:00, £3

Audiophile, Maggie May’s, Eclectic.,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

DJ Fiona J, Michelle Marsh and Suzie McGuire, Hang The DJ, Byblos, Student

anthems., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

theskinny.co.uk/listings 62 THE SKINNY

October 08

Listings


Current & classic indie rock, electro., 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 12am

Fri 17 Oct Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students

HOUSE OF FIX, Ignorant, PRODUCTION UNIT, Radar,

Soundhaus, Techno., 23:00–04:00, £tbc Upside Down, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Rock n roll, punk, garage., 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm Embolada, Blackfriars Basement, World music and latin beats., 23:00–03:00, £5

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious, Stereo, Yesterday’s sound

of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Boom Monk Ben, The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum, Brel, Retro soul,

21:00–01:00, Free

Children of the 80s, Classic

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3) Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

21:30–03:00, £6

Craig McGee, Horrorshow, Firewater, Indie, rock, punk,

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip

Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco, 21:00–01:00, Free Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip

hop classics, 22:30–03:00, £tbc Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6 Bottle Rocket, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Indie., 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

AndNotOr, Sound The Alarm, The Twisted Wheel, Techno

party, 23:00–03:00, £1

Sun 19 Oct Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, ñran

M—r, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4 Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket, RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo,

Classic house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Fly-

ing Duck, Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk &

rock, 16:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Sound Service, ñran M—r, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

Gerry Lyons, Funkey Do-

Mon 20 Oct

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s,

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house,

Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays,

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition

ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Magnetic Man, Fortified, Glasgow School of Art, Dubstep, electronic, bass., 22:00–03:00, £tbc Jukebox!, The Twisted Wheel, Brit-pop, punk, rock n roll, hip hop, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4

Sat 18 Oct ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk,

23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage,

Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

Tue 21 Oct Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club,

rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

New wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

ians, Monox, Soundhaus, Techno & electro., 23:00–05:00, £12 (£10)

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Jackal & Hyde, Monox-

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN, Classic Grand, Metal, rock,

industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

HARRI & DOMENIC, Subculture, The Sub Club, TRIPTYCH special,

23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House

and smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students Bob’s Full House, ñran M—r, Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8

Numbers DJs, The Ivy Bar,

The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop, Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk.,

21:00–01:00, Free

Jo Jo De Freq, Death Disco, The Arches, Electro, disco, 23:00–03:00, £12

Activator, Vandall, Infexious, Ivory Black’s, Hardcore, hardstyle, techtrance., 22:00–03:00, £12

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot,

Glasgow School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house,

23:00–03:00, £3

Audiophile, Maggie May’s, Eclectic.,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

DJ Fiona J, Michelle Marsh and Suzie McGuire, Hang The DJ, Byblos, Student

anthems., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Ross Whitten, Destroy the Decades, Classic Grand, Current & classic indie rock, electro., 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 12am

Fri 24 Oct Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays, ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

21:00–01:00, Free

Children of the 80s, Classic

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3) Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

21:30–03:00, £6

Craig McGee, Horrorshow, Firewater, Indie, rock, punk,

electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Gordie & Jack, Old School, The Buff Club, Old school

tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666, The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s, CafŽ Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Sound Service, ñran M—r, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

Sat 25 Oct

23:00–03:00, £5

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop, Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk.,

21:30–03:00, £3

21:00–01:00, Free

Super8 & Tab, Inside Out,

The Arches, Trance, hard house, house, 22:30–03:00, £12

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot,

Glasgow School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5) Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks, Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, Woodland Creatures present, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Psyche-

delic folk, oddness and curios., 23:30–03:00, £whatever you can give

Mon 27 Oct Mash, Normski and Zeus,

Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage,

Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco,

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house,

Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip

Tue 28 Oct

21:00–01:00, Free

hop classics, 22:30–03:00, £tbc Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6

Rafla and Nobodaddy, The Hot Club, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy,

Garage, punk, psych., 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Onra and Pursuit Grooves, Ballers Social Club, The Ivy Bar, Techno, electronica,

hip hop., 21:00–01:00, Free

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6) Teknika, Blackfriars Basement, Minimal techno., 23:00–03:00, £6

Maelstrom, Andy Piacentini, Derek Smith, Dance! Dance! Dance!, The Twisted

Wheel, Disco, eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £5 ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk, rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Sun 26 Oct DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket, RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo,

Classic house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Fly-

ing Duck, Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk &

rock, 16:00–03:00, Free

23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

DJ Toast, Up The Racket, Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house, 23:00–03:00, £3

Audiophile, Maggie May’s, Eclectic., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Recloose, Sub Cub Presents..., MacSorley’s Music Bar, 21:00–01:00, £3

DJ Fiona J, Michelle Marsh and Suzie McGuire, Hang The DJ, Byblos, Student anthems., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Ross Whitten, Destroy the Decades, Classic Grand, Current & classic indie rock, electro., 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 12am

Fri 31 Oct Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays, ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Harri (Subculture), The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up &

coming folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Wed 29 Oct

DJs Rasef & Lobo, Halloween Nonsense, Eruption, The Halt Bar, A night of punk, garage, blues, soul, ska, R&B., 19:00–00:00, Free

Green velvet, Oxia, Slam, Marco Passarani, paul Ritch, Pressure, The Arches, Hoouse & techno., 22:00–03:00, £18

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum, Brel, Retro soul,

Residents, Octopussy, The

21:00–01:00, Free

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

DJs Madame S & CeeNiven, Unherd! & Afraid of the Dark, Classic Grand, Electro, dirty-

house, disco-sleaze, punk-treats & technobeats., 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Thu 30 Oct Boom Monk Ben, Mixed Bizness, Glasgow School of Art,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00, Free Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Children of the 80s, Classic Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £6

Craig McGee, Horrorshow, Firewater, Indie, rock, punk, electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Gordie & Jack, Old School, The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666,

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar,

Disco electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s, CafŽ Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

DJ Zinc (House Set), How’s Your Party?, The Sub Club, Breaks, edits, house, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Umek, Hell, Byblos, House & techno., 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Andy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & coming folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Wed 22 Oct Gerry Lyons, After Hours,

The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3 Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Residents, Octopussy, The Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

DJs Madame S & CeeNiven, Unherd! & Afraid of the Dark, Classic Grand, Electro, dirty-

house, disco-sleaze, punk-treats & technobeats., 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Thu 23 Oct Hunt Them Crew, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Reggae, dub and dubstep., 23:30–03:00, £2

21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Bizness, Glasgow School of Art, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

www.theskinny.co.uk

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

Pauly, Simon and Steev,

Black Tent, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 21:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11.30pm

Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5) Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks, Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop,

for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum, Brel, Retro soul,

rey, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Northern soul, funk, ska, hip hop, latin and reggae., 23:30–03:00, £2

CafŽ Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

Disco electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

23:00–03:00, £5

School, The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6 The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar,

Mr Nice (Freakmenoovers), The Ivy Bar, The Ivy

21:30–03:00, £3

Nicola Walker, Route 666,

23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers) Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3 Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00, Free Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Gordie & Jack, Old

Clatty Pats, ñran M—r, Eclectic,

Boom Monk Ben, Mixed

October 08

THE SKINNY 63

Listings

Ross Whitten, Destroy the Decades, Classic Grand,


Edinburgh Clubs Wed 01 Oct

Sat 04 Oct

Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

chris & paul, The Egg, Wee Red

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music to

make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth, Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclectic,

chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo CaffŽ, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco,

RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4 Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set, 21:00–03:00, Free The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free JungleDub, The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free Wacky Wednesdays, Luna, Student night., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Thu 02 Oct Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

Pivo CaffŽ, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free

The Blessings, Stepback,

Medina, Baltimore, ghetto-tech, electro & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note, Cabaret

Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The

Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco & dance,

22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge, Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm Crash, Luna, Electro, indie, hip-hop, drum and bass & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Fri 03 Oct orlando voorn, stephen brown and wolfjazz, Creative Industries, The GRV, Techno., 23:00–03:00, £10

Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, In-

die, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5 Kutski, Nuklearpuppy, Luna, Hard dance, house, trance., 22:00–03:00, £10 Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Octogen (LIVE) + DJ Sketchy, Trouble, Cabaret Voltaire, The sixth

birthday bash with Hobbes & Erik D’Viking & Rookie eclectic dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

