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INDEP ENDEN T C ULT URAL

JOURNAL ISM

Issue 86 November 2012

F�lm Melv�l Poupaud and Suzanne Clément Ben Wheatley on S�ghtseers

Mus�c An�mal Collect�ve Deftones Soundgarden Swans Rob Zomb�e Books Converge Scott�sh Book Week Buck 65 A Gu�de to The Culture StumbLE�ne AıDAN MOFFAT Clubs Theatre Juan Atk�ns, Edd�e Dav�d Hughes Dance 'Flash�n' Fowlkes & Ke�th Tucker

TH

E N E

E N W

O H W

W Y LL

D O O

PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON ON THE MASTER

Music | Film | clubs | Theatre | TECH | Art | Books | Comedy | fashion | TRAVEL | Food | Deviance | listings


S U N D AY 3 0 D E C E M B E R 2 0 12 - T U E S D AY 0 1 J A N U A R Y 2 0 13

Edinburgh ’ s Hogmanay 2012 -13 tickets are now available for the WORLD famous NEW YEAR CELEBRATIONS

EDINBURGH’S HOGMANAY CONCERT IN STREET PARTY THE GARDENS TORCHLIGHT PROCESSION

THE KEILIDH

FOR FULL DETAILS AND ALL TICKETS:

THE LOONY DOOK

www.edinburghshogmanay.com

EH2013 BOX OFFICE: 0844 573 8455 FUNDED BY:

SUPPORTED BY:

CANDLELIT CONCERT IN ST GILES’ CATHEDRAL

180 HIGH STREET, EDINBURGH Supported through the Scottish Government’s Edinburgh Festivals Expo Fund

CREATED AND PRODUCED BY:


Edinburgh

Art Fair 60 Galleries, Printmaking, Creche, Restaurant & Bar

“Be Original..... Buy Original!”

The Edinburgh Corn Exchange, New Market Road, EH14 1RJ 16th - 18th November : Opens 11am Daily : Admission £6 / £4.

For further information call 01875 819 595 or visit

www.artedinburgh.com


Contents

KRISKRISTOFFERSON IN CONCERT PLUS SPECIAL GUEST RODDY

THUR 06 DEC GLASGOW

A REGULAR MUSIC / TRIPLE G PRESENTATION IN ASSOCIATION WITH PRIMARY TALENT INTERNATIONAL

In association with PRIMARY TALENT INTERNATIONAL

RUFUS WA I N W R I G H T A N D

H I S

CONCERT HALL

B A N D

Photo: Atiba photo

0141 353 8000

HART

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

ADAM C O H E N

(BO T H S H O W S ) KRYSTLE WARR E N + T E D D Y T H O M P S O N (EDINBURGH)

(GLASGOW)

THUR 13 DEC

FRIDAY 14 DEC

0131 228 1155

0844 477 2000

USHER HALL EDINBURGH

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW

Thursday 6th Dec ABERDEEN The Garage SOLD 8th Dec Saturday UT Garage GLASGOWOThe

Sunday 9th Dec DUNDEE Fat Sams Monday 10th Dec Dumfries The Venue

p12 Animal Collective

p28 Ben Wheatley on Sightseers

karine polwart

Thursday 29 Nov INNERLEITHEN Memorial Hall Friday 30 Nov EDINBURGH Queen’s Hall

EDINBURGH Queen’s Hall Sun 11th Nov 0131 668 2019

28

New Album ‘Traces’ Out Now The Guardian ★★★★ Scotsman ★★★★★ Songlines ★★★★★ The List ★★★★ Scotland on Sunday ★★★★

GENTLEMAN’S DUB CLUB

0131 668 2019

Edinburgh Voodoo Rooms

FRI 30TH NOV

O2 ABC2 GLASGOW

p30 Cappadocia

THUR 29 NOV O2 ABC

GLASGOW

Tues 11th Dec Edinburgh Liquid Rooms

REGULAR MUSIC AND SERIOUS PRESENT

june tabor & oysterband SUN 25TH NOV EDINBURGH USHER HALL

Wed 5th Dec EDINBURGH Queen’s Hall

0131 228 1155

0131 668 2019

WWW.USHERHALL.CO.UK

JOHN MURRY

JUST ANNOUNCED

Thurs 24 Jan EDINBURGH Voodoo Rooms

Ron Pope Glasgow Oran Mor Tues 8th Jan

NELL BRYDEN

JUST ANNOUNCED

TUES 15 JAN

EDINBURGH

VOODOO ROOMS

November 2012

Editorial

Get in touch: E: hello@theskinny.co.uk T: 0131 467 4630 P: The Skinny, 3 Coates Place, Edinburgh, EH3 7AA

Editor Music & Online Editor Books Editor Comedy Editor Competitions Editor Deviance Editor DVD Editor Fashion Editor Film Editor Food Editor Heads Up Editor Listings/Cyberzap Editor Performance Editor Tech Editor Travel Editor

The Skinny is Scotland's largest independent entertainment & listings magazine, and offers a wide range of advertising packages and affordable ways to promote your business. Get in touch to find out more.

E: sales@theskinny.co.uk All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the explicit permission of the publisher. The views and opinions expressed within this publication do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of the printer or the publisher.

Printed by Mortons Print Limited, Horncastle ABC verified Jan – Dec 2011: 32,162

S GLa N MOR ORA

Rosamund West Dave Kerr Keir Hind Bernard O’Leary David McGinty Ana Hine Keir Roper-Caldbeck Alexandra Fiddes Jamie Dunn Peter Simpson Anna Docherty Anna Docherty Gareth K. Vile Alex Cole Paul Mitchell

Production Production Manager Designer Sub Editor

fri 21 dec edinburgh liquid rooms

Glasgow, Rose St Edinburgh & Ripping Records and all usual outlets

THE SKINNY

Issue 86, November 2012 © Radge Media Ltd.

JUST ANNOUNCED

elll m a H TriaJAN On WED 2G3OW

www.ticketmaster.co.uk www.regularmusic.com 0844 844 0444 or in person from Ticket Scotland: Argyle Street 4

p41 Aidan Moffat does the dirty dozen

November 2012

10TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR PERFORMING ‘FIRE’ IN ITS ENTIRETY

Photo: Neil Jarvie

Photo: Ally Brown

HEY SALSA CELTICA SAT 24TH NOVEMBER ROSETTA! EDINBURGH QUEEN’S HALL Tues 13th Nov

printed on 100% recycled paper

Peter Marsden Maeve Redmond Bram Gieben

Sales/Accounts Sales Director Marketing Executive Sales Executive Accounts Administrator

Lara Moloney Michaela Hall George Sully Tom McCarthy Solen Collet

Publisher

Sophie Kyle


contents 6

8

10

front

Chat: Singer-songwriter Chuck Ragan on his upcoming Revival Tour; Shot of the Month; Skinny on Tour visits an aquatic musical instrument; Stop the Presses; Hero Worship. Heads Up: We do the homework so you don't have to – all of November's highlights in one place, so you'll never miss the fireworks.

FEATURES

We talk to director Paul Thomas Anderson about The Master, and examine The New New Hollywood, the generation of 90s mavericks now holding sway in the film industry.

12

Animal Collective's Josh 'Deakin' Dibb on returning from sabbatical.

14

Returning Seattle titans Soundgarden talk new album King Animal and reminisce about lugging their gear.

15

We talk to the stars of Xavier Dolan's groundbreaking new film Laurence Anyways, Melvil Poupard and Suzanne Clément.

30 31

Lifestyle

Travel: Our roaming reporter Ally Brown takes a ride in a hot air balloon above the caves and lava formations of Cappadocia. Looks like ‘giant cocks’, apparently. Deviance: Claire Askew examines the culture of jokes about domestic abuse, while Caitlin Field asks if gaydar really exists.

32

Showcase: A look at the work of Scottish sculptor Iain Hales.

35

Fashion: Events highlights for November include a gentlemen-only sewing group, Nightwalk AW2012 and Dundee's Selling Dreams: One Hundred Years of Fashion Photography.

36 39

Review

Music: All our regular features including Live Highlights, the Metal Column, new albums by Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Umberto and Mogwai, plus! Aidan Moffat reviews this month's singles. We chat with Bristol chillwave producer Stumbleine about his debut.

46

18

A look at upcoming work inspired by Charles Bukowski, by David Hughes Dance.

48

Film: Reviews including The Master, Sightseers and Amour, plus November's Film Events.

19

Michael Gira of Swans on his band's creative renaissance and latest album The Seer.

49

20

DVD: Reviews of Margin Call, A Simple Life, and Jodrowsky's masterpiece Santa Sangre.

Ahead of his show with Marilyn Manson, we speak to legendary musician and director Rob Zombie, with a guest question from Alice Cooper!

50

Art: Exhibitions reviewed include Ugo Rondinone's primitive at The Common Guild, and Semi at Rhubaba, plus a closer look at the DCA print shop.

22 25 26 28 29

We interview epically heavy US rockers Converge – they never lost their hardcore. Buck 65 is back with a new tour and forthcoming LP – he tells us how he spun the pain of his divorce into creative gold. As Iain M. Banks' universe-spanning sci-fi creation The Culture turns 25, we present a beginner's guide. Director Ben Wheatley talks to us about his follow-up to Kill List, horror-comedy Sightseers. A look at events and happenings taking place during Scottish Book Week including the intriguingly-named Dragon's Pen.

51 52

A FORM OF CHANGE LIVE EUROPEAN TOUR

GLASGOW THE ARCHES

O2 ABC GLASGOW

SAT 10TH NOVEMBER

FRIDAY 9TH NOVEMBER

coheedandcambria.com

NEW ALBUM THE AFTERMAN: ASCENSION OUT NOW

IN ASSOCIATION WITH PCL

O2 ABC GLASGOW E

L I V TOUR

+

WED 14TH NOVEMBER

NEW ALBUM ‘DEAD SILENCE’ OUT NOW BILLYTALENT.COM

+DON BROCO

Theatre: We take a look at the forthcoming season at the Theatre Royal, plus a preview of Nicky Spence's The Magic Flute.

53

Comedy: Will Setchell explains why rape jokes are generally shit.

54

Competitions: Win cool stuff! See The Twilight Sad at the Barras and invitations to the Edinburgh Art Fair could be yours for the asking.

55

Listings: What's happening where and when throughout the month for Glasgow, Edinburgh and Dundee.

63

Chino Moreno of Deftones on their new non-dubstep direction. Plus: Crystal Baws - Mystic Mark's horrorscopes for November

Orbital + NATHAN FAKE

Edinburgh HMV Picture House Sunday 2nd December orbitalofficial.com

O2 ABC GLASGOW

Tuesday 20th November NEW SINGLE 'TRUTH IS' OUT NOW FROM NEW ALBUM 'STATIC ON THE AIRWAVES' OUT NOW www.levellers.co.uk www.facebook.com/levellersofficial

LIVE

+AYAH MARAR

O2 ABC GLASGOW

SUNDAY 25TH NOVEMBER netskymusic.com

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW PLUS GUESTS

SATURDAY 17TH NOVEMBER

/netskymusic

@netskymusic

KREPT & KONAN + SAVING GRACE

GLASGOW CLASSIC GRAND SATURDAY 10TH NOVEMBER

NEW ALBUM ‘GENERATION FREAKSHOW’ OUT NOW FEEDERWEB.COM

Clubs: A look at the clubbing highlights in November, Bicep lead the 90s house revival, plus an exclusive DJ chart from the Unseen residents.

Tech / Books: The latest from the world of literature, plus our Tech Editor dispels some myths about 4G.

11PM-3AM

plus special guests

Food and Drink: Food that kills! Plus: a look at Kenya's bestest boozes.

Motor City Electronics: seminal Detroit techno pioneers, Juan Atkins, Eddie 'Flashin' Fowlkes and Keith Tucker discuss their craft.

17

DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS… DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS…

EDINBURGH Liquid Room wewerepromisedjetpacks.com

(ALL ALONG THE) WATCHTOWER’ FEAT. ED SHEERAN OUT NOW OFFICIALDEVLIN.COM

O2 ABC2 Glasgow Wed 14th Nov

LIVE www.jakwob.com

Sat 24th Nov

PLEASE NOTE: RESCHEDUED DATE & VENUE – ORIGINAL TICKETS STILL VALID

MYSTERY JETS

+ LUCIUS BRAVE + THE LAFONTAINES

3OH3MUSIC.COM

GLASGOW THE GARAGE MONDAY 5TH NOVEMBER GLASGOW ORAN MOR TUE 13TH NOVEMBER

+ BEST FRIENDS + HOUSE OF THIEVES

MYSTERYJETS.COM

+ Arches + Cara Mitchell (Aber.) + Mick Hargan (Glas.) + Greg Pearson (Edin.)

Aberdeen, The Lemon Tree Friday 16th November Glasgow, King Tuts Saturday 17th November Edinburgh, Electric Circus

Sunday 18th November

GLASGOW ORAN MOR WAITING FOR GO + VAGABOND POETS WED 21ST NOV EDINBURGH ELECTRIC CIRCUS THU 22NDNOV THISISTHEMILK.COM FACEBOOK.COM/THISISTHEMILK

+ GOLDHEART ASSEMBLY

EDINBURGH ELECTRIC CIRCUS WEDNESDAY 14TH NOVEMBER

The Neighbourhood

Glasgow King Tuts Fri 16th Nov

fall

2012

GLASGOW THE GARAGE

Chuck Ragan Emily Barker SATURDAY 17 TH Cory Branan Jay Malinowski NOVEMBER Rocky Votolato therevivaltour.com (of Hot Water Music)

(of Bedouin Soundclash)

Accompanied by Joe Ginsberg and Jon Gaunt

Bill Wells & Aidan Moffat

GLASGOW Cottiers Theatre Wed 7th November EDINBURGH Pleasance Theatre Sat 24th November

O2 ACADEMY GLASGOW FRIDAY 16TH NOVEMBER MIRAGE ROCK THE NEW ALBUM OUT NOW

+LUKE

O2 Academy Glasgow EDINBURGH PLEASANCE THEATRE FRI 23RD NOV SITAL SINGH

BLUE EYES TOUR

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

Friday 30th November

NEW ALBUM 'ANXIETY' OUT NOW

www.benfolds.com

WED 7TH NOV

For tickets call: 08444 999 990 or online: www.gigsinscotland.com www.ticketmaster.co.uk

Follow gigsinscotland on twitter @gigscot November 2012

THE SKINNY

5


CHAT

Editorial

Ah November, season of impenetrable haar and near-perpetual darkness punctuated by the occasional firework. Welcome. As you may be able to tell from the elegant code of our cover, this month we are mostly excited about the New New Hollywood, a term (possibly) coined by our Film editor to encapsulate the work of the band of cinematic miscreants whose debuts emerged in the 90s, and whose films now form the most interesting mainstream releases coming out of Tinseltown. We’ve spoken to Paul Thomas Anderson, he of Boogie Nights and There Will Be Blood renown, about his hotly anticipated new release The Master, and why he’s definitely not trying to piss off the Scientologists. Others included in the New New Hollywood gang include Darren Aronofsky, Noah Baumbach, Alexander Payne and Wes Anderson. See if you can spot all their films on the cover. In Music, we had some words with Animal Collective’s Josh Dibb on the subject of melancholic new album Centipede Hz, ahead of the band’s gig at the O2 ABC this month. Autumn has also brought its usual re-emergence of the heavy rockers. We celebrate with interviews with Soundgarden, Rob Zombie, Converge Swans and Deftones – there’s even a guest question from Alice Cooper thrown in for good measure. Other folks dropping by for a chat include Dadaist rapper Buck 65, and new blood Stumbleine. In the Review section, Aidan Moffat takes a swipe at the singles; turns out he’s right into Nicola Roberts, but strongly opposed to the latest release from Girls Aloud. Glad we’ve got that straight. Clubs celebrates Detroit electronic music by having some chats with seminal Motor City techno pioneers Juan Atkins, Eddie ‘Flashin’ Fowlkes and

Hero Worship: Johnny Ramone

Soundgarden bassist Ben Shepherd says that, for all his controversial politics, New York punk pioneer Johnny Ramone was an uncle figure

Keith Tucker. Books this month is most excited about Scottish Book Week, which offers an expansive programme of literary events all over the country, from Kirkwall to Dumfries. We also have a 25-point guide to Iain M. Banks’ sci fi world The Culture in celebration of the 25th anniversary of its creation. In Travel, roving reporter Ally Broon regales us with tales of dawn hot air balloon rides over wind-formed stone chimneys as he explores Cappadocia. Do not be put off by comparisons to enormous stone penises – the eroded cave dwellings sound quite magical. Food has finally woken up to the inherent perils of its subject matter, and this month presents a guide to the various ways eating could kill you, and how to avoid this happening. Basically, eating cockroaches is a bad idea. As is fermented Swedish fish. Remember, remember.[Rosamund West] This month's cover was created by illustrator Eva Dolgyra. She moved to Glasgow from Athens to study Illustration at the Glasgow School of Art and now lives and works in the city as a freelance illustrator. She says, "While illustration is my strongest attribute and the element I feel most at home with, I am passionate about all facets of art and design. My influences cover a wide spectrum, with a particular fondness for weird facts and imaginary scenarios. Something strongly reflected in my work is my soft spot for traditional printmaking; however, I believe there is a correct tool for each job and enjoy using my laptop just as much as a chisel."

SHOT OF THE MONTH

the ramones from left; johnny, joey, marky & dee dee

Tasked to tell you about one of my lifelong heroes, there are so many people to talk about – like my own band mates, for instance. But I remember feeling strange – you know that feeling you get when you’re around one of your idols, and you realise who you’re talking to and hanging out with – when I spent time with Johnny Ramone on tour. I’m still sad that he passed away back in 2004. We were opening for Guns N’ Roses in ‘91 in Madison Square Garden when we met Joey and C.J from the band. For us, it was like ‘wow, the Ramones, no way!’ – and they were Soundgarden fans. C.J is still a dear friend, and Joey I think was probably the nicest guy you could ever meet. I’m not kidding – I feel sorry for people who never met Joey Ramone because he was so goddamned nice. But Johnny and I got along really well. Later on in ’94, we travelled down to Australia to play the Big Day Out tour – The Ramones were on it too, and we’d hang out with Johnny there.

