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The Skinny ISSUE 36 :: September 2008 :: FREE

.co.uk

Starring...

the Pictish Trail, James Yorkston, & King Creosote

You could call it the fence connection!

Leave it out, lads! I’m more interested in the merchant city festival, the homeless world cup, and finding out how to release my own music!

Aberdeen I Dundee I Edinburgh I Glasgow I Perth I st Andrews

www.theskinny.co.uk


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PCL CARDINALS Featuring:

Ryan Adams Neal Casal Chris Feinstein Jon Graboff Brad Pemberton

PCL

www.pclpresents.com 14th November

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Edinburgh Picture House

lll#i]Z[gViZaa^h#Xdb

WWW.RYAN-ADAMS.COM

GLASGOW ABC1 4TH OCTOBER EDINBURGH PICTURE HOUSE 5TH OCTOBER HVijgYVn'%i]9ZXZbWZg

I]ZEg^ci;VXidgn B^YYaZhZmHigZZi!@^cc^c\EVg`!<aVh\dl

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14th November - Glasgow ABC 1

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N e w s i n g l e “ E v e r y b o d y Wa n t s M e ” O u t N o w

sunday 12th october edinburgh liquidroom

SATURDAY 29TH NOVEMBER - EDINBURGH CORN EXCHANGE SUNDAY 30TH NOVEMBER - GLASGOW BARROWLAND MONDAY 1ST DECEMBER - GLASGOW BARROWLAND

in association with DFconcerts

ON SALE 5TH SEPT

TUESDAY 4TH NOVEMBER GLASGOW ABC1

OCTOBER

DUNFERMLINE KINEMA INVERNESS IRONWORKS DUNDEE FAT SAM’S ABERDEEN MOSHULU EDINBURGH PICTURE HOUSE

www.noahandthewhale.com

GLASGOW ARCHES SATURDAY 25TH OCTOBER EDINBURGH LIQUIDROOM SUNDAY 26TH OCTOBER

Bon Iver

Plus Anais Mitchell

17th September

Edinburgh Queen's Hall

THE WEDDING PRESENT

12TH DECEMBER - EDINBURGH LIQUID ROOM 13TH DECEMBER - ABERDEEN MOSHULU 14TH DECEMBER - GLASGOW QMU P R E S E N T S : DOLBY ANOL B R E A K B O T

PLUS

LIAM FINN

EDINBURGH QUEENS HALL - 16TH NOVEMBER 8 + 10th november (8th sold out)

Glasgow Oran Mor

Roddy Frame 16TH DECEMBER GLASGOW ORAN MOR

MIDNIGHT JUGGERNAUTS GLASGOW ARCHES

+ JO MANGO / BEN WETHERIL / ESSIE JAMES

30th Sept GET WELL SOON + punch & the apostles PIVOT + MUNCH MUNCH / NACIONAL / FOUNDING WHEEL 3rd oct 17th oct JOHNNY FLYNN + amy lavere

LOW

A CHRISTMAS CONCERT

GLASGOW ORAN MOR - 17TH NOVEMBER

EDINBURGH QUEENS HALL

11TH SEPTEMBER

PELICAN + TORCHE

GLASGOW ORAN MOR - 14TH SEPT GLASGOW STEREO 12TH NOVEMBER

10PM - 3AM - 2ND OCTOBER

COMING UP AT NICE N SLEAZY LIZ GREEN 24th Sept

ORAN MOR - 4TH NOVEMBER

9TH NOVEMBER

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

COCKNBULLKID

Glasgow ABC1 7th December

22ND 23RD 24TH 25TH 26TH

GLASGOW ABC1 - 26TH NOVEMBER ABERDEEN MOSHULU - 28TH NOVEMBER

live band Featuring Kim ann, Nomi, Jason, Carter, Guy, Morgan, Andrew & Andy PLUS

WILLIAM BENNETT (WHITE HOUSE)

GLASGOW STEREO 17TH NOVEMBER

+Russian Circles

WIRE

GLASGOW ARCHES THURSDAY 11TH SEPTEMBER

Glasgow Stereo

American Music Club 5th Sept SHEARWATER ...................................................15TH SEPTEMBER Sun Kil Moon/Mark Kozolek 15th Sept CONSTANTINES W/ THE MOTH & THE MIRROR........16TH SEPTEMBER ADEM................................................................21TH SEPTEMBER Fijuya & Miyagi 27th Sept ISLANDS............................................................28TH SEPTEMBER 30TH NOVEMBER BODIES OF WATER..............................................2ND OCTOBER Heavy Trash + Powersolo 28th Sept DAEDELUS + A LA FU (LIVE).................................5TH OCTOBER GLASGOW ARCHES Paul Gilbert THE WEEK THAT WAS..........................................24TH OCTOBER 20th Nov tickets and information available from: www.pclpresents.com, 0844 847 2487, tickets scotland, ripping and venue box offices

WWW.CAPTAINSREST.CO.UK


THE SKINNYShowcase


For September the Skinny Showcase presents our pick of the Glasgow School of Art's class of 2008, Katy Watson. Working in both print and film, Katy produces works that question the role of the media in creating our reactions to contemporary life, and examines the interplay between subject and object, viewer and viewed. She sums up her inspiration thus: "My practice is concerned with the disparity between the representation of conflict by the media and its actuality. I believe that the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;society of the spectacleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; forces the subject into compliance with our expectations of the specific external narrative. This homogenisation omits the human aspects of those depicted and as a result the people become defined by the political realities of the situation. Our media-saturated society, in its desire to kowtow to our cultural dependency, can, in its methods, categorise and reduce the individual. The apparatus of the western media renders the event as a sound-bite; in doing so we are overencumbered with these stories as consumable products and our natural empathetic response becomes apathetic." FOR THE CHANCE TO HAVE YOUR WORK SHOWN HERE, SEND IMAGES AND INFO TO SHOWCASE@THESKINNY.CO.UK

SEE THE LATEST SHOWCASES ONLINE: THESKINNY.CO.UK/GALLERIES


Welcome Editorial The Skinny consistently goes out of its way to showcase the best of Scottish talent, so in some senses to run a ‘Local Heroes’ special issue is just an extension of what we’re doing anyway. But there’s something exciting about the explicit use of the word ‘heroes’; it’s a big accolade to live up to; and best of all, everyone we’re covering lives up to the name: Scottish culture is truly exceptional right now. Our cover stars (does anyone spot the movie reference?) the Fence Collective are typical of this trend: easy going folk from just up the road - King Creosote and The Pictish Trail even got up in fancy dress to play our website ‘space’ launch party earlier this year - the Fence crew’s unique take on traditional musical stylings is deservedly winning international acclaim. We have interviews with both of the above and James Yorkston this issue (p. 36-7), and there are Yorkston tracks to listen to on the I Hear A New World podcast available from www.theskinny.co.uk. In line with the Local Heroes theme, I was lucky to interview Mel Young, the founder of the fantastically successful Homeless World Cup, for the Hyperculture series of interviews. Again he was a perfect example of someone making an international impact from a Scottish base (turn to p. 10 to find out more), but he had an interesting perspective on Scotland’s lack of appreciation for its best exports: despite invitations and incentives from other countries, the Homeless World Cup remains based here for what are largely sentimental reasons, not because they’ve had much practical indigenous support. The joy with which Scots knock chunks off those who make a go of it is a cliché and in many cases false; but Mel isn’t the only person to have felt a lack of enthusiasm for ‘our own’ in these parts. As Reginald D Hunter quipped during this year’s Fringe, people in Britain ‘don’t really like men, unless they’re athletes; they don’t really like women, unless they’re mothers; and they don’t really like kids, unless they’re missing’. Painfully close to the truth. Hopefully the unashamed appreciation throughout this issue can go some way to showing some love.

Last month we started distributing in Aberdeen. It was fun stuff: we had a long 6-month strategy for integration up there, starting with our Student Handbook and going from there. But then last month, we were in the office and asked ourselves ‘shall we just do it now?’ A couple of weeks later, Aberdeen has a few thousand magazines, and everyone was very pleased to take the mag. Easy. In fact, we’re having a wee do to celebrate our North East launch, to coincide with an exhibition from London-based graffiti artist Remi Morgan at Peacock Visual Arts. It’s on the 25 September, and we’d love to see you there. Gins are on us. Drop jaco@theskinny.co.uk a line for further info or to reserve a place. Slightly earlier in the month, at Moshulu, will be the first of our series of recommended gigs ‘The Skinny Dip’ (don’t say we’re not classy). Frightened Rabbit will be sure to blow away any optimism you might have had lying around the more faith-based parts of your soul with a searing set of deeply personal songs (Moshulu, Aberdeen, 18 Sep, £8). The second ‘Dip’ will take place at Barfly in Glasgow, where Rolo Tomassi will be sure to give it some as they bring their far-out noisy flair to town (Barfly, Glasgow, 26 Sep, £6). Tickets from the usual spots, but if you register on our website there’ll be a good number of competition tickets available through our weekly ‘Cyberzap’ newsletter - as well as useful tips on how to get the best (or worst, depending on your preference) out of your weekend.

This month we bid a sad farewell to two of our long-standing section editors, both of whom have done fantastic jobs here at The Skinny, and who are accordingly going on to exciting things: Alex Burden our Clubs Editor will be the Scotland Editor for DJ Mag, and Paul Greenwood our Film Editor is taking the post of Film Editor at the Evening Times. Best wishes and good luck to you both from all of us here at The Skinny. This means that two highly desirable posts are available here with us, and we’re really looking forward to seeing who’s interested. Turn to page 19 to see the posts advertised, and have a look at www.theskinny.co.uk for further information on how to apply.

The Skinny Let us know what you think: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk P: The Skinny, The Drill Hall, 30-38 Dalmeny St, Edinburgh, EH6 8RG Issue 36, September 2008 © Radge Media Ltd. The Skinny offers a wide range of advertising packages and affordable ways to promote your business. Get in touch to find out more: E: sales@theskinny.co.uk

Publisher Sophie Kyle editor Rupert Thomson Creative Director

MATT MACLEOD

ENterprise Manager Lara Moloney Production editor

David Lemm

Aberdeen Editor

Jaco Justice

online & Music editor

Dave Kerr

Clubs & music EDITOR Alex Burden Heads up Editor Erin McEIlhinney Deviance EDITOR Nine

T: 0131 467 4630

Film EDITOR

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the explicit permission of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within this publication do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the printer or the publisher.

Fashion Editor Lindsay West

Printed by Trinity Mirror ABC: 28,592. 1/1/08 - 30/6/08 Cover Image Leigh Pearson: thunderheart.co.uk

theatre EDITOR

Paul Greenwood Gareth K. Vile

comedy editor Emma Lennox Books EDITOR

Keir hind

games EDITOR

Josh Wilson

ART editor Rosamund West FOOD & Drink editor Ruth Marsh Competitions Editor

Finbarr Bermingham

Club Listings

andrew cooke

Subeditors Rosamund West

Paul Greenwood

ally brown

Jenni cruickshank

Showcase curator Rosamund West

6 THE SKINNY

September 08

Contents


Contents

8 12 16 18 20 24 25 26 29 30 32 44 52 58 69

GLASGOW ORAN MOR MONDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER

Issue 36 :: September 2008

LY K K E L I

Heads Up

Gutter Talk: an Aberdeeny interview with the public.

EDINBURGH CABARET VOLTAIRE SUNDAY 14 TH SEPTEMBER

Edinburgh Cabaret Voltaire Thursday 9th October

Fashion

THE SUBWAYS

Eight Scottish designers who are going to London Fashion Week. Big up the Scots!

Food & drink Britain’s first ever carbon neutral bakery .

+ THE KING HATS + THE HUGS

Definitley not pants: Hilary Laing and others in LFW ::P10

GLASGOW ABC

GLASGOW GARAGE

Deviance

FRI 19TH SEPTEMBER

MONDAY 6TH OCTOBER

EDINBURGH LIQUID ROOM

Monitoring LGBT references in the media: Garry Otton.

MON 22ND SEPTEMBER

‘ALL OR NOTHING’ THE NEW ALBUM OUT NOW

www.therascals.co.uk www.myspace.com/rascalmusic

Film

Good Dick proves independent film works, plus chats with [REC] co-director Jaume Balaguero.

Games

**SPECIAL VENUE OPENING SHOW**

Reviews and the WII Loop Machine.

EDINBURGH THE PICTURE HOUSE SATURDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER WWW.IDLEWILD.CO.UK

Books

Christopher Brookmyre talks about his new book and book launch.

Sandy Christie :: P 30

Theatre

+ WILD BEASTS + MAPS & ATLASES (ABERDEEN ONLY) + HOLY FUCK + DANANANAKROYD (GLASGOW ONLY)

Merchant City Festival, No Limit People and previews.

Glasgow Garage

Wednesday 1st October

comedy

Local comedians and previews.

Edinburgh Liquid Room

Art

Edinburgh-based Sandy Christie burns a trail for using alternative ways of getting his art out there.

Mogwai get dressed up to Pounce you in the woods :: P33

Music

ABERDEEN MUSIC HALL SATURDAY 4TH OCTOBER

GLASGOW BARROWLAND

Thursday 2nd October

SUNDAY 5TH OCTOBER

Dundee Fat Sams

WWW.MYSPACE.COM/FOALS

Friday 3rd October

DEBUT ALBUM ‘ANTIDOTES’ OUT NOW

Aberdeen Moshulu

Our local musical heroes: Fence Collective, Mogwai, Glasvegas and more.

Saturday 4th October

Records

andy yorke

Including the album of the month from Fujiya & Miyagi

GLASGOW KING TUTS MONDAY 6TH OCTOBER EDINBURGH CABARET VOLTAIRE TUESDAY 7TH OCTOBER

Clubs

Damian Lazarus (not local but still ace)

Listings

EDINBURGH LIQUID ROOM

Who what where when. Sort your life out.

WEDNESDAY 8TH OCTOBER

GLASGOW THE ARCHES

THURSDAY 9TH OCTOBER

Slime & Reason out September 1st on Big Dada

Competitions

TICKETS: 24HRS: 08444 999 990 & www.gigsinscotland.com

Featuring Uncle Finbarr’s Quiz Time.

www.theskinny.co.uk

Put your hands up for the Hold Steady :: P40

IN PERSON: GLASGOW Tickets Scotland, EDINBURGH Ripping, Tickets Scotland, DUNDEE Grouchos and all Ticketmaster Ticket Centres. ONLINE: www.ticketmaster.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 7

Contents

DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…DF CONCERTS PRESENTS…


HEADS UP The Wire Comes to Glasgow The Wire may just well be the best TV show ever, so we’re pretty excited its creator, David Simon, will be appearing to talk about it at the Glasgow Film Theatre on 18 September. Because The Wire hasn’t been shown on terrestrial television, it’s currently a cult hit. But the cult grows larger every day, because the show consumes the life of anyone who watches it. The Wire initially follows a police team in Baltimore who use wiretaps to collect evidence on drug gangs.

Brad

Dugald

Jan

Lou

Nina

shaun

Gutter Talk the mean streets of aberdeen

But this is only initially - through five seasons, the show has widened its scope to focus on the docklands, the political system, the school system, the press and just about everything in between. The cast is enormous, but the characters are all fascinating. It’s structured more like a novel than a typical TV show, so we expect Simon to be eloquent and descriptive about his brilliant show. [Keir Hind]

by Jaco Justice

Name: Shaun Fowler Age: 20

David Simon, GFT, 18 September, 8.15 - 10.15pm. Tickets £6/4.50 conc. David Simon’s Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets will be published by Canongate (4 Sep).

Best thing you’ve seen this summer?

Best thing you’ve seen this summer?

My eyes nearly popped out when I saw my work colleague’s (Callum – Earl of Sandwich) new barnet last Friday. Kind of a Rutger Hauer meets trailer-park trash southerner.

The stinking street urinals mysteriously disappearing from outside the café! Typical Aberdeen Council in putting such a negative practice into action. We have a terrace at the restaurant I work so the last thing the customers need to smell is a boat load of oil workers relieving themselves.

Do you have a hidden talent?

(An extended version of this article is online at theskinny. co.uk.)

PReviews What do We-Think?

Tramway/The Lighthouse, 11-12 Sep

I have grown two moustaches, one on the back of my neck and one somewhere else. 2008 is all about the Magnum. Have you ever slept outside in Aberdeen? It’s far too cold! But back on home turf, Australia, we have plenty of kangaroo pouches to get snug in. Just call me Joey. If you went on X-Factor, what song would you audition with?

To say that the internet revolutionised our world may be the understatement of millenium (although you’d have to Google it to double check). It has changed practices in every arena of life; knowledge is power and we now have a wealth of information literally at our fingertips.

on to his website, specifically for the purpose of receiv-

changed the way the book was written”.

Many businesses have been smart to these benefits for a while, but now engage Scotland - a support and education network for those working in the visual arts, with members Scotland wide - are looking at “how ‘open source’ and ‘mass-collaboration’ trends... could be applied to the cultural sector.” We’re not sure how necessary the speech marks are there, but the concept is still an absorbing one.

One thing you must do before the summer ends?

Needless to say then, the conference is aimed at a wide range of people, from policy makers through to

Make a 100ft daisy chain and get those funny rashes checked out.

students, and will involve many members of engage

Favourite Aberdeen street name?

Scotland. The fee is a whopping £150, but the reason

Affleck St (like Ben! Swoon!) Plus the streets have a finger pointing you in the direction of the street, how ‘handy’.

Take, for example, Charles Leadbeater (the keynote speaker of the upcoming conference, who was interviewed in our April issue), whose latest book, We-Think, was published in March 2008. Eighteen months previously, Leadbeater uploaded the first eleven chapters

ing constructive criticism. It was “downloaded thousands of times“ and “received hundreds of comments from people, most of them very helpful and some that

we think the event’s worth mentioning at all is that they have a back door cost of a rather more manageable £25 for artists, freelancers and students, available for the effort of telling them how attending could benefit you and your work. See engage.org for more information. [Erin McElhinney]

So here they are. Not the usual Ibizan, Parisian or London-based sites (check out the Cans Festival repaint in Waterloo) that Remi’s letterform battlegrounds usually take place in, but their loss is our gain. Some keen-eyed readers out there will know the artist has already stealthily placed his painted mark on

8 THE SKINNY

September 08

Name: Jan Mair Age: 22 Best thing you’ve seen this summer? A man on the beach in Barcelona balancing a tray of donuts on his head while dancing and handing them out.

www.engage.org

Do you have a hidden talent?

Peacock Arts, 25-27 Sep Art pilgrims to Aberdeen take note: the city isn’t on fire. That smoky atmosphere you see hanging overhead is (we like to think) actually a creative haar formed by the many artists that reside in and around its environs. And coming northwards this month to take a big whiff is eminent London graffiti artist Remi Morgan, more commonly known under the tagging guise of Rough. He’s been collaborating with Northeast turntablist and producer A La Fu (Big Dada/ Vava Records) for a “good few years as art director to his label work”, while the duo have planned “an attack on the ears and eyes of unsuspecting heads for some time now”.

Erm, I’m not too sure. It would be something with a growling bass-line. My MC name is Party Fowl. Quite topical since it’s shooting season.

Engage Scotland Conference 2008, Tramway and The Lighthouse, Glasgow, Thu 11 and Fri 12 Sep 2008

Coded Language

I can cure swollen balls… for horses. Just to clarify I ride horses. Does that sound wrong too? Digging a hole here arrrrrggghhh. Have you ever slept outside in Aberdeen?

a few locations up here: namely new fringe-cutters Wonderland and that monument of daily bread, Earl of Sandwich. And now for three autumnal days in Aberdeen we can gaze upon his space-invading, paint-stricken canvases indoors.

Unfortunately yes. But it was just outside my house. Should of just gone to the stables really. Although that has no religious meaning.

The second day in this short expo (Friday 27 September) features an artist meet and greet from 6-8pm. Then when clubbing hours begin Victory takes hold of the crisply white ‘New York loft’ studio of the Peacock art centre for a soirée in the deepest electronic fashion, with A La Fu and Martin Jay doing the duties there ‘til late.

Elton John – Tiny Dancer. Reminds me of my boyfriend. Oh dear, another hole.

The Skinny is having a ‘yay-we-now-cover-Aberdeen’ party at the Martin Miller lubricated Remi/Rough viewing on the Thursday at Peacock (6-10pm), contact Jaco Justice (jaco@theskinny.co.uk) if you’re interested in attending and learning more about how to get involved. [Jaco Justice]

Name: Brad Broom Age: 34

If you went on X-Factor, what song would you audition with?

One thing you must do before the summer ends? Find out who stole the photo of me sporting a moustache in the male toilet of Café 52! The jury is still out but it was rather fetching. The boys still have Kerren doing his Tootsie impression. Favourite Aberdeen street name? Golden Square. I do love a golden shhhhh… apart from the boys curb crawling there’s some decent bars round there too, such as Under the Hammer and The Globe.

Do you have a hidden talent? Never hide your talents! Have you ever slept outside in Aberdeen? God no! I’m Australian. I’ve managed to come back to a non-existent summer. I think I’ve cursed the land. If you went on X-Factor, what song would you audition with? A Grace Jones number so I could dig my stilettos deep into Cowell’s groin area. Grace keeps her watchful eye over the restaurant at all times. One thing you must do before the summer ends? Catch up with my dear friend Sophie – lurking somewhere in Skinny Towers! Favourite Aberdeen street name? The Green. It’s the only street I know. Well more of a plaza, or green you might say. It’s a well kept secret in Aberdeen, even though it’s just yards from the main shopping avenue.

Name: Dugald Allan Age: 21 Best thing you’ve seen this summer? Two seagulls munching upon an unfortunate pigeon (flying rat). You’d have thought they’d just nabbed some crisps from the corner-shop like every other selfrespecting gull. Do you have a hidden talent? Yes, but if I showed you it wouldn’t be hidden. It’s not Debbie Magee anyway. Although Paul Daniels should be back on TV. Now that’s magic! Have you ever slept outside in Aberdeen? No, but I do have some friends who have learnt the hard way. They’ve thawed out now. Come to think of it why isn’t the penguin enclosure in Edinburgh moved up here? If you went on X-Factor, what song would you audition with? Popcorn by Hot Butter. De-de-dededede-de… and chorus… TTF’s version could be considered. One thing you must do before the summer ends? Visit my fine lady in Copenhagen, Denmark.

buildings. Naughty naughty.

Name: Lou Couper Age: 27 Best thing you’ve seen this summer? The ground floor view in the Topshop in Oxford Street, London. It’s a melee of exciting independent designer clothes, some of which my shop Coco Violet in Aberdeen stocks. I think I tried on about 20 items in the changing room. It’s immense. Do you have a hidden talent? I can do the splits after I have had enough wine! Have you ever slept outside in Aberdeen? No! Even the thought of going camping makes me feel queasy. I like my nice posh hotels and free miniature toiletries. And, of course, my hair-straighteners. I’m a bit of a girl. If you went on X-Factor, what song would you audition with? Sweet Child of Mine by Guns n Roses. I can sway excellently like Axl Rose. I think I would be quite convincing. One thing you must do before the summer ends? What summer!? Ahh, perhaps a spot of Spring/Summer cleaning. I generally like to keep my shoe count to just below 100 pairs. I think it may have crept up as of late! Although having a shop which sells some pretty awesome shoes really doesn’t help matters... Favourite Aberdeen street name? Wapping Street. It sounds funny.

Name: Nina Eggens Age: 29 Best thing you’ve seen this summer? My party tent flying - We didn’t secure the thing properly on a very windy day. Luckily the food table stayed put (unlike every other piece of furniture). Do you have a hidden talent? I make bunting for any occasion… and it’s windproof too. My fiancé hunts slugs very proficiently. Have you ever slept outside in Aberdeen? No, but in winter the bedroom is so freezing cold that I would count that as outside too. If you went on X-Factor, what song would you audition with? Working 9-5 by Dolly Parton. Rumour has it there will be a full-scale musical based on the film. Go girls! One thing you must do before the summer ends? Paint my gate blue.

Favourite Aberdeen street name?

Favourite Aberdeen street name?

Allan Street, off Broomhill Road. Does exactly what it says on the tin. Apart from that Justice St is well suited since all the bams have to walk up there to the court

Holland Street! I’m Dutch so it’s comforting to know the Scottish care about us! Although Froghall Terrace is a close second. Reminds me of Wind in the Willows.

HEADS UP


HEADS UP

WE DANCE TO RADIOHEAD TOO

THEATRE ROYAL, GLASGOW &-"'%HZeiZbWZg'%%%-,%%+%++),W`\[ZZ lll#i]ZVigZgdnVa\aVh\dl#XdbW`\[ZZ i^X`ZihhiVgiVi—&'

FESTIVAL THEATRE, EDINBURGH '*"',HZeiZbWZg'%%%&(&*'.+%%%W`\[ZZ lll#Z[i#Xd#j`W`\[ZZ i^X`ZihhiVgiVi—&% 8[ijWlW_bWXb[i[WjiWj˜'&\ehijkZ[djiWlW_bWXb[ edef[d_d]d_]^ji"Y^[Yam[Xi_j[\ehZ[jW_bi$

www.theskinny.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 9


The Homeless World Cup:

Mel Young on Practical Change Mel Young is a true Edinburgh, nay Scottish, hero. In over twenty years of working on the issue of homelessness, he has been nothing if not highly effective, and imaginative. As the Homeless World Cup gears up for its biggest year to date, RJ Thomson speaks to the organisation's founder about what really makes a difference Eighty per cent of participants in the Homeless World Cup have made dramatic changes to their lives soon after taking part. That’s some record; and it’s one that Mel Young, who has worked on homelessness issues for more than twenty years since founding the Big Issue in Scotland in 1993, is in no way blasé about. “Reintegration is really hard,” he tells me. “Sometimes it’s two steps forward one back, or three back. And yet these figures were suggesting something had happened immediately. So we investigated that very thoroughly, and it turned out to be true.” When I meet Young in the Leithbased attic office of the Homeless World Cup, he is unashamedly proud of his achievements. Yet he is also so evidently delighted to have been able to have had a real effect, and so realistic about the scale of the remaining worldwide problem of homelessness, that it’s impossible not to be genuinely inspired. In fact, I’m particularly pleased to be able to present this interview as part of our Local Heroes special issue, because Young is somewhat rueful about the degree of enthusiasm for the Homeless World Cup - which is quickly becoming a global phenomenon - that exists here in Scotland. It’s nice to be able to provide a bit more recognition and appreciation. I’m also pleased to include him as part of the Hyperculture series of interviews, because so much of what he had to say in conversation echoed, or contrasted interestingly, with comments made by previous interviewees. If you have a look online at our interview with Charles Leadbeater, who is presenting his current ‘big idea’ of We-Think at the Engage Scotland conference this month, you’ll start to see what I mean. Type ‘Hyperculture’ into the search box and there are more cross-references to be made. But to go back to that statistic - eighty per cent of participants making major changes to their lives - it’s probably appropriate to put it in a bit of context. There are now a lot of people involved with the Homeless World Cup, despite the fact that it’s all coordinated by a team of six folk in an attic by the Shore. In Nairobi, Kenya earlier this year, 264 teams, featuring 3,000 players, came to compete to see which team would represent Kenya at the next Homeless World Cup. The tournament was watched by 500,000 people over the space of a fortnight. Though this is the biggest qualification process the organisers have yet heard of, with partnerships existing in over 70 countries around the world, it’s clear that the headline event itself is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of giving huge numbers of people a renewed sense of purpose. How on earth did it get so big? It seemed appropriate to take it from the top... Whose idea was the Homeless World Cup, and how did you come to be working on it?

10 THE SKINNY

September 08

Well it was my idea actually, with a colleague called Harald Schmied. We both were running street papers: I was running the Big Issue in Scotland and he was running one in Graz. All the street papers had come together to create a trade association called the International Network of Street Papers, which is a global organisation but with a tiny budget.(1) All that people were able to do in the beginning time [...] was to meet once a year and have an annual conference - which was always very positive and important. We’d talk with each other ‘til three in the morning about how things were working in our own countries and how we could work together. And at the conference in 2001, I was sitting in the bar with Harald at the end of the conference, and we were saying how great this conference had been, but there were no homeless people: there were editors or directors or founders, and we were all getting this great adrenaline and inspiration from this international conference. How could homeless people experience the same thing? We thought of having a conference for homeless people, but we thought they would be bored. We talked about exchanging our homeless sellers, but we thought that would be difficult because of Visa problems. Then we thought of another problem - language. And we thought: there’s only one international language, it’s called football. So I said, ‘well, some of our homeless vendors in Scotland claim to have some semblance of a football team; they could be Scotland’. And Harald said he had the same situation in Austria, and that they could be Austria. So we said ‘okay, we’ll play each other: Scotland v Austria’. I said that we’d win because we never win anything at football, and he said they’d win ‘cause they never win anything at football. We shook on a deal. Then we had some more beer, and by the end of the night we said ‘every team should come’, and we called it the Homeless World Cup. And then in the morning - I suspect you’ve had this too, when you have these wonderful conversations at night and then the next morning you think ‘well that was a wonderful conversation’ - but then we talked about it the next day and asked: ‘well will we do it?’ And we said we’d do it. So 18 months later we had the first one. Do you feel Edinburgh is a natural home for the Homeless World Cup? Well, yes and no. Yes because it was born here, and I live here. And yes because we hosted it in 2005. It was supposed to be in New York, but we had a problem with visas. We had an emergency, and had to make a decision about whether we were going to skip a year or have the event somewhere else. We made a decision that to skip a year was the wrong thing to do because we had this whole momentum: we had to try to put it on somewhere. It was a big risk, because all our sponsorship went to zero. But we put it on here

in Edinburgh, and it was a big success. It was an example of a community coming together, because it was like: ‘Right, we’ve got no money jackets off, sleeves up’, and on the phone to, like, everybody I knew. And that made it happen and put it back on course. So that’s another reason why it’s here. But equally, logistically Edinburgh isn’t the right place: we really ought to be in Geneva, Switzerland where the other sporting associations are. And also, without wanting to sound hypocritical, that I don’t think Edinburgh, or Scotland in general, really embraces some things that are good. Without wishing to blow our own trumpet, this is an incredible thing that has happened; the attention it’s getting across the world, from the world’s governments, and the effect it’s having on homeless people is incredible. And it’s all centred here in Edinburgh; and Edinburgh, and Scotland in general, doesn’t really seem to get it. Other countries have come to us and said ‘why don’t you locate it in our country; we’ll give you lots of incentives; we really want you here’. Whereas in Scotland you sometimes feel as though [people are thinking] ‘what are you doing here?’. This disappoints me a bit, but in some ways the spiritual home for this is here so it’ll always be here. At the 2005 Homeless World Cup I bought the T-shirt, and it was made by Nike, having previously thought I’d never buy anything from Nike.(2) How much support do you get from companies like that? There are two sides to the Homeless World Cup: there’s the organisation, which runs as a social enterprise and puts on the events; and there’s the foundation, which handles the more grassroots side. And we run the organisation like the Olympics or like the FIFA World Cup - although smaller! - and so we have to get sponsors in the same way they get sponsors. Nike have been with us since the beginning; they are a fabulous company to work with; they’ve been very supportive of us. They give us finance [and] they give us marketing advice. Journalists in the past have said: ‘Aren’t you working with the enemy? These are the kinds of people you shouldn’t be working with.’ But my point of view is that we’ll work with anybody who wants to work with us in a genuine partnership. The results are that it’s bringing about change, and so without Nike we wouldn’t have this level of change. And secondly, anyway, their company has really changed since the time they had issues with supply-chain. If you look at their level of social responsibility and transparency, then they’re now - in terms of sports apparel - the top company, and they’ll allow anybody to come and

have a look at what they’re doing. And they’re now becoming very progressive with some of the decisions they’re making. So for us, working with a company that’s young, innovative, go-ahead, makes quick decisions - it’s perfect for us. We have a good relationship with them. So do you think working with big business is a strong way forward for social enterprises and foundations? I think the world is changing: big business is starting to realise - if nothing else from its own self-interest - that it’s much better to do business in a good world than a bad world. They realise that the world is finite, that you can’t go on mining the world forever. It’s something that this credit crunch is bringing forward as an issue: that people only have a finite amount of money, you can’t go on spending spending spending; you can’t go on and on and on throwing your rubbish out; you can’t go on and on mining for oil because it’s going to run out. It’s dangerous to have a world that’s full of, on one half rich people, and on the other half poor people, with a gap between; it’s not sustainable, and it falls apart. I think it’s also because there’s a changing issue of ‘who takes responsibility?’. Traditionally, if you look back in history, it has been the church who looked after poor people or people in ill-health. But then post-war in Britain you had the growth of the welfare state, and so it all became government. And over the past couple of decades you’ve seen the growth of the charity sector, as well as government. But it seems that in the modern age governments are incapable of delivering proper social welfare: partly because the structure is very slow; partly because it can’t afford it, because no-one pledging high tax will get voted in. You have to look no further than the US to see what happens when this occurs.(3) So it seems that another change is going on, where maybe for the next generation welfare is no longer the fiefdom of the government; the government is doing something else and welfare is the fiefdom of business. Maybe that happens. But certainly, there’s a sea change going on. Interesting times. One thing that comes to mind is the Hometime 2012 campaign; we were contacted by the Leith Agency(4) and we’re working with them to promote it. It seems appropriate to me that you have an advertising agency and a magazine, rather than giving money - which certainly for us is a very scant resource - doing what they do to support the campaign: which actually makes it more effective. That’s a very good point you make, and that’s exactly the sort of thing that’s going on. If you’d have looked at The Skinny and the Leith Agency 20 years ago, would that conversation have

Feature


Feature Mel young David Anderson

"Then we had some more beer, and by the end of the night [...] we called it the Homeless World Cup."

do you come up with an answer? What you do is you just don’t think about it: you just do what you can do. Which is just a little, but if it’s affecting one person or half a dozen people then it’s better than nothing.

True. Our success here kind of mirrors the failure of the world. There’s homelessness now in every country in the world. And it is absurd that we have to have something like the Homeless World Cup.

taken place? I doubt it very much. But now you’re thinking, ‘what can we do?’, and although it’s not costing you anything you’re using your creative energy to do something constructive. I think that’s a good example of the type of thing that’s happening all over the place.

It’s fascinating and very encouraging, what you’ve said about people taking part and then ceasing to be homeless. It’s almost a paradox: whenever you hear about the wish to eradicate something, it always seems to me to have an undercurrent of sustaining that thing; the traditional model of that would be of ‘charity’, where you try to eradicate poverty by giving away your illgotten gains; and on the flipside you’ve got things like the Homeless World Cup, where the very name implies you need homelessness to run, but actually you get rid of it.

[With at least] one hundred million people on the streets in the world, we’ve come up with a practical way we can change people’s lives. And I maintain if we’re changing one or two, it doesn’t matter - as long as we’re changing some. The key for us is that change. The events are great fun, but I think if we were just doing that, even if we were raising the profile of the issue and changing people’s consciousness, then I wouldn’t continue doing it. The key thing is the number of people who are actually getting involved and changing. So as long as that happens we’ll keep doing it. But for sure: our aim is not to exist!

There are two statistics used for homelessness the world over: one is one billion, the other is one hundred million. So whatever way you want to look at it, it’s ginormous. You look at it and you just blank out, because how can you as an individual deal with a billion homeless people? How

www.theskinny.co.uk

www.homelessworldcup.org/content/melbourne-2008 (1) The International Network of Street Papers website is at www.street-papers.org. (2) This wasn’t a totally random decision, there was an outcry in the late 1990s about the treatment of workers in Nike factories in Thailand, China and Vietnam. More info can be found at www.saigon.com/~nike/. (3) At another point in the interview Young observes that the quoted figure of homeless people in the US is 3million, and that this is “a disgrace”. (4) The Leith Agency is a Leith-based advertising agency behind, among others, the recent award-winning Irn Bru campaigns. The Hometime 2012 campaign is concerned with putting back on the agenda the Scottish government’s commitment to providing everyone with a suitable home by 2012. More info can be found at www. theskinny.co.uk/shelter2012.

September 08

THE SKINNY 11


Fashion

Skinnyjeans by Lindsay West

Dressed to Kilt As local heroes go, there can be few candidates with a history as motley and contentious as good auld tartan. If it weren’t such a terrible pun, we might say that it’s past was checkered; but given that we’re far above that sort of cheap gag, we’ll just say that both in and outside of fashion, our traditional weave has been through the mill a good few times.

dose of check is just the ticket for Autumn/Winter, and there are

Banned in 1746 for all but the toffs and the army, then reinstated and cleaved by approximate notions of clan from 1815, the origins and significance of tartan are seemingly multiple, contested, and contradictory. And to add Skinny Jeans’ noisy opinion to the national clamour, it seems to us that, ideologically and stylistically speaking, tartan runs via two paradoxical threads, still knotted to the 1746 split.

For more local talent, catch the Glasgow School of Art MDes Degree Fashion Show on Thursday 4 Sep at 7pm & 8pm. Tickets are strictly limited, and can be snagged by emailing c.highmore@gsa.ac.uk.

always accessories for the tartan-shy. So salute this much maligned local hero by, at the very least, strapping on a pair of sky-high tartan platforms and striding through the rain with pride. Do it for your country.

Paul quickly prepared a portfolio and enrolled at Edinburgh’s Telford College, and through studying the various photographic disciplines, realised his heart lay in fashion. “I was always interested in glossy, art-based fashion magazines, so began to take notes on the various photographers, break down the components, and then try to emulate them. I’m inspired by the romantic soft styles of Sarah Moon, Paolo Roversi, and Serge Leblon.” Working between Edinburgh and London, Paul has just finished shooting his second lookbook for Bebaroque, who are featured in this month’s fashion spread, also shot by Paul. “I feel so lucky to be working commercially such a short time after leaving college. I will never allow myself to become complacent. I’m always learning and will probably never stop.”

A link to one of Paul Marr’s fashion shoots for The Skinny can be found here: www.theskinny.co.uk/gallery/15-doll-grown-up www.marrzphoto.com

Designer Spotlight:

Hilary Laing Printed fashion designer Hilary Laing might draw her inspiration from children’s sketchpads, but it’s unlikely that your average juvenile artwork comes anywhere close to these divine doodles. A collection filled with playful Crayola swirls set on silk mix fabrics, Hilary’s pieces are so sweet that when you’re not wearing them, you might just want to hang them on the fridge.

Until, that is, the dawn of Autumn/ Winter ‘08. Flip open any recent glossy mag and chances are you’ll fairly swiftly be greeted by D&G’s pre-fall ads – a double-page spread of leggy glamazons assembled on a gloomy country backdrop, swathed head-to-toe in full-throttle tartans. The fashion mags might have had their heads turned by the knotted neck scarves and tweedy styling enough to hail it as ‘English heritage’, but make no mistake: it’s tartan, it was ours first, and it’s bloody everywhere.

A graduate of Heriot Watt’s School of Textiles and Design, Hilary spent time in London working for designers such as Elspeth Gibson and Antoni & Alison, before returning to Glasgow and to her first love: print design. “About a year ago, I decided I had to commit and do this full time,” says Hilary, “I have to be creative.” This creative commitment has clearly paid off, with Hilary’s collection of handprinted silk mix scarves, covered bracelets, ties, and made-to-order dresses generating national press and ever-increasing orders to fill. “It’s a really exciting time,” nods Hilary, “ I’ve had a lot of interest from overseas, after being featured on various fashion blogs, and in Look magazine. Look have also requested one of my scarves to use in a shoot, which is great.”

From Paul & Joe to Preen, through House of Holland and our very own Jamie Bruski Tetsill (featured in this month’s spread), everyone is calling tartan, checks, tweeds, and plaids as the common thread tying up Autumn/Winter.

September 08

Paul Marr has lived a few lives already. After gaining a degree in Modern Musicianship and touring Europe with a rock band, he played bass guitar with various jazz outfits, in between holding down retail jobs to pay the bills. So, when did he fall in love with photography?

Four years ago, Paul’s wife bought him a digital camera to experiment with. He started taking pictures of “the everyday and mundane” with extraordinary results. His wife encouraged him to take it further. “With digital, the results are instant. I was able to train my eye at an early stage. Very quickly, I could see my mistakes and correct them. Digital is a great learning tool for this.”

The weft, however, starts from the other side, where the toffs left off – deep in the heart of Country Casuals turf, embedded in the ‘heritage’ look punted by Sloane Rangers sporting calf length kilts all year round. And it’s here that tartan unfortunately got tangled with the twee. Seemingly reserved for tourist tat, our short-lived bursts in international football tournaments, and born and bred Americans who swear blind they’re as Scottish as Tunnock’s Caramel Wafers: tartan has been stuck in the novelty bin, in fashion terms, for multiple seasons. With the exception of Dame Westwood, who’s always known how to keep tartan bleeding at the cutting edge, it seemed that the national check might never again make it to the couture catwalks in force.

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by Ema Johnson

If you’ve pored over these pages, no doubt you’ll have noticed rising sensation Paul Marr’s fashion shoots prettying up recent issues of the Skinny. The Edinburgh-based photographer’s ethereal, cinematic style promises to make him one of Scotland’s most in-demand fashion photographers, and The Skinny managed to pin him down to talk past, present, and future - but no photos, please. Think Banksy - the glasses are as much as you get.

“I remember a photographic exhibition having an early effect on me, a series of black and white American mid-west landscapes by Wim Wenders, cinematic imagery, silent pictures of endless highways rolling off into the horizon and barren dust ridden ghost towns. It was probably at this point that my eyes were opened to photography and how it could make you feel.”

The first, the warp, is the rebel yell – the spirit of the highland army and those defying the Dress Act, the tartan adopted by punks decades on. It’s this thread that Good Queen Viv Westwood has been twirling round her finger ever since she stormed on to the Kings Road, a loyal subject without any undue reverence, messing with the check and reimagining it season after season.

Though admittedly the Scottish Parliament and its proposed national register of tartans might contest the lineage of many of these catwalk checks, let’s just take credit for them all anyway, and revel in all the various incarnations set to flood the high street. Though head-to-toe might only be for the truly brave of heart, a well-chosen

Man from Marrz

DAVID LEMM

by Lindsay West

I’m also looking at fringing and patchwork ideas.” We’re not sure about you, but we’re looking forward to seeing what appears next in Hilary’s gallery. Hilary’s pieces are stocked at www.hilarylaing.com and at Fancy Dans, & Slanj, Glasgow. Hilary Laing will also be taking part in the fantastic ‘Brand New You’re Retro’ Catwalk Show at Byblos on Saturday 27 September, with a host of other designers, as part of Glasgow’s Merchant City Festival. Tickets are priced £10, with all proceeds going to Childline Scotland, and are available from Tickets Scotland and Joy, Queen St, Glasgow. www.hilarylaing.com

The candy-coloured goodies you see here are from Hilary’s current, Spring/Summer collection, but for Autumn/Winter, she’s giving a key trend the Laing treatment. “I’ve got a scribble tartan for this next season. It’s really mad, and

Fashion


Feature www.theskinny.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 13


Chances are, you’ve probably worn an Olanic original without knowing it. As a freelance designer for Schuh, Olanic’s Niki Taylor already has designs selling on the high street, but it’s her stunning mainline collection that has grabbed copious column inches in the fashion press. A graduate of Heriot-Watt’s School of Textiles & Design, Niki’s dynamic prints and streamlined silhouettes have shown at LFW since 2005, but this season marks her first catwalk show. “My collection is inspired by the British weather,” she explains: “I’m collaborating with Mackintosh on rainwear, and I’m introducing accessories for the first time, which is exciting.” Named ‘one to watch’ by the Times, and generating substantial buzz in anticipation of this must-see collection, Olanic has been a recurring name within the recent Scottish fashion fever. But Niki’s unmistakable talent is multi-discipline, with upcoming collaborations with filmmakers, musicians, and other designers keeping her busy well after Fashion Week. “People have said, ‘Is there something in the water up there? What is it that’s making you all so creative?’ she grins. “But Scotland has always been known for its inventors, so maybe there is something working out there that we’re just not aware of.”

“What's great about all this is for people to know there are designers working here, and it's not just some fashion student making t-shirts in a backstreet warehouse,” remarks Deryck Walker, “It's significant, international designers.” Deryck is one such designer himself, who, after honing his craft working for Versace and Robert Cary-Williams amongst others, has come home to Glasgow with his now formidable reputation for razor-sharp tailoring. Best known for his menswear, Deryck's LFW will centre around a showcase in conjunction with Saville Row-based Scottish textiles firm, Holland & Sherry. “I'm doing a stand-alone day in Saville Row, to let buyers come and feel the clothes. It'll let them see the detail, rather than just watch it go by on a runway.” Already gearing up for a key role in the relaunch of Harris Tweed, Deryck's doubtlessly bright future will be subject to plotting during LFW by a high profile mentor: Mary 'Queen of Shops' Portas. “Mary and her team look after me, so I'll be doing a couple of days with them when I'm in London,” Deryck grins, “She's like my svengali.”

Truth be told, you'd be hard-pushed to find a more selfeffacing pair of Scottish Fashion Award winners than Bebaroque's Mhairi McNicol and Chloe Patience. “It was surreal, really a shock,” says Mhairi, speaking from Bebaroque's studio. “At one point, Chloe wanted to go and check her makeup in case we won, and I was like, 'For God's sake – we're not going to win!” But win they did, and it seems the surreal has done nothing but escalate for the 2008 Scottish Accessory Designers of the Year - by way of a major national stockist in ASOS. com, and more than a few dealings with the ladies at Vogue. “They've already got ten pairs of our tights sitting in their wardrobe dept,” explains Mhairi, “and they also requested a pair to use on November's front cover.” In this, their first LFW with the Design Collective, Glasgow School of Art graduates Bebaroque will take their hand-embroidered, exquisitely printed hosiery to the tents where they'll inevitably gain some new fans – and then presumably come straight home. “I think everyone should have a shot down in London, because it's great,” says Mhairi, “But our main aim is to be successful and stay at home. We love it too much here.”

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September 08

“Last London Fashion Week, I don't think I was as organised as I am for this one,” says Jamie Bruski Tetsill, “I'm going down prepared this time.” Only in his second LFW as a graduate, Jamie's upcoming showroom is to be a direct application of that first class Honours degree in Textiles, with a directional dresses-only collection. “It's quite wacky, modern, geometric prints on classic, fitted shapes. It's all about the colour and the print.” Picked out during his degree show by Christopher Kane, and during the last LFW by multiple Vogue journalists, as 'one to watch', Jamie's chic, progressive aesthetic has guaranteed him a wealth of coverage, and an eager audience for his imminently high profile career. So, what's it like to be at the centre of the hype hurricane? “It is really funny to be able to Google yourself and get hits back with people talking about you in Japan,” says Jamie, “That is quite bizarre, I must admit”

Ask any Glaswegian worth their salt of the earth, and they'll tell you that there's always been something a bit special about Scotland's biggest city. And thanks to the international success of West-coast wonders Jonathan Saunders and Christopher Kane, what the locals always knew is finally catching on, with all influential eyes now fixed on Scottish fashion. This month, the Glasgow: Scotland with Style Design Collective, of which Kane is a graduate, will take its fourth batch of Glaswegian born, based, or trained designers to the tents at London Fashion Week. In the interests of getting 'aw the gen, The Skinny caught up with some of this seasons' big names at The Lighthouse, Scotland's National Centre for Architecture & Design, and found out what the well-deserved fuss is about. Fashion


Fashion

Add in the other four designers showing under the Glasgow: Scotland with Style Design Collective umbrella, and you've got a formidable, eight-strong roster of the very best in Scottish design talent. As one of the most established and internationally lauded members of the Design Collective, Glasgow-born Aimee McWilliams' shows are consistently amongst the hottest tickets during Fashion Week. A perpetual innovator, Aimee's collections never disappoint, incorporating luxe fabrics and modern silhouettes within truly aspirational garments. An ever-rising Scottish player on the international fashion stage, we can't wait to see what Aimee comes up with this season. Similarly anticipated is Scottish Young Designer of the Year, Graeme Armour's catwalk collection. Having worked at Alexander McQueen's right hand as a graduate, Graeme has been steadily building his own brand over the past few years, and will show at LFW this season as one of the most experienced members of the Design Collective. The Glaswegian-born, Central St Martins graduate's label has become synonymous with chic, sleek design, and inventive experiments in organzas and silk. Despite being a relatively young brand, Vidler & Nixon - the dynamite combination of Glaswegian Kerry Nixon and Aussie-born Stefan Vidler â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have already established themselves as one of the hottest new labels currently gracing the fashion glossies. Their impeccably pleated outerwear has already made it on to Sienna Miller's back amongst others, and their reputation for elegant, vintage-inspired structure makes them an always exciting prospect for Fashion Week. Nothing short of a knitwear architect, LFW first timer Alice Palmer is swiftly developing an unparalleled reputation for cutting edge techniques and creative constructive solutions. A textiles graduate from Glasgow School of Art, Alice won the 2007 Textprint Knit award, and even showcased as an inventor at the Glasgow Science Centre, displaying her original silk & wire-based knit fabric. Luxurious yet wearable, Alice's garments are bound to turn a few influential heads come Fashion Week. London Fashion Week S/S 09 runs from 14-19 September 2008. www.londonfashionweek.co.uk For more information on Glasgow: Scotland with Style Design Collective, visit www.seeglasgow.com/design With many thanks to all the designers, The Lighthouse, GSWS Design Collective, and Dani Ross at Stripe Communications. Words by Lindsay WEst Illustrations by Nick Cocozza Photography, left hand page, by paul marr @ Marrzphoto.com

www.theskinny.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 15


Food and drink

Bake To The Future

Cake and guilt traditionally go hand-in-hand, but two pioneering Edinburgh cafes are making a move towards sweet treats that’ll keep your conscience smelling of roses. Ruth Marsh sinks her teeth in. Raw Food, as a movement, is normally associated with the blue skies and bright lights of California. Luminaries of 90s Hollywood like Demi Moore and Alicia Silverstone are devotees of the diet, which claims innumerable physical and mental benefits of consuming unprocessed, undiluted, ‘living’ foodstuffs - over 400 raw outlets can be found across the US. It is, in fairness, the last food concept you’d expect to find launching in Scotland, even if it is in Edinburgh’s mellow, shabby-chic Stockbridge. To enter Red Sugar, you have to battle through the snaking queue waiting to buy bridies and yum yums from the Greggs next door, as owner Steve Montgomery wryly notes.

Mmm... buns. fraser Morgan

‘I want raw to be introduced in an easy way’ Steve says ‘I don’t want to take people out of their comfort zone. This is fresh, handmade botanical food’.

An architect by training, and originally from Shetland, Steve got into a raw diet due to health reasons, around seven years ago. Enthusiastic to an evangelical degree, no one could doubt the positive effect it’s had on him - anyone who’s been working 18 hours a day for six months without a break has no right to be this bright eyed and animated. Small but welcoming, the superfood haven he has created is calm and contemporary - it certainly shies away from the tye-dyed stereotype many people harbour when faced with a niche food culture. “I want raw to be introduced in an easy way,” he says. “I don’t want to take people out of their comfort zone. This is fresh, handmade botanical food”.

Up the road at beloved patisserie The Manna House, a very different type of superfood is on display. Boozy pistachio mousse, perfect ovals of rhubarb cheesecake and crusty artisinal breads spill off the shelves - it’s a world away from the minimalist vibe of Red Sugar, but behind the scenes they are also looking at their impact on the world. As co-owner Fabio Borreani points out, their food is deliberately free of sinister shelf-life improvers and flavour enhancers. He adds “we want to extend this healthy ethos to the way we treat the environment”.

Currently the menu is largely a shrine to the cacao bean in its many forms. As Steve points out, cacao has been a foodstuff for hundreds of years and it was only in the commercialised 20th century that it became associated with candy, drowned amongst skimmed milk powder and refined sugar. The raw cacao nut he gives me to nibble has over 300 nutrients in it and packs the anti-oxidant equivalent of a punnet of blueberries. He also makes his own chocolate bars (98% pure cacao plus a pinch of Himalayan pink salt, making it ideal for diabetics and those watching their cholesterol) and, if you’re willing to wait 15 minutes, you can have a raw hot chocolate - 100% cacao tempered below 30 degrees until it crystallises, giving you an energy hit as allegedly intense as that other well-known South American, er, pick-me-up.

Fabio moved to Edinburgh from Italy and was frankly horrified by the standard of the local diet and the mantra that if it’s cheap, we’ll eat it, regardless of quality, taste or anything else the Italians hold dear. The bread was ‘a trauma’, he confides. So The Manna House was born and instantly embraced by foodie Edinburghers (you try getting a table on Saturday). One such regular customer was Charles Henderson, director of Edinburgh-based Climate Futures, a specialist in environmental business consultancies. Curious to know the impact of a bakery (having worked with conglomerates like Reebok and Scottish Power), he conducted a full eco-audit that has set them on the way to becoming the UK’s first carbon neutral bakery.