DJ Tall Paul & Selector Robigan, Lucky 7, The Forest CafŽ, Ska

& reggae., 21:00–01:00, Free

Tony K, Liam G, Our House, The

Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7, £6 b4 12am

Carlton ‘Killawatt’ Valley, Big Toe’s Hi-Fi, Wee Red Bar, Reggae,

dub, dancehall, dubstep, 22:30–03:00, £5 PLAAYDOH, Fast, The Bongo Club, Electro, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4 b4 12am)

64 THE SKINNY

Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 students/members Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock, motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students Luvely, The Liquid Room, Gay friendly house night, 22:30–03:00, £12 (£10) The Go-Go, Studio 24, Garage, pop, mod, ska, beat, psychedelia, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4) Bleep By Day, The Courtyard, Techno, electro, house, 15:00–23:00, Free

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More,

James Longworth & Jamie

Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4 Split, Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo CaffŽ, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The

Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00, free James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Wed 08 Oct

Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00, £7, £4 b4 11pm Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock, metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music to make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul,

PAUL TROUBLE ANDERSON & MARK E, Moovn, Berlin, House & live

percussion., 22:30–03:00, £10, £8 (NUS/ECCF b4 12) Tom Middleton, Headspin, The Bongo Club, Funk, hip hop, house, disco, 4 deck mix, 23:00–03:00, £9

Joey Negro, Ultragroove, Cabaret Voltaire, Deep house & techno, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Diwan, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, TRIPTYCH special, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm

DJs Fisher & Price The Visitor [AKA Jon Pleased Wimmin] and Kaupuss, Fever, Luna, Gay friendly

Saturday house club., 23:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Sun 05 Oct Curious? Sunday Joint, The

Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk,

industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

John Hutchinson, Shake,

Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special,

22:30–03:00, £3

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, 23:30–03:00, free

Black Spring DJs, Black

Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

James Combe, The Latin Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house,

22:00–03:00, free

Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge,

Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo CaffŽ, Soul, jazz &

funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront &

unplayed cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots, ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Tue 07 Oct Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

October 08

French 60’s pop, psyche, retro., 21:00–01:00, Free Dirt Vs. Pangea, The GRV, DnB, Jungle, dubstep, ragga and hip-hop., 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Sat 11 Oct chris & paul, The Egg, Wee Red Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 students/members Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock, motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

CaffŽ, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco,

RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4 Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set, 21:00–03:00, Free The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free JungleDub, The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free Wacky Wednesdays, Luna, Student night., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Thu 09 Oct Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

Pivo CaffŽ, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free

23:00–03:00, £4

Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note, Cabaret

Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The

Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free

Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The

Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco & dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge,

Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm Crash, Luna, Electro, indie, hip-hop, drum and bass & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Fri 10 Oct Funki Diva, Dejaybird, Boy Toy, Debi T, Furburger, GHQ, Furburger is

for girls who like girls who like music., 23:00–03:00, £tbc Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5

JOHN ASKEW, IndepenDANCE,

Studio 24, Trance., 22:00–03:00, £8, £6 b4 12am

Reactor Vs. Darkside, Twisted & Brainfire, Luna, Hardcore., 21:00–03:00, £12

Live electronics., 17:00–00:00, £tbc

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More, Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul,

Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00, £7, £4 b4 11pm Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock, metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

ELECTRIK PLAYGORUND, Musika, The Liquid Room, We Love Space Ibiza party., 22:30–03:00, £8

STEVE PORTER, Karnival, Cabaret Voltaire, House & techno., 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Colin Cook, Lel Palfrey, Cosmic:Dust, The Speakeasy @ Caba-

ret Voltaire, Live performance, the occasional visual artist, creative people and wide angle DJ sets., 23:00–03:00, £7

Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge,

Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge,

22:00–03:00, free

Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo CaffŽ, Soul, jazz &

funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow

People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront & unplayed cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots, ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Tue 14 Oct Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house.,

23:00–03:00, £4 Split, Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo CaffŽ, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs,

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo

Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free

Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco & dance,

Tokyo Knife Attack, Marcus Rafferty, Espee, Parasite Audio, Pest Control, The Courtyard,

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth,

The GRV, Hip hop, jazz, new wave, dub techno., 22:30–03:00, £4, £2 b4 12am

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The

James Combe, The Latin Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house,

Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclectic, chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky

the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

Tall Paul & Angus, Bubblegum Boogaloo, The Voodoo Rooms,

the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Mon 06 Oct

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join

& rave., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

Nasty P, Sonny & U-Turn, Pass The Vibes, Medina, Live hip-hop.,

bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Residents, Happy Mondays, Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Beeds & Sugar Skull, $5 Dollar Shake, Wee Red Bar, Electro, dubstep

Residents, Happy Mondays, Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Sinnerman, Marmalade Maslin, James “”Jammin”” Thomas & Jammiwam, Jam The Box,

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion,

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam, 23:00–03:00, £4 DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for deserving

Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3) Coalition, Cabaret Voltaire, Breaks, drum & bass, dubstep, techno, electro and mashup., 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00, free James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Wed 15 Oct Gary Mac & friends, We Are

Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House, electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music to

22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm Crash, Luna, Electro, indie, hip-hop, drum and bass & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Fri 17 Oct Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5 Recovery Sounds & DJ Playaround, Touch, Luna, Electrohouse,

tech-house, breaks., 22:30–03:00, £5

Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

HLI & caller Ken Gourlay, Assembly Rooms Ceilidh, Assembly Rooms (George Street), 20:00–01:00, £10

Tokyoblu, Cabaret Voltaire, House

night with skilled house house band, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£6)

Benetti & Cassavettes, italoBLACK, Wee Red Bar, Italo disco, space disco.,

23:00–03:00, £5

Sat 18 Oct Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock, motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students Madchester, The Liquid Room, Indie, brit pop & rave., 22:30–03:00, £5 Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More, Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul,

Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00, £7, £4 b4 11pm Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock, metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Joe Acheson Quartet, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar,

make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Scott Donachie and Kristian Elliot, Cryptik, Sneaky Pete’s, Techno,

Brett King and Brian Dempster, Satisfied, Luna, House, prog,

chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Ame, Trus’Me, Linkwood, Ultragroove, Cabaret Voltaire, Deep

TRIPTYCH special, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm

trance, anthems., 23:00–03:00, £6 Hooked, Luna, House, prog, tech-house., 23:00–03:00, £6

Sun 12 Oct Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free Curious? Sunday Joint, The Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk,

industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

John Hutchinson, Shake,

Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special,

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth, Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclectic,

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo CaffŽ, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco,

RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4 Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set, 21:00–03:00, Free The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free JungleDub, The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free Wacky Wednesdays, Luna, Student night., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Thu 16 Oct

22:30–03:00, £3

Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

23:30–03:00, free

Ghislain Poirier, Stepback,

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam, 23:00–03:00, £4

Mon 13 Oct DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for deserving

bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Pivo CaffŽ, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free

Medina, Baltimore, ghetto-tech, electro & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note, Cabaret

Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

House, Electro, Minimal., 23:00–03:00, Free

house & techno, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Trio Valore, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, TRIPTYCH special, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm

Chris & Paul, The Egg, Wee Red

Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Breakage, Volume Presents Breakage (Digital Soundboy), Luna, Drum & bass, dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Sun 19 Oct Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free Curious? Sunday Joint, The Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

The Sunday Social, The Sun-

day Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk, industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free John Hutchinson, Shake,

Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special,

22:30–03:00, £3

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, 23:30–03:00, free

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam, 23:00–03:00, £4

Listings


DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for deserving

bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Residents, Happy Mondays, Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco & dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge,

Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm

Benetti & Cassavettes, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join

disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Crash, Luna, Electro, indie, hip-hop, drum and bass & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

James Combe, The Latin Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house,

Fri 24 Oct

the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

22:00–03:00, free

Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge,

Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo CaffŽ, Soul, jazz &

funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront &

unplayed cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots, ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5 Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Tue 21 Oct

DYLAN & ROBYN CHAOS, ESQURE, DJ REDRUM, PHONOGRAF, Therapy Sessions Scotland,

Split, Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free

Bob Disaster & Mr. Biscuits, Vapors!, Wee Red Bar, Old School rap,

Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo CaffŽ, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The

Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00, free James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Cabaret Voltaire, Drum & bass., 23:00–03:00, £11

hip-hop, electro., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Mono, Luna, Techno, tech-house and minimal., 23:00–03:00, £5 Monster Sound, The Voodoo Rooms, Eclectic set, 21:00–01:00, Free

Mark Balneaves, Daragh Byrne and Martin Lightbody, Definition, Sneaky Pete’s, House, electro,

minimal & techno inspired by the likes of Sonar, Fabric & Pressure., 23:00–03:00, Free

Sat 25 Oct POPOF, Stereotype, Berlin, House,

22:30–03:00, £10 (£8)

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More,

Wed 22 Oct

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul,

Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music to

make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth, Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclectic,

chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo CaffŽ, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco,

RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4 Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set, 21:00–03:00, Free The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free JungleDub, The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free Wacky Wednesdays, Luna, Student night., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Thu 23 Oct Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

Pivo CaffŽ, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free

Werd & Deeko, Pass The Vibes,

Medina, Live hip-hop., 23:00–03:00, £4 Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note, Cabaret

Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session,

The Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

www.theskinny.co.uk

Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00, £7, £4 b4 11pm Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock, metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Twitch and Wilkes, Optimo, Cabaret Voltaire, Diverse music policy., 23:00–03:00, £10

Erik D’Viking, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, TRIPTYCH special,

hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm Chris & Paul, The Egg, Wee Red Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4) Fuse, Luna, House, techno, electronica., 23:00–03:00, £5

Sun 26 Oct Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free Curious? Sunday Joint, The Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, 23:30–03:00, free

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk,

industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

John Hutchinson, Shake,

Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special,

22:30–03:00, £3

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam, 23:00–03:00, £4 The Dark Assassin, aka Hobbes, The Hollywood Touch, aka Mr Meaks, New Idols, The

Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 if you turn up (fancy) dressed as your idol

Mon 27 Oct DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade

Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for deserving bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Residents, Happy Mondays, Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free Residents, The Late, Great

Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

Listings

Mon 20 Oct

James Combe, The Latin

Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house, 22:00–03:00, free Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge, Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo CaffŽ, Soul, jazz &

funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront &

unplayed cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

Tue 28 Oct Split, Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo CaffŽ, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The

Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00, free James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Wed 29 Oct Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music to

make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth,

Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclectic, chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4) Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo CaffŽ, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco, RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4

Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set,

21:00–03:00, Free The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free Wacky Wednesdays, Luna, Student night., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Thu 30 Oct Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

Pivo CaffŽ, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note, Cabaret

Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session,

The Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco & dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge,

Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm

Benetti & Cassavettes, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space

disco., 22:00–03:00, Free

LuckyMe with The Blessings LIVE, Big Toe’s Spooky Hi-Fi,

Wee Red Bar, Reggae, dub, dancehall, dubstep., 22:30–03:00, £5 Crash, Luna, Electro, indie, hip-hop, drum and bass & dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Fri 31 Oct Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5 Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) October 08

THE SKINNY 65


Aberdeen Clubs Wed 01 Oct Martin Jay, Zombie Disco, Snafu, Newly branded midweek capers with super diverse selection of underground/overground gems.. no sell outs folks. Martin Jay knows his shizzle in pizzle! Student friendly., 22:00–02:00, Free

Thu 02 Oct Andy Da Kipp, Giles Walker, Infra Sonic, Origin, Andy Da Kipp + Giles Walker with dubstep, grime and general sounds that’ll keep the underground maniacs happy. Student Friendly., 23:00–02:00, £3

Sat 04 Oct Funky Transport + friends, The Deep End, Snafu, It’s the regular Saturday house session with Aberdeen’s finest house jock FUNKY TRANSPORT, professing his love of all things 4/4...including select cuts in the form of disco, electro, funk, house, minimal, fidget and ALL things deep. This is a 5 hour lesson in quality music from a DJ/producer whose career has seen him release records on Derrick Carter’s Classic imprint, Ralph Lawsons 2020Vision, New York’s Chez and German pioneer Playhouse - to name a few... 10-3AM MEMBERS FREE / FREE ENTRY B4 12AM / £6/£5 AFTER, 22:00–03:00, Free before 12 (£6/5 after)

Kid Proquo, Calum Stuart, Click, Everything Else Sucks, The Tunnels,

Everything Else sucks gladly boasts its financial benefits where the filthiest electro in town with cost you less that £1 per hour. In these times of credit crunching and mainstream munching they may well have made a bloody good selling point as they play host to some very rewarding DJs., 11:00–03:00, £3

Funky Transport, The Deep End, Snafu, Weekly

house fix with resident Funky Transport (classic/2020vision) hosting a number of local + international guests., 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Foals (DJ set), Adventures in Stereo, Moshulu, The official afterparty for the Foals with DJ sets from one of the band and Steve Milne, 23:00–16:31, £6

Soul Club DJs, Granite City Soul Club, Beach Ball-

room, Northern Soul & Motown Allnighter Saturday 4th October, 22:00–06:00, £12

Sun 05 Oct tbc, Live Jazz, Origin, Details to be confirmed but weekly live jazz session to cap off the weekend., 23:00–02:00, £tbc

Wed 08 Oct Martin Jay, Zombie Disco,

Snafu, Newly branded midweek capers with super diverse selection of underground/overground gems.. no sell outs folks. Martin Jay knows his shizzle in pizzle! Student friendly., 22:00–02:00, Free

Thu 09 Oct

Thu 16 Oct

Thu 23 Oct

Wed 29 Oct

Andy Da Kipp, Giles Walker, Infra Sonic, Origin,

Andy Da Kipp, Giles Walker, Infra Sonic, Origin,

The Scottish Enlightenment + Dumb Instrument, Dirty Hearts Club, Snafu, The

Martin Jay, Zombie Disco,

Andy Da Kipp + Giles Walker with dubstep, grime and general sounds that’ll keep the underground maniacs happy. Student Friendly., 23:00–02:00, £3

Andy Da Kipp + Giles Walker with dubstep, grime and general sounds that’ll keep the underground maniacs happy. Student Friendly., 23:00–02:00, £3

Sat 11 Oct

Sat 18 Oct

Funky Transport, The Deep End, Snafu, Weekly

Funky Transport, The Deep End, Snafu, Weekly

house fix with resident Funky Transport (classic/2020vision) hosting a number of local + international guests., 22:00–03:00, £6/5

TOMOKI TAMURA, The Deep End, Snafu, Weekly house fix with resident Funky Transport (classic/2020vision) hosting a number of local + international guests., 22:01–03:00, £6 advance

house fix with resident Funky Transport (classic/2020vision) hosting a number of local + international guests., 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Optimo, Metropolis, Origin, Glaswegain superheroes Twitch + Wilkes take their bow in the newly (re)opened Origin for night of diverse beats + sounds that many try to imitate but fail. Get there early!, 23:03–03:00, £12

Sun 12 Oct

Sun 19 Oct

tbc, Live Jazz, Origin, Details to be

tbc, Live Jazz, Origin, Details to be

confirmed but weekly live jazz session to cap off the weekend., 23:00–02:00, £tbc

confirmed but weekly live jazz session to cap off the weekend., 23:00–02:00, £tbc

Wed 15 Oct

Wed 22 Oct

Martin Jay, Zombie Disco,

Martin Jay, Zombie Disco,

Snafu, Newly branded midweek capers with super diverse selection of underground/overground gems.. no sell outs folks. Martin Jay knows his shizzle in pizzle! Student friendly., 22:00–02:00, Free

Snafu, Newly branded midweek capers with super diverse selection of underground/overground gems.. no sell outs folks. Martin Jay knows his shizzle in pizzle! Student friendly., 22:00–02:00, Free

Scottish Enlightenment + Dumb Instrument join host Steven Milne for a mixture of live + DJ, 20:00–13:03, £3

Snafu, Newly branded midweek capers with super diverse selection of underground/overground gems.. no sell outs folks. Martin Jay knows his shizzle in pizzle! Student friendly., 22:00–02:00, Free

Andy Da Kipp + Giles Walker with dubstep, grime and general sounds that’ll keep the underground maniacs happy. Student Friendly., 23:00–02:00, £3