He’d ask me questions and make sure I wasn’t losing my mind and that the band wasn’t getting ripped off. He was quite serious about our band and how we ran our business; how to take care of ourselves. He was kind of an uncle figure in a strange way, that he would ask those kinds of things. We could’ve talked about anything in the world but he chose to take a real interest in us, which was just his mentality. He was a great guy and a total prankster – funny as hell. Most people were tripped out by him. You’ve got to read his book Commando – his autobiography. It’s like a Ramones song, it’s fast and interesting. Then boom – you’ve zipped right through it. Out of all the people I’ve met in this life, he took me under his wing. People were down on me for that and would ask ‘why are you hanging out with him?’ I’d say ‘what do you mean by that?’ They’d say ‘well, he’s such a Republican.’ ‘Fuck, really?’ I had no idea. I didn’t know that at all – we never talked politics.

SKINNY ON TOUR azelia banks at o2 abc glasgow on 29 October by kat gollock

Roseanne took some time out of her vacationing to read our Bat for Lashes feature and sent us this pic to prove it. Do you know where she is? Enter your guess www.theskinny. co.uk/competitions and you might win a bottle of wine courtesy of our expert friends at VINO WINES. Closing date: Fri 30 Nov Winners will be notified on the day of closing and will be required to respond within one week or the prize will be offered to another entrant. For full terms and conditions, go to www. theskinny.co.uk/terms and www. drinkaware.co.uk for the facts. Going somewhere nice? Why not take a copy of The Skinny and perhaps you can be in next month’s Skinny on Tour. Submit your entries to competitions@ theskinny.co.uk

6

THE SKINNY

November 2012


CHAT

The Skinny Food and Drink Survey closes on 30 November! Head along to bit.ly/theskinnyfood to cast your votes in the most important culinary survey of 2012. What is your favourite date venue? Where do you lurk when hungover? Who is your ultimate Food Hero? Yes, that is a thing. Contributors will be entered into a draw to win a bottle of delicious Edinburgh Gin. And you can even make the voting process interactive – upload your photos of your favourite meals / venues / drinks to Instagram, using the tag #foodsurvey. Best shot will also win a bottle of gin.

The Jill Todd Photography Award’s inaugural exhibition runs in Whitespace, Edinburgh from 3-11 November. Set up in memory of talented young photographer Jill Todd, the prize is open to final year students, post grads and recent graduates, each year dealing with a particular theme – this year’s is Kin. Head along to the gallery to check out work by Nick Paton, Caroline Alexander and Tamara & Yoshi Kametani. www.jilltoddphotoaward.com Martha Payne is the 9- year old girl the council tried to ban when she started a blog, NeverSeconds, reviewing her dinner. Bad move – it only added to her publicity. A few million blog hits later (literally) and with over £100,000 raised for the Mary's Meals Malawi charity, Martha – and her Dad – are releasing a book telling the whole story of NeverSeconds. The book launch is free, and will be at 7pm on 15 November, at Waterstones Argyle Street, Glasgow. www.cargopublishing.com

No Division

Now in its fifth year, Hot Water Music’s Chuck Ragan explains The Revival Tour’s communal power second artist will enter to collaborate with the first. After this, the first artist will exit while the second remains to spotlight their own material, leaving us all with a seamless transition. The evening commences in this way with endless possibilities as to who may enter the stage next. We often have special guests appear unexpectedly, both to the crowd as well as the cast! You simply never know what to expect. What stays consistent is the constant music, storytelling, seamless transitions and unique stimulation through song, in a way that you won’t find on many other tours. After each artist has done their due diligence, everyone joins together again for a send off set. The Revival Tour

“Revival   is always different, always a learning experience and always exhilarating” chuck ragan

normally rolls about three ours straight, sometimes scripted, sometimes not. Always staying up, interesting and new. Revival is always different, always a learning experience and always exhilarating. Which is one reason why I think the energy carries over so well to the audience. I personally have no care whatsoever to go see any performance that isn’t given to me with full conviction, passion and dedication. I’d rather stay home if that were the case. We believe in giving the folks that support these events a night to remember and a truly unique one at that. The Revival tour comes to Glasgow Garage on 17 Nov www.therevivaltour.com

# foodsurvey

Between 20 and 25 November Tramway will host a ‘medley of bold and adventurous theatre, dance, spoken word and digital installation’ from England’s Fuel company. Fuel is a producing organisation working in partnership with some of the most exciting theatre artists in the UK: the programme at Tramway includes Body Pods – podcasts in custom built listening stations – Ring by Shunt co-founder David Rosenberg – takes place in complete darkness – The Simple Things in Life, two intimate performances in garden sheds. Inua Ellam’s Black T-Shirt Collection is a lyrical fable of two brothers and the consequences of success. Uninvited Guests’ Make Better Please is a chance to voice concerns on the news of the day over a cup of tea and a biscuit. www.fueltheatre. com/projects/ fuelfest-at-tramway

bluebeard

Sonica comes to Glasgow this month, with a unique programme of events, exhibitions and performances bringing together the best of cutting edge sonic art both local and international. Highlights include a multimedia production of Bartok’s Bluebeard (think: opera for the computer game generation); cellists performing in light-flecked glass tubes; a laser show; and a piano apparently played by birds. Artists include Luke Fowler, Mookyoung Shin, Claudia Molitor and Kathy Hinde. 8-18 Nov, various venues across Glasgow. Full programme can be found at www.sonic-a.co.uk

on the web photo: oscar garcia

When folks have asked what The Revival Tour is all about, I’ve always answered that it was “an old way of sharing folk music.” I still stand by that but the more I see and hear what we’ve done and how we’re doing it, the more I’ve felt these people coming aboard are breathing a new life into an age old concept. When we set out to do this tour, we wanted to make it an annual and international event but we weren’t sure how the crowd would accept it or how the artists and crew would accept it. It was after the first few songs into the first set that we realised that it was something worth sacrificing for. The Revival Tour in its 5th year has hosted well over 50 artists in over 175 gigs, through multiple countries totalling over 600 hours of live music and storytelling. It’s a movement that we believe in and that carries a pure and simple passion for sharing songs in a grassroots fashion. There are many special elements about RT but one of the most special is the uniqueness each performance brings. When the hour comes, the entire cast takes the stage together for the welcoming set. This is the most important part of the evening. No matter whom you came to see, you will see them immediately. That’s why it’s important to be there as the doors open! Otherwise you most likely will miss something special. This action is done for a few reasons; firstly, to unify the cast immediately from the get go and disrupt any sense of hierarchy, so to speak. It’s more fun and exciting when egos do not exist. Most importantly, it immediately bonds the entire crowd and cast. In an instant, we all realise why we’re there and find a moment in time where we leave our troubles at the door to find something in common with strangers. From the top, we play and sing together, showcasing a song from each artist’s catalogue that’s on the bill that evening. There’re usually 5-6 artists as well as back-up accompaniment of fiddles, upright bass, mandolins, banjos and more. After this, most will peel off to spotlight one of the artists aboard who’ll present their own works. When coming to the end of their time, a

"There was no preparation whatsoever; the lights went down and we played for 80 minutes" Led Zeppelin man John Paul Jones on his first gig with Norwegian improv group Supersilent. See them play The Arches on 15 Nov and read the full interview online at www.theskinny.co.uk/music.

November 2012

THE SKINNY

7


HEADS UP

TUE 30 oct

It's another beastly, 35-day ‘month’, appropriately enough taking in everything from Halloween to the rather ace-sounding Shhh Festival on 1 December (yes, December – we told you it was a long month). Enjoy...

wed 31 oct

thu 1 nov

You may have to beg, borrow or steal your way in, but surely Alice Cooper's Halloween Night of Fear is the most fun to be had on All Hallows’ Eve, like, ever. Bringing his annual event to Edinburgh this year, it's set to be the usual riot of theatrics and all-out dressing up, with full band tearing into the classics. Usher Hall, Edinburgh, 7pm, £sold out. See listings for more Halloween events

Duncan of Jordanstone play host to a new exhibition of works from the leading lights of German comic book art – Comics, Manga & Co. – taking in autobiographical, surrealist, and historical narratives alongside comic reportages and literary adaptations, for which there will also be a talk by featured artist Anke Feuchtenberger the day before the launch (31 Oct, 5.30pm). DJCAD, Dundee, opening night 5pm-7pm, then 2 Nov-8 Dec

photo: laurence winram

HEADS UP

Following its rehearsed reading back in April as part of the Traverse's Write Here festival of new writing, Morna Pearson previews her (now-finished) new work, The Artist Man and the Mother Woman, a humourous and surreal portrait of a spectacularly dysfunctional relationship written in Pearson's trademark postmodern Doric. Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, 30 Oct-17 Nov, various times, see listings for details

COMPILED BY: ANNA DOCHERTY

Anke Feuchtenberger

tue 6 nov

wed 7 nov

thur 8 nov

Experimental folk trio Lau (aka talented chaps Kris Drever, Martin Green, and Aidan O'Rourke) unveil their new concept album, Race The Loser, in the city in which they formed back in 2004, following its October unveiling down't London-way at one-off Lau-a-thon mini-fest, Welcome To Lau-Land. The Queen's Hall, Edinburgh, 7pm, £13 (£11). Also playing Dundee (3 Nov) and Glasgow (4 Nov)

Collaborating chums Bill Wells and Aidan Moffat take to the road as part of their all-Scottish mini tour, where they're dangling the tantalising carrot of maybehopefully-possibly previewing some recently-recorded new material following a few days in the studio. Cottiers, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £14. Also taking to Stirling (22 Nov), Perth (23 Nov), Edinburgh (24 Nov), Dunfermline (25 Nov), Aberdeen (26 Nov). Collect 'em all.

The Scottish Poetry Library address our love/hate/ indifferent relationship with poetry head on with their What I Love – What I Hate About Poetry debate, a no-holds-barred event in which playwright David Greig, poet and editor Gerry Cambridge, journalist Alan Taylor, and poets Stav Poleg and Liz Lochhead battle it out to decide how we really feel about poetry. Scottish Poetry Library. Edinburgh, 6.30pm, £7 (£5)

liz lochhead

tue 13 nov

wed 14 nov

thu 15 nov

Talented Scottish novelist and playwright Alan Bissett presents his first new work since the much raved-about Moira Monologues, The Red Hourglass, in which he'll play all five parts – three male, two female, all of 'em spiders – locked up together in a scientist's tank. No surprise then that the play takes its name from the markings on the Black Widow. Eek. The Arches, Glasgow, 13 & 14 Nov, £9 (£7)

Showing for a mini two night run at The Old Hairdressers, fledgling Glasgow company Attune Theatre present their pitch black comedy drama, I Trust You To Kill Me, centred around the story of an office which decides if the people that enter live or die. Sounds suitably dark and twisted (as in, we're there). The Old Hairdressers, Glasgow, 13 & 14 Nov, 7pm, £7

The Institut Francais d'Ecosse adorn their walls with an exhibition of images by Scottish photographer Albie Clark, who, working on-and-off the stage during the summer of 2012, captured a series of images of the Institut in action during a busy series of theatre shows, film screenings, talks, social events, and parties for the Festival Fringe. Institut Francais d'Ecosse, until 19 Jan, Free

wed 21 nov

thu 22 nov

Favourited gig-in-a-club night LAID arrives for its November outing, bringing with it the usual egg-themed fun, alongside a headline set from Glasgow-based alternative hip-hop MC and drummer duo Hector Bizerk, buzzing along on electro-bass and stop-start drums, with support from Solareye (aka Dave Hook of Stanley Odd). Bloc, Glasgow, 9pm, Free

Twisted folk storyteller Dan Willson (aka Withered Hand) takes to Mono to perform a full band set to celebrate the release of his new limited edition 10-inch vinyl EP, a rescheduled date of sorts for his cancelled September gig at Kinning Park Complex. Tragicomic troubadour Charles Latham will do the honours of opening the show. Mono, Glasgow, 8pm, £8

photo: abbie clark

mon 12 nov Long Beach, CA legends Ugly Duckling brighten up our month somewhat with their golden era hip-hop, taking their newest album, Moving At Breakneck Speed on tour. Quite frankly, though, we'd love them just as much if their singular musical output had been the glorious witty ditty, Meatshake, from 2003 album Taste The Secret. 'Meat to the shizzake', etc. Stereo, Glasgow, 8pm, £10. Also playing Sneaky Pete's the following evening

susanne dietz

wed 28 nov Witness and Electrikal join forces for the evening down't Sneaky Pete's way for a special night at which Chicago-based DJ duo Flostradamus headline a bill that also takes in Glasgow native Taz Buckfaster, and a back-toback set from Anarkid and Skanky B. Sneaky Pete's, Edinburgh, 11pm, £5 (members go free)

hector bizerk

fri 23 nov Lovers of all things indie-pop and Swedish, Super Trouper Club returns to The Flying Duck for another outing at which they'll again worship at the alter of all things ABBA, Lykke Li, Roxette, The Knife... (insert more poptastic Swedish bands/musicians here). They also promise an exciting guest DJ for this edition – all eyes on their Facebook page for the grand reveal. The Flying Duck, Glasgow, 11pm, £5 (£4)

photo: takeshi suga

Tramway team up with producing company Fuel for multi-artform mini festival, Fuelfest, where we're looking forward to checking out a show set to take place in total darkness, Ring, for which audience members will be taken on a sound-based journey via headsets, entering a room where everything is not quite as it seems. Tramway, Glasgow, 20 & 21 Nov, 7.30pm, £10 (£7)

Photo: Neil Jarvie

tue 20 nov

lykke li

Thu 29 nov

fri 30 nov

Fence head honcho King Creosote plays a special set with Edinburgh trio and fellow Fencers, FOUND, as part of the 15th 'Bits of Strange' Homecomings tour, for which yer £25 ticket gets you gig entry, access to the end of tour party, and a set of limited edition tour merchandise – including a TOUR TEA TOWEL! Done deal. Scottish Storytelling Centre, Edinburgh, 7.30pm, £25

Sub Club continue to celebrate their 25th year– full marks for eking out the celebrations over the whole bloody year, chaps – with the penultimate installment of the Sub Club 25 schedule finding percussive maestro Blawan locking horns with one half of Optimo, Mr JD Twitch, to soundtrack a night of the very best electronic party music. We'll do the dancing. Sub Club, Glasgow, 11pm, £10

blawan

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November 2012


HEADS UP

mon 5 nov Fence Records' lass Rozi Plain takes her most recent release, Sometimes Joined Unjoined, on the road proper, a gem of a thing built upon her home-built electric guitar and Catherine Wheel vocal harmonies. Support on the night comes from Scottish multi-instrumentalist Esperi, and Aberdeen musician-cum-artist, Sarah J Stanley. The Glad Cafe, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £6. Also playing Edinburgh's Electric Circus the following evening

holy mountain

photo: dylan matthews

sun 4 nov Matthew Herbert tours his conceptual and controversial new album, One Pig, which explores life, death, and consumption through the recorded noises of a single pig's birth, growth, and eventual butchering, re-told in a live setting via a band playing instruments made from pig remains, and an on-stage chef. Dundee Rep, Dundee, 7.30pm, From £10. Also playing Glasgow (3 Nov) and Edinburgh (8 Nov)

video still Courtesy the artist

Jeremy Deller, Cockfight (2011),

sat 3 nov Multi-arts venture Spaced in the City returns with another mini festival of wonder, Roots and Ruins, taking in live music, installation art, and fashion over one packed Saturday, with doom'n'roll Glasgow trio Holy Mountain headering the bill alongside the likes of Woodenbox, Blank Canvas, Palms, Honeyblood, and North Atlantic Oscillation. The Barras Centre, Glasgow, noon-3am, £10

photo: euan robertson

fri 2 nov The Fruitmarket open their winter season with a unique exhibition bringing together work by twelve artists who travelled to and spent time in the remote Galápagos archipelago. The artwork produced takes in a suitably absorbing mix of media, of which Jeremy Deller's cock fight stills are particularly captivating, more so for the fact that a year later the 'sport' was outlawed in Ecuador. Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, until 3 Jan, Free

fri 9 nov For her contribution to Sonica 2012, Korean artist Mookyoung Shin presents her response to the growing repetitive nature of everyday life, in an installation piece entitled Our Contemporaries, where hundreds of giant kinetic ‘fingers’ drum down on individual desks, growing more and more impatient as they tip-tap towards a climactic cacophony. Disquieting stuff. Tramway, Glasgow, until 18 Nov, free. See listings for full Sonica 2012 listings

sat 10 nov

sun 11 nov

Edinburgh gig-in-a-club night par excellence, Limbo, celebrate their 5th Birthday with a headline set from local rock'n'rollers Delta Mainline, who'll be marking their third appearance at the night, helping along by Zed Penguin and White Lightnin', plus the Black Spring DJs playing into the blurry (read: drunken), wee hours. The Voodoo Rooms, Edinburgh, 8pm, £6

Canadian hip-hop artist Buck 65 (aka Richard Terfry) takes in Glasgow's King Tut's as part of his current European tour to road-test material from his new album, which he's in the midst of recording. He also promises to play a few audience requests, for which we'll be the first to demand his ode to a centaur, er, Centaur. King Tut's, Glasgow, 8pm, £12.50

sat 17 nov

sun 18 nov

mon 19 nov

Local music blogger Song, By Toad hosts the third edition of his new night, BAD FUN!; a gig night with post-band DJs and a 1am licence – bound to encourage bad behaviour on our part. Taking to the vaults this time are local stalwarts Broken Records, alongside Manc experimental popsters Easter, and shoegazey Glasgow newcomers LeThug, St John's Church, Edinburgh, 8pm, £7

Sonica 2012 continues to brighten our month, with the 33 1/3 Collective presenting a new 3D interpretation of Bartok's opera, for which artists Douwe Dijkstra, Jules van Hulst and Coen Huisman work around a white cube to create multi-media representation of Duke Bluebeard's metaphorical dungeon. Trust us, this'll be magic. Tramway, Glasgow, 14-18 Nov, various times (see listings for details), £12 (£8

Cult San Franciscoan indie-popsters The Aislers Set play what will be their first Scottish date in almost a decade, following their recent reformation. And as if that wasn't exciting enough, support on the night comes from Belle and Sebastian's Stevie Jackson, and members of Camera Obscura and The Pastels will be turning DJ for the evening. Mono, Glasgow, 8pm, £10

sun 25 nov

mon 26 nov

photo: kathy hinde

fri 16 nov This month Processed Beats make their return with another outing of their eclectic electronic night, slotting together a beastly line-up that takes in a headline set from bedroom-produced techno scamps Clouds, alongside Optimo's JD Twitch, HaHaHa, Death By Repetition, Roman Nose, IndianRedLopez, Any Colour Black, and Ginger Beard Men over a sprawling seven hour party. The Arches, Glasgow, 8pm, £7

jd twitch

Crude comic par excellence, Rob Rouse is back on the road following the birth of his second child – with the ominously entitled Life Sentences tour – for which the majority of his chat centres around, well... pretty much crapping and peeing. The Stand, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £12 (£10). Also playing Edinburgh on 25 Nov