The cake cabinet wouldn’t look out of place in the Dean Gallery - these are immaculate, labour-intensive constructs, raw ingredients re-configued into perfect likenesses of gateaux, brownies et al. Whilst this artifice may sound a trifle unpalatable, my slice of chocolate cake passed the taste test. A dark concoction of Ecuadorian beans mixed with virgin coconut oil and hand-cracked cashews (cashews are traditionally roasted open, so that’s a raw no-no) it gave a rush of pleasure minus the usual palpitations, headaches and comedown sluggishness I usually get post- hot toffee choc fudge binge. To wash it down I try a downright blissful Skin Pleaser smoothie - fresh-pressed pear juice, camu camu berries (wild harvested from the Amazon), cashew nut-based iced cream and coconut water; frothy, milkshakey and top lip-lickingly delicious. Perhaps the biggest criticism Steve faces is that most of his ingredients are from the further reaches of the world - the shelves are packed with agave nectar, and pots of spirulina powder, all of which trumpet their rainforest origins. These are big food miles, but he practices a real commitment of working closely with the small scale suppliers, visiting sites personally to ensure non-exploitative working conditions and shipping, rather than air freighting, stock.

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September 08

“We have always made a conscious effort to recycle and it really just grew from there,” says Fabio’s business partner Drew Massey. Everything was totted up, from the electricity used to power the ovens to the miles travelled by both their ingredients and their staff. Suggestions now implemented include working with farms literally down the road for seasonal fruits, eggs, honey and flour and getting energy from a more ecologically-sound supplier. They then make up their small deficit by purchasing the theoretical surplus of another carbon neutral company to the tune of a few hundred quid.

The Manna House fraser Morgan

What’s more, there’s a consistent ethos throughout the business - be it the composting of all waste, biodegradable packaging or sustainable bamboo chairs from Finland. Even the post-its by the till are made from recycled elephant poo. They have major plans for menu and Empire expansion. Steve’s chocolate is about to be launched in the retail market, from September they will have a full savoury menu to comple-

ment the sweetness which can be delivered to your desk for a Pret-free lunch, and they will be actively encouraging people to get the raw ingredients and have a go at making their own chocolate bars. As Steve points out, the idea of chocolate as unhealthy is essentially a marketing construct, convincing you that shovelling Galaxy-style crap down your hole is a decadent treat, something to do with the girls in between glasses of Blossom Hill.

It’s a clean consciousness that also makes financial sense, says Drew and presents it as a model that could be adopted by other smallscale producers. “This is an ideal chance to get one up on the big boys” grins Drew.

Red Sugar, 27b Raeburn Place, Edinburgh, EH4 1HU 0131 332 8455 www.red-sugar.co.uk The Manna House, 22-24 Easter Road, Edinburgh EH7 5RG 0131 652 2349 www.manna-house-edinburgh.co.uk

Food and Drink


Food and Drink

Reviews Tex Mex 2

Tex Mex 2, 64 Thistle Street, Edinburgh EH2 1EN Tel: 0131 260 9699

The ‘Gaucho Grande’ comprised a pork burrito and a taco filled with chile Colorado. Two dishes in one! The warm pink-purple and lime green interior of Tex Mex II could be described variously as intimate, cosy, close, or uncomfortably cramped. Having been dazzled by the bold colours you will be bewildered by the busy menu. On closer inspection the majority of the dishes seem to be largely similar: some kind of meat wrapped in a flat bread disc. One dish, myriad descriptions. A few of other main courses are available (beef, tuna and swordfish steaks) but they are dominated by the fajita-taco-enchilada family. All these similar options combine to the effect that no matter what you chose, you feel it’s the wrong choice. After a small pitcher of ‘the best margarita in town’, however, you may have relaxed a little and settled in. The ‘Cerviche Pacifico’ a mixture of ‘shrimps scallops and seasonal fish’ was an underwhelming starter, a scattering of rather piquant peppercorns spoiling the more subtle flavours. ‘Soft Shell Crab Flautas’ were more successful, the warm crab meat didn’t jar too badly with the formulaic sour cream and guacamole dolloped on to its tortilla wraps. The generic salad with squeezy-bottle dressing zigzagged over it common to both our starters reappeared with our main courses. Unfortunately the flaming fajita, although delivered dramatically by the friendly but flustered waiter, was rather greasy and burnt. The ‘Gaucho Grande’ was more palatable, and for £8 was good value given that it comprised of a pork burrito and a taco filled with chile Colorado. Two dishes in one! Tex Mex II is cheap, its portions large (after starters and mains we couldn’t manage a dessert between us) and it doesn’t have ideas above its station. Fine dining it is not, but if you know what to expect when you go then it’s not impossible to thoroughly enjoy the whole experience. [Barnaby Seaborn] 2 courses for two plus a bottle of wine and small margarita pitcher £48.55.

fraser Morgan

gramofon Bistro

7 King Street, Merchant City, Glasgow G1 5QZ Tel: 0141 552 7177

There’s nothing twee or pretentious about this place. Kick off your shoes and settle down for a treat at Gramofon Bistro. The new owners of this Merchant City delight have been toiling passionately for 8 months and are making their mark with a vibrant menu, buzzy atmosphere and a sociable team. Gramofon is an intimate, relaxed bistro with its walls covered in a gallery of eclectic statement art. Downstairs is a cosy den with a mish-mash of seating and a small stage that plays host to an open-minded variety of comedy, theatre and music. There’s some hearty banter between staff and customers and the kitchen opens onto the bistro so it feels transparent, bustly and friendly. The menu is diverse and refreshingly exciting - the only problem was deciding what to have, especially when the chef came over to animatedly add that he also had fresh tuna, monkfish and salmon that he could cook to our fancy. It was a struggle to pick from the various options that included confit of duck with pearl barley and beetroot risotto, Catalan fish stew or buffalo steak with slow cooked garlic and rosemary potatoes. I finally plumped for firm spicy Thai fishcakes with a sesame seed coating served with a tangy home-made mango chutney, fresh salad garnish and crunchy parsnip crisps. I went with the chef’s recommendation on the main and savoured every mouthful of a luscious piece of meaty monkfish pan-fried to perfection with a spicy beany salsa and spring onion mash, all washed down with a chilled zesty sav blanc. There’s nothing twee or pretentious about this place. It’s honest, high quality, personable and flexible to your notions and tastes. The food is exciting and fresh, made with great ingredients and prepared and served by experienced people who really care about what they’re doing. Gramofon Bistro feels indulgent, comfortable, like being spoilt by an old friend. [Susan Maguire] www.myspace.com/gramofonbistro

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Kristopher Andrew Hamilton

September 08

THE SKINNY 17


Deviance Garry Otton:

Editorial When I first heard Iris Robinson’s comments on homosexuality, I felt embarrassed to come from the same part of the world as her. I mean, in this day and age, here’s a Northern Irish politician offering to refer homosexuals to a nice Christian psychiatrist who can (apparently) turn them straight. She also opposes gay parenting on the grounds that kids may be bullied by their peers, rather than, for example, calling for zero tolerance of homophobic bullying. But here’s my favourite quote of hers: “Envisage, down the road, a child […] going into their parents’ bedroom, as is natural for a child to do, and finding two women or two men making love.” The horror! Look, pretty much anybody is going to be horrified if they walk in on their parents having sex. Just as our parents generally like to imagine we don’t have sex, we like to pretend they don’t either. It’s best if everyone just doesn’t think about it. I shouldn’t have been surprised by her remarks, anyway - she’s in the DUP, the party that brought us the Save Ulster From Sodomy campaign, in which her husband took part thirty years ago. (“The campaign was ultimately unsuccessful,” smirks Wikipedia.) But I shouldn’t be all that embarrassed, either – it’s not like Scotland is glitch-free. This has been made fairly evident by Garry Otton’s work in Scots Gay. He’s got a scathing sense of humour, set against a nice backdrop of righteous anger, preventing the reader from getting waylaid by despair. Interviewing him this month was a really enjoyable experience, and the book he’s working on right now should be a valuable document, given that many people I know were too young – or not in Scotland – to remember the saga of Section 28. The fact that some of the stories he recounts already seem absurd goes to show how quickly things can change, and given the response to Iris Robinson’s remarks (over 15,000 signed an online petition calling for Gordon Brown to reprimand her), maybe things aren’t all that hopeless back home either. /Nine

magazine REVIEW

Lock Up Your Daughters #1 Kicking off with a delicious rant that blasts the queer movement for inertia and liberalism, Lock Up Your Daughters summons old school punk energy that drove through queercore and riot grrrl before collapsing in Ladyfest. It’s a hefty read, sharp and beautifully laid out. Since the LYUD gang are pretty together - they’ve already held two nights to promote themselves - they are set to become a serious irritant. An article on Bearlesque aside - they turn up as regularly as my bad itch - the features are intelligent and detailed. Local literary goddess Louise Welsh gets a visit, as does fashion’s rising star Paul Alexander Thornton. There are even cartoons in the back which are readable and not painfully personal, unlike most zine scribbling. I wish they’d been as pissed off through the whole thing as they are in the editorial: they talk about things they love, which is constructive and all, but I long for more LUYD mayhem. [Gareth K Vile]

www.lockupyourdaughtersmagazine.co.uk

18 THE SKINNY

September 08

Radical Historian “Oh my god, he’s so easy to get drunk,” says Garry Otton, of himself. “Half a glass and he’s anybody’s.” We’re having dinner and a bottle of Chablis at the Slug and Lettuce in Edinburgh’s Omni centre. He’s just been to see the Fringe production of What’s Wrong With Angry?, which he’s very enthusiastic about, and I’m scrawling soundbites on bits of paper because I don’t have a dictaphone. And we agree that we’re both angry, about lots of things, and that anger can be both positive and necessary. Garry’s the man behind ‘Scottish Media Monitor’, which ran as a regular feature in Scots Gay magazine for ten years. It took aim at homophobic and anti-sex attitudes prevalent in the press - like the blame-the-victim coverage of hate crimes. “It started after the first murder in Queen’s Park [in Glasgow]. A girl and two lads went to a party boasting about what they’d done – his face was unrecognisable, they’d jumped up and down on his head. About ten weeks later a guy, John Macleod, was writing about gays ‘simply not equipped to live’. Some years later I outed him. He was gay, he admitted it to me. He regretted [the article], put it down to a mad phase in his life – but he was still homophobic. “The Herald was absolutely chocka with religionists. Media Monitor just rolled on – I began to be more sensitive to the media. There were soft but powerful religionists, like Eddie Barnes, the former editor of the Scottish Catholic Observer, who went on to Scotland On Sunday.” I mention the tendency of Scotland’s papers to wheel out a religious spokesperson for a ‘balanced viewpoint’ – almost always a condemnatory one, despite the diversity among churches - when gay themes are covered. “Any story on the Catholic Church, would they wheel out a gay representative?” he asks rhetorically. “I took Scottish Media Monitor very seriously. All these terrible stories, these cries for help – people were sending me envelopes stashed with cuttings.” Out of all this grew his first book, Sexual Fascism, published by Ganymede with a foreword by Peter Tatchell. His second book, Badge of Shame, is currently being serialised in Scots Gay before publication. “It’s about ... the repeal of Section 28. It’s an important chapter in Scottish history. It’s useful to write from my perspective as a gay man, rather than the press perspective which is largely from the Catholic Church and Brian Souter’s perspective.” A quick recap for those who were elsewhere at the time: Section 28 was a piece of legislation from the Thatcher government which banned local authorities from “promoting homosexuality”. It was basically unworkable in law, and very much open to interpretation, but in order to avoid conflict many authorities opted to just not mention homosexuality at all. Its effect was most felt in schools where lesbian, gay and bisexual pupils – as well as those with LGB parents – could expect to be written out of the curriculum, and a blind eye was often turned to homophobic bullying. When repeal was finally on the cards, Stagecoach boss Brian Souter poured a million pounds into his Keep The Clause campaign, and the media delivered plenty of moral panic around the prospect of ‘gay sex lessons in schools’. “Scotland in 2000 for gay people must have been like being Jewish in the

thirties,” Garry recalls. “There were stories in the press of an international conspiracy. There were smashed windows, diagrams in the press of how to spot a homosexual, beatings, murders, stories withheld from other editions, huge amounts of money coming from abroad against repeal. There are ten chapters out so far, and believe me I’m only warming up, it gets worse.” He continues to express concerns about the SNP – “not just because Salmond took half a million of Souter’s money, but because of behind-the-scenes talks with the Catholic Church. There’ve been talks with Souter’s foundation – whose main aim is to promote religion – to administer electroshock treatment to drug addicts. Salmond has also written in the Scottish Catholic Observer that he’ll do what he can to find a way round for Catholics to discriminate against gay people.” While debates rage on about issues like gay marriage, Garry has a different take on it: “Marriage is under threat. Marriage is in crisis and it’s like ‘quick, get the gays on board, they’re good at reviving something that’s dead’. Marriage as an institution is very fragile. It’s expensive, shallow, an excuse to party. I see too many [heterosexual] women who put their whole life and soul into the ceremony and come out the other side depressed, because - what now? They’re not sure where to take their lives after marriage.” In the past, Garry illustrated love sto-

ries for Jackie magazine. “My pictures were distributed to nine countries. There was a montage of them on TV, set to I Wanna Know What Love Is. It was very romantic but then I quit because I felt, ‘It’s a lie’. It was always hetero. I was feeding this lie to people.” Having illustrated heterosexuality for a living, it’s no wonder he’s sensitive to the invisibility that’s frequently imposed on queer people – and the internalised homophobia that results. “Gay people are incredibly homophobic,” he laments, “like the gay outdoors club I went to where they were basically like ‘don’t draw attention to yourself’. It was full of people who are desperate to assimilate, guys desperately trying to be butch and masculine. There aren’t many working class people there either: they’re mostly very middle class and trying to emulate straight people. I want to celebrate the feminine side of gay men - too many clubs give negative messages to feminine men and boys. Gay is getting more conservative, and youth today is getting more conservative, far more conservative than youth in the 70s or 80s.” This assimilationist trend meshes well with an anti-sex climate. “I’ve always seen sex as an art, a creative force,” Garry says. “I love the writers Avedon Carol and Susie Bright because they’re positive about sex, upbeat about sex. I’m tired of negative things about sex in the papers, like dogging, cruising. We have the biggest heart attack rate in Europe and these people are going out walking and exercising - we should promote it!” www.scottishmediamonitor.com

Deviance


Different Strokes

Sex work has made Slutty McWhore more tolerant of difference. Can the same be said of her clients?

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Film Editor Clubs Editor A few weeks ago, I opened my door to a new client and gasped when I found a soldier in full uniform staring back at me. My first thought was that US Immigration had finally cottoned on to my sideline in handjobs and had sent the army to deport me. The soldier averted his eyes in embarrassment, and shifted his weight awkwardly from one immaculately polished black boot to the other. Clearly, he wasn’t there on official military business. I took one look at this soldier’s hair, shorn right down to his scalp, and the almost preternatural orderliness of his attire, and groaned inwardly. What on earth, I thought, could an American soldier and a Scottish vegan socialist sex worker possibly have in common? I imagined that our time together would drag on endlessly, punctuated only by awkward attempts at conversation. In many ways, this client lived up to some of the stereotypes I had of soldiers. He was sexist, and explained, as I caressed his cock, that he was using my services because his wife was a “fat bitch”. He also firmly believed that the US was the greatest country in the world, and that the American invasion was the best thing that had ever happened to Iraq. When I first started out as an erotic masseuse, comments like these would make me want to grab the client’s balls and squeeze them as tightly as possible. Instead, I would just see this inwardly, containing my hatred, and let the ball-twisting scenario play out in my imagination. As the months went by, and after countless men had bared their souls on my massage table, I began to recognise, almost against my will, that many of my clients – even the Republican

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dickheads – were more complex than I had wanted to accept. With the blinds shut tightly and the candlelight flickering against the walls, my massage room seemed to metamorphose into a confession box for my clients. They made themselves vulnerable there, and told me secrets they would have never dared tell a stranger out in the ‘real world’. The soldier, a lieutenant colonel, revealed inadvertently that the rigid structure of army life could not bring order to his emotions. His marriage was crumbling away into a crushing loneliness he didn’t know how to escape. This knowledge didn’t make me like him more, but it did at least force me to view him with compassion and tolerance. It amuses me that sex work, which is supposed to leave women bitter and hardened, has actually made me a nicer person in some respects. I wonder if any of my clients have been forced to see sex workers in a new light after meeting me. They often tell me that they never expected to have such a good conversation with a sex worker. I don’t know whether to be flattered by the compliment, or offended. Did they imagine that most sex workers communicate in grunts?! Most of my clients seem to appreciate the fact that I try to inject some warmth and ‘humanity’ into our sessions. Yet they often look bewildered upon realising that the woman holding their dick in her hand is not just a sexual fantasy, but also a real woman with opinions and emotions. The sad irony of my job is that the closer I become to my clients, the more likely they are to stop coming back to see me. It seems weird, they say, to get a handjob from somebody they consider a friend. In the erotic masseuse business, you see, friendliness can lead only to flaccidity.

You'll need to know all there is to know about the contemporary landscape in your field, be able to write and edit concisely and clearly, to deadline, and contribute ideas to develop a key section in Scotland's most widely-read culture magazine. The Skinny runs on willpower and human creative energy (with a little help from our advertisers), so the more you can bring to the table in terms of enthusiasm and commitment the better. More info about both posts and how to apply for them is available online at

WWW.THESKINNY.CO.UK/JOBS September 08

THE SKINNY 19

Deviance

Slutty McWhore:


Film Editorial Well folks, all good things and all that. After more than two years of editing the film section, the time has come to pass the baton to someone else’s capables. I’m off to pages new and the long goodbye has arrived. It’s been a brilliant couple of years: I’ve seen films great and terrible, met some famous people, learned a few things and, most importantly, made some very good friends. The Skinny is going places and it’s been wonderful to have been a part of a magazine that does what it does better than anything else of its kind out there. September is traditionally a rank rotten month for new film releases, so apologies for leaving you with the likes of Disaster Movie and Death Race as the nights draw in, but hopefully you can still have fun and maybe I’ll see you at the movies.

Nothing Like Good Dick?

JR: Hell yeah there’s a space for Iron Man! MP: [Giggling] Yeah, I watch Legally Blonde when I’m sick – I just stick it on, watch it 20 times over, and I’m happy again!

Release Schedule

JC: Your character doesn’t wear a scrap of make-up in the film, rather refreshingly. Why not? MP: Yeah, the whole reason I wanted to make the film was to explore what is truly ‘sexy’. One aspect of that is vocalised very clearly today, but I think there’s a range of sexiness that exists that isn’t really explored or talked about. What I find personally attractive about someone is not usually to do with what they look like, it’s something about them that is attractive that isn’t necessarily their face. That’s why not wearing make-up in films is kinda important to me – it’s silly to put this stuff on. I don’t like having to sit there in the morning while they put all that on your face.

Faintheart, 26 September

5 sep

12 sep Ashes Of Time Redux (TBC) The Boy In Striped Pyjamas (12A) Eden Lake (18) Eraserhead (18) Heavy Metal In Baghdad (15) Jar City (15) Partition (TBC) Pineapple Express (15) The Romance Of Astrea And Celadon (12A) The Women (TBC)

19 sep The Chaser (18) The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (TBC) Linha De Passe (15) Then She Found Me (15) Tropic Thunder (15) Unrelated (15) The Wave (15) Zombie Strippers (18)

26 sep Alexandra (PG) Death Race (15) Faintheart (TBC) The Foot Fist Way (15) Redbelt (TBC) Righteous Kill (TBC)

20 THE SKINNY

September 08

JR: The thing is, even though people generally don’t go around introducing themselves as recovering drug addicts because they fear judgement, we all make snap decisions about people we meet anyway. And that works for the movie: because the audience questions our characters’ actions – why she’s so mean all the time, why he stalks her initially. Those in the audience who initially judged these characters now realise that there are good reasons for what they do. MP: I like including the audience that way; they have to be actively watching. I love going to see those kinds of films, but I equally love things like Legally Blonde – there is a space for everything, huge movies like Iron Man....

Paul.

Bangkok Dangerous (18) Disaster Movie (12A) The Duchess (12A) El Cantante (15) Never Apologise (15) Rocknrolla (15) Sweet Land (TBC)

in a realistic way. No-one says: “Hi, I’m Marianna and I was an alcoholic and a prostitute,” in the real world. Not that I’m either of those things, but it’s not how people usually talk about themselves!

Good Dick is the writing and directing debut of Marianna Palka, a Glasgow born actress who left Scotland ten years ago to live in the States. It’s the darkly amusing tale of a video store clerk who pursues a porn-obsessed young woman who clearly wants nothing to do with him, and it was warmly received at this year’s Edinburgh International Film Festival, winning the New Director's Award. Jenni Cruikshank caught up with Marianna and her co-star/producer/boyfriend, Jason Ritter, to discuss the true meaning of ‘independent’ film.... Jenni Cruickshank: A lot of debut writer/ directors might find it tricky doing just one new job - what made you decide to take on acting and directing too? Marianna Palka: Originally, I wrote it to be in it – I wanted to be both writer and actress. Then my friend Daphne, who is also the costume designer for the film, told me that there’s no ladder you have to climb to become a director; you just do it, learn while you’re doing it and that way you’ll get the best education. I already knew that Jason was going to produce and that I was writing the lead male role for him because he’s a genius. He was genuinely the obvious choice, and not just because I know him; he’s a really unique actor and has a quality which I don’t think exists in anyone else who’s working right now – this masculinity mixed with patience. JC: Jason, your character begins his courtship in a rather stalker-ish fashion, yet you manage to maintain his sense of innocence brilliantly. How did you do it? Jason Ritter: I knew that this character had to do some very strange things: looking up her address, going to her place, lying to her about his dead aunt... so it became about the reasons behind his actions. One of the things Marianna and I talked about was that the movie was like a fairytale, where I’m a knight who has been given a mission. In Good Dick, the mission is to save the damsel in distress and fight the dragon, but the damsel and the dragon are the same person. That’s what

I tried to keep in mind when he was stalking her and doing all those strange things in the beginning – she was giving him no other options and he knew he had to reach out to her. I don’t condone stalking at all but as you watch the movie you realise that his intentions towards her are only positive. He’s a very ego-less character; he literally does every single thing for her. That was one of the things I liked about the script: these characters don’t do things that are socially acceptable but somehow you warm to them anyway. MP: The stalker thing is really funny because whether or not someone is a stalker depends on their intentions, and in retrospect it’s kind of romantic that he is so devoted to her. A lot of personal information about the main characters in Good Dick is kept hidden; even their names aren’t revealed. JC: Was there a process in deciding what to conceal? MP: I had to be very specific in what I included because I didn’t want to spoon-feed the story to the audience, but I also didn’t want them to be so bored that they wouldn’t be interested in the film then struggle to follow along. So I made sure the characters talk about things with significance later on, like the dead aunt, just enough so that they will pay off towards the end. I didn’t want everything to be given away immediately, because it allows the audience to get to know the characters

JR: Yeah, they spend all this time trying to make you look ‘natural’; then you see a person on the street with a spot and you’re like: “Ugh! How dare you be a real person!” MP: That’s mainly why I’m interested in making films that are about characters that are genuine and don’t have to be stereotyped; they can just be real. Feminists always talk about wanting strong women in films, and I don’t feel it’s weak women – it’s about no women. Women are typically in films to serve the male character, to define them and give the audience information about that character. They’re very one-dimensional. You see so many different kinds of male character actors getting work all over the place; so forget about just having more strong women, have more of all types of women. JC: Speaking of strong women, I heard that you’re also distributing the film yourself, too... MP: Yeah, we’re self-distributing in the US, under our company Morning Knight, which is a really big deal. We’re talking to a lot of other filmmakers who are doing the same thing right now - because of the internet and the current state of the US film market, it makes a lot of sense for filmmakers to hold on to their rights. It also means that all the money goes to the filmmakers – you’re not only buying a DVD but you’re supporting and promoting artists. You’ve seen it happen with bands like Bright Eyes: they can make their music to pay the bills just simply because they cut out the middleman - it’s amazing. It’s radical, and it’s great for filmmakers as well as bands. Now, we’re thinking about how to make a genuine community in L.A. for new filmmakers coming up through the ranks: we just want to make it easier for them, because we’re discovering new things all the time. I think there is strength in numbers, and filmmakers are just beginning to figure that out.

www.gooddickthefilm.com

Film


Film

September Film News Edinburgh Filmhouse

Alongside a couple of literary adaptations in the shape of Keira Knightley’s latest costume drama The Duchess (Fri 5 Sep – Thu 2 Oct) and the moving WWII story of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (Fri 12 Sep – Thur 2 Oct), Edinburgh’s Filmhouse has a typically eclectic mix this month. Friday 5 and Saturday 6 sees them screen Japanese thriller Death Note, based on a manga work about a cursed notebook which conjures up a 10 foot demon, while Wednesday 10 and Thursday 11 bring us the sequel Death Note: The Last Name, made back-to-back with the original. Starting at the Filmhouse on Saturday 13 September is Take One: Action!, the UK’s first major film festival about people and movies that are changing the world. Celebrating Scotland’s global connections – from South Africa to Nicaragua – it explores global challenges in which Scotland has a vital role to play, from climate change to the rules about how poor nations trade. With 20 films, both new and classic, there should be something for everyone here – see www.takeoneaction. org.uk for full details.

Pierce Brosnan ones) there’s a chance to see new digital prints of both ABBA: The Movie (Sun 14) and Grease (Wed 24).

Glasgow Film Theatre

The Cameo, Edinburgh

Described by the New York Times as ‘unquestionably one of the best and most original series on television,’ HBO’s The Wire transfers to the big screen for one night only on Thursday 18 September at Glasgow’s GFT. Alongside an episode of the series, creator David Simon can be seen in conversation. A few days later on Tuesday 23 there will be a preview of the new film version of Brideshead Revisited starring Ben Wishaw and Emma Thompson, hopefully attended by the cast and crew. And for anyone who’s still humming tunes from Mamma Mia! (even the

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The boy in the striped pajamas, 12 Sep—2 oct

At Edinburgh’s Cameo, The Wackness (from 29 August), a new comedy set in New York in the summer of 1994, stars Ben Kingsley in a role almost as memorable as his gangster appearance in Sexy Beast, though a million miles away in tone. If word of the rumoured Sky One remake makes you queasy, head along to Ednburgh’s Cameo on Friday 26 for a screening of the original. Monday 18 sees a special screening of Get Real, Patrick Wilde’s coming-of-age drama in which two British schoolboys find themselves falling in love with each other – the film’s writer Patrick Wilde will

introduce. There’s also a great double bill on Sunday 7 with Gone Baby Gone and Mystic River.

Dundee Contemporary Arts Centre

The DCA is showing Shane Meadows’ Somers Town from Friday 12 – Thursday 18 Sept, his follow up to 2006’s This is England. This new film has another star turn from young Thomas Turgoose and deserves as much success as it predecessor. Clint Eastwood stars as The Man With No Name in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly from Fri 5 – Mon 8. [Jonathan Melville] www.takeoneaction.org.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 21


On [REC]ord Jaume Balagueró, co-director of the terrifying [REC], takes some time out from writing the sequel to talk to Paul Greenwood about the Spanish horror masterpiece, out on DVD recently Where did the idea for [REC] come from? The idea was to tell a classic horror story but using live TV language. Using this live report style, we wanted to reach a higher level of realism and credibility in order to increase the implication of the audience and fear. We like to perceive [REC] like a film not just to be seen, but experienced.

tired every day, running up and down without stopping. The last scene in pitch black with the “Niña Medeiros” creature, was really scary for Manuela and the cameraman. Before that moment, they didn’t know about her. Nothing at all.

How was the filming experience?

[REC] was released in Great Britain around the same time as Cloverfield and Diary of the Dead – why do you think ‘homemade’ horror is currently so popular?

We wanted to shoot the movie in the most organic and credible way. The actors never got the complete script, just a few pages with the general story. No dialogue at all. That’s why we needed to shoot chronologically: they were discovering all the details of the story while we were shooting, reacting spontaneously to all the new events. In some way, the movie was growing by itself. We jsut needed to control it.

Something is changing in the attitude of the audience. People need to feel more and more participative, an important part of the cinematic fact. That’s probably the reason behind this new wave of live-style movies. It could explain the coincidence in time of such movies like [REC], Cloverfield, Diary of the Dead and more. The cinema industry is trying to offer to the audience what the audience is starting to demand.

What are the good and bad things about having two directors?

Is this a golden age for Spanish horror?

It’s impossible to co-direct a movie. However, t was this time because it’s really special, different and more a documentary than a fiction film in terms of direction. We were there together all the time discussing any decision, but it was great fun and it was just the way the project was born, and it really worked for us. Did the actors have to go through a lot of difficult situations? All the shooting became a strong and unexpected experience for all of them. It was shot chronologically, in strict real time, no cuts, and with no script for them. They were extremely

I don’t think so. But lots of people from other countries seem to have this impression. Actually, there are only two or three horror films released each year, at least commercially. What films did you use as inspiration? Of course there are some evident references like Cannibal Holocaust, Man Bites Dog or The Blair Witch Project. But what we used as inspiration was actually the TV. How the mass media creates the reality. Nothing exists until you see it on TV. Only what is shown on TV becomes real. Even on TV, the border between reality and fiction is very thin. That’s something to worry about. Very disturbing.

Film Reviews The Wave

Director: Dennis Gansel

rrrr Professor Wegner (Vogel) has been roped into teaching autocracy as part of project week at his school. His students are a mix of goths, bullies and cool kids, most of whom couldn’t give a hoot about how dictatorships are formed. But when Wegner devises an experiment in which the class simulates an autocratic society, things take a turn for the deeply disturbing and unsettling as his pupils become an organised mob that turns on outsiders. Director Gansel cranks up the tension in this German drama, never holding back from showing just how fragile democracy can be. Most shocking of all, however, is that the film is based on a true story which took place not in Germany but in California in 1967. Brutal, bleak and brilliant, here’s one that will play on your mind long after the credits roll. [Kevin McHugh] Starring: Jürgen Vogel, Frederick Lau, Max Riemelt Release Date: 19 Sep 2008 Certificate: 15 www.welle.info

Taken

Director: Vito Rocco

rrrr Tramping its size 10s in the footsteps of James Bond and Jason Bourne is this

Faintheart

highly entertaining – if highly unoriginal – thriller starring Liam Neeson. The

Director: Pierre Morel

Rob Roy star is former CIA man Brian, who’s hung up his badge to devote himself to being a good dad to his teenage daughter (Grace), who has de-

rrr

cided that she is now old enough to vacation in Paris with a girlfriend and no

Brought to us by the unlikely combination of MySpace and Film4, Faintheart is a moderately entertaining British comedy. Eddie Marsan plays the loveable Richard, a wannabe Viking who, with his merry men, reenact Norse battles at the weekends – a hobby that takes precedence over all else, including going to his father-in-law’s funeral. Naturally enough, his long-suffering wife (Hynes) decides enough is enough and leaves him, causing our Thor wannabe to try and win her back any way he can, including recreating their very first date. The film also features Trainspotting star Ewen Bremner, who gets one of his best roles in years

22 THE SKINNY

September 08

as Richard’s Star Trek-loving pal who, in one of the film’s best scenes,

parents. But his hopes of bonding with his little gal come a cropper when sex traffickers kidnap his little princess. It’s then up to our action hero to come

arranges a date with a ‘woman’ he meets on the internet. It’s very much

out of retirement and use every trick in the CIA handbook to track down

a by-the-numbers British comedy that’ll keep you entertained but cer-

the bad guys. The result is a fine old school revenge thriller, with Neeson’s

tainly won’t leave a lasting impression. [Kevin McHugh]

portrayal of a desperate dad and some top-notch action scenes making up for a far-fetched, not to mention familiar, storyline. [Kevin McHugh]

Starring: Eddie Marsan, Jessica Hynes, Ewen Bremner

Starring: Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen, Maggie Grace

Release Date: 26 Sep 2008 Certificate: TBC

Release Date: 26 Sep 2008

www.takenmovie.com

Certificate: 15

Film


Westworld

XXY

Logan’s run

Stars: Yul Brynner, James Brolin, Richard Benjamin Cert: 12 Released: 22 Sep

Stars: Ines Efron, Ricardo Darin, Martin Piroyansky Cert: 15 Released: 15 Sep

Stars: Michael York, Jenny Agutter, Richard Jordan Cert:PG Released: 22 sep

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dir: Michael Crichton

A consequence-free environment with a disposable android population, Westworld is the theme park of the future where the most illicit and amoral of wild-west fantasies are fully indulged. But the days full of rigged shoot-outs, hard boozing, and robo-floozies abruptly come to an end when the synths hit the IT problem from hell, brutally murdering all but one of the tourists. Brynner’s malfunctioning and merciless gunslinging ‘bot, who relentlessly stalks the lone survivor of the massacre, is the undisputed star of the show. He’s a strangely compelling visual and narrative juxtaposition of the sci-fi and western genres, and the intensity of his unwavering stare and seemingly unstoppable forward momentum is genuinely menacing. That it has been successfully remade, ripped-off, and parodied takes nothing away from it - it still stands up as an eye catching and taut pursuit movie with something to say, a real joy to watch that deserves its ‘classic’ status. [Jack McFarlane]

dir: Lucia Puenzo

The tense confusion of something unspoken is thick from the opening credits of XXY. Lack of understanding is at the heart of every single frame of the film: nobody really knows what they’re doing, or what the consequences of their actions might be. There is also a sense of inevitability - after a certain point, there’s no turning back. Alex is rebelling, as fifteen year olds are expected to do. However, when rebelling means stopping taking the hormones which set your life on one particular path, the results have far-reaching implications. Alex is a hermaphrodite, living with her adoring, scared parents in a small Uruguayan town, and her secret is out. For such taboo subject matter to be handled so deftly is remarkable: free of stereotyping and sanitisation, Alex is a vulnerable, sexual human being, propelled into an uncertain adulthood faster than anyone deserves to be. Unique, captivating and challenging, XXY is nigh-on perfect. [Cara McGuigan]

dir: Michael Anderson

In this post-apocalyptic society, every aspect of life is cared for by the computer that controls the hermetically sealed cities. There is no work, just play. But there is one serious snag: at the age of 30 you must take part in a mass suicide to maintain society’s equilibrium, or else be hunted and terminated by the Sandmen. When the Sandman called Logan goes on the run himself, society’s order is threatened. It’s a strong pitch and its premise is still its strongest feature, but every other aspect is seriously lacking or painfully dated. The dialogue and acting could curl your toes, and the stylisation and special effects are now so laughable that even an inspired parody would pale in comparison. Always a little too silly to be considered a true great, by current standards its main appeal lies in its extreme kitsch factor and it’s just screaming out for a decent remake. [Jack McFarlane]

Lost Boys 2: The Tribe

Under the Volcano

The Two Sides of the Bed

Stars: Angus Sutherland, Corey Feldman, Autumn Reeser Cert: 18 Released: 8 Sep

Stars: Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, Anthony Edwards Cert: 15 Released: 1 Sep

Stars: Ernesto Alterio, Guillermo Toledo, Pilar Castro Cert: 15 Released: 8 Sep

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Dir: P.J. Pesce

One of the most imaginative vampire movies of all time finally gets a sequel, but is it worth the 21 year wait? The original Lost Boys breathed new life into the increasingly stale bloodsucking genre, resulting in a film that still holds its own today, and the makers of this sequel appear to have reasoned that what isn’t broke shouldn’t be fixed, hence their decision to peddle exactly the same story, albeit it with a Noughties makeover. Gone are the hairspray, shoulder pads and Kiefer Sutherland. In their place are surfboards, floppy hair and The OC’s Autumn Reeser. Fans of the original will either find the homages, cameos and references cringeworthy or chic cool. Corey Haim does appear briefly, but it’s Corey Feldman reprising his role as Edgar Frog which every 80s child surely wanted to see. Before he went all 24, Keifer Sutherland was the coolest, most terrifying vampire to grace the screens since Christopher Lee. His younger half brother Angus plays head Nosferatu this time around with the same pretty boy looks but about as terrifying as the thought of Flatliners 2. So, nowhere near as good as the original but rent them both with a few beers for a silly yet enjoyable straight-to-DVD sequel. [Kevin McHugh]

www.theskinny.co.uk

Dir: John Huston

Dir: Emilio Martinez Lazaro

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Adapted from Malcolm Lowry’s ‘unadaptable’ 1947 novel, Under the

Following on from 2002’s The Other Side of the Bed ( El Otro Lado de

Volcano gave Albert Finney one of the five Oscar nominations of his

la Cama), Emilio Martinez Lazaro’s sequel of sorts is exactly the sort

career, and brought director John Huston back to Mexico for the first

of plush, Spanish comedy of errors that begs for comparisons to early

time since The Treasure of the Sierra Madre. In the vein of all those

Almodovar. Viewing its predecessor is worth it, but by no means nec-

great, charming literary drunks before him, washed up and wasted

essary as although many of the characters re-appear, the tangled

ex-consul Geoffrey Firmin (Finney) staggers his way through the Day

web they weave is built of brand new complications. Three years on,

of the Dead, pining for his ex-wife (Bisset), and racking up a monster

Javier (Alterio) is ready to marry Pilar while Pedro (Toledo) is settled

bar bill. As might be expected from such a quality production, this is a

with new love Raquel (Lucia Jiminez), but things only remain calm

film in which the cinematography predictably sparkles, and the script

around the length of your average pop song. What ensues is a game

crackles with radiant wit and nuanced observation. But it is Finney’s

of often literal musical partners, as agonies are enacted, and affairs

performance that really makes this movie a truly welcome re-release.

negotiated through elaborate, interjected song and dance numbers.

A more lovably infuriating screw-up you’d be hard pushed to find

Far less gimmicky than it sounds, The Two Sides of the Bed keeps its

outside of a Hunter S. Thompson epic, Firmin’s bender is a couple of

musical refrains infrequent, and fills itself up to the brim with the genu-

hours well worth losing. [Lindsay West]

inely comic. Great stuff. [Lindsay West]

September 08

THE SKINNY 23

Film & DVD

DVD Reviews


Games

The Skinny's Games content is provided by square-go

Wii Loop Machine Dave Cook talks to Former Edinburgh student Yann Seznec about his revolutionary new music creation software

Insanely popular music simulation games such as Guitar Hero and Rock Band may make you feel like you’re some kind of musical master, but they are just that, ‘a simulation’. Commercial music creation software, on the other hand, was all the rage in the last generation with release such as Music on PsOne and the eJay series on PC. Today, however, these titles are irrelevant as the idea of ‘faux’ musicians becomes all the more appealing; lest we forget that playing music games is generally less hard work than learning Spanish folk guitar for real. In this context, Yann Seznec enters his wonderful Wii Loop Machine software which puts the fun back into music creation. An alumnus from the University of Edinburgh, Yann’s programme is the result of a lot of hard graft and his passion for music. It makes full use of the Wii’s motion sensor controller and lets you remix your favourite tracks in realtime via your movements. Yann says, “I’m originally a musician, and I perform a lot using laptops and electronic music software, which has always frustrated me in terms of interface. I love to dance around while I play music but traditional electronic music interfaces (keyboards, mixers, and now laptops) are really not conducive to movement, and (by extension) human expression.” So, Loop Machine is all about getting up on the floor and cutting loose, yet this is no mere gimmick or shallow dancing title. There is great depth here in terms of what you can do with the simple interface, so even beginners can remix their favourite songs to their heart’s desire. Borne from a project for his Sound Design course, Yann placed a free version of the software on his website and the results were overwhelming. Says

Yann, “I got tens of thousands of hits within a week, and press interest from around the world. I realized that this was a piece of software that could be developed into a commercial product, so after I finished my thesis I set up Lucky Frame Limited.” Lucky Frame is the name of Yann’s business and, as the market is opening up to the idea of independent developers getting their work out into the marketplace, Wii Loop Machine couldn’t have come at a better time. You can buy the software on his website, but Yann has his eyes on another potential opportunity. Yann Says, “The WiiWare platform is definitely my target for the moment. It seems like a very good way to get into the console game market: it is certainly cheaper and way easier than it has ever been. Nintendo talks a lot about giving innovative game ideas and developers a chance to get their games on to the console, but the reality is a bit tougher.” However, with unprecendented levels of software downloads, media and word of mouth interest and a recent appearance on Dragon’s Den under his belt, Yann is confident his software will be an even bigger success as the popularity of the Wii grows. Yann offers, “Millions of people around the world are intimately familiar with how the Wii remote works, which is a godsend for music software designers! How often does that happen?” - We checked...The answer is not very often, which is just one of the reasons why the Wii Loop Machine is set to rule. www.theamazingrolo.net/wii www.wiiloopmachine.com

Games Soul Calibur IV

Pool Party SouthPeak

Bionic Commando: Rearmed

Out now on Xbox 360, PS3, £49.99

Out now On Wii, £29.99

Out now on Xbox 360, 800MS Points

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After a degree of success with a similar but smaller game based around billiards in the WiiPlay package, the idea of a dedicated Pool game was not necessarily a bad one. However, the idea of a shoddily put together, painful to play in a kind of ‘why on earth would you do it that way!?’ way, is.

Rearmed is insanely old-school, mixing classic platform elements with all kinds of nods to the original. Sent behind the Imperial enemy lines to rescue captive agent Super Joe, Nathan “R.A.D.” Spencer is in for one tough mission.]

Ubisoft

Set in the Middle Ages, Soul Calibur IV takes place in a reality where fighters from across the world and different walks of life come together in combat to claim or destroy Soul Edge, a legendary demon sword of unspeakable power. This is a massive title, boasting a wealth of fighting styles, modes and unlockable content. Arcade mode puts you up against several foes in simple one-on-one combat, whereas short story mode presents increasing challenges while revealing your character’s back story.

create your own player using the hundreds of accessories and attributes to kit out your own fighter. Another neat move from the developer is a new punishment for players who are too fond of the block button. Guard against too many high attacks and suffer a ‘Soul Crush’, shattering the middle-armour and rendering your torso defenseless. This isn’t to say the game punishes conservative play, it just encourages you to get stuck right into the fight, the way any good scrap should be.

Tower of Souls is a new mode that sees you fighting your way up a massive, 30-floor tower. As a result of the strict rules enforced in this mode, all aspects of fighting style are tested. Nullifying ring-outs or unblockable attacks are prohibited, so button-bashers beware! Luckily, you’ll find a character who fits your style perfectly, thanks to the massive player roster.

And then? Well this is a matter of preference, but depending on which version you own, you can play as Star Wars characters Yoda (360 version) or Darth Vader (PS3 version). Some will love the inclusion, others will think it’s daft. This odd addition aside, the game is near flawless, minus some rare, crippling lag during online versus mode. As the cheesy fight commentator says, “the legend will never die” — True that! [Dave Cook]

For those who like to bring a personal flair to the arena,

soulcalibur.uk.ubi.com

24 THE SKINNY

September 08

The characters look terrible, and having a ‘so and so is thinking, 47%’ every time the computer takes a shot is just silly. Who has percentage-based thought? Oh right, aye, these disembodied, badly rendered cretins I’m playing ‘pool’ with. Not a great way to get you engrossed in the game. Pool Party falls short on so many fronts it is a travesty. Horrible characters, terrible menus, awful gameplay. Sure, there is a lot of ‘game play’ (there are tables and cues to unlock! wooo). But how varied can a cue be? And, to be honest, who cares when getting to play the game is as confusing as this. And why, oh why have an option to play Pool on a yacht? Surely. SURELY. A yacht is a rubbish place to play pool.

Capcom

Packing a powerful bionic arm, Spencer can grab objects, swing across chasms, climb platforms and even punch bullets out of the air. He’s seriously kitted out. As you might expect, there’s a catch: our hero can’t jump or vault over obstacles, which may put many people off. Once you get your head around Spencer’s ape-like moves, you will be pulling off all sorts of crazy maneuvres with the greatest of ease. Eventually, you will wonder why you ever questioned the lack of jump button in the first place. Armed primarily with a simple rifle, you must tear your way through hordes of enemy soldiers and robotic foes, through over 15 levels of non-stop action. Each level boasts an imaginative end boss, each of which takes some cunning to dispatch.

There is nothing here, for anyone who isn’t some kind of wallet based masochist. And even then, your walletmasochist friends will think you have gone too far. [Josh Wilson]

With tons of unlockable weapons and upgrades, there is much to discover here. There are even some fun, if a little uninspired top-down stages, which will test your bullet dodging skills. But largely, these don’t come close to the excitement of the main levels. [Dave Cook]

www.southpeakgames.com

www.bioniccommando.com

Games


Books

Books

A Snowball in Hell...

...And Billy Franks as well. Keir Hind caught up with Christopher Brookmyre at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, and they chatted about his new book and a new kind of launch night... Christopher Brookmyre’s new book A Snowball in Hell features blackmail, gun battles, magic and the torture of various reality TV stars. All kinds of great stuff. It also sees the return of some familiar characters, namely thief and magician Zal Innez from The Sacred Art of Stealing, and Glasgwegian supercop Angelique de Xavia and the villainous Simon Darcourt from A Big Boy Did It and Ran Away. The book’s launch will be an open event in The Liquid Room in Edinburgh, and will feature music performed by Billy Franks, the former front man of The Faith Brothers. “I’ve been a fan of Billy’s music for more than 20 years, since I saw The Faith Brothers supporting The Alarm at Barrowlands in 1985” says Brookmyre, who has taken two of his book titles, The Country of the Blind, and The Sacred Art of Stealing, from songs by Franks. So, he says, “I thought I should see if he’d want to come up – I know he hadn’t played in Scotland for 20-odd years”, and Franks agreed. It’s particularly appropriate that a talented musician should play at this launch. “The book’s largely about talentless musical wanabbes, and about when you’ve got a character like Zal Innez who’s got genuine talent, it shows how much work you have to put into something to make you good at it” says the author. “So I thought, let’s have someone who is really good, playing good music as part of this.” In the book, there’s a talent contest called Bedroom Popstars, where you don’t even have to sing – just mime. It seems all too likely. “Part of the genesis of this book” Brookmyre says, “was that despite not watching reality TV, you can’t help learning lots about it, you know the names of loads of folk off of these programmes without having to watch them, you know all sorts lots of details about their lives” and so, he sums up, “It’s the information equivalent of secondary smoke inhalation”.

Christopher Brookmyre Charlie Hopkinson

So the infamous supercriminal Simon Darcourt returns, and takes an interest in these shows, kidnapping a series of very punchable celebs that the police, including Angelique de Xavia, have to try and find. Brookmyre says “Simon Darcourt in the past has gone after soft targets, and desperate celebrities are a fairly soft target” - so Darcourt allows a certain form of wish fulfilment. “Folk think, ‘yeah, what a pain in the arse all these celebs are’” Brookmyre says “and it’s amusing to think of appropriate punishments that they might undergo. But nobody would actually subject them to this kind of stuff - so Simon does”. It’s extremely malicious

too, and all the more entertaining for it. Brookmyre seems to have a certain affection for his protagonists. “I was thinking that I did want to bring these characters back, and finally an idea came to mind that I could explore”. He adds that this book is different, because “it’s a sequel to two separate books. So in a way it has to deliver what was in both of those, even though the tone of those was quite different. So I waited a long time for the book to be right and then I got them back”. Somehow, this dual sequel merges the tone of the earlier books successfully. Of course, Brookmyre always blends styles well, in that he typically writes crime fiction with comedic elements. “From the experience of seeing movies,” he says, “when you’re watching a film that’s a good thriller but has lots of funny moments, that’s fine, but what really never works is when somebody’s trying to make a comedy that’s also a thriller”. This approach seems to have worked very well for him. And now that he’s finished this book, he gets to organise its launch. So at The Liquid Rooms “I’ll read, and Billy will play a wee bit, and then we’ll have a Q&A and hopefully it’ll be a bit more like a launch party than just a normal event. I’m very excited by the prospect of it”. And, he adds with a grin, “since he’s staying with me I can nobble him in terms of the playlist, and get him to play some of the songs I want to hear”. Good work. Christopher Brookmyre will be appearing with singersongwriter Billy Franks on Tuesday, 9 September, 7.30pm at The Liquid Room, Edinburgh. Tickets £6, Available from; Waterstone’s (West End), 128 Princes Street, EH2 Tel: 0131 226 2666 A Snowball in Hell is out now, RRP £16.99

There’s loads of coverage of the Edinburgh International Book FEstival online, including a blog featuring reviews of many events, including christopher brookmyre and lynn ullmann, as well as many, many others. Stuff like “And that’s when Chuck Palaniuk started throwing sex dolls,” y’know, the usual...

FREE EXHIBITION National Library of Scotland George IV Bridge Edinburgh EH1 1EW www.nls.uk/jma

www.theskinny.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 25


Theatre Editorial Watching art does not make us better people. If it did, art historians would be renowned for their compassion and sensitivity, dance critics would not go into ferocious rages and, thanks to its comprehensive programme of drama, Glasgow would have a tiny crime rate. Unfortunately, studies have shown that audiences rarely develop profound morality from exquisite performance. Nevertheless, in a generation of swine where Jordan and Peter André parade their selfmutilation on television, politics descends into a brutal farce and texting is the dominant mode of discourse, the theatre won’t do much harm. In the past month, I have seen Krapp’s Last Tape warn against becoming fixated on failure, Czech dancers explore erotic politics, clowns consider post-communist Europe through explosions and loud music, and contact improvisation explain the Irish peace process. At the very least, this kept me out of the way. But, according to the studies, art can help our crumbling society, through participation. This explains the first shift in our Theatre pages this month, the inclusion of previews of classes and activities. The additional previews, will hopefully encourage participation - reviews, although still important, have moved online, to provoke debate, agreement and- if my experience is representative - death threats from irritated performance artists. Like faith in God, my belief in art’s potential is flawed, vague and scientifically naive. However, through engagement, through discussion, through turning up and thinking, I believe that the theatre still has the potential to change. I want the argument to start here. /Gareth K Vile

Top 5 events Rosalind Masson: Be Water Arches Festival, 23-26 Sep

Dance on film is increasingly becoming fashionable and dynamic. A chance to see one of the local, dynamic fusion artists in action and on celluloid.

Seeds of Thought CCA, 6 Sep

Multiple art forms, free entry and spoken word performance. Worth supporting for the local artists and to encourage the CCA to persevere with the programme.

Sunset Song

Theatre Royal, Glasgow, 16-20 Sep His Majesty’s, Aberdeen, 5-13 Sep Kings, Edinburgh, 30 Sept- 4 Oct The most popular Scottish novel ever comes to the stage for those who didn’t get it at Higher.

Cherry Blossom

Traverse, Edinburgh, 24 Sept-11 Oct Traverse maintains its commitment to new Scottish writing, with multi-media trappings.

Mother Courage and her Children Dundee Rep, 3-27 Sep

Brecht warhouse rolled out to provoke at the start of the Rep’s season. One of the most accessible and engaging works from a modern master.

26 THE SKINNY

September 08

Merchant City Festival 2008 Edinburgh has had its month, but Glasgow is the real Festival City. Gareth K Vile finds high art on the street corners. With the Edinburgh Festival season safely tucked away, Glasgow immediately stakes out its claim to be the festival city for the next eleven months. The Merchant City Festival is brief, running from 25 to 28 September, but dynamic, bringing together guerrilla performance art, French acrobatics, new drama and comedy in a celebration of the East End’s emerging artistic quarter. Directed by Neil Butler - himself a former performer - it promises to have a distinctive identity. “We are interested in creating a festival that expresses the best in Scottish arts and culture,” Butler suggests. “Anywhere I go in Europe, people ask when is the best time to go to Scotland to see what is going on there. The Edinburgh festival is the best festival in the world, but it is an international festival. So we wanted something that gave a snapshot of what is really going on in Scottish arts and culture. And so we created a festival where we could get involved with the national companies and get the other festivals involved.” This open-ended approach to collaboration gives The Merchant City Festival its particular flavour. “We invited Festivals directors around Europe to nominate performances,” he added. “I just wanted to know what would the great festivals suggest - so what we managed to do is bring together acts which are really exciting directors across Europe.” From Daniel Andrieu of Vive Cite Festival, France, came Two Urbanologists, a surreal study of the city; Pierre Sauvigeot of Lieux Publics offered the walkabout piece, Parfait Etat De Marche. Likewise, Butler has drawn on local knowledge. “Why should we invent ourselves as comedy programmers when there are already great programmers at the Glasgow Comedy Festival? So if people come to our festival and see a fantastic piece of comedy, they can go to the Glasgow Comedy Festival, or if they see some fantastic performance art, they can go to the National Review of Live Art. We hope to represent what is going on and we are open to partnerships.”