Snafu, Newly branded midweek capers with super diverse selection of underground/overground gems.. no sell outs folks. Martin Jay knows his shizzle in pizzle! Student friendly., 22:00–02:00, free be 12 / £3

Andy Da Kipp, Giles Walker, Infra Sonic, Origin,

Burning Bush, Leyton, Infra Sonic, Origin, Andy Da Kipp + Giles Walker with dubstep, grime and general sounds that’ll keep the underground maniacs happy. Student Friendly., 23:00–16:27, £3

Sat 25 Oct Funky Transport, The Deep End, Snafu, Weekly house fix with resident Funky Transport (classic/2020vision) hosting a number of local + international guests., 22:00–03:00, £6/5

Rico Tubbs, Giles Walker, Hush Hush, Origin, Finland’s hardcore guru get’s his grimey dub hat on alongside resident Giles Walker, 23:00–16:21, £6

Sun 26 Oct tbc, Live Jazz, Origin, Details to be

Recloose (Planet E / Peacefrog), Zombie Disco,

Thu 30 Oct Andy Da Kipp, Giles Walker, Infra Sonic, Origin,

Andy Da Kipp + Giles Walker with dubstep, grime and general sounds that’ll keep the underground maniacs happy. Student Friendly., 23:00–02:00, £3

Fri 31 Oct AKA-Ska + The Hijacks + Peg & The Bouffants + DJ Deathly Dan, Skalloween 3, The Lemon Tree, London 6-piece mixing

old-time, bluegrass & celtic folk, supporting new album, Revivals, Rituals & Union Songs, 21:00–15:12, £6

Surgeon, Sonic Deviant, Dr Angus, Kid Pro Quo, Axis & Keltech, Origin, British

confirmed but weekly live jazz session to cap off the weekend., 23:00–02:00, £tbc

Murder Boy legend Surgeon gets in on the Techno act., 23:00–03:00, £10

DJ Robert Walker, Back

Fri 24 Oct

Dundee Clubs Wed 01 Oct

DJ Robert Walker, Back

Resident DJ’s, Vodka Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop,

21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after Student Night, Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Thu 02 Oct

to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Resident DJ’s, Soul’d Out, UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop,

Sun 05 Oct

Anthems and Classics, Fat Sam’s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Ladies Night, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before12 £5 after

21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

Fri 03 Oct DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic

weekend warm-up, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30–02:30,

£tbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s,

All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

PENDULUM (EL HORNET) DJ SET + MC JAKES + Pangea DJ’s, OKUPA!, ‘DRUM AND BASS’ - Does

what it says on the tin, 22:00–02:30, £14 Advance Tickets Tel: 01382-228496

Sat 04 Oct DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party

Mash-up, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAM’S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD,

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best cur-

rent chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00–00:00, free

Tue 07 Oct DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca, Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Wed 08 Oct Resident DJ’s, Vodka Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop,

21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after Student Night, Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Thu 09 Oct Resident DJ’s, Soul’d Out, UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

Anthems and Classics, Fat Sam’s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Fri 10 Oct

Tue 14 Oct

DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic

DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca,

weekend warm-up, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30–02:30,

£tbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s,

All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Sat 11 Oct DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party Mash-up, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAM’S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

DJ Robert Walker, Back to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky

House and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Sun 12 Oct Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD,

Ladies Night, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before12 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best cur-

rent chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00–00:00, free

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Wed 15 Oct Resident DJ’s, Vodka Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop,

to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after Student Night, Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Sun 19 Oct

Thu 16 Oct

Ladies Night, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before12 £5 after

Resident DJ’s, Soul’d Out, UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

Anthems and Classics, Fat

Sam’s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Fri 17 Oct DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic

weekend warm-up, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30–02:30,

£tbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s,

All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Sat 18 Oct DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party

Mash-up, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAM’S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD,

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best cur-

rent chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00–00:00, free

Tue 21 Oct DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca, Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Wed 22 Oct Resident DJ’s, Vodka

Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after Student Night, Fat Sam’s, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Thu 23 Oct Resident DJ’s, Soul’d Out, UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00–02:30, £2.50 before 11 £5 after

Anthems and Classics, Fat Sam’s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Sat 25 Oct DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAM’S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc

DJ Robert Walker, Back

to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Sun 26 Oct DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best cur-

rent chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30–02:30, £tbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Fri 31 Oct The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc NEON NIGHTS feat RADIOCLIT (Paris/France) + Team! Neon, NEON NIGHTS HALLOWEEN PARTY feat RADIOCLIT, OKUPA!, ‘TROPICAL - JUNGLE

- ZOUK’ -, 22:00–02:30, £10 Advance Tickets Tel: 01382-228496

theskinny.co.uk/listings 66 THE SKINNY

October 08

Listings


Wed 01 Oct Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum

Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details

Directed by Kenny Ireland, Sunset Song, King’s Theatre,

Scotland’s favourite novel, adapted for the stage by Alastair Cording, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Thu 02 Oct Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum

Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details

Directed by Kenny Ireland, Sunset Song, King’s Theatre,

Scotland’s favourite novel, adapted for the stage by Alastair Cording, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Absurd Person Singular,

King’s Theatre, Ayckbourne classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Thu 09 Oct Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum

Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details

Lesley Garrett, Carousel,

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £23

Absurd Person Singular,

King’s Theatre, Ayckbourne classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Martial Dance, The Other, Brunton Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £10.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Fri 10 Oct Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

Fri 03 Oct

from £10

Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details Directed by Kenny Ireland, Sunset Song, King’s Theatre,

Scotland’s favourite novel, adapted for the stage by Alastair Cording, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £23

Absurd Person Singular,

King’s Theatre, Ayckbourne classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

Sat 04 Oct

Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

Scotland’s favourite novel, adapted for the stage by Alastair Cording, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Benchtours, The Lesson,

Brunton Theatre, Ionesco gets absurd on educational matters, 19:30–21:30, £10.50

Festival Theatre, Manilow musical., 19:30–22:00, from £11

Tue 21 Oct Chesney Hawkes, Can’t Smile Without You, Edinburgh

Festival Theatre, Manilow musical., 19:30–22:00, from £11

Wed 22 Oct Chesney Hawkes, Can’t

Chesney Hawkes, Can’t Smile Without You, Edinburgh

Festival Theatre, Manilow musical., 19:30–22:00, from £11

Traverse and NTS, Cockroach, Traverse, By Sam Holcroft,

Directed by Tony Cownie, Mary Rose, Royal Lyceum Theatre, JM Barrie explores a darker path, 19:45–22:00, from £12

Chesney Hawkes, Can’t Smile Without You, Edinburgh

Festival Theatre, Manilow musical., 19:30–22:00, from £11

Traverse and NTS, Cockroach, Traverse, By Sam Holcroft,

a study of natural selection and education, 20:00–22:00, from £8

Directed by Tony Cownie, Mary Rose, Royal Lyceum Theatre,

Absurd Person Singular,

King’s Theatre, Ayckbourne classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

JM Barrie explores a darker path, 19:45–22:00, from £12

Chesney Hawkes, Can’t Smile Without You, Edinburgh

Festival Theatre, Manilow musical., 19:30–22:00, from £11

Traverse and NTS, Cockroach, Traverse, By Sam Holcroft,

Guy Masterdon and TTI, Follow Me, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £10

Thu 02 Oct Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £9.50

Calendar Girls, Kings Theatre, Citizens Company, The New Not New, Citizens Theatre, 19:00–19:15,

Free

from £10

Fri 03 Oct Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Free

Guy Masterdon and TTI, Follow Me, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £10

Sat 04 Oct Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £9.50

Calendar Girls, Kings Theatre,

19:30–22:00, from £13

Needcompany, Needcompany, Tramway, 20:00–22:00, tbc Needcompany, Needcompany, Tramway, 20:00–22:00, tbc Citizens Company, The New Not New, Citizens Theatre, 19:00–00:00,

Free

Guy Masterdon and TTI, Follow Me, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Mon 06 Oct

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Absurd Person Singular,

King’s Theatre, Ayckbourne classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Tue 07 Oct Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details Lesley Garrett, Carousel,

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £23

Absurd Person Singular,

King’s Theatre, Ayckbourne classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £14.50

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Wed 08 Oct Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details Lesley Garrett, Carousel,