Between March and November of 2011, 10 intricate book sculptures were hidden at various locations across Edinburgh, photographed as they were found by local photographer Chris Scott. They now take to Edinburgh's Scottish Poetry Library as part of a special Scottish libraries tour, offering punters the chance to marvel at them in the flesh. Scottish Poetry Library, Edinburgh, until 8 Dec, Free

tue 27 nov

Future pop duo Purity Ring bring their wares to Glasgow's Stereo (about time too, we've been gagging on this date since we interviewed them back in July), with their debut release offering a vision of synth pop as polished as bloody crystal, with Corin Roddick's productions incorporating sugar-sweet melodies, with a liberal use of side-chained beats and synths. Amen. Stereo, Glasgow, 8pm, £8 photo: Sebastian Mlynarski

sat 24 nov The RSA fling open their doors for the annual RSA Open exhibition of small works, sourced by open submission from artists across Scotland. The selection will include paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints and photographs, with this year also seeing the addition of a room dedicated solely to architecture – with all artworks available to buy. RSA, Edinburgh, until 31 Jan, Free

Acrobat-Xian by George Donald

sun 2 dec

mon 3 dec

Brightening our December (yes, it's December already – keep up) is Shhhh Festival, an allday celebration of quiet music and art at Platform, featuring performances from the likes of Emma Pollock, Meursault, Rick Redbeard, Wounded Knee, and Eagleowl, alongside a visual art programme curated by Luke Drozd. Platform, Glasgow, 3pm11pm, £12 earlybird

There’s not much danger of a limb staying still as Brooklyn’s Yeasayer play their rescheduled Glasgow date, cherrypicking tracks from their latest album, Fragrant World, which deftly morphs their previously tribal-heavy sound into something altogether more lovestruck and danceable. The Arches, Glasgow, 7pm, £14

Japanese instrumental post-rockers Mono grace Glasgow's Òran Mór once more (having wowed with their set back in March 2010), touring their bloody lovely new album, For My Parents. Trust us, it doesn't get much more epic than their immense cinematic soundscapes, expertly traversing the line between loud and quiet. Òran Mór, Glasgow, 7.30pm, £12.50

eagleowl

photo: juliet buchan

sat 1 dec

November 2012

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film

F E A T U RE S

Crest of a Wave

Outside of superhero franchises, no other feature release of 2012 reached the levels of anticipation of The Master. With some critics ready to call endgame on the medium of film, we need directors like Paul Thomas Anderson more than ever INTERVIEW: Jamie Dunn

According to David Thomson, cinema’s great dissident critic, the putrid stench of death hangs in the air at your local multiplex, commingling with the more familiar funk of nacho cheeSe and acnefaced adolescents. “Film is not dead,” Thomson writes in a recent issue of The New Republic, “it is just dying. This morbidity is familiar to us all.” Paul Thomas Anderson, director of The Master, this festival season’s most thrilling spectacle, clearly hasn’t received the memo. “There’s always going to be a way, right? There’s got to be,” the 42-year-old filmmaker tells me from his office in Los Angeles when I ask about Thomson and other critics’ recent premature obituaries for the medium. “But, as Neil Young says, maybe that’s a hippie dream.” Anderson’s sixth feature looked like it too was going to be a dream after Universal Pictures balked at its script and budget. The project was eventually nurtured and independently bankrolled to the sum of $35m by Megan Ellison, the 26-yearold daughter of Silicon Valley giant Larry Ellison, who’s recently been ploughing her future inheritance into smart and daring projects from some of the world’s finest auteurs, including the upcoming films of Wong Kar-wai and Kathryn Bigelow. Perhaps one reason Universal was reluctant to get behind Anderson’s film is its subject matter. It concerns Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), an alcoholic, sex-obsessed marine who, after he’s spat out of the Navy at the close of WWII, stumbles through a series of peripatetic misadventures. A stint as a department store photographer is cut short when he inexplicably beats up one of his customers and a job as a farmhand harvesting cabbages ends with Freddie being chased across a furrowed field by pitchfork-wielding migrant workers after his potent homemade booze poisons a co-worker. It’s while on the lam for this crime that

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Freddie stumbles into the life of avuncular charmer Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman), aka the Master, Svengali of a self-help religion that looks remarkably like an early incarnation of Scientology. It’s easy to understand Universal’s unease. Attacking the celebrity-endorsed religion from inside the Hollywood citadel would be a bit like reading The God Delusion in the Vatican’s lobby. During the feverish online build-up to The Master’s premiere at Venice Film Festival, Anderson’s film was widely rumoured to be the cinematic equivalent of ex-Scientologist Paul Haggis’s exposé in The New Yorker. Those expecting a vicious takedown of L. Ron Hubbard’s enterprise are likely to be disappointed. “Nowadays, if people get a whiff of what you are doing they kind of have impressions about what it should or shouldn’t be,” explains Anderson when we get on to the furore that was the lead up to The Master’s release. “When it comes to Scientology, I think the expectation is that you should somehow attack it. That was never what we were doing, it was never what we were talking about doing or thinking about doing, we just had other things on our mind.” What Anderson did have in mind was a love story. “I was always thinking of it as just two people that meet, seemingly in the middle of their lives, they look at each other and they have this intense attraction, as friends, as drinking partners, as master and servant. And having that work both ways, not just that the Master is the master and Freddie the servant, but Freddie is kind of the dog that’s leading on the leash.” It’s this bromance that lends The Master its beautiful melancholic streak: these crazy kids just can’t work it out. “The Master can’t be exclusive to Freddie because he’s got to take care of so many different people,” Anderson explains “and it’s not as if it’s in Freddie’s nature

illustration: lauren crow

to commit to anyone because his history says if I commit to you you’re just going to leave or someone’s going to get hurt.” So, basically, it’s kind of a homoerotic remake of When Harry Met Sally. We’ve been here with Anderson before. Fiery relationships between older and younger men drive the narratives of almost all his films. There’s the bitter creative differences between a porn director and his well hung leading man in Boogie Nights; There Will Be Blood sees a cold-hearted oil tycoon waging war against a slimy evangelical preacher with dollar signs in his eyes; while Magnolia, Anderson’s epic collage of overlapping soap operas, is scattershot with a seemingly endless supply of father-son conflicts. Does PT have daddy issues? “I just keep coming back to it, really not intentionally at all, it’s just gravity – an accidentally on purpose type of thing,” the director confesses. “Whatever it is in my life or in me or in the way I came out – my relationship to my old man was very strong and very important to me – it just seems to come back when I write these things; I can’t get away from it. Sometimes you’ve got to just accept the things you can’t do anything about. That sounds like a postcard but it’s just that you start writing and these things start to come out of you and you have to listen to them.” What’s interesting is that as Anderson has got older his alliances with his protagonists has shifted. While Boogie Nights was told primarily from the younger man’s point-of-view, The Master is more even handed. Does he see himself identifying with his older characters more as time marches on? “I’m a father myself,” he laughs. “I’ve got three kids, so I’m getting pretty far past my prodigal son phase.” Another explanation for Anderson’s sympathetic rendering of the Master character might be that a megalomaniac with hordes of people hanging

on his/her every word isn’t too far removed from his own profession. “Oh sure, trying to convince somebody to follow you and dress up and march around the room?” he deadpans in his soft San Fernando Valley drawl. “There are a lot of similarities to being a movie director. You’re working with all these people and some days you’re just making it up as you go along hoping no-one will notice.” Characters like the Master, Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis’s oil-man in There Will Be Blood), Barry Egan (Adam Sandler’s combustible salesman from Punch-Drunk Love), and Jack Horner (Burt Reynolds’ porn director in Boogie Nights who refuses to switch to video tape when the bottom falls out of his industry) are all driven to be the best they can be in their chosen fields. It’s easy to guess why Anderson is drawn to these fiercely independent self-made men: they are kindred spirits. “My girlfriend [former SNL regular and Bridesmaids star Maya Rudolph] would agree. She would definitely call me a strong individual,” he says with a knowing laugh. “I’m proud of the path that we’ve taken, for sure (and when I say we I mean all the people I’ve worked with since the beginning, we’ve all worked together.)” And this path has become increasingly idiosyncratic. The criticism of Anderson’s early films was that they were too indebted to other filmmakers. Hard Eight’s script riffed on David Mamet; Boogie Nights’ dizzying Steadicam shots were lifted from Goodfellas; and Magnolia’s sprawling narrative was laced with the DNA of Robert Altman. Post Punch-Drunk Love this criticism stopped; with that surreal, violent, and often hilarious romantic comedy he’d found a visual grammar and a filmmaking voice all his own. “I hope we’re not doing the same thing as when we started out, we’re kind of getting more confidence and swagger


F E A T U RE S

moonrise kingdom

the New New Hollywood: From the Margins to the Mainstream

With new releases this month from David O. Russell and Paul Thomas Anderson, key figures in the unofficial mid-90s renaissance of American film, The Skinny looks back at their generation’s wave of subversive upstarts, the New New Hollywood words: Jamie Dunn

and strength to do the things we want to do. You can be independent but everything is always a compromise as well, just by the nature of making a film. But hopefully you can just add up the compromises and you can live with them, and you get enough of what you were after that you can feel good.”

“I   was always thinking of it as just two people that meet, they look at each other and they have this intense attraction, as friends, as drinking partners, as master and servant” paul thomas anderson If there’s a major flaw to Paul Thomas Anderson’s oeuvre, it’s a gender imbalance. While rewatching Magnolia and Boogie Nights recently all the damaged, substance-abusing wives, mothers and daughters seemed to blend into one pathetic whole. Female actors would be better off looking for juicy parts in a Michael Mann movie than in one of Anderson’s. The brilliance of Amy Adams’ sly turn as Peggy Dodd, the Master’s

heavily pregnant wife and the steely linchpin of his operation, just might absolve these previous sins. “She’s dynamite,” says Anderson when I mention Adams’ mesmerizing performance. “I love her work and wanted to work with her for a long time, she can do it all. And I mean do it all: singing and dancing. She’s more like an old time actress when they could do everything, they could sing and dance and do both dramatic or comedic parts. They don’t make them like that so much any more.” 2012 is looking to be a particularly good year for the subtle, subversive group of filmmakers that burst on to the scene during the mid-90s alongside Anderson. David O. Russell, who released his debut feature Spanking the Monkey in 1994, two years before Anderson’s debut Hard Eight, is likely to be fighting it out with Anderson for Best Director at the upcoming awards pantomime with romantic comedy Silver Linings Playbook (released 21 Nov). Anderson’s more fastidious namesake, Wes, whose debut feature, Bottle Rocket, was released within weeks of Hard Eight, also had a great year, with critics and audiences falling for the undeniable charms of Moonrise Kingdom, the director’s paean to first love and outdoorsmanship. Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman’s next project, meanwhile, is being financed by the same angel who put up the cash for The Master. “I don’t know those guys personally,” says Anderson. “I’m not friends with them, but I know of them and I’ve met them and I definitely feel a part of them in a generational sense that we’re all working and creating on a similar wavelength. And we grew up watching the same movies so there’s definitely something to that. There’s so much good stuff going on, it’s crazy. Anybody who’s going to complain about movies not being good is not watching enough movies right now.” The Master is released 2 Nov by Entertainment UK

“There are no waves; there is only the ocean.” So said Claude Chabrol, a filmmaker who knew a thing or two about filmmaking waves, given that his 1958 debut Le Beau Serge became the first swell of the Nouvelle Vague. He’s correct of course, film movements are nothing more than historians and critics trying to crowbar theory and order on to chaotic systems of art, but, like Bodhi in Point Break, I can’t help but get excited for that next big wave. While we wait for that to arrive, filmgoers can continue to surf the last great wave to hit American cinema, the New New Hollywood one, which looks in no danger of crashing into the surf. It all began in the mid-90s, when several Gen X upstarts started making idiosyncratic movies within the Hollywood dream factory. Filmmakers like David O. Russell (Spanking the Monkey, 1994; Flirting with Disaster, 1996), Wes Anderson (Bottle Rocket, 1996), Paul Thomas Anderson (Hard Eight, 1996; Boogie Nights, 1997) and Noah Baumbach (Kicking and Screaming, 1995) led the charge. Then, in 1999, the levees burst. The following were released within a heady twelve-month period: Rushmore (Wes Anderson), Magnolia (P.T. Anderson), Three Kings (David O. Russell), The Virgin Suicides (Sofia Coppola), Election (Alexander Payne), Being John Malkovich (Spike Jonze). That’s more gems than you’ll find on the Queen’s fanciest hat. Like Primark underpants or Sugababes lineups, these types of filmmaking waves don’t last long – a decade seems to be a good innings. Nine years after Le Beau Serge and Truffaut’s Les Quatre Cents Coups kicked off the Nouvelle Vague, Godard put a stake through its heart with 1967’s Weekend, the cinematic equivalent of having acid thrown in your face. The Hollywood Renaissance of the 70s was also destroyed from within thanks to a combination of Spielberg and Lucas inventing the summer blockbuster and the hubris of the movement’s golden boys Coppola and Michael Cimino, who went from Oscar winning money-makers to ostentatious money-burners when their late-70s productions, Apocalypse Now and Heaven’s Gate, spiralled out of control. It would be a contrarian who tried to argue that the New Hollywood brat pack of Scorsese, Lucas, Coppola and De Palma have been able to better their masterworks of the 70s over the last three decades. It’s hard to see a decline in the New New Hollywood pranksters, however. Some have been making films for two decades now, but they’ve far

from hit their peak. Take this year’s efforts from the New New Hollywood gang. Moonrise Kingdom, from Wes Anderson, released in May, a candy-coloured geek-meets-freak romance following an orphaned Boy Scout over the weekend he spends with his emotionally wrought girlfriend on an idyllic New England island, is the dandy director’s most critically and financially successful film to date. His namesake, Paul Thomas Anderson, meanwhile, releases The Master on 2 November, which is surely the most anticipated movie release of the autumn. And at the end of the month, David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook, a loose-limbed romantic comedy that was awarded the People’s Choice prize at Toronto International Film Festival, hits UK screens. Once the subversive elements of Hollywood, these young outsiders are now its establishment figures. This year’s Oscars – the very definition of conformity – will most likely see P.T. Anderson and Russell nominated for Best Director while The Master and Silver Linings Playbook are shoo-ins for Best Picture nods. What’s remarkable though is that these filmmakers have moved from the margins to the mainstream without succumbing to the artistic cowardice and conservatism that characterises most Hollywood productions. Will either of them win? The Academy likes to invite wild cards like Russell and Anderson to the party but reserves its accolades for safer options. Just ask Martin Scorsese. His best post-70s films continually played bridesmaid to bland works by bland actors-turned-directors. At the 1980 ceremony Robert Redford’s Ordinary People knocked Raging Bull out for the count, while Kevin Costner’s Dances with Wolves made Goodfellas look like a mook in 1990. Scorsese eventually had to resort to a remake (The Departed) to get his mitts on a gold statuette. The Master and Silver Linings Playbook’s biggest competition at next year’s ceremony is likely to be Argo (7 Nov). And who was behind its camera? Serviceable slab of hunk turned serviceable actor/director Ben Affleck. Russell and Anderson don’t stand a chance, but I don’t think they care one bit. The Master is released 2 Nov by Entertainment UK Silver Linings Playbook is released 21 Nov by Entertainment UK Moonrise Kingdom is currently available on DVD and Blu-ray from Universal Pictures

November 2012

THE SKINNY 11


photo: atiba photo

music

F E A T U RE S

Everybody Hz

Having returned to the fray after sitting out on 2009’s Merriweather Post Pavilion, Josh Dibb of Animal Collective talks about the band’s rejuvenation, their melancholic homecoming and how this time they’re inviting everyone to the party Interview: Darren Carle On 20 July 1969, as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were making history on another celestial body, a congratulatory message was beamed from Earth to the intrepid explorers. “Be advised, there are lots of smiling faces here and all around the world,” gushed mission control of the historic event unfolding before them. “There are two up here also,” Armstrong replied coolly. Then, from a lonely satellite some sixty miles above the moon, a solitary voice reminded the world of his existence. “Don’t forget about me,” quipped third astronaut Michael Collins as he orbited inside the command module. Although it’s certainly a stretch, it’s possible to imagine that Josh Dibb of the Animal Collective had something of a similar experience. Back in 2009, the Baltimore quartet unleashed eighth album Merriweather Post Pavilion to unanimous glowing praise. A logical culmination of their previous experimental work but with a more accessible bent, critical acclaim went hand in hand with commercial clout and, relatively speaking, Animal Collective went stratospheric. However, Dibb, who works under the pseudonym Deakin, wasn’t involved in the writing, recording or touring of Merriweather. It was by no means an unusual situation for the group who operate less as a band than an ensemble, where membership can fluctuate fluidly around a core personnel. Even in the beginning, debut album Spirit They’ve Gone, Spirit They’ve Vanished was written and recorded by Dave Portner and Noah Lennox alone, only retroactively becoming Animal Collective’s official debut. Yet having been integral to lead-up albums Feels and Strawberry Jam, Dibb had certainly contributed to the position the band found themselves in as they undertook what was to become, for many, their finest hour. “I had mixed feelings,” admits Dibb looking back on the period from his New York home. “But on the positive side, it’s really awesome being able to be a big fan, guilt free, where I can just say ‘Wow, that’s really amazing!’. And the Merriweather stuff was amazing.” Indeed it was, yet Dibb was hardly sitting idle during this period. His list of activities is fairly exhaustive but a truncated list saw the

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November 2012

multi-instrumentalist indulge in building homes designed for sustainable living, travelling to a festival in Mali via Kickstarter, producing bandmate Dave Portner’s solo record Down There, remixing for the likes of Goldfrapp, Ratatat and Phoenix as well as running the band’s own label Paw Tracks.   Yet despite any misgivings, Dibb remains assured that he did the right thing. “It was a really tough decision,” he admits. “But I knew deep down that it was the right one. It was necessary for a lot of reasons, some of it to do with music, some to do with how I was approaching my life. I felt like I needed it and I don’t think we’d be doing what we’re doing now if I hadn’t.” By that Dibb is referring to current album Centipede Hz and its imminent world tour. In contrast to Merriweather, the band’s latest studio album is a sonically-dense affair, one factor which earned it cautiously optimistic praise when compared to its predecessor. “When the reviews first started coming out there were so many of them comparing this record to Merriweather,” he says of his initial reaction to the critical feedback. “We’ve always moved in a non-linear way so I couldn’t figure out why everyone was comparing it like that. But obviously in another way it totally makes sense why someone would relate a band’s new record to the one that came before it.” In its own right, Centipede Hz is a record that requires patience and repeated listening in order to reap the benefits. It’s perhaps not an issue for long-time fans who have taken sonically boisterous albums like Strawberry Jam to their hearts, but Dibb does worry that committing wholeheartedly to an album these days is not for everyone, himself included. “It’s a really difficult thing to do,” he concedes. “I find myself constantly checking out recommendations [but] the first thing I do is go on YouTube or iTunes and sometimes within forty seconds I’ve made up my mind.” In contrast, Dibb reminisces about his time growing up in Baltimore as a music-loving teenager in the late eighties and early nineties. “Every month or so I’d go to a record store and buy a few records, maybe because a friend recommended one, or I’d heard a song I liked by a band and just wanted to hear the rest of their stuff. So I’d have

these records I’d take home, these records I had invested in. In those days I bought a lot of stuff that I didn’t really get into but I still held onto them. They’d sit there for six months and I’d maybe try it again, still not feel it, then a year later I’d put it on and it suddenly just made sense.” What also made sense and brought the band full-circle in one respect, was returning to their hometown of Baltimore, where such experiences were borne, to write and rehearse Centipede Hz. Yet while Dibb’s sentiments might hint at a nostalgic yearning behind the relocation for these sessions, he in fact claims the opposite. “I think the actual influences of Baltimore were, oddly enough, darker if anything,” he explains. “It wasn’t so much a joyous homecoming. It was a bit too familiar and we had this weird nostalgia where we felt we were coming back to something we thought we had left behind.”