Liz aggiss will be doing amazing things with dance throughout the Merchant City Festival Thurs 25 - Sun 28 September

“Why should we invent ourselves as comedy programmers when there are already great programmers at the Glasgow Comedy Festival?

The Tron is also contributing a new work: Six Acts of Love by Ioanna Anderson, and directed by Tron boss Andy Arnold. Anderson is a Scottish author, currently based in Dublin and Six Acts is a bitter-sweet meditation on the life of Katherine, who appears to have reached an impasse. Despite Arnold’s usual taste for existentialist intensity, Anderson doesn’t see herself in the tradition of Pinter or Beckett. “I wouldn’t put myself even remotely on that level! It is quite a different kind of writing,” she admits. “It is quite poetic- it is quite wordy. I find Beckett quite hard, and slightly depressing.”

The NRLA - often controversial, always colourful, has a particular place in Butler’s heart. “I think NRLA and New Moves are two great programmes: I co-directed it with Nikki Millican about twenty years ago: people around the world refer to the festivals, they are world-class. I am delighted to have a relationship with them: she has nominated two pieces for us.”

Six Acts examines the impact of marital breakdown and parental illness, but not in brutal tragedy - there is a humour and compassion that makes this more than hard-hitting angst. Anderson’s attitude towards drama is gentle. “I wouldn’t say that this is a fluffy play: it is happier and warmer. But as I get older, I like to leave the theatre a bit uplifted!” And even though it is part of the Festival, it fit well within the Tron’s own project to develop modern scripts and authors.

On of these will be an absolute highlight - Brighton agitator and dancer Liz Aggiss. “I am a huge fan of hers. She is hugely experimental and confrontational - in a good way. She is also very generous in representing other choreographers. You might be in the festival club, or in Merchant Square, or outside a comedy club, and you will see this amazing woman doing amazing things!” Other contributors include the Dance House - they are presenting a reprise of their child-friendly nightclub, Barefoot Boogie (28 September) and a Burlesque Extravaganza (26 September), devised by Gypsy Charms, one of the school’s teachers and co-founder of The Academy of Burlesque. While details of the latter are a closely guarded secret, an inside source has admitted that one piece “takes its inspiration from 80s iconic films

– Fame and Flashdance! There will be a lot of glitter involved!”

The Merchant City Festival runs that difficult line between openness and identity, somehow expressing something potent and coherent without excluding possibilities, or ignoring the natural culture of the surrounding area. By sharing with other festivals, it has a showcase quality, but the angular choices give it a cutting edge charm. Diverse, inclusive - and often free - the events make up a programme that suggests a pattern for all festivals.

www.merchantcityfestival.com Una Maclean and Barbara Wilshire in six degrees of love douglas robertson

The Merchant city festival is on from the 25 to 28 September, full event information can be found on the website.

Theatre


A new company take on an old problem. Michael Cox adjusts his No Limit People.

AUTUMN/ WINTER 2008 HIGHLIGHTS BOX OFFICE 0845 330 3501 www.tramway.org

VISUAL ART Unreliable Witness Fri 31 Oct – Sun 7 Dec

Theatre

There’s No Limit for Some People

PERFORMANCE Needcompany

The Porcelain Project Fri 3 & Sat 4 Oct

Glasgay! 2008 Events

Thu 9 – Sat 18 Oct Further information www.glasgay.com Catherine Wheels and National Theatre of Scotland

Something Wicked This Way Comes

Wed 29 Oct – Sat 1 Nov SweetScar

4.48 Psychosis

Thu 6 – Sat 15 Nov Ankur Productions

Heer Ranjha

Thu 20 – Sat 29 Nov Forced Entertainment

Spectacular

Thu 4 – Sat 6 Dec Fish & Game

Otter Pie

Photograph: Hugo Glendinning

Thu 4 – Sat 6 Dec

After a short, yet triumphant run at the Citizens Theatre in June, Singing I’m No A Billy He’s A Tim is returning for a Scottish tour. The production, NLP Theatre’s first professional venture, is as colourful as the history behind the company’s inception. Artistic Director Scott Kyle was in a rut, stocking shelves and wondering what to do with his life. With encouragement from his girlfriend, he enrolled in a performing arts course at Glasgow College of Nautical Studies. Upon completion, Kyle realised that the key to finding employment was to create his own opportunities. A chance discovery would change his life. Upon skimming the titles at a local library, Kyle discovered the text to Des Dillon’s I’m No A Billy. After Kyle arranged a read-through, he became intent on staging the piece. Casting himself, two other friends and asking one of his former lecturers to serve as director, Kyle hit the ground running in order to realise his vision. The play occurs in a jail cell during an Old Firm match. Billy, a Rangers supporter, and Tim, a Celtic fanatic, are both locked up due to different circumstances. Under the watch of a jailer, Harry, both men want access to a television in order to watch the match. Cleverly using the timeframe of a football match (each act is 45minutes long), the play gives a brave statement about Scotland’s football customs and focuses on themes of culture, history and identity. Kyle calls the play, “A great story about humanity.” Kyle and Dillon apparently see different aspects

www.theskinny.co.uk

within the structure of the script. Kyle sees the piece as a brilliant statement against sectarianism whereas writer Dillon believes the piece focuses more on family life. Even with the difference of interpretation, the play appears to strike a chord with both theatre-goers and football fans. In fact, many who had attended the initial production had never seen a theatre production before. With its focus on a Rangers vs. Celtic fans storyline, it is surprising to learn that the piece had not been played in Glasgow, outside of schools, prior to NLP Theatre’s staging. Indeed, Kyle’s belief in the play is so great that he has produced the production himself, investing his own money in the project and storing key props in his home. Kyle is touring the production throughout Scotland and has tailor-made a school programme, using the characters and themes of the play, in hopes of raising the production’s profile and the needed investment to fund the company and the production itself, which he hopes will have an international afterlife. It’s always exciting when a new theatre company comes along. But already with a bone-fide hit under it’s belt, it’s easy to believe that Kyle’s passion and belief in the power of theatre will not only spill over to the audience of I’m No A Billy but will in fact carry over into future productions. Here’s hoping that Kyle’s belief in himself, and financial gamble, will payoff. www.nlptheatre.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 27


theatre previews

Slicker than Slick

Dance Base, Edinburgh Autumn Programme

Tron Theatre, 16-20 Sep

A great deal of fun comes from a cursory glance at Dance Base’s autumn programme. Pole dance workshops vie for attention next to Taoist Tai Chi; a Rambert masterclass rivals a Very Red moving and grooving session for all levels. The range of classes - over one hundred and thirty per week - expresses their inclusive enthusiasm. Dance Base has been spreading its gospel since 1994. The purpose built studios in the Grassmarket appeared in 2001, creating a genuine base for the city’s professional and amateur adult dancers. The diversity of styles- one wrong turn and a ballet dancer could end up in the burlesque class - bears out the seriousness of the company’s mission statement: “Dance Base encourages and celebrates the potential for dance in everyone. As Scotland’s National Centre for Dance, we offer a vibrant and uplifting focal point which reaches out and inspires well-being and creativity, and cultivates a future for dance in local, national and international communities.”

Puppets and the story of a young boy? Sounds like children’s theatre, doesn’t it? Well, it isn’t. It’s the energetic and unique new production by VoxMotus, who brought us such innovative gems as How to Steal a Diamond. Using plump little puppet bodies alongside human faces and hands, Slick looks like South Park jumped out of the television onto the stage. The likeness doesn’t stop there - Slick will have you simultaneously “awing” at the character’s adorableness, laughing out loud at the clever staging, and writhing at the disturbingly graphic gestures and cruelty of the characters. (This is

Scottish Ballet

Abderdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Inverness, Autumn Programme

not meant to put anyone off: If you love South Park, see this show. If you hate South Park, see this show.)

allow ones attention to linger there for more than a

It is the story of Malcolm Biggar, a nine-year old boy living in a tenement outside of Glasgow, who must navigate through an array of grotesque characters in an attempt to save his unloving family. His adventure begins with the discovery of oil flowing through his toilet. The nonsensical deceit and murder spawned by greed for black gold begs the pondering that perhaps this show is a metaphor for the irresponsible fumblings of the worldly powers that be, but Slick’s non-preachy and otherwise non-political upbeat pacing doesn’t

The elements of this production come together seam-

moment.

lessly, from the inspired soundtrack to the ever-changing set, which echoes a magician’s black box. The acting is fantastic, with facial contortions and quick delivery ideal for dark comedy. The onstage talent, the quick writing and most of all, the surprising and

In common with Glasgow’s Dance House, Dance Base’s vision incorporates both the professional and amateur, which leds to the distinctive dance culture of the Central Belt. There is no hard and fast divide between the career contact improviser and the purely-for-pleasure students. This helps to explain both why comunity work is so natural to Scottish companies - but also why there is a high level of awareness about new work. Janis Claxton, for example, is both a teacher at Dance Base and an up-andcoming choreographer. Bookings for new courses begins on 6 September, although drop-in classes are available all year. Whether it is African, tango, ballroom or Musical Madness, Dance Base delivers. [Gareth K Vile] www.dancebase.co.uk

sophisticated aesthetics makes Slick a surprising burst of mature fun. [Melissa Tractenberg] www.voxmotus.co.uk

Dance House, Glasgow Autumn Programme

Since its inception in 1998, Dance House has offered classes for adults, creative residencies for choreographers, and developed community performances, such as 2000’s Carmina Burana. The dynamic team

Scottish Ballet is taking an exciting leap this September, with three ambitious productions which combine contemporary music, fashion and cinematographic techniques.

of Administrative Director Sheila McCubbin and

Topping the bill is Steven Petronio’s Ride The Beast, set to be filled with Petronio’s signature twists and jolts, all to the music of Radiohead. Costumes are provided by New York acclaimed fashion designer and stylist to the stars, Benjamin Cho. Described by principle dancer and poster boy, Daniel Davidson, as “completely beautiful. A work of art,” Ride the Beast looks set to be a dynamic treat of sound and visuals.

At the start of the teaching term, Karen Wood

The big apple connection is continued in MG: The Movie, a piece by widely-acclaimed, NY-based choreographer, Trisha Brown. As the title suggests, the piece explores the idea of bringing film techniques to the stage, combining dance and the cinema. Set to the music of Alvin Curran, the piece is subtle, unpredictable and beautiful. “It was a whole new way of working,” Daniel explains, “everything was stripped back.” Both these pieces were debuted at last year’s Edinburgh festival to wide critical approval. The final production in the Scottish Ballet’s triple bill is the world premier of Pennies From Heaven, a depiction of love stories by artistic director Ashley Page. Described as “pure vintage glamour,” the audience can expect perms, pearls and diamonds, to the sound of popular songs of the period. “It’s a really fun piece,” Daniel enthuses. The Scottish Ballet appears to have captured a diverse and exciting array of visuals, pace and atmospheres with their Autumn productions. “Audiences should prepare to be surprised,” Daniel advises, and with a combination of dance, popular culture, cinema, 1930s decadence, and vibrant fashion, there’s every reason to beleive they will be. [Mhairi Graham] www.scottishballet.co.uk

28 THE SKINNY

Creative Director Karen Wood have consistently supported the growth of Glasgow’s vibrant dance scene.

admits pride at the new classes. “Bollywood, Shiatsu Bodywork and the Butoh workshops all extend the range of practices that we offer. As the boundaries between dance forms blurs, we are reflecting this in our programme.” Dance House offers a wide range, from classical ballet through contemporary, to burlesque. All levels of ability are welcomed: Dance House has an equal commitment to community and professional work. The Creative Labs are residencies for artists, culminating with informal performances. This term, the labs include Flamenco, hip-hop with Tony “the Tiger” Mills and Brian Hartley’s Wee Dance, Wee Groove, an interactive activity for kids. Caroline Bowditch, Scottish Dance Theatre’s Agent for Change will also be visiting. Karen points out, “The programme is as varied and diverse as ever! It is always a treat to share in the early stages of new ideas and work emerging.” The Dance for Film Training, with Douglas Rosenberg, reveals this enthusiasm for new media. Studies demonstrate that participation in the arts is more therapeutic and supportive than either watching performances or taking some medication. Until the NHS puts Butoh Workshops on prescription, Dance House is offering a healthy alternative. [Gareth K Vile]

www.dancehouse.org

September 08

Theatre


Theatre & Comedy

Idle worship Local comedian Teddy tells of meeting his comedy hero When I was around 13-14, I’d watch Lee and Herring’s Fist of Fun on BBC2. Along with Sean Hughes’ Sean’s Show, it was probably my most formative comedic experience growing up. Imagine my excitement then when, around eight years ago, Stewart Lee was playing at The Stand in Edinburgh and after the show I was introduced to him. What to say? What clever nuance of his work would I pick up on? What eloquently put opinion would I agree with? Lost for words, I babbled “You know when you were talking about Name That Tune with Eamonn Andrews? I can only remember it with Lionel Blair.” The great man looked at me with what was probably politely masked disdain and said “Oh. Right. I don’t remember it with Lionel Blair. I think I was probably going out by then.” Christ. I felt like i’d just been introduced to the Dalai Lama and used the moment to ask his opinion on Fraggle Rock. If I ever get to meet Alexei Mikhailichenko (google him), I’m hoping I don’t blow that one too. “So Alexei… do you ever actually eat Chicken Kiev?” Teddy is hosting Bastardmind, a quiz night run by former Amazing Bastards Steven Dick and Allan Miller, at the Glasgow Stand, Mon 29 September, 20:30

PReviews Tom Stade I Swear...

Tom Stade is a comedian who engages with his audience, so any punters sitting in the front row of his new show, I Swear... should be careful: you may end up discussing your marriage, sexual orientation or whatever else Stade decides is fair game. That’s not to say the experience will be uncomfortable - Stade is more likely to embarrass you with his counter-confession but when that gravelly voice bears down at you, be ready with an answer. A slight but powerful presence on stage, Stade is a funnyman who doesn’t shy away from extremely personal bêtes noirs. A transplanted Canadian (no, he’s not nice) now living in Edinburgh, Tom Stade is an experienced commuter on the UK comedy circuit. His comedy may be a hair more aggressive than the more waspish stand-ups out there but it’s worth it: Stade’s rambunctious energy and beer-buddy delivery pay off more often than it bombs. His Edinburgh Fringe Festival show Fuck, Do We Need A

Reviews

Title Too? reflects his reluctance to enter into comedy’s bureaucratic monotony, and this regular guy is not out to play ball with the rest of corporate comedia. Fans of one-liners and earthy, off-colour confessions won’t be disappointed. But sit in the back row. [Carmody Wilson] Blackfriar’s Basement, 28 September, 20:30, £7/£5

Susan Calman Maybe It Is Your Fault rrrr Susan Calman may be a school boyish, four foot eleven jokester, but this is one lady you wouldn’t want to cross. Calman claims in complete sincerity that she “really, really fucking hates people,” before carrying on in her chatty Glaswegian tones about the difficulties of relationships. Seven years as a lawyer has trained Calman to be a methodical ball buster on the stage, and her show Maybe It Is Your Fault, takes no prisoners, particularly girlfriends or friends. The gist of the show concludes people should be more open about their feelings, but for Calman this means setting her irrational emotions alight, with a microphone and mischievous glint in her eye. As a regular compere of the Stand’s Wicked Wenches, Calman possesses an easy charm on stage and weaves the crowd banter into her self deprecating anecdotes of pitiful revenge and point scoring. Maintaining a subversive streak right to the end, Calman transforms from comedian into the little devil on your shoulder; you know you shouldn’t listen, but it does sound fun. [Emma Lennox] Susan Calman Is performing Maybe It Is Your Fault at Blackfriar’s Basement, 27 September, 20:30, £8 (£6)

www.theskinny.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 29


Art Editorial I can’t say, in all honesty, that I’m devastated to wave goodbye to August... A month of slowwalking crowds and over-excited thespians transforms me into one of those sour, proud-local types who can’t be doing with all this festival malarkey. Time to draw breath I feel. On a more positive note, I am currently in awe of the new Ingleby Gallery. The space itself is incredible, and redefines what it can mean to be a commercial gallery in Edinburgh. Rather than the stereotypical twee of the Dundas St offerings, the Ingleby presents a vast white space with the scope and scale to truly showcase the work of interesting contemporary artists. The debut show of Susan Collis is a case in point, gemstones made into rawl plugs and white gold screws transforming both the precious and the mundane to create a series of charming, subtle works. From a personal point of view, the space has an added poignancy in its positioning in the building of the old Venue. I had a bit of a moment, sitting in the upstairs gallery and pondering the collision of worlds evinced by the view of Waverley’s girders glimpsed across the pristine white and finished wood of the genteel gallery surrounds: industry meets high culture in the shell of a former sweaty nightclub. The Venue has truly grown up, and it is impossible when in the space to gel the new environs with what it used to be. It’s nice, though, to think that this beautiful gallery, with its meticulously displayed work, was once the scene of our misspent youth. /Ros

Top 5 events 1. “...WRETCHED STARS, INSATIABLE HEAVEN...” STEVEN CAMPBELL

Sandy Christie Paul Mitchell speaks to Sandy Christie, our Art Local Hero. Sandy presents an altrnative route for artists trying to disseminate their work to a wider audience, eschewing the traditionally proscribed avenues of gallery-approved selection in order to go it alone with a system of open submissions, self-publication and guerilla exhibiting.

“An artist cannot fail; it is a success to be one.” Of course, Turner-winning art galactico Tracey Emin thinks American sociologist Charles Horton Cooley failed, as it were, to see the bigger picture, with her oft quoted perspective that “Taste cannot get mixed up with what’s good and what’s bad”, and that less recognised artists than herself would have “made it if they were any good”. It is easy to preach when camped out in an ivory tower of publicity, but for the countless artists who struggle for both recognition and indeed economic viability, this view smacks of both extreme arrogance, and appalling taste. Enter Sandy Christie, Edinburgh-based artist and self-styled “biggest blagger in town”. Sandy considers himself as an all-rounder (“I work with painting, videos, installations”) who does indeed aspire to Emin-esque recognition, but has resigned himself to utilising alternative methods of self-promotion until the gallery curators come a-knocking. For some years now he has been busying himself by producing and disseminating his own work through a series of zines called Sandy Meets. Zines are small-circulation, noncommercial publications that are produced and distributed by their creators, documenting topics as diverse as sci-fi, science, political views, and in this instance, artwork.

GSA, TILL 11 OCT A selection of new paintings from the body of work completed by the Scottish artist in the twelve months prior to his untimely death in August 2007.

2. SUSAN COLLIS INGLEBY GALLERY, TILL 24 SEP Trompe l’oeil sculptures executed in precious stones create a playfully subtle vignette of a show.

3. PATTIE LEE ECA, EVOLUTION HOUSE, 12 – 19 SEP Group show of artists Jock Mooney, Daniel Irwin, Natalie McGowan and Charlie Billingham curated by Cesca Howard with a view to taking home-grown talent on a world tour.

“Sandy Meets is just me recalling conversations I have with my friends, but I replace them with drawings of famous people, or fictitious characters in order to explore the cult of celebrity and turn it on its head with the use of Scottish colloquialisms and everyday scenarios”. With a keen awareness of the limited showcase opportunities available to artists, Sandy feels a new zine he has launched might provide some of the solutions. Paper X is designed to be an open submission (anyone can contribute) vehicle for artists who want to retain complete control over their work and share it, not because they have any expectation (or in some cases desire) for commercial and/or critical approval. Eminently noble in theory, it still requires a huge effort on his part to put the project together; attracting submissions being part one of the challenge:

SORCHA DALLAS, TIL 27 SEP

“I leave blank source books around galleries, cafes, art college etc and people can draw directly into the books. Mainly people email their submissions to me. I advertise it quite a lot on Facebook. I’ve got 2,000 friends but there is a Paper X group with 600 members, so it acts as a good support group. I send out emails to college and gallery mailing lists. Issue one was fairly ad hoc, but more people are wanting to get involved in Issue Two, which I’m putting together right now”. Meticulously collating the submissions, Sandy prints them in his own flat before setting out on the road for the hard sell. It’s clearly a labour of love requiring a great deal of commitment, but one which he hopes points the way towards a business model which others may use.

New solo show from the Glasgow-based artist.

“Finincially, I’m not running at a great loss

4. THE HOUSE OF BOOKS HAS NO WINDOWS

JANET CARDIFF AND GEORGE BURES MILLER FRUITMARKET GALLERY, TILL 28 SEP Intense, immersive multi-media installations that absorb and astound an all-too-willing audience.

5. OUTSIDER KATE DAVIES

30 THE SKINNY

September 08

thankfully. It costs about £1.50 a book to produce and I sell them at £2.50 each, with over 800 copies sold so far. I go to zine fairs a lot and tour around. I’ve been to the Glasgow CCA Zine fair, the recent one in Edinburgh and I’m hoping to go to London. I moonlight at galleries and openings etc and then try to sell it.” It is this constant willingness and dedication to promotion that has garnered him a reputation as blagger par excellence, appearing as he does at almost every available art-related event, peddling his wares. Occasionally feeling like “a maniac who’s just trying to sell books”, he is in no doubt that this relentless hard sell is important in order to generate recognition for the work. “As an artist you’ve got to be able to convince people of what you’re doing. With little or no funding you need to be a bit of a blagger to get

spaces, sponsorship, materials, and so on but it is worth it just to see the end product or people enjoying themselves at an opening. Artists working together to form exhibitions out of nothing, even if they only last for two hours [this is a reference to an open submissions event, Artoscopic, in the surreally wonderful surroundings of St Leonards Tunnel, Edinburgh which Sandy has organised for the past two years] is an amazing experience. What matters is the event happened! This creates a buzz and enthusiasm and hopefully inspires others to do the same. So for me the true definition of blagging is getting stuck in to see what’s out there, stirring up the dust if you will.” Sandy Christie, tireless campaigner and worthy Local Hero, blag on. www.sandychristie.co.uk

Art


Janet Cardiff and Georges Bures Miller

Andrew Grassie: Painting as document

rrrr

rrrr

The Fruitmarket

Talbot Rice Gallery

Opera for a small room, cardiff miller

Everybody likes a little emotional manipulation. We pay for drugs, roller coasters and horror movies because they make us feel something, whether it be good, invincible or scared shitless. This exhibition does all these things. Now, admittedly for some that last statement won’t seem to wash, because for most, art just doesn’t ever cut the ‘real-life’ mustard. Reason being, art seems to be stuck behind a thick intellectual barrier. It seems to demand a level of linguistic interpretation which distances it from the ecstasy of pleasurable youthful pursuits, and the almost always instant gratification that they provide. It isn’t like skiing or sex, it’s like reading and maths. The work of this internationally respected artistic partnership, however, contests this misconception. Janet Cardiff and Georges Bures Miller eschew ideas of discourse or signification as sufficient starting points for artist appreciation, and instead encompass corporeality. Using a series of really rather clever sound editing techniques, the pair have constructed six fictional scenarios which attend not to the intellect but to the sensation.

ART Listings

GLASGOW:

They’ve had to build big new walls and sound proof corridors to house these outstanding installations. Encountering them is like meeting some twisted transformers, different emotions upon you. Their scale and spectacle is so vast that they seem to make the meek idea of hanging paintings on a wall seem frankly ridiculous. Filmic, theatrical, sculptural and technologically complex, The Killing Machine, Dark Pool, Muriel Lake Incident and Opera for a Small Room utilise objects, images and sound to play with the viewer. The use of binaural recording uncannily messes with our concepts of space and time, an effect which further adds to the fun-house appeal. Walking around this exhibition is genuinely entertaining. This attention demanding exhibit cleverly disembowels preconceptions of the very purpose and influence of an art exhibition itself. [Nancy Katz] Fruitmarket Gallery 31 Jul - 28 Sep 08

EDINBURGH: Bongo Club Café Jock Mooney, Skinny Showcase, Drawings,a new book and a music video from the Scottish artist Thu 07 Aug–Fri 05 Sep, 12:00–19:00, Mon-Fri, Free

CCA

City Art Centre

J M Thomson, Pio Abad, Allison Gibbs, Intermedia, Mon

China: A Photographic Portrait, The clue is in the title Tue 05

22 Sep–Mon 20 Oct, .

Collins Gallery Keith Ingham, Perspective,

Glasgow-based photographer Sat 23 Aug– Sat 27 Sep, 12:00–17:00, Mon-Sat, Free

Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art Jim Lambie, LambieÕs biggest exhibition in Glasgow to date and will include a version of his famous black and white,striped ÔZobopÕ vinyl floor.Fri 11 Apr–Mon 29 Sep, 10:00(mon-thu)/11:00(fri-sun)–17:00(friwed)/20:00(thur), Mon-Sun, Free Glasgow School of Art

Aug–Sun 14 Sep, 10:00(12:00)–17:00, Mon-Sat(Sun), £5 (£3)

Collective Gallery Group Show, The Golden Record: Sounds of Earth, Ambi-

tious display of newly-commissioned works and comedt festival hook-up Fri 01 Aug–Sat 13 Sep, 12:00–17:00, Tues-Sat, Free

Corn Exchange Gallery Sam Douglas, Thu 04 Sep–Thu 16 Oct, 11:00–16:30, Tues-Sat, Free Doggerfisher Alexander Heim, Doves, Thu 31 Jul–Sat 13 Sep, 10:00–18:00, Tue-Fri, Free

Christy Cole & Emmanuel Kurewa, Emergent Artists,

Dovecot

Steven Campbell, Wretched Stars, Insatiable Heaven,

arists and designers working in silver and metal inaugurate studio and gallery space Mon 04 Aug–Sun 28 Sep, 11:00–18:00, Mon-Sat, Free

Showcase of artists at the beginning of their careers Fri 15 Aug–Sat 13 Sep, 10:00–17:00(14:00), Mon-Fri(Sat), Free

Selected works created by the artist in the 12 months before his death Sat 16 Aug–Sat 11 Oct, 10:00–17:00(14:00), Mon-Fri(Sat), Free

Group Show, Influential Voices, 12 interntationallly renowned

Edinburgh College of Art

Inverleith House Richard Hamilton, Protest Pictures, Thu 31 Jul–Sun 12 Oct, 10:00–17:30, Tue-Sun, Free

Modern Art Galleries Exhibiting Surrealism, Sat 13 Sep–Mon 01 Dec, 10:00–17:00, Mon-Sun, £6 (£4) National Galleries Complex Impressionism and Scotland, Sat 19 Jul–Sun 12 Oct, 10:00–17:00, Daily, £8 (£6)

Patriothall Gallery Love without a heart? , Thu 21 Aug–Wed 10 Sep, 12:00–18:00, Daily, Free

Portrait Gallery Vanity Fair Portraits, Portraits from the magazine from 1913 to the present day Sat 14 Jun–Sun 21 Sep, 10:00–17:00, Daily, £6 (£4) RSA ReSeArch, Survey of artists who have benefited from the SAC’s residency programme in 2007/08 Sat 12 Jul–Sun 21 Sep, 10:00(12:00)–17:00, Mon-Sat (Sun), Free Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Edinburgh Printmakers

Stills

Sorcha Dallas

Chad McCail, New screenprints Sat

Library, Open reference library from artis’s personal library Fri 01 Aug–Sun 09 Nov, 11:00–18:00, Mon-Sun, Free

Fruitmarket Gallery

Talbot Rice Gallery

Kate Davis, Outisder, Sat 23 Aug–Sat 27 Sep, 11:00–17:00, Tue-Sat, Free Streetlevel Photoworks Jerwood Photography, Sat

06 Sep–Sat 18 Oct, 12:00–17:00, Wed-Sat, Free

www.theskinny.co.uk

19 Jul–Sat 06 Sep, 10:00–18:00, Tues-Sat, Free

Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Collaborative art com-

bining image,sound,video and music Thu 31 Jul–Sun 28 Sep, 11:00–18:00, Daily, Free

1 Aug - 27 Sep 08

l’oeil Fri 01 Aug–Wed 24 Sep, 10:00–18:00 (19:00/17:00), Mon-Fri (Thurs/Sat), Free

Turner prize nominee Sat 21 Jun–Fri 26 Sep, 10:00 (12:00)–18:00 (17:00), Mon-Fri (Sat/ Sun), Free

colourful cylinder Thu 24 Jul–Wed 03 Sep, 10:00–18:00, Daily, Free

The size of photographs, the meticulous works depict and appropriate familiar pieces, playfully rearranging existing displays, introducing alien works to tangible gallery spaces around the world in order to re-juggle

the hierarchy and chronological exhibition of art. Concerns with artistic processes, both literal and conceptual, both of Grassie’s and of the discipline at large, are laid bare in works which document the mixing of paint and the layering of paintings within paintings within paintings. The culmination of Grassie’s multi-layered collection in Painting As Document comes in the form of a new work commissioned for Talbot Rice. The piece captures the installation itself – a self-referential moment which traps you inside its tiny frame. Painting As Document makes for a weighty visit. With their multiple theoretical implosions, Grassie’s microscopic masterpieces more than hold their own amidst the Art Festival’s programme. [Rebecca Pottinger]

Susan Collis, Jewel-studded trompe

Tracy Emin, 20 Years, Retrospective of the YBA narcisist Sat 02 Aug–Sun 09 Nov, 10:00–18:00, Daily, £6 (£4)

Cathy Wilkes, Solo show for the

Walking into Andrew Grassie’s first Scottish solo show feels a little like jumping head first into a masterclass for procrastinating postmodernist brainstormers. Described as elliptical orbits, the disorientating shunt of the collection of photo-realist egg tempera miniatures is startling. A collection of paintings from the past ten years charts Grassie’s process of finding and very much sticking to a concept. Appropriating the high school bullies of the art world, Grassie has pushed and pulled canonical works around his tiny, mythical gallery compositions in contemporary art’s answer to Championship Manager.

Ingleby Gallery

Sanford Wormfield, E-cyclorama, Big immersive

Modern Institute

Andrew Grassie, Tate Modern 2001

each equipped with a set of powers capable of inflicting

Nicky Bird, Martha Rosler

Andrew Grassie, Painting as Document, Painstaking painting playing with gallery interiors Fri 01 Aug–Sat 27 Sep, 10:00(14:00)–17:00, Mon-Sat (Sun), Free

September 08

THE SKINNY 31

Art

Reviews


Music Dear readers, this is my last issue with The Skinny as Clubs and Club Music Editor - it’s been a blast and given me a good excuse to interview with artists such as Gary Numan, DJ Food, Marshall Jefferson, The Body Snatchers, and Calvin Harris. It’s been an honour to work with so many talented writers, and a headfuck to know that other people are interested in what we have to give. Thank you for your support over the past two and a bit years, and thank you to the local clubs for giving us plenty of good news and guests to report on. As a local writer for a local magazine, it’s perhaps fitting that this, our special Local Heroes issue, is the note I leave on; it will hopefully afford the opportunity for more Scottish-based writers to get involved with Scottish media, to benefit and learn as I have. The following pages are testament that the Scottish music and cultural scenes are as productive as ever, so read on, read up, and get involved! Later. /Alex

A Muso’s top 10:

Paramount

Styles Scott McCloud of post-punk legends Girls Against Boys recently dropped us a line with some recommended listening and the announcement of his intention to tour a new electroacoustic outfit featuring GvsB man Alexis Fleisig and Richard Fortus of Psychedelic Furs and Guns N' Roses. Stay tuned for a forthcoming interview over at www.theskinny.co.uk

"These are some bands we've been either playing with, or listening some to, while on tour with Paramount Styles. The Failure American Style album is out now in Europe on Cycle/Konkurrent, and in the USA through Touch & Go distribution. Dates in the US start early October, and Paramount returns to Europe and the UK in November. Hoping to get to Scotland then, we'll see..."

1. Joan As Police Woman - Christobel 2. Obits - Widow of My Dreams 3. Enon - Mirror On You 4. Angela McCluskey with Telepopmusik Breathe 5. Laetitia Sheriff - Hullabaloo My TV Rating 6. The Wry - Sister 7. Stearica - Sky Smoke Clouds 8. DAAU - Lounja La Gazelle 9. Tommigun - Spotlight 10. Operator - Icebreaker

Bon Iver’s Cabin Fever

Paul Neeson sits down with Justin Veron of Bon Iver, and asks him how he feels about the near obsessive focus bestowed upon his startling debut album - recorded in a remote Wisconsin log cabin - and his critically bestowed status as folk music’s new messiah Taking an opportunity to wax lyrical with Justin Vernon amidst a sound check in Glasgow, the romantic in me is keen to confirm, if nothing else, that the creation of his startling debut For Emma, Forever Ago was every bit the exorcism that the tales surrounding it suggest. As Vernon enters the room, bottle of mineral water and apple in hand, smiling languidly and sinking his six foot-plus frame into the couch across from me, I realise that I’ve fallen victim to the folklore of For Emma as much as the next hack. I’d expected a man meek in appearance and nature with frost-burned skin; thin boned and socially closeted. That the creator of such beatific frozen-lake folk should look closer to a professional athlete than a life-whipped troubadour sets The Skinny off balance. I start by asking what he makes of the romanticism bestowed upon the album, and whether Vernon feels that the story of its making has overshadowed the music. He’s very sure that the media’s assertions are - if not quite inaccurate - at least a sugared versioned of the truth, though he does convey the sense of a man who has been on a journey; geographically, emotionally and creatively. And whilst he’s keen to play it down, for those who haven’t walked such a path, the album’s romanticism seems as stark as the landscape in which it was created.

Derek M Chapman

Editorial

“I was struggling with the break up of my band, and I was thinking ‘what the hell am I going to do?’ And yes, that story has gathered its own force, but for me, going to the cabin wasn’t about leaving society, or any of that garbage or mythology, but rather it was about re-approaching myself.” This isn’t delivered with any venom, more just a casual sweeping aside of critical conjecture. However, he continues, “In order to do that I needed a lot of time alone, a lot of time in the middle of nowhere,” and the music press’s ideals of an isolated exorcism seem to ring true. As with this personal journey, it seems that the creation of Vernon’s music itself was also rather grounded. Hoping that he’d confirm that the songs were the product of an epiphinal moment, rising from the silence of the woods, Vernon admits that he was unsure of the merit of the whole process. “By the time I’d left the cabin, I still didn’t feel as though I had a record. I had eleven or so songs that might fit together.” In fact, rather than bounding from isolation reborn, he was still somewhat confused about his direction: “I was thinking, ‘I don’t want to be the guy with the guitar, I don’t want to do that. I don’t have any shows. What am I writing for?’ I was very nervous about the whole thing.” Now, in the light of day, with the certainty of underground success validating his efforts, Vernon appears at ease with the pressure of being a new folk icon, and with the weight of expectancy which his sophomore effort will need to buoy. “When the time comes, I’m just going to sit down for eight weeks and make a record, but the success of For Emma has given me the confidence to not feel that I have to repeat it. It’s my duty as a musician to make a record that is current, that isn’t influenced by the record before it, but rather my emotional context at that time.” Whatever that context, whatever the story of that time, one suspects that Bon Iver have more to offer than For Emma, For Ever Ago’s isolated brilliance. Bon Iver plays Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh on 17 Sep 7pm, £11 www.myspace.com/boniver

www.thealiens.co.uk

32 THE SKINNY

September 08

Derek M Chapman

Music


Music

Mogwai:

Rock Action, By The Book On the eve of the release of Mogwai’s sixth album, Barry Burns tells Darren Carle about finally delivering on their ‘instrumental’ tag, schmoozing with literary stars, and why Young Team is shite "We’ve always been thought of as an instrumental band, and now, after ten years, we’ve finally delivered" - Barry Burns

Steve Gullick

Not every band can coax a literary giant to pen their press release, an area of journalism normally associated with faceless hyperbole of even the most mundane acts. But then again, not every band are Mogwai. With Ian Rankin’s tales of a brutal and dark Scottish underbelly and Mogwai’s atmospheric, brooding, cinematic sounds, perhaps it was meant to be. Barry Burns, the bands most versatile musician, explains more from his Glasgow home on a wet Monday morning, strong cup of coffee in hand. “My Dad read a couple of his books and he said there’s a thank-you to Mogwai in a few of them,” he begins. “I think it just helps him write for some reason, probably because there’s no singing. I think Stuart (Braithwaite, guitarist) met him at some event, schmoozing away maybe, who knows? We just thought he might be a good person to get on board. I mean, press releases are usually pretty dry, so it’s good that he wrote that.” The press release itself is for Mogwai’s forthcoming studio album, The Hawk Is Howling, due for release this month. And with that sixth LP in the can, it seems Burns has itchy feet. “I’m just waiting for the album to come out. It’s a wee bit frustrating because it’s taking so long,” he admits. So, is this down to nerves or excitement? “I don’t know. We kind of gave up being nervous about what other people think two albums ago because it doesn’t really matter. We’re just excited that it’s finished and want to get it out and let people hear it,” he states. “But it’s more exciting playing live. The album’s really just a means to an end for us being able to go out and play shows, because that’s where the fun is.”

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Burns is more than happy to take us through the bands creative process, though he is typically modest about it. “We never seem to have a plan of what we’re doing and we don’t really talk about it when we’re rehearsing and writing the songs - we don’t really talk about anything,” he laughs. “I remember reading an interview with Sonic Youth and apparently that’s how they do it too. Someone will start playing a song and if everyone’s ears prick up, then everyone else will just… this sounds really hippy-ish,” he worries, “but it’s not like that at all. It sounds like it’s considered, but we don’t really talk about it...it just comes out the way it does.” Yet despite being considered an instrumental proposition throughout their career to date, The Hawk Is Howling is actually Mogwai’s first studio album that entirely fits the tag. “I don’t enjoy singing much, and we’re not really very good at it,” confesses Burns. “It’s only if we have a song that doesn’t sound as if it’s finished that we’ll try and put samples, singing or spoken stuff over it. We just didn’t feel like it needed it this time. We’ve always been thought of as an instrumental band, and now, after ten years, we’ve finally delivered,” he laughs. With no lyrics to dissect, it mght be tempting to pick apart the album’s intriguing song titles such as I’m Jim Morrison, I’m Dead, and I Love You, I’m Going To Blow Up Your School. However, fans familiar with the irreverence of the ‘Gwai will already have picked that for the futile exercise it is. “I think we were just trying to make up more ridiculous song titles and then that came out of it,” admits Burns of The Sun Smells Too Loud, an upbeat, dare we say, happy track that even he describes, with inimitable Glaswegian panache, as “chipper”. “We always have all the songs finished and it’s just a case of ‘we’ve got to name them now so everybody get your National Enquirer out!’” Along with the ‘burden’ of song naming, it’s been a busy year for Mogwai. As is becoming obligatory for bands of their stature, a belated

tenth anniversary release of debut album Young Team - re-mastered and re-packaged with extra tracks - was released earlier this year. Yet despite formally joining the band after its initial release, Burns found himself an equal amongst men. “All we had to do was just pick what extra songs there were and I felt like I shouldn’t really say much about it, but the rest of the band were just like ‘naw, if it’s crap, tell us’,” he laughs. “None of the four of them really like that album, apart from a couple of songs, and because I’m a little bit detached from it, I quite like it. But when we were practising Summer, the five of us were just looking at each other going ‘this is shite – why are we playing this?’” he states deadpan. “I mean, it was good fun, but we probably won’t do it again. I’d rather play these new songs.” And they’ll be doing exactly that come this October, supported by the likes of Errors and RememberRemember, two bands who just happen to be on Mogwai’s own Rock Action record label. “It doesn’t feel like we’re label bosses or anything like that,” explains Burns of the band’s responsibilities in this area. “They’re just friends and we’ve put their music out, so it doesn’t feel like a business at all. I don’t know if we’ve even signed anyone,” he ponders. “I don’t think Part Chimp have ever put pen to paper - I’m not sure who has. I don’t ever remember going to a signing party,” he laughs. “It’s a bit like Factory, but without the excess.” Perhaps though, we should leave the last word to Rankin, a man who knows the power of words and, it seems, of music; “You shouldn’t be reading this. It’s completely redundant. All the potency, texture and variation of moods come from instruments alone. Mogwai paint pictures in sound; no words needed.”

The Batcat EP is out on 8 Sep, followed by The Hawk Is Howling on 22 Sep via Wall of Sound. Mogwai play The Corn Exchange, Edinburgh on 21 Oct. www.mogwai.co.uk

The Bands that Built Mogwai Mogwai’s Barry Burns walks us through five of the bands who have helped sculpt the Glasgow quintet in to the beast we hear today

De Salvo

“Glasgow remains the band’s hunting ground, providing a source of continuing inspiration - the sounds of urban fracture, of desperate nights, fights and high-rise love affairs. Romance is fleeting but palpable… All I know is, eleven years in, Mogwai still sound like the future, their five-strong core membership still the coolest gang in town” – Ian Rankin

1) De Rosa. This Scottish Chemikal Underground band were one of the reasons we wanted to record with Andy Miller again after his brilliant work on their debut album Mend. Every song on this album is a total belter and I was lucky enough to get to play on their forthcoming album too. Martin, the singer, sang at my wedding earlier this year too, fact fans. 2) Composite Profuse. This is a guy called Valerio Lombardozzi who makes really good electro records on his label Minimal Rome. It’s the best vocoder electro I’ve ever heard and I have a feeling he knows his minims and relative minors because it’s almost proggy. 3) Crystalized Movements. An old Connecticut band from the early 80s and onwards that took influences from 60s psych and 70s punk. Often sounds like 2 big guitars having a lovers tiff. I’ve been listening to their music a lot for the last 6 months and I intend to rip it off for the next Mogwai album. 4) Les Savy Fav. I’m much more a fan of their last album, Let’s Stay Friends than anything they’ve done before (read: it was pretty shite) but as far as good old enjoyable guitar music goes, I can’t get enough of it. They put on a great show too and all their detractors can just bolt. 5) De Salvo. Another Scottish band with ‘De’ at the start of their name. They are signed to our own label, Rock Action Records, and they will completely and utterly destroy your life until you want to kill your family with a premium nail gun. Some of the nicest people I’ve ever met, though.

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What Happens in Vegas... The last time we chatted to Dalmarnock's Glasvegas they were a fledgling band, just one single into their career. Paul Neeson catches James Allan as he tumbles off-stage from their first Glastonbury gig and finds out what a difference nine months can make

"Our lives are changing a lot,, there’s no denying that. Truth is, I never expected it to be as much as this" - James Allan

Wandering backstage with a mobile which was just handed to him, James Allan searches for a quiet spot to chat, apologising profusely for keeping me holding, and at the same time describing the thrill of playing to a crowd who spilled well beyond the boundaries of the tent just to catch a glimpse of rock and roll’s new heroes. Allan’s enthused about the set, but it’s just one great moment amongst many for Glasvegas over the last year, which has culminated with the completion of their debut album. Like almost everything about the quartet, Allan has been intrinsic to the recording process, having recorded, produced and self-released their material to date. “Yeah, well me and Rich [Costey - Interpol, Muse, Franz Ferdinand] co-produced it,” he explains of their recent recording sessions in the Big Apple. “And I think that’s the first time he’s co-produced anything. I couldn’t help myself. It would have been too difficult to get a producer in and let go. We’ve got such a specific thing that we’re looking for. I think that’s been a bit of a strain on everybody... maybe I’ve pushed people quite far.” With Allan’s heavy involvement, I ask why there was a need for another set of hands. “The nice thing with Rich is that he’s such a master of rock and roll. I think with him, sonically, it’s a bit more widescreen. It’s just bigger” he offers, before qualifying. “Yeah, it’s really loud man. I know that’s not a very technical term, but it is loud.” And that seems to sit well with him. “Last

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night was the first time I heard all of the tracks together. It was an amazing moment. I’m really proud of it.” Of course, it’s essential that Allan is deeply proud of what Glasvegas have produced, given the intense hype surrounding their rise from providing support for local bands who struggled to compete with their backcombs, to a mainstream media poster-band, and the inevitable backlash to follow the release of their debut, which will no doubt provide the fist truing up of their worth. I question whether their ascendancy has felt naturally progressive, or if there’s a sense of being having been swept along. “It’s so fast. There’s not a lot of clarity... it’s like a psychedelic blur.” James confirms, “Our lives are changing a lot, there’s no denying that. Truth is, I never expected it to be as much as this.” And how is he coping with the threat of impending rock stardom? “All I was ever trying to do was express myself, and you just need to keep doing that. The thing is, in a lot of ways the attention is really sweet. The way I read it is that people are saying ‘I like this band, I believe in this guy’. That’s the beauty of rock and roll, I suppose; it can be so unpredictable, and that’s a brilliant quality. The magic can happen in such a short space of time, and I like that with anything in life.” The magic - the transition which Allan speaks of - has undoubtedly been dramatic. By his own admission, pre-Glasvegas, he was on the dole, and doing little else. Having previously had a

career as a professional footballer, being in a band had never been a serious consideration. So where did the sudden ambition come from? “Being on the dole, I had a lot of free time spent very isolated. That isn’t always the best thing, but then it forces you to get to the bottom of things, to dig deep within yourself. When I think back now, I guess an interest in music was always there; consciously or subconsciously, I was always taking it in. But it was probably when I saw Oasis that I thought, that looks like a good job, a good thing to do.” The key to Glasvegas’ burgeoning success is perhaps that they have crafted something which - although there are permissible touchstones sounds unlike anything else of this time. Part of this uniqueness no doubt stems from their late foray in to music and a certain lack of self-consciousness because of it. “I listen to a lot of classical music, and old rock & roll,” says Allan. “And the thing is, I miss a lot of those bands at the moment, so we’re just making up our own world,’ he admits. And does that trouble him at all, given that his band are now very much part of current music culture? “We were on Radio Scotland last night, and they were asking us to pick a track that got us in to music. I picked Starship, Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now. They seemed quite taken aback, but I just picked it because it’s the first time I remember hearing popular music and being amazed by it.” It’s clear enough from this anecdote alone that Allan is maintaining his distance from modern influences.

Now he’s making waves very much on his own terms, what are Allan’s plans for Glasvegas? “I’d like to think that I’ll always be inspired by and involved in music. I can never guarantee that though, look at what happened with football. But, with [the band], I just hope that I can keep everything together for as long as I can. I mean, if I feel that I’ve still got something worthwhile to say, I’ll still make records. If not, then I guess I’ll just stop.” Just like that? “Well, we’re going to make a Christmas record, after that we’ll see what happens.” Intrigued, I ask why such a bold, frankly left-field second, perhaps final, album? “I don’t know. Something just tells me I need to make a Christmas album,” he offers behind a laugh. And what will define it as a Christmas album? “I’ve always found Christmas to be a romantic time of year, and also a time when people look within themselves, and take stock of where they are. I know that’s what I do. I think it can also be a magical time of year, and hopefully we can capture some of that. In fact, I was writing some stuff for it in New York” he offers. “Oh, and we’re going to Transylvania”, presumably to research their Hammer Horror themed follow-up. Glasvegas, the debut album, is released on 8 Sep via Columbia Glasvegas play: Fat Sams, Dundee, 3 Sep QMU, Glasgow, 5 Sep The Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 7 Sep www.glasvegas.net

Music


Music

Liza-Marie:

A Change of Heart We last interviewed Scotland's L-Marie in Sept 2006 for her successful mixtape release. Now step forward Liza Marie, who talks to Scott Ramage about a change of name and a change in style

“Sorry I’m late,” gushes Liza Marie as she arrives for our interview. She’s been travelling all day and rushing to keep time, but she couldn’t seem to be in better spirits.

Marie suits me now. L-Marie is associated with that whole era. I want to try to move away from that. I’m not 19 - I’m 27 this year. I can’t call myself L-Marie when I’m 30.”

“I’m really glad to be home,” the soul star enthuses. “I’ll always be a Glasgow girl at heart,” she insists. Originally from Lanarkshire - “I can’t tell you where exactly”- three years ago moved to the English capital to boost her career. “I grew up in Lanarkshire - people there only like rock or house music. It was really difficult to be different when you’re that age.” She goes on to discuss what awakened her passion for soul music: the Sister Act movies. “When you’re that age it’s really difficult to have any choices outside of what your peers are listening to. When I saw that film, it showed me that there’s other things out there.

She’s far more enthusiastic talking about her album, which is nearly finished and due for release in the near future. “I can’t categorise it as hip-hop or rnb. The music is a mix of indie, soul, funk and rock.

“Growing up somewhere like Lanarkshire has really grounded me. It’s made me want more for myself.” More is definitely what Liza Marie is aiming for. She started out as a mixtape artist, releasing a series called Liza Heat - a collection of tracks by other artists, featuring her rich soulful croon delivering alternative lyrics written by the lady herself. “The mixtapes were a great foot in the door. But now I want to be taken seriously as a musician and as an artist. The mixtapes served a purpose, but now I just want to…” A great sweeping motion across the table with her hands makes her meaning perfectly clear. “My sound has changed from the last stuff I released. As I’ve got older, my tastes have expanded. Before, it was other people’s instrumentals and I was writing stuff over it, but now I’m writing my own music to go with the songs.” This is the reason why Liza Marie is returning to her name, after many years as L-Marie. “Liza

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“I had to distance myself from that time as LMarie - I didn’t want to be known as a mixtape singer. I came away, wrote as much as I could, and now I’m gigging again. The response is great. It’s the best I’ve ever done - now it’s coming from my heart, as opposed to Kanye West’s heart.” For the past year, Liza Marie has been hidden away, writing songs. How does it feel to return to the music scene? “I had this fear that I wouldn’t be able to do gigs. But once I got up there it felt like I was home again. It re-affirmed that it’s what I’m meant to be doing. Gigging is the reason I do it. I couldn’t write for that year I took away - I wanted to do just one show. The live stuff really motivates me. There’s no feeling like it.” Motivation is the key to Liza Marie’s strength. “I don’t know what’s going to happen but I feel really positive about it. I feel now’s the time. There will always be something else I want - women can never be happy! “If anything is going to happen, now’s the time.” It’s the perfect statement to sum up exactly where Liza Marie is just now: a girl with a typical laid-back Scottish attitude, with the talent and potential to establish herself as Scotland’s brightest soul star. www.myspace.com/lmarie4u

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Keeping it Sur The Pictish Trail:

From small beginnings, Anstruther-based label Fence Records has deservedly grown in stature over the last decade or so, and now boasts a dedicated fanbase and an impressive roster of artists whilst very much retaining its down-to-earth DIY ethos. Milo McLaughlin caught up with label lynchpins Johnny Lynch and Kenny Anderson, otherwise known as The Pictish Trail and King Creosote for a chin-wag before they played the Retreat! mini-festival in Edinburgh last month

Powerhouse of Funk Secret Soundz Vol.1, the first longplayer from The Pictish Trail aka Johnny Lynch, Perfectly represents the organic mix of traditional and electronic instrumentation that characterises the output of the Fence Collective

Given the shared ethos and sound of the artists involved, Fence could almost be classed as a subgenre in itself. For example, there’s no doubt that Fence’s relative success is to some extent down to the fact they are a collective as much as a record label; this extended family includes post-Beta Band acts The Aliens and Black Affair. The Beta Band connection is one that Kenny Anderson is justly proud of, especially as his brother Gordon, aka The Lone Pigeon, co-wrote several of their songs. “This year at Homegame (annual Fence festival held in Anstruther) Steve Mason played and he had my brother Ian on the drumbox,” Kenny beams. “He did his solo thing but he did also lots of Beta Band songs, and for a lot of the guys that came to Fence from the Beta Band, so this is people that in 1999/2000 had tracked us down, and they were in tears at the door of that hall. It was like a complete circle.”

Born and raised in Auld Reekie before moving to the US as a teenager (where he became a big fan of the likes of Beck and Pavement), Johnny Lynch was drawn back to study at St. Andrews University by a love of the Beta Band and Belle & Sebastian, and it wasn’t long before he made a fateful encounter with Fence founder Kenny Anderson aka King Creosote. “Kenny used to play pub shows in St. Andrews and they’d be three hours long with different songs every time. I got the Beta Band connection when I saw him and his brothers singing She’s The One, which Gordon (aka The Lone Pigeon and lead songwriter of The Aliens) had written. It was just amazing seeing that and being a fan of that band.” And the rest is history. Despite having released material for years, Secret Soundz is the first “proper” album Johnny’s released, but he’s philosophical about his chances of breaking through into the mainstream. “Maybe people will buy the record and become new fans of Fence or maybe they’ll just be sworn off buying anything by anyone Scottish ever again!” chuckles Johnny. “I know people were burnt really badly with Deacon Blue - they ruined it for us!” And although there are three excellent tracks that were recorded with The Earlies - who also played on Kenny’s first major label album KC Rules OK - the album is extremely varied, and far removed from any predictable attempt to replicate his pal’s winning formula. “I wanted it to be a kind of hodge-podge thing because a lot of the songs have been done at different recording sessions - I mean I respect bands who go and do a ten day stint somewhere and record a thing all at the same time - like Bruce Springsteen’s Nebraska - but I wanted things a bit fucked up and a bit weird.”