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £23

19:30–21:30, from £13

Tue 07 Oct

Tron Theatre Company, Suddenly Last Summer, The

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Wed 15 Oct

Tron, 19:30–21:30, £10

Adapted by Tim Firth, Calendar Girls, King’s Theatre,

Wed 08 Oct

Wed 29 Oct

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

19:30–21:30, from £13

Thu 16 Oct Adapted by Tim Firth, Calendar Girls, King’s Theatre,

19:30–21:30, from £13

Fri 17 Oct

Directed by Tony Cownie, Mary Rose, Royal Lyceum Theatre,

Thu 09 Oct

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £10

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Rambert, Eternal Light,

£10.50

Sat 18 Oct Adapted by Tim Firth, Calendar Girls, King’s Theatre,

19:30–21:30, from £13

Lung HA, Il Panico di Pantalone, Brunton Theatre, 19:30–21:00, £10.50

Young Citizens, Reflections on the River, Citizens Theatre,

Theatre, 21:00–23:00, £6

Fri 24 Oct

Arches, 20:00–22:00, £9

Theatre Workshop, The Persecution and Assaaan,

Glasgay, To Kill A Kelpie, Q! Gallery, 19:30–21:30, £8

Benchtours, The Lesson,

Crisp and Pacitti: subversion of sexuality and theatrical form ahoy!, 20:00–22:00, £8

Young Citizens, Reflections on the River, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £7

Glasgay!, Elysian Fields, The

Tron Theatre, Ionesco gets absurd on educational matters, 19:30–21:30, £8

Spartan, The Emotional Life of Furniture, Tron Theatre, Mental

Health Festival, 19:30–21:30, £8

Sat 11 Oct Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £9.50

Sir James, The Quiz Show, Tron Theatre, 21:00–23:00, £6

Tramway, 20:00–22:00, £10

Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £10

Pacitti Company, Civil, Tramway,

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Young Citizens, Reflections on the River, Citizens Theatre,

£8

Crisp and Pacitti: subversion of sexuality and theatrical form ahoy!, 20:00–22:00, £8

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens Glasgay!, The Chalky White Substance, The Arches, 19:30–21:00, Yvonne Cadell, Colette, Q!

19:30–21:30, £7

Gallery, 19:30–21:00, £8

Arches, 20:00–22:00, £9

Theatre, 21:00–23:00, £6

Glasgay!, Elysian Fields, The Glasgay, To Kill A Kelpie, Q! Gallery, 19:30–21:30, £8

Benchtours, The Lesson,

Tron Theatre, Ionesco gets absurd on educational matters, 19:30–21:30, £8

Sir James, The Quiz Show, Tron

Tue 28 Oct Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £10

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens

Sat 18 Oct Young Citizens, Reflections on the River, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:19, £7

Glasgay!, Elysian Fields, The Arches, 20:00–22:00, £9

Glasgay, To Kill A Kelpie, Q! Gallery, 19:30–21:30, £8

Benchtours, The Lesson,

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Glasgay, And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Tron Theatre Company, LikeThe Rain, Tron Theatre, 21:30–23:00, £8

Rhymes with Purple, Man in a Bath, Q! Gallery, 19:30–21:30, £8 RSC, Romeo and Juliet, Theatre

Tron Theatre, Ionesco gets absurd on educational matters, 19:30–21:30, £8

Royal, 19:30–21:30, from £9

Tue 21 Oct

Wed 29 Oct

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens

Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Glasgay!, The Chalky White Substance, The Arches, 19:30–21:00,

Wed 22 Oct

Tramway, Part of Glasgay! An opera dripping with steamy passions, 20:00–22:00, £10

Yvonne Cadell, Colette, Q!

Gallery, 19:30–21:00, £8

Fri 17 Oct

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Cryptic, An Ocean of Rain,

Glasgay!, The Chalky White Substance, The Arches, 19:30–21:00,

£8

Theatre Workshop, The Persecution and Assaaan,

Thu 30 Oct

Tramway, Part of Glasgay! An opera dripping with steamy passions, 20:00–22:00, £10

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens

Gallery, 19:30–21:30, £8

Benchtours, The Lesson,

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

from £14.50

Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Sat 25 Oct

Sir James, The Quiz Show, Tron

Nottingham Playhouse, All Quiet on the Western Front, King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Tramway, 20:00–22:00, £10

Arches, 20:00–22:00, £9

Glasgay, To Kill A Kelpie, Q!

Fri 10 Oct

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £10

Sir James, The Quiz Show, Tron

19:30–21:30, £7

Glasgay!, Elysian Fields, The

Tron Theatre Company, Suddenly Last Summer, The

Rambert, Eternal Light,

Arches, 21:00–22:00, £6

Gallery, 19:30–21:00, £8

Arches, 21:00–22:00, £6

JM Barrie explores a darker path, 19:45–22:00, from £12

Glasgay!, A Slow Dissolve, The

Wed 15 Oct

Cryptic, An Ocean of Rain,

Directed by Tony Cownie, Mary Rose, Royal Lyceum Theatre,

Glasgay!, The Chalky White Substance, The Arches, 19:30–21:00,

£8

Yvonne Cadell, Colette, Q!

Nottingham Playhouse, All Quiet on the Western Front, King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Tron, 19:30–21:30, £10

Lung HA, Il Panico di Pantalone, Brunton Theatre, 12:00–13:00,

Gallery, 19:30–21:30, £8

£8

Lung HA, Il Panico di Pantalone, Brunton Theatre, 12:00–13:00, £10.50

Arches, 20:00–22:00, £9

Glasgay, To Kill A Kelpie, Q!

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

from £14.50

19:30–21:30, from £13

19:30–22:00, £9.50

JM Barrie explores a darker path, 19:45–22:00, from £12

Adapted by Tim Firth, Calendar Girls, King’s Theatre,

ZAP! www.theskinny.co.uk

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Nottingham Playhouse, All Quiet on the Western Front, King’s Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £14.50

Glasgay!, Elysian Fields, The

Pacitti Company, Civil, Tramway,

Mon 06 Oct

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £23

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Tue 14 Oct

Needcompany, Needcompany, Tramway, 20:00–22:00, tbc Needcompany, Needcompany, Tramway, 20:00–22:00, tbc Citizens Company, The New Not New, Citizens Theatre, 19:00–19:15,

19:30–22:00, from £13

Directed by Tony Cownie, Mary Rose, Royal Lyceum Theatre,

Adapted by Tim Firth, Calendar Girls, King’s Theatre,

Health Festival, 19:30–21:30, £8

Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £10

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Adapted by Tim Firth, Calendar Girls, King’s Theatre,

Lesley Garrett, Carousel,

Spartan, The Emotional Life of Furniture, Tron Theatre, Mental

Thu 16 Oct

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Tue 14 Oct

Tramway, 20:00–22:00, £10

Calendar Girls, Kings Theatre,

Tue 28 Oct

from £10

Theatre Workshop, The Persecution and Assaaan,

from £10

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Mon 13 Oct

JM Barrie explores a darker path, 19:45–22:00, from £12

Theatre, 21:00–23:00, £6

Tron Theatre, Ionesco gets absurd on educational matters, 19:30–21:30, £8

from £10

19:30–21:30, from £13

Thu 23 Oct

Sun 12 Oct

Free

a study of natural selection and education, 20:00–22:00, from £8

Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

Spartan, The Emotional Life

Citizens Company, The New Not New, Citizens Theatre, 19:00–19:15,

19:30–22:00, from £13

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

Sir James, The Quiz Show, Tron

Tramway, Part of Glasgay! An opera dripping with steamy passions, 20:00–22:00, £10

of Furniture, Tron Theatre, Mental Health Festival, 19:30–21:30, £8

Guy Masterdon and TTI, Follow Me, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details

Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £23

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Cryptic, An Ocean of Rain,

Calendar Girls, Kings Theatre,

Thu 23 Oct

Sat 25 Oct

Lesley Garrett, Carousel,

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

19:30–22:00, from £13

from £10

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum

Wed 01 Oct

Smile Without You, Edinburgh Festival Theatre, Manilow musical., 19:30–22:00, from £11

Fri 24 Oct

Sat 11 Oct

Directed by Kenny Ireland, Sunset Song, King’s Theatre,

Chesney Hawkes, Can’t Smile Without You, Edinburgh

Lesley Garrett, Carousel,

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum Theatre, 19:30–22:00, contact venue for details

Mon 20 Oct

a study of natural selection and education, 20:00–22:00, from £8

verse, 20:00–22:00, various

from £10

£10.50

Lyceum, Macbeth, Royal Lyceum

Teatr Polski and Traverse, The Cherry Blossom, Tra-

Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

Lung HA, Il Panico di Pantalone, Brunton Theatre, 19:30–21:00,

Glasgay!, A Slow Dissolve, The Yvonne Cadell, Colette, Q!