“We’re   all just really restless” josh dibb Reminiscence is of course anathema to Animal Collective who have been pushing themselves and their fans with each subsequent release. More accurately, the move to Baltimore was a case of geographical necessity rather than any sort of pining for past experiences. With Dibb located in New York, Dave Portner in Los Angeles, Brian Weitz in Washington and Noah Lennox all the way over in Lisbon, a central meet-up has become ever more essential for the disparate group. “Every writing session we’ve had since Noah moved to Portugal in 2005 has been really condensed, usually before a tour for a week or so,” explains Dibb of the creative process preCentipede Hz. “We’d just make a song every two days then go on the road and play them. That’s been the norm for us for six or seven years, so this was really our first time since Noah leaving where we were together in the same place, working most days for long periods. I think that aspect of it was, maybe not nostalgic, but it was a return to a way

of writing that we hadn’t done for a long time.” Such sessions are likely to become more commonplace for the band as they juggle increasingly complex lifestyle and musical commitments, but it’s something Dibb feels rejuvenates rather than depletes the long-time friends. “We’re trying to figure out how to run the band in a way that doesn’t impact on our families,” he explains. “Early on we experienced what it was like to live and work together all the time and it was a bit claustrophobic. We really feel this way has a lot of benefits for us as long as we make the time to get together. There’s actually a lot more drive and creativity coming out now because each of us is able to spend time on our own projects, so when we do get together, there’s a lot of energy.” It’s an energy the group are gearing up to take on the road once again, but this time they’re feeling a little more like sharing the good vibes. Notorious for playing ultra-new material even on the back of a recently released album, the experimental quartet have drawn praise from the more avant-garde sect of their fanbase while receiving criticism from those who wouldn’t mind hearing a few tunes they actually know, thank you very much. This time though, Dibb is unequivocal in the band’s approach for touring Centipede Hz. “This will be the first tour where we’re strictly playing the new record,” he promises. “There’s something really beneficial in playing songs that unite people, to feel like they’re part of a shared event. It’s the new thing for us to do. Playing lots of new stuff and not the songs on the record has almost become formulaic for us. So it’s fun and interesting to go in the other direction a little bit.” Even when playing it straight, there’s something a little off-beat about Animal Collective. Just don’t expect this to herald some kind of predictable malaise for the band. “It’s really hard for us to anticipate where we’ll be in terms of our next creative burst,” assures Dibb. “We don’t like sitting in one place for too long. We’re all just really restless. There’s a part of us that feels that once you’ve done something, then it’s time to push towards new horizons.” Playing O2 ABC, Glasgow on 7 Nov www.myanimalhome.net


November 2012

THE SKINNY 13


F E A T U RE S

Alive in the Superunknown

music

As Soundgarden prepare to deliver their first studio album in 16 years, the Seattle titans explain how they found a road back

photo: danny clinch

interview: Dave Kerr

It was another summer of unlikely reunion tours amongst giants – The Stooges’ Raw Power line-up trucked on despite Ron Asheton’s death; Black Sabbath made it work without Bill Ward in their employ; Kyuss sued each other over the use of the name while John Garcia and Brant Bjork kept the circus in town regardless; The Afghan Whigs returned to the stage with grace; and Refused put their ‘better to burn out’ punk principles aside for one last lap around the circuit – meanwhile the cynics flatly accused them all of topping up their pension.   Reassembled Seattle mavericks Soundgarden were the common denominator at one festival or another, but what distinguished this band from the nostalgia tour was a willingness to think about a future beyond retreading the glory days. Now with their fifth album – boldly titled King Animal – due this month, they’re determined to make a sure-footed return, but cautious to avoid the industry trappings that smothered them the first time around. Huddled inside a portacabin backstage at Hyde Park, The Skinny’s time with the band is a precious commodity as the world’s music press thumps on their door. It doesn’t help that Chris Cornell (chatty yet guarded, whose eyes dart around the room like Timbaland might parachute in at any minute) and Kim Thayil (the jovial, easy-going good cop) burn half of it cracking jokes. As the guy who taught Cornell how to play guitar, it’s apt that they continually finish each other’s sentences. In fact, remarkably, from the evidence of their summer tour, Soundgarden seem like a band back on the same page. Yet it all seemed so unlikely. Rewinding a couple of years, the quartet’s return was almost accidental; a Tweet to say that the “Knights of the Soundtable ride again” – essentially that their old fanclub had been reactivated – was taken as a thinly veiled hint that they’d reconvened the band after 12 years away. Cornell implies that they just rolled with the misconception. “It was something that kinda just strangely occurred,” he says, “based on us being in the same room with each other. There was that, and as our meetings progressed – where we were trying to service the legacy of the band – no reasons to not get back together ever seemed to appear.” As a group that seemed to cherish its privacy in correlation with heightening fame, the details of Soundgarden’s split were left hazy in ’97, although drummer Matt Cameron – currently pulling double shifts with his old band as well as Pearl

14 THE SKINNY

November 2012

Jam – has since suggested that the band were simply swallowed up by the business. “Was that in his autobiography?” Thayil arches an eyebrow. “Because if it was, he’s been misquoted!” Cornell chimes in: “That was in the movie – The Matt Cameron Story... Matt Damon was the star – straight to video.” Serious face on, is the industry still as meddlesome for a multi-million selling ‘property’? “Oh, more so. Nobody told us how to be, creatively, but they expect a lot of other things out of us,” says Thayil. “Everything’s completely different,” Cornell offers. “There was a specific way that the business ran – this cyclical nature of writing, recording, doing press, touring and then starting that whole thing over again. You’d be contracted to a label for several albums where they’d be looking at their balance sheets and thinking ‘well, it’d be great if you guys had an album out by March next year, because as we look at the numbers, in order for us to make the amount of money we need to make – it’s on you to deliver. 'We never succumb to pressure to ever do anything of any kind.” Thayil pipes up with a nugget of mock management speak: “Schedualise!” As the first band of the Seattle boom to sign with a major label, it’s perhaps no surprise that a corporate mentality would eventually jar with the DIY sensibilities the band had governed itself by in its first few years of being. “We started out as an indie band where we kinda did everything on our own,” Cornell reflects. “The first few releases weren’t even on the same label – it was all on our own schedule, on our own time – we basically did everything ourselves.” Thayil remembers the glamour of slumming it, too: “…including driving our own van and loading our own gear, then unloading it through the night...which was a lot of fun for a few years, I suppose...” “Yeah, something about that eventually wasn’t necessarily good for us,” Cornell chuckles. “Now it’s not the same thing. The labels close in on one album at a time – we’re not contracted to any specific one beyond that, neither are any of us individually. In that sense we can go anywhere we want, do anything we like, make any decision; we don’t give up the publishing rights to anything either.”   “Part of that is a function of our success, but it’s also the weakness of the record labels now,” remarks Thayil of the changed landscape that the band now finds itself in. “Record labels need other partners; bands now have partners other than

labels. Labels are less likely to call the shots and pressure you to schedualise everything.” Cornell suggests that, perhaps now more than ever, the possibilities are wide open for any band with a good idea that they can execute themselves. “It’s the nature of the business; bands can have success by running their own label, or by knowing how to get a viral response.” Of course, at the heart of Soundgarden’s success the first time around was the sheer experimental diversity afforded by the myriad writing partnerships within it, seemingly unlocked by Ben Shepherd’s addition to the fold by the time they broke through with psychedelic sludge rock epic Badmotorfinger in 1991. “[King Animal] has that same variety of songwriting combinations we’ve always had,” says Thayil of the new LP. “There’s certain ways that we respond to each other that we kinda always have.”

“We   somehow naturally click in a very specific way” chris cornell “Yeah,” Cornell nods, “the partnerships are interesting to me – a long break put them in focus. The way that one person responds creatively to another, differently than they would in any other situation – the way that I would, for example, come up with lyrics and melodies to a song Matt brings in, versus Ben or Kim, versus when I write on my own, versus one I would co-write with someone else. We somehow naturally click in a very specific way. For example, writing with Kim has produced the kind of material that would never occur to me in any other situation, yet it can remind me very much of songs he and I wrote together 15, 20 or even 25 years ago. Then, also, writing an entire song for Soundgarden on my own is just a different mindset for me. I’ve written so many songs since that don’t sound anything like that. And yet, it doesn’t require a lot of thought, I just have a clear idea of what I think the musical identity of Soundgarden is, and what everyone else’s tastes are.” Suddenly Thayil dives in, as if to intercept any assumption that one man’s in charge here. “Part of

it is Chris naturally knowing what would fit with the band, as much as it’s about the other three guys actually gravitating towards an idea and saying ‘hey, let’s play that!’” Cornell barks back in firm agreement: “Right!” Throughout their European summer tour the band were keen to keep new material under lock and key, save for what, by their own admission, was a ‘family friendly’ contribution to The Avengers soundtrack. Dynamic songs like Bones of Birds – featuring a plaintive vocal from Cornell, one of Thayil’s trademark drop-tuned easternflavoured motifs, and a typically off-kilter rhythm from Shepherd and Cameron – is the stuff one imagines will see the group firmly re-established as a supernatural anomaly in modern rock. “Once you hear any notes of it you think ‘oh my God, it’s Soundgarden’ immediately,” enthuses Shepherd – as much a fan of the band as a member. “It covers the whole gamut – as usual, the same moody spectrum. But the sound is a lot closer to a better version of what [previous 1996 swansong] Down on the Upside was – where it’s stripped down and sounds like a band in a room. We know our way around the studio better now.” Did time away give the band a fresh perspective on the rest of their catalogue? “Oh yeah,” Shepherd laughs. ”We can actually play it now!” Looking to the future, Shepherd reveals that the band intends to take King Animal around the US next year after an intimate whistle-stop tour of Europe – including another date in London – this November. The Skinny reminds him that they haven’t played in these parts since 1996. “I’m sure we’ll get over there,” he assures. “We have to play Scotland. I want to play the Barrowlands again, just to see what it’s like. I do miss Glasgow.” In terms of the bigger picture, Cameron has spoken with some uncertainty about whether the band can endure as a long-term prospect; how does Shepherd think of it? “Yeah, Soundgarden’s back,” he matter-of-factly offers in parting. “Matt can go do whatever he wants, so can Chris, Kim and I – and whenever we decide to reconvene, we can. We’ve re-established ourselves enough to have that open door. We can go make another record. We don’t have big commitments and debts – this is truly for the art of the music and the brotherhood of the band. It’s pretty cool.” King Animal is released via Mercury on 12 Nov Read our extended interview with the band online at www.theskinny.co.uk/music www.soundgardenworld.com


F E A T U RE S A D VER T I S ME N T F E A T U RE

film

Are you ready to release the Kraken?

Un Certain Regard

Melvil Poupaud and Suzanne Clément sit down with The Skinny to discuss working with Quebecois filmmaking prodigy Xavier Dolan on his latest effort, Laurence Anyways, and portraying a ten-year relationship in the film interview: Philip Concannon Xavier Dolan is probably growing weary of film reviews and articles that constantly refer to his age, but when you’ve had three films screen in Un Certain Regard at Cannes by the age of 23, what do you expect? It’s hard to resist remarking on the director’s tender years when you see how accomplished his filmmaking has become, with his new film Laurence Anyways marking a huge leap forward for Dolan as a dramatist. The film charts one decade in the life of Laurence (Melvil Poupaud) and Fred (Suzanne Clément), whose relationship is rocked by Laurence’s revelation of his long-suppressed desire to live as a woman. It is by far the largest canvas that Dolan has operated on, but Clément, who worked with the director on I Killed My Mother, his debut, noticed a new confidence and maturity in him when they reunited on this picture. “When I arrived for the first day of shooting I was amazed at the steps he had taken, which I now understand is normal for Xavier, he’s always moving really, really fast,” she says. “He is much more creative and really confident in the fact that he wants things to happen and is willing to try anything to get it.” For Melvil Poupaud, who plays the crossdressing protagonist, working with Dolan was an intense experience, particularly as he was thrust into the role with little time to prepare after Louis Garrel pulled out at the eleventh hour. Fortunately, the actor slipped into the role with ease. “I arrived two weeks before the start of the shoot and weirdly the costumes fit me, and I didn’t feel uneasy with the high heels or those extravagant dresses,” he recalls. Poupaud also benefitted from a prior knowledge of the subject, as he had once edited a documentary his mother had made about transsexuals. “I knew about those people who were dressing up as women on the side, secretly, since they were a child, and they have this kind of duality,” he explains. “Some of them go all the way to the operation and assume it in society, while others keep on doing it on the side, even

though they have children. I discovered through this documentary that those people are hyper-heterosexual and not homosexual; it’s like a crazy love for women that makes them feel they are more woman than man. So I could avoid all of these clichés about transvestites and drag queens, and they had already been avoided by Xavier in the script.” Typically, the act of making Laurence Anyways was unconventional. The film required a five-month break in shooting to accommodate the changing seasons, but Poupaud said this was a great help to him and Clément as they attempted to forge a convincing long-term relationship onscreen. “When we came back to the second part of the shoot he had edited the first part so he knew what was missing, so he could tell us where we had to go further in our relationship or what we had to correct. He showed us the editing so we could all understand the movie and see where it was going, so it was very helpful having this break.” Clément adds that Dolan, who has acted in his previous two features, couldn’t resist participating in scenes from behind the camera. “During this movie he was actually talking to us during the takes, which was quite an experience,” she says. “It was a lot of fun, sometimes disturbing, but it really brings you off-balance and makes you take the direction you wouldn’t normally take as an actor. As he said himself, it was his way of playing a part in Laurence and you could always hear him in the dailies. I think he got tired of his own voice.” Laurence Anyways is a remarkable artistic triumph for Dolan, Poupaud and Clément, and both actors have expressed their readiness to work with the Canadian wunderkind again in the future, although Poupaud hopes that their next collaboration won’t require quite so much dedication. “On the first night he arrived he had to have his whole body shaved. That was some preparation,” Clément laughs. “Yes, it was hardcore,” Poupaud says with a rueful smile. Laurence Anyways is released 30 Nov by Network Releasing

Somewhere, in the depths of this issue, lies a beast feared by seafarers for centuries. A beast so fearful the mere mention of its name causes paroxysms of terror. But if you, brave reader, are able to locate this nefarious and tentacled monstrosity, you may be in with a chance of winning some precious nautical booty. Said booty is no less than a bottle of The Kraken Black Spiced Rum - imported from the Caribbean and blended with 14 exotic spices. It’s no typical liquor - from its dark inky hue, to the Victorian flagon-style bottle with hooped glass handles (said to mimic the very eyes of the titular colossus itself). Swirling the rum around a glass creates distinctive tentacle-like drips as the rich liquid seeps back to the depths; while the thick, caramel-like taste lingers long after the last sip. You can find bottles of The Kraken in some of Scotland's finest pubs and bars – as well as some far less reputable harbourside taverns. If, however, you would like to win a bottle through courage and ingenuity alone, tell us what page the wee beastie is hiding on, and how YOU would release The Kraken. Head to www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions and answer the above question. Competition closes Mon 3 Dec. Winners will be notified on the day of closing and will be required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. For full terms and conditions, go to www.theskinny.co.uk/ about/terms

Below the thunders of the upper deep Far far beneath in the abysmal sea, His ancient, dreamless, uninvaded sleep The Kraken sleepeth: faintest sunlights flee About his shadowy sides: above him swell Huge sponges of millennial growth and height; And far away into the sickly light From many a wondrous grot and secret cell Unnumbered and enormous polypi Winnow with giant arms the slumbering green. There hath he lain for ages and will lie Battening upon huge seaworms in his sleep, Until the latter fire shall heat the deep; Then once by men and angels to be seen, In roaring he shall rise and on the surface die. – ‘The Kraken’, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, 1830

www.krakenrum.com

November 2012

THE SKINNY 15


player

player

GFT and Filmhouse have joined forces to offer you the chance to stream specially curated films online. Films can be enjoyed at home or on the go for as little as ÂŁ3.99. All you have to do is visit

www.glasgowfilm.org/player or

www.filmhouse.com/player log in, pay and then watch!