Not everything has run smoothly however. Anderson’s last two albums as King Creosote, KC Rules OK and Bombshell were released through Warners offshoot 679, allowing him to reach a much wider audience than Fence’s East Neuk hub would allow. But the record industry being what it is, he’s back to releasing his latest album through Fence and perhaps not coincidentally it has a more experimental side, not least in title They Flock Like Vulcans to See Old Jupiter Eyes on His Home Craters. Being back in control must be something of a relief though, given the hoops that major labels expect their artists to jump through to justify their investment? “Well, it is a relief,” Kenny admits. “We’re at the helm so we’re as busy as we make ourselves. The difference is when you’re with another label and they make you busy with all sorts of things that you never expected to have to do, but you’ve signed up to do it - and they make it quite awkward for you if you don’t do it. All these things are there to help promote your album, but it’s just amazing all the weird and wonderful things you end up doing.” As well as interminable interviews that take up entire days (The Skinny not included, obviously), this has involved some major support tours, for the likes of KT Tunstall and Squeeze. And despite Tunstall’s early links with the Fence clan, it was playing with Squeeze which paid off. “Actually, Squeeze made more sense,” says Kenny. “It was an older, music buying audience, and we did better from sales of albums. Whereas a lot of Kate’s audience were younger and had only heard two or three songs on the radio; it was like a different gig. As soon as she played Suddenly I See, the place just went bananas - even though it’s not a stand-out in the set at all, but it’s just one that everybody knows. So for us as a support band, can you imagine? We don’t have anything even approaching her least known songs.” Johnny, however, is keen to stress the glass-halffull side of the arrangement. “It doesn’t mean it was worthless because the end product of that was that for other Fence shows that we’ve done since then, it’s brought in a different audience and it’s made the audience that was there think of us as a real band instead of ‘just some guys from Fife.’” Kenny agrees that there are benefits to such compromises. “That’s true, and also playing with Kate did get us that Jools Holland gig - without a doubt that was what swung it for the producers.” But despite the raised profile, both are determined to avoid the label morphing, Decepticon

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Far from the cabin fevered sparsities of The Boss, Secret Soundz is influenced by bands like Hot Chip - who Johnny admits to being a massive fan of though he says that by comparison “the equipment I’m using is absolute shit!” There are also similarities to fellow Fence artists Barbarossa and Found, not surprisingly as Johnny, who runs Fence on a daily basis, was the man who signed both acts and still speaks excitedly about the pair.

"We're not in it just to make a quick buck and escape!" - Kenny Anderson

ThePictish Trail, King Creosote and his technicolour dreamcoat Maeve Rolston

style, into a monstrous corporate machine. “It’s reflective of the audience that’s there.” Johnny offers. “If the audience that gets properly excited about it becomes bigger then we want to accomodate that, because there’s nothing worse than putting on something when the people who really want to be there can’t get to it.” “But we’re not in it just to make a quick buck and escape,” reassures Kenny. “The Homegame, for example, is different, oddly enough because it is different. We’ve made our own rules. Everybody expects you to want to be bigger and better, but

“The Barbarossa record I got through Adem - we put out an acoustic EP, and then James had also recorded stuff with Simon Lord from [now defunct electro rock band] Simian, which was the sort of music I get really excited about - it’s the same thing with Found because they’ve nailed proper songs with something that’s a wee bit experimental but not for its own sake - it’s not too arty, it’s pop music. Man, you should hear the new Barbarossa stuff, he sounds like Justin Timberlake! He’s done a few tracks with Diplo who did the MIA record.”

we kind of don’t. We want it to be manageable, and just to keep people happy.” Johnny: “Because at the end of the day the Fence thing only has to supply a wage for two people.” Kenny: “And a lot of kids...”

So given his taste for genre-hopping artists, can we expect Secret Soundz Vol. 2 to be Pictish Trail’s answer to Beck’s infamous Midnite Vultures? “I’m not sure,” Johnny ponders. “I might not even call the next record Vol.2. But I do love that album powerhouse funk is an overlooked genre!”

Fence Club #6 takes place on Wed, 17 Sep at The Caves, Edinburgh and will feature James Yorkston, Malcolm Middleton and The Pictish Trail. They Flock LIke Vulcans... is available now at King Creosote’s live gigs and will be more widely available in November.

Secret Soundz Vol. 1 is released on 8 Sep via Fence. The Pictish Trail plays: The Caves, Edinburgh on 17 Sep A.I.A Hall, Anstruther on 21 Sep The Tunnels, Aberdeen on 25 Sep Captain’s Rest, Glasgow on 26 Sep www.thepictishtrail.com

King Creosote, The Pictish Trail and The Fence Collective play The Corn Exchange, Cupar on 25 Oct. www.fencerecords.com

Music


When the Music Rolls In

Also appearing at Fence Club and releasing a new record this month, the Fife label's most famous export talks to Milo McLaughlin about the ever-present haar, being stalked by nutcases and doing 'a Willy Wonka'

RECORDS SPECIAL Innovative and unusual music from Scotland and beyond, by Milo McLaughlin This month’s I Hear a New World podcast is the first of a two-part Fence special with the chance to hear brand new material from the excellent new albums from James Yorkston and The Pictish Trail, as well as special cover versions of James Yorkston songs by Rozi Plain and David Thomas Broughton which will only be available on the accompanying limited edition boxset. James Yorkston Queen of Spain

The most immediate song on Yorkston’s latest When The Haar Rolls In is full of lush instrumentation and gorgeous harmonies. The stunningly poetic yet obtuse lyrics seem to be a romantic tribute to the Queen of the title, with mentions of “the bar where I proposed”, but also hint at darker depths: “And you let it slip that every door is open, and every past is questioned, loyalties are lost”. See album review elsewhere on the site for more details. The Pictish Trail

I Don’t Know Where To Begin

James rues the day he bought that bloody terrier

This month James Yorkston releases When The Haar Rolls In, his follow-up to 2006’s sleeper breakthrough The Year of the Leopard. Whilst that album was beautifully produced by Rustin Man, this time Yorkston has taken the helm himself and the result is a rich and full sound, tempered with wry lyricism. His label Domino are also releasing a limited edition box-set which will include such extra goodies as an exclusive covers CD - and one lucky punter will find a ‘Golden Ticket’ which will entitle them to a Yorkston track written especially for them and performed in their own house (geography permitting). I asked him to explain his methods. So is the title of the album an attempt to educate people outside of Scotland about the meaning of the word ‘haar’? “It’s funny you say that, because no one seemed to know what it was at all, in fact they still don’t! The guy from Domino, when I first told him it was going to be called When the Haar Rolls In, he thought I said when the hare rolls in, as in the animal, and I thought, well if he was going to let me call it that, it means that I’ve pretty much got free reign to call it what I want!” This time round you produced yourself - did you have a clear idea of what you wanted to do? “For both Just Beyond the River and Leopard we’d had one problem or another which meant that something hadn’t quite gone right, so it was like an unfinished business thing. I’m 36

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years old, and if you know what it is you want to do there’s no need to have a producer there. I wanted to go in there and make it as beautiful as possible, and that’s why it’s sounding really lush; there’s a lot of different instruments there and it’s really varied, which is what I like.”

I can do, so long as I’m lucky and it’s not a nutcase! Without going in to details there have been a few nutcases in the past, and you can print that. In fact, it got to 5 I think, but they were different kinds of nutcases. I was going to say it’s flattering, but it’s not, it’s just annoying!”

Would you say The Year of the Leopard was something of a breakthrough album for you?

Finally, how important have you found it to be a part of the Fence Collective over the years?

“Absolutely - I was really worried about it, but it was a record I just felt that, well, I’ve done this now, and now I can do anything. So it was a breakthrough album, but I also realised that whatever I did next the oceans were never going to boil, I was just going to release another record.” How did it feel to have all those great artists cover your songs for the bonus covers CD? “It was mad because they all started arriving at much the same time, and I’d just click on my inbox and pretty much everyone was saying ‘Here’s the song James, I don’t think I’ve done it very well, and you don’t have to use it if you don’t want’. I listened to them and I just thought they were brilliant, there’s some amazing versions on it. There are quite a few them, like Adrian Crowley’s and Charlotte Greig’s versions, which I think are better than the originals.” And you are also doing ‘a Willy Wonka’? “Yes, that was Domino’s idea! They put a lot of money into my albums and I thought it’s the least

“Very important. Fence has been a real help quite a few times in my musical career, one way or another. When I first started out there would be gigs in St. Andrews, they also released my first album and individual tracks of mine on their samplers, and they were just great fun to jam and play gigs with. After Moving Up Country, I kind of retired back to Fife because it went down really well and I ended up touring for ages all around the world. I was exhausted, and when I came home Fence was a lovely thing to come back to musically, because it was all very relaxed. And now, since I’ve just moved back to Fife, again it’s proving to be a great thing, it’s really nice to be among people who can understand the kind of irrational but crazy love that we have for music - they don’t question, they just do it; they don’t say ‘shouldn’t you just get a job in a bank?’ When the Haar Rolls In is released on 1 Sep via Domino. The Ltd Edition box set is available to pre-order now. James Yorkston plays Fence Club on 17 Sep at The Caves, Edinburgh. www.jamesyorkston.co.uk Read the full version of this interview online at www.theskinny.co.uk

One of several stand-out tracks from Secret Soundz Vol.1, this would seem to be an honest admission of the complete and utter confusion which we all feel from time to time. Johnny Lynch’s voice is at it’s most pristine, and he’s backed beautifully with accordion, flute, double bass and cello by The Earlies, and gorgeous backing vocals from King Creosote and Sara Lowes. Rozi Plain

The Lang Toun (James Yorkston cover)

The Lang Toun is a nickname for the Fife town of Kirkcaldy but the song is actually an unblinking portrait of domestic violence. Despite this, and the fact the original version was a 10 minute kraut-folk epic, it was chosen by Domino records as Yorkston’s first single. For her version, the fantastic Bristolian songstress Rozi Plain, whose debut album is released by Fence next month, layers intricate vocal harmonies to stunning effect. David Thomas Broughton

St. Patrick (James Yorkston Cover)

David Thomas Broughton’s incredible The Complete Guide to Insufficiency marked him out as one of the most fascinating musicians in the UK. As Yorkston himself says of this version of a track originally released on his debut album Moving Up Country: “I was delighted when David Thomas Broughton said yes, he did a few different versions of my songs and some of them were just crazy, but the version of St. Patrick he’s done is one of my favourites.” Listen and subscribe to the podcast at www.theskinny.co.uk and on iTunes. www.fencerecords.com

September 08

THE SKINNY 37

Music

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We Were Promised Chit-Chat

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The chiselled cheekbones of the new Indie™ order might be the nightmare of any discerning music hack, but when Billy Hamilton caught up with the lads from We Were Promised Jetpacks he found their infectious patter a breath of fresh air… Since the razzmatazz revival of modern-era Indie™, the guitar-clutching tune smuggler has become a nightmare to interview. Armed with pursed-lips and the obligatory quota of well-oiled retorts, a chat with today’s leather jacket adorning chancers tends to mirror their assembly-line melodies. It’s difficult not to feel short changed when every question is met with an ambivalent, numbskulled response and - despite what P45-avoiding scribes may protest - the thought of waxing lyrical with “the next Kooks” is as inspiring as a cheesegrater to the genitals.

particularly when discussing a certain blast from the past:

It’s with a degree of scepticism, then, that I meet and greet with Glasgow-dwelling indie-pop ensemble We Were Promised Jetpacks. Sure, the quartet are blessed with a magnificent, dreamyeyed moniker and exhale the type of fleet-footed songsmithery that led Kapranos and co catapulting up the charts, but such virtues don’t necessarily go hand in hand with an accommodating chit-chat. In fact, so concerned is The Skinny that our rendezvous will hit a dead end that I’ve scribbled down the token silence-filling contingency of every music journalist: “Describe your sound in three words”.

They may still be reeling from this fledgling defeat but the Edinburgh-born group have certainly raised their game since moving to Glasgow three years ago: “I think there’s a lot more maturity to the songs now,” says Darren, only recently returned from a four month trek to Germany. Sean agrees: “Before, we wrote three minute pops songs but I think what we’re producing now is a lot more intense. When we started out we all liked things like Franz Ferdinand and Muse but now we’re listening to bands like El Padre – they’re amazing.”

I should have saved the ink. Huddled tableside in the pit of a sun-soaked Edinburgh tavern, Adam Thompson [Vocals/Guitar], Darren Lackie [Drums] and Sean Smith [Bass] are a breath of fresh air. As loquacious and antsy as a gaggle of primary school freshmen, the trio complete each others sentences and continuously answer questions before they’ve been fully put –

“We told a guy about it once and now it’s what everyone asks us,” interrupts a riled Adam as I enquire about an infamous and ultimately unsuccessful Battle Of The Bands competition where the group reinterpreted Jet’s woeful dirge Are You Gonna Be My Girl. “We had two of our own songs played as well, it wasn’t just a Jet cover. It was one of our first shows and we tried to secure victory with our own stuff but we had our set cut short.”

Definite stamps of Franz-styled angularity can still be found in the jerking revs of Roll Up Your Sleeves but the thrill of sprightly jangling is beginning to wear off on the WWPJ boys: “When Darren was away we did a few low-key acoustic shows where we played different versions of our songs,” says Sean before Adam interjects: “We ended up having more people in the band than we normally do. We’ve introduced glockenspiel, organ, violins and bells – we’re trying to become a little more expansive.”

With such a sci-fi loving appellation are We Were Promised Jetpacks looking for lift-off into the charts? “We’ve not really thought about [mainstream success],” says Adam. “I don’t see us as an indie band and there’s nothing particularly experimental about us so I’m not sure where we fit in.” Sean continues: “The worst kind of question is ‘what kind of music is it?’ Especially when someone doesn’t really know what to compare it to.”

a well-primed response is unexpectedly delivered: “Loud. Full. Fun”. Not quite a bravado-packed statement of intent but, then again, did we really expect anything else? We Were Promised Jetpacks play: Nice n’ Sleazy, Glasgow, 29 Aug Hydro Connect Festival, Inveraray, 31 Aug Dundee University Student’s Union, 16 Sep Moshulu, Aberdeen, 18 Sep

Sensing I’ll never get a better opportunity, The Skinny makes its play for those three eternal adjectives. Eyes are rolled and cheeks are puffed before

The Caves, Edinburgh, 25 Sep www.myspace.com/wewerepromisedjetpacks

In Defence of Edgar Prais

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They're not going to take the easy way, but Edgar Prais are determined to make it to ATP. Kristoffer Morgan tells Finbarr Bermingham that he's allergic to the channels that will bring him success. “I worry that sometimes we can lean towards the mainstream too much. We have a big chorus and all of a sudden people start talking about radio play. It’s something we want to shy away from and keep it kind of off the radar.” Ridiculous as it might sound, this man is in a band. His band are Edgar Prais, an Aberdonian outfit. His name is Kristoffer Morgan and when we meet at T In The Park, he seems paradoxically ambitious yet apathetic; a tortured soul, no doubt. “It’s not really our scene here, I find myself intimidated by big crowds. It might be the potential to gain a new fanbase for us, but if I had my choice I’d like to be accepted at All Tomorrow’s Parties.” The line between courting fickle mainstream hyperbole and gaining the necessary exposure for an up and coming band is undoubtedly thin. It’s a Catch 22 scenario that Morgan is all too aware of. “A lot of people shy away from bands classed as the ‘NME type,’ for instance. I guess I’m kind of guilty of that myself. I haven’t even listened to them before for that reason.” He directs his thumb over his shoulder and in the general direction of the Main Stage, where The Enemy are entertaining the masses. “I might actually like their music. It’s probably a bad thing but the NME is so much like a tabloid newspaper, it turns me off bands.” Edgar Prais stand little danger of being lumped in with The Enemy. Tabloid Rock, it would seem, is not a genre they care to dabble in. “We look to artists like Townes Van Zandt, Bob Dylan and Tom

38 THE SKINNY

September 08

Waits. Other than that there’s a lot of Motown, pop and soul running through our music.” Yet their penchant for penning intelligent pop songs has seen them come in for some strange criticism. Despite looking forward to catching Vampire Weekend’s set later on this particular afternoon, Kristoffer explains that no matter how good a band are, lazy comparisons can prove to be less help, more hindrance. “We had some reviews that compared us to them in a derogatory manner, saying we were consciously trying to be intelligent and calling us foppish. I don’t get it. Our songs are built up around narratives and a lot of thought go into the lyrics. Apparently Vampire Weekend are the only band that are doing that right now.”

objected to the use of his name. When quizzed as to whether he is a fan, Morgan isn’t certain. “I don’t think so,” he shrugs, “he’s Jewish and I think the only music he listens to is at Bar Mitzvahs and the like.” Perhaps attracting the devotion of Edgar Prais, the man, is a bridge too far for Edgar Prais, the band. But there’s a balance to be struck, somewhere in the rather sizeable gap between the eponymous

eccentric and The Enemy. The Skinny wishes Morgan luck, as he sets off serendipitously through the hordes of Kinross to find it. Edgar Prais play Skate4cancer at Moshulu, Aberdeen, 20 Sep Cafe Drummond, Aberdeen, 27 Sep One-Up, Aberdeen, 4 Oct www.myspace.com/edgarprais

It’s a sad indictment for the media when a band are castigated for being smart, but their background shows Edgar Prais take inspiration from outwardly intelligent figures. The band are named after a member of the Queen’s Council who defended a local musician facing a perjury charge in Aberdeen. “It was about two years ago,” he explains, “the other two members of the band were actually at the case, they were good friends with the defendant. It’s a bit messy, so I shouldn’t really go into it. But Edgar Prais was so flamboyant and charismatic when he went to the bar, we thought he deserved to have a band named after him.” Prais is apparently aware of the band and has not

Music


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8/15/08 1:17:26 PM


The Hold Steady:

The Bards of Bar Rock With an acute awareness of rock history, Craig Finn drops some knowledge on Jason Morton about how his band plan on sustaining the spirit of its legacy Back in the mid-80s - before III, before Sammy Hagar - Van Halen shot a video for a soon-to-be hit single entitled Hot for Teacher. In that clip, Eddie and Co. infiltrate an American primary school, allowing the kids - and the band members themselves - to run amok. In the end – once the teachers are bikini-clad, and after the cool kids have sped away with Diamond Dave in the back of a hot rod – the band have erected their own school of rock ‘n’ roll. But if there was indeed a true institute for rock music, The Hold Steady – whilst sharing some base-level characteristics (tales of excess, a propensity for blazin’ hot licks) with the aforementioned, sometimes-venerated progenitors of hair metal – would teach an entirely different curriculum, and that’s exactly what wordsmith and lead singer Craig Finn suggests gives the band an edge on the competition. “You find over the years, if you look at great artists, you have people like Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen or Neil Young - these guys really, really loved rock ‘n’ roll and understood it all the way back to its roots,” he asserts. The band, whose members all fall in the over-30 crowd, see their recognition of rock’s past as an asset. “I think it’s the fact that we’re a little older, I think we have a little better handle on rock ‘n’ roll history.” The crew of Brooklynites’ musical sound certainly recalls the sounds of 70s guitar rock, but looking into Finn’s lyrics one can see the efforts of a songwriter trying to pay homage to a narrative rock legacy. He employs a number of recurring figures to tell intertwining stories in The Hold Steady’s catalogue, which often have teenage protagonists working their way through trying and sordid situations, more from a ‘been-there, done-that’ perspective than that of someone still swimming in debauchery. Prime examples abound on the group’s 2005 release Separation Sunday, with Charlemagne in Sweatpants delivering an account of a conflicted drug dealer and the LP’s final two tracks – Crucifixion Cruise and How a Resurrection Really Feels – telling the story of a young girl crashing mass after a hard night of partying. “I use a lot of characters just because I find it interesting, more interesting to talk, not in a confessional way, but to create something that’s more cinematic,” he says. “I’ve had an overarching idea of what I want to say.” Stay Positive, released in July to critical praise and a number 15 UK chart debut, continues the themes and intentions exhibited on previous releases, with Finn still maintaining attention to his craft. “I think the last line of the record, ‘We make our own movies’, I was particularly proud of, because I think it summed up a lot of what I was trying to say on the record.” Breakout hit Massive Nights, from 2006’s Boys and Girls in America contains another favorite line of the frontman. “It says, ‘I had my mouth on her nose, when the chaperone said we were dancing too close’. There’s something about that line that I think really captured what I wanted to say about being young and not knowing what you’re doing, but trying really hard anyway – trying to be cool, trying to be an adult, and faking your way through things.” As one can gather – through the lyrics or the band’s conspicuously titled 2006 LP – The Hold Steady impart a good deal of American feel to their sound. However, they’ve gained ground in the UK through radio play of Massive Nights, Citrus and Sequestered in Memphis as well as summer festival tours, including back-to-back appearances at T in the Park. According to Finn, however, the boys in the band didn’t ex-

40 THE SKINNY

September 08

pect to make a big splash across the pond. “Our first two records didn’t come out in the UK, and we were told it was too American. But when Boys and Girls came out - it really took off.” The transplanted Minnesotan chalks the band’s transatlantic appeal up to commonalities in storytelling: “I think if you’re a good songwriter, you’re trying to say something specific - like maybe mention a street corner in Minneapolis - to explain something that’s universal.” Finn ties those sentiments not only to his approach to songwriting, but also to his own appreciation of music. “Going back to when I first fell in love with rock ‘n’ roll music, I’d listen to the Clash and I wouldn’t know what a lot of things were, what they meant, but I could understand through the inflection what they were talking about; what it meant, how it felt.” While Joe Strummer may have influenced The Hold Steady’s sound, the seminal Londoners aren’t where Finn’s keenness for UK music ends, as the band brought Art Brut on a tour of the States last year, and he ranks Scotland’s

own Frightened Rabbit as impressive in their own right. “I think they’re a really cool band,” he says. “I still haven’t seen them live, but I really love their record.” And as the band’s popularity continues to grow, they’ve been able to foster other groups on tour such as the poppy, punky Loved Ones, and will return to the states after a string of UK gigs to cross America with recent Edge Festival performers Drive-By Truckers and Philadelphia’s The War on Drugs, another up-and-coming group whom Finn admires. Still taking cues from their heroes, the band persists with near-constant touring – not to mention a release schedule of four full-lengths and numerous singles in five years. With this, one might expect The Hold Steady to hold back for a while, but Finn’s got other plans: “I think if things stay the same for too long, you get bored. There’s always new opportunities; last summer I thought we finished the tour and all of a sudden the phone rings: it’s the Rolling Stones and they wanted us to open for them in Dublin. There’s always these things coming up

that keep you motivated to do it.” Full-blown stardom might still be a distance away for the band, or it could be knocking on their door, but the signals Finn’s receiving suggest they’re most definitely on the right path. “With this record, I knew that people were going to listen,” he assures. “I knew we weren’t just going to put it out to a vortex.” And the increasing crowds are a clear indication that Finn pays due attention to. “I go up onstage and 800 are backing me. It seems to me it’s reaching people.” You can double that number when they hit the ABC early next month. Pushing ahead in new directions on Stay Positive – as evidenced with One for the Cutters’ harpsichord infusion and the Zeppelin-esque Both Crosses – The Hold Steady have been toiling diligently at the Institute for Rock ‘n’ Roll and, from the looks of things, should be in line for distinction. The Hold Steady play ABC, Glasgow on 1 Oct www.myspace.com/theholdsteady

Music




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8/15/08 1:17:24 PM


Capitol K:

Full Stop Capitol K's fifth album takes in electronica, jazz, world music and electro. Liam Arnold talks to him about squats, politics and Tropicalia. For a man who has toured the world, lived in squats for a year, released five albums and set up his own record label, Kristian Robertson is surprisingly mild-mannered. He was first signed to Planet Mu after a friend handed his demo to Mike Parandinas; the story goes that he was allegedly too scared to do it himself. When I call him to discuss his fifth album, Notes From Life on The Wire With a Wrecking Ball, he’s laidback, friendly and unassuming; the antithesis of a prima donna musician. “When you put out an album, it reminds people that you exist, so I‘m just waiting for people to start coming back to me about the record now I‘ve reappeared,” he humbly tells me. In truth, it has been a while since we heard anything from Capitol K: his last album, Nomad Junk was nearly three years ago and despite receiving rave reviews, he kinda dropped out of sight after that. As part of the process of creating a new record, Kristian stepped away from traditional society, living in squats in London with other artists. He admits that it was partly a choice, and he was “deliberately breaking away from my comfort zone” in an attempt to challenge his perceptions. “Every time a situation got precarious, I would get into it. I was very deliberately rocking the boat to create the edge that’s going to produce the best music. It can be dangerous though to get too sucked into this,” he says. As with Orwell’s Down and Out in Paris and London, or Burroughs’ Naked Lunch, Notes has definitely been shaped by the life of the author, and the unhinged existence of squatting is reflected in

the fact that Notes is a far edgier proposition than previous works. Robertson sings far more than on other albums, demonstrating a lilting pop tone on the Kinksesque Libertania, and sampling his own voice for Go Go Go and Rocked/Shocked. This vocal presence undeniably makes Notes a far more personal record. There’s also a strong sense of a chemistry, created by the communal lifestyle, between Robertson and contributing musicians Vladimiro Carboni and Felipe Pagani. “We were in this big tower block basically in the middle of a traffic roundabout. We were in the eye of this storm going on around us,” he explains. It’s a fitting image for the gently melodic album, as a calm, safe place within the madness of society. Robertson’s debut album Sounds of The Empire was heavily involved with processing the aftermath of European colonialism, and reflecting his personal experiences of travelling whilst growing up. The titles Nomad Junk and Happy Happy similarly act as statements of intent. Robertson had explained that Drum St, named for the location of their studio-squat which was demolished by fatcat property developers, is a protest track. Was Notes From Life on The Wire With a Wrecking Ball a continuing of the titled manifesto? Where exactly was he swinging the wrecking ball? “I became increasingly aware of the maximization of culture going on - maximum house, maximum color, maximum impact,” he tells me, “so in-turn I wanted to create a subvert maximum music for a maximum world.”

If Notes is a comment on society, does he consider it a political record? “It’s political in the sense that I’m trying to express what’s going on without passing judgement. Just trying to express my personal things,” he states, drawing comparisons to Tropicalia: “I’m a big fan of this idea where you take all of these influences that are being pushed on you, you digest them and make them your own. As opposed to resisting influences, you take these things and make them a part of your identity.” It’s an appropriate comparison, not least because whilst groups like Os Mutantes were politically-minded, they were also undeni-

ably great pop music. Indeed, it’s the multiple levels to Notes that make it such a compelling album: it manages to combine an explicitly political outlook with hugely infectious pop music as well as experimental tendencies and virtuoso musicianship. And all this comes from a man so unassuming, someone else had to give out his demo tape. Notes From Life on The Wire With a Wrecking Ball is out on 8 Sep Faith and Industry www.capitolk.com

No Musical Recloose Former Detroit resident and now adopted New Zealander Matt Chicoine tells Colin Chapman why it's all about the soul and funk for him

“Starting out as a producer and DJ in Detroit, I was exposed to lots of different people, experiences and sounds I wouldn’t have come across growing up elsewhere… looking back, I’d definitely consider those years the most important in my aesthetic development.” However, as well as having a considerable effect on his personal life, the move down under influenced his recording career: “Inevitably, my sound changed quite a bit because there were new stimuli at play - new sounds, an amazing culture and also the vastly different physical environment. Beyond this, I found a plethora of talented musicians here who I quickly began to work with, and I think this in turn did a lot to change the direction of what I was doing.” Evidence of this could be seen on his 2005 followup album, Hiatus On The Horizon, which, thanks to Chicoine’s use of live instrumentation, was something of a departure from the largely electronic Cardiology. Gareth Mood

The oft-repeated tale of Matthew ‘Recloose’ Chicoine’s unusual ‘demo-on-rye’ entry into the music business has now become part of techno folklore. Suffice to say, on that fateful day in spring 1997, legendary Detroit producer, Carl Craig received an unusual sandwich courtesy of the then music student. Almost immediately, he was signed to Carl’s Planet E label, resulting in his 12” debut, So This Is The Dining Room. “I tended to gravitate more towards Carl’s take on the Detroit sound because it was experimental, deep, soulful, and

42 THE SKINNY

September 08

weird all at the same time,” he says, explaining his reasons for approaching the well-respected producer. “He helped me by sharing his studio knowledge, but more through developing my ear for the music he did and [with the] input he gave me into what I was doing.” A year after the release of his well-received first album, 2002’s Cardiology, he relocated to New Zealand, but views his time spent in the city as crucial to his musical development.

Later that year he formed the 8-piece Recloose Live Band, featuring many of the artists he worked with on his sophomore release. The group went onto to tour New Zealand, Australia and Europe, also recording the funk compendium, Backwards and Sideways in 2007. On listening to his third full-length effort, the forthcoming Perfect Timing, it’s not hard to see how playing with others in a live setting has helped Matt develop the musical template he first set out on Hiatus: “What I tried to do more on this album was write songs that were dancefloor friendly, musically

and sonically stimulating, and primarily driven by an electronic funk and soul aesthetic. Forming and playing regularly in a band with amazing musicians has helped develop my own confidence as a player and songwriter. As a producer working solely in the studio it was hard to imagine taking this musical leap, but the process helped demystify the dimensions of playing with other people and collaborating creatively.” Perfect Timing seems to have roots in the soul and funk productions of the early eighties and indeed, Matt confirms that it was the records from this period that he took as inspiration when making the album. “It was partly for nostalgia reasons, but I also felt a personal need to hear more of that electronic funk and soul sound that used to drive a lot of both underground and popular music. I think in the end the whole project worked because it was not a style that most of my co-writers were used to. It challenged them to try something a bit different to their experiences and I’ve found that getting musicians out of their comfort zones usually results in an exciting performance.” Despite the emphasis he places on recording and playing live with others of late, Matt foresees a return to more solo efforts in the near future. “The studio is definitely beckoning and I anticipate I’ll take to getting back to basics for a while in more of that Detroit, Planet E-days type approach samplers and synths!” Perfect Timing is released on 29 sep via Sonar Kollektiv. www.myspace.com/mattchicoine

Music


Music

Locals Get Industrious:

Music Industry Tips STeve Glencross and Liam Arnold present Part One of The Skinny's guide to navigating the music industry and how to get started Picking the right music for a bar or cafe is a surprisingly tough job. It would seem obvious that trendy cocktail bars deserve some chic electro or house, or that you can’t really have Robert Hood in quiet little tea room. Then again, life can still surprise you from time to time, and our unofficial ‘Death Metal Mondays’ at work resulted in a number of sleepy old men sat at the bar,nodding along happily to Dimmu Borgir and Mayhem. Equally, pop that seems innocuous can do a surprisingly good job of alienating punters, particularly earworms that interrupt conversation. Last month Scottish start-up Open Ear launched a program designed specifically to tackle the complex issue of what music should be played out in venues. Arguing that sound is an important factor in establishing an appropriate ambiance, Open Ear offer a “music design consultancy,” which produces tailored soundtracks for venues with independent analysis and appropriate selections. This might simply seem like a way for bars to outsource their jukebox, but Open Ear have consistently produced campaigns which support low-level, local music and offer unique platforms for artists. Open Ear’s ‘on demand’ service has already been used in Glasgow’s The Lighthouse’s shop and café, with an option for punters to buy the music if they’re taken with it. The Director of Open Ear, Brian Harvey observes that “the music that public spaces and businesses play says so much about what they represent and stand for – our use of a wide range of contemporary Scottish labels helps identify The Lighthouse as a promoter for new Scottish design talent, whilst at the same time giving something back to the artists and labels involved. It’s also a great platform that unsigned acts can use to get their music heard by an international audience.” This gets interesting when you consider that Open Ear are mostly using local artists and labels like Chemikal Underground, Hum + Haw, Mungo’s Hi-fi and Benbecula, and pay royalties from every sale to local artists. In short, this offers struggling independents the opportunity to circulate their music and looks set to improve the quality of music in most bars. Open Ear’s new project changes the face of independent music production, and compares interestingly to another local story of local artists. Smear, Glaswegian and purveyor of some seriously bass-heavy minimal techno, has just released Transect. This work of bass-heavy nastiness has been picked up by the likes of Surgeon, and a good number of local DJs; Rub-a-Dub sold out their pre-release stock of the records straight away. What makes this so

www.theskinny.co.uk

interesting is that Smear lacks any big label backing; he put together Forward Strategy Group records to release productions by himself and Edinburgh local, Patrick Walker. “We got the pressing process started before we started looking for distribution, we probably should have seen if there was any interest first! Basically we thought we’ll get it made and distribute ourselves if we had to, but luckily we have a distro that’s really positive about FSG, so it looks like we got away with it!” he tells me. Despite the multiple layers involved in releasing music, Al claims that it really wasn’t too difficult: “There was slightly more to it than I originally thought but it hasn’t really felt like much work.” Admittedly, when asked if he sees working on his own in this way as financially viable, he happily replies “Nope! [But] as long as we can scrape together enough to make the next record and the distro are happy with putting it out then we’re happy.” He’s keen to stress the control that this gives him over the entire project however, pointing out that “if we’d gone through someone else, we’d probably still be waiting for the record.” For most artists, the releasing process involves a great deal more stages than this including tests, profile / promotion and of course winning a distribution deal for your physical product. These used to be fairly simple tasks, but the result of mass changes across the music industry has shifted the goal posts making it both more complex and expensive. In the early nineties, the task of getting a deal for the production and distribution of music was a relatively simple process. Producers were few in numbers, so if you had music with potential, it didn’t take much to get a distributor to take you on. UK distributors like Prime, Southern, Silver Fish and Inter-Groove were always on the look out for new talent, and in many cases were willing to not just distribute your music, but also manufacture and promote it for you too. On top of this, music manufacturing was fairly cheap, with a stream of pressing plants happy to take your money like Independent (Holland), MPO (France), Palace (Germany) and JTS or Damont (UK). Mastering houses were also much more reasonable with charges, with places like Porkies Prime Cuts charging as little as £175 for a 12” cut, a great find if you were on a budget.

Over the last 10-15 years the rise of the internet and digital music has changed the face of the industry as we know it. There’s been a surge of new producers, the product of a now ‘open industry’ fuelled by tools like MySpace, cheap music production software and the ability to release music on MP3, without having to pay for traditional vinyl or CD pressings. There are now many people wanting distribution deals, with distributors only having the ability to handle a certain number of labels at any one time, so getting a deal can involve being known already, or producing something pretty special. In terms of actually producing vinyl, the prices of manufacturing have shot up. Digital music has taken away sales figures from labels pushing down the average number of units sold; small numbers of units are more expensive to produce, and labels tend to rely on economies of scale to make a profit. Equally, the number of pressing plants has been reduced, making it harder to find somewhere to press at a competitive price. So is it impossible to get your music produced without paying top dollar or taking a massive risk? Not exactly: there are ways and means, but you’ve just got to be clever about it. This means things like do-

ing a lot of pre-mastering yourself instead of paying others to do it, or by getting you’re music to the right people in the industry who might be willing to give you a break in the form of a P&D (Production & Distribution deal). On top of the financial issues, it’s important to understand certain legal aspects of the industry. Two organisations of interest are the MCPS (The Mechanical-Copyright Protection Society), the main industry body that pays royalties on music to artists, sold in any shape or form, from records and CD’s through to film and computer game scores. The other is the PRS (The Performing Rights Society), an organisation that acts on the behalf of musicians, collecting monies that are due to them from having their music used by any third parties, such as radio, clubs or even retail stores. To protect yourself and be sure that you are receiving what you are due for your works, it’s important to understand the basics of both organisations. You can check them both out at: www.mcps-prs-alliance.co.uk. We’ll have more on this next month. Capitol K, who we speak to elsewhere in this issue, has independently released his past three albums, fronting the cash for the vinyl pressing, mailing out press releases and designing promo materials. He’s downbeat about the amount of work involved in putting out records, however he points out that in terms of organisation, touring takes a far greater effort than merely mastering a recording and finding a distributor. “Once you get into touring, you’re involving yourself with this whole mass of promoters, event managers, sound technicians and much more co-ordination.” Whilst the only way to get paid straight-away and with no taxation is busking, it often seems that there is far too much tainting the process of simply putting music out with cash in hand back. More independent, smaller labels means fewer people to deal with, and as the success of the labels that Open Ear are supporting demonstrates, they, and the option of going it alone, are viable alternatives to the monopoly of major labels. In the October issue we will be looking more in depth at the role of the MCPS, PRS, royalties and self-promotion, so keep picking up The Skinny to stay informed! www.openearmusic.com Forward Strategy Group

www.katecopeland.co.uk

www.mcps-prs-alliance.com

September 08

THE SKINNY 43


Singles

The Dirty Dozen

By Nick Mitchell

The Dirty Dozen does like a band to seduce it a bit. So when newly-formed Londoners Rock City Sixteen send in a 7” of Lunettes Noires Pour Nuits Blanche ( rrrr, 8 Sep) in appropriate black and white design with creative press release, I am easily swayed. The effortlessly cool Velvetsaping song is good too, mind. This month’s brainless-indie-romp comes courtesy of The Zutons. What’s Your Problem ( rr, 8 Sep) is more of the same sax-led 70s rock, and the trick is wearing thin. As the leaves wither like that band’s career, maybe it’s good that White Lies make no attempt to cheer us up with Death ( rrr, 22 Sep). But their stately, dare-I-say epic indie marks them out as ones to watch. If one band do merit the wearisome ‘epic’ tag, then it’s surely Sigur Rós. Inní mér syngur vitleysingur ( rrrr, 8 Sep) translates as “Within me a lunatic sings”. If so, he is a remarkably tuneful lunatic, and heralds a return to form for these enchanting Norsemen. We’ve had Dinosaur Jr, T-Rex, and now another extinct creature is revived in bandname form, with the arrival of San Franciscan duo The Dodos. Fools ( rrr, 15 Sep) is a likeable little breeze of stick-drumming, chugging

After the travesty that was last month’s Dirty Dozen, Nick Mitchell finds that the art of a quality single is in better hands this September. Mostly.

guitar and indiscernible muffles. On the subject of band names, Johnny Foreigner can be contracted to JoFo, and there’s more to like: Salt, Peppa and Spinderella ( rrr, 8 Sep) is another hi-NRG rock-out from this talented trio. Never having fallen for his Bright Eyes work, it was unlikely I would perform somersaults of praise for Conor Oberst’s new solo venture. And while Souled Out!!! ( rr, 1 Sep) is a decent rock’n’roller, I can barely summon a critical starjump, never mind a somersault. And now it is with hushed excitement that I present a specially themed and hastily conceived ‘part deux’ of this month’s D-12: The Scottish Selection. And what melodious, home-grown treats we have in store... Those now-ubiquitous favourites Frightened Rabbit offer a double serving of their alt.folk majesty with I Feel Better / The Twist ( rrr, 22 Sep), a double A-side offering a mirror image of their fragile/blustering sound. Broken Records may be swatting the record deals away like flies at the moment, but in the meantime they’ve produced another tantalising glimpse of their talent. Slow Parade ( rrrr, Out Now) is a wistful, delicate paean that

swells to a stirring, brassy coda. Idlewild singer and one time punk contortionist Roddy Woomble is maturing into a respected folk troubadour and, along with John McCusker and Kris Drever, he has spun a shimmering wee song in Silver And Gold ( rrrr, 1 Sep). Although born and bred in London, Alex Cornish still qualifies for this celtic love-in, since he now writes and records from his Edinburgh bedroom. “I’m not breaking new ground,” Cornish sings in Until the Traffic Stops ( rrrr, 29 Sep), but who cares about that when he can turn out rousing, honest tunes like this? A deserving single of the month. And just when you thought Scottish music had been completely ensnared by whisky-blooded folkie types, Mogwai emit one of their atomic waves of distortion to knock us clean off our barstools. Batcat ( rrrr, 8 Sep) is a taster of their forthcoming sixth album and reveals the Glaswegians back in earth-shattering form. Alex Cornish plays Cabaret Voltaire, Edinburgh on 12 Sep and Box, Glasgow on 13 Sep www.alexcornish.com

reviews Y’All is Fantasy Island

The French Quarter

The Mirimar Disaster

Out Now, Winning Sperm Party

15 Sep, Self-released

Out now, undergroove

With Handclaps EP

We’re Not French EP

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Volumes EP

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Like their contemporaries Frightened Rabbit, Y’All Is Fantasy Island are a band who seem to take the conveyor belt approach to music production: write, record, and repeat. But that’s where the factory motif ends, because just three months since producing the four-Skinny rated Rescue Weekend, Adam Stafford and his revamped band have crafted another fine, albeit more compact, collection of songs. Consider Yourself Swallowed is a simmering distillation of pent-up aggression, Punk Rock Disco an intriguing blend of 90s American rock and Kevin Shields-ian tremolo fuzz, With Handclaps a kind of rock Boléro, while A General Gust finds them back in their former late-night, slow-burner element. With another album on the horizon, YiFi are not just prolific - they’re unstoppable. [Nick Mitchell]

The French Quarter are steeped in the traditions of Scotland’s finest musical exponents. Engineered by one time Mogwai and Delgados producer Andy Miller, the Tillicoultry quartet’s debut EP We’re Not French is a dreamy, post-rocking daze of twinkling ivory and nimble guitar smothered in the kerosene growl of vocalist Frank Murray. Each number besieges the eardrums with military precision, building from the cautious cyclical rhythms of It’s The and Shed Away before exploding as an artillery of percussion during the breathless Hide. The record’s peak is the wondrous T2; a track that wails to the sound of aching chords and sobbing key chimes while strangling neck hairs with Murray’s tragic, paralysing narrative. A truly remarkable EP drenched with melodious ingenuity. [Billy Hamilton]

Following on from The Mirimar Disaster’s eponymous debut, this is an impressive EP. Like Mastodon, they have the ability to attract listeners who own more than just black t-shirts and studded armbands, whilst also keeping the horn-raising die-hards happy. The five tracks on display run both long and short and swing between crushingly heavy and delicately sinister. The riffs are imbued with considerable momentum and the precise but frantic drumming, again reminiscent of Mastodon, sends bursts of gunfire past your ears throughout. That is except during The Town of Empty Sound - featuring Maria Christopher of 27 - which appears from amidst the racket as an oasis of soothing acoustic chill, bringing balance to a well realised and satisfying record. [Austin Tasseltine]

Available as a FREE download from www.winningspermparty.com/yifi. Y’All Is Fantasy Islans play The Tunnels, Aberdeen on 19 Sep

The French Quarter play: Stereo, Glasgow, 14 Sep Mucky Mulligan’s, Perth, 20 Sep, Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh, 21 Sep

www.myspace.com/themirimardisaster

The Black Box Revelation

The Aliens

Jubilee

15 sep, t4 tunes

22 sep, pet rock

8 sep, buddyhead

Live at the AB EP

Magic Man

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In With the Out Crowd

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Storming in from Brussels - of all places - come The Black Box Revelation, delivering a four-track hit (three live, one studio) of blues revivalism glossed over an indie-rock sensibility. Dirty duo Jan Paternoster and Dries Van Dijck follow their 2007 LP Set Your Head on Fire with some live cuts heavily influenced by the likes of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and the Detroit garage rock scene. The first two tracks of the EP - Love, Love is on My Mind and Gravity Blues - might not be the stuff of Iggy’s dreams, but Set Your Head on Fire has the vigour its title suggests, despite its bluesy simplicity. Sole studio track and single I Think I Like You lands a little too close to derivative (and overhyped) rockers Jet in its sound, but in that line of thinking these Belgians could have a hit on their hands. [Jason Morton]

The Aliens’ first release from their second album Luna takes up where their debut LP left off. Magic Man is a psychedelic pop stomper, layered with vocal harmonies and melodic guitar riffing. It sounds for all the world like Architecture in Helsinki as fronted by Ian Brown. Not a bad thing, but it is the accompanying tracks which suggest that Luna is a step forward for these local favourites. Of its B-sides, Sunlamp Show begins as a straightforward homage to the Beach Boys, before the guys expertise in genrehopping takes centre stage, giving the track a thoroughly modern feel. Psych-ballad Theremin is quite simply a joyful oddity. Just what we wanted. [Wilbur Kane]

Considering Jubilee is fronted by Aaron North - formerly of LA noiseniks The Icarus Line and industrial digi-rockers Nine Inch Nails - and completed by members of Wires On Fire and Queens of the Stone Age, their second single is surprisingly sedate. Its fuzzy guitar hooks and a wistfully blissed-out middle-eight of falsetto harmonies culminating in excitingly anthemic clamour is reminiscent of The Weakerthans, another ex-punk (in their case John Samson of Propaghandi) choosing radio-friendly indie rock over the more hard-hitting sound of yore. Scuzzier tracks among the B-sides, meanwhile, suggest they haven’t left the filth and fury behind quite yet. [Chris Buckle]

The Aliens play The Liquid Room, Edinburgh on 9 Oct

Jubilee play The Cathouse, Glasgow on 28 Aug

www.blackboxrevelation.com

www.thealiens.co.uk

www.jubilee.la

Pirate Robot Midget

NiYi

The Black Dog

15 Sep, Hell Yeah!

15 Sep, Tummy Touch Records

22 sep, Soma

It’s My Beat Now! EP

r

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“It’s my beat now!” smirk Pirate Robot Midget. At least they’re upfront, though from the first listen this EP sounds almost entirely plagiarised from other sources. The title track is irritating and repetitive, with Stateside rapper Grand Agent smugly announcing, “I jacked yo’ beat and I ain’t goin’ to court!” Good for you, sir. This is the kind of music that longs to stand out from the crowd, but if you forgot to label it in your iTunes you would run the very real risk of confusing it with Justice, Alter Ego, Autokratz or just about any other electro-rock outfit around at the moment. The intro to second track Scarum sounds so like Waters of Nazareth that it’s surprising they don’t actually have a lawsuit on their hands. So Undead is a slightly better effort but fails to save what is overall a shoddy collection. Also, they’re from Amsterdam but describe themselves as ‘Italian French electro-rock’ - go figure. [Emma Kilday]

44 THE SKINNY

I Love You All / Poached Eggs

September 08

Detroit Vs Sheffield (Soma)

rrrr

Despite being labelled a ‘rapper’ in the accompanying press release, St

The Black Dog re-appear with their third EP from the Radio Scarecrow long

Martin’s drop-out NiYi’s sound is more punk-pop on I Love You All. Respon-

player. It’s probably the most high profile section from the project so far,

sible for London’s avant-garde and achingly hip Gauche Club, which the

Sunday Times claimed was responsible for clubland’s neon craze of recent times, NiYi’s vocal brings to mind that of Bloc Party’s Kele. Coming in both longer and radio edit versions, Love You All blends surf-rock guitar and a dash of trance-style synths. Meanwhile, on Poached Eggs NiYi takes more of an MC approach as he regales us with his love of poached eggs, over discordant 80s arcade FX, eventually collapsing into a gabba-like frenzy. [Colin Chapman] www.myspace.com/niyi

bringing in minimal innovator Hood and old skool master The Bass Soldier for remix duties. Hood lays down a fine example of razor sharp minimal techno with his edit of Train By The Autobahn: a polished and hypnotic Hood style riff that hits in all the right places. It’s a tad predictable, but will satisfy Hood disciples. The Fogemasters remix of Siiipher is however, a killer: a classic off-beat with super deep atmospherics, sub low kicks and dark anthemic synth licks. The Black Dog may be old skool, but this package is sure to bring them extra fans. [Steve Glencross]

Records


Records

The Aliens:

We Believe The Aliens' John Maclean discusses abductions, superheroes and evil empires with Paul Mitchell

With one sentence John Maclean denies any extra-terrestrial motivation behind the naming of his band, The Aliens, instead suggesting the moniker as metaphor for their craft; “We’re not really interested in the ‘little green men’ scenario, but like David Bowie used to suggest, it’s nice to look at the world through alien eyes because you see things differently, and I think we try to produce something different with our music.” With the next sentence, he performs a complete volteface, hilariously so, by revealing that “Gordon [Anderson] does believe he had a UFO encounter in France when he was younger and that he was actually abducted by aliens.” So there’s certainly still some eccentricity involved in being an Alien, a band on the cusp of releasing their second LP Luna after 2006’s well-received debut Astronomy For Dogs, but this should be expected for three guys (Maclean, Anderson and Robin Jones) who previously bestrode the music scene as members of the Beta Band (though Anderson did depart after the release of the first EP). Their on-stage alter-egos Nighthawk (Anderson), Pungous Nightbread (Jones) and Eddie Candles came about because “Gordon was writing a superhero film script at some point and Nighthawk was his character who cycled through the night solving crimes. It’s just a bit of fun really”. So, if there’s a tinge of madness, there is also an abundance of effort. Signed to EMI for the first album, Maclean explains with relief how things are so much better now they’re recording for their own Pet Rock Records label. “There was a lot wrong with EMI, for starters. I think it was just a good time to get out of there because the big record companies really are struggling. To be fair, EMI never pushed us, ever. People there were more worried about keeping their jobs rather than promoting the records, so it was nice to get out and start working for ourselves. People say ‘oh, you’ve got a lot more creative freedom now’, but that’s not really the case. We’ve always done what we wanted to do. Obviously money is tighter when it comes to gigging and recording and we can’t afford to be completely indulgent. It’s liberating however in that everything is of a certain Aliens style and quality because you’re giving of yourself and not relying on other people to care so much about the product.” Astronomy For Dogs introduced us to a band masking straightforward rock anthems with a myriad of genres and musical twists and turns. It was an accomplished debut which tantalisingly hinted at much more to come. Will Luna live up

www.theskinny.co.uk

to the expectation? “I don’t know if every band says the same, but this record is definitely a step up for us. We just recorded in Gordon’s studios in Fife and had a lot more time to deconstruct the tracks and be at one with them.” So how has this increased independence impacted on the overall sound of the album? “The first record had quite a straight drums, bass, guitar, sound because that’s all we could do. But this record we’ve been able to make a lot more beats, and give it more of a contemporary sound. There’s still the retro element, but there’s more of a mixture in this album.” After their less than joyous experience with the major labels, Maclean and co. note with interest trends in the industry; particularly the emergence of download sites - such as the Skinny-affiliated Ten Tracks due to launch next month - which directly reimburse the artists for every download of their music. “I think that if more people follow the Ten Tracks mould then it will be great for bands. When you’re on a major record label, and you’re not really earning much from the sale of your music, rather just the advances you get, you don’t pay much attention to how much stuff is getting downloaded for free. When you’re on your own little labels, and you’ve spent a lot of money and effort putting a record together, of course you want to be able to sell and earn money so you can go off and make another one. I’m more frustrated than ever that people don’t go off and buy music, but that’s just the way the world’s going.” But does he really believe that people can be persuaded to abandon the notion of building up their music collection for free? “I think if they realise it’s not just going to a big record company, and that the record company is not just going to spend it on taxis and cocaine, that it’s going to be spent so bands can make another record then I think they would buy. All our fans on our messageboards buy a couple of the records because they know we’re getting the money and they feel like they’re buying into the whole cause. If we can convince more and more people to do that, then that will be a great thing.”

Luna is released 20 Sep via Pet Rock. First single Magic Man is released on 22 Sep.

www.thealiens.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 45


Albums Album of the month: Fujiya & Miyagi - Light Bulbs Out now, Full Time Hobby

rrrr A gastronomic interest is introduced in the first seconds of Fujiya & Miyagi’s third album, with David Best’s repetitive whisper of “vanilla, strawberry, knickerbockerglory”. Best later makes reference to “Stella Artois mixed with beefburger” in that distinctive hushed tone that recalls Massive Attack’s Daddy G. But delving into the lyrical meaning is pointless: this Brighton group use words purely for rhythmic effect. In fact, arguably every noise F&M make is for rhythmic effect, whether it’s the layered groove on Rook To Queen’s Pawn Six, to which Brian Eno would surely nod his baldie heid, or - since we’re in that ballpark - the updated Talking Heads afro-funk of Sore Thumb, complete with retro synth gurgles.