Gallery, 19:30–21:00, £8

Theatre, 21:00–23:00, £6

Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

from £10

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Glasgay, And Tell Sad Stories of the Death of Queens, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Tron Theatre Company, LikeThe Rain, Tron Theatre, 21:30–23:00, £8

Rhymes with Purple, Man in a Bath, Q! Gallery, 19:30–21:00, £8 RSC, Romeo and Juliet, Theatre

Royal, 19:30–21:30, from £9

from £10

Thu 30 Oct

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

SomethignWicked This Way Comes, Tramway, Catherine Wheels adapts

£8

Citizens Comapny, The Caretaker, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–21:30,

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens Glasgay!, The Chalky White Substance, The Arches, 19:30–21:00, Glasgay!, A Slow Dissolve, The

the Bradbury classic, 19:30–22:00, contact venue

Arches, 21:00–22:00, £6

from £10

Gallery, 19:30–21:00, £8

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £10

Yvonne Cadell, Colette, Q!

Glasgay, The Parade, Citizens

Sign up for the skinny’s cyberzap at theskinny.co.uk And get good stuff in your inbox that nobody else does. October 08

THE SKINNY 67

Listings

Edinburgh Theatre Glasgow Theatre


Aberdeen Theatre

Glasgow Art

Wed 01 Oct

Sat 18 Oct

Collins Gallery

Kate O’Mara, An Ideal Husband, His Majesty’s Theatre, Peter Hall

In the Eye of the Storm, In

Footloose, His Majesty’s Theatre,

19:30–22:00, from £11.50

Natasha Gilmore, The Blank Album, The Lemon Tree, Playful and intelligent dance., 19:30–21:00, £10

Footloose, His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £11.50 Youth Norway, Ireland & Scotland, National Festival of Youth Theatre,

Aberdeen Arts Centre, For one weekend only, Aberdeen will be home to Youth Theatres from across Scotland, Ireland and Norway, coming together to perform, meet and create. At the heart of the festival the Arts Centre will also perform its own Act III., 11:00–19:00, £tbc

Fri 03 Oct Footloose, His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £11.50 Youth Norway, Ireland & Scotland, National Festival of Youth Theatre,

Aberdeen Arts Centre, For one weekend only, Aberdeen will be home to Youth Theatres from across Scotland, Ireland and Norway, coming together to perform, meet and create. At the heart of the festival the Arts Centre will also perform its own Act III., 11:00–19:00, £tbc

Scottish Ballet, Triple Bill,

Mon 20 Oct

Gallery of Modern Art

Modern Institute

His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–22:30, from £12.50

Liung Ha, Il Panico, The Lemon

Jo Spence, Self Protraits,

Tree, 19:30–21:30, £8

Richard Hughes, ‘nothing left, it’s alright’, Solo show for

Red Shoes Theatre Company, Red Shoes Theatre Company presents Lady Lane, Aberdeen Arts Centre, Based on the novel “”A White Bird Passes”” by Jessie Kesson., 19:31–22:00, £12 / 10 (conc)

Scottish Ballet, Triple Bill, His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–22:30, from £20.50

Sat 11 Oct Red Shoes Theatre Company, Red Shoes Theatre Company presents Lady Lane, Aberdeen Arts Centre, Based on the novel “A White Bird Passes” by Jessie Kesson, 19:31–22:00, £12 / 10 (conc)

Scottish Ballet, Triple Bill, His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–22:30, from £20.50

Footloose, His Majesty’s Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £11.50

Kate O’Mara, An Ideal Husband, His Majesty’s Theatre, Peter Hall

Sun 05 Oct Youth Norway, Ireland & Scotland, National Festival of Youth Theatre,

Tue 21 Oct High School Musical, His Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Wed 22 Oct High School Musical, His

Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Thu 23 Oct High School Musical, His Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Sat 25 Oct

Tue 28 Oct

Doggerfisher

Just Cause Productions, Zombie Prom, Aberdeen Arts

Video from the 70s and 80s,

Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50 The Lemon Tree, 19:30–21:30, £10

Centre, Grease meets Little Shop of Horrors! , 19:30–22:00, £10 / 8 (conc) High School Musical, His Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, TBC

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, The Rep Theatre, Catherine Wheels and The National Theatre of Scotland present SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES Written and adapted by Ray Bradbury, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Thu 02 Oct Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, tbc

SomethignWicked This Way Comes, Dundee Rep, Catherine Wheels adapts the Bradbury classic, 19:30–22:00, Contact Venue for Details

Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, TBC

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, The Rep Theatre, Catherine Wheels and The National Theatre of Scotland present SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES Written and adapted by Ray Bradbury, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Fri 03 Oct Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, tbc

68 THE SKINNY

adapts the Bradbury classic, 19:30–22:00, Contact Venue for Details

Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–00:00, TBC

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, The Rep Theatre, Catherine Wheels and The National Theatre of Scotland present SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES Written and adapted by Ray Bradbury, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

JANEY GODLEY Ð ÔDOMESTIC GODLEY, The Rep Theatre, Scotland’s funniest woman (Scotsman), multi-awardwinning stand-up, bestselling author and “”Just a Minute”” regular (regularly last!) tells extraordinary home truths about family, friends and her outrageous life., 22:00–08:57, £tbc

Sat 04 Oct Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, tbc

SomethignWicked This Way Comes, Dundee Rep, Catherine Wheels adapts the Bradbury classic, 19:30–22:00, Contact Venue for Details

Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, TBC

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES, The Rep Theatre, Catherine Wheels and The National Theatre of Scotland present SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES Written and adapted by Ray Bradbury, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

October 08

Stills

Modern Art Galleries

Nicky Bird, Martha Rosler Library, Open reference library from

Exhibiting Surrealism, Sat

13 Sep–Mon 01 Dec, 10:00–17:00, Mon-Sun, £6 (£4)

National Galleries Complex

artis’s personal library Fri 01 Aug–Sun 09 Nov, 11:00–18:00, Mon-Sun, Free

Talbot Rice Gallery Langlands + Bell, Sat 25 Oct–Sat 13 Dec, 10:00(14:00)–17:00, Mon-Sat (Sun), Free

Fruitmarket Gallery

Portrait Gallery

The Jazz Bar

Close-up, Collaborative art combining image, sound, video and music Fri 24 Oct–Sun 11 Jan, 11:00–18:00, Daily, Free

Heroes, 19th century self-help role models Mon 12 May–Fri 19 Dec, 10:00–17:00, Daily, £6 (£4)

Gilda Lily, Dr Sketchy’s Anti-Art School, Sat 04 Oct–Sat

Centre, Grease meets Little Shop of Horrors! , 19:30–22:00, £10 / 8 (conc) High School Musical, His Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Dundee Theatre SomethignWicked This Way Comes, Dundee Rep, Catherine Wheels

Pictures, Thu 31 Jul–Sun 12 Oct, 10:00–17:30, Tue-Sun, Free

Oct, 10:00–18:00, Tues-Sat, Free

Just Cause Productions, Zombie Prom, Aberdeen Arts

directs, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Peter Pretsell; Helen Snell, New screenprints Sat 13 Sep–Sat 25

Richard Hamilton, Protest

Tracy Emin, 20 Years, Retrospective of the YBA narcisist Sat 02 Aug–Sun 09 Nov, 10:00–18:00, Daily, £6 (£4)

Just Cause Productions, Zombie Prom, Aberdeen Arts

Thu 30 Oct

Kate O’Mara, An Ideal Husband, His Majesty’s Theatre, Peter Hall

Edinburgh Printmakers

Inverleith House

Gallery of Modern Art

Wed 29 Oct

directs, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Fri 17 Oct

Sat 20 Sep–Sat 25 Oct, 10:00–18:00, Tue-Fri, Free

22 Nov, 10:00–18:00 (19:00/17:00), Mon-Fri (Thurs/Sat), Free Ruth Claxton, Sat 04 Oct–Wed 19 Nov, 10:00–18:00 (19:00/17:00), Mon-Fri (Thurs/Sat), Free