16 THE SKINNY

NOVEMBER 2012


clubs

Motor City Electronics

Ahead of the final night in La Cheetah’s series of Detroit celebrations, The Skinny talks to key Motor City players Juan Atkins, Eddie ‘Flashin’’ Fowlkes and Keith Tucker

‘Put your hands up for Detroit.’ This was an appeal fervently heeded by clubbers across Europe during the summer months of 2006, when Fedde Le Grand’s stuttering electro house anthem dominated the airwaves, refusing to die off quietly. Presumptuous as it may be to speculate, it is likely that many of those who fist-pumped to that Matthew Dear-sampling chart hit, did so without quite knowing exactly why they should venerate the city in the title. Yet, being the birthplace of techno, Detroit has long been hallowed turf for those with a passion for underground electronic music. Having held a series of nights billed as Motor City Electronics over the past three months, Glasgow’s La Cheetah Club is set to round things off in impressive fashion by hosting an exclusive debut live performance by the originator of techno, Juan Atkins. Over a career spanning three decades, the prolific producer, DJ, and owner of Metroplex records has set the benchmark high in a city with an embarrassment of musical riches. Releasing seminal records under various aliases including Cybotron, Model 500 and Infiniti, he paved the way for future Detroit artists to develop and expand on both the techno sound and its future-inspired conceptual backdrop. Taking a break from working on his upcoming set, which he tells us will include some new material, Atkins ponders the influence of his hometown. “Detroit has always provided fertile ground for creative ideas going back to the Motown days. There’s just something about the place that I can’t quite put my finger on. It’s such a hard city. It’s not like New York or Chicago or LA, where you have a cosmopolitan vibe. You don’t have the fashion world, the movie world and things like that. You just have plain, gritty Detroit. “It was also one of the first cities to experience the transition into technology, with the emergence of robotics and the automation of the car plants. So we experienced a lot of post-industrial decline in the landscape before most cities in America. But I think there is something about all of this that stimulates creativity in the arts.” The Motown era may in fact provide some clues as to what has made the city’s modern electronic output so distinctive. No doubt, some may find it difficult to associate the legendary label – responsible for releasing hits by the likes of The Supremes, Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye – with the synthesised, ultramodern sounds explored by Juan Atkins and his peers. Yet many electronic artists from Detroit feel that their music shares that same lineage. “The funk and the soul play a part in Detroit,” says Eddie ‘Flashin’’ Fowlkes, ahead of his set at the opening night of La Cheetah’s series. “I want to play what I feel is the heart of Detroit – not so hard, not so soft. You have to remember that the music wasn’t at 130 [beats per minute] when we started off. It wasn’t what kids nowadays think it is, like trance.” Fowlkes has a point. It’s hard, for instance, to ignore the funk flowing from much of Juan Atkins’ early work with Cybotron, most notably on tracks like Cosmic Cars. Though the city’s music has evolved a lot, with a more hard-edged breed of minimalistic techno and a darker strain of electro emerging over time, there is a particular Detroit vibe that has been carried through to this day. For AUX 88’s Keith Tucker, who blitzed his way through the history of electro at La Cheetah in September, his own music developed from the seeds sown by pioneers like Juan Atkins. He stresses that his work should not be confused with any of the countless new genres that seem to be dreamt up continually nowadays. “I was upset at first when electro house came along and people were referring to my stuff as

Juan Atkins

“To   me, our thing is like putting George Clinton in the elevator with Juan Atkins.” Keith Tucker electro house. Not that there’s anything wrong with it, but that’s not what we do. I personally call our style electro-funk. Derrick May used to talk about putting George Clinton and Kraftwerk in an elevator together and seeing what you get. That’s the way we look at it. To me, our thing is like putting George Clinton in the elevator with Juan Atkins.” So, while groundbreaking electronic acts like Kraftwerk no doubt influenced much of the early Detroit material, Juan Atkins and contemporaries such as Eddie Fowlkes, Kevin Saunderson and Derrick May all put a distinctive Motor City stamp on their work which has continued to influence local acts, and indeed producers from around the world, to this day. Even ghettotech, a rapid-fire hybrid of Detroit techno and Miami bass music, shares this quality. “There’s just a certain attitude that you hear in the beats,” explains Brian Jeffries AKA DJ Godfather. “A lot of people outside of Detroit are trying to do ghettotech records and you can really tell the difference. The Detroit stuff is dirty sounding on

purpose. It has to have that Detroit vibe, while still being aggressive, if that makes sense. A lot of people will do a fast ghettotech record and you can tell it’s not from Detroit. It’s lacking that grit and soul to it that you hear in Detroit house and techno music.” It is admiration of this inimitable, gritty quality and a respect for Detroit’s impressive musical legacy that has characterised the Motor City Electronics series. Perhaps most importantly, the series has been defined by its commitment to showcasing influential artists who perhaps don’t have the profile of other Detroit alumni such as Jeff Mills or Richie Hawtin. “There’s the Detroit you know, and then there’s the Detroit you may not know about but really should know,” says La Cheetah’s events coordinator, Grahame Ward. “We wanted to put on a series of guests – particularly people like Eddie Fowlkes, Keith Tucker and DJ Godfather – who have been very influential over the years. These artists are guys who are greatly respected but often don’t get as much attention as they perhaps deserve. We really wanted to hear what their definitive account of this music was.”   For Fowlkes, nights such as these are an important way to commemorate the legacy of his city. “None of us had a blueprint or knew how big it would become. We were just some kids who wanted to make some music,” he explains. “Any time you can celebrate something you did, something that blossomed into a billion dollar business,

Photo: Marie Staggat

Interview: Ronan Martin

it’s cool. Too bad we couldn’t control the billion dollar business. But any time you can celebrate something that you love to do, it’s beautiful.” It’s hard to conceive of a more fitting way to close such a celebratory series than by coaxing an exclusive live set from perhaps the most significant figure in the development of techno music. “From the club’s perspective, the Juan Atkins night is the biggest booking we’ve ever had,” explains Ward. “Juan has a plethora of aliases and he has released outstanding music through all of them. I’m hoping that it will be the best techno night in Glasgow this year, just because of who Juan is and because he is doing something that has never been done before. To have a night like this in a limited capacity club like La Cheetah is mouthwatering really.” Having lit the touch-paper for three decades worth of truly innovative music to explode out of Detroit’s local scene and into the world, and with contemporaries queuing up to sing his praises, Juan Atkins has every reason to feel proud of his legacy. “It’s a really good feeling,” he admits. “If you have an opportunity and you have a gift that can change the world for the better then I think you need to seize that opportunity. Basically, that’s what I did. At the same time, I had no way of knowing how my music would get out into the world or what effect it would have. “I just knew that I was doing something special.”  Motor City Electronics with Juan Atkins, Fri 30 Nov, 11pm, £10 La Cheetah Club, Glasgow

November 2012

THE SKINNY 17


Bukowski Gets Rocked

Belgian post-rock, stunning choreography, an inspired take on the writings of Charles Bukowski – David Hughes Dance tell us about their new production, The Chinaski Sessions Interview: Gareth K Vile

animal collective

Having bubbled under the surface since their 2010 debut album Innerspeaker, Australian psychedelic rockers Tame Impala look ready to boil over with their second offering Lonerism. It finds the quintet still embracing their vintage geek tendencies for seventies experimental rock while branching out within the generous boundaries the genre permits. Meanwhile the plaudits are rolling in thick and fast as this month’s show at the O2 ABC on 3 November approaches. Sweet cosmic coincidence! We’re still picking through the dense sonic landscape of Centipede Hz, the latest studio album from Animal Collective (O2 ABC, 7 Nov). It’s a rawer, looser affair which should translate well to the live arena. The band themselves attest that their normal skewed approach of road-testing über-new material is behind them for now, so enjoy this rare opportunity to catch them playing the hits, such as they are. Sounds good already. What more is there to be said about Motörhead (O2 Academy, 9 Nov)? Well, the legendary heavy rockers, led by the inimitable Lemmy, have released an astonishing twenty albums since their eponymous 1977 debut. As such it’s easy to take the veteran trio, most famous for the eternal Ace of Spades, completely for granted. The only way to remedy such nonchalance is to get your arse down for this sure-to-be-rawking show and pledge (or re-pledge) your allegiance to old Snaggletooth. Hailing from Sweden but sounding genuinely steeped in American woodsy folk and blues, First Aid Kit (O2 ABC, 24 Nov) are nothing if not a beguiling concept. Sisters Klara and Johanna Söderberg are the precocious talents behind the unassuming moniker that brought us this year’s sophomore record The Lion’s Roar. With a previous leg-up from Fleet Foxes, the siblings now look ready to venture out on their own. Dig out your favourite Fair Isle jumper and be there. Having returned with a new album in September after more than a decade apart, college rock favourites Ben Folds Five (O2 Academy, 30 Nov) are cementing their return by embarking on a European tour, with this Glasgow drop-in being their only Scottish date. In the saturated market of reunion shows, Ben and his boys can hold their heads up high having delivered a decent new record while never really going off the boil in the first place. Eat that Stone Roses! [Darren Carle] facebook.com/o2abcglasgow

18 THE SKINNY

November 2012

David Hughes Dance has been a leader in the new wave of companies coming through in Scotland, gaining recognition beyond the traditional audiences and causing controversy through their collaborations with physical theatre maestro Al Seed. The emphasis on communicating ideas or stories, and the drive of artistic director Hughes have made their annual tours of new work hotly-anticipated events. It’s no surprise that they eventually got around to sneaking a peek at masculinity, pulling together a cast of seven men, including Belgian post-rockers I Love Sarah and using the writing of acclaimed misogynist and poet Charles Bukowski as an inspiration. The surprise is that Hughes has commissioned a female choreographer to help the boys blow off steam. Kylie Walters already has a reputation as a “blonde banshee ball breaker” (her quote), and she approached The Chinaski Sessions with few illusions about Bukowski’s attitudes. “I’d read Women by Bukowski and was blown away by the way in which he draws you into his shambolic, alcohol-fuelled and yet highly creative world,” she explains. “You are admirative, disgusted and fascinated in turns.” But rather than using the stories that Bukowski tells of his thinly disguised alterego Chinaski, Walters evokes the atmosphere of an all male environment: “The piece is inspired more by the atmosphere of Chinaski’s flat rather than the poetry or stories of Bukowski per se. I’ve taken the Chinaski reference merely as a springboard to explore masculine behaviour in a rock context.” For associate director and dancer Matt Foster, the piece reflects the company ethos. “The artistic vision is to challenge and redefine the boundaries of dance and physical theatre. Every work we produce must in some way challenge notions of context, what technique really means and certainly to challenge convention,” he says. David Hughes adds: “This time an audience can expect a full on evening of in-your-face, relentless testosterone, you get to the end and go ‘what was that!’” The presence of a live band not only connects The Chinaski Sessions to the rich European choreographic tradition that loves to get the musicians on stage and involved, but marks how the dying ritual of the rock gig is being replaced by more imaginative ways of performing. Like A Band Called Quinn in their recent Biding Time (Remix) show, I Love Sarah are integral to the performance action, and not just a discreet musical bonus. Walters explains. “I am a fan of I Love Sarah – their music, their presence, their humour. I have pretty much based the piece on the band, so they were in the mix right from the beginning.” Some delicate negotiations followed – “I reassured them I would not make them dance!” – Walters dropped the duo into the mix. “Apart from shaping the music for the piece and also integrating the presence of five other guys banging on their cymbals and destroying their cables, the band have quite a lot of text and stage activities to perform. This is pretty new for them.” The alliance between dance and rock has become steadily more potent and imaginative in the past twenty years: from Michael Clark’s groundbreaking use of The Fall in Curious Orange to Iona Kewney’s ‘duets’ with Take A Worm For A Walk Week frontman Joe Quimby, choreography

has invigorated rock’s intelligence while capitalising on its raw energy. “I think this really pulls the show out of the realm of your standard rock gig or dance piece with live music,” Walters continues. Foster is even more enthusiastic. “It doesn’t fall into the conventional realm of dance: this work was created to ‘stomp on the stale ground of contemporary dance.’ What you will see is seven guys putting their guts and soul into eighty minutes of rock-fueled madness.” By concentrating more on the themes of Bukowski’s work, Walters has developed a show that gives space to very masculine behaviour. But this is no eulogy for a lost identity. “What interests me here is that all this male energy is used and channeled to create something – rock,” Walters says. “The band, their mates and hangers on are all male, there are no women in the room. This theatrical foundation provides the stamping ground for a range of male, and sometimes ‘cock rock’ behaviour.” It almost becomes an examination of the relationship between group behaviour and the creative process, says Walters. “Something about the chemistry of hanging out and playing together spurs on a creative act. It’s almost a ritualistic playing out of masculinity in order to access that creative territory. How do men function and create in a group situation? Does a certain setting affect the style of what comes out in the end? This fascinates me.” The Chinaski Sessions may echo many of the trends in modern dance – delightfully, David Hughes Dance has never defined itself as ‘contemporary dance,’ perhaps recognising the phrase as meaningless, and attempting to avoid the connotations of self-conscious posturing, such as the intimate involvement of musicians and the preoccupation with masculinity; but they are a unique proposition. The dancers are always chosen from diverse backgrounds – at least three of the company are known for their own choreography – and are as likely to have roots in hip-hop as ballet. What does define the company is the complete engagement with whatever approach they have taken: previously, it was physical theatre with Al Seed, now, Hughes notes, it is back to “pure dance.” Hughes’ own restless energy – he is still performing, on occasion, Hurricane, an exhausting dance made for him by Christopher Bruce, another choreographic revolutionary – translates into the company’s ferocious attack. Never afraid of pushing boundaries, or courting controversy, their repertoire hints at the potential for dance to leap clear of its ghetto and take its rightful place as the most dynamic artistic medium in Scotland. Refusing to play safe, never getting lost in the abstract beauties of technical perfection but applying technique to the visceral communication of concepts, David Hughes Dance are staking a claim to be regarded as the most important performance troupe north of the border. That isn’t to disrespect other theatre makers – the competition is fierce – but The Chinaski Sessions promises the same immediacy and shock as their 2011 Traverse Fringe production, only this time from a different perspective. The Chinaski Sessions, David Hughes Dance Autumn Tour, various venues, 2-10 Nov www.davidhughesdance.co.uk


music

F E A T U RE S

Following the ambitions of post-rock bands like Mogwai and Godspeed You! Black Emperor towards an oceanic, expansive and orchestrated ecstasy, Swans’ The Seer is a culmination of rock’s yearnings to capture the depth and intensity of a romantic symphony. Garnering international critical acclaim, and establishing leader Michael Gira as one of music’s most visionary performers, The Seer’s success has been consolidated by a series of live shows that see the newly energised band push their fascination with immensity further. The elegant irony that an earlier incarnation of Swans provided inspiration for the likes of Mogwai is emphasised by Gira’s refusal to wallow in nostalgia: “I see no point in trying to rehash old things,” he says. “It keeps you alive, going into uncomfortable areas.” And although Swans have been releasing albums since the early 1980s, Gira spent much of the post-rock era running the Young God record label and producing sinister Americana under the Angels of Light name. Reactivating Swans in 2010 was clearly no attempt to cash in on past glories: although he has reassembled many familiar faces, “It’s not really getting the band back together,” he explains. “Because the band changed over time but I just chose who I think would be useful – and even more importantly, for who they are as people.” Besides, the crushing noise of releases like Cop and Raping a Slave never had the mainstream appeal of other supposedly alternative acts currently churning out their greatest past moments. The continuity of Swans, however, is clear. Gira continues to be concerned with creating immersive sounds and, even down a transatlantic phone line, his quiet confidence and emotional honesty is evident. He is disarmingly polite and uninterested in defining Swans within a wider musical context, even laughing good humouredly at wild attempts to place their use of repetition in a classical context or his lyrics in a spiritual tradition. “I am not a publicist or a music biz person,” he says. “So I just try to be a good artist.” And as

A piece of the sky Michael Gira explains why Swans will always be a work in progress

interview: Gareth K Vile

for comparisons with the American minimalists, he replies: “I don’t know. I don’t think that way when making music. I guess I have a predilection for making music that has a single chord structure. There are all kinds of worlds within a single chord. It’s not like La Monte Young, trying to find an answer...” Perhaps the strongest thread through Gira’s Swans work is the importance of the live experience. If early gigs were notoriously brutal,and

“It   keeps you alive, going into uncomfortable areas” michael gira combative – one bootleg from a joint tour with Sonic Youth has Thurston Moore threatening a disgruntled audience with an all-star Swans/Sonic Youth jam to considerable heckling – Gira named one album, White Light from the Mouth of Infinity after an on-stage experience and the new music is being increasingly shaped by touring. And for Gira himself, “when [a Swans concert] reaches its peak it’s the closest thing I have to spirituality. I have a short time on earth and I want to experience the most intense condensation of reality that I can.” If The Seer fulfilled the promise of return album, 2010’s My Father Will Guide Me Up a Rope to the Sky, the live performances are taking the sound further into the immensity Gira is craving. “Our sets now... last night was two and a half hours. It’s quite ecstatic,” he reflects. “We have half new material, unrecorded, that is slowly morphing through each show, taking on different forms every night and slowly evolving.” Affirming that the band’s sound is increasingly developing through the process of playing live, he is quietly enthusiastic about the reception it

Photo: Alex Woodward

receives. Asked about audiences – now larger and more positive, he replies “That is gratifying. I think that if they have a predilection for what we are doing, they can find it. They want what the music has to offer, and that’s the best thing. They are very open. Well, they have to be for what we do.” And unlike many musicians of similar vintage, Gira is looking towards future development. While he might be reluctant to identify any particular influences, either musical or cultural – “I actually don’t picture myself in anything,” he says. “There are a bunch of things that influence me: daily life, the people I am working with, making shapes out of what is available” – he describes the evolution of the music in concise, direct terms. “We are really trying to explore some grooves now. Particularly with this new material, it’s a new avenue to pursue. It’s enjoyable,” he adds. “I realise it is not a conscious thing – we are not trying to sound like James Brown – although I can’t think of anything better than to sound like James Brown.” Gira is more reticent about explaining his lyrics. The Seer, especially on the title track, hints at a mystical appreciation of the world, but Gira is quick to deny any religious or spiritual agenda. When questioned about a possible theological interpretation of his songwriting – given that he once released a double album called Children of God, it’s not that unreasonable – he pauses. “Well... yeah.. I suppose so.” His good natured chuckle returns. “I guess it is just what I gravitate towards. It’s not a working illustration of studies, or something. It just really engenders itself. When I work on a song, one thing leads to another and it ends up in the form it is. I rarely sit down when writing a lyric and think about what it is about.” There are songs on The Seer that do call for more attention to the words. “Some songs are lyrical and that’s one thing,” he admits. “But when the lyrics are involved in these cosmic escalating crescendos, I think to have a literal descriptive lyric in there makes the music sound smaller. It’s really about finding words that charge the sound, and I have to embody

them as a singer. So when I write words for the bigger pieces, they have to be in the present tense. Writing poetically would tend to be an intrusion.” If the spirituality of Swans is formed not by intention, but the shamanic intensity of performance – again Gira modestly demurs here, observing “I think I am more like a psychedelic clown” – he acknowledges that they echo a very American religious music. “The words are part of it and they inform it. It’s a delicate issue. It’s like in certain American gospel music, where a simple phrase is repeated and keeps building. I tend to gravitate towards that.” While Gira’s modesty may be frustrating for those desperately trying to build an aesthetic justification for Swans’ return, the lack of a grand design is probably what allows the band to chase and capture their majestic fire. When Gira describes himself as “the impresario,” he stresses that the current line up contributes to the visceral impact. “It’s just a physical and psychic and emotional commitment to make the sound live that we do, so the people that are doing it are very important. It’s very challenging.” Clichés about years in the wilderness, or a return to form, can never quite fit Gira’s idiosyncratic career: he has been making intriguing music consistently, and embodies a restlessness that has seen him create melancholic yet bucolic folk against ear-bursting slabs of noise, all informed by both an idiosyncratic humour and seriousness. Yet there is no doubt that Swans are, finally, reaching large audiences who are receptive to Gira’s vision. “We just had a tremendous experience in Poland, at a festival,” he explains. “One of the best shows I have ever been involved in. How many people – maybe twenty, maybe thirty thousand, I don’t know. We headlined one night and Iggy Pop headlined the other. A tremendous amount of people and they seemed to really get it. I think the sound was right – it worked completely, and that was really gratifying.” Swans play The Arches on 16 Nov, the seer is out now www.younggodrecords.com