The irrepressible heartbeat pumps on through the spidery riff on Pterodactyls, the motorik muscle of Hundreds & Thousands and the breathy vocals on Pussyfooting, where Best eventually gives up on proper words, resorting to lots of taka-taka-uh’s. Judged against Transparent Things, the 2006 record that launched their career, Light Bulbs is no radical overhaul. But when the original model was so effective, it’s probably better that they’ve tightened their sound on this LP, rather than ripping out the wiring and heading for Homebase. [Nick Mitchell] Fujiya & Miyagi play Stereo, Glasgow on 27 Sep

Clouds

Ballboy

Glasvegas

Out now, Hydra Head

Out Now, Pony Proof

8 Sep, Columbia

We Are Above You

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I Worked On The Ships

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Oh boy, this is macho music. Clouds swagger out onto their porch, shirtless, clutching a can of Miller. As enormous balls very nearly protrude from beneath their shorts, they wander, shoeless, to the end of their path where they sit most of the afternoon, talking about football and wolf-whistling at passing women. From amidst this curly forest of wifebeater-clad, hardcore aggression protrudes a huge, hard-rock priapism with big nods being made in the direction of Entombed’s “Death n’ Roll” genre. The only breaks from relentless testosterone come in the form of The Bad Seat and Glass House Rocks. The former bobs along on a remarkable jaunty signature whilst the latter is a slower, psychedelic grind. We Are Above You is littered throughout with hints at Adam McGrath’s previous tenure in Cave-In and, though not a match for that band’s most recent opus, it ain’t no pussy either. [Chris Cusack]

Ballboy must be sick of living on the edge. Since 2001, the Edinburgh quartet have established a cult-like following – the late John Peel was a staunch advocate of their jaunty twee-isms – without ever striding into the public’s conscience. It’s unsurprising then to find that album number five, I Worked On The Ships, looks set to continue the group’s trend of garnering chin-stroking acclamation. That’s not to say this is a disastrous record, far from it. Cuts like The Guide To The Short Wave Radio and A Relatively Famous Victory are beatific paeans, shivering with introspection and gushing melody. Yet for all the heart fluttered grace We Can Leap Buildings And Rivers’ happy-clapping pop brings, this delicious long-player will merely rekindle wanting desire in long-term lovers, never eliciting the advances of fresher faced admirers. One day Ballboy may finally make their move but, for now at least, the periphery’s all they’ve got. [Billy Hamilton]

www.myspace.com/cloudsrock

www.ballboymusic.com

Glasvegas

rrrr

Trends can be fickle beasts. For those who set them, the rise and fall from grace can be a cruel one, and that Glasvegas have been forecast as the next great British band - and the possible saviours of Rock n’ Roll - has set them up for the hardest of falls. For each band who simply can’t meet such ludicrous expectation, there are those who effortlessly fulfil it, and with their debut album, Glasvegas have done just that. From reworkings of earlier material such as Go Square Go, Daddy’s Gone and current single Geraldine, to Polmont On My Mind’s anthemia, S.A.D. Light’s nursery rhyme melancholy and album closer Ice Cream Van’s desolate poetry; Glasvegas is a debut that ultimately proves to be determinedly heavyweight, restrainedly succinct, and which, essentially, carries a sense of being not just culturally relevant, but of being absolutely definitive within current music culture. [Paul Neeson] Glasvegas play: Fat Sam’s, Dundee, 3 Sep QMU, Glasgow, 5 Sep

James Yorkston

When The Haar Rolls In Out Now, Domino

rrrr

The Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 7 Sep

Kris Drever, John McCusker, Roddy Woomble

Take A Worm For A Walk Week

15 sep, Navigator Records

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Before the Ruin

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The Monroe Transfer 22 sep, Undergroove

James Yorkston’s new album is, on first listen, a much more straightforward affair than its sublime predecessor, 2006’s The Year of The Leopard. But like the haar itself this is merely an illusion, because it’s full of rich instrumentation and quietly devastating lyrical turns - with flourishes that will appear over repeated listens and floor you with their unexpected beauty. As ever, Yorkston has an uncanny knack of stirring those deep mysterious oceans within the soul with a well-chosen turn of phrase or subtle melody. The title track swells and retreats like a midnight tide and The Queen of Spain swaggers with the magnificent romance of a wedding ceremony aboard a storm-tossed trawler; Tortoise Regrets Hare is a Darwinian reverie, whilst the cover of Lal Waterson’s Midnight Feast is performed by Yorkston and members of Waterson’s family with all the passion you’d expect of such folk royalty. [Milo McLaughlin]

At a time when the term ‘folk’ is a promiscuous lover, shacking up with rock, pop, jazz, etc., it’s surprisingly refreshing to hear a straight-forward, no-modifierneeded folk record. Before the Ruin finds Edinburgh folkies Kris Drever and John McCusker teaming with Idlewild frontman Roddy Woomble for ten solid tracks, and the lads come through with a subdued but entirely listenable long player. Woomble’s doleful crooning matches the acoustic strum well, but it’s the contributions of McCusker’s fiddle that seal the deal, its morose yet soaring whittle haunts over the songs where it’s featured. The remarkable title track does find the trio playing with the formula - enough to add in a few touches of electric guitar - but not at the expense of the otherwise earthy elements, and Stuck in Time is a sweet send off. Featuring collaborations with Radiohead’s Phil Selway and members of Teenage Fanclub, this is the work of three talented core musicians delivering a quality take on a time-honoured genre. [Jason Morton]

Their name might suggest twee and adorable animal-friendly shenanigans, but their sound becons internal bleeding. Don’t be fooled by the presence of a cover of Whip It by Tonka hat-wearing Disney haters DEVO on the tracklist: in the hands of Glasgow’s Take A Worm For A Walk Week (or TAWFAWW, as they’re known by the short-of-word-count) it’s a discordant thrash that’ll scare the bejesus out of the unprepared. Luckily, extensive touring of their formidable lycra-clad live show - including gigs with the less cutely named Cephalic Carnage and Skindred - has helped to minimise the potential for such misunderstandings. With their second full length - the term is used loosely because it’s over in 16 minutes - the band set violent grindcore screams to off-beat rhythms in a maelstrom of Dillinger Escape Plan-styled eruptions, or ‘evil pop’ as the band themselves describe their sound. Evil? Yep. Pop? Maybe if you squint. But twee? Never. [Chris Buckle]

James Yorkston plays Fence Club at The Caves, Edinburgh on 17 Sep www.jamesyorkston.co.uk

Drever, MCCusker & woomble play Tolbooth, Stirling, 30 Sep, Ironworks, Inverness, 2 Oct, Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow, 3 Oct and Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, 5 Oct www.navigatorrecords.co.uk

TAWFAWW support Raging Speedhorn at King Tut’s, Glasgow on 15 Oct and play The Hive, Edinburgh on 18 Oct www.myspace.com/takeaworm

Mogwai

The Streets

The Pictish Trail

22 sep, Wall of Sound

15 Sep, sixsevenine

8 Sep, Fence

The Hawk Is Howling

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With no child-like passages about ‘spaceships over Glasgow’, or indecipherable, forlorn vocoders, The Hawk Is Howling stands as Mogwai’s first wholly instrumental album. Furthermore, there’s precious little sentience that can be gleaned from titles like I’m Jim Morrison, I’m Dead. As ever, it’s all about that primal, elusive, emotive response, and like their celluloid namesakes, Mogwai continue to be an unpredictable beast. Listen to Danphe and the Brain in the wrong frame of mind at the wrong time of night and its haunting, guitar motif, eddying throughout unnoticed until the calm centre of the storm, could tear away at your soul. However, salvation is just around the corner with The Sun Smells Too Loud, almost certainly the bands cheeriest moment yet. Lead single Batcat meshes the sonic dissonance of Like Herod with the austerity of Glasgow Mega-Snake; a frightening prospect. As such, you’ll be forgiven for exhibiting a certain level of ennui, but amidst the beautiful cacophony and malevolent calm, it’s clearly business as usual for the post-rock overlords. [Darren Carle] Mogwai play Corn Exchange, Edinburgh on 21 Oct www.mogwai.co.uk

46 THE SKINNY

September 08

Everything Is Borrowed

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Mike Skinner’s a Marmite musician if ever there was one: if his first two albums didn’t convince you that this likely geezer could inject as much meaning into mundanity as any artist, in pop music or out of it, then Everything Is Borrowed won’t convince you otherwise. For the rest of us, it’s just a relief that Skinner has shed the impression of third album Hardest Way To Make An Easy Living of a thoroughly dislikeable cokehead. Call this his ‘mature’ album: from the sweet refrains of the opening title track it’s clear he’s taking a fatalistic approach. Skinner’s done a lot of growing up, and the wonderfully told stories of mid-album duo Edge Of A Coin and Edge Of A Cliff impart uncharacteristically sage advice. He’s not quite swapped the Classics for slippers and the pranging for a pipe, but Borrowed is Skinner’s most relaxed, unselfconscious and thematically diverse record yet. [Ally Brown]

Secret Soundz Vol. 1

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In his behind the scenes role at Fife’s Fence record label, Johnny Lynch has obviously been well-placed to soak up all the best aspects of the label’s varied output. Secret Soundz Vol.1 is a collection of intricate but playful electronica as colourful as its striking cover art. The album’s joyously schizophrenic combination of strong pop songs and wistful experimentation are given focus by Lynch’s plaintive vocals and musical accompaniment by various members of the Fence Collective, and on three key tracks The Earlies. This contributes an autumnal depth of field that perfectly complements the fairground incandescence of Lynch’s own arrangements. Words Fail Me Now is a supernatural carousel with such melodic strength it could spin you off your centre of gravity, The Lighthouse might appear to emit a lasting glow of metaphorical optimism but in fact hides a darker tale of psychopathic behaviour, and Into The Smoke is a slow-burning anthem that recalls the effortless transcendence of prime Beta Band. A sterling debut. [Milo McLaughlin]

First single Everything Is Borrowed is released on 29 sep. “The Escapist” is available now as a free download from www.myfreedownload.co.uk/thestreets

The Pictish Trail plays Fence Club at The Caves, Edinburgh on 17 Sep

play Glasgow Barrowlands on 4 Oct, tickets £17.50.

www.myspace.com/pictishtrail

Records


Lustmord

David Vandervelde

22 Sep, City Slang

Out Now, Hydra Head

22 sep, Secretly Canadian

Broken Hymns, Limbs and Skin

Other

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O’Death are apparently tired of their recorded output being derided in favour of their live performances. On hearing even one minute of Broken Hymns, Limbs and Skin, their third album proper and second for City Slang, it’s difficult to fathom such criticism, especially having been privy to a said live show at an abandoned truck stop in New York. The opening gambit in the gypsy quintet’s battle against their detractors, Low Tide, is a brutal and riotous stomp of punk, bluegrass and swing, coupled with a murderous undertone that sets blueprint for the album perfectly. If you’ve ever enjoyed Modest Mouse’s sojourns into such territory, then O’Death offer the complete package, the real deal. Singer Greg Jamie lurches from a Neil Young-like whine to, on the barnstorming Ratscars, a belligerent Black Francis yelp, that makes this punchy album a joy from start to finish. Death has rarely held such appeal. [Darren Carle] O’Death play Nice’n’Sleazy, Glasgow on 28 Sep www.myspace.com/odeath

Waiting For the Sunrise

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There are two sides to every coin. Heads here sees cult icon and creator of the “dark ambient” genre, Lustmord, embark on a campaign of unsettling, abstract musical intimidation. Other is the soundtrack to a serial-killer, kerbcrawling the dark streets of some rain-soaked urban downtown. A brooding David Lynch montage of charcoal shapes and shifting patterns set against a backdrop of maloevolent intent. Tails, however, sees a Welshman named Brian Williams subject us to 78 minutes of largely featureless rumbling noises and occassional metallic clanks. It very much stretches conventional definitions of music and going the distance must surely qualify as hard work for even the most determined experimentalist. Certainly, it’s no wonder that Lustmord is in high demand for soundtracks, as this is an extremely atmospheric piece of work. Yet, collaborations with Melvins’ Buzz Osborne and Tool’s Adam Jones notwithstanding, it’s a little hard to imagine why anyone might listen to this in any other context. [Chris Cusack]

Ghosting from a bygone era, David Vandervelde’s 1970s emulation on his official debut long-player, Waiting for the Sunrise, is fairly remarkable, much in the way that Midlake’s The Trials of Van Occupanther was, for its purist capture of a classic age and sound. From the sunshine-burnt beauty of opener I Will Be Fine, through to the narcotic, mainline drift of Lyin’ In Bed, Vandervelde belies his youthful 22 years with an album as adult in sound and observationally mature as any. The single detraction is that at times there’s the odd over-reliance on pastiche, and a whimsy which conjures the image of bearded men with tropical shirts and a jarring, peaceloving glaze in their eyes. Ultimately though ,this is a top-down Cadillac drive through the breezy West Coast scene of the 70s, and a beautiful trip at that. [Paul Neeson]

www.lustmord.com

www.myspace.com/davidvandervelde

Friendly Fires

Bomb The Bass

Recloose

OUt Now, XL

15 Sep, !K7

29 SEp, Sonar Kollectiv

Friendly Fires

Future Chaos

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Essentially, Friendly Fires do just one thing, but they do it well. The St Albans trio make superb party music - funky, unpretentious, danceable - if your repertoire extends beyond the standard rhythmic feet-shuffling. Look elsewhere for introspection; this is adrenaline-fuelled, angst-free indie-disco. If James Murphy started a clubnight - while The Rapture and !!! were out of town, of course - Friendly Fires would surely be his choice for house band. Surprisingly, the breakthrough single Paris is one of the weaker moments on this punchy ten-track romp, its syrupy sentiment wiped up by the metallic guitar of opener Jump in the Pool, the DEVO-ish beat of White Diamonds and the somehow ragged-yet-slick groove of Photobooth, the most energising essence of their cowbell-heavy aesthetic. Friendly Fires’ stylistic limitations prevent this being any more than good, but it’ll surely find a home in many a DJ’s flightcase. [Nick Mitchell] Friendly Fires play King Tut’s, Glasgow on 20 Sep www.myspace.com/friendlyfires

rrrrr

Bomb The Bass is back. As if he didn’t create enough devastation the first time around in the 80s with genre-defining hit Beat Dis, Tim Simenon returns to deliver a vengeance killing of mass proportions. Simenon spares us the Spice Girls reunion tour, steering clear of a nostalgic road trip, instead delivering an album that’s as forward-thinking as ever. His musical progression takes him to new realms, creating a haunting piece of work that is truly dark by design. Opening track Smog, like the many collaborations with Paul Conboy of A.P.E. on the album, has a very distinct Depeche Mode flavour, perhaps unsurprising given Simenon’s remix work for the group. The collaboration with Fujiya & Miyagi on Butter Fingers is just incredible, dark to the core with a terrifyingly simplistic but menacing vocal. Following the raw energy on Burn The Bunker (featuring Toob), So Special and No Bones bring it right back down to Earth before album highlight Black River touches down on a planet where electronica collides with the Johnny Cash-style tones of Mark Lanegan. It’s the sort of confident experimentation you would only expect from someone with the experience of Simenon, and it’s brilliant. [Don McVinnie]

Jacopo Carreras

Capitol K

From Bed to Couch

Notes from Life on the Wire with a Wrecking Ball

8 Sep, Lan Muzic

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It’s pretty remarkable when an album lives up to its press release, but with

From Bed to Couch Jacopo Carreras has managed to create an intriguing synthesis of music, one that you should not let go by. This is an album that shouts a giant ‘fuck you’ to pigeon holes. Carreras’ overriding principle is to fill the sonic space, keeping his listener’s curiosity absorbed by the complexity of his electronic work. Even tracks like Sbangy and Gentle Touch, which feel like they have come from a minimal origin, have more than enough going on to keep the brain engaged. Carreras regularly uses consonant drone sounds to great effect; strings and brass synths hold lengthy notes that create feelings of euphonious pleasure. What’s really great about From Bed to Couch is that it has an ‘expect the unexpected’ feel, and a concoction of styles on nearly every track. It’s hard to say whether he’s pushed any one genre’s boundaries further, but he’s taken electronic music and given it personality and busyness, something this reviewer has been gagging for. [Nicol J. Craig]

Super Adventure Club Chalk Horror!

Out Now, Self-released

rrrr Welcome to the bonkers world of Super Adventure Club - Edinburgh’s radgest new band - who’ll knock you over one minute with an armour-piercing guitar assault before lifting you back up with a lullabied line about “Jabba The Hut phoning Pizza Hut, drinking cheap cider watching films with Rob Schneider”. But Super Adventure Club’s batty humour doesn’t make them a comedy band; you can’t doubt the chops of two music teachers and a music student, and when second track Math Rock criticises over-thought, joyless music, you know exactly where they’re coming from. Sure, they can switch from ballistic post-hardcore attacks to gentle hip-swinging grooves, from sludgy metal riffing to Zappa-esque wah-wobbling; and sure lead vocalist Bruce Wallace is equally at home wailing like an unhinged lunatic as he is crooning a doleful falsetto; but Super Adventure Club know it’s no fun playing serious music if you have to take it seriously. [Ally Brown] Chalk Horror! is available at Avalanche, Mono, or from the band at gigs & on their MySpace page.

www.theskinny.co.uk

Perfect Timing

8 sep, Faith and Industry

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In 1997, Matthew ‘Recloose’ Chicoine was signed to Carl Craig’s Planet E label, by way of a ‘demo on rye sandwich’ handed to the techno pioneer. The Detroit resident moved to New Zealand in 2001, a year before the release of his critically acclaimed debut album, Cardiology. His relocation gave him the opportunity to collaborate with many of the country’s talented musicians and vocalists. The success of his shared studio experiences led Chicoine to form the eight-piece Recloose Live Band, and again it’s his work with others that shapes Perfect Timing. Steeped in funk with bongos, brass and moog squelches combining to offer an irresistible concoction that at the very least, should get heads nodding. Standards are high throughout but it’s the dreamy-soul of the Joe Dukie sung Deeper Waters and the Tyna-vocalled So Cool, Emotional Funk and The Sanctuary which stand out on what’s the ideal soundtrack for cool, autumnal nights. [Colin Chapman]

www.recloose.com

Arabian Prince Innovative Life

29 sep, Stonesthrow Records

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Fusing upbeat electronica with harder percussion and soaring melodies, Notes from Life on the Wire with a Wrecking Ball is at once a beautiful piece of pop music, and a detailed portrait of myriad musical influences. Capitol K builds layers of chattering laptop melodies over curiously restrained vocals on opener Diamond Skys (sic), before cutting loose on the energetic Go Go Go, and chanting the title. It’s a reference to the beat poet jams, but Notes also takes in tropicalia, acid 303s and Kafka’s Metamorphosis, uniting them all within the psychedelic pop of The Kinks or the Beach Boys. Whilst it’s clearly designed as a cohesive whole, Drum St and Bomb Bomb are beautifully sing-along, and far superior to the majority of pop songs clogging up the charts. Notes is an addictive album that grabs the listener with catchy riffs, yet reveals layers of detail over every repeat play. [Liam Arnold]

If Arabian Prince is not a name you are familiar with then it’s time to get acquainted. Alongside Dr Dre, he was one of the founding members of the multi-platinum selling N.W.A. - the group who pioneered the gangsta rap phenomenon. Ironically, the group’s success far over-shadowed his own much-loved early electro-rap work, meaning some of this material has rarely been heard until now. This album serves as an anthology, with all the tracks recorded between 1984 and 1989. The sharply delivered lyrics of tracks like Panic Zone and Innovator are hard-edged, but the synth-driven melody is ethereal and distant. It gives a great insight into what West Coast electro could have been if the rap phenomenon hadn’t eclipsed it to obscurity. With more and more hip-hop/electro crossovers like Chromeo and Kid Sister reigniting this 80s sound, Arabian Prince’s work is just as relevant now as it was on its first release. [Emma Kilday]

www.capitolk.com

www.myspace.com/arabianprince

Online reviews

Top 5 albums

King Khan and The Shrines The Supreme Genius of King Khan rrrr Made Out of Babies - The Ruiner rrrr Everlast -Love, War and the Ghost of Whitey Ford rrr Lords of Bastard - Lords of Bastard rr Manda Rin - My D.N.A rr TK Webb & The Visions - Ancestor rrr The Hussy's - Super Pro rr David Holmes - The Holy Pictures rr Lukestar - Lake Toba rrr Jump Ship - whatisthisandwhy rr Rose Kemp - Unholy Majesty rrr

1. Fugiya & Miyagi Light Bulbs 2. Glasvegas Glasvegas 3. Super Adventure CluB Super Adventure Club 4. James Yorkston When the Haar Rolls In 5. the Pictish trail secret soundz vol. 1 September 08

THE SKINNY 47

Records

O’Death


Live Reviews Noah & the Whale

Digitalism

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The London septet spend much of the show colouring within the lines of their folk-pop debut

Most of the horde emerge from the venue sweat-soaked and grinning

If there’s one thing to be realised at Cabaret Voltaire tonight, it’s that the kids dig Noah and the Whale. Playing to this young assembly, the Whalers steam through just about all of Peaceful, the World Lays Me Down with note-for-note precision. Indeed, the London septet spend much of the show colouring within the lines of their folk-pop debut whilst mostly steering clear of the LP’s slower moments. The quick pace doesn’t prevent the blue-and-yellow troupe from delivering a charming performance, however, with inspired highlights like Shape of My Heart - where the band lull the crowd for an intro, then shake it up with a blast of brass - and the sombre ballad to balance the otherwise cheery pop session arriving in the form of Second Lover. The ukelelefuelled Five Years Time proves to be as big a hit with the crowd as it has in the singles chart, but a hasty encore of 2 Bodies, 1 Heart proves practically unnecessary after superior set-closer Rocks & Daggers already raised the roof to its limit. [Jason Morton]

9pm is really too early for an act like Digitalism to take the stage. The German duo are like the Chemical Brothers without the indie pretensions, or Daft Punk without the space-age sheen, and their high-octane electro-clash is tailored more to post-midnight revelry than the evening gig protocol. But this complaint is evidently lost on the Edinburgh crowd, who display all the loose-limbed energy of a chemically fuelled latenight knees-up.

The Liquid Room, 23 Aug

Cabaret Voltaire, 15 Aug

Digitalism - the pairing of wiry button pusher Jence Moelle and big, burly cymbal hitter Isi Tüfekçi - raise energy levels with the first bleep of Zdarlight, and maintain it through Idealistic, with required “Come on Edinboro” rabble-rousing, before saving the biggest surge of Balearic-style euphoria for set-closer Pogo. It’s all anything but subtle: booming beats, heavy distortion and unremitting strobe, and most of the horde emerge from the venue sweat-soaked and grinning. It’s now only 10.15pm, and the rest of the night can only be a comedown. [Nick Mitchell]

Noah and the Whale play Stereo, Glasgow on 25 Oct and The Liquid Room, Edinburgh on 26 Oct. www.noahandthewhale.com

Noah & The Whale Shannon McClean

Kristin Hersh: Paradoxical Undressing

Shout Out Louds

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The sort of harmless, sugary indiepop that American film and TV studios dribble over

Cabaret Voltaire, 13 Aug

www.thedigitalism.com

Cabaret Voltaire, 7 Aug

rr If, as popular conception dictates, Swedes really do only follow one of two musical extremes - church-burning black metal or polyphonic, wide-eyed pop - then Shout Out Louds have definitely chosen the latter. The Stockholm quintet combine the dreamy ambience of The Cure with the resonant guitar of U2, adding their own lush harmonies and tropicana beats. It’s the sort of harmless, sugary indie-pop that American film and TV studios dribble over, and in person, Shout Out Louds have the look to match their mass-market appeal, with pretty-boy singer Adam Olenius and elfin blonde Bebban Stenborg on keyboards. But it’s precisely this clean-cut image that detracts further from their limited musical excitement, especially in a live setting. Tracks from latest LP Our Ill Wills - particularly Tonight I Have To Leave It - do manage to perforate the general flatness, but these are exceptions to the humdrum rule. [Nick Mitchell] Shout Out Louds Charlotte Rodenstedt

www.shoutoutlouds.com Kirsten Hersh Scott Watson

Hersh’s monologues are consistently colourful and fluidly poetic Paradoxical Undressing is the extreme state of hypothermia where the illusion of body heat causes sufferers to remove their clothes and worsen their condition. Tonight, Kristin Hersh uses the syndrome as an analogy to explain the casting away of her perceived shyness to reflect candidly on coping with personal tragedy, unplanned motherhood and an untameable, obsessive compulsion to create while she was a young musician in the Throwing Muses. The gig consists of two acts where spoken word is accompanied with subtle guitar strum and punctuated with reinterpretations of songs from across the Muses’ back catalogue and her nebulous solo career. With strange tales of hanging out with rats, lounging with lizards, growing up in a hippy commune and wearing elephant shit sandals, Hersh’s monologues are consistently colourful and fluidly poetic. A certain mastery of lighting and projector serves the subdued atmosphere well, and although her exterior appears cool and reserved, there’s a possessed gaze in her eye that suggests this yields a greater catharsis than most gigs. [Dave Kerr] www.throwingmusic.com

September 08

The Liquid Room, 6 Aug

The Liquid Room, 21 Aug

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The Truckers play up to their slackjawed stereotype, but there’s much more to this lot

Dizzee leaves The Liquid Room a sweat bath of satisfaction in relative awe of a rushed performance

The only real surprise about tonight’s show in The Liquid

Dizzee Rascal, Dizzee Rascal, oh where is Dizzee Rascal?

Room is the absence of a row of chicken wire along

He’s late, and the crowd is restless. The same track has

the front of the stage. The music was always going to

played three times now and we just want to know where

be superb, there was always going to be more females

he is. 30 minutes later, Jus’ A Rascal kicks in and the

onstage than off (Shona Tucker on bass providing a

crowd refrains from angry boos to eating from Dizzee’s

surprisingly forceful feminine touch to her well slapped

gold clad hand in an instant. DJ Slimzee lays down am-

bass) and Drive-By Truckers play up to their slack jawed,

ple dirty tracks from Dizzee’s three albums to date and

if nimble fingered, stereotype in full: bearded and suited

makes support act Young Fathers look like a boy band.

out in their finest cowboy shirts, swigging heftily from a

The crowd makes as much noise as possible throughout

bottle of ol’ Jack and howling about the complications

well knowns, I Luv U and Paranoid, before erupting for

of a supposedly simple family, daddy needing a drink

the almost nu-metal single Sirens. Although tonight he’s

and how, last night, they slept with their boots on again.

monotone in places, Dizzee succeeds in mixing his set up

But there’s much more to this band than the typecast.

enough to make the crowd plea for new single Dance

It’s musicianship at its finest and the Southern Rock

wiv me. Played as an encore, it leaves The Liquid Room a

Opera the ‘Truckers promised us in 2001 is delivered

sweat bath of satisfaction, in relative awe of what was a

in emphatic, Alabama ass whuppin’ style. [Finbarr

rushed performance. [Simon Hay]

Bermingham]

www.dizzeerascal.co.uk

48 THE SKINNY

Drive-By Truckers

Dizzee Rascal

Dizzee Rascal Shannon McClean

www.drivebytruckers.com

Live music


Records Following a successful launch in glasgow last month, the mill is set to roll into action in the capital in september. We interview one of the most exciting upcoming bands punch and the apostles and have a catch-up with recent mill debutantes How to Swim

Preview Punch & The Apostles 17 and 18 Sep

How To Swim Take a Run at The Mill

Ink Miller of How To Swim tells Finbarr Bermingham of his affinity with a certain Cuban dictator as he rounds up the first month of The Mill

“Just playing fast and loose with Jesus really,” comes the deadpan response from Paul Napier, lead singer of Glaswegian septet Punch and the Apostles. The question, of course, was referring to their unusual band name. “It’s up to other people to read into it,” he continues when pushed to develop his explanation. “We view the Bible as a comedic text: instead of a tragic figure, we see Jesus as a Benny Hill-type figure. He’s got some pretty good soundbites.” Napier’s monotone conversation is miles from his more choral work. In fact, he’s so impassive, it’s difficult to know whether he’s being wholly irreverent or taking the piss. As he continues to give his views on modern music, though, it seems likely to be a combination of both. “Music died in 1943! After Edith Piaf’s fifth marriage things really started to go downhill.” I’m speaking to Napier and his bandmate, bassist Rory Hayejahans, ahead of their double header at The Mill this month. “Paul thinks all music is dead at the moment,” explains Hayejahans later in the conversation. But it’s obvious that despite having played the local scene in this incarnation for just six months, Punch and the Apostles ain’t impressed. “The bands getting talked about are not the bands that I’m interested in. But at the same time there are some friends of ours that are starting to get some exposure and do well, but there’s really nothing I’m much interested in in Glasgow.” Napier’s assessment, however, is slightly more condemning. “In Glasgow, the vast majority is based on a copycat scene,” he asserts, “there’s this whole 80s thing, where people get a synthesiser and play dance music. If Franz Ferdinand are doing well, they start playing angular guitar pop. It’s very rarely you see a band you like, I can’t remember the last time I did. Well, maybe Super Adventure Club. We played with them last week, they’re good.” Listening to the songs Punch and the Apostles have made available on MySpace would lead you to conclude that they’re the latest in a line of ragamuffin bohemian types: hung up on polka and romanticism. Napier however, is unimpressed. “In a way that

sort of characterisation has gained a precedence that’s not warranted, there are four or five [tracks] that could be regarded as Eastern European, but it’s not the main influence that runs through our music.” Despite their rejection of it, though, it’s not an assessment the band are uncomfortable with. We can call them whatever we want we’re told, as long as we’re listening to their music. The problem is; how do they reach us? P & tA have released their debut single on local imprint Lucky Number Nine and plan a similar release for single number two in the near future. With enough material recorded for two albums, however, the band is starting to think long term. “Well, record labels are just crumbling edifices. There’s not much behind them and they’re not interested in putting money and effort behind developing bands. Nobody’s buying fucking records anyway. So we’re probably going to have to do it ourselves; play lots of shows and put our work out.” Napier’s appraisal of the industry is almost as scathing as his evaluation of the Glasgow scene. Disgruntled, aye, but far from disillusioned. At a time when labels are warier than ever over having their fingers burnt, P & tA realise their unique and unconventional compositions represent a high risk, but remain undeterred. “If we wanted to be millionaires we would’ve sold nuclear arms or pharmaceuticals. If you wanna be a millionaire, stay away from the music business right now. These people are unscrupulous bastards!” The band are determined, then, to stick by their guns and continue making intelligent and uncompromising music safe in the knowledge that Punch and the Apostles aren’t going to be lining the pockets of any man in a suit just yet. [Finbarr Bermingham]

The Mill Edinburgh, Niddry Street South, Edinburgh, EH1 1NS The Mill Glasgow, 731-735 Great Western Road, West End, Glasgow, G12 8QX www.myspace.com/punchandtheapostles

How To Swim have been staples of the Scottish music scene for a number of years now, but having released their excellent Littlest Orgasm mini-album on Electric Honey in 2005, things seemed to have gone a bit quiet.

With such complications, the need for a leader becomes increasingly important. Unafraid to assume the dictatorial mantle, Wilson steps up to the plate with some gusto. But who does he model his leadership style on?

The hiatus, though, is over. A set at The Mill late last month and a double A-side single release (Genesis P & Me / From Here to Dundee) signal a return to stereo and pre-empt an album, pencilled in for an end of ‘08 release. But things are far from simple. “There are 12 of us now in the band,” explains Wilson. “The record has got string quartets and we’re trying to get a gospel choir. It’s fucking insane! For me as a composer, it’s been [about] seeing what we can do with the power behind us.”

“I’m a benevolent dictator!” he assures me, “I’m definitely not Hitler or Mussolini. Nor Pol Pot, he was too violent. I’ll go for Castro, he has a good health care system and I look after the guys in the band. I always have some plasters and stuff! When you’re running a band of this size, it’s tough. We have quite a high turnover especially with having a lot of classical guys, they get picked up by orchestras. So I think it’s important to have a core of five or six who have been with us for the same number of years, those would have more authority than the periphery.”

For bigger, should we read better? “Well, it’s reaching a point where things have to become less complicated because it’s quite difficult to get everything on. For the next record we might see what we can do with a more restricted palette. But yeah, we’re happier with this single than we have been with anything else we’ve put out.”

By the time you read this, Wilson will have already led his band of merry men and women to their debut performance at The Mill, which all kicked off in August with performances from Juno! and Thomas Tantrum at Oran Mor. Read the full review on this very page. www.myspace.com/howtoswim

Sign up to The Mill’s website (www.themill-live.com) to enter for an opportunity to score tickets to their upcoming events.

It’s an exciting line-up, with a range of Skinny-favoured bands in the offing. We Were Promised Jetpacks, interviewed this month, should make for a cracking bill alongside rising stars Frightened Rabbit. Alternatively the upbeat sound of The Ads should cotrast well with the experimental tendencies of FOUND, but in truth all these bookings look strong. Happy days.

GLASGOW: Wed, 3 Sep Tokyoblu, Kazoo Funk Orchestra Wed, 10 Sep Twin Atlantic, Kobai Wed, 17 Sep Injuns, Punch & The Apostles Wed, 24 Sep Endor, Be A Familiar

Wed, 1 Oct Pearl and the Puppets, We See Lights Wed, 8 Oct Dbass, Underling

EDINBURGH: Thu, 18 Sep Punch & The Apostles, Injuns Thu, 25 Sep Frightened Rabbit, We Were Promised Jet Packs Thu, 2 Oct The Ads, FOUND Thu, 9 Oct Underling, Dbass

www.theskinny.co.uk

September 08

THE SKINNY 49


Live Music

Live music Previews Ladyhawk

Highlights

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 28 Sep

by Ted Maul

Constantines’ live shows leave little room for discussion: they just rock. Captain’s Rest on 16 Sep is where it’s going down.

Constantines, Captain’s Rest, 16 Sep

Zoey Van Goey set the bar high early in September with a gig at GRV in Edinburgh on 4 Sep (+ Glasgow on 18 Sep at 13th Note). Not yer typical indie outfit, this continually evolving three-piece deal in beautifully understated pop songs that sparkle and fizz with intelligence and power. Highly recommended. The story of The Silver Apples is an astonishing one: after pioneering electronic synthesis in rock music during the late 60s, and having overcome the death of his musical partner and a car accident that severed his spinal cord, the mere fact that Simeon is still making music at all is miraculous. Get down to Stereo in Glasgow on 6 Sep to experience some of the most unusual sounds you’ll hear all year. Playing just a few days after the release of their hotly anticipated new album Carried to Dust, eclectic Arizonans Calexico will play the Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, on 11 Sep. Expect horns, strings and plenty of lush, inspirational music. Toronto’s Constantines have been impressing The Skinny for a good few years now with their moody, muscular indie chops. Their most recent album split the critics but their live shows leave little room for discussion: they just rock. Captain’s Rest on 16 Sep is where it’s going down. Peppy Teesiders Dartz! will play GRV in Edinburgh on 17 Sep, and if you’re in the mood for some quality

Futureheads-esque riffing then you could be in for a treat. On record they may sound a tad derivative thus far, but they are a seriously tight live outfit who will get your feet moving with no worries. A great live prospect. Having tried their hardest to upstage the Twilight Sad in their support role at a recent Edinburgh gig, and currently garnering serious praise from many quarters, Selkirk’s Frightened Rabbit will playthe first Skinny Dip at Aberdeen’s Moshulu on 18 Sep (+ Glasgow Arches on 30 Sep). Their mojo is really working right now - this is the perfect time to check them out. Although printing the words ‘cocksure indie urchins with a penchant for ska’ is likely to have as many of you reaching for the sick bag as for your dancing shoes, The Skinny is a broad church and is willing to admit that Peckham (endearingly spelt incorrectly on their own MySpace) based rude boys The Metros have a lively and youthful following. Skanking commences at Glasgow King Tut’s on 27 Sep. Currently touring in support of her upcoming solo album, Amanda Palmer of Dresden Dolls will be performing at Edinburgh’s Cabaret Voltaire on 30 Sep. Without the exuberant Brian Viglione punishing the skins, her new stuff sounds even more personal and intimate, and anyone who takes a chance on this gig is likely to be in for a real treat - Palmer is a huge talent.

Live music Previews Rolo Tomassi Wire

A bitter and changeable climate, northern isolation, heavy drinking and life in the shadow of their southern neighbour: Ladyhawk’s background story is something many of us Scots can surely relate to. This September will afford us the opportunity to see how these common sources of inspiration translate when they visit Glasgow. With recent masterpiece Shots still spinning fresh in stereos, at last we get to savour their Neil Young-inspired, bluesy racket live. Their refreshingly unfussy, lo-fi approach – albums steeped in atmosphere thanks to recordings in barns, for example - and a love of proper melody have also drawn comparisons with latter-day Sebadoh. “I want a drink so bad right now my hands are shaking,” starts Duffy Driediger, frontman with the Canadian quartet. “I’ve heard the Scots like a drink now and again. Good enough for Teenage Fanclub, good enough for me!” Having already presided over two critically acclaimed albums and one EP, though never making it this far afield until now, the singer and guitarist is eager to take in the sights, smells and native beverages of our homeland. Rumours of “success” on the back of their most recent opus and the forthcoming European tour are quickly dismissed, however. “Success? I’m broke as shit,” says Duffy.

“People are feeling us more in Canada these days, but we’re still lucky to get 15 people at most of our shows in the States... but those 15 people have gotten better looking.” That’s not exactly a complaint, Duffy explains: “My only ambitions were to have a band and play shows, maybe put out a record somehow, so I think we’re doing pretty good.. though it would be nice to be able to actually afford to go on tour instead of always worrying about how I’m going to pay my rent.” Whilst the aformentioned chilly wilderness of Canada has fathered some of the most enthralling alternative music of recent years - see Arcade Fire, A Silver Mt. Zion and ‘hawk co-conspirators Black Mountain, to name but a few Duffy also attributes Ladyhawk’s current achievements to their long-standing relationship with each other. Certainly, a band lasting for three records with its original line-up is something of a rarity these days. “We are like brothers at this point. Sometimes we get annoyed with each other, but it never really gets too bad. Mostly we just bitch about each other behind our backs. That being said, if you fuck with one of us individually, we will come at you like a pack of rabid dogs.” You’ve been warned. [Chris Cusack] 7.30pm, £7.50 www.myspace.com/ladyhawk

Shearwater

Captain’s Rest, 15 Sep Keen bird-spotter Jonathan Meiburg is more interesting than the anorak and binoculars stereotype suggests: he’s been a multi-instrumentalist and vocalist in Okkervil River since 1999, and is now concentrating full-time on ornithologically named side-project Shearwater, whose new record Rook is one of the most beguiling of the year so far. With his distinctively sharp crooning vocals and a real ear for creating space with careful production, Meiburg’s band has crafted a sumptuous melodrama that wavers between moments of despondency and beacons of hope. The sparse atmospherics

have lead to many comparisons with latter-day Talk Talk, but Shearwater retain far more energy than Mark Hollis’ sleepy troupe. Rook is in fact their fifth album; after three tiny independent releases, their fourth album Palo Santo was picked up and re-released by Matador last year to much critical praise. Now Rook has become one of the most critically acclaimed albums of 2008, so it’ll be a real treat to see at the Captain’s Rest. [Ally Brown]

Adem

Killing Joke

8pm, £8 www.myspace.com/shearwater

The Skinny Dip @ Barfly, 26 Sep

The Arches, 11 Sep

Freaking the hell out of anyone unprepared the last time round, Sheffield’s Rolo Tomassi return to the Barfly on the 26th in promotion of their debut album Hysterics. Their brand of hyper-spazz, uber-technical, shouty shouty, Nintendo-inspired fusion is enough to turn the head of the most hardcore post-hardcore fanatic. The fact that they are ridiculously young - just barely legal now and probably shouldn’t have been allowed on the premises last time - truly astonishes, magnifying their talent all the more. Lulling you in to a false sense of security with such a sweet and innocent appearance, you will be held aghast when cherub-faced front girl Eva Spence takes to the mic, somehow managing to project the vociferous yelps and growls that put her in the same ranks as Converge’s Jacob Bannon. Putting this patronising fixation on their age aside, having recently come off tours with Meet Me In St Louis and Youthmovies and no doubt buzzing off the media interest in their first album (and all those sweeties) you should expect that their already incredibly tight, energy packed show be even more chaotic than before. [Emma Smith]

135 compulsory reasons to go and see Wire: (1) They are Wire (2) They are still playing music after 30 odd (odd being the operative word here) years (3) They were post-punk before the fall of punk itself (4) They can be challenging (5) They can be easy to listen to (6) Their 1977 debut LP Pink Flag, together with the band’s two subsequent LPs (Chairs Missing and 154), turned punk-rock on its head, subverted genres, fragmented songwriting, dabbled in art, dabbled in pop, and made history (7) They consistently and compulsively reinvent themselves—from album to album, from song to song, from hiatus to hiatus (8) They could go on another hiatus at any point (which would make it their fourth) and, who knows, it could be their last (9) They have a good sense of humour (135) Their studio albums combined contain a total of 126 songs, most of which are glorious, some of which they will play at their show, and all of which are potential reasons on their own to see them play. It all adds up. [Jorge Marticorena]

Adem Ilhan’s intimate solo debut Homesongs was a record of uncommon majesty: you realise that when, in between its actual songs, you hear your own satisfied exhalations loudly above the noise of your environment, be it bathtub, bustling street, or bus. Like a certain brand of whisky, Adem at his best is able to extract tranquil beauty from any given situation. Second album Love And Other Planets introduced more electronic tinges, finally ceding to the ex-Fridge bassist’s oft-tagged ‘folktronica’ label, but Adem’s latest tour will see him concentrating on recent third outing Takes. If the prospect of a covers album instead of new material seemed underwhelming to fans, the execution was certainly no disappointment. Another high-quality offering, this time Adem reconstructed favourite songs by artists like PJ Harvey, Aphex Twin, Low and The Breeders into his own distinctive mould. And if you don’t recognise the song, you can always listen out for the contented sighs instead. [Ally Brown]

Industrial post-punk legends Killing Joke take to Glasgow’s ABC on the 2nd of October under their original incarnation, following the untimely death of mainstay bassist Paul Raven late last year. The enduring appeal of Jaz Coleman’s uncompromising unit proves ever telling; proving a key influence on the likes of Faith No More, Metallica, Jane’s Addiction, Nirvana (hell, Dave Grohl even played drums on one of their records) Korn and countless others. This tour is set to coincide with the release of radio sessions from the landmark John Peel show, documenting the band between the period 1979-1981. With music described by the original drummer as ’the sound of the earth vomiting,’ Cliff Richard this isn’t. Thus expect an intense show with some quasi-metal goth rock classics, proto-industrial noise and everything in between, detailing the band’s long and celebrated career. And with Coleman recently announcing a new album, it seems there’s more of it to follow. [John Tonner]

8pm, £6

8pm, £16.50

7pm, £7

7pm, £18.50

www.myspace.com/rolotomassi

www.myspace.com/wirehq

www.adem.tv

www.killingjoke.com

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September 08

Stereo, 21 Sep

ABC, 2 Oct

Live music


Records

Metal up your ass! by Austin Tasseltine

The misanthropy continues in Edinburgh as the Cold Dead Hands collective celebrates five years of itself. A bill of angry metal and skewed hardcore, including Tombs (USA), Planks (Germany), Flatlands (Sheffield) and Glasgow’s hotly tipped Citizens, seems intent on exorcising some demons right in to your face. Its a 3pm early start at Henry’s Cellar Bar (13 Sep). Glasgow drone fans might have a bit of a dilemma when Hydra Head Records’ Torche and Pelican attempt to shake Oran Mor to the ground with drop-tuned thunder, whilst the 13th Note

www.theskinny.co.uk

After weeks of pretentious street-theatre, Edinburgh gets its comeuppance and Cabaret Voltaire can expect a thorough kicking from Rock Action face-abusers DeSalvo (25 Sep) as the Glaswegian four-piece pay another belligerent visit to our nation’s capital. Only 24 hours later and Glasgow’s Barfly can likewise look forward to having its eyes scratched out by the insane casio-grindcore of Rolo Tomassi at the inaugral ‘Skinny Dip’.(26 Sep).

rolo tomassi

Thank goodness then for Meshuggah. Five Swedish men with heads like calculators and fists of hardened steel pummelling their way through musical conventions, like 4/4 timing, at Glasgow Garage (8 Sep).

grinds itself further underground with the rock-hard musings of Stand Up Guy, The Final Sigh and the infamous Black Sun (14 Sep). Either way, hearing damage is likely. The same is true of Take A Worm For A Walk Week’s launch for their second LP The Monroe Transfer (see the review this issue) at Captain’s Rest (17 Sep).

Lastly, ending as we began, Sweden will growl us toward October. The bright and sleepless Scandinavian nights seem to be manifesting themselves in the form of some distinctly unhappy axe-work. We see two different sides of the Krona as mega-stars In Flames bring their suspiciously tight sound to Barrowlands (27 Sep) (a tenner to anyone who can prove the amps are actually switched on). That same night, Henry’s is again subjected to the brilliant misery of Afgrund. Fellow countrymen of both Meshuggah and In Flames, let’s just say these fellas don’t have fleets of tour-buses and roadies. Expect gritted teeth and any blood spilled is most probably real.

Meshuggah

Thus September arrives. The long, breezy nights of summer pass in to memory and hazy fields of pollen give way to the roasted pastel shades of Autumn. Swept up in the aesthetic, arboreal fireworks and long sunsets of this glorious season, it’s easy to yearn for the soothing strum of an acoustic guitar and the husky drawl of some southern fellow relating bittersweet tales of love and loss. On the other hand, residents of Scotland subjected to this year’s unrelenting deluge probably don’t feel quite so benevolent. Weeks of heavy jackets, cancelled sporting events and squeaky windscreen wipers might just have dented enthusiasm in the folk scene.

September 08

THE SKINNY 51


Clubs Club Snafu:

A Fourtuitous Birthday Four years has passed since Snafu opened its doors, so with that in mind, it must be time for a four day celebration. Nicol J. Craig looks in on the northern light of music venues The Skinny has been slowly penetrating the north: first Dundee, and now the Granite City of Aberdeen, where one subterranean nightclub paradoxically stands above the rest - Snafu. Celebrating its fourth birthday this September, club owners Mo and Amanda have decided a four-day beat feast (18-21 Sept) is in order.

haggard, succeeded immensely in catering for the commercial bulks who’ll happily bop along to The Proclaimers for the rest of their days. Due to the reputation Mo and Amanda previously built up running the infamous Pelican club in the late 90’s, which hosted the legendary Kia-Aura, they managed to start Snafu from a respected basis.

Snafu’s paradoxical nature can also be found in its name, it roughly translates to ‘situation normal: all f*cked up’ which seems more like an antonym of the club’s performance. Rather than a messy operation, Snafu’s growing reputation comes with due cause: previous guests include Vitalic, Green Velvet, Erol Alkan, Steve Bug, Simian Mobile Disco, Andrew Weatherall, as well as up and coming acts such as Crookers, Streetlife DJs, The Presets, and Deportivo Street Team. With such a plethora of beat connoisseurs, it’s no wonder Snafu has become the hub for the electronic northeast.

Last year, Snafu beat off the mighty Arches in winning the much revered SLTN Nightclub Of The Year award. Being genuinely innovative in its bookings and ethos, the club has carved itself a niche, in which others have failed.

In between top notch clubs, Snafu also finds the time to promote comedy, live indie and alternative music, as well as a seasonal mag with info on the club and Aberdeen in general. You might think it mysterious too, how this small club (capacity 350) has found favour and following with so many top DJs, and established such strong local support. Yet there is little mystery. Before Snafu, the city’s young ‘uns were crying out for a club with aspirations of bringing quality acts up north. The nightlife, rather

But it’s not all banging bookings and glittering prizes. Snafu also sports a social responsibility cap: much effort goes into creating its unique sense of intimacy with its clientele. Local support has been the basis for the club’s ability to book big name acts, but success hasn’t come overnight. “The first two years were a bit tough,” says Amanda, “Our regulars really saw us through; they saw that we were dedicated in creating something special, something all Aberdonians could be proud of.” “We always wanted to create a venue that we would feel comfortable to go to and where we would enjoy a night out ourselves,” adds Mo. Optimo favourites X Vectors are kicking off the birthday bash (18 Sept, £4/£3) - the Edinburghbased band are coming off the back of their single Now Is The Winter Of Our Discotheque.