Impressionism and Scotland, Sat 19 Jul–Sun 12 Oct, 10:00–17:00,

Kate O’Mara, An Ideal Husband, His Majesty’s Theatre, Peter Hall

Donmar, Guys and Dolls,

28 Oct, 12:00–17:00, Tues-Sat, Free

Kate O’Mara, An Ideal Husband, His Majesty’s Theatre, Peter Hall

directs, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

11:00–17:00, Tue-Sat, Free

New Academicians, Fri 26 Sep–Fri 26 Sep, 10:00(12:00)–17:00, Mon-Sat (Sun), Free

Sam Douglas, Thu 04 Sep–Thu 16 Oct, 11:00–16:30, Tues-Sat, Free

Kate O’Mara, An Ideal Husband, His Majesty’s Theatre, Peter Hall

Glasgow-based artists Sat 27 Sep–Sat 25 Oct,

Nov, 12:00–18:00, Tue-Sun, Free

Richard Forster, Sat 04 Oct–Sat

Benchtours, The Lesson,

Camera/Movement is a specially compiled programme of dance films celebrating the ever-evolving relationship between dance and camera., 18:30–15:38, £4.50 / 3.50

bition curated by Hanne Wyllie Fri 10 Oct–Sun 09

Edinburgh Art

Tue 14 Oct directs, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

The front row, a fashion based exhi-

Michael Kent, Kendall Koppe, Ariki Porteous, Darren Rhymes and Michael Roy, 5

Lila de Magalhaes, New Work Scotland, Sat 27 Sep–Tue

Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Secondry schools Aberdeen + Shire, The Shakespeare Schools Festival,

adapts the Bradbury classic, 19:30–22:00, Contact Venue for Details

Sat 16 Aug–Sat 11 Oct, 10:00–17:00(14:00), Mon-Fri(Sat), Free

Transmission

RSA

Thu 16 Oct

SomethignWicked This Way Comes, Dundee Rep, Catherine Wheels

Steven Campbell, Wretched Stars, Insatiable Heaven,

Sep–Sat 18 Oct, 12:00–17:00, Wed-Sat, Free

Ingleby Gallery

Tue 07 Oct

Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, tbc

Recoat

10:00–17:00(14:00), Mon-Fri(Sat), Free

Jerwood Photography, Sat 06

Collective Gallery

Centre, Grease meets Little Shop of Horrors! 19:30–22:00, £10 / 8 (conc) High School Musical, His Majesty’s Theatre, Disney conversion., 19:00–21:00, from £13.50

Donmar, Guys and Dolls,

Sun), Free

Art Trek, Tue 07 Oct–Fri 24 Oct,

Corn Exchange Gallery

Camera/Movement Ð A Dance Film Event, danceLive! 2008, Belmont Picture House,

Oct, 10:00 (12:00)–18:00 (17:00), Mon-Fri (Sat/

Glasgow School of Art

High School Musical, His

directs, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

the Turner prize nominee Fri 19 Sep–Sat 04

Streetlevel Photoworks

High School Musical, His

Wed 15 Oct

Wed 01 Oct

Fri 06 Jun–Sun 16 Nov, 10:00(monthu)/11:00(fri-sun)–17:00(fri-wed)/20:00(thur), Mon-Sun, Free

Tue-Sat, Free

Fri 24 Oct

Aberdeen Arts Centre, For one weekend only, Aberdeen will be home to Youth Theatres from across Scotland, Ireland and Norway, coming together to perform, meet and create. At the heart of the festival the Arts Centre will also perform its own Act III., 11:00–19:00, £tbc

Aberdeen Arts Centre, Shakespeare Schools Festival offers young people from every secondary school the opportunity and support to perform abridged productions of Shakespeares most famous plays in their local professional theatre., 19:00–22:00, £8 / 6 (conc)

Alex Frost, Compassion fatigue, Sat 11 Oct–Sat 15 Nov, 11:00–17:00,

Nov, 12:00–17:00, Thurs-Sat, Free

Mon 13 Oct

Aberdeen Arts Centre, For one weekend only, Aberdeen will be home to Youth Theatres from across Scotland, Ireland and Norway, coming together to perform, meet and create. At the heart of the festival the Arts Centre will also perform its own Act III., 11:00–19:00, £tbc

Matthew Smith, Sat 11 Oct–Sat 08

the Eye of the Storm Sat 04 Oct–Sat 22 Nov, 12:00–17:00, Mon-Sat, Free

Sat 04 Oct Youth Norway, Ireland & Scotland, National Festival of Youth Theatre,

Sorcha Dallas

directs, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Fri 10 Oct

Thu 02 Oct

Mary Mary

Wed 08 Oct Benchtours, The Lesson,

Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:30, £14 THE LESSON, The Rep Theatre, Thought-provoking yet funny, charming yet sinister, familiar yet bizarre. The Lesson is a fresh, bright and brilliant play by one of the foremost absurdist writers of all time. Ionesco’s writing changed the face of 20th century theatre and has inspired and excited generations of theatrelovers., 19:30–09:00, £tbc

Thu 09 Oct Lost Dog, Hungry Ghosts, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:30, £12

Sat 11 Oct Birds of Paradise, Offshore, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:30, £12

Thu 16 Oct Adapted by Ellie McDonald, Lysistrata, Dundee Rep,

Adapted in Scots, the classical anti-war sex comedy, 19:30–21:30, £6

Sun 19 Oct Mad About the Musicals, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, £tbc

Wed 22 Oct Scottish Dance Theatre, Dog and Tenderhook, Dundee

Rep, A great double bill, 20:00–21:00, £12

Daily, £8 (£6)

04 Oct, 13:00–15:00, £7/6

Glasgow Comedy Thu 02 Oct Paul Sinha, The Reverand Obadiah Steppenwolf III, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Mon 06 Oct Sketch troupe, Rough Cuts,

The Stand, New writing tested out on guinea pigs, that would be you., 20:30–00:00, £5/£4/£2.50

Tue 07 Oct Scott Agnew, Red Raw, The Stand,

New acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

Wed 08 Oct Sarah Millican, AL Kennedy, Maureen Younger, Susan Calman, Wicked Wenches, The

Stand, Part of LadyFest 2008, 20:30–00:00, £7/£5/£3

Thu 09 Oct

Thu 16 Oct

Sarah Millican, Scott Agnew, Adam Hills, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce Devlin,

Rob Deering, Nick Doody, Bruce Fummey, Jeff O’Boyle, Susan Morrison, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce

21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Sun 12 Oct Michael Redmond, Sarah Millican, Scott Agnew, Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service, The

Sun 19 Oct Michael Redmond, Nick Doody, Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service, The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5/£4/£1

Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5/£4/£1

Tue 14 Oct

Tue 21 Oct

TBC, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts. New

Antony Murray, Neil Mcfarlane, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts.

jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

Edinburgh Comedy Thu 02 Oct

Thu 09 Oct

Sun 19 Oct

Rudi Lickwood, Matt Kirshen, Adam Tempest, Susan Calman, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted

Robin Ince, Pete Cain, Maureen Younger, Bruce Devlin, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by

Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th,

by Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Sun 05 Oct Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th, 12:00–00:00, Free

Matt Kirshen, The Sunday Night Laugh In, The Stand, Hosted by Billy Kirkwood, 20:30–00:00, £5/£4/£1

Tue 07 Oct

Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Sun 12 Oct Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th, 12:00–00:00, Free

Thu 16 Oct

Sarah Millican, AL Kennedy, Maureen Younger, Susan Calman, Wicked Wenches, The

Stewart Francis, Sandy Nelson, Andrew O’Neill, Raymond Mearns, The Thursday Show, The

Stand, Part of LadyFest 2008, 20:30–00:00, £6/£5/£3

Stand, Hosted by Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

12:00–00:00, Free

Sandy Nelson, Andrew O’Neill, Joe Heenan, The Sunday Night Laugh In, The Stand, Hosted by Billy Kirkwood, 20:30–00:00, £5/£4/£1