November 2012

THE SKINNY 19


F E A T U RE S

Season of the Witch

music

With a new feature film and a giant stage production headed for these shores, Rob Zombie talks The Lords of Salem and the touring buddy who wants to kick his ass Interview: Dave Kerr

From Mortiis the cave dwelling goblin to vampire wannabe Dani Filth, shock rock personalities were ten a penny throughout the 90s, but none caught the public imagination quite like the deranged theatricality of Rob Zombie or Marilyn Manson. Zombie, with White Zombie, brought an unusual kind of groovy, muscular, B-movie referencing industrial metal to the mainstream with Astro Creep 2000 in ‘95, perhaps inadvertently preparing MTV’s palette for Manson’s macabre Trent Reznorproduced breakthrough Antichrist Superstar the following year. The two figures’ paths only fleetingly crossed during their ascent, but it’s all change now that their Twins of Evil tour has hit the highways of America, bound for a stop in Glasgow later this month. As The Skinny’s call with Zombie connects while his tour bus hurtles towards Ohio, Manson’s very public threat to “kick his ass” for allegedly eating into his stage time at a gig in Michigan just a few nights before still rings in his ears. Presumably, with no small measure of restraint and diplomacy, he recalls his initial encounter with the self proclaimed ‘God of Fuck.’ “It was a long time ago – back in 1992,” he drawls. “They opened up for White Zombie one time in Florida, but I didn’t watch the show. That was the first time I heard the name. I didn’t know who they were, didn’t know anything about them – I didn’t see them. I met them a couple of years later when they opened

up for Danzig. I was there to see Glenn and they came up to me and introduced themselves. It was just Manson and Twiggy at the time. First impressions? They seemed like they were very excited to be there – that’s how I remember it. When I finally got to hear them I thought they wrote great songs and made great records.” These days, former Manson associates John ‘5’ Lowery and Kenneth ‘Ginger Fish’ Wilson stand by Zombie’s side in the current incarnation of his band. Did common allies help pave the way for a full-blown tour after all this time? “Yeah, but I think John’s a little more my friend these days,” he lets out with a devilish chuckle. “But it’s all good. Actually, John’s been in my band a lot longer than he was ever in Manson’s. I never actually got to see him play with them. I don’t really associate him with them much because when I saw them he wasn’t the guitar player.”     Acknowledging the various intersections that their careers’ trajectories have shared in common and the great tradition of musical rivalries between two contemporaries who operate uncomfortably close to one another’s bread and butter – from The Beatles and Stones to Nas and Jay-Z – it’s tempting to ask whether Zombie ever considered Manson his adversary. “I have a friendly rivalry with the whole world, potentially,” he says with a hearty chuckle. “It’s the same thing with Alice Cooper – we have a friendly rivalry. I think every musician does with each other; I don’t know how

ANDY HOPE 1930 When Dinosaurs Become Modernists

INVERLEITH HOUSE Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh 1 November to 13 January Tuesday to Saturday. 10am–3.30pm Admission Free

www.rbge.ac.uk/inverleith-house

20 THE SKINNY

November 2012

you couldn’t. But never specifically with Manson; that just isn’t my mentality. We’re almost the same age – he’s a little younger than me, so I assume that our influences are similar from the time period. I guess, with me and Manson, we’re into the same vibe but we’re taking it in two different directions.”

“Me   and Manson are into the same vibe, but we’re taking it in two different directions” rob zombie Following his old band’s demise, Zombie proved he could go it alone with 1998’s Hellbilly Deluxe – a worthy successor to Astro Creep, albeit with a bit more pop nous – before refocusing his energy on a film career which made more of his vivid sensibilities as a horror aesthete, most successfully with his gory, backwater serial killer yarn The Devil’s Rejects and a controversial retelling of John Carpenter’s Halloween. Meanwhile, the world stage felt Zombie’s absence as he largely confined touring activity to America, a cycle he broke when he finally returned to tour the UK for the first time in 12 years last

February. “In the past I wouldn’t do music at all while I made a movie,” he admits. “Now I’m trying to keep both alive simultaneously, but it’s a lot more work. Right now, my new movie The Lords of Salem is finished – that’ll be in theatres early next year. I’m working on another movie now – it’s in the early stages while I’m doing this tour. I’m trying to keep everything alive at the same time. The new record’s finished – I just have to finish mixing it. That’ll probably be out around the same time as the movie, actually.” The topic of Zombie’s impending feature is impossible to ignore. Told in the present day but loosely rooted in the hysteria of the Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692, he suggests that the basis has been staring him in the face since childhood. “Truthfully, I grew up in Massachusetts,” he points out. “So I was very aware of the Salem Witch Trials. That was sort of a jumping off point as an idea. The movie, really, is pretty fictitious. I took the idea of those trials, where 20 to 25 innocent people were put to death, and played with the idea that there was another secret group of people that were put to death who were actually witches – they were everything they claimed to be. Making the movie was great – especially shooting in Salem. It’s spectacular; the place just has such a great look. The architecture of the buildings is very specific; the cobblestone streets and the cemeteries – the whole look of the town – really added greatly to the film.” 


ZOMBIE LAYS DOWN HIS FIVE FAVOURITE HORROR SCORES 1. DAWN OF THE DEAD (1978) Even though their contributions are used with stock music, the great Goblin cues really jump out and make for some classic cuts. 2. SUSPIRIA (1977) I really love the Italian stuff, and the score for Suspiria is phenomenal – another particularly memorable example of Goblin’s greatness. The opening theme is as unforgettable as Tubular Bells is in The Exorcist.

A conscientious and meticulous entertainer on the stage as well as the film set, Zombie’s last touring production held nothing back; towering motorised robots and prowling ghouls meshed with chaotic visuals and a pyrotechnics show to rival KISS. Putting the spectacle above the pay cheque, the man himself dubbed carting it around Europe ‘financial suicide.’ “That’s probably what it’ll be again – I’m working on it right now,” he asserts. “We have a massive show and we’re trying to figure out how to get it to you and ship it all over there. We’ll bring the biggest show we physically can – that’s our goal.” And, of course, the God of Fuck will be there too.

3. CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST (1980) Riz Ortolani provides a bizarre soundtrack to the most shocking movie of all time. There’s something very odd about it, I don’t know if I can put my finger on what that is, but it’s a very scary score. From beautiful acoustic cues to sickening electronic sounds, it all works to make you ill.

ROB ZOMBIE AND MARILYN MANSON’S TWINS OF EVIL TOUR COMES TO GLASGOW SECC ON 28 NOV

ALICE ASKS…

4. HORROR OF DRACULA (1958) If you want classic horror movie music look no further than James Bernard’s haunting score for the only Dracula that matters.

Did you ever get in trouble when you were a kid for sneaking out and going to an Alice Cooper concert without your parents’ permission?

PHOTO: CLAIRE TAYLOR

Nope, because it was all done under the cover of darkness, like Jack The Ripper sneaking around Whitechapel – an intricate web of lies leading up to the day of the concert! Remember kids, parents are easy to fool. Spookshow Baby!

5. JAWS (1975) I have to include the only piece of music that ever actually scared me. The great John Williams ruined summer swimming forever.

19 B l a i r S t

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INGRID NILSSON New work 2012 17th November – Christmas Eve

pitchers & promos + live DJ’s every Fri/Sat + SnapFax

15 Howe St, Edinburgh EH3 6TE blogging at www.bonpapillon.com

www.thecitycafe.co.uk

lGT NOVEMBER 2012

THE SKINNY 21


music

F E A T U RE S

Distance and Meaning

Converge’s Jacob Bannon explains why, the older they get, the heavier the Massachusetts hardcore kings become interview: Ross Watson In the twenty-plus years since their inception, Converge have retained their status as one of the most relevant and respected bands in modern metal. Vocalist, lyricist and visual artist Jacob Bannon started the band with fellow member Kurt Ballou when they were still teenagers. He has remained immersed within hardcore subculture for most of his life, but as he chats about the Massachusetts quartet’s eighth album All We Love We Leave Behind – another nuanced aural assault which blends beauty with brutality – it’s clear that he remains self-aware, opinionated, and firmly grounded to this day. There’s a distinct lack of cynicism surrounding Converge’s legacy. A rarity in the genre, they’re almost universally lauded by spectators of recent developments in guitar music, from earlier compilation Petitioning the Empty Sky through 2001 opus Jane Doe right through to their most recent work. Bannon, however, tries not to concern himself too much with outside perceptions of his work. Upon commending him on the release of the new record in relation to its highly positive reception, he responds with caution: “I don’t know if it’s something to be congratulated – that’s not the goal for us, but we feel positive when it happens. It’s not necessarily for the feedback; it’s the fact that we still do what we do. We haven’t changed our approach to writing music, why we do it or why we put everything we have into it.” When asked to explain why he hesitates to engage with outside opinion of the band, Bannon promptly justifies why he tends to keep himself at a distance: “When you start caring about those things, you start writing music for those people. You start writing music for critics, or to be perceived in a certain way. There’s already an internal struggle when you’re writing songs and writing music; you’re trying to make it measure up to your own standards. To allow someone else’s opinion sway what you do would just be band suicide. You see that a lot – bands who start caring too much about record sales or whatever, feeding their ego. They forget the reason why they’re there;

22 THE SKINNY

November 2012

the reason is just to write and play. The intention should never be anything more than that.” Still, journalists remain an occasional source of amusement for Bannon: “It’s funny,” he starts, “I saw an interview piece I did the other day. Someone basically said ‘Hey, they’re kind of going through a mid-life crisis!’ No we’re not! If writing emotional songs means we’re in a mid-life crisis, we’ve been in a mid-life crisis since we were 14 years old.” Converge have always been poetic, emotional and dramatic in their approach to writing music, All We Love We Leave Behind is no different. “They’re all soul-searching records – they always have been,” Bannon affirms. “The longer we live, the heavier things can get emotionally. You hear that in a musician – if somebody’s just playing guitar, the way that they play at 18 can be completely different from how they’re playing at 35. They may be playing the same riff, but it’s played with a different kind of soul. I think you hear that in our band at this point.” Recognising the significance of Converge’s longevity, he remarks: “A lot of bands, especially when they age, lose steam, you know? They lose the connection with the angst and the turbulence in their lives that compels them to make heavy music. There’s a disconnect; we’ve never had that disconnect. We feel like heavy music can evolve as you evolve and as you grow; it can evolve as you become more complex, darker. It has more shades of you in it.” Last album, 2009’s Axe to Fall, featured contributions from members of grindcore vets The Red Chord, experimental mathcore trio Genghis Tron and sludge kings Neurosis. All We Love We Leave Behind, on the other hand, is entirely the band’s own work. “We’re always reactionary,” says Bannon. “We don’t really think about it too much. I think there was about two sentences said about it. It’s always a natural thing. We don’t overly plan what we do and how we do it. That comes from the songwriting and why we’re creating together. We were like ‘Hey, let’s just do this one ourselves,’

and got excited about it. We don’t over-think things, and we’re not that meticulous about that aspect of what we do. We’re meticulous about everything else.” Guitarist and producer Kurt Ballou has described the new record as Converge’s “singles” collection. Bannon offers some insight into this: “Each song is self-contained. When we were coming up with a track sequencing for the record it took a lot of effort. We had, like, eleven different sequences that we were trying out. We ultimately came to a scientific and emotional decision to go with the one that we did.” When asked whether he sees

“If   writing emotional songs means we’re in a mid-life crisis, we’ve been in a mid-life crisis since we were 14 years old” jacob bannon a recurrent theme in the record from his own personal point of view, Bannon offers: “All of the albums are individual songs with personal stories intertwined within them. There’s no overall concept or anything – that’s for bands that want to write about space and things. People tend to add their own narratives outside of that, and they can’t really control it – that’s just what listeners do when they connect with music.” Bannon’s artwork for All We Love – various Converge visuals cut-and-pasted onto the Lunar phases – has sparked similar kinds of readings: “It’s just a metaphor for time and time passing,” he offers. “I think it complemented the title quite well and was a nice juxtaposition to the rest of the packaging of the record. The rest of the art is very

vibrant and very explosive, so I wanted a ‘calm before the storm’ kind of moment to lead you into this deep, textural music. It just made sense, it connected with me, and it seems to be connecting with people in different ways. A lot of people interpret it as a negative cover that symbolises death. That’s them putting a narrative on it, not me. It’s interesting to see how people interpret those things.” By now, Converge are notorious for their raw approach to recording and performing: their albums make minimal use of studio effects, constantly aspiring towards more of a ‘live’ sound with each record. Bannon thinks they’ve gotten perpetually closer to that goal with every LP, but doesn’t think he’ll ever be fully content: “That’s part of why our sound evolves the way it does. When a band is playing live, you’re dealing with so many other senses around you. You’re dealing with crowd, the heat of the venue, the volume of the P.A. and the acoustics of the room – even the size of the person standing in front of a speaker, you know, that changes everything.” As well as his work with Converge, Bannon earns his living as a visual artist for other bands. He also co-owns Deathwish Inc, a symbol of quality for enthusiasts of challenging yet rewarding heavy music since 1999, which has recently released music by a diverse range of forward-thinking bands including Birds in Row, Touché Amoré, Loma Prieta and Deafheaven. Yet Bannon is modest and humble about the label’s ethos: “We’re just a few people. I started the label with my best friend Tre McCarthy who used to work with Converge, tour-managing us. It started in my house, now we have a building. It’s a good thing. My wife’s been doing the mail order for eight years, managing the online store aspect of things. It’s a small operation, but we just have a passion for music that we find to be interesting within the independent and abrasive community.” Playing Classic Grand, Glasgow on 28 Nov All We Love We Leave Behind is out now on Epitaph www.convergecult.com


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A TASTE ADVENTURE SCOTS LOVE a good adventure. Alexander Mackenzie was the first European to reach the Pacific, Mark Beaumont rode a bike all the way around the globe, and Scott of the Antarctic went to... the Antarctic. Now you can go on an adventure of your very own – A Taste Adventure, with Ginger Grouse, the new alcoholic ginger beer flavoured with a splash of The Famous Grouse whisky. So gather a crew, and plot your course for a glorious taste adventure. EDINBURGH First up is The Blackbird in Tollcross, pairing quirky furniture and stylish touches with some traditional elements and a cracker of a beer garden. It is therefore the perfect place to gauge the weather for the rest of your adventure. Second is Teuchters in the West End, boasting an incredible range of whiskies, beers, and of course Ginger Grouse. Behind the bar, there is a handy definition of exactly what a ‘teuchter’ is, which will come in useful for those whose adventuring takes them north. The first thing to know is that it’s pronounced ‘chooch-ter’, but this bar will help you find out the rest. Next, move through the West End to Lothian Road, and the Red Squirrel. It’s stylish, lively, and manages the same trick as Ginger Grouse in combining tradition with modern touches. It’s also next door to the HMV Picturehouse, so it’s great for a pre-gig drink before the latest travelling bands from across the world arrive in town. From here it’s just a short walk around the side of Edinburgh Castle and down the Royal Mile to Bar Kohl. It’s a steep climb, so you’ll be pleased to hear that Bar Kohl is both comfy and modern once you get there. There’s a quality food menu if you’re feeling peckish after all your trekking around, and a whole host of cocktails on offer alongside the Ginger Grouse. Your next stop is Bannerman’s, in the subterranean Cowgate. A ‘proper pub’, with bands in the back room almost every night and a great crowd of regulars out front, it’s a great place to kick back and recharge the batteries after all that walking. The final stop is at the very foot of the Royal Mile, at Holyrood 9A. Your taste adventure culminates by a roaring fire around big, old tables in a

laid-back and relaxed atmosphere, with Ginger Grouse on hand as your reward. If none of that takes your fancy, then stay central and plot a course through Montpelier’s host of bars, from Indigo Yard in the West End to Opal Lounge and Candy Bar on George Street, all of which can help you on your Ginger Grouse journey. GLASGOW For those of you in Glasgow, start by setting a course for Òran Mór in the West End. Òran Mór and the Ginger Grouse have a bit in common, as they both are thoroughly modern and up-to-date once you get inside. Always a hive of activity with gigs, theatre and a great regular crowd, this is the ideal spot to begin your Ginger Grouse journey. The second stop on your itinerary is Lebowskis on Argyle Street. It seems fitting that our taste adventure takes us to the pub named for one of the most reluctant adventurers in cinema, but you’re unlikely to be troubled by abusive bowlers or German nihilists here. Just a fun atmosphere, a great location, and Ginger Grouse. The Dude would love it. After Lebowskis, it’s a short hop to Driftwood. Driftwood The vaguely Mexican logo in the doorway is a sign of the light-hearted approach of Driftwood, and also a sign that the Ginger Grouse fits right in. Limes are a huge part of the Mexican food and

drink, so you will fit right in with your Ginger Grouse served over ice and lime. It gives it the extra edge. To finish your Glasgow taste adventure, head over to Metropolitan in the Merchant City. At the end of your adventure, the quirky and exciting design and the historic location in the heart of the city will make your voyage seem well worth it. We’re sure that the refreshing Ginger Grouse will help as well. FALKIRK And for the really adventurous, why not leave the twin cities and head to Falkirk? Behind the Wall serves up Ginger Grouse in a relaxed and fun setting, and is the ideal place between Edinburgh and Glasgow to meet up and plot further taste adventures.