Mixtape resident Giles Walker headlines on Friday 19th (£5/£4). A local hero for the up north crew, he likes to stride across the musical spectrum, giving an eclectic blend of all things electronic. More recently he’s been pushing dubstep and baile funk sounds to great success. The third night of the festivities sees The Deep End invite Funky Transport to the mix (£6/£5). Of late, the Invernesian has built himself an impressive selection of original 12” releases, getting remixes from the likes of Phonique, Derrick Carter and 20/20 Vision. One of the north’s leading DJs, expect house of the stripped down variety with just a dash of electro encouragement. And as a fitting finale, Erol Alkan rolls up donside for the third time to claim Snafu as his own (£15). The fourth birthday wouldn’t be complete without a belter of a climax. Alkan, no stranger to the big occasion, is sure to please the discernible Snafu regulars. Aye, and if you don’t fancy that; you could walk around the corner and find yourself an orange faced fishwife with a mouth like a trout and experience a different kind of Aberdonian happiness. 18 Sept: 9pm-2am, £3/£4 19 Sept: 10pm-3am, £4/£5 20 Sept: 10pm-3am, £5/£6 21 Sept: 9pm-3am, £15 www.clubsnafu.com

Having a Ball of a Time Don McVinnie sings Happy Birthday as Ballers Social Club turn one and line up a two day special to celebrate local and UK talent One of the DJs hasn’t shown up ‘cause she spent the entire day getting pissed in the park, and some guy’s just been arrested on the dancefloor: one year ago Ballers Social Club celebrated their opening night at The Ivy in true style with the sort of riotous overindulgence one could expect of the early rave generation. Joe Kalamo, one of the duo responsible for the party reminisces: “The first night was wild. A real get dumb affair. In Glasgow it’s always wet so the majority of people just get hedonistic in clubs.” Taking hip-hop as its basis, Ballers Social Club has evolved to suit the promoters’ diverse musical leanings. “Rustie and I used to talk about new crunk, hyphy and more commercial rap / production all the time,” explains Joe. “I just started a club night which represented that kind of music. The guests and music policy always reference it in some way but we generally play the best shit in any genre. We wanted a club that also represented the music we make.”

nadsdroic Christina Kernohan

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September 08

The night has attracted a number of high-profile guests from across the Atlantic, such as Montreal crunkfuckers Mofomatronix, Detroit fat cat Phat Kat, and “prime of the pancake stack” Andrew Meza, but the club’s success rests equally on the local talent introduced every month and the strong list of residents. “It’s important that we support like-minded artists and have fun while

doing this. Glasgow has a lot of talent and I think a lot of people are now catching on to how much talent there is here. You can see the best music week in, week out in Glasgow and that influences people. The residents are all good friends of mine and we all take part in the shaping of LuckyMe [the club’s affiliate record label]. All the residents have roots in Scotland and the majority are from Glasgow or Edinburgh. I try and support their talent via the night. Every resident deserves a place in Glasgow’s ever growing club scene.” LuckyMe are a regular and integral part of Ballers Social Club, a shared ideology bringing the two together. Label director Dom Sum explains, “When we started in 2002 I guess our schtik was, and still is, the naive confidence to stand up and say that all this varied shit we make, and all this varied shit we like, is good enough to put out to the world. The LuckyMe sound then grew naturally. Some people see us as some sort of progression for hip-hop that they have been waiting for. That is very cool but really we are just doing what is natural to us, which is find a middle way between all the shit we love, and we just keep listening to new music.” The club’s upcoming first birthday celebration sees top notch talent from the LuckyMe stable in the form of Hudson Mohawke and The Blessings (Dom’s collaboration with labelmate FineArt), coming together once again with Andrew Meza - his last session with the club in November left

the crowd braying for more. Heading the bill from Brooklyn via Detroit are soulsters Platinum Pied Pipers (PPP). Having shared stages with Roy Ayers, Brazilian Girls and Mark Ronson amongst many others, they’re now going to thrill the crowd at Glasgow School of Art with their outstanding live show. Never ones to get stuck in the present however, the club are already looking forward to next year’s line-ups. “2009 is the year that my girlfriend convinces me to put on more dubstep,” says Joe. “GZA, DJ Skurge, Fulgeance, Darkstar, Glitch Mob, Onra, Pursuit Grooves and more will appear before the end of the year. We’re also going to try to bring Chris Brown alongside Panda Bear.” Also watch out for upcoming releases on LuckyMe from Nadsroic, an exquisite rapper cum singer produced by Hudson Mohawke, and The Blessings. The ball is just getting rolling. The Ballers Social Club 1st Birthday Part 1: Platinum Pied Pipers (full live band), and Andrew Meza (DJ Set), with support from Hudson Mohawke + FineArt @ Glasgow School of Art, 12 Sep 11pm-3am, £8 (adv.) / £10 The Ballers Social Club 1st Birthday Part 2: Lukid (live) Andrew Meza and Mike Slott (B2B DJ Set) @ The Ivy, Glasgow, 13 Sept 10pm-2am, free entry www.myspace.com/ballerssocialclub

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Club Previews

The Bug & Warrior Queen Soundcrash Launch Party Glasgow School of Art, 12 Sep

In recent years, Soundcrash have been operating rigorously in London and running folk ragged with meaty names such as Luke Vibert, DJ Kentaro and Hexstatic, supplemented with healthy doses of Krush, Vadim and Kode 9. It’s about time then that the production company is bringing their self-proclaimed rag-tag assortment of vagabonds, miscreants and roll call of musical ingénues and geniuses northwards to Glasgow. For the launch party they have The Bug and Warrior Queen to bombard you with dark animal beats and throbbing bass partnered with otherworldy, hypnotic rhythms. DJ A’ La Fu, a selector with an ear for the extraordinary, will assault you with mixes that are much-loved and muchpimped by both his labels and all of his many listeners. Memory9 aims for more than glitch with his dub-inflected musings: intense, genre-resistant electronic mashups and music. A self described ‘electronic postmodern deconstructivist luckdragon on wheels’, he completes the night, alongside Rob Soundcrash. Defo a launch party you won’t want to miss. [Michael Slevin] 11pm-3am, £8 adv. / £10 www.myspace.com/thebuguk www.soundcrash.co.uk

Dollz At Play Hell

Classic Grand, Glasgow, 19 Sep This month Hell beckons for female DJ duo Dollz At Play. Combining the talents of half-Swiss/half-Mexican, Xochitl West and Spaniard, Bea Rodreguez Dias, the pair have been spinning together for only four years but have already achieved three residencies in Ibiza and their own weekly Sunday nighter, Superfreq at The End in London. Mentored by Mr C (West’s husband), the long-established DJ and producer helped secure the girls most of their early DJ dates and gained them representation with the ITB DJ Agency. However, both are talented in their own right and aside from playing a combination of pulsating electro, techno and house, they’ve a distinct sense of style, customising their own outfits to help them stand-out from the usual jeans ‘n’ shirt DJ brigade. Appearing on the cover of DJ Magazine earlier this year, the girls have played across Europe and South America and cite Kraftwerk, Front 242, Nitzer Ebb and punk as influences. [Colin Chapman] 11pm - 3am £TBC www.myspace.com/dollzatplay www.myspace.com/hellevents

Various Production Numbers

Sub Club, glasgow, 5 Sep After a lengthy pursuit Numbers are ecstatic to bring you one of their all time favourites, Various Production. Shrouded in mystery, this musical duo have given no interviews to date, preferring to let the vinyl do the talking. They producing a distinctive, haunting sound that drives through selections of clattering percussion, garage bass-drops, dubsteppy rhythms, hip-hop and folk music. Their highly addictive, limited edition releases sell out as soon as they hit the shelves, with help from the phenomenal illustrations of David Bray (aka Bonesy) whose sexually explicit and cutesy cartoon characters adorn them. Factory Records would be proud. Having cut ties with XL Recordings, Various Production continue to release on their own imprint, their latest being Various Versus, which features Numbers friends Rustie and Actress. Various will perform with support from DJ Jackmaster, Production Unit and VJ Retina Glitch. [Ema Johnson] 11pm-3am, £10 www.myspace.com/numbers12345678

Parklife

Strathclyde Country Park, 13 Sep Tired of looking at your mates’ Ibiza photos on Facebook and wishing you were there? Fret not, now you can round off your festival calendar and test your party endurance with an all day session of dance music mayhem that’s a little closer to home. Inside Out and Goodgreef are

54 THE SKINNY

September 08

teaming up with local house leaders Stereofunk to create a festival that will propel you into autumn with a bang. Eddie Halliwell is set to headline in his only Scottish gig of 2008, alongside the likes of Judge Jules, Kelly Lorena, Ultrabeat and Flip & Fill. Expect breakneck BPMs from the likes of GG Xtra Hard and new leaders in hard dance Alex Kidd. For those wishing to make more than just a day of it, Afterlife, the official festival after-fling, will continue on at the Arches until 3am. [Emma Kilday]

t r Cha J D

Damian Lazarus

12pm – 10pm. Early Bird Tickets: £25 + BF (Ticketweb only) Standard Tickets: £35 + BF, limited VIP packages: £45 + BF For bus travel info see www.happybus.co.uk or www.stepys.co.uk Afterlife: 10pm – 3am @ The Arches. Tickets £10 www.parklifeforever.com

Mark du Mosch Slabs of the Tabernacle The Twisted Wheel, Glasgow, 6 Sep

Slabs of the Tabernacle is a party happening on the first Saturday of every month in the basement of Glasgow’s best kept secret - The Twisted Wheel. Now on their fifth night, Slabs of the Tabernacle have already hosted Scottish debuts for a number of artists such as the Third Man (ai Records) and UK italo pioneer Casionova (Magic Waves / Dissident). Next up is Rotterdam’s Mark du Mosch (Moustache Records). Armed with a bag of his finest records, a ‘tache spectacular awaits! Championed by the likes of fellow Dutchman, I-F, Mark Du Mosch makes music that is not of this earth: melodies that sound like they were crafted on the moon, layered with deep spacey synth swooshes that will illuminate any dancefloor. Since 2006’s Let it Go he has only released a handful of records but they have all been of the highest calibre. Space helmets at the ready then, for a DJ set that will explore the realms of disco, italo, house, techno and beyond. [Joel Shaw] 10.30pm-3am, £5 www.moustacherecords.com www.slabsofthetabernacle.com

DJ Rahaan Melting Pot

The Admiral, Glasgow, 6 Sep Marking only his second appearance in Glasgow, Chicago’s legendary, über-talented DJ Rahaan started out playing house parties alongside The Chuck Brothers in the late eighties, before moving to Wisconsin in 1990. Spending the next six years collecting rather than DJing records, he returned to Chicago in ’96, where he rejoined the Chucks and also hooked up with Ken Torry (aka Afrodesia) to play The Spot. Soon after he began notching up guest spots at nights like Sisterz Of Vision and Soul In The Hole before gaining a residency at Chicago’s Budda Longe in 2000. A year later, his first productions efforts were released on Fourplay Records and he began posting up mixes on the Deep House Page and Bring The Heat websites, which helped his talents get noticed across the globe, leading to bookings in Belgium, Spain, Japan, Ireland and the UK. More recently his re-edits have turned up on the Jisco Music and Kat labels. [Colin Chapman] 11pm - 3am £10 on the door Melting Pot Pre-Club, The Admiral, 72a Waterloo Street, Glasgow, G2 7DA, free entry from 9pm

Andy C

Street Knowledge

Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 20 Sep After the success of Street Knowledge’s launch back in May, DJ Kid’s clubnight returns for a freshers’ week special. Headlining the proceedings is dnb’s original superstar DJ, Andy C. Since co-founding Ram Records back in 1992, Andy has been at the forefront of the scene, receiving bookings around the world. As a producer, he’s released some of drum and bass’s biggest anthems, including 2002’s catchy classic Bodyrock. His DJ sets are often an up-tempo affair, flawlessly mixing between the latest drum and bass releases and timeless classics. This night sees him utilising three turntables for what should be a truly memorable set. Joining him for the evening will be Hospitality resident, MC Wrec. Always a favourite in Edinburgh, MC Wrec has played in the capital several times now. His subtle intelligent style never fails to impress. [Al Majik]

Crosstown Rebel label owner and frequent electro house guest in Glasgow, Damian Lazarus gives us his top ten for September Riz Mc - Radar (Loco Dice Rmx) (Crosstown Rebels)

Seth Troxler - Love Never Sleeps (Rmxs) (Crosstown Rebels)

New signing to my label, and one of the most talented new artists I’ve met. Just won a BAFTA for his acting skills and set to turn heads with his future music.

The youngest new kid on the block, Seth debuts on

Franklin Da Costa - Corny (Leena) Weird and trippy synths, slow and moody - bliss.

Jamie Jones - 911 (Crosstown Rebels)

Crosstown Rebels with the sound of the summer. Killer remixes come from Adam Marshall and Par Grindvik.

Luke Solomon - Demons (Brennan Green Rmx) (Crosstown Rebels) The combination of two amazing artists, Luke and Brennan, bring forth a weird and wondrous smash hit -

This is no comedy record! The track with the emergency call from a fucked up couple who think they’re dying from a marijuana overdose, heavy sound!

cartoon techno sounds for cool ears.

Radio Slave - Rj (Cdr)

One of my favourite tracks on my Sci Fi mix album, vo-

One of the most prolific producers around turns in an old school techno monster.

Dapayk Solo - A Saw Attacks (Mo’s Ferry) Sliding saw sound shakes the dancefloor in this next level work of techno genius.

Pele - Viva Belize (Connaisseur) A staple of my set this summer: as yet unreleased magical latin-based gem from Germany via Brazil.

Portable - Albatross (Sud Electronic) cal electro doesn’t get much better than this.

Deetron - Let’S Get Over It (Henrik Schwarz Rmx) (Music Man) A special record to end any special DJ set: lush vocals, pure slow-groove energy, a beautiful track in every way. Early heads up! Lazarus will be playing for The Arches’ local heroes, Pressure, who celebrate their tenth birthday in November. Details still tba so keep reading The Skinny for the lowdown.

Tokyoblu 6th Birthday

Pangea 4th Birthday

Set to celebrate their 6th Birthday this month, Tokyoblu blurs the lines between club night, DJ duo and seven-piece band. Starting out in Club Ego’s Cocteau Lounge, the night’s acted as an outlet for the talents of DJs John and Iain Tokyoblu and the live band of the same name, featuring vocalists, keys, guitar, bass and decks. While John and Iain throw down an eclectic mixture of disco, house, gospel, Latin and African flavours, the Tokyoblu live experience has drawn comparisons with that of Groove Armada and Basement Jaxx, and since its beginnings on the capital’s underground club scene, has gone onto establish itself on both the festival circuit and internationally. The night now resides at Cabaret Voltaire and this special occasion is sure to attract the many friendly, up-for-it party people the club counts as its loyal following - especially because they are launching their single Groove Tonight on the same night. [Colin Chapman]

It’s been a crazy few years since Pangea first opened its

Cabaret Voltaire, Edinburgh, 19 Sep

Reading Rooms, Dundee, 19 Sep doors and invited crowds to come and bear witness to the sound of drum and bass. With residents Special Ed and Professa Fresh spinning a variety of sounds of the musical underground and host MC Troubla presiding over the sweat-soaked proceedings, the club quickly expanded and is now laying waste to dancefloors in both Dundee and Glasgow on a regular basis. In honour of their fourth anniversary, Pangea are welcoming special guest Simon ‘Bassline’ Smith. During a career spanning almost two decades, Smith has released on almost every major dnb label and become something of a legend in the genre. His track Odyssey reached number one in the UK dance charts and he has appeared at some of the biggest clubs, raves and festivals in Europe. Expect a relentless aural assault, top-quality visuals and live graffiti carnage in what will definitely be a birthday to remember. [Emma Kilday]

11pm-3am, £13+bf adv.

11pm-3am, £6 - £10

10:30pm - 3am, £6.50 adv (available from Grouchos, Dundee) / £9 / £12 on door

www.myspace.com/streetknowledgeevents

www.tokyoblu.com

www.pangeanation.co.uk

Clubs


Clubs

Clubbing

Highlights Summer is just getting started... get yersel to the dance floor

Drum & Breaks Curriculum As the summer draws to a close and the last of the music festivals are over, Scotland’s cities begin to buzz with excitement again. The arrival of new students in each city prompts many clubnights to raise their game in September, and this year is no exception. Taking place at Cabaret Voltaire every Tuesday, Split has been the cause of Wednesday hangovers in Edinburgh for almost 5 years now. With free entry, this is a must for any people wanting to catch Scotland’s finest drum & bass and breaks DJs for next to nothing. For all

Bar & Venue

the junglists out there, it’s definitely worth checking out Mutiny at The Bongo Club on 11 Sept. They’ve got pioneering legend DJ Remarc playing (11pm-3am, £4/£6). Over at The Reading Rooms in Dundee on Fri 19, Pangea will be celebrating their 4th birthday. Guest DJ for the evening is none other than Technique recordings label boss Simon Bassline Smith (11pm-3am, £6.50/£10). Back in Edinburgh and on the same night Xplicit will be taking over Potterow for a special fresher’s party. They’ve managed to book not one, not two but all three of the infamous Scratch Perverts. Expect a healthy mashup of hip-hop, breaks and drum and bass (19 Sept, 10pm-3am, £6). [Al Majik]

Live Bands. Great Music. Fresh Food. VELCRO QUARTET + SUPER ADVENTURE CLUB.....3RD SEPT WOODPIGEON / THE FRENCH WIVES / EAGLEOWL...8TH SEPT SHEARWATER ...................................................15TH SEPT CONSTANTINES W/ THE MOTH & THE MIRROR........16TH SEPT ADEM................................................................21TH SEPT PETER MOLINARI...............................................25TH SEPT ISLANDS + LORD AUCH.....................................28TH SEPT BODIES OF WATER..............................................2ND OCT DAEDELUS + A LA FU (LIVE).................................5TH OCT MAPS & ATLASES + NO KILTER..........................8TH OCT NIGHTMARCHERS............................................19TH OCT HOLY GHOST REVIVAL ....................................20TH OCT THIS WILL DESTROY YOU..................................13TH OCT THE WEEK THAT WAS..........................................24TH OCT THROW ME THE STATUE....................................28TH OCT KID BRITISH......................................................16TH NOV .....AND MUCH MORE

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Hat Club, Byblos, 11pm-3am, £8, 5 Sept

House of Techno So have we finally got the answer to the extensive game of Cluedo that Hyperdub has been playing with fans, about the ‘true’ identity of Mercury-nominated producer Burial? J’accuse Will Bevan, in South London, with a bunch of technology. A secret identity has possibly been shattered, but some Google searching reveals a top-ranked hit of William Bevan, funeral director. Funeral director - Burial, geddit? It could merely be a coinicidence of course, but if so how will the knowledge of Burial’s name affect the response to his music? Not at all. The anonymity preserved for so long was not one of Richard D. James’ piss-artist pranks, full of semi-clues and red herrings, nor is it in any way comparable to the guessing games played over Banksy’s true identity. There was never any suggestion that Burial was a nom de plume for an established artist (though the Sun bizarrely suggested Aphex Twin and Fatboy Slim had been considered). All his blog tells us is that he’s a bloke from London who makes tunes, which is hardly anything surprising, or even interesting. Even if Will Bevan isn’t actually his name. We should be embracing

this disinterest in personality, not playing coy guessing games about recalcitrant artists. Cover over the labels on your vinyls, give out blank CDs, and refuse to accept anything except what your ears tell you. On a related note, this month, I’m listening to the new album from Edinburgh’s Double Helix, who prove that Scotland can make great hip-hop. I’ll also be heading down to see the gorgeous Erol Alkan at Death Disco (The Arches, Glasgow, 20 Sept, 11pm-3am, £12). Also worth checking out will be the launch of Comapkt, a new night at the Cabaret Voltaire, playing a range of minimal tech, deep house and electro. Residents Jamie Kidd and Paul Thomas alone are worth checking out, but their launch night brings over Par Grindvik, whose releases on Drumcode and Primate have been making serious waves (11pm-3am, £8-10, 12 Sept). Or for a slightly more visually aesthetic trip, check out Hat Club at Glasgow’s Byblos, with filthy house from James Fitch of Prok and Fitch, and a startling array of headgear (11pm-3am, £8, 5 Sept). [Liam Arnold]

Hip-Hop Highlights

for all the crunk, Baltimore and hip-hop fans out there (Blackfriars, Glasgow, 28 Sept, 8pm-late, £3/£5).

Kicking off September in true style is Trade Union (Cabaret Voltaire, Edinburgh, Mon 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 Sept, 11pm-3am, £0/£1): residents Wolfjazz & DJ Beefy always play a healthy dose of hip-hop to get your bootys shaking first thing in the week! Soul Biscuits puts on a Run DMC tribute night (Cabaret Voltaire, 5 Sept, 11pm-3am, £5), and later in the month they will be joining forces with the Mixkings to put on Bass Drunk

Freakmoves welcomes Samir down for a sweaty night of electro-crunky hip-hop beats (Glasgow School of Art, 25 Sept, 11pm-3am, £tbc). For hip-hop fans in the capital there is only one place to be every Sunday with Tipsy continuing their weekly sessions with resident DJ Nick G taking control of the 1s and 2s (Massa, 7, 14, 21, 28 Sept, 11pm-3am, £5). [Lady K]

World On The Beat Get yourself over to Dundee for the second incarnation of the Sunweed Dub Explosion, featuring Messenger Sound System and Ras Echo, venturing to dub you up the right way (Reading Rooms, Dundee, 26 Sept, 10.30pm-3am, £tbc). Monday may not be the brightest of days, so the following uplifting music will be of extreme importance: The Groanbox Boys’ curious country blues will get your feet tapping (Leith Folk Club, Edinburgh, 8 Sept, 8pm-late, £tbc), and Ronny Spector and The Ronettes will take you back to yuletide

www.theskinny.co.uk

1969, where you can rock around the Christmas tree (The Arches, Glasgow, 29 Sept, 7.30pm, £20), whilst the Platinum Pied Pipers will take you to the future of live soul music, with horns, harmonies, and edgy beats (The Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh, 15 Sept, 8pm-late, £tbc). But what can be better than to boogie in a worldly way for a weekend in the mud, the rain, the sun, the green glen, with the good company of DJ Aphrodite, MC Junior Red and Kangaroo Moon? The Hairth (Knockengorroch Festival) will be music to the hills, and ears! (Dumfriesshire, 19-21 Sept, £29-£70) [Josh Coppersmith-Heaven]

September 08

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Glasgow gigs Mike Nisbet, Colin Train, Jack in the Green, The Rio Café,

Sun 14 Sep

Flaming Rocks, Mama Mayhem, Rockers, Rawk, 19:30, £TBC Lach, Arthur Delaney, Alan McKim, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, The

The Easy Orchestra, Blackfri-

Singer / songwriter night, 20:00–00:00, Free

NYC anti-folk guru returns, 20:30, £ 6.50

Thu 11 Sep Wolfpac, Damaged Gods,

Rockers, Ex-Bloodhound Gang, 19:00, £TBC Wire, Lonelady, The Arches, Postpunk experimentalists, 20:00, £TBC

The Arcadian Kicks, Agent Ribbons, Plastic Stasi, Is This Music?, 13th Note, Garage / psychedelic

rock, 20:00, £TBC

Oran Social, Andrea Marini, Concrete Campfire presents…, Brel, Folk and flamenco, 20:00,

Free

Manda Rin, Fangs, Barfly Glas-

gow, Former Bis disco popper girl goes it alone, 20:00, £TBC Jason Molina, ABC2, Indie rock songwriter, 19:00, £ 12.00 Houlette, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Aussie chanteuse, 20:00, £ 2.00

Wed 06 Aug

Rocketfox, Kurai Kotoro, Talk to Angels, Non Zero,

Sinister Flynn, 13 Conditions, Craig Hughes, The Richard Mailey, French Wives, Tommy Reilly,

Alternative rock, 19:30, £ 5.00

Rags & Feathers, Elliot from the West, The Concrete Campfire presents…,

Wed 27 Aug

Down the Tiny Steps, 13th Note,

Regurgitator, The Afteraffects, Litle John Rocket,

Laikadog, New Generation Superstars, Glam Sleaze, Race Rock 2008, Rockers, Punk and

Mark Morriss, Acoustic Butterfly, Oran Mor, Solo show by

The Covergirls, The Echo Session, The Retrofets, Intervals, Flowers in the Dustbin presents…, 13th Note,

Brel, Folk rock, 20:00, Free

Skinflints, The Winchester Club, Indie rock, 20:00–03:00, £ 6.00

Mon 01 Sep Stolen Order, The Detours,

13th Note, Some rock music for your face, 19:30, £TBC Yaman, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Indian classical music on sitar and flute, 20:00, £ 2.00

Serj Tankian and The Flying Cunts of Chaos, ABC, Metal: Ex (?)

System of a Down frontman brings that howl, 19:30, SOLD OUT

Anavris, Forever Ends Tomorrow, Rockers, Metal / hardcore,

19:30, £TBC

“”Synthesized bluesy madness””, 20:00, £TBC

hip-hop hybrid, 19:00, £TBC Dave Dominey, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Laptop, electric bass and a guest soloist, 20:00, £ 2.00

Fri 05 Sep Super Adventure Club, Super Adventure Club, The Vale,

Great new Edinburgh band prepare for French tour, 19:45–22:30, £tbc Stairway to Zeppelin, The Barfly, A whole lotta Led, TBC, £TBC

Jackie Leven, Jono, Tommy Reilly, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Folk,

Tue 02 Sep What The Blood Revealed,

Bloc, Huge metallic post-rock, 21:00–23:30, free The Bottleneckers, Blackfriars, 50s styled rock and roll, 21:00, Free

Shaped By Fate, My Minds Weapon, Your Fears, The Barfly, Hardcore punk, 20:00, £TBC

Jimmy Richards, A Still Frame Skyline, Pablo Gone Nuts, 13th Note, “”If Morrissey and David

Bowie had sex while Frank Turner was watching.”” Ewww, 19:30, £TBC Hypo Psycho, Rockers, Rock, 19:30, £TBC

Clare & the Reasons, Brendan Campbell, Alex Cornish, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Folk rock, 20:30, £ 7.00 Allan Y McDougall, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Traditional Scottish music arranged for guitar and bouzouki, 20:00, £ 2.00

Wed 03 Sep

20:30, £ 7.00

Glasvegas, Queen Margaret Union, Their time to shine, let’s hope the lager anthems don’t spoil them, 19:00, £TBC

Ex Men, Spy Movie, Cuddly Shark, Electrolite, Pinup Nights, The Winchester Club, “”Like Un-

derworld remixed by Chris Morris””, 21:00–03:00, £ 4.00 Echofela, Nice’n’Sleazy, Acoustic pop, 20:00, £TBC Backyard Babies, Cathouse, 90s punk metallers, 19:00, £TBC American Music Club, Stereo, Soft San Fran indie rock, 19:30, £TBC

AB/CD, Tigers On Vaseline, Levee Breakers, Gallus Co, Monsters of Mock, Glasgow Garage, What it look like?, 18:00, £TBC

Sat 06 Sep The 66, Manta, Grant Kelly,

The Barfly, Echoes of Madchester, TBC, £TBC

Dances On The Sand, Rio Café,

20:00–00:00, Free

The Dodos, Euros Childs, Beerjacket, King Tut’s Wah Wah

Hut, Hippy folk from San Fran, 20:30, £ 7.00

Tokyoblu, Kazoo Funk Orchestra, The Mill, Oran

Mor, A new platform for emerging music talent in Glasgow, 19:00–22:30, See www.themill-live. com, Free via website Residents, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Modern jazz standards played by resident trio, 20:00, £ 2.00 Michael Simons, Tchai-Ovna Deanston Drive, Folk, blues and beyond from fingerstyle guitarist, 20:00, £ 2.00

Decoy, James Connor, Andrew Yule, The Rio Café, Swedish

metal, 20:00–00:00, Free Kids Can’t Fly, Rockers, Rock, 19:30, £TBC

Thu 04 Sep Yaman, Tchai-Ovna Deanston Drive,

Indian classical music on sitar and flute, 20:00, £ 2.00

Rose Hill Drive, White Ace,

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Bluesy American rawk, 20:30, £ 8.00 A Traitor Like Judas, Ivory Blacks, German metallers, 20:00, £TBC

58 THE SKINNY

Nice’n’Sleazy, Rawk, 20:00, £TBC

Ruth Wilson, Uri Stav Quartet, Brel, Jazz hands at the ready,

15:00–18:00, Free

Reactor, Gammer, Bass Generator, Darwin, Rob Da Rhythm, Mikey Motion B, Ivory Blacks, Metal, 21:00, £TBC

Pearl and the Puppets, John Carson, Mick Drain, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Acoustic pop, 20:30, £ 5.00

Jamie Barnes & Cochise, The Big Licks, The Fakes, Rockers, Classic rock, 19:00, £TBC

Hand of Dog, The Fighting 69th, 13th Note, Rawk, 19:30, £TBC Christine Bovill, Cossachok,

Remembering Edith Piaf, 21:00, £ 6.00

Carol Laula with the Well Green, The Tron, Folk singer supporting

new LP Red Wine and Age, 20:00, £ 12.00

Sun 07 Sep Underoath, The Garage, Christian rock band from Tampa, Florida, 19:00–22:00, £11.00 Underoath, Glasgow Garage, Metal outfit from Florida, 19:00, £ 11.00 The Toasters, Root System, The Hostiles, Esperanza, Rockers, Ska, 19:00, £TBC

The Gary Miller Blues Duo, Blackfriars, Jazz and blues, 21:00, Free

SEPTEMBER 08

Twisted Wheel, Rock / ska, 20:00–00:00, £ 4.00

Nice’n’Sleazy, Folk rock, 20:00, £TBC

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Classic rock, 20:30, £ 10.00

Bluetones frontman, 19:30, £ 8.00

Foxgang, 32 Miles for Breakfast, Lost Persona, The Hostiles, Classic Grand, Industry showcase of local up-and-comers, 19:00, £ 6.00

Chris Bradley, Dean Queasy, Daffy, Alexander Murry, No Hassle at the Hof, Republic Bier Hof, Edinburgh singer songwriter, playing in support of his debut LP, 20:00, Free

Billy Kelly Songwriting Award, Heat 2, Oran Mor, A battle

royale of bands, 20:00, £TBC

Fri 12 Sep

Voodoo Six, Cathouse, Wonk rock, 19:00, £ 7.00

ars, Pop rock, 21:00, Free

Stand-Up Guy, The Final Sigh, Black Sun, 13th Note, Stellar riff manu-

facturers, 19:30, £TBC

Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, Jesus H Fox,

Captains Rest, Pop rock, 20:00, £TBC Pelican, Torche, Oran Mor, Skilled Hydra Head records’ post-rock combo, 19:00, £TBC Malefice, Paige, Ivory Blacks, Metal, 19:00, £TBC

eVe Buigues, Ged Brockie,

Cossachok, The Jazz in Paris Project, 21:00, £ 6.00

Mon 15 Sep Shearwater, Shearwater,

Captian’s Rest, Jonathan Meiburg, founding member of Okkervil River, arrives in Glasgow to perform with his other band, the fast-rising Shearwater., 19:00–22:30, £tbc Yaman, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Indian classical music on sitar and flute, 20:00, £ 2.00

The Academy Is, We The Kings, Glasgow Garage, Emo, 19:00,

Soft Toy Emergency, The Part Time Signals, ABC2, Electro

indie rock from ex-Okkervil River man, 20:00, £TBC

Shearwater, Captains Rest, Emotive Kiss Kiss Baby, Halcyon, Labels, Danica, Rockers, Indie rock, 19:30, £TBC

Golden Silvers, Ex-lovers, Down the Tiny Steps, King Tut’s

Forever the Sickest Kids, ABC2, Indie rock, 19:00, £ 6.00

Louise McVey, Cracks in the Concrete, Last Ones Left, Concrete Campfire presents…, Brel, Acoustic session, 20:00, Free Sennen, Captains Rest, Indie rock, 20:00,

£TBC

Swervedriver, Terra Diablo, Latonic, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, First

Scottish gig in a decade for the shoe-grungers, mon the Swervies!, 20:30, £ 12.50 Bodies, Rockers, Punk, 19:30, £TBC

Fri 19 Sep

sive Jetplane Landing offshoot, TBC, £TBC

The Felt Tips, The artial Arts, Oran Mor, Glaswegian indie pop, 19:30, Single launch, £TBC

Tue 16 Sep The Little Ones, Stereo, Indie rock,

19:00, £ 6.50

The Chemists, Pablo Eskimo,

JMC, Kronahaarn, Firebrand, The Twisted Wheel, Metal heads,

Starving Weirdos, Vodka Soap, Nackt Insecten, Single Helix, Beyond Good & Evil,

Vehicle Field, The Salt Weapon, Rockers, Rock, 19:30, £TBC Unreliable Narrators, Lula Maes, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Folk duo

rise, 19:30, £TBC Y&T, Cathouse, Classic rock, 19:00, £ 16.00 Vulture Speak, Tchai-Ovna Deanston Drive, Psychedlic folk, 20:00, £ 2.00

Houlette, Spirals, Nice’n’Sleazy,

French pop / folk, 20:00, £TBC

Mon 08 Sep

Tue 09 Sep

Great new Edinburgh band prepare for French tour, 20:00–22:00, £tbc

The Law, Gloria Cycles, The Brogues, The Rioteers, Ewan Butler, Capitol Fresher’s Festival, Capitol, The

Indie rock, 20:30, £ 5.00

The Bottleneckers, Blackfri-

Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Swedish indie rockers, 20:30, £ 5.00 Meshuggah, Glasgow Garage, Math rock: Makes Foals look like snails, 19:00, £ 13.00 Bowerbirds, The Admiral, Folk pop, 20:00, £TBC

Thu 18 Sep

The Rascals, Glasgow Garage, Indie

Fighting With Wire, General Fiasco, This July, The Barfly, Explo-

This City, Sons of the Morning Star, The Barfly, Hardcore punk,

Immanu El, Over The Wall, The Lava Experiments, King

platform for emerging music talent in Glasgow, 19:00–22:30, See www.themill-live.com, Free via website

Wah Wah Hut, Indie rock, 20:30, £ 6.00

Weenliz, Air Raider, 13th Note,

without irony, 19:00, £TBC

Injuns, Punch & The Apostles, The Mill, Oran Mor, A new

Me My Head, The Ghosties, Castaway, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut,

Sat 13 Sep

Miramar Disaster, Proceed, Let’s Play God, Ivory Blacks, Metal

Take A Worm For A Walk

Week, Captain’s Rest, Local spandex clad spaz metallers launch second LP, 19:30, £ 2.00

Zoey Van Goey, The Starlets, John B McKenna, Is This Music?, 13th Note, Indie rock trio on the

Hardcore / metal, 19:30, £TBC

The Anomalies, The Lafontaines, Destino, King Tut’s Wah

Yaman, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Indian classical music on sitar and flute, 20:00, £ 2.00 Woodpigeon, Captains Rest, Folk rock, 20:00, £TBC

Residents, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Modern jazz standards played by resident trio, 20:00, £ 2.00

Asking Alexandria, Rockers,

Free

Channah Van’t Riet, Tommy Beavitt, Skiff, The Layers, Not in this Town, Gigswap 2008, 13th Note, Neo-hippy Dutch rock,

20:00, £TBC

20:00–00:00, Free

Super Adventure Club, Super Adventure Club, The Vale,

£ 11.00

pop, 19:00, £ 6.00 Rollor, 13th Note, Power trio, 19:30, £TBC Mesquite, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Acoustic guitar duo, 20:00, £ 2.00

Kindlefire, OHIO, Kevin Walls, The Rio Café, Folk rock,

Fool For A Pretty Face, Courty, No Hassle at the Hof, Republic Bier Hof, Pop, 20:00–00:00,

Stray Cats, Vince Ray and the Boneshakers, Carling Acad-

emy Glasgow, Classic rock, 19:00, £ 26.50

Tony Joe White, Ross Fair-

weather, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Singer / songwriter night, 20:30, £ 15.00

“”Super fuzzy plinky plonks,”” OK?, 19:30, £TBC

TBC, £TBC

19:00–22:00, £ 3.00

The Rabble, Nice’n’Sleazy, Indie rock,

20:00, £TBC

Jamie Barnes & Cochise, The Fakes, Rockers, Classic rock, 19:00, £TBC Hue and Cry, The Classic Grand, Pop and jazz from the 80s duo, 19:00, £TBC Gym Class Heroes, Glasgow Garage, Pop rock, 19:00, £ 13.00

Gotye, Clare Bowditch, Izo Fitzroy & The Royal Bastards, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Acoustic

Wah Hut, Indie rock, 20:30, £ 5.00

ars, 50s styled rock and roll, 21:00, Free

The Fire And I, Sol Diablos, The Elvis Suicide, The Barfly, Two

piece alternative rock combo, TBC, £TBC The Debuts, Nice’n’Sleazy, Indie rock, 20:00, £ 6.00

Les Bof!, The Brutes, The Pharisees, 13th Note, Garage rock,

19:30, £TBC

13th Note, An audio/visual attack, apparently, 19:30, £TBC

Accomplished singer songwriter, specialising in diversity, 20:00, £ 2.00 Firewind, Kiuas, Cathouse, Metal, 19:00, £ 12.00 3 Card Trick, Rockers, Classic rock, 19:00, £TBC

Short Warning, Lyu, Duty Calls, Rockers, Pop punk, 19:30, £TBC Ross Clark, Oran Mor, Acoustic

session from the up and coming Glasgow singer / songwriter, 20:00, Free Keith Caputo, The Barfly, Life of Agony singer goes it alone, 19:30, £TBC Andy Miller, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Acoustic guitar virtuoso presents a variety of bands, 20:00, £ 2.00

Abgott, Keep of Kalessin,

15:00–18:00, Free

Wed 17 Sep

ABC, Fiddle and accordion, a malt in hand is mandatory, 19:00, £ 18.00

Dances On The Sand, Rio Café,

Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham,

Dundonian merchants of jangle rock cometh, 20:00, £ 5.00

Classic Grand, Punk rock, 19:00, £ 6.00

pop, 20:30, £ 6.00

Dias Quartet, Brel, Jazz hounds,

rock, 19:00, £ 9.00

Cathouse, Metal, 19:00, £TBC

20:00–00:00, Free

Jack Law, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane,

Sat 20 Sep T-Bone Steak, Brel, New band

featuring “”trombone virtuoso”” Kevin Garrity, 15:00–18:00, Free Scars On Broadway, ABC, Ex (?) System of a Down lads bring the noise, 19:00, £ 13.00 Robert Forster, Oran Mor, GoBetweens founder drops the hits, 19:30, £ 12.50

Jonquil, This Town Needs Guns, Peter Parker, Is This Music?, 13th Note, Experimental rock,

20:30, £ 4.00

from Montreal, 20:00, £ 2.00

The Bottleneckers, Blackfriars, 50s styled rock and roll, 21:00, Free

Ross Clark, Oran Mor, Acoustic

session from the up and coming Glasgow singer / songwriter, 20:00, Free

Modey Lemon, Oscar Charlie, The Manhattan Country Boys, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Psyche-

delia from Pittsburgh, 20:30, £ 7.00 Michael Simons, Tchai-Ovna Deanston Drive, Folk, blues and beyond from fingerstyle guitarist, 20:00, £ 2.00 Emmylou Harris, Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, Country star, 19:00, £25-£35

Die! Die! Die!, Hyena, Guests, Captains Rest, Kiwi punk rock, 20:00, £TBC

Wed 10 Sep Dances On The Sand, Rio Café,

20:00–00:00, Free

Twin Atlantic, Kobai, The Mill, Oran Mor, A new platform for emerging

music talent in Glasgow, 19:00–22:30, See www. themill-live.com, Free via website Seabear, Nice’n’Sleazy, Icelandic experimentalists, 20:00, £TBC Residents, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Modern jazz standards played by resident trio, 20:00, £ 2.00

Listings


Jamie Barnes & Cochise, The Demon’s Eye, The Fakes, Rockers, Classic rock, 19:00, £TBC

Freight Logistics, Occasional Flickers, Drive Carefully Records presents…, 13th

Note, Peoper indie rock, 19:30, £TBC Colin MacIntyre, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Folk rock from the Mull Historical Society man, 20:30, £ 10.00

Sun 21 Sep

D-Bass, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Live band creating hip-hop influenced jazz breaks, 20:00, £ 2.00

Daniel Goodman, Maeve O’Boyle, The Rio Café, Travelling troubadour from NYC, 20:00–00:00, Free

Thu 25 Sep Replay, Replay, Live jazz and blues band.,

18:00–21:00, Free

The Message, ABC2, Indie rock, 19:00,

£TBC

Thrash Till Death, Rockers,

Teddy Thompson, Oran Mor, Folk

The Ting Tings, Barrowland, Indie

Sinking Cities, Merchant City Festival, The Winchester Club,

Thrash - quelle surprise, 19:00, £TBC

pop, 19:00, £ 13.50

The Sick and Indignent Song Club, Blackfriars, Pop rock, 21:00, Free The Balladeers, Kevin Walls, James Connor, No Hassle at the Hof, Republic Bier Hof, Folk rock, 20:00–00:00, Free

Sick City, Ivory Blacks, Metal, 19:00, £TBC

Sun Reeds United, Cossachok, Klezmer, Argentinean tango and folk tunes from the Balkans, 21:00, £ 6.00 Iglu & Hartly, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Indie rock, 20:30, £ 7.00 AC/BC, ABC2, Making Bon proud, 19:00, £TBC Mon 22 Sep Yaman, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Indian

classical music on sitar and flute, 20:00, £ 2.00

Pitchblend, Realign the Stars, Rockers, Hardcore / rock, 19:30,

£TBC

Duff McKagan’s Loaded, Loyalties, Glasgow Garage, Where’s

Slash?, 19:00, £ 17.00

Broken Records, King Tut’s Wah

Wah Hut, More Grant Lee Phillips / Levellers than Beirut / Arcade Fire, 20:30, £ 7.50

Tue 23 Sep The Bottleneckers, Blackfriars, 50s styled rock and roll, 21:00, Free

Sam Sparro, Sneaky Sound System, ABC2, Wonky pop, 19:00, £ 10.00 Ross Clark, Oran Mor, Acoustic

session from the up and coming Glasgow singer / songwriter, 20:00, Free Paul Curreri, Nice’n’Sleazy, Folk rock singer / songwriter, 20:00, £TBC

Rose Kemp, Pearl and the Puppets, Becci Wallace, The

Barfly, Goth rock singer, touring in support of her new LP, TBC, £TBC

Man Down, Next Page Over,

rock, 19:00, £TBC

Indie rock, 20:00–03:00, £ 6.00 Militia, Rockers, As in Metal, 12:00, £TBC Peter Molinari, Captains Rest, Singer / songwriter, 20:00, £TBC

Julie Peel, Ciaran Mcllwham, Concrete Campfire presents…, Brel, Acoustic session,

20:00, Free

Hamfatter, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut,

Folk rock, 20:30, £ 7.00

Folk fae Fife, Tchai-Ovna Otago

Lane, Folky sounds from the great kingdom and beyond, 20:00, £ 2.00

Anterior, Cathouse, Metal, 19:00, £TBC Fri 26 Sep Wing and a Prayer, Tchai-Ovna

Otago Lane, Blues based singer songwriters playing original material, 20:00, £ 2.00 The Duke Spirit, Oran Mor, Avant garde indie rock, 19:30, £ 9.00

Rolo Tomassi, Mirror!Mirror!, Carnivores, The Barfly, Hyperactive cyber-punks with an ear for a bruising riff, 20:00, £TBC Neil Halstead, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Singer / songwriter, 20:30, £ 9.00

Mulehog, Welcome to Spook Club, 13th Note, Garage rock two-piece, 20:00, £TBC Mesquite, Tchai-Ovna Deanston Drive, Acoustic guitar duo, 20:00, £ 2.00 Ladyhawk, Nice’n’Sleazy, Vancouver grunge quartet touring in support of latest LP, Shots, 19:30, £ 7.50

Guns On the Roof, Hyperjax, Rockers, Pop punk / psychobilly, 19:00, £TBC

Danse or Die, Day of Days, Must Be Something, The Win-

chester Club, Dance rock, 20:00–03:00, £ 6.00

Certain Death, Paradox, Psyko Dalek, Cathouse, Metal,

19:00, £TBC

Sat 27 Sep

Rockers, Metal, 19:30, £TBC

Think:Fire, ABC2, Farewell gig from the

Note, Indie rock, 20:30, £TBC

The Metros, The Troubadours, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Tropical

Action Beat, Bob Corn, Jer Reid & Shane Connolly, 13th Wed 24 Sep Luis Francesco Arena, Predestination Records, Captian’s

Rest, alternative moods from ex-Headcases frontman, 20:00–23:30, £5.00 Model Horror, The Barfly, Electro rock, 20:00, £TBC Michael Simons, Tchai-Ovna Deanston Drive, Singer / songwriter, 20:00, £ 2.00 Matterhorn, Rockers, Metal, 19:30, £TBC

Endor, Be A Familiar, The Mill, Oran Mor, A new platform for emerging

music talent in Glasgow, 19:00–22:30, See www. themill-live.com, Free via website

Scottish indie rock quintet, 19:00, £TBC

funk, from Peckham, 20:30, £ 7.00

The Counterfeit Clash,

Nice’n’Sleazy, Combat rock, 20:00, £TBC Spear of Destiny, The Barfly, Rock ‘n’ roll, TBC, £TBC One Republic, Carling Academy Glasgow, Maroon 5 for younger ladies, 19:00, £ 18.50

Mira Opalinska International Quartet, Brel, It’s jazz, daddio,

15:00–20:00, Free

Jamie Barnes & Cochise, Dc79, 3 Card Trick, Rockers, Classic Rock and AC/DC tribute, 19:00, £TBC

In Flames, Gojira, Volbeat, Sonic Syndicate, Barrowland, Metal titans, 19:00, £ 15.00

Glider, The Miss’s, Gdansk, If You Lived Here You’d Be Home By Now, Dropkick, Hyena, Vars of Litchi, Ally Kerr, Down the Tiny Steps, Kid Canaveral, Q Without U, Merchant City Festival, 13th Note, Another terrific multi-disciplined double all-dayer of local muzak, TBC, £TBC

Galchen, Nanobots, Endor, Marco Cafolo Quartet, Outdoors at Blackfriars,

Blackfriars, Terrific multi-disciplined double alldayer of local muzak, 13:00, Mini festival, Free Fantazia - Hero’s 3D, Braehead Arena, Glowsticks oot, 18:30, £TBC

Fujiya & Miyagi, Project Jenny Project Jan, Stereo, Our album of the month - see Music, 19:30, £TBC

Brett Anderson, Oran Mor, Ex-

Suede frontman does his solo thing, 19:30, £TBC

Sun 28 Sep Twin Atlantic, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Homegrown emo rock, 20:00, Over 14s, £ 6.50 The River Detectives, ABC2, Indie pop, 18:00, £ 15.00 Some Boy, Standing Order,

The Winchester Club, Local singer/songwriter, cites King Creosote and Jim Morrison as influences - interessant, 20:00–03:00, £ 6.00 O’Death, Nice’n’Sleazy, Goth country punks, seriously, 20:00, £TBC

Rivercard, I See The Dead, Rockers, Metal, 19:30, £TBC

Mon 01 Sep

Sat 06 Sep

Rioteers, The High Lines, Boycotts, The Ark, Pop punk fae

AB/CD, The Liquid Room, Shaking you all

Glenrothes, 19:30, £4.00

Sat 13 Sep

Studio 24, Skank till yr chequers fall off, 21:00, £7.00 Katana, Engine 80, Bannerman’s Underworld, Simply metal, 21:00, £4.00

Chris Helme, The Liquid Room,

Bombskare, The Toasters,

Tue 02 Sep

Miguel de la Bastide, Brian Gore, Andy Sheppard, Cecilia Zabala, The International Guitar Night, The Recital

Village, Experimental folk, 20:00, £6.00

Sun 07 Sep

Wed 03 Sep

Tie For Jack, Electrolite, Ninecircles, The Ark, Cardigan clad

20:00–00:00, Free

Room @ City Halls, Fretboards be blazin’ tonight, 20:00, £ 12.00 Islands, Captains Rest, Avant garde Canadian indie tock, 20:00, £TBC Midnight Tokers, The Twisted Wheel, 60s-present covers quintet, 20:00–00:00, £ 3.00 Heavy Trash, Stereo, NYC rockabilly goodness, 20:00, £TBC

Figure 5, The Redwells, The Ray Summers, The Doledrums, Liam Ferns, Capitol Fresher’s Festival, Capitol, Mod

rock, 20:00, £ 5.00

Mon 29 Sep Yaman, Tchai-Ovna Otago Lane, Indian classical music on sitar and flute, 20:00, £ 2.00 The Spinto Band, Oran Mor, Acclaimed US indie poppers wnho might still have their hour in the sun, 19:30, £ 10.00 Sam Roberts Band, King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, Canadian indie rock, 20:30, £TBC Ronnie Spector & The Ronettes, The Arches, New Jersey

punk rocker, 20:00, £ 20.00 Millencolin, Glasgow Garage, Swedish pop punk, 19:00, £ 15.00 Joan Baez, Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, Folk legend, 19:00, £ 28.50

Tue 30 Sep To Catch a Thief, The Barfly,

Alternative rawk, 20:00, £TBC Ross Clark, Oran Mor, Acoustic session from the up and coming Glasgow singer / songwriter, 20:00, Free

Super Adventure Club, Super Adventure Club, City

Café, Great new Edinburgh band prepare for French tour, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Electrolite, Playtone, Capstin Pole, Voodoo Rooms, Electro rock, 20:00, £5.00

Forever Ends Tomorrow, Anavris, Sidelock, Idiotcut, No Drive Home, The Hive, Thrash

metal, 19:00, £4.00

Slow Motion Replay, Cielo Drive, The Ark, Punk metal, anyone?, 19:30, £4.00

Twin Atlantic, The Xcerts, Cry Over Billionaires, Cabaret Voltaire, Homegrown emo punk, 19:00, £6.00

Thu 04 Sep

indie rock, 19:30, £4.00

Dead Boy Robotics, Hobo, The Bongo Club, Sonic adventures from Transylvania to The Great Wall of China’, 23:00–03:00, £3.00

Elvis On Tour - The Legend Continues, The Playhouse, It can’t be,

surely?, 19:30, £18.50-£21.50 Glasvegas, The Liquid Room, Rising kitchen sink rockers fae Glesgae, won’t be playing them this small for long, 19:00, £8.00 Vessel, The Ark, Metal, 19:30, £TBC Yashin, Studio 24, Screamo metallers, TBC, £5.00

Mon 08 Sep Gar Cox, Jay Brown, The Ark, Indie rock, 19:30, £TBC

The Groanbox Boys, Leith Folk Club, The Village, Rootsy prairie-

Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4)

born ballads, 20:00, £8.00

Moody alternative rockers, 19:30, £4.00

Alan Johnston, Tom Napper, Leith Folk Club, The Village, Folk,

Myshkin, Immune, The Caspian Sea Monsters, The Ark, Old Crow Medicine Show,

The Liquid Room, Rootsy folky country, 19:00, £12.00 Out of the Bedroom, The Canon’s Gait, Open mic night, 20:00, Free

The Autumn Defense, Plush, Delta Mainline, Cabaret Voltaire,

Tue 09 Sep 20:00, £6.00

The Arcadian Kicks, Agent Ribbons, Cabaret Voltaire, A big

sax-augmented rock sound from the Midlands, 19:00, £6.00

face off with the Black Spring DJs, 20:30, £5.00 The Lucid Dream, Bannerman’s Underworld, Shoegaze, 21:00, £4.00

Thu 11 Sep

GRV, Dance rock, 20:30, £6.00

Fri 05 Sep A Traitor Like Judas, Rise With the Fallen, Crimson Conflict, Doubts Cast Shadows, Studio 24, German metallers, 19:00, £5.00

Laikadog, New Generation

Superstars, Peepshow, The Hive, Like Terrorvision done rougher, from Bradford too, 19:00, £7.00 Louisiana Ragtime Band, Spirits of Rhythm, Heriot’s

Rugby Club, Easy on that sour mash, dab that brow profusely, 20:00, £6.00 So So Modern, Fast, The Bongo Club, Kiwi synth-pop, 23:00–03:00, Fast is 5, £4.00

Wounded Knee, Joe Acheson Quartet, The Black Diamond Express, Acoustic Café, Out of the Blue,

Benbecula wunderkind meets tripped out jazz heads, 19:30, Ticket price includes launch month membership for new download service - www.tentracks.co.uk, £8.00

Dananananaykroyd, O Children, Hostage, Puppytooth,

Cabaret Voltaire, Jittering, stuttering indie rock combo, 18:00–22:00, Under 18s only, £7.00 Idlewild, The Strands, The Picture House, Veteran local indie rockers blow open the doors to promising new venue, TBC, £15.00

The Final Sigh, Stand Up Guy, Zillah, Bannerman’s Underworld, Just the metal, m’lady, 21:00, £4.00

Tombs, Planks, Black Horse, Flatlands, The Process, Citizens, The Black Chain, Issues of Morality, Cold Dead Hands, Henry’s Cel-

lar Bar, A mixture of post-rock, stoner rock, hardcore, grindcore, stick it up your jumpore, 15:00, 5th birthday celebration for the DIY promoter, £8.00

Universal You, State of Emergency, Sonorous Breaks, The Ark, Kinda like Drugstore and

Garbage inside a tumble drier, 19:30, £4.00

Sun 14 Sep Platinum Pied Pipers AKA PPP, The Voodoo Rooms presents:, The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, £12.00

Bryn Christopher, Cabaret Voltaire, Brummie soul pop, 19:00, £7.50

The Spectres, Amy Thomas,

The Fire and I, Little Doses, Limbo, Voodoo Rooms, Two local bands

Former Seahorses frontman does his own thing, 19:00, £7.00

Gundogs, The Hive, Dainty, radio-friendly

Wed 10 Sep

Wilco man’s California-tinted side-project, 19:00, £8.00

Zoey Van Goey, We See Lights, Meursault, The Occasional Flickers, Rubix, The

www.theskinny.co.uk

night long, etc, 19:00, £10.00

Napoleon in Rags, Wullae Wright, Lovers Turn To Monsters, Republic Bier Hof, Folk,

Lori Watson and Rule of Three, Leith Folk Club, The

Shadows Fall, The Liquid Room, Boston metallers doin’ it old school, 19:00, £TBC

The Jam House, White reggae’ and ‘sultry jazz grooves’, dust down yr chinos, TBC, Nae trainers, £TBC

pop rock songs, one’s called Ode to Cunt, 18:00, £5.00

Munchkins, Frantic Chant, Darklight, Fireside Aliens, The Hot Lips, The Ark, Metal up your

ass, 19:30, £4.00

Oliwa, Bukkake Birthday Party, The Council, The Deliberate Crumbs, Henry’s Cellar

Bar, Dirty punk, TBC, £TBC

Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4) Calexico, The Queen’s Hall, Ace alt country from Arizona, TBC, £14.00 Dying Too Young, Fortuna, When All Prevails, The Hive,

Screamo, Auld Reekie style, 19:00, £4.00 Missing Cat, The Ark, Howlin’ blues, 19:30, £4.00 Out of the Bedroom, The Canon’s Gait, Open mic night, 20:00, Free

Sellotape, Ex Lion Tamer, Limbo, Voodoo Rooms, Two local bands

Mon 15 Sep Kosmos Kollectif, The Betamax, The Ark, Experimental electro rock, 19:30, £4.00

PPP aka Platinum Pied Pipers, Underling, Jae P, Voodoo Rooms, Pop, funk and hippedy-hop, 21:00, £12.00

Tue 16 Sep Angie Palmer, Leith Folk Club, The Village, Mancunian folk rocker,

20:00, £6.00

face off with the Black Spring DJs, 20:30, £5.00

Wed 17 Sep

Fri 12 Sep

Super Adventure Club, Cry Over Billionaires, Super Adventure Club, The GRV, Great

David Holmes Album Launch, The Voodoo Rooms presents:, The Voodoo Rooms, 21:00–03:00, £9.00

Alex Cornish, Cabaret Voltaire, Soulful local singer/songwriter, playing in support of new single, 19:00, £TBC

Blueberries Jazz Band, Jazz ‘n’ Jive Club, Heriot’s Rugby Club,

Jazz, rahs and yahs - keep an eye on that dancefloor, 20:00, £8.00 David Holmes, Voodoo Rooms, Oceans 11 soundtrack maestro launches new LP, The Holy Pictures, 21:00, £9.00

new Edinburgh band prepare for French tour, 20:00–22:00, £tbc Bon Iver, The Queen’s Hall, Captivating, acclaimed ‘nu-folk’ guru, TBC, £11.00

Break Nekk Speed, Big Wave, The Caspian Sea Monsters, Jacob’s Pillow, The Ark, Dirgy Falkirk

rawk quartet, 19:30, £4.00 Dartz, The Hive, Emo Punk - but good - like Stapleton, TBC, £5.00 Go Drowsy, Bannerman’s Underworld, Gothenburg pop punkers, 21:00, £5.00

SEPTEMBER 08

THE SKINNY 59

Listings

EDINBURGH gigs


EDINBURGH gigs James Yorkston, Malcolm Middleton, The Pictish Trail, Rozi Plain, Fence Club #6, The Caves, A stunning assembly of local lo-fi troubadours. Gig of the month?, 20:00–23:30, £10.00