Thu 23 Oct Trevor Crook, Daliso Chaponda, Susan Morrison, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Listings


Tune Up is an initiative of the Scottish Arts Council funded by the National Lottery to bring quality live music to a host of communities, large and small, across the country; from Stornoway to Selkirk and everywhere in-between. Throughout the Autumn/ Winter season, Tune Up will take Rumba Caliente, Arild Andersen, Tommy Smith and Paolo Vinaccia trio, Injuns, Catriona Macdonald & John McCusker’s Under One Sky. featuring Julie Fowlis, Roddy Woomble, Graham Coxon and more on the road. The Skinny is delighted to offer lucky readers the chance to win a pair of tickets to the Tune Up gig of their choice every month from October to March. To be in with a chance just follow these simple instructions. Visit www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions throughout October and tell us who you would like to see play a Tune Up gig in Scotland most – and where! We can’t guarantee it will happen, but we can guarantee one of you will win a pair of tickets to a show of your choice on each of the six tours. More info here: www.tuneup.org.uk

Led by musicians Marc Collin and Olivier Libaux, Nouvelle Vague resurrected classics from the New Wave music era, and reinterpreted them in a bossa nova style on their first album to create an unlikely word-of-mouth hit. The songs were stripped back to acoustic arrangements by gathering a parade of chanteuses from all over the world to cover bands including XTC, The Clash, Joy Division and The Undertones. Their second album, Bande à Part, adds some gentle Caribbean flavour to their sound and includes versions of Ever Fallen in Love by Buzzcocks, Blue Monday by New Order, The Killing Moon by Echo and the Bunnymen and Blondie’s Heart of Glass. As they prepare to take their live show to Scotland, The Skinny is delighted to give away five pairs of tickets to their gig at Perth Concert Hall in November. To be in with a chance of winning, just answer this simple question:

Where are Nouvelle Vague from? A) France B) Sweden C) Spain To enter, visit www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

WIN COPIES OF “I SEE” BOOKS I See Modern Britain and I See Xmas are the essential spotters’ guides to our modern lives. They are a humorous look at our home-owning, latte-quaffing, gym-going, two car-owning, super-food munching, cheap flying, alco-popping, non-smoking, therapy attending lives. The writers are both based in Edinburgh and the books feature many photographs taken in the capital. The books are out this October and published by Portico.

I See Modern Britain tackles the quirks and obsessions of British society. Will you be able to spot boy racers, binge-drinkers, ‘charity muggers’, anaemic Goths and manbag-carrying metrosexuals? The Skinny is delighted to team up with the authors to offer five copies of I See Modern Britain to our readers. And since we’re feeling generous, we’ll throw in five copies of I See Xmas too, just to make sure you’re in good nick come December! To win, just answer this simple question:

Who are the publishers of the I See… series? A) Harper Collins B) Penguin C) Portico

Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

WIN TICKETS TO FRESH AIR LIVE Fresh Air FM is Edinburgh’s award winning independent student radio station. Bringing you the best music, for free, it’s no wonder we’re delighted to team up with them this month to offer our readers the chance to see some great gigs, courtesy of Fresh Air Live. We’ve got two pairs of tickets to: Fresh Air Live Presents....Metronomy at Cabaret Voltaire on Wednesday 29 October from 7pm. Metronomy’s only Scottish date. And two pairs of tickets to: Fresh Air Live Presents....Indie Club Together at Cabaret Voltaire on Thursday 23 October from 7pm - 3am w/Damn Shames, Dance Lazarus Dance, Dirty Summer and DJ’s from //FAST//, I Fly Spitfires, Dogtooth, Black Tape, This Is Music, Clash!, Dance Disaster Collective and Jerk Alert! To enter and be in with a chance of winning tickets to these great gigs, all you have to do is answer this simple question:

What is the name of Metronomy’s new album, released on Monday 8th September?

To enter, visit www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions before 31 October

Visit www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions before 21 October

Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

www.theskinny.co.uk

October 08

THE SKINNY 69

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WIN TICKETS TO A WIN TICKETS TO SEE NOUVELLE TUNE UP GIG OF YOUR CHOICE VAGUE IN CONCERT!


Quiz Time with Uncle Finbarr 1. John Fogarty was the lead singer of which California roots rock outfit, who enjoyed stardom at the turn of the Sixties? 2. Wheels On Fire was the world’s first platinum selling double album, but who was it recorded by? 3. Which influential musician and cultural icon died from melanoma in 1981 aged just 36? His last words to his son were “money can’t buy life.” 4. Which legendary rock guitarist once had a trial with Manchester City FC? When asked why he had not been successful he said, “I was good enough for City, but they didn’t follow it up because I was probably the only player out there wearing eyeliner.” 5. Which German singer / songwriter and model was christened Christa Päffgen and died in Ibiza in 1988 after collapsing whilst cycling her bike? 6. Which late Texan songstress was the lead singer of Big Brother and the Holding Company? 7. In which country were the hard rock band AC/DC formed in the 1970s? 8. If Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young are the surnames, what are the Christian names?

11. Which trio of influential musicians passed away on 3 February 1959 when their plane crashed in Iowa? The day was popularly tagged ‘The Day The Music Died’ by Don McLean in his hit song American Pie? 12. Farrokh Bulsara was more commonly known by his adopted frontman persona. What was Bulsara’s pseudonym? 13. Who was voted the Greatest Guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone magazine in 2003? 14. Which founder member of the Beach Boys, who died in 1983, has recently seen a rise in popularity and public awareness thanks to the reissue of his solo masterpiece Pacific Ocean Blue this year? 15. Which veteran musician links The Clash with The Good, The Bad & The Queen? 16. There’s A Riot Goin’ On was the fifth album by which American funk band, released in 1971 to critical acclaim? 17. Which psychedelic rock band had a string of hits in the 1960s and 70s, including White Rabbit and Somebody To Love? 18. For how many studio albums was Syd Barrett a member of Pink Floyd?

9. How many studio albums did the Sex Pistols record in their first incarnation?

19. What song was played as the legendary Radio One DJ John Peel’s coffin was carried from the church at his funeral in 2004?

10. Which miniature American icon’s most recent album, entitled Planet Earth, was released as a free cover-mount in the Daily Mail?

20. Which singer, philanthropist, activist and artist was the highest ranked musician in the BBC’s 100 Greatest Britons in 2002, coming in eighth place? john Peel...played some good songs

HOROSCOPES

by Cystic Meg

Libra

Astrological predictions hint that Halloween will come at the end of the month. For you it is an opportunity to dress as a pumpkin and terrorise your neighbours by knocking on their doors and screaming ‘Trick or Treat, you fools’. Don’t come crying to me when to me when you are chased away with a broom and end up with egg on your tights.

scorpio In the coconut shy of life, you just never seem to be able to hit those hairy nuts. Hence you may never be the proud winner of an oversized, synthetic soft toy.

sagittarius

taurus

This month you should treat yourself to a hot, deep, candle-lit bath full of bubbles. You smell like a goat.

Of all the pound shops in Great Britain, you had to walk into this one.

capricorn

GEMINI

When wandering through the supermarket this month, somewhere in the cheese and yoghurt aisle, you will find a little shiny nubbin that will change your life forever.

Are your legs getting shorter or is it just that your trousers, chairs and everyone you hang out with is getting longer?

aquarius

cancer

Paul the wizard is waving his magic wand over you this month. He is a learner wizard though, so will most likely turn you into a carrot.

Autumnal love god Perplexus is looking over you this month. He watches you in the shower then retires to the sofa to watch Jeremy Kyle.

pisces

LEO

You may think you have the X Factor, but you don’t. You would be one of those rubbish ones they get back to perform on the final show for everyone to laugh at.

Your boss may well be a bawheid, but spitting in his coffee cup is not the answer. Smile at his bald patch instead.

aries This month life may feel rather like trying to get a whole lot of toothpaste back in the tube. Stop trying and start living, bozo.

Virgo When changing a lightbulb, be sure to steady yourself on the giraffe that lodges in your grandpa’s house. KRIS STODDART www.doodlekris.co.uk

70 THE SKINNY

October 08

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The Skinny October '08  

The Skinny is Scotland's leading culture and listins magazine

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