INDIGO YARD METROPOLITAN DRIFTWOOD

LEBOWSKIS

HOLYROOD 9A

BEHIND THE WALL

BANNERMANS

THE BLACKBIRD TEUCHTERS

BAR KOHL RED SQUIRREL

ÒRAN MÓR

NOVEMBER 2012

THE SKINNY 23


24 THE SKINNY

November 2012


music

Here, My Dear

After enduring a year of hell, rapper Buck 65 is back on tour, and preparing a new album of cold electronic beats and surreal, Dadaist lyrics Interview: Bram E. Gieben

Richard ‘Buck 65’ Terfry’s career in hip-hop spans nearly a quarter of a century. The Canadian rapper, producer and DJ is incredibly prolific, with more than thirteen albums to his name, including more than a few classics. Lionised by independent and major labels which range through Anticon and Strange Famous to Warner, with whom he has been releasing albums since 2002, he is relentlessly experimental in his approach to music, fearless of taking in everything from folk and blues to punk, electronica and “classic 70s rock ballads” and applying it to his mercurial understanding of hip-hop. This year, wounds still healing as a result of his recent divorce from ex-wife and former collaborator Claire Berest, he returns to the fray with an honest, intense, surreal and emotionally-driven album, many tracks on which will be “wildly unlike anything I’ve ever done before,” according to Terfry himself. “It’s looking like it’s going to be a pretty heavy record,” he explains almost apologetically, stating in no uncertain terms that it is about his recent divorce. “Not only did I feel the need to express that in the lyrics of the songs on the record, I also wanted to find a way to convey the feeling of the last year of my life in the music,” he explains. “I really wanted to create a sense of a lot of empty space, as a pretty straightforward metaphor for the state of things in the last year or so. I also wanted it to sound kind of cold. So it’s largely electronic.” This is something of a departure for Buck 65; he usually works with sampled drums, or on occasion a live drummer: “I wanted to keep that part of it as cold as I could, and to keep a lot of it pretty sparse, to create that sense of empty space,” he explains. “I think a lot of it is really going to surprise people.” Working with producers such as Anticon’s Alias on one track, and with electronica producers Marten Tromm and Sunclef on a host of others, Terfry has embraced the genre of ‘future beat,’ mentioning Tame Impala, J-Dilla, Flying Lotus, Madlib and Flaming Lips’ producer Dave Fridmann

as big influences. The record was brought to completion under the guidance of esteemed producer Dean Nelson, who has worked with everyone from Jamie Liddell and Beck to Thurston Moore and Stephen Malkmus. The album also features drums from Justin Peroff of Broken Social Scene. His wife’s departure took its toll on Terfry: “It was almost as if I was... I don’t want to say helpless, but... I had to make a list of things to do, and it would include basics like: ‘Eat. Bathe. Brush your teeth.’ I’d put all those things on a list, and then keep the list in my hand and go about that as though that was my work for the day, my duties. Something that I could focus on to just keep me on the rails as best I could. I wouldn’t get off the couch or out of bed all day, and would just spiral deeper and deeper. Eventually, I knew I had to do something with all the ways I was feeling.” The process of creating art from such intense emotions was taxing: “What I was doing was almost forcing myself to keep my own head held underwater,” Terfry explains. “I was forcing myself to spend lots of intense time with something that was very painful. When you write about something, you’re staring it down. Submerging yourself in it.” Eventually, this process paid off. When Terfry completed a demo, “this powerful feeling would sweep over me,” he says. “The terrible feelings would be overtaken by a feeling of: ‘Holy shit, that’s strong stuff. That’s really good.’ And then I would actually have a day when I would feel good! It was a pretty rare occurrence. The first good day I had after my wife left was when that started to happen.” He started recording new songs, most of which will remain exclusively on his SoundCloud page, rather than featuring on the new album. One of these songs was “crowd-sourced” via Twitter: “I posted up a message to my followers saying: ‘What would you want to hear in a song? Give me ideas, and I’ll incorporate as many of them as possible.’ I got hundreds of responses... I barely had to write the thing at all. It was like a giant mountain of words and phrases and... stuff. I just kind of wove it together and then posted it up a few hours later. So those tracks were mostly there just to try

and prevent me from losing my mind.” One massive project that went almost unremarked in the mainstream media was Buck 65’s release of three free albums under the names Dirtbike Vols. 1-3. Featuring collaborations with artists such as fellow Canadian rapper / producer Cadence Weapon, they showcased Terfry’s trademark experimental hip-hop in a raw, unrestrained form. “As simple and as scrappy as they are – and they’re pretty shitty recordings, I just made them at home, I did them without a budget – I really like those records a lot,” he recalls. “When I sat down to make them, I had one simple idea in mind, which was to try to create something which would be failure-proof.”

“They   all thought that I had completely lost my mind...” Richard Terfry, aka Buck 65 His solution: Dirtbike. “I thought okay, before I go into this, before I even sit down to write, I’m going to decide that I’m not going to try and sell it, and I’m not going to offer it up to the press in any way. I’m not going to hire a publicist to push it, whatever else,” he explains. “I was just going to let it exist, and if anyone was interested, it would be there. It’s not going to feel like anyone has wasted their time or money by listening to this – it’s just there if they want it.” This was tremendously liberating: “It had a completely different, deeper, more subtle psychological effect on me,” he continues. “I wasn’t second guessing anything that I did, whatsoever. It felt like something I wanted to do, and I just went ahead and did it. This was basically the most self-indulgent thing that I had ever done.” Rather than creating a bloated, over-elaborate mess, the result was pure, uncut Buck 65: “If somebody is interested in your art, no matter

what you do, whether you’re making music or something else – that’s kind of what you want,” he says, warming to his topic. “You don’t want the creative process to be polluted by outside factors. You don’t want someone who’s making a painting to be already thinking about selling it, or thinking about what art critics might say about it. You want them to express themselves as purely as they can.” Beyond the release of his forthcoming new album, Terfry has literary ambitions – currently working on the second draft of a novel, which he hopes to publish in 2014. He’s still flirting with the idea of trying his hand at filmmaking too: “I can already imagine some aspiring filmmaker reading this and rolling their eyes and thinking, ‘Oh brother, here’s another person from a completely different world who thinks they can walk in and just do this without going to school for it,’ y’know?” he says. “I would love to experiment a little bit, try my hand at it and see where it could go. In fact, over the past few years, film has been as much if not of greater interest to me than music or writing or anything else.” Far from moving away from music, he still sees it as a vital, inescapable part of his life: “I don’t have enough of an ego to assume that I will keep on building my audience, making it larger and larger until the day I die. I assume it will peak at some point. Maybe it already has. And then it will just kind of dwindle away to nothing again, but I will always be making music.” For Terfry, music is “something I need so I don’t end up jumping out of a window.” It’s an escape, a purpose, a calling, and one that he has always embraced: “Maybe one day I’ll be an old man with a bad back, bent over a desk somewhere, still pounding out music.” Thankfully, that day still seems very distant indeed. Buck 65 is back – and what didn’t kill him has made him that much stronger. Read the full-length interview with Buck 65 on our website. Buck 65 plays King Tut’s on 11 Nov; the release date for his as yet untitled new album has not yet been announced Check out his exclusive Soundcloud tracks at soundcloud.com/buck65. For a taste of the new album www.buck65.com

November 2012

THE SKINNY 25


books

THE CULTURE: A BEGINNER’S GUIDE

It's about time 'Scotland's Culture and Listings Magazine' considered The Culture. The fascinating society from Iain M Banks' series of science fiction novels, that is. It's been going for 25 years now, so here is a 25-point guide for beginners WORDS: KEIR HIND

ILLUSTRATION PEDRO MARTINEZ

1. First, the basics. The Culture is Banks’ fictional intergalactic civilisation, and it can be vaguely described as an anarchist utopia in space. He’s published ten Culture books, beginning with Consider Phlebas in 1987, with the latest, The Hydrogen Sonata, hitting the shops right now. The books all take place in a shared Universe rather than forming a continuing story. 2. Banks notably writes all of his science fiction novels using the name Iain M Banks. The M stands for Menzies, which is his middle name. Sort of. Not on official documentation, because his dad somehow managed to leave it off the birth certificate, but the family continued using it in any case. Whatever this may say about naming law, it does seem appropriate that Banks publishes science fiction under a non-existent name. 3. Gigantic trans-galactic civilisations are pretty common in sci-fi – see ‘The Empire’ in Star Wars. However, while the point of The Empire was effectively that it would get defeated in a final conflict (which involved lightning hands and teddy bears with spears, which seems odd looking back) The Culture is a permanent fixture. When he does Q&A sessions, Banks is asked whether we’ll ever see a book that either describes the start or end of The Culture, almost more than he’s asked ‘where do you get your ideas from’. His answer is the same:

26 THE SKINNY

NOVEMBER 2012

Nope. It’s here to stay, and he’s not going to be tempted to change that. 4. With that said, Excession (the fifth Culture book) depicts a situation where The Culture does come under threat when a mysterious, gigantic sphere appears on the edge of Culture Space, and appears to be older than the Universe. The Culture’s Minds investigate – and by ‘Minds’ we here mean the term used for the massive hyperintelligent computers that usually inhabit their own spaceships, and play a large part in ‘governing’ The Culture, in as much as it is governed. This is as close, Banks has said, as he’s ever going to get to ending The Culture. 5. Though The Culture novels are not one continuing saga, they do progress roughly chronologically. Each new book doesn’t always take place after all the others, but there’s been a rough and gradual, two steps forward, one step back kind of progression so far. So the fact that there have been five books written since Excession should hint at whether The Culture ended there or not. 6. The new Culture novel, The Hydrogen Sonata, does allude to the start and the end of intergalactic civilisations, when a civilisation called The Gzilt, that helped set up The Culture, but backed out of joining it in the end, decides to ‘sublime’, which is to ascend to another, formless, plane of existence.

The Culture generally regards this step suspiciously – in fact, sci-fi in general views ‘subliming’ warily. David Tennant’s last episode of Doctor Who showed the Time Lords attempting to do this, but being stopped by The Doctor, because it would end time. This would make this a curiously mainstream suspicion. 7. The Gzilt decide to sublime by holding a referendum. The Culture novels haven’t alluded to contemporary politics in any specific way in the past, so this probably isn’t a comment on Scottish Independence. Probably. 8. The beginning of The Culture, for readers, was in Consider Phlebas, where the protagonist, Horza, is actually working against them. He’s a mercenary working for the Idirans, a competing, and religious, intergalactic civilisation The Culture is at war with. A curious way to begin the series, but the book is very accessible. It's often suggested that the second book, The Player of Games, is a better introduction to reading the series, but Consider Phlebas is greatly enjoyable and certainly no barrier to entry. 9. Consider Phlebas includes descriptions of the relationships between people and computers in The Culture that are very important to the series as a whole. The Minds are of course massively more intelligent than individual people, but each sentient being is afforded the same rights. People are more numerous than Minds, though, and so the very intelligent amongst them can sometimes solve problems that elude The Minds, a process Banks describes as ‘sleight of neuron’. This annoys The Minds. 10. In broad terms, computer intelligence in science fiction either regards itself as beyond biological life forms and becomes antagonistic – see HAL9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey – or runs everything and keeps people, like pets. The Culture bridges this gap with Minds that have individual personalities, often of the rational humanist type, and who have decided to value biological beings with sentient minds. More than just value, they get on with people, people get on with them, and so it goes in The Culture.

“Banks’ notion that only the periphery of The Culture is dramatically interesting is a good working approach, but I’m going to say he’s wrong” 11. ‘People’ are not earth-humans as such, but humanoid beings. The differences from earthhumans are that humanoid citizens of The Culture have evolved themselves biologically. They now have better sex lives, they have improved immune systems to the point where they can re-grow severed limbs, they can produce their own (potent, but non-addictive) drugs through glands in their body, and they can even change sex at will, though that does take time. 12. Gurgeh, the title character and protagonist of The Player of Games has never changed sex, which is considered slightly unusual. However, he’s a genius at the sort of strategy games Banks likes to play, and occasionally write about – a game called Damage features in Consider Phlebas, and crossing over to Bank’s ‘straight’ books, Cameron Colley in Complicity is hooked on a computer game called Despot, which is basically Civilisation 2, which Banks was addicted to at one point. This is why Gurgeh is recruited for a special mission to a games-obsessed planet. 13. Who recruits Gurgeh? The Culture has an agency of sorts called Contact, which deals with contacting other, usually slightly less advanced, civilisations, to see if they want to assimilate with The Culture. Usually they do. A more extreme branch of Contact is Special Circumstances, who play a large part in Banks’s novels, though they’re


only a small part of The Culture as a whole. 14. Banks has said that since The Culture is so balanced a society, it wouldn’t be that interesting to set a book inside its heart, because there’s not enough conflict. So the books tend to be about the periphery of The Culture. 15. Inversions is only debatably a Culture Novel, because the Culture is only alluded to. The book is set on an alien planet that The Culture, and almost certainly Special Circumstances, is involved with, but it’s not explicit how or why they’re doing this, in a way that makes it possible to read the book without noticing The Culture at all. It remains a good book, but it’s not the one to start with if you want to get into the Culture Novels. 16. A book that is undeniably a Culture Novel is Matter, which builds up to a specific Special Circumstances mission to the centre of a shell world, a planet with many different levels inside. 17. Banks' notion that only the periphery of The Culture is dramatically interesting is a good working approach, but I’m going to say he’s wrong. Any time his novels reference events in The Culture itself, they’re pretty fascinating – in The Player of Games Gurgeh has an old cast-iron cannon that he fires into a nearby lake, largely just because he can, which is pretty appealing. In Surface Detail, there’s an account of Culture citizens realising they can fix up anti-gravity oxygen bubbles to… well, anything they want, and then fly, for example, houses around in space. Also pretty appealing. 18. All of this lovely nonsense is completely justifiable by the fact that The Culture is a post-scarcity society. Meaning they’ve discovered how to produce matter and energy, so it won’t ever run out. That’s quite necessary for utopian conditions. 19. It also means The Culture has abandoned living on planets, preferring instead to construct Orbitals, gigantic structures that run round the entire orbit of a star. They’re mostly geo-formed to be covered in earth-like terrain too, rather than being cold, metal, constructs. 20. At the start of the Idiran War, the Idirans unexpectedly attacked The Culture by destroying

enough of some Orbitals to loosen the rest of the structures, which then went flying through space, killing the people on them, who didn't expect these kinds of attacks. This is one disadvantage of living in such an advanced society. 21. The Culture’s advanced technology and intelligence eventually engineers a complete victory over the Idirans. This is one advantage of living in such an advanced society. In Look to Windward – which is related to Consider Phlebas in that it concerns this war, and in that both titles come from Eliot’s The Waste Land – one of the major characters is composing music to commemorate the anniversary of the war’s end. 22. The Minds don’t compose music; if they did, it’d be much too incredibly perfect. And so they���re not allowed to, by common consensus. This said, the Minds are fully formed personalities, and they, like the rest of the Culture, do pursue fun. They just don’t do it in ways that would detract from the endeavours of other Culture citizens. 23. An idea of how much of a sense of humour Banks ascribes to the Minds can be seen in the names they choose for their own spaceships. These names are justly admired by the readers of The Culture novels. Some examples are the ships Pure Big Mad Boat Man, Poke It With A Stick, No More Mr Nice Guy, Just Read The Instructions, Of Course I Still Love You, Very Little Gravitas Indeed, Well I Was In The Neighbourhood, Appeal To Reason, Anything Legal Considered, and the very in-jokey Eight Rounds Rapid. 24. Very In-Jokey could be a ship name in itself. 25. A debatable point, but let’s go for it: Banks’ Culture, and sci-fi novels as a whole have been more consistently excellent than his ‘straight’ novels. A theory I’ll advance is that his ‘normal’ books have had greater highs as well as greater lows, but the space-based tales have definitely achieved a higher average. Well, kind of sort of definitely (another ship name there). Feel free to read them and argue the point.  The Hydrogen Sonata is out now, published by Orbit, cover price £20

November 2012

THE SKINNY 27


Carry on Killing

film

Ben Wheatley was kind enough to take some time out from editing new picture A Field In England to be quizzed by The Skinny on this month’s Sightseers, and what he’s got coming up next Interview: Chris Fyvie

Witty, urbane and with a dark streak a mile wide, 40-year-old Brighton-based writer-director Ben Wheatley has made an auspicious start to his filmmaking career. Beginning in TV with Modern Toss and Time Trumpet, he then made a splash with his micro-budget directorial feature debut Down Terrace, then cemented his reputation with last year’s excellent Kill List. What makes him stand out from the genre crowd is that he manages to retain the idiosyncrasies of British character and culture while still delivering the Kensington Gore. Wheatley’s latest film is Sightseers, a murderous road movie following a seemingly benign couple who go on a killing spree around various Midlands landmarks and museums. Written by co-stars Steve Oram and Alice Lowe, Sightseers is a similarly dark tale to Wheatley’s previous films, albeit with a greater emphasis on laughs. A need to lighten the load somewhat, and to ensure a variety to his work, appears to have been on the agenda for the director from the off. “Yeah, I got offered it before Kill List, and I knew that Kill List was about to happen, and I kind of thought that I definitely wanted to do a comedy after doing a horror film,” explains Wheatley. “That’s why I took it really; and that I knew Alice and Steve, and I’d actually seen the short film version that they’d done [with the same characters], so I kind of knew what the project was. And, when I began making films I always wanted to make sure that I didn’t end up doing the same thing again and again, if that was possible.” Filming someone else’s material for the first time, Wheatley seems to have hit the jackpot in colluding with likeminded artists. Oram and Lowe were also happy to collaborate, and the presence of Wheatley’s spouse and Kill List co-writer Amy Jump on the writing team helped add familiarity to

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November 2012

the project. “Amy did a pass on the script, so it was kind of tailored to the kind of stuff that would fit with the way that we’ve been working,” he says. “The script itself is very well represented on-screen. The improv stuff is extensions of those scenes – not a massive amount of new scenes, because it would be very difficult to work like that. You can’t just trawl about making stuff up randomly. But we would find locations, and we would make up extra scenes within those spaces.” Wheatley is particularly enthusiastic about these heritage sites, as evident both on-screen and in our conversation about their scouting. “The locations had come from a trip that Alice and Steve had done – a kind of research trip – a year or so ago. And the actual locations had been found by Steve’s dad, Eddie Oram, who knew the area really well all around the Midlands and up to the Lake District. He basically designed all that and said, you know, you want to go to the Pencil Museum, and the Tram Museum, and things like that.” The Pencil Museum holds one of the standout moments in the film, which could have been played to belittle the eccentric attraction. “I think it could’ve easily been that. You know, taking the piss out of those places, but I have an absolute affection for them. The comedy is about the characters, not the places. But, I mean, even the Pencil Museum is a really interesting place, you know… but there is something funny about a giant pencil.” The comedy of the characters is crucially juxtaposed with the full human effect of the couple’s crime spree. “You need to see the aftermath of what they’ve been doing. If you don’t, then somehow the filmmakers condone it, you know?” This is a doctrine Wheatley clearly sticks to, as evident

by his body of work. “You don’t collude with the characters to say, ‘it’s okay to murder people.’ And you give the evidence to the audience to make their own decision, and then they can feel like, y’know, they like the characters, and they feel that they’ve got a point, but they also understand that what they do is wrong, and, if you don’t show that stuff, you’re basically saying that what they’re doing is right, and it’s not. It’s a bit like when you see The A-Team, isn’t it? They machine-gun loads of people, or barns explode and then people stagger out afterwards. It’s a very strange message, isn’t it? Because you’re saying that it’s alright to shoot at people, cause they won’t die. I don’t think that’s right!”