Paul McKenna Band, Edinburgh Folk Club, Pleasance Bar,

Wed 24 Sep Allan Taylor, Edinburgh Folk Club, Pleasance Bar, Acoustic

folk rock, 20:00, £7.00

Eliza Carthy, Voodoo Rooms,

Dundee gigs Mon 01 Sep

Tue 09 Sep

Wed 17 Sep

TWIN ATLANTIC / THE XCERTS / DESCARTES, Fat Sams Live,

Local, Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, Free

Concrete Campfire,

20:00–18:51, TICKETS FROM GROUCHOS

Wed 10 Sep

Tue 02 Sep

Concrete Campfire,

Local, Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, Free The Dodos + Euros Childs + Kaput, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:15,

Gundogs + Colour Coded + The Frets + Ocean Conveyors, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:20,

world, Alternative rock, 21:00, £4.00

Experimental folk chanteuse, 19:30, £10.00 Moya, The Ark, Ambient / lounge act, 19:30, £4.00 The Motion Theory, Bannerman’s Underworld, Indie rock, 21:00, £4.00

Thu 18 Sep

Thu 25 Sep

£7.00

£5.00

Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The

Black Spring DJs, Limbo, The Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4) Bands TBC, Limbo, Voodoo Rooms, Two local bands face off with the Black Spring DJs, 20:30, £5.00

Wed 03 Sep

Thu 11 Sep

Traditional Scottish folk, 20:00, £7.00

Void Pleasantries, Urban City Lights, Bannerman’s Under-

Voodoo Rooms, A live music dance party, 20:30–01:00, £5 (£4) Bad Manners, Citrus Club, Ska pioneers, TBC, £14.00

Crash My Model Car, The Debuts, Heriot-Watt Student Union,

Celtic-accented alternative rock, 21:00, Free

Punch and the Apostles, Injuns, The Mill, The Caves, A new

platform for emerging music talent in Edinburgh, 19:00–22:30, See www.themill-live.com, Free via website

The Gussets, Babybones, Limbo, Voodoo Rooms, Two local bands

face off with the Black Spring DJs, 20:30, £5.00

Fri 19 Sep

DeSalvo, Lords of Bastard, The Fatalists, Your Loyal Subjects, Cabaret Voltaire, Perverse

rock that would have David Yow salivatin’, 19:00–22:00, £5.00

Frightened Rabbit, We Were Promised Jetpacks, The Mill, The Caves, A new platform for emerging music talent in Edinburgh, 19:00–22:30, See www. themill-live.com, Free via website

Model Horror, Sick Note,

Bands TBC, Benbecula Shoecase, Voodoo Rooms Ballroom,

Sample some of the strange ambient fruits from this local boundary pushing label, TBC, £TBC Carol Laula, Cabaret Voltaire, Folk rock, 19:00, £TBC

Haftor Bedboe, more TBC, Sonic Fusion Festival, Voodoo

Rooms Speakeasy, An evening of electronic sound art/installation, TBC, See www.sonicfusionfestival.com/, £TBC

Plastic Adults, Sad Society, Incendiary Bats, Henry’s Cellar

Bar, Pop punk, 23:00, £4.00

Spirits of Rhythm, Fred’s Clubhouse Seven, Jazz ‘n’ Jive Club, Heriot’s Rugby Club, Jazz,

rahs and yahs - keep an eye on that dancefloor, 20:00–23:30, £6.00 The Sky Mangle, Bannerman’s Underworld, Psychedelic pop for Sonic Youth fans, 21:00, £4.00 Tokyoblu, Cabaret Voltaire, House night with a skilled house house band, 23:00–03:00, £10.00

Your Fears, Mind Set A Threat, Kudos, Dying Too Young, Which Way Now, The

Hive, Growling metal from the hills, be afraid, 19:00, £5.00

Sat 20 Sep

Cabaret Voltaire, Indie disco rockers, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Fnords, Uncle Butcher, Rob K, Bannerman’s Underworld, Female-fronted Scottish punk trio, 21:00, £4.00

The Hussy’s, Chris Bradley,

Heriot-Watt Student Union, Indie pop, 21:00, Students and guests over 18 only, Free The Moodswings, The Jam House, Sinatra-style vocals and a nostalgic repertoire,’ take gran along, TBC, Wear trainers and you’re out, sunshine, £TBC Travis, The Picture House, Rumour mill says that Fran and co are about to return with guitars, 19:00, £19.50

Fri 26 Sep Amusement Parks on Fire, Gasgiant, North Atlantic Oscillation, Cabaret Voltaire, Experimental rock par excellence, 19:00–22:00, £7.00

Little Doses, Svengali, Burn Your Slippers, Last Tree, Leith FM 98.8 Benefit Session, Leith Dockers Club, Local talent converge for community radio benefit, 19:00, £5.00

Speed Theory, Soundshok,

The Hive, Thrash metal, 19:00, £5.00 Bands TBC, SVAW, The Bongo Club, Band showcase in aid of Amnesty International, 19:00–22:00, £7.00

AC/BC, The Bongo Club, Tribute representing both the Bon Scott and Brian Johnson eras, 19:00–22:00, £10.00 Andy C, The Liquid Room, D’n’b / electronica specialist, TBC, £13.00

Mah Grassy Shoes, Skitten,

Gunfight, Attack The Hive, The Hive, A pleasant evening of hardcore and screamo awaits tender ears, 19:00, £5.00

Electric Avenue Band, Broken Lights, The Bongo Club, Like

D-Rail, Beasts, Friday Night

Vantage Point, Lycanthrope, Dirty Rose, The Ark, Local thrash metal, get in to that scene kids, 19:30, £4.00

Sun 21 Sep Autosafari, The Ark, Straight up rock, 100% irony free, 19:30, £4.00 Cibelle, Voodoo Rooms, Tropical punk’, TBC, £12.00 Hayes Carll, Lonesome Highway, Cabaret Voltaire, Acoustic

Folk, 19:00–22:00, £10.00

Stephen Dale Petit, Bannerman’s Underworld, He gots da blues, 20:00, £4.00 The Reverb Syndicates, Hobo, The Bongo Club, Sonic adventures

from Transylvania to The Great Wall of China’, 23:00–03:00, £3.00

Mon 22 Sep Moody Blues, The Playhouse, Al-

ways went down a treat in dad’s car, 20:00, £32.50 Rose Kemp, Cabaret Voltaire, Goth rock, 19:00–22:00, £TBC The Rascals, The Liquid Room, Indie rock trio, on Deltasonic, 19:00, £TBC

Bannerman’s Underworld, Keep them aff mah braw cairpet, 21:00, £4.00

Sat 27 Sep Patti Smith doing Chinese folk music - what would Eddy Grant say?, 19:00–22:00, £4.00 Fall Short! Conform!, Cabaret Voltaire, Geordie experimental rockers, 19:00, £TBC

Hunger’s Mother, Bad Boat, Guarana Drought, Bannerman’s

Underworld, Northern Irish blues-rock combo, 21:00, £4.00 Pearl Doors VI, The Hive, Bands TBC, 19:00, £TBC

Sun 28 Sep Sam Amant, The Bongo Club, Sonic adventures from Transylvania to The Great Wall of China’, 23:00–03:00, £3.00 Spear of Destiny, Cabaret Voltaire, Post-punk done like New Model Army, 19:00–22:00, £10.00 The Fabulous Corvettes, Distant Soul, Monterey Soul, Who’s Your Mama Now?, Hobo, The Ark, Modern blues quartet, 19:30, £4.00

Concrete Campfire, Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

GLASVEGAS & SUPPORT, Fat

Sams Live, 19:30–18:54, £8 FROM TICKETMASTER

Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute

Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Isoscelles + Ross Clark, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:21, £5.00

Thu 04 Sep

Fri 12 Sep

Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute

The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s,

Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc Open Mic, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:16, free

Fri 05 Sep The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s,

All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic

Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Grace Emilys Single Launch + Woodenbox + Cut Cut Shape + The Curators, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:17, £5.00

Sat 06 Sep Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

The Trade EP Launch + Would Be Kings + Safe2Say + The Varionis, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:18, £5.00

CONCRETE JUNGLE, The Read-

ing Rooms, DJ’s ESA (Subclub / Subculture) + FAUD www.myspace.com/thereadingrooms, 22:30–02:30, £6.00

Sun 07 Sep Jazz Afternoon, Drouthie’s, A

Selection of Live Jazz, 12:00–15:00, free Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00–00:00, free

All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic

Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

The Goodnights + Agent Ribbons + Arcadian Kicks + The Rioteers, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:22, £5.00

Sat 13 Sep Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar,

Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free BRYN CHRISTOPHER, Fat Sams Live, 19:00–18:57, £7.50 FROM TICKET MASTER

Monrow + Airraider + Our Name is Legion, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:24, £5.00

DJ’s THOUGHTLESS HUSSIES + ADO! + TEAM! NEON, NEON NIGHTS, The Reading Rooms, Electro +

Electronic dancefloor grooves, 22:30–02:30, £5 before 11.30 £8 after

Mon 01 Sep

22:00–02:30, £14 Advance Tickets Tel: 01382-228496

Sat 20 Sep Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

Page 6 + Baddies + Monrow + Make Sparks, The Doghouse,

20:00–19:26, £tbc

Sun 21 Sep Jazz Afternoon, Drouthie’s, A Selection of Live Jazz, 12:00–15:00, free Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00–00:00, free Broken Records + Support, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:27, £8.00

ing Rooms, ROOTS AND DUB MUSIC, 22:30–02:30, £5/7

Sat 27 Sep Resident DJ’s, Saturday @ The Jute Bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Saturday Night Mix-up, 20:00–00:00, free

Beatnic Prestige + The Side + Sleepmode, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:32, £5.00

DJ’s SLAM (SOMA) + Octogen live (Soma) + Support DJ’s, DJ’s SLAM (SOMA) + Octogen live (Soma) + Support DJ’s, OKUPA!, TECHNO DRIVEN - www.myspace.com/okupadunde,

Concrete Campfire, Rose Kemp+ Support, The

22:00–02:30, 12 Advance Tickets Tel:

Black Tooth Rock Lounge - New Breed + tbc + Pryon, Snafu, Rock/Metal - Not for the faint hearted!, 21:00–02:00, £3.00

Dead Metal, Thirteen Knives + guests, The Tunnels, Dead Metal, Thirteen Knives + guests at this rock + metal night, 20:00–late, £tbc

Thu 04 Sep Dirty Hearts Club - Grace Emilys + Cut Cut Shape + Underkills, Snafu, Melodic indie pop that’ll get your feet moving, 22:00–02:00, £3.00

Fri 05 Sep

Fri 12 Sep

Fri 19 Sep

Mon 22 Sep

Hue + Cry, Lemon Tree, Pop soul duo combining crunchy guitar riffs with wailing trumpet solos, 21:00, £18.50 + b.f

AC/BC (AC/DC Tribute Band),

Black Tooth Rock Lounge - Heat Thieves + The Dials + Cook House Heroes, Snafu,

Extension Party with Giles Walker + local DJs TBC, Transition Extreme Skate Park, Giles Walker hosts an evening to raise funds for an extension to the already killer indoor exterme mecca in Aberdeen., 18:00, £5.00

Mon 15 Sep Chris Helme (Ex Seahorses) - Acoustic Set, Café Drummond, Folk music with a heavy 60’s US influence, 22:00–tbc, £tbc

Sergeant + support, Moshulu, Pop/Indie, 19:30, £8.00

Blazin’ Fiddles, Music Hall, “”Led Zeppelin of the folk world”” - The Scotsman, 19:30, £15 + b.f

Mr Gavin McGinty, Kitchen Cynics and Timothy Courtney, Amber Wilson EP launch, The Tunnels, The

Sat 06 Sep

Morcheeba singer goes solo.. Alongside other friendly foes., 7.30pm, tbc

Indie/Folk, 20:00, £8.00

SEPTEMBER 08

DJ EROL ALKAN (TRASH / LONDON) + Support DJ’s, OKUPA, OKUPA!, ELECTRO DRIVEN,

MESSENGER SOUND SYSTEM (EDINBURGH) + MC RAS ECHO Meets SUNWEED SOUND SYSTEM_THE MILITANT ROOTICAL SOUND, SUNWEED DUB EXPLOSION 2, The Read-

aberdeen gigs

alternative, anti-folk, 20:00–late, £tbc

60 THE SKINNY

original and best drum and bass night celebrates it’s 4th Birthday Party, 22:30–02:30, 6.50 Advance £9.50 after

20:00–19:30, £5.00

£6.00

Tue 30 Sep

Voltaire, Nu-metal disguised as electro rock, 19:00, £9.00

DJ SIMON BASELINE SMITH + PANGEA RESIDENT DJ’s, PANGEA, The Reading Rooms, Dundee’s

CHOS.

Fall Short! Conform! + Sugarhouse Wynd + Hard 2 Explain, The Doghouse,

Doghouse, 20:00–19:28, £7.00

Local, Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, Free

Super Adventure Club, Luis Francesco Arena, Unknown Hagana, Super Adventure Club, Henry’s Cellar Bar, Great

tonal fiddler, nothing sinister, 20:00, £6.00 The Xmas Lights, Bannerman’s Underworld, Oxford hardcore sextet, 21:00, £4.00

Doghouse, 20:00–19:25, £5.00

20:00–19:09, TICKETS £6 FROM GROU-

Joots Fest - Charity Alldayer, The Doghouse, 20:00–19:33,

Frightened Rabbit + We Were Promised Jetpacks + The Little Kicks, Moshulu, Pop/

Kill Hannah, Serpico, Cabaret

Jocasta Sleeps + Descartes + The Floor, The

FLOOD OF RED, Fat Sams Live,

Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

IMMANUEL , GREATER THE SHADOW , NO PASSARAN , DEBUTAUNT., The Tunnels, indie,

singer, 20:00, £6.00

Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Friday night Tunes, 20:00–00:00, free

Tue 16 Sep

Sun 07 Sep

Bruce MacGregor, Sandy Brechin, Brian o’hEadhra, Leith Folk Club, The Village, Tradi-

Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic

Resident DJ’s, Fridays @ Jute bar, DCA - Jute Bar, Eclectic

Sun 28 Sep

influenced emo, might as well jump, 19:30, Free

Gill Bowman, Leith Folk Club, The Village, Acclaimed Edinburgh folk

The Karma Lounge, Fat Sam’s, All your favourite classics from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Fri 26 Sep

01382-228496

‘n’ hip-hop, 19:00, £8.00

new Edinburgh band prepare for French tour, 20:00–22:30, £tbc

Fri 19 Sep

Wed 24 Sep

To Catch A Thief, The Ark, Van Halen-

One half of the Dresden Dolls brings her Brechtian style to the Cab, 19:00–22:00, £12.00

20:00–19:29, £tbc

Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Local, Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, Free

Luis Francesco Arena, Henry’s

Amanda Palmer, Cabaret Voltaire,

Open Mic, The Doghouse,

Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute

Jazz Afternoon, Drouthie’s, A Selection of Live Jazz, 12:00–15:00, free Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00–00:00, free

Dirty Hearts Club/Snafu 4 Year Birthday Special – X Vectors (live) + DHC DJs,

Cellar Bar, former Headcases frontman with new acoustic trio, 20:00–23:30, £4.00

Thu 18 Sep

Tue 23 Sep

Sonic Boom Six, The JB Conspiracy, The Hive, Rude Mancunian punk

Tue 23 Sep

Resident DJ’s, Jute, DCA - Jute Bar, 20:00–00:00, £tbc

Sun 14 Sep

Stairway to Zeppelin, Moshulu, Led Zeppelin Tribute Band - Regarded as No.1 in the world, 19:30–22:30, No support Band on at 20:00 - 2 1/2 hr show, £12.50.

Mon 29 Sep

Drouthie’s, 19:00–00:00, £tbc

Thu 25 Sep

Thu 18 Sep

Snafu, Pop/House/Techno, 21:00–tbc, £tbc

Café Drummond, UK’s leading AC\DC tribute act, 21:00–tbc, £8.00 Lau, Lemon Tree, Traditional folk trio, 20:00, £12.00

Sat 20 Sep Dressed To Kill ‚Äì KISS Tribute Band, Café Drummond,

Killer covers, killer costumes (tongues included!), 22:00–tbc, £tbc

ISLAJA, KEMIALLISET YSTÄVÄT, ES and TOMUNTONTTU – most represented by the label FONAL, Approximately Infinite Universe, Lemon

Tree, Innovative live music from Finland’s top underground acts collaborating with an uncompromising host of Americans, including FURSAXA, SAMARA LUBELSKI, AXOLOTL, BLEVIN BLECTUM and the SKATERS., 19:30, £12 + b.f

Skate 4 Cancer’ - the first event outwith North America, Transition Extreme Skate

Park, Volcom, Quicksilver and Red Bull join forces to host one of the biggest competitions the extrem park has seen. Afertparty at Moshulu until 3am., 14:00–20:00, £10 for riders / spectators fee but donations welcome.

Sun 21 Sep Dean Owens, Lemon Tree, Ex-

Felsons frontman supporting his 3rd solo effort. Country-rock., 19:00, £10 + b.f

Indie/Rock/Funk, 21:00–02:00, £3.00

Tue 23 Sep Travis, Music Hall, The Scottish 4-piece returns on the back of a No.1 EP, 19:00, £19.50 + b.f

Thu 25 Sep THE PICTISH TRAIL + ROZI PLAIN + LAZY SHEEPDOG, interesting music promotions present, The Tunnels,

Welcoming tales, keyboard odysseys, acoustic neo-folk rumblings and all manner of undeniable oddball noise from the head of Fence Records., 20:00–late, £7 advance £9 door

Sat 27 Sep BombSKAre, Café Drummond,

“”Scotland’s finest ska band””, 22:00–tbc, Free

Sun 28 Sep Aly Bain + Phil Cunning-

ham, Music Hall, Highly regarded Scottish accordion & fiddle duo, 19:30, £15 + b.f Mon 29 Sep Black Tooth Rock Lounge - Riot Riot (tbc) + Get In Get Out + Zero The Fool, Snafu,

Indie/Rock/Alternative, 21:00–02:00, £3.00

theskinny.co.uk/listings Listings


Tue 02 Sep

Thu 11 Sep Susan McFadden, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,

Puppet State, The Man Who Planted Trees, Brunton Theatre,

Mon 01 Sep

Brendan O’Carroll, Good Mourning Mrs Brown,

11:00–14:00, £tbc

Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50

Thu 25 Sep

Mór, 12:30–14:00, £10.00 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12

Edinburgh Playhouse, Long runnning story of the Dublin lady of a certain age, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

MsFits, Sex and Chocolate,

Wed 03 Sep

Brunton Theatre, 19:30–22:30, £10.50

Scottish Ballet, Scottish Ballet Triple Bill, Edinburgh

Brendan O’Carroll, Good Mourning Mrs Brown,

Fri 12 Sep

Festival Theatre, Three works from the company on the move., 19:30–22:00, From £12

Susan McFadden, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,

Scottish Ballet, Autumn Triple Bill, Edinburgh Festival

Edinburgh Playhouse, Long runnning story of the Dublin lady of a certain age, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Thu 04 Sep Brendan O’Carroll, Good Mourning Mrs Brown,

Edinburgh Playhouse, Long runnning story of the Dublin lady of a certain age, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50

Sat 13 Sep Susan McFadden, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50

Theatre, 19:00–21:00, from £10

Fri 26 Sep Scottish Ballet, Scottish Ballet Triple Bill, Edinburgh Festival Theatre, Three works from the company on the move., 19:30–22:00, From £12

London Classic Theatre, Humble Boy, Brunton Theatre,

Fri 05 Sep

Mon 15 Sep

19:30–21:30, £10.50

Brendan O’Carroll, Good Mourning Mrs Brown,

Flashdance the Musical, Ed-

Scottish Ballet, Autumn Triple Bill, Edinburgh Festival

inburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £10

Edinburgh Playhouse, Long runnning story of the Dublin lady of a certain age, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Tue 16 Sep

Sat 06 Sep

inburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £10

Brendan O’Carroll, Good Mourning Mrs Brown,

Edinburgh Playhouse, Long runnning story of the Dublin lady of a certain age, 19:30–21:30, from £13.50

Flashdance the Musical, EdWed 17 Sep Flashdance the Musical, Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £10

Thu 18 Sep

Theatre, 19:00–21:00, from £10

Sat 27 Sep Scottish Ballet, Scottish Ballet Triple Bill, Edinburgh Festival Theatre, Three works from the company on the move., 19:30–22:00, From £12

Beyond the Barricade, Edinburgh Playhouse, Musical medley, 19:30–22:00, £15.50

A Play, A Pie and a Pint, Óran

Tue 02 Sep A Play, A Pie and a Pint, Óran

Mór, 12:30–14:00, £10.00 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12 Jungle Book, Theatre Royal, 19:00–21:00, £14.00

Thu 04 Sep

Arches, 19:30–21:00, tbc Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12 Jungle Book, Theatre Royal, 19:00–21:00, £14.00

Fri 05 Sep

Flashdance the Musical, Ed-

Directed Andy Arnold, Six Acts of Love, The Tron, 19:30–21:00,

inburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £10

from £10

dundee Theatre Wed 03 Sep

Thu 11 Sep

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Dundee Schools Music Theatre, Celebration, Whitehall

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £7

Thu 04 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Dundee Schools Music Theatre, Celebration, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, from £7

Fri 05 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Dundee Schools Music Theatre, Celebration, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:43, from £7

Sat 06 Sep

Fri 12 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Sat 13 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Mon 15 Sep The Full Monty, Whitehall The-

atre, 19:30–22:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Tue 16 Sep The Full Monty, Whitehall The-

atre, 19:30–22:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

Wed 17 Sep

Mon 08 Sep

atre, 19:30–22:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Tue 09 Sep

The Full Monty, Whitehall TheMother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Sat 20 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Mon 22 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Tue 23 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Wed 24 Sep

Cora Bissett, Amada, The Arches, 19:30–21:01, tbc Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12 Jungle Book, Theatre Royal, 19:00–21:16, £14.00 Mon 08 Sep Bill Kenwright production, Absurd Person Singular, Theatre Royal, Ayckbourne

classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12

Thu 25 Sep Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc Fri 26 Sep

Thu 11 Sep

The Fabulous Las Vegas Show, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–22:00,

Bill Kenwright production, Absurd Person Singular, Theatre Royal, Ayckbourne

tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

The Full Monty, Whitehall The-

Sat 27 Sep

atre, 19:30–22:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

Wed 10 Sep

Fri 19 Sep

Tue 30 Sep

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

The Full Monty, Whitehall The-

Donmar, Guys and Dolls, Whitehall Theatre, 19:30–21:30, tbc

classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12

Fri 12 Sep Bill Kenwright production, Absurd Person Singular, Theatre Royal, Ayckbourne

classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50

19:30–22:00, from £11 20:00–22:00, from £10

NLP, Singin I’m Not A Billy, He’s a Tim, SECC, 20:00–22:00, £16.00 Sacha Kyle, Lost Property, The Arches, 18:00–21:00, tbc Sun 21 Sep

Wed 17 Sep

Mon 22 Sep

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Kenny Ireland Directs, Sunset Song, Theatre Royal, Vox Motus, Slick, Tron,

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Michael Frayn (author), Noises Off, Theatre Royal, 19:30–00:00, from £10

Tue 23 Sep

Thu 18 Sep

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Shelley Nadashi, Arrow in the Eyes, The Arches, Part of Arches

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Megan Barker and Neil Doherty, Cria, The Arches,

Michael Frayn (author), Noises Off, Theatre Royal,

Live, 22:00–23:00, tbc

19:15–20:30, tbc

19:30–00:00, from £10

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Wed 24 Sep

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Adrian Howells, Footing Washing for the Sol, The

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Arches, 18:00–23:00, tbc

19:30–22:00, £9.50

19:10–20:00, tbc

19:30–00:00, from £10

Little Vikings are Never Lost, The Arches, Part of Arches Live, Jean Cocteau, La Voix Humaine, The Arches, 18:00–19:00, tbc Violent Night, The Arches, Part of

Arches Live, 22:00–23:00, tbc

Kenny Ireland Directs, Sunset Song, Theatre Royal,

19:30–22:00, from £11

Vox Motus, Slick, Tron,

Fri 19 Sep

classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12

Kenny Ireland Directs, Sunset Song, Theatre Royal,

NLP, Singin I’m Not A Billy, He’s a Tim, SECC, 20:00–22:00, £16.00

20:00–22:00, from £10

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

19:10–20:00, tbc

Violent Night, The Arches, Part of

20:00–22:00, from £10

Bill Kenwright production, Absurd Person Singular, Theatre Royal, Ayckbourne

classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12

Little Vikings are Never Lost, The Arches, Part of Arches Live,

Vox Motus, Slick, Tron,

Tue 09 Sep

Bill Kenwright production, Absurd Person Singular, Theatre Royal, Ayckbourne

Mother Courage and her Children, Dundee Rep, 19:30–21:00, tbc

www.theskinny.co.uk

A Play, A Pie and a Pint, Óran

Mór, 12:30–14:00, £10.00

Wed 10 Sep

Thu 18 Sep

atre, 19:30–22:00, tbc

Sat 06 Sep

Beyond the Barricade, Caird Hall, Musical medley, 19:30–22:00, £19.50

Kenny Ireland Directs, Sunset Song, Theatre Royal,

20:00–22:00, from £10

inburgh Playhouse, 20:30–23:00, from £10

Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50

Tue 16 Sep

Cora Bissett, Amada, The

Wed 10 Sep

Sat 20 Sep

Cora Bissett, Amada, The

19:30–22:00, from £11

Fri 19 Sep

Arches, 18:00–23:00, tbc

Vox Motus, Slick, Tron,

Arches, 19:30–21:00, £10.00

A Play, A Pie and a Pint, Óran

Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50

Susan McFadden, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,

Cora Bissett, Amada, The

Cora Bissett, Amada, The

Mór, 12:30–14:00, £10.00

Adrian Howells, Footing Washing for the Sol, The

Arches Live, 21:30–22:30, tbc

Sun 14 Sep

A Play, A Pie and a Pint, Óran

Arches, 19:30–21:00, tbc Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12 Jungle Book, Theatre Royal, 19:00–21:00, £14.00

Mon 29 Sep

classic comedy of manners, 19:30–22:00, from £12.50 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12

19:30–22:00, from £11

Scottish Ballet, Autumn Triple Bill, Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 19:00–21:00, from £10

Bill Kenwright production, Absurd Person Singular, Theatre Royal, Ayckbourne

Mon 15 Sep

19:30–21:30, £10.50

Flashdance the Musical, Ed-

19:30–22:00, £9.50

A Play, A Pie and a Pint, Óran Mór, 12:30–14:00, £10.00 Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00, from £12 Jungle Book, Theatre Royal, 19:00–21:00, £14.00

inburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, from £10

Susan McFadden, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,

Sat 13 Sep

Arches, 19:30–21:00, £10.00

Mór, 12:30–14:00, £10.00

Flashdance the Musical, Ed-

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Wed 03 Sep

London Classic Theatre, Humble Boy, Brunton Theatre,

Tue 09 Sep

Evita, Theatre Royal, 19:30–22:00,

from £12

Sacha Kyle, Lost Property, The Arches, 18:00–21:00, tbc

Michael Frayn (author), Noises Off, Theatre Royal, Thu 25 Sep Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £9.50

Michael Frayn (author), Noises Off, Theatre Royal, 19:30–00:00, from £10

Fri 26 Sep Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Megan Barker and Neil Doherty, Cria, The Arches,

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

19:30–00:00, from £10

19:15–20:30, tbc

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Adrian Howells, Footing Washing for the Sol, The

Arches, 18:00–23:00, tbc

Little Vikings are Never Lost, The Arches, Part of Arches Live, 19:10–20:00, tbc

Jean Cocteau, La Voix Humaine, The Arches, 18:00–19:00, tbc Violent Night, The Arches, Part of

Arches Live, 21:30–22:30, tbc

Kenny Ireland Directs, Sunset Song, Theatre Royal,

19:30–22:00, from £11

Michael Frayn (author), Noises Off, Theatre Royal, Sat 27 Sep Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £9.50

Michael Frayn (author), Noises Off, Theatre Royal, 19:30–00:00, from £10

Mon 29 Sep Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre,

Vox Motus, Slick, Tron,

19:30–22:00, £9.50

Sacha Kyle, Lost Property, The Arches, 18:00–21:00, tbc

Tue 30 Sep

20:00–22:00, from £10

Sat 20 Sep Megan Barker and Neil Doherty, Cria, The Arches,

19:15–20:30, tbc

Citizens Theatre Company, Don Juan, Citizens Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £9.50

Calendar Girls, Kings Theatre, 19:30–22:00, from £13

SEPTEMBER 08

THE SKINNY 61

Listings

Edinburgh Theatre Glasgow Theatre


Glasgow Clubs Ooft Music, The Ivy Bar, The

Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Basement residents, The Basement, Soundhaus, Techno, electro

& house., 23:00–04:00, £8 (£7)

James Fitch, Chris Harris, Woody, Hat-Club, Byblos, House., 23:00–03:00, £8

The Brutes, Eyes Wide Open, The Twisted Wheel, Live bands & club, 22:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Tronic, Blackfriar’s Basement, Electronic., 21:00–02:00, £8

Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6

Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

Sun 07 Sep

Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

JESSIE EVANS, Optimo, The Sub Club, Diverse music policy., 23:00–03:00, £9 (£8)

No Hassle, Republic Bier Halle,

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage,

Tue 09 Sep

20:00–00:00, Free

Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New

Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo, Classic

wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & com-

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff

Andy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

23:00–03:00, £3

Mór, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4

Craig McGee, Horrorshow,

Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

Gordie & Jack, Old School,

Mark Du Mosch, Casionova, Nick The Greek, Slabs DJs & more, Countach Moustache, The Halt Bar, Disco, italo, electro,

Firewater, Indie, rock, punk, electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666,

The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s,

Café Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

Sat 06 Sep All Tore Up, Blackfriar’s Basement, 1950’s record hop, R&B, rockabilly and rock n roll., 22:00–03:00, £5 ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk,

rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Mark Du Mosch, Andrew Ingram, Hobbes, Brian d””Souza, Slabs Of The Tabernacle, The Twisted Wheel, Techno,

house., 15:00–00:00, Free

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket,

ing folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free

Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Wed 10 Sep

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Flying Duck,

Gerry Lyons, After Hours,

Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk & rock,

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of every-

16:00–03:00, Free

KEVIN ROWLAND, Sound Service, Òran Mór, Funk, soul,

23:00–03:00, £5

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

23:00–03:00, £5

thing, 23:00–03:00, £3

Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Residents, Octopussy, The Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers

Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay

venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage, Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

Freakmenoovers DJs,

Freakmoves, Glasgow School of Art, Fresh hip hop & funk cuts, Record Playerz in the bar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00,

Free

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar, Disco

electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal,

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays, ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Wed 03 Sep Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of every-

thing, 23:00–03:00, £3

Gerry Lyons, After Hours, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric Residents, Octopussy, The

Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Thu 04 Sep

Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students

Various Production, Numbers, The Sub Club, Eclectic electronic.,

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

23:00–03:00, £2

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Clatty Pats, Òran Mór, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers)

23:00–03:00, £10

The Club (69), Techno, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious,

Stereo, Yesterday’s sound of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Alex Under & Edit Select, Return To Mono, The Sub Club,

Brel, Retro soul, 21:00–01:00, Free

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House and

Craig Smith, The Ivy Bar, The

Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Carol Chakra, Jason Pussypower, Dom & Daz (Disco X), Ctrl+Alt+Del (Electrobix), Yaw (Dannix), Loverat (Sleazy Social), Shuffle, Soundhaus, Shuffle Charity

Bob’s Full House, Òran Mór, Stefan Robbers, Bleep,

Event raising cash for ‘Street Kids Night Shelter’ in India and Pakistan., 23:00–04:00, £7 (£5)

Stereo, Live techno, 23:00–03:00, £8

Cannibal Cooking Club, Error, DJ Drops, ritalin, terry & jason pussypower, Footwork, Soundhaus, Techno.,

Sinister Flynn, 13 Conditions & Craig Hughes, Fabbotoir, The Twisted Wheel, Pop

23:00–04:00, £tbc

& indie, 23:00–03:00, £4

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop, Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk., 21:00–01:00, Free

Children of the 80s, Classic Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy Ash (Five20East, Liverpool), The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar,

Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays,

GAMMER, BASS GENERATOR, DARWIN, Twisted & Brainfire, Ivory Black’s, Hardcore.,

Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £6

Craig McGee, Horrorshow, Firewater, Indie, rock, punk, electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

21:00–03:00, £12

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot, Glasgow

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

Stereo, Yesterday’s sound of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic

Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Casa, Òran Mór, Classic house, dance,

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks,

Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s

Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco,

Brel, Retro soul, 21:00–01:00, Free

21:00–01:00, Free

EX MEN, SPY MOVIE, CUDDLY SHARK & ELECTROLITE, Pinup Nights, The Winchester, Indie, punk,

Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip hop classics,

SEPTEMBER 08

BIGGER THAN JESUS, Sleaze,

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum,

DJ Rahaan, Al Kent, Melting Pot, The Admiral, Cosmic, disco, house,

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious,

soul & electropop., 21:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Motown to punk., 21:00–02:00, £5

gow School of Art (Vic Gallery), Techno, electronica, hip hop., 22:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

23:00–03:00, £10

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Spitfire, Blackfriar’s Basement,

PPP, Andrew Meza, Hudson Mohawke and FineArt, Ballers Social Club, Glas-

23:00–03:19, £12, £8 b4 12am

School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

23:00–03:00, £8

Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic,

62 THE SKINNY

Pangea, The Vic Bar, Drum & bass., 23:00–03:00, £5

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

School of Art, Dubstep, bass, beats, hip hop., 22:00–03:19, £10

CATZ N DOGZ aka 3 CHANNELS (DIRTYBIRD, POLAND), Subculture, The Sub Club, TRIPTYCH special,

Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8

Fri 05 Sep

ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Casa, Òran Mór, Classic house, dance,

Classic Grand, Metal, rock, industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house,

Andy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays,

23:00–03:00, £8

smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students

The Bug, Warrior Queen, A La Fu, Memory9, Rob Soundcrash, Soundcrash, Glasgow

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

23:00–03:00, £3

Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN,

Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3) Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

Fri 12 Sep

20:00–23:00, £15

Tue 02 Sep

Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & coming folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house,

DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Silver Apples, David Barbarossa, Huntleys and Palmers Audio Club, Stereo,

hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

House & techno., 22:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Detroit, disco, basement party, 22:30–03:00, £5

£3 (£2)

DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, Òran

Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £6

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition

Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuJim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays,

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house, 23:00–03:00,

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Re-

cord Playerz, The Vic Bar, Disco electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

wave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3

Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00,

Free

Children of the 80s, Classic

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mon 01 Sep

Freakmenoovers DJs,

Freakmoves, Glasgow School of Art, Fresh hip hop & funk cuts, Record Playerz in the bar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

22:30–03:00, £tbc

Gordie & Jack, Old School,

The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666, Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £3

Thu 11 Sep Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Mon 08 Sep Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Clatty Pats, Òran Mór, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers)

Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s,

Café Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

Sat 13 Sep ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk, rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric ALY & FILA, Afterlife, The

Arches, 22:00–03:00, £10

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN,

Classic Grand, Metal, rock, industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Listings


Club, TRIPTYCH special, 23:00–03:19, £12, £8 b4 12am

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House and

smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

Bob’s Full House, Òran Mór,

Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5 DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage,

Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00, Free

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar, Disco

Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Tue 16 Sep

for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4

Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

11.30pm with matric

DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4

The Rudiments, Jukebox!, The

Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, Òran

Wed 24 Sep

Embolada, Blackfriar’s Basement,

Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff

The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

Twisted Wheel, Brit-pop, punk, rock n roll, hip hop, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4

Afro, Brasil, Jamaica, Cuba, roots, 23:00–03:00, £5

Freefall Vs. Refresh, Godskitchen, The Arches, 22:45–03:00, £14

Children of the 80s, Classic

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

ing folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free

12.30am with PIYP

Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays,

hop., 21:00–01:00, Free

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop,

Andy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8

Lukid, Andrew Meza and Mike Slott, Ballers Social Club, The Ivy Bar, Techno, electronica, hip Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk., 21:00–01:00, Free

Xaver Naudasher, Wrong Island, Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, Techno, beats,

Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & com-

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk,

DJ Normski, Zero Thursdays, Boho, Funk, electro & house, 23:00–03:00, £3

Afterglow, The Twisted Wheel, 60’s

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff

The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

23:00–03:00, £5

21:30–03:00, £3

Mon 22 Sep

Sat 20 Sep

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house, 23:00–03:00,

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot, Glasgow

Basement, DJs and live bands, country, soul, rock n roll., 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

23:00–05:00, £12 (£10)

Surgeon, Monoxians, Monox, Soundhaus, Techno & electro.,

£3 (£2)

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage, Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN,

house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Classic Grand, Metal, rock, industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks,

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

ing folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House and

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Bob’s Full House, Òran Mór,

22:30–03:00, £tbc

Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8

Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6

Maggie Mays, Techno., 23:00–03:00, £8

Paul Mac, Digital Fortress, Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop,

Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old

Argonaut Sounds, The Ivy Bar,

school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays,

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot, Glasgow

Wed 17 Sep Gerry Lyons, After Hours,

ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Flying Duck,

Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Residents, Octopussy, The

Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Stereo, Yesterday’s sound of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk & rock,

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of every-

Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Residents, Sound Service, Òran Mór, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

23:00–03:00, £5

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

21:30–03:00, £3

Mon 15 Sep

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Friday Street, Blackfriar’s Base-

ment, 22:00–03:00, £5

Josh wink, slam, ben sims, octogen, Pressure, The

Arches, Hoouse & techno., 23:00–03:00, £15

Gavin Dunbar, Back Tae Mine, The Flying Duck, Eclectic,

23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo,

thing, 23:00–03:00, £3

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious,

Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £2

Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy,

Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk, ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5) Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks, Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip

DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic

Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco, 21:00–01:00, Free

Casa, Òran Mór, Classic house, dance,

Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip hop classics,

23:00–03:00, £8

Thu 18 Sep

School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum, Brel, Retro soul, 21:00–01:00, Free

PLAYGROUP Vs. RITON, Cotton Cake, The Sub Club, Techno,

22:30–03:00, £tbc

Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock,

house, dub, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8 b4 12am)

Sun 21 Sep

Clatty Pats, Òran Mór, Eclectic,

Mr Nice (Freakmenoovers), The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs.,

JD Twitch & JG Wilkes, Optimo, The Sub Club, Diverse music policy.,

indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

21:00–00:00, Free

Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

Alex & John, 45 Kicks, The Buff Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3

Specialitee presents UNBELIEVABLE Vol 2 - Taste the 90s, Soundhaus, 90s Techno, Old

20:00–00:00, Free

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition

Freakmenoovers DJs, Freakmoves, Glasgow School of

Armin Van Buuren, Rehab,

house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

www.theskinny.co.uk

Andy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

Reggae soundsystem., 20:00–00:00, £2

23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers)

playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers

Fri 26 Sep

Wheel, Techno party, 23:00–03:00, £1

Fri 19 Sep

The Buff Club, Pick & mix of everything, 23:00–03:00, £3

16:00–03:00, Free

Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

Sound The Alarm, The Twisted

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket,

RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

days, Boho, Funk, electro & house, 23:00–03:00, £3

TYCH special, 23:00–03:19, £12, £8 b4 12am

20:00–00:00, Free

Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

DJ Normski, Zero Thurs-

Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & com-

THE ROBERT OWENS BAND, Subculture, The Sub Club, TRIP-

No Hassle, Republic Bier Halle,

Mór, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4

Firewater, Indie, soul, britpop, rock, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 10.30pm

The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Diverse music policy., 23:00–03:00, £9 (£8)

Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, Òran

DJ Billy, Skint, The Cathouse, Metal, hip hop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2), free b4 12.30am with PIYP

Numbers DJs, The Ivy Bar,

DISRUPT, Optimo, The Sub Club,

house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Rubbermensch, ABC 2, A night for indie lovers, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk., 21:00–01:00, Free

Sun 14 Sep

Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo, Classic

23:00–03:00, £2

Hi-Fi Sean & Hushpuppy, Record Playerz, The Vic Bar, Disco

DJ Toast, Up The Racket,

Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New

smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

Dub & Grub, The 78, Dub, 19:00–00:00,

Free

electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Tue 23 Sep

Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip hop classics,

Art, Fresh hip hop & funk cuts, Record Playerz in the bar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/club workers

Erol Alkan, Death Disco, The

21:00–01:00, Free

Club, New York & underground school inspired beats, 23:00–03:00, £3

Psyklopz, Stereo, Eclectic,

Arches, Electro, disco, 23:00–03:00, £12

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco,

23:00–03:00, £4 (Free for NHS workers)

Mash, Normski and Zeus, Burn, The Buff Club, Glasgow institition

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Freakmenoovers DJs, Freakmoves, Glasgow School of

Café Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

The Reverb Syndicate, Shout Bamalama, Blackfriar’s

Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Thu 25 Sep

Clatty Pats, Òran Mór, Eclectic,

rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

thing, 23:00–03:00, £3

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

Gordie & Jack, Old School,

Stephen Rodgers and Nick Ferrara, Elemets Of Soul, Basura Blanca, Deep & soulful house., 22:30–03:00, £5

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk & rock,

Arches, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Harvey Kartel & DJ Pumpio, Easy, The Buff Club, Pick & mix of every-

DJBarry & Harvey Kartel, AltNation Club, Bamboo, Rock,

ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk,

Basement, Techno, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Residents, Octopussy, The

Òran Mór, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

Firewater, Indie, rock, punk, electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

Stereo, Disco, rock n roll., 23:00–03:00, £10

One More Tune, Blackfriar’s

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Flying Duck,

Residents, Sound Service,

James Holden, After Dark,

northern soul, 70’s soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Tongue In Cheek, Bamboo, Lounge, RnB & indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£5), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

16:00–03:00, Free

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s,

23:00–04:00, £15 (£13)

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket,

Craig McGee, Horrorshow,

The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

DJ Pierre (Afro Acid), Phuture 303 (Chicago), Hologram Hookers (Afro Acid) & residents, Inner City Acid, Soundhaus, Electro, techno, bass,

Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

Gerry Lyons, After Hours,

Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £6

Nicola Walker, Route 666,

electronica., 23:00–03:00, £4

Mór, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4

Art, Fresh hip hop & funk cuts, Record Playerz in the bar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

School, Rave, Club Classics, Pop, Indie, Rock., 23:00–04:00, £3 (free) Byblos, 20:00–04:00, £20

23:00–03:00, £9 (£8)

No Hassle, Republic Bier Halle, Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo, Classic

SEPTEMBER 08

THE SKINNY 63

Listings

LUKE SOLOMON (REKIDS, LONDON), Subculture, The Sub


Glasgow Clubs Edinburgh Clubs Mon 01 Sep

Geoff M, Junior Campos & Max, Toxic Pop, Bamboo, House

DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for

music, hip hop & lounge, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 11pm/12am students

deserving bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Euan Nielson, ABC Fridays, ABC 1, Genre mash-up, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Residents, Happy Mondays,

DJs Rasef & Lobo, Uncle Butcher, Rob K, Eruption,

Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

The Halt Bar, A night of punk, garage, blues, soul, ska, R&B., 19:00–00:00, Free

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join

Andrew Divine & David Barbarossa, Curious Curious,

the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

James Combe, The Latin

Stereo, Yesterday’s sound of tomorrow, today., 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4), £3 b4 12am

Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house, 22:00–03:00, free Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge, Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

DJBarry, DamnatioN, Classic Grand, Rock, indie., 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2) DJ Hushpuppy (Art School) & Chris Geddes (Belle & Sebastian), Sound Museum,

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo Caffé, Soul, jazz

Brel, Retro soul, 21:00–01:00, Free

& funk, 19:00–03:00, free

A La Fu (Big Dada), The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs.,

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow

People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront & unplayed cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

21:00–00:00, Free

DJs Quzzy (CoExist) & Scott (Achren), Sin, Soundhaus, Metal.,

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots,

23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The Hidden Masters, Palace Ballet, Vic Galloway, Alpha Mitchell & Paul Needles, Funhouse, The Twisted Wheel, Rock

23:00–03:00, £4

Nicola Walker, Route 666,

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

The Buff Club, Old school tunes, 22:30–03:00, £6

emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, Mr. Divine & Hushpuppy, Divine!, The Vic Bar, Northern soul, funk,

ska & mod tunes, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Lil Rich, Glamorama, Boho, 90s

House, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£6)

Stevie Sole Middleton, Domenic Martin & Scottie B, Homegrown, Bamboo, House and

smooth RnB, jazz & funk, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 10.30pm/12.30am students

Bob’s Full House, Òran Mór,

Dance & pop, 23:00–03:00, £8

William Daniel, Danny Smith & Alan Belshaw, Inside Out, The Arches, Trance, hard house, house, 22:30–03:00, £12

Robbie Rolex, The Hip Drop, Brel, Reggae, funk and tekfunk., 21:00–01:00, Free

Hans Bouffmyhre and Jean Ramesse, Vakama, Orsan Kart Vs. DK & Solar, Graeme Dunn, Phatkat, Jamie Ramage, Richard Maxwell, Logi, Brother Luke, Altronix, Shift, Soundhaus, Deep, minimal, house & techno., 23:00–04:00, £10, £8 b4 12am

Boom Monk Ben, The Ivy Bar, The Ivy Bar, DJs upstairs., 21:00–00:00, Free

Maelstrom, Andy Piacentini, Derek Smith, Dance! Dance! Dance!, The Twisted

Wheel, Disco, eclectic, 23:00–03:00, £5

Loose Joints & Stevie Elements, Bad Robot, Glasgow

School of Art, Rock to techno & breakbeats, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5), £2 GSA, free after 12am

Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock,

The Catwalk Rock Lounge, Classic & cult rock, 21:30–03:00, £tbc

Ian Thomson & Paul Rea, Sabado Saturdays, Byblos,

22:00–03:00, £8, £6 b4 12am

Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina,

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house.,

Gordie & Jack, Old School,

23:00–03:00, £10, £5 b4 12am

Gareth Binks, Rosco, IndepenDANCE, Studio 24, Trance.,

23:00–03:00, £4

Firewater, Indie, rock, punk, electro, soul, britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

HARRI & DOMENIC, Subculture, The Sub Club, TRIPTYCH special,

hop, 23:00–03:00, Free Kinky Indie, Citrus Club, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £5/ £2 DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house.,

Craig McGee, Horrorshow,

Classic Grand, Metal, rock, industrial, punk & ska., 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

P-Stylz & Mastercaird, Masterstylz, Medina, RnB, funk & hip

French 60’s pop, psyche, retro., 21:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Evol, The Liquid

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers, 21:30–03:00, £6

DJBarry & Dec, AbsolutioN,

Pivo Caffé, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free DJ John H, Bounce, Po Na Na, Club classics, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

Jim Da Best, Flirtini Fridays,

ABC Saturdays, ABC 1, Soul, punk, rock & indie dance, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5), free b4 11.30pm with matric

Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

Tall Paul & Angus (The GOGO), Sam Jose (Vegas), & Professor Plastic, Bubblegum Boogaloo, The Voodoo Rooms,

Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free

Electroball, Karbon, 80’s, nuwave, rock & punk, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Teknika, Blackfriar’s Basement, Minimal techno., 23:00–03:00, £5

Cabaret Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

TONY K and LIAM G, Our

House, Cabaret Voltaire, Electro and classic house tunes., 23:00–03:00, £7, £6 b4 12am

Edinburgh locals, Split,

Grand, DJs & live performances, 80s tunes, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Sat 27 Sep

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note,

Luna, Hard dance, house, trance., 23:00–03:00, £15

ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Children of the 80s, Classic

Café Rio, Jazz, funk & soul, 22:00–03:00, Free

Thu 04 Sep

Lisa Lashes, Nuklearpuppy,

Tue 02 Sep

& soul., 22:00–03:00, £5

Mark Robb, Sparkies 45s,

JungleDub, The Bongo Club,

23:00–03:00, Free

house, 80s classics, RnB & chart, 21:30–03:00, £8

Craig Wilson, Hanoi Rocks,

Paul Crawford, Soul Sundays, Firewater, Indie, punk & rock, 16:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Sound Service, Òran Mór, Funk, soul, 23:00–03:00, £5

Jon Mancini & Kris Keegan, Tricky Disco, Karbon, House,

Firewater, Indie, rock & britpop, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 10.30pm

23:00–03:00, £5

Robbie Rolex & Nel, Hip Drop, Brel, Funk, soul, electro & disco,

Jim Da Best, We Love Sundays, Boho, Party tunes & floor fillers,

21:00–01:00, Free

Kev McFarlane, Stephen Lee & Woody, Karbon Saturdays, Karbon, House & hip hop classics,

22:30–03:00, £tbc

Nu-school, The Buff Club, Fresh northern soul, jazz & funk featuring live percussion, classics downstairs, 22:30–03:00, £6

21:30–03:00, £3

JD Twitch & JG Wilkes, Optimo, The Sub Club, Diverse music policy.,

23:00–03:00, £9 (£8)

Cristian Vogel Vs. Neil Landstrumm, Kinky Afro,

The Sub Club, Electronic, dubstep, techno., 23:00–03:00, £10

Craig Loosejoints & Mark Robb, Sunday Service, Òran

Mon 29 Sep Shawn Roberts, Passionality, Byblos, Commercial house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2) Club, Glasgow institition playing underground classics, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free for pub/ club workers

Fresh, The Polo Lounge, Popular gay venue with house & indie, 23:00–03:00, £5

DJ Andy & DJ Dec, Poptimism/Rocktimism, The Garage, Pop & rock, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3), free +1 b4 12am with PIYP

Mór, Soul, jazz, latin, funk., 23:00–03:00, £4

Tue 30 Sep

Marky Mark, Junk, The Buff Club, Jazz & funk featuring live percussion by Duffy, 23:00–03:00, £3, free with matric

Killer Kitsch, The Buff Club, New wave, indie, electro, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Bass Drunk, Blackfriar’s Basement, 23:00–03:00, £5

Shazza Halliwell, Audioculture, Byblos, Chart, cheese, rnb,

DJ Richard Levinson, Club Priory: Retox Rooms, Blanket,

house, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£2)

RnB, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy Wilson & DJ Kash, All Star, Bamboo, Funk & hip pop,

Dominic Martin, Kash & Max, Disco Badger, Bamboo, Classic

22:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12am with matric

house music all night long with other boogie next door, 20:00–03:00, £5 (£4), free b4 11pm/12pm with matric

Folk It!, The Mixing Rooms, Up & com-

Jumblesale Sounds, It Sure Beats Waitin’, The Flying Duck, Bass, percussion & scratching, 21:00–03:00, Free b4 11pm

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo Caffé, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00,

free

Dava & Hobbes, Synthetic Love, Lulu, Eclectic set, 20:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11pm

James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Todd Terje, Burn, The Buff Sun 28 Sep

The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

ing folk musician session, 20:00–01:00, Free

Kaleidoscope Live, ABC 2, Old school rock & roll, soul, funk, from the 1960’s1980’s, 22:00–03:00, £3, free with matric. After 12am

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Wed 03 Sep Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music

to make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

DJ Casey Cooper & DJ Dan,

Rude, Po Na Na, Remixes & twisted beats, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth, Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclec-

tic, chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo Caffé, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco, RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4

Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set,

21:00–03:00, Free

Mash & Jon Pleased, Roller Disco, Lulu, Past & future electronic classics,

20:00–03:00, £4.99, free b4 11pm The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The

Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco

23:00–03:00, £8

22:30–03:00, Free

Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

& dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge, Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm

Fri 05 Sep DJ John Hutchison (Tokyo Blu) & DJ Dan, Kandiflip, Po Na

Na, Uplifting house & club classics, 22:30–03:00, £6, £4 b4 11pm

Residents, Planet Earth, Citrus Club, 80s tunes with residents, 22:30–03:00, £5, free B4 11pm

Psylent V, Nasty P, Bassdrunk, Soul Biscuits,

Cabaret Voltaire, Hip hop, funk, 23:00–03:00, £5 SO SO MODERN, Fast, The Bongo Club, Electro, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4 b4 12am)

billy nasty, wolfjazz, stephen brown, Creative Industries, The GRV, Techno., Sat 06 Sep

Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock, motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

chris & paul, The Egg, Wee Red

Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 students/members

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Asazi Space Funk Explosion, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, TRIPTYCH special, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm

theskinny.co.uk/listings/clubs 64 THE SKINNY

SEPTEMBER 08

Listings


club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul, Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00,

£7, £4 b4 11pm

DJs Fisher & Price The Visitor [AKA Jon Pleased Wimmin ] and Kaupuss, Fever, Luna, Gay friendly Saturday house club., 23:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