“The   Pencil Museum is a really interesting place, you know… but there is something funny about a giant pencil” Ben Wheatley The marriage of comedy and horror seems set to continue with Wheatley’s upcoming projects. Along with A Field In England, the filmmaker has been keeping busy by directing a segment of highly-anticipated horror portmanteau The ABCs of Death, and beginning work on the decidedly John Carpentery sounding Freakshift, where hunters defend a world overrun with grizzly monsters.

With a slated budget of $15 million, it’s a dramatic upping of the financial stakes for his team. “We’re in a kind of pre-pre-production mode at the moment, so we’re doing storyboards and designing creatures and starting to think about the casting of it, so, y’know, it’s pottering along. But it’s such a big movie for us, so it’s kind of going to take a bit more time to get together than the usual.” The ABCs of Death is something Wheatley is clearly excited about too: “I met up with Tim League, who’s one of the producers on it – he’s the guy who runs the Alamo Drafthouse in Texas, and he runs Fantastic Fest. Fantastic Fest gave Down Terrace, my first film, its first showing, and they really championed it, and we won some awards there; basically, I owe quite a lot to Tim. So, I ran into him in Cannes, and he went, ‘D’you wanna do The ABCs of Death?’ and I was like, ‘Yeah, okay. Whatever.’ The one we did was a kind of a vampire thing, and I just got the feeling I possibly will never get to make a vampire film, cause it’s kind of been so done. But I still wanna do one, y’know,” he says with a laugh. “So, I got my chance to make a little version of it.” And what of A Field In England, which seemingly came together in practically a matter of days? “It’s a period film set during the English Civil War, and it’s got Michael Smiley in it, Reece Shearsmith, Peter Ferdinando and Richard Glover, who’s in Sightseers. Ryan Pope’s in it, who’s one of the guys I worked with on Ideal, who’s really brilliant, and Julian Barratt’s in it as well, and it’s kind of like a… it’s a period movie meets a Roger Corman psychedelic movie. So there’s a lot of mushroom taking in it. And magic.” Sounds a suitable marriage of genres and good old-fashioned British weirdness to continue his current rich vein of form. Sightseers is released 30 Nov by StudioCanal


books

Books: One Whole Week of Them

The Hippodrome Ambassadors proudly present

Monster Day

Book Week Scotland will take place from 26 Nov to 2 Dec, during which time hundreds (literally hundreds) of events will take place. Some even look pretty good too. Here’s a brief selection of some we like the look of

A day of classic, cult and new films... with added grrr and arrgh!

Saturday 17th Nov 2012

Hippodrome, Bo’Ness

words: Johnny Chess

. 11.00

KING KONG + SHORT- PG)

. 15.30 Masterclass - cert tbc with Grabbers screenwriter Kevin Lehane))

. 19.00 . 21.30

Grabbers - 15

Red Carpet Preview

)

The Wicker Man

- 15)

Tickets: £5.85 / £4.55 conc. (‘King Kong’ only £2.25) Monster Day Deal: 20% off when you buy for two or more events/screenings (subject to availability)

Photo: Kasai!!

Advance booking recommended! 01324 506850

But first, the suggested programme highlights are: (a) The launch of a book called My Favourite Place, which is a collection of pieces about people’s favourite places. There are contributions from Alexander McCall Smith, Alasdair Gray and Michael Palin, as well as the general public, and the book will be given away free. So there’s that. (b) The Reading Hour will take place on 11am on St Andrew’s Day, where various readings will take place at that time, and people will be encouraged to read for that hour. Why? I’ve no idea. (c) The Mitchell Library in Glasgow will host a series of events on 1 November, author talks, workshops and debates. This will probably be worth a look. The author events will be the best, specifically in this case because authors are going to places they don’t often visit. Alan Massie will be giving a talk on crime and literary novels at Balloch Library (28 Nov), Janice Galloway will be talking about her work at Dumbarton Library (26 Nov) and then at Lionacleit Community Library in Benbecula (29 Nov), Iain (M) Banks will be appearing at Loch Leven Library (27 Nov), while James Robertson will be appearing in Uddingston Library (28 Nov) but not before an event at St Giles Cathedral on the Royal Mile (27 Nov). And William McIllvanney will be appearing at Dalmuir Library on the 29 November, but I’m keeping that apart since that isn’t a place he doesn’t often visit. His appearance before was a successful one (if you ask my Dad, who attended). Crime writers are well represented, with Caro Ramsay appearing in Menstrie (26 Nov) and then Rothesay (28 Nov), Chris Brookmyre at the Central Library in Greenock (26 Nov), Gordon Ferris and Tony Black in a joint event at Newton Mearns Library (29 Nov), Denise Mina going out to Beith Library (27 Nov), and Val McDermid probably travelling furthest, to the Orkney Library in Kirkwall (29 Nov).  All of the above are free events (though interestingly, when Val McDermid appears in her home town of Kircaldy on 28 November, you’ll need to buy your ticket – they’ll be paying on the streets of Raith, then). Some of the events are more than just single

author talks though. Edwin Morgan will be celebrated in events featuring his biographer, James McGonigal, and George Burt of the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra, on whose latest CD Morgan appears, first at the William Patrick Library in Kirkintilloch (28 Nov), and then for the CD’s official launch at the CCA (29 Nov). Alan Bissett will team up with Ewan Morrison and Doug Johnstone for An Evening with Cargo Publishing at Port Glasgow Library (29 Nov), while Gutter Magazine are putting on an event at the CCA (27 Nov) featuring the much-admired American wordsmith David Vann alongside the usual strong bill of Scottish writers. The entertaining sounding Dragon’s Pen event at the Scottish Women’s Library (29 Nov) will feature a panel, including Laura Marney and Kirsty Logan, as well as Scottish Women’s Library staff, listening to writers read their stories, and offering advice, but apparently not Dragon’s Den-style tough love, nor tons of cash either. Slightly further north, Bill Wells and Aidan Moffat will perform at the DCA (Dundee Contemporary Arts) playing from Everything’s Getting Older, and there’s Out of the Narrative, a poetry evening in Stirling featuring Tom Leonard, Billy Letford and Anita Govan (29 Nov). On 29 November, there’s an intriguing event on at the Scottish Poetry Library. Since this year is the 350th anniversary of The Book of Common Prayer, and 30th anniversary of the New Testament in Scots, Richard Holloway and James Robertson will be discussing the influence of sacred texts. And my pick of the bunch, the now irregular Words Per Minute returns for an event (on 2 December) at The Glad Café in Shawlands, in partnership with the Scottish Refugee Council. The night will mix up performances by new writers from refugee communities in Scotland with performances from well-known Scottish authors… but as always with WPM, no-one will get more than ten minutes. If you’ve read this far, you’re clearly interested – you should probably go to something.

@FalkirkCultural Hippodrome100PresentsMonsterDay

Minima Music for Silent Film: Masterclass with Minima Inside the creative process of the band at the forefront of silent film accompaniment in the UK today. Followed by a performance of their entirely live score for Soviet sci-fi fantasy Aelita Queen of Mars.

Friday 9 November 14:30 Masterclass 19:30 Film: Aelita Queen of Mars Tickets: Masterclass + Film £10 / £8 conc Box Office: 01324 506850 Hippodrome, 10 Hope Street, Bo’ness W: falkirkcommunitytrust.org/hippodrome100

More details of these, and many, many other events can be found at www.bookweekscotland.com www.bookweekscotland.com

November 2012

THE SKINNY 29


travel

Up, Up and Away – Hot Air Ballooning in Cappadocia Our very own Uncle Travelling Matt checks in to show off once again. This time from beautiful Cappadocia (everyone’s favourite kebab house) words and photo: Ally Brown Cappadocia is one of the most extraordinary places in the world. It’s often absurd, usually fantastic, and sometimes unbelievable. In fact, superlatives are rarely sufficient: ducking through caves, turning corners and reaching peaks, you’ll find your vocabulary dazed and on the ropes when confronted with the challenge of describing the discovery that’s just smacked you in the face. Cappadocia is a spoiler, in fact. It is to caves, rock formations and alien landscapes as Iguazu is to waterfalls, or the Temples of Angkor are to ancient ruins: it’s so endlessly impressive that you might struggle to appreciate other examples of the type again. In the environment of Cappadocia it’s entirely understandable that locals attributed the creation of the land to a conscious deity. It’s a far more satisfying explanation than wind. Just as biochemistry fails to explain love in a way that captures the subjective magic of the experience, so geology comes up short when tasked with explaining the utterly bizarre natural constructions around the small village of Goreme, five bus-hours east of Ankara in central Turkey. Until three million years ago, this was an area of intense volcanic activity, resulting in many areas and layers of different kinds of rock being thrown around and mixed together. Almost all of the softer rock has since been eroded by water and wind, except for some persistent harder rock that remains in the forms of pyramids, columns, shards, mushrooms, towers, wizards’ hats, needles, and whatever other shapes your imagination can conjure. It’s a boring explanation and difficult to visualise, and it frankly doesn’t satisfy the profound confusion felt while walking through a forest of 80ft penises (the euphemistically named Love Valley). Cappadocia is repeatedly jaw-dropping. The village of Uçhisar, just a few kilometres from Goreme, is built around a ‘castle,’ a giant protruding rock into which several floors of caves were dug. It’s a short climb to the top, and the views of the surrounding areas are staggering. On the other side of Goreme are the Red and

30 THE SKINNY

November 2012

Rose Valleys, which can be explored on foot or bicycle for an hour or a day. Here the landscape is mostly petrified lava flow, but it looks more like a tumultuous lava rush which solidified in an instant, capturing the drama of the moment for millennia. Towards the back are bright yellow and red rock ridges, giant wigwams, melted marshmallows, and a breathtaking half-collapsed church, hidden within a huge round rock with flowers painted around the windows. In Pigeon Valley, a stegosaurus the length of a football pitch lies down next to a cobra standing the height of a double-decker. At the entrance to Love Valley is a to-scale abstract sculpture of a fairytale castle, made by the wind, apparently. Sometimes, it’s too much to believe. It’s not just the rock formations that impress. For almost two thousand years, locals have settled here by digging caves in to the pyramids, towers, tsunamis and gherkins. And not just holes to sleep in: caves with rooms and corridors and stairs, giant rocks with several floors of what could now be described as ‘apartments,’ multi-room churches and graves. Since many of the rooms were carved out when the rocks were different sizes and shapes, they often appear in completely impractical locations: like 50 feet up a sheer cliff-face. Since it was inhabited, that ground has just been swept away. Around many of the doors can still be seen red-painted decorations and within, Christian frescoes, painted by Byzantine locals before the area was conquered by Islamic tribes.  The best-preserved frescoes, dating from the 10th-11th centuries, are to be found in the Goreme Open Air Museum, a sectioned-off area of the so-called ‘fairy chimney’ rocks containing many churches. You practically have to have a tour coach between your legs to be admitted. Even in low-season it’s extremely busy, and it costs 15 Lira (£6) to enter, so a better idea is to cross the road, climb a fairy chimney, and go for a wander. Cappadocia is infinitely explorable. You can be on your own on top of a huge rock pyramid admiring thousand-year old cave-paintings while six tour buses process their contents into the museum just

out of earshot. Then, duck into a cave, find the stairs, and at the bottom is a row of graves, inside the rock pyramid. Turn around, take a left, and a rickety ladder leads you to the (sadly padlocked) door of another heavily frescoed cave, with an address plate on the outside. This cave is number 11. This is No.11, Kilçlar Valley Caves, Goreme, Turkey. Send them a postcard. The caves above ground are great fun to explore, but the ancient inhabitants of Cappadocia have built even more impressive cave complexes under the ground. Derinkuyu is an underground city – one of over two hundred found in the area – over 60m deep and boasting an incredible eight floors. Evidence suggests underground caves were first dug here almost three thousand years ago, and at its later peak, Derinkuyu had enough space for 20,000 inhabitants and the food, wine and worship rooms that they’d require. It’s an unbelievable feat of human endeavour, but visit in the late afternoon to avoid hordes of tourists, and it’s worth paying for a guide to bring the tunnels, chambers and coves to life. Once you’ve spent a few days exploring groundlevel and below ground-level, there’s only one more place to go. The big inflatable floating cherry on top of the Cappadocia cake is the most popular tourist activity here: the hot air balloon ride. On one hand, the one-hour morning flight to nowhere might cost the same or even more than the three-to-four hour flight that brought you to Turkey from the UK. On the other hand, you’ll forget those hours as soon as you land in Turkey, while a hot air balloon flight over Cappadocia, at sunrise, can be described without fear of hyperbole as ‘unforgettable.’ As hot air balloon flights go, some available in Cappadocia are among the cheapest anywhere (from £90 if you search, up to twice that if you don’t), and the strangeness and variety of the landscape makes it an ideal location. It’s also an ideal location because it’s so popular. Unusually, hot air ballooning is a tourist activity improved by the presence of more tourists doing the same thing. In low season, the sight of eighty

other balloons (each holding about twenty people) spread across your field of vision, of different colours, designs and sizes, is glorious. In high season up to 120 balloons take off every morning. It’s an intensely peaceful experience. The group of twenty chattery Chinese tourists in my basket immediately fell silent as we lifted off from the ground. Only the periodic blasts of propane through a pilot light, to send hot air into the vast red bag above, punctured the tranquility; but those moments were never a distraction from the important business of the view. Slowly the basket rotated, giving everyone a panorama, smoothly, almost imperceptibly. Just outside of Goreme, our pilot skilfully let the balloon descend into the narrow White Valley, and then ascended from it up to a height of a kilometre. Birds of prey flew below us. The volcanoes that created the mess appeared on the horizon. Under our feet: rock cucumbers, teardrops the size of houses, and petrified Mr Whippy ice creams.  Surprisingly, a hot air balloon flight is in ways reminiscent of scuba diving. In the latter, you descend smoothly from sea level to float and swim silently above a beautiful coral reef below, enjoying the shimmering air bubbles rising from other divers. In the balloon, we ascended from ground level to float and fly silently above a beautiful landscape below, enjoying the colourful balloons rising with other tourists. Most importantly, both activities are accompanied by a deep sense of leaving your everyday troubles behind: in diving because you’ve found a new, more beautiful world; in ballooning because you’ve died and are ascending to heaven. Cheap flights to Turkey are easy to find: easyJet flies to Istanbul via London Luton, but also consider flying to Antalya or Dalaman instead. Turkey’s bus network is excellent and reasonably priced to get you on to Cappadocia: the biggest nearby city is Kayseri, then connect to Nevsehir, then Goreme. Goreme is packed with good accommodation options, including many ‘cave’ hotels and hostels built into the rocks. Accommodation is also available in nearby villages such as Uchısar. Ally flew with Anatolian Balloons, the biggest commercial hot air ballooning company in the world, and the only one to have been granted the highest safety certificate See www.anatolianballoons.com for more details.


deviance

D e v i a nc e

Do The Dishes or I’ll Kill You: Domestic The Abuse is No Laughing Matter Essence of Gay? Analysing the trend of comedians telling jokes about domestic abuse, and why we should all think before we laugh

Caitlin Field fires up her ‘gaydar’ to ask some questions about our perceived notions of gayness

words: Claire Askew

A couple of days ago, a woman I follow on Twitter re-tweeted the following two sentences: ‘The person sleeping next to you is statistically more likely to murder you than any other person on the entire planet. Do the dishes.’ My first response was a small smile. I smiled because I thought about my own relationship, about how I sometimes catch myself saying things like, “If he doesn’t stop leaving his coat on the damn floor I might just kill him.” I related to this tweet. I found it funny, so I smiled. A week earlier, I’d stood in Edinburgh’s St Andrews Square Gardens at a candlelit vigil, organised by Shakti Women’s Aid and Scottish Women’s Aid as part of the Peace One Day campaign. I’d listened as a recording of male and female voices drifted out across the garden: survivors and their allies talking about why domestic violence must be fought and stopped. I’d held a sputtering candle and observed a minute’s silence in memory of those victims of domestic abuse who hadn’t survived their ordeals. I listened as the event’s speakers described domestic abuse as a war in which vulnerable people die every day. I read the tweet again, and felt sick.  As jokes about gender-based violence go, this one was pretty mild. It certainly doesn’t rival Jimmy Carr’s one-liner, “What do nine out of ten people enjoy? Gang rape,” or Joan Rivers’ recent response to the ongoing saga of Rihanna and her one-time-boyfriend-turned-abuser Chris Brown. In August Rivers divided opinion when she tweeted: ‘Rihanna… still loves Chris Brown. Idiot! Now it’s MY turn to slap her.’   Women’s groups, survivors of violence, and irritated people of all genders regularly take to their social media platforms to protest against “jokes” like these. And comedians, performers and their fans rush to respond in defence of themselves, their peers, and their heroes. In early September, comedian Simon Caine wrote a piece for the Huffington Post, defending the right of comedians to tell jokes about gender-based violence. In it, he claims that if a joke is ‘more about the word play than the subject matter,’ then it’s probably ‘more funny than offensive.’ He cites Carr’s gang rape joke as an example. The joke is, Caine says, ‘a fact expressed in a blunt and unforgiving style, which is why it’s amusing.’ He continues: ‘When you see this performed it is clear Jimmy is not saying “gang rape is great,” he is merely using language to address an issue in a cold and direct way so the audience don’t see the punchline coming.’ While I appreciate Caine going to the trouble of telling us exactly how jokes work, he has failed to address the real problem behind quips like Carr’s. People who dislike these jokes do not dislike them because they don’t see how they’re funny. I think Carr’s one-liner is repulsive, but I understand why other people laughed. I had a little chuckle at the tweet I received before my own common sense kicked in. And that’s the point: those of us who object, object because after we initially respond to the instinctive appeal of the joke, we step back, think about it, and see the joke in the context of a society where minority groups of all stripes are regularly singled out for ridicule, objectification and abuse.  Those who defend comedians like Carr often try and take the ‘how is a domestic abuse joke worse than a racist joke?