GARETH SOMMERVILLE, Ultragroove, Cabaret Voltaire, Deep house

& techno, 23:00–03:00, £8, £6 NUS

DJ Keiron, Stuart Braithwaite, Grainne Braithwaite, Extra Width, The Speakeasy

@ Cabaret Voltaire, Eclectic dance, 23:00–03:00, £5

Fryer & Jason Stirland, Soul Spectrum, The Voo-

doo Rooms, Norwegian soulboy special, 21:00–01:00, Free Luvely, The Liquid Room, Gay friendly house night, 22:30–03:00, £12 (£10) The Go-Go, Studio 24, Garage, pop, mod, ska, beat, psychedelia, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4) Bleep By Day, The Courtyard, Techno, electro, house, 15:00–23:00, Free

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More, Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts,

22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock, metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm Headspin, The Bongo Club, Funk, hip hop, house, disco, 4 deck mix, 23:00–03:00, £8

Sun 07 Sep Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free Curious? Sunday Joint, The Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

JOHN HUTCHISON (TOKYOBLU), Shake, Shanghai, House, soulful & funky,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

John Hutchison & Gareth Sommerville, Rise, Opal Lounge, Funky house, electro disco, club classics, mashups & remixes., 22:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

www.theskinny.co.uk

Paul Cunningham & Huggy, Peepshow, Medina, Eclectic., 22:00–03:00, £5

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk,

industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

John Hutchinson, Shake, Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special, 22:30–03:00, £3

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, 23:30–03:00, free

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam, 23:00–03:00, £4

Tue 09 Sep Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo

Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House,

Edinburgh locals, Split,

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house.,

23:00–03:00, £4

Caffé, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

21:00–03:00, Free

Funki Diva, Dejaybird, Boy Toy, Debi T, Furburger, GHQ,

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal,

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

20:00–03:00, £4.99, free b4 11pm

23:00–03:00, Free

JungleDub, The Bongo Club,

23:00–03:00, Free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo Caffé, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs,

Thu 11 Sep

DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The

Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

deserving bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00,

Mon 08 Sep

Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop,

urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Residents, Happy Mondays, Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

James Combe, The Latin Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin

21:00–03:00, free

Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

free

Dava & Hobbes, Synthetic Love, Lulu, Eclectic set, 20:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11pm

James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Wed 10 Sep Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music

house, 22:00–03:00, free

to make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

& funk, 19:00–03:00, free

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members

Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge, Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo Caffé, Soul, jazz Mark Du Mosch, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront & un-

played cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 22:00–03:00, Free

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots, ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth,

Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclectic, chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm

Fri 12 Sep

Mash & Jon Pleased, Roller Disco, Lulu, Past & future electronic classics,

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

& dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge,

disco, RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4

Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set,

emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock,

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco

Pivo Caffé, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free DJ John H, Bounce, Po Na Na, Club classics, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note,

Cabaret Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

P-Stylz & Mastercaird, Masterstylz, Medina, RnB, funk & hip

hop, 23:00–03:00, Free Kinky Indie, Citrus Club, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £5/ £2 DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free

REMARC (Planet Mu), PRODUCER (Deathchant), GHOST (life4land), Nass TSC, Mutiny,

The Bongo Club, Junglist breakcore and hardcore sounds., 22:30–03:00, £6, £4 b4 12am Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free

Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Furburger is for girls who like girls who like music., 23:00–03:00, Free

DJ John Hutchison (Tokyo Blu) & DJ Dan, Kandiflip, Po Na

Na, Uplifting house & club classics, 22:30–03:00, £6, £4 b4 11pm

Residents, Planet Earth,

Citrus Club, 80s tunes with residents, 22:30–03:00, £5, free B4 11pm Not So Dirty, Luna, Electrohouse., 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

PÄR GRINDVIK, Compakt,

Cabaret Voltaire, Deep house, minimal, tech house and rolling European techno., 23:00–03:00, £10, £8 b4 12am

ROBERT OWENS, TRENDY WENDY, DOWSER, Hotty Notty, The

Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, House., 22:00–03:00, £15 Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5

G-Mac, Silver Storic, Al Majik, Kur-Mak, Bass Syndicate, The Bongo Club, BASS SYNDICATE

Presents… STRICTLY BREAKS Following their huge 2nd Birthday show in the Edinburgh Festival with Stanton Warriors and Krafty Kuts the Bass Syndicate Crew are going back to their roots for a home team special at The Bongo. Resident DJs in the house George Mac & Silver Storic will be joined by the notorious Al Majik plus up & coming Polish Dj Kur-Mak for a ‘Strictly Breaks’ night featuring a plethora of monster breaks old and new! DJ G-MAC (Underground Solu’shn) SILVER STORIC (Fresh 12) AL MAJIK (Az-Tech) KURMAK (Poland), 23:00–03:00, £6 / £4 before 12am Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4)

Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk,

rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Sat 13 Sep Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock, motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm

Ceilidh band Wild Geese & caller Ken Gourlay, Assembly Rooms Ceilidh, Assembly Rooms (George Street), 20:00–01:00, £tbc

chris & paul, The Egg, Wee Red

Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 students/members

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

The Banana Sessions, Satur-

day Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, TRIPTYCH special, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students Brett King and Brian Dempster, Satisfied, Luna, House, prog,

trance, anthems., 23:00–03:00, £5

PAOLO MOJO, MIKE PINKERTON, MATT EDWARDS, RYAN ELLIS, Karnival, Cabaret Voltaire, House & techno., 23:00–03:00, £10

D RAMIREZ, Derek Martin, Neil Bartley, Musika, The Liquid

Room, We Love Space Ibiza party., 22:30–03:00, £10 DJ Claudio, Haedfunk, Massa, House., 23:00–03:00, £5

Bimbo Jones, Diskokitten,

Berlin, House, bootlegs, classics., 22:00–03:00, £8, £6 b4 11.30pm

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

SEPTEMBER 08

THE SKINNY 65

Listings

Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth


Edinburgh Clubs Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More, Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts,

22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul, Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00,

£7, £4 b4 11pm

Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock,

metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Sun 14 Sep Curious? Sunday Joint, The

Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free

JOHN HUTCHISON (TOKYOBLU), Shake, Shanghai, House, soulful & funky,

23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

John Hutchison & Gareth Sommerville, Rise, Opal Lounge, Funky house, electro disco, club classics, mashups & remixes., 22:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Paul Cunningham & Huggy, Peepshow, Medina, Eclectic.,

22:00–03:00, £5

Fisher & Price, Miss Chris and Marco Smith, Taste, The

Liquid Room, Dance music, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk,

industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

John Hutchinson, Shake,

Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special,

22:30–03:00, £3

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, 23:30–03:00, free

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam, 23:00–03:00, £4

Mon 15 Sep DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for

deserving bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Residents, Happy Mondays,

Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

James Combe, The Latin Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin

house, 22:00–03:00, free

Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge,

Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo Caffé, Soul, jazz

& funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront & un-

played cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots, ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Tue 16 Sep Edinburgh locals, Split,

Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy mid-week rave, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house.,

23:00–03:00, £4

Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo Caffé, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00,

free

Dava & Hobbes, Synthetic Love, Lulu, Eclectic set, 20:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11pm

66 THE SKINNY

James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Wed 17 Sep Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music

to make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth, Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclec-

tic, chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo Caffé, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House, disco, RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4

Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set,

21:00–03:00, Free

Mash & Jon Pleased, Roller Disco, Lulu, Past & future electronic classics,

20:00–03:00, £4.99, free b4 11pm The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free JungleDub, The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Vandal, Touch, Luna, Electrohouse, tech-house, breaks., 22:30–03:00, £5 Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm

David George and Beast, Riddim Tuffa Sound, The GRV, Reggae,

jungle, dub, ragga, dubstep, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Sat 20 Sep Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock, motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm chris & paul, The Egg, Wee Red Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 students/members Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Underling, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar, TRIPTYCH spe-

cial, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

Sinnerman, Marmalade Maslin, James “”Jammin”” Thomas & Jammiwam, Jam The Box, The GRV, Hip hop, jazz, new wave,

Thu 18 Sep

dub techno., 22:30–03:00, £4, £2 b4 12am

Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

& techno, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£8)

Pivo Caffé, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free DJ John H, Bounce, Po Na Na, Club classics, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note,

Cabaret Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

P-Stylz & Mastercaird, Masterstylz, Medina, RnB, funk & hip

hop, 23:00–03:00, Free Kinky Indie, Citrus Club, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £5/ £2 DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note,

Cabaret Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats, 22:30–03:00, Free

SPENCER PARKER, Ultragroove, Cabaret Voltaire, Deep house DJ Keiron, Stuart Braithwaite, Grainne Braithwaite, Extra Width, The Speakeasy

Fri 19 Sep Fresh, Luna, Hip hop to breaks & house.,

23:00–03:00, £3, free 4 students

DJ John Hutchison (Tokyo Blu) & DJ Dan, Kandiflip, Po Na

Na, Uplifting house & club classics, 22:30–03:00, £6, £4 b4 11pm Rob Stow, Synthetic, The Bongo Club, Techno, 23:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Planet Earth, Citrus Club, 80s tunes with residents, 22:30–03:00, £5, free B4 11pm

Tokyoblu Live band, NIALL & DENNIS McKERVEY, Tokyoblu,

Cabaret Voltaire, Live house band, 23:00–03:00, £10 (£6) Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5

Randy Katana, Aly & Fila, Marcus Schossow, Gatecrasher, Ocean Terminal,

22:00–03:00, £10

SEPTEMBER 08

deserving bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Residents, Happy Mondays,

Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

James Combe, The Latin

Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house, 22:00–03:00, free Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge, Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Fryer & Jason Stirland, Soul Spectrum, The Voo-

doo Rooms, Norwegian soulboy special, 21:00–01:00, Free

Andy C, Street Knowledge, The Liquid Room, Drum & bass, dubstep, 21:00–06:00, £13

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More, Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts,

22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

played cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

John Hutchison & Gareth Sommerville, Rise, Opal Lounge, Funky house, electro disco, club classics, mashups & remixes., 22:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Paul Cunningham & Huggy, Peepshow, Medina, Eclectic.,

22:00–03:00, £5

23:30–03:00, free

The Speakeasy @ Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 if you turn up (fancy) dressed as your idol

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk, industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

John Hutchinson, Shake, Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Scottish Hobo Society

lar Bar, Techno & electro., 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo Caffé, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00,

free

Dava & Hobbes, Synthetic Love, Lulu, Eclectic set, 20:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11pm

James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna,

to make girls dance, 23:00–03:00, £3

Gary Mac & friends, We Are Electric, Cabaret Voltaire, House,

electro, techno., 23:00–03:00, £2, free b4 12am/ members Residents, Freak, Citrus Club, Northern soul, 70s funk, disco, 22:30–03:00, £4, free B4 12am Indi-Go, The Liquid Room, Indie & alternative, 22:30–03:00, £2, £1 students

Pacman, Joy, Bass Invasion, Secret Arcade, Drum & bass, breakbeat, 21:00–01:00, Free

Calverto, Harry Ainsworth, Chairman Meow, Shanghai, Eclec-

tic, chart, dance, indie, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£1) DJ Jez Hill, Chambles, Opal Lounge, Funk & chart, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Robotales, The GRV, Eclectic set,

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge,

The Dark Assassin, aka Hobbes, The Hollywood Touch, aka Mr Meaks, New Idols,

23:00–03:00, £4 Split, Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy midweek rave, 23:00–03:00, Free Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house.,

John Hutchinson, Shake,

22:30–03:00, £3

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free

Mon 29 Sep

Barry Wilkins, DJ Focus, DJ Beef, Quickshot, Medina, House,

Scottish Hobo Society (live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special,

Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

Fri 26 Sep

The Sunday Social, The Sunday Social, The Hive, Metal, rock, punk, Shanghai, House, soulful & funky, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

22:30–03:00, Free

Curious? Sunday Joint, The Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk,

CRAIG FRASER, DOWSER, LITTLE GROOVES, Hotty Notty, The Speakeasy @ Cabaret

industrial, ebm, 80’s, 23:00–03:00, free

The Freaky Family, 100% Organic Hip Hop Live Session, The Jazz Bar, Hip hop & funky beats,

Sun 28 Sep

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam,

ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Tue 23 Sep

Breadmark & Johnny Cashback, The Good Groove, Pivo

Voltaire, House., 23:00–03:00, £5

Cabaret Voltaire, From indie and new wave to fidget house, Baltimore booty bass to nu-rave., 23:00–03:00, Free

dancehall & jungle, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£4 b4 12am)

TOM, Audacious, The Bongo Club, Breakcore, gabba, jungle, dubstep., 23:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 12am

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots,

Black Spring DJs, Black Spring Rocks, The Jazz Bar, Music

JOHN HUTCHISON (TOKYOBLU), Shake, Shanghai, House, soulful & funky,

Clash!, Spies in the Wires DJs & guests, Sick Note,

metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

David George, Beast, DeBurgh & Decoy Roy, Big N Bashy, The Bongo Club, Dubstep, reggae,

(live), The Bongo Club, TRIPTYCH special, 22:30–03:00, £3

Mumbo Jumbo, The Bongo Club,

Cabaret Voltaire, Funky vocal house, electro and club classics., 23:00–03:00, Free

hop, 23:00–03:00, Free Kinky Indie, Citrus Club, Student night, 23:00–03:00, £5/ £2 DJ Benetti, italoBLACK, Sneaky Pete’s, Italo disco, space disco., 22:00–03:00, Free Residents, Bump, The Liquid Room, Chart, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£1)

Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock,

& dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge, Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm

Wed 24 Sep

Miss Kriss, Kaupuss, More,

P-Stylz & Mastercaird, Masterstylz, Medina, RnB, funk & hip

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco

Bastard!, The Hive, Indie, electro, rock,

Funk, soul, electro & house., 23:00–03:00, £7 (£6)

Pivo Caffé, Electric mash up dance grooves, 19:00–03:00, Free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront & un-

& funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

metal, punk, 23:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11.30pm

Jacek Zamojski & guests, Polyphonic Social Club,

Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul, Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00,

£7, £4 b4 11pm

Thu 25 Sep

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo Caffé, Soul, jazz

The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

Dave Pearce, Boombox, Luna,

Curious? Sunday Joint, The Bongo Club, Diverse selection of music, free internet & games, 16:00–03:00, £3, free b4 11pm

Electro-pop, classics & disco, 22:00–03:00, £5, free b4 10pm

DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for

22:30–03:00, £tbc

Gareth Somerville, Frazer McGlinchey & guests, Souled Out, Opal Lounge, Soul, disco & dance, 22:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am

Mon 22 Sep

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice,

Sun 21 Sep

Jez Hill, Stiletto, Opal Lounge,

23:00–03:00, £4

@ Cabaret Voltaire, Eclectic dance, 23:00–03:00, £5

Kieron, Cheated Hearts, The Hive, Indie, 23:00–03:00, £2

Trendy Wendy, Playgirl Mansions, Lulu, Chart pop & glam,

Caffé, Funk, afrobeat, latin breaks & house, 21:00–03:00, Free

disco, RnB, 22:00–03:00, £4

21:00–03:00, Free

Mash & Jon Pleased, Roller Disco, Lulu, Past & future electronic classics,

20:00–03:00, £4.99, free b4 11pm The Pit, The Hive, Rock & metal, 23:00–03:00, Free JungleDub, The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

BEATWIFE, PHETAMEAN, KING

CURSOR MINER, FANCY & SPOOK, Substance, Henry’s CelResidents, Planet Earth, Citrus Club, 80s tunes with residents, 22:30–03:00, £5, free B4 11pm

MOOQEE, TONI JARVIS, B-SIDES & THE BANDIT, Sugarbeat, Cabaret Voltaire, Breaks, beats, bootlegs., 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Mr Copy, Paul Morrice and Flav, Mono, Luna, Techno, tech-house

and minimal., 23:00–03:00, £tbc Residents, Evol, The Liquid Room, Indie, hip hop, alternative beats & rock, 22:30–03:00, £5 Isla Blidge, Get Funk’d, Medina, Hip hop to house, 22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm DJ Fiona, Maestoso, Shanghai, Classics, chart, anthems, 21:00–03:00, £8 (£4) Misfits, The Hive, Indie, electro, punk, rock, retro & a tequila girl, 23:00–03:00, £3, free b4 12am Salsa Caribe!, The Lot, Salsa DJs on the special wooden dancefloor, 21:00–01:30, £5, £4 b4 9.30pm SkunkFunk, The Jazz Bar, 5-piece funk band, 23:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Astroboy, Simon Hodge, Jonny Cashback & Monkeyboy, Four Corners, The Bongo

Club, Funk, afro, beats, latin, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3 b4 12am)

Sat 27 Sep Tease Age, Citrus Club, All things rock,

motown, alternative & soul, 22:30–03:00, £6, free b4 11pm chris & paul, The Egg, Wee Red Bar, Indie, garage, punk, ska & more at the Art College’s long running institution, 23:00–03:00, £5, £4 students/members

Digital Jones & Ladi6, Saturday Night Fish Fry, The Jazz Bar,

TRIPTYCH special, hip hop, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 b4 11.30pm Sanctuary, Studio 24, Underage goth club, 18:00–21:00, £7 (£5) Retribution, Studio 24, Rock, alternative, 23:00–03:00, £5, £3 students

JD Twitch & JG Wilkes, Optimo, Cabaret Voltaire, Diverse music

policy., 23:00–03:00, £10 Fuse, Luna, House, techno, electronica., 23:00–03:00, £5

Todd Terje, Shoot The Pump, The GRV, House, disco, 22:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Calverto, Scott Grainer, Musicology, Shanghai, Funk, chart,

dance, 21:00–03:00, £10 (£5)

Nasty P & Cunnie, Much More, Medina, Hip-hop & funk cuts,

22:00–03:00, £4, £3 b4 11pm

Mark B & guests, Liquid Soul, Po Na Na, Chirpy music, 23:30–03:00,

£7, £4 b4 11pm

Sam Jose, Tall Paul, Easy Sunday DJ Set, The Jazz Bar, Lounge, 23:30–03:00, free

23:00–03:00, £4

DJ Beefy & Wolfjazz, Trade

Union, Cabaret Voltaire, Night for deserving bar & club staff, 23:00–03:00, £2, (£1), free b4 12am

Forbidden, Shanghai, RnB, hip hop, urban electro, chart, 22:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Residents, Happy Mondays, Po Na Na, Night for students & Industry folk, indie, rock & funk, 22:30–03:00, free

Residents, The Late, Great Jam Session, The Jazz Bar, Players join the house trio, 22:00–03:00, free after 23.15

James Combe, The Latin Quarter, Medina, Salsa, funk & latin house, 22:00–03:00, free

Residents, Mojo, Opal Lounge, Modern music & timeless classics, 22:00–03:00, £3, free before 12am

Astroboy & Breadmark, Sounds Good, Pivo Caffé, Soul, jazz & funk, 19:00–03:00, free

Trouble DJs, Tomorrow People, The GRV, Obscure, upfront & un-

played cosmic, boogie, dubstep, b-more, re-edits, eclectic, 21:00–01:00, Free

Commanderson and General B-Battenburg, Freak Screen, The Bongo Club, Films on roots, ska & funk., 20:00–01:00, Free

Tue 30 Sep Fryer & Gino, Motherfunk, Opal Lounge, Original soul, funk, disco, latin & hip hop, 22:00–03:00, Free

James Longworth & Jamie Morrison, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Split, Cabaret Voltaire, Blend of electro, techno, drum & bass, breakbeat, healthy midweek rave, 23:00–03:00, Free

Residents, Antics, The Hive, Rock, emo, punk & metal, 23:00–03:00, free

Mr. Jinx, The Diamond Dice, Massa, Hip hop, RnB & grime, 22:00–03:00, £5

DJ Stuart Johnston, Frunt, The Liquid Room, House music all night long, 22:30–03:00, free

Nick A.K.A. & The Dalek, Indie Mix, Pivo Caffé, Indie, alt, Mashup & bootlegs, 21:00–03:00, free

DJ Aki, Late, Live n’ Funky, The Jazz Bar, 2 drummer funk band, 23:30–03:00, free

Residents, Spitfires Social Club, Red, Indie social club, 21:00–03:00, free

Dava & Hobbes, Synthetic Love, Lulu, Eclectic set, 20:00–03:00, £4, free b4 11pm

James Longwarth, Vibe, Luna, Sexy house., 23:00–03:00, £4

Listings


DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Wed 03 Sep Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Vodka

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30,

ÂŁtbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BRENDAN LONG (Bugged Out), HYRULE, The Reading Rooms,

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Thu 04 Sep

Sat 13 Sep

Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;00:00, free

Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d Out,

DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party Mash-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

Tue 23 Sep

Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after Student Night, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after Anthems and Classics, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc DJ DAVID, FELT, The Reading Rooms, Music by: Modern Lovers, Architecture in Helsinki, Belle & Sebastion, Velvet Underground, Vampire Weekend, XTC, Camera Obscura, Sonic Youth ETC, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ3 before 12 ÂŁ5 after - ALL DRINKS ÂŁ2

Fri 05 Sep DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ARGY (Cocoon / Pker Flat) + Headway Residents Graeme Binnie, Bruce Anderson & Neil Clarke, Headway, The Reading Rooms, DJ

Argy makes his Scottish debut at Headway presenting speaker freaking house, minimal & techno, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ10.00 DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic weekend warm-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30,

ÂŁtbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,

All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Sat 06 Sep DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party

Mash-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current

chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJ Robert Walker, Back to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House

and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Sun 07 Sep Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD, Ladies Night, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before12 ÂŁ5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current

chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;00:00, free

Tue 09 Sep DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Wed 10 Sep Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Vodka Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop,

21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after Student Night, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Thu 11 Sep Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d Out,

UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after Anthems and Classics, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc DJ DAVID, FELT, The Reading Rooms, Music by: Modern Lovers, Architecture in Helsinki, Belle & Sebastion, Velvet Underground, Vampire Weekend, XTC, Camera Obscura, Sonic Youth ETC, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ3 before 12 ÂŁ5 after - ALL DRINKS ÂŁ2

Journey into the land of breakbeat, electro & house, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ6 before 11.30 ÂŁ8 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current

chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJ Robert Walker, Back to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House

and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Vodka Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

Student Night, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Thu 25 Sep Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d Out, UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;00:00, free

Tue 16 Sep

DJ DAVID, FELT, The Reading Rooms, Music by: Modern Lovers, Architecture in Helsinki, Belle & Sebastion, Velvet Underground, Vampire Weekend, XTC, Camera Obscura, Sonic Youth ETC, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ3 before 12 ÂŁ5 after - ALL DRINKS ÂŁ2

Fri 26 Sep

Wed 17 Sep

DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic weekend warm-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Vodka

Society, UNDERGROUD, Student Pop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after Student Night, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc Thu 18 Sep Resident DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d Out,

UNDERGROUD, R & B + Hip Hop, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after Anthems and Classics, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc DJ DAVID, FELT, The Reading Rooms, Music by: Modern Lovers, Architecture in Helsinki, Belle & Sebastion, Velvet Underground, Vampire Weekend, XTC, Camera Obscura, Sonic Youth ETC, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ3 before 12 ÂŁ5 after - ALL DRINKS ÂŁ2

Fri 19 Sep DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic

weekend warm-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30,

ÂŁtbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc Sat 20 Sep DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party Mash-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current

chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJ Robert Walker, Back to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House

and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DESPERATE DAN + DLOVE,

PLASTIC SOUL, The Reading Rooms, Afrobeat, hiphop, reggae, funk, soul, beats and other dancefloor tings, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ5.00

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

Sat 27 Sep DJ Gautham, UNDERGROUD, Party Mash-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual Saturday night favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

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DJ Robert Walker, Back to Reality, Fat Sams Level 2, Funky House and club classics with Resident DJ Robert Walker in the biggest dance night in the city for the past 5 years., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, All your favourite classics from the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 90â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Flares and leg warmers are optional!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

')I=D8IÂ&#x2014;. 7;

DJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s DESPERATE DAN + DLOVE, PLASTIC SOUL, The Reading Rooms, Afrobeat, hiphop, reggae, funk, soul, beats and other dancefloor tings, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ5.00

Sun 28 Sep Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD, Ladies Night, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before12 ÂŁ5 after DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current chart, Hip Hop and R&B anthems mixed with the usual favourites with our resident DJ Ricky Harrison., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

The Karma Lounge, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Brings you all your favourite songs from the 1970s and 80s with a twist, as requested by you!, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc Sunny Sunday, DCA - Jute Bar, Live Bands on the Patio, 12:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;00:00, free Tue 30 Sep

DJ Simon, UNDERGROUD, Eclectic

Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD,

DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca,

www.theskinny.co.uk

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ÂŁtbc

Sun 21 Sep Ladies Night, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before12 ÂŁ5 after

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DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30,

Fri 12 Sep weekend warm-up, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before 11 ÂŁ5 after

&HID8I Â&#x2014;&* 7;

Anthems and Classics, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Expect anthems and classics, plus all the current chart hits and floor fillers you would expect in a club; Rockers to the Ravers all catered for here., 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca, Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

''C9H:EI Â&#x2014;. 7;

Wed 24 Sep

Pearl Lounge, UNDERGROUD,

DJ Ricky Harrison, FAT SAMS, Fat Sams Level 1, The best current

+I=H:EIÂ&#x2014;&% 7;

DJ Joe Brodie, Discoteca,

Sun 14 Sep Ladies Night, 21:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁ2.50 before12 ÂŁ5 after

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Fat Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 22:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;02:30, ÂŁtbc

SEPTEMBER 08

THE SKINNY 67

Competitions

dundee Clubs


Aberdeen Clubs

Glasgow Comedy

Fri 05 Sep Mixtape presents Percy X + Andrew Weatherall (Edit-Select), Snafu, Minimal

electronica with a Detroit influence, 22:00–03:00, £7 Adv Axis, Origin, Electro/Techno, 23:00–03:00, £5.00

Sat 06 Sep Jungle Nation w/DJ Tez,

Origin, Drum & Bass with Jungle Nation’s founding father, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Fri 12 Sep Axis, Origin, Electro/Techno, 23:00–03:00,

£5.00

Sat 13 Sep Hush Hush w/Giles Walker, Origin, Deep House/Electro, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Axis, Origin, Electro/Techno, 23:00–03:00,

Fri 26 Sep

Mon 01 Sep

Sat 20 Sep

Mixtape + Belisha Music Present Waxdolls + Giles Walker, Snafu, Belgian electropunk

Raymond Mearns, Paul Pirie, Allen Chalmers, Dance Monkey Boy Dance, The Stand,

£5.00

The Deep End/Snafu 4 Year Birthday Special – Ooft + Funky Transport, Snafu, Deep

house & tough disco, 22:00–03:00, £6/5 Adv

£5.00

Breakbeat/Electro/Techno from the men behind “”Something Good 08””, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

A la Fu + Martin Jay with visuals from Remi/Rough, Victory, Peacock Visual Arts, New

Sun 21 Sep

York style loft party for the kids in the know., 22:00–late, £3.00

Snafu 4 Year Birthday Special – Erol Alkan + Giles Walker, Snafu, Erol returns to wreak

Sat 27 Sep

havoc fusing together electro, techno and disco in his own distinct way., 22:00–03:00, £15 Adv

Funky Transprt, The Deep End, Snafu, Deep house & tough disco,

Wed 24 Sep

22:00–03:00, weekly, fee bfore middnight then £6/5

Martin Jay, Mom…The Video Broke, Snafu, Only the finest

Hush Hush w/Bok Bok & Manara, Origin, London duo playing

Thu 25 Sep

Very special guests TBC, Adventures Close to Home, Lemon Tree, Next installment of

Break Beats + Basslines w/ Utah Saints + Dj Tez, Origin,

undeground+ overground from the 70s to the present, 22:00–02:00, weekly, Free

Fri 19 Sep Mixtape/Snafu 4 Year Birthday Special – Boom Monk Ben + A La Fu, Snafu,

Down ‘n’ dirty electronica, 22:00–03:00, £6/5 Adv

band, 22:00–03:00, £tbc

Axis, Origin, Electro/Techno, 23:00–03:00,

Dirty Hearts Club - DHC DJs, Snafu, Alternative Indie-electro-rock,

22:00–02:00, weekly, £3.00

Garage/House/Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

the hip clubnight with DJs + live bands in tow tbc, 22:00–late, tbc

Edinburgh Comedy Mon 01 Sep

Fri 12 Sep

Sian Bevan, Daliso Chaponda, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts.

Tony Law, Steven Dick, Eilidh McAskill, Sandy Nelson, The Stand, The Stand,

New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–11:00, £2.00

Tue 02 Sep

21:00–00:00, £9/£8/£5

Brendan Burns, Brendan Burns, The Stand, 20:30–00:00, £10.00 Mon 22 Sep Scott Agnew, Red Raw, The

John Ryan Johnny Candon, Ben Norris, Mike Wilkinson, Jongleurs, Jongleurs,

Stand, New acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap.,

19:00–00:00, £11.00

20:30–23:00, £2.00

Sat 13 Sep

Wed 24 Sep

Wed 03 Sep

Tony Law, Steven Dick, Eilidh McAskill, Sandy Nelson, The Stand, The Stand,

Kevin Bridges, Bruce Devlin, Best of Scottish,

TBC, Benefit in aid of Barnardo’s, The Stand, 20:30–16:59,

£7/£5

Thu 04 Sep

21:00–00:00, £12.00

John Ryan Johnny Candon, Ben Norris, Mike Wilkinson, Jongleurs, Jongleurs,

19:00–00:00, £14.00

Susan Murray, Jojo Sutherland, Dave Heffron, Billy Kirkwood, The Thursday Show, The Stand,

Hosted by Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Fri 05 Sep Stu Who, Jojo Sutherland, Dave Heffron, Bruce Devlin, The Stand, The Stand,

21:00–00:00, £9/£8/£5

John Warburton, Brian Higgins, Rick Right, Kevin Bridges, Jongleurs, Jon-

gleurs, 19:00–00:00, £11.00

Sun 14 Sep Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th, 12:00–00:00, Free

Sandy Nelson, The Sunday Night Laugh In, The Stand, Hosted

by Billy Kirkwood, 20:30–00:00, £5/£4/£1

Tue 16 Sep Harry Ainsworth, The Voodoo Revue, The Voodoo Rooms, 21:00–23:00, £3.00

Pete Firman, Pete Firman, The Stand, 20:30–00:00, £10/£8

Sat 06 Sep

Wed 17 Sep

Stu Who, Jojo Sutherland, Dave Heffron, Bruce Devlin, The Stand, The Stand,

TBC, Benefit in aid of CCLASP, The Stand, 20:30–00:00, £7/£5

21:00–23:00, £12.00

Thu 18 Sep

John Warburton, Brian Higgins, Rick Right, Kevin Bridges, Jongleurs, Jon-

gleurs, 19:00–00:00, £11.00

Wayne Deakin, Chris McCausland, Sian Bevan, Bruce Devlin, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce

Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Sun 07 Sep Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th, 12:00–00:00, Free

Jojo Sutherland, The Reverend Obadiah Steppenwolfe III, The Sunday Night Laugh In, The Stand, Hosted by Billy Kirkwood, 20:30–00:00, £5/£4/£1

Mon 08 Sep

Wed 10 Sep Sketch troupe, Melting Pot, The Stand, 20:30–16:56, £5/£4/£2.50 Thu 11 Sep

£9/£8/£5

Smug Roberts, Steve Harris, Susan Murray, Anthony King, Jongleurs, Sat 20 Sep Wayne Deakin, Chris McCausland, Sian Bevan, Ross Baillie, Bruce Devlin, The Stand, The Stand, 21:00–00:00, £12.00 Smug Roberts, Steve Harris, Susan Murray, Anthony King, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £14.00

Tony Law, Steven Dick, Eilidh MacAskill, Sandy Nelson, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce

68 THE SKINNY

Wayne Deakin, Chris McCausland, Sian Bevan, Ross Baillie, Bruce Devlin, The Stand, The Stand, 21:00–00:00,

Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £11.00

Scott Agnew, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–23:00, £2.00

Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Fri 19 Sep

Sun 21 Sep Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th, 12:00–00:00, Free

SEPTEMBER 08

Tue 02 Sep Silky, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1 Wed 03 Sep Susan Murray, AL Kennedy, Deborah Jane Appleby, Wicked Wenches, The Stand, Part

of LadyFest 2008, 20:30–00:00, £7/£5/£3

Thu 04 Sep John Gillick, Kevin Dewsbury, Deborah Jane Appleby, Joe Heenan, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce Devlin,

21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Fri 05 Sep John Gillick, Kevin Dewsbury, Deborah Jane Appleby, Joe Heenan, The Stand, The Stand, 20:30–00:00, £9/£8/£5

Sandy Nelson, Dave Williams, Michael Fabbri, Ron Vaudry, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £12.00

Sat 06 Sep John Gillick, Kevin Dewsbury, Deborah Jane Appleby, Joe Heenan, The Stand, The Stand, 21:00–00:00, £12.00

Susan Murray, Jojo Sutherland, Deborah Jane Appleby, Wicked Wenches, The Stand, Part of LadyFest 2008, 20:30–00:00, £6/£5/£3

Improv and sketches on the spot, 20:30–00:00, £4.00

The Stand, Hosted by Susan Calman,

Sandy Nelson, Dave Williams, Michael Fabbri, Ron Vaudry, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £15.00

Sun 07 Sep Michael Redmond, Kevin Dewsbury, Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service, The

21:00–00:00, £9/£8/£5

Mike Wilkinson, Gavin Webster, Richard Morton, Tommy Campbell, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £11.00

Sat 27 Sep Sean Collins, Steve Cummins, Sean Grant, Bruce Morton, The Stand, The Stand, 21:00–00:00, £12.00

Mike Wilkinson, Gavin Webster, Richard Morton, Tommy Campbell, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £14.00

Sun 28 Sep Stu and Garry, Whose Lunch is it Anyway?, The Stand, See the 6th, 12:00–00:00, Free

Graeme Thomas, Sean Grant, Scott Agnew, The Sunday Night Laugh In, The Stand, Hosted by Billy Kirkwood, 20:30–00:00,

Pete Firman, Pete Firman, The Stand, 21:00–00:00, £10/£8

Thu 18 Sep

The Stand, New writing tested out on guinea pigs, that would be you., 20:30–00:00, £5/£4/£2.50

acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

Brendon Burns, Pete Cain, The Stand, The Stand, 20:30–00:00, £9/£8/£5

Joe Heenan, Roger D, Stu Who?, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £12.00

Sat 20 Sep Brendon Burns, Pete Cain, The Stand, The Stand, 21:00–00:00, £12.00

Joe Heenan, Roger D, Stu Who?, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £15.00

Sun 21 Sep

Sun 14 Sep Dylan Moran, Michael Redmond, Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service, The Stand,

20:30–22:30, £6/£5/£3

North East Act Showcase,

Snafu, Stand-up & improv with the North East’s finest comedians, 20:30, Hosted by Wendy Ives, £5.00

20:00–00:00, £3/£2

Jim Jeffries, Jim JeffriesHammered, Maggie May’s, 20:30–00:00, Charlie Ross, Charlie RossJust One Word, Bar Bacchus, Alan Anderson, Glasgow vs Edinburgh; Bumper Comedy Challenge, Arta, 20:00–00:00, £8/£6 Billy Kirkwood, Austin Low, Smell Yer Maw 2!, Bar Bacchus,

20:00–00:00, £7/£5

Sat 27 Sep Susan Calman, Susan Calman- Maybe it is Your Fault,

Blackfriars Basement, Susan Calman brings her debut Fringe show to the Glasgow audience., 20:30–16:25, £8 (£6)

Joe Rooney, Mark Maier, Mick Sergeant, Bruce Devlin, The Stand, The Stand,

21:00–00:00, £12.00

Jeremy Hardy, Merchant City Festival, Old Fruitmarket,

Raymond Mearns, Paul Pirie, Allen Chalmers, Dance Monkey Boy Dance, The Stand,

New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

Wed 24 Sep Joe Rooney, Steve Cummins, Sharon Mannian, Michael Redmond, Best of Irish Comedy, The Stand, Hosted by Michael

Joe Rooney, Mick Sergeant, Bruce Devlin, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce Devlin, Mick Ferry, Geoff Boyz, Andy White, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £8.00

Mark Nelson, Merchant City Festival, Blackfriar’s Base-

ment, 20:30–00:00, £7/£5

Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £15.00

20:00–00:00, £15/£12

Susan Calman, Merchant

City Festival, Blackfriar’s Basement, 20:30–00:00, £8/£6 Bruce Morton, Merchant City Festival, Tron Theatre,

22:00–00:00, £10.00

Alan Anderson’s Gallus Glasgow Comedy Walk, Merchant City Festival, Maggie May’s, 17:30–00:00, £7/£5

Scott Agnew, Scott AgnewBig Boy, Bar Bacchus, 21:45–00:00, £7/£5 Stu who?, Stu Who- Eejit, Maggie May’s, 20:30–00:00, £7/£5

Sun 28 Sep Tom Stade, Tom Stade: I Swear..., Blackfriar’s Basement,

Drawling Canadian comic, Tom Stade brings his laid back humour to Merchant City Festival., 20:30–21:30, £7 (£5)

Michael Redmond, Mick Sergeant, Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service, The Stand,

20:30–22:30, £5/£4/£1

Jenny Eclair, Merchant City Festival, Tron Theatre, 20:00–00:00,

£15.00

Tom Stade, Merchant City

Stand up, drink up- comedy pub crawl, Merchant City Festival, Maggie May’s, 19:30–00:00,

Festival, Blackfriar’s Basement, 20:30–00:00, £7/£5

The Grand Gong Show, Merchant City Festival, Maggie

Fruitmarket, 19:45–00:00, £13/£10

£7/£6

May’s, 22:00–00:00, £3/£2

Fri 26 Sep Joe Rooney, Mark Maier, Mick Sergeant, Bruce Devlin, The Stand, The Stand,

20:30–00:00, £9/£8/£5

Mick Ferry, Geoff Boyz, Andy White, James Dowdeswell, Jongleurs, Jongleurs, 19:00–00:00, £11.00

showcase, Scottish Comedian of the year final, Old Mon 29 Sep Allan Miller, Steven Dick,

Teddy, Bastard Mind, The Stand, Comedy quiz night: The Amazing Bastards do Master Mind., 20:30–00:00, £2.00 Tue 30 Sep Billy Kirkwood, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

Tue 23 Sep

Dundee Comedy

Sandy Nelson, Kung-Fu

Sat 06 Sep

aberdeen Comedy Tue 02 Sep

showcase, Best of HaHa Raw Comedy, Bar Bacchus,

Mon 22 Sep

£5/£4/£1

21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

19:00–00:00, £15.00

City festival, 20:00–00:00, £8/£6

Mick Ferry, Geoff Boyz, Andy White, James Dowdeswell, Jongleurs,

Fri 12 Sep

Tony Hendriks, Niall Browne, Fred MacAulay, The Stand, The Stand, 21:00–00:00, £12.00 Raymond Mearns, Gavin Webster, Ava Vidal, John Scott, Jongleurs, Jongleurs,

gie May’s, 17:30–00:00, £7/£5

Scott Agnew, Male vs Female; Bumper Comedy Challenge, Arta, Part of the Merchant

Michael Redmond, Pete Cain, Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service, The Stand, 20:30–22:30,

Thu 25 Sep

Sat 13 Sep

Alan Anderson’s Gallus Glasgow Comedy Walk, Merchant City Festival, Mag-

Fri 19 Sep

Tony Hendriks, Niall Browne, Fred MacAulay, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted

19:00–00:00, £12.00

22:00–00:00, £10.00

21:45–00:00, £7/£5

Redmond, 20:30–00:00, £7/£6/£4

Tony Hendriks, Niall Browne, Fred MacAulay, The Stand, The Stand, 20:30–00:00, £9/£8/£5 Raymond Mearns, Gavin Webster, Ava Vidal, John Scott, Jongleurs, Jongleurs,

Raymond Mearns, Merchant City Festival, Tron Theatre,

£12/£10

Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Thu 11 Sep

by Bruce Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

Bob Doolally, Merchant

City Festival, Blackfriar’s Basement, 20:30–00:00, £8/£6

Brendan Burns, Pete Cain, Susan Morrison, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce

TBC, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts.

Comedy, Snafu, A satirical look at the cur-

Susan Morrison, Del

Fri 05 Sep

rent music, art & cultural scenes, 20:30, Hosted

The Best Of Flunge, Lemon Tree,

by Scott Forbes, £5.00

Just Laugh, Fat Sam’s, 21:00–21:00,

Tue 30 Sep

£9.00

Open mic featuring stand-up and alternative variety performances, 21:00, £5.00

Mon 29 Sep

Thu 18 Sep

Viv Gee, Red Raw, The Stand, New

Pete Firman - Flim Flam, Lemon

£2.00

Wed 17 Sep

Sketch troupe, Rough Cuts,

£5/£4/£1

acts. New jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–23:00,

jokes. Dead Cheap., 20:30–00:00, £2/£1

Tue 23 Sep

Viv Gee, Red Raw, The Stand, New

Sean Collins, Steve Cummins, Sean Grant, Bruce Morton, The Stand, The Stand,

Jojo Sutherland, Paul Pirie, Red Raw, The Stand, New acts. New

Mon 08 Sep

Tue 09 Sep

Fri 26 Sep

Tue 16 Sep

Improv and sketches on the spot, 20:30–00:00, £4.00

Thu 25 Sep

Devlin, 21:00–00:00, £7/£6/£3

20:30–00:00, £6/£5/£3

Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5/£4/£1

20:30–00:00, £6/£5/£3

Sean Collins, Steve Cummins, Sean Grant, Bruce Morton, The Thursday Show, The Stand, Hosted by Bruce

Dylan Moran, Raymond Mearns, Paul Pirie, Allen Chalmers, Monday Night Comedy Special, The Stand,

Tree, Star of Channel 4’s ‘Dirty Tricks’, showcases his unique brand of magic & off-beat comedy, 20:00, £14 + b.f

Strain, Derek Johnstone,

Andy White, Kung-Fu Com-

Thu 18 Sep

edy, Snafu, Silly voices & impersonations spe-

Dylan Moran, Dylan Mo-

cialist, 20:30, Hosted By Martin Bearne, £5.00

ran, Dundee Rep, 22:30–00:00, £15/£13

Listings


In 2008, Danny Bhoy will be taking his brand new show on a substantial tour of the UK and Ireland. In 2007, Danny embarked on his first extensive world tour. In addition to sell-out runs in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, he also became the first ever English-speaking stand-up to perform in India. This tour will finally give UK audiences a chance to see why this most gifted of storytellers has achieved such recognition around the globe. It’s not long since Danny Bhoy was the best selling comedian at the Edinburgh Festival. With his recent performances at the Fringe going down a storm, The Skinny is delighted to offer our readers the chance to see him on two of the Scottish dates of his tour. We have a pair of tickets to his show in The Stand, Glasgow on October 15 and a pair for his show in Dundee Rep Theatre on October 17. To be in with a chance of winning, just answer this simple question:

Where is Danny Bhoy from? A) Moffat B) Skye C) Orkney

After the Danny onslaught thebefestival In 2008, Bhoyofwill taking season, his brand new September is traditionally chill show on a substantial tour the of the UKout andmonth Ireland. in the gig going calendar. Everyone’s skint, In 2007, Danny embarked and on his extensive the bands are knackered thefirst buzzing in world tour. In addition to sell-out runs in Australia, your ears needs at least 30 days to heal. New Zealand and Canada, he also became the first ever English-speaking perform in India. October, however, is astand-up different to matter. Feet This tour willand finally give UK audiences a chance to start itching people start fidgeting. The see why this most of storytellers has achieved ever present nip ingifted the Scottish air becoming recognition around thethat globe. asuch harsh bite is a sure sign it’s time for more quality gigs. The Skinny is this It’s not long since Danny Bhoy was themonth best selling delighted up with The Liquid Room comedian to at team the Edinburgh Festival. With his recent to offer lucky readers 2 pairs of VIP tickets to The performances at the Fringe going down a storm, any event of their choice Skinny is delighted to offerthroughout our readersOctober. the chance to see him on two of the Scottish dates of his tour. The month’s roster is a veritable smorgasbord We have a pair of tickets to his show in The Stand, of sonic delights, with15appearances Glasgow on October and a pair forpending his show in from HalfRep Man Half Biscuit, Stiff17. Little Dundee Theatre on October Fingers, Roots Manuva, CSS, Kids In Glass To be in with a chanceWheatus of winning, justNoah answer this Houses, Alphabeat, and and simple question: The Whale. For your chance to win VIP tickets to any of the above, just answer the simple question below:

Where Danny Bhoy from? Who is isthe lead singer of CSS? A) Moffat Lovefoxxx B) Skye Danny Fox C) Orkney Speakerfox

To enter, visit theskinny.co.uk/competitions before 30/09/08

To enter, visit theskinny.co.uk/competitions before 30/09/08 31/09/08

Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

WIN TICKETS TO PARKLIFE On September 13th, the UK’s legendary dance music institutes INSIDE OUT and GOODGREEF plus local house leaders STEREOFUNK proudly present PARKLIFE - an all-dayer (12-10pm) at Strathclyde Country Park.

For those who like their music with a little sting in the tail, GG XTRA HARD delivers a hard line up to rock Scotland to its core and leave a hard-edged stamp on the proceedings. Expect the usual fast paced antics from the immortal TIDY BOYS. Meanwhile the new leaders in hard dance ALEX KIDD & KUTSKI will set the BPM needle well up with an exclusive B2B set. International artists jump into the fray with Q Dance’s FTS Wielding, SHOWTEK and BRENNAN & HART. On the house front local heroes STEREOFUNK will play host to JUDGE JULES (house set), the impressive MY DIGITAL ENEMY and an array of top notch guests. Set in the idyllic surroundings of Strathclyde Country Park, with five arenas, 40 DJs, and over 10 hours of party music, it’s one of the premier dance festivals of the summer. The Skinny is delighted to giveaway 2 pairs of tickets to Parklife. To enter, just answer the simple question below:

What is Judge Jules’ real name? B) Julio Iglesias

C) Julius O’Riordan

To enter, visit theskinny.co.uk/competitions before 10/09/08 Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

www.theskinny.co.uk

WIN TICKETS TO PLATINUM PIED PIPERS It’s been three years since Questlove (The Roots) famously revealed: “I listened to the album [Triple P] seven times in a row.......I made 23 friends listen to the album 3 days straight....... at gunpoint - I’m on the run. I will go to jail for Platinum Pied Pipers,” and the time has been well used by the duo, who have since changed their name to the more simply stated PPP. The group’s latest incarnation will be releasing a new EP on Ubiquity Records in the spring of 2008, with the follow-up album, Abundance dropping in the fall. Never ones for staying stagnant, PPP take a new, more progressive direction on this project that manages to stay true to Triple P’s soul-based foundation, while broadening its sound and covering plenty of new sonic territory. The result is a fluid mash-up of the group’s array of both vintage & modern influences from pop, house, funk, Detroit techno, and of course, hip-hop - all filtered through the group’s unique vision for the future.

Headlining the Inside Out – Fire It Up arena is the insurmountable talent EDDIE HALLIWELL, playing his only Scottish date of 2008. Joining Eddie are special guest MARCO V and Radio 1 legend JUDGE JULES. Jules will perform two sets: his usual peak time roof raiser, plus his Ibiza-famed house set.

A) Julian Clary

Listings

WIN TICKETS TOTO WIN VIP TICKETS SEELIQUID DANNYROOMS BHOY THE

DAVID ANDERSON

WIN TICKETS TO SEE DANNY BHOY

The Skinny is delighted to offer readers the chance to see Platinum Pied Pipers at The Voodoo Room on September 15. We’ve got 5 pairs of tickets to give away, so if you fancy taking a punt on Questlove’s hot tip, just answer the question below:

Where are Platinum Pied Pipers from? A) LA B) Detroit C) New York To enter, visit theskinny.co.uk/competitions before12/09/08 Regular Skinny T&Cs apply, available on request.

SEPTEMBER 08

THE SKINNY 69


Quiz Time with Uncle Finbarr 1. Who produced the soundtrack to the movie Natural Born Killers?

11. Which hip hop star was one of the producers of the soundtrack to Kill Bill: Volume One?

2. Brian Eno and eighties rockers Toto produced the soundtrack to which David Lynch movie?

12. Which movie currently holds the Academy Award for Best Original Score?

3. Hakuna Matata, a song from the Lion King soundtrack, is a Swahili phrase that means what in English?

13. And which song is the current holder of the Best Original Song Oscar?

4. Which 2003 movie soundtrack features songs from My Bloody Valentine, Squarepusher, The Jesus and Mary Chain and Bill Murray?

14. Which Tyneside musician has appeared in The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and, um, Ally McBeal?

5. Which French duo scored the film soundtrack to Sofia Coppola’s Virgin Suicides?

15. Dracula, Mystery Men and Wristcutters: A Love Story all feature appearances from which veteran music man?

6. Which former member of Pop Will Eat Itself scored the soundtrack to Requiem For A Dream and The Hole?

16. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds, It Was A Very Good Year and Mr Tambourine Man were all covered by which much maligned actor cum singer on his 1968 album The Transformed Man?

7. Which film features appearances from both Jools Holland and Meatloaf? 8. Starsky and Hutch, The Basketball Diaries and Kalifornia are all part of which female front woman’s filmography?

17. Which Italian American composer has collaborated with David Lynch on Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks and Mullholland Drive?

9. Which of the following did not appear on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack:

18. Which American actor appeared in the video to Fatboy Slim’s 2001 hit Weapon Of Choice?

Kool and the Gang Band?

19. Hollywood legends James Dean, Martin Sheen and Steve McQueen are name checked in which REM song, from the New Adventures In Hi-Fi album?

Funkadelic

KC and the Sunshine

10. Portuguese singer Seu Jorge covered the songs of whom for a large part of the movie The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou?

20. Which fictional band, taken from a Roddy Doyle novel, featured Deco Cuffe as lead vocalist, Outspan Foster on guitar and were managed by Jimmy Rabbitte? steve zissou...actually bill murray

HOROSCOPES

by Cystic Meg

Virgo

This month you’ll dream that you are in the Crystal Dome at the end of The Crystal Maze and Richard O’Brien’s bald head and pointy chin is glaring at you through the glass. You are trying to catch gold tickets and not grab the silver ones but they are suddenly not tickets at all but bums, little foily bums. Will you get enough to get a crystal? Yes, because all contestants get one anyway, but I bet you also snuck one of them bums in your pocket for after.

scorpio A void in the Capital following all that festival madness may be accompanied by a void in your heart this month. Get over it you sad little nugget.

sagittarius

taurus

For he that unwraps the Babybel with one hand, the squidgy cheese tastes sweeter.

This month, ask not what Humpty Dumpty can do for you, but what you can do for Humpty Dumpty.

capricorn

GEMINI

Reading your horoscopes in the Metro this month, you may find things contradictory to this one. Best avoided at all costs.

A quandary: if people that eat rice cakes lack self confidence, what does that say about people that snack on Sesame Snaps in parks?

aquarius

cancer

Recently you have been considering golf. I know you have because I’ve seen you looking at your bogies in a peculiar way.

Whilst you have always been inconsiderate, this month you are really going to take the biscuit. And the Jaffa Cakes, the Viennese whirls and the exceedingly good Mr Kipling’s. Fatty.

pisces

LEO

Mars may be the dominant planet in your sign this month but that doesn’t mean you have to do everything the nasty red planet tells you. You can have another Chewit if that’s what you really want.

There’s a pedicure treatment you can get that involves putting your feet in a tank full of water and letting little fish nibble your toes. But which are you more like Leo? The fishy or the pinky?

aries This month is the perfect time to take your closest friends to a garden centre and swap them for gnomes.

70 THE SKINNY

SEPTEMBER 08

libra The rollercoaster of life takes you on a particularly turbulent journey this month. Smile when you go past the camera but don’t buy the photo, it’s a rip off.

KRIS STODDART www.doodlekris.co.uk

Listings


Cabaret Voltaire is open 7 nights a week, it’s a thriving, 3-roomed venue that hosts some of the best-known club events in the Capital. It caters for all genres of underground music, inc. the Utah Saints award-winning club Sugarbeat and the East Coast home of Glasgow’s infamous Optimo. You’ll also find hugely popular free entry weekly Tuesday drum n bass night, Split and Indie/Electro free entry Thursdays - Sick Note. Book a booth in the Speakeasy for table service and cocktails at no extra charge. Cabaret Voltaire is also regarded as the best Edinburgh venue to visit to see the finest in emerging live music talent. Currently presenting around 30 gigs a month, it stages performances by a wide array of local bands, nationally known artists and international breaking acts. The venue is dripping in atmosphere and boasts a great sound system, making it a favourite and memorable stop amongst up and coming touring acts. “Edinburgh’s most forward thinking venue” The List.



The Skinny September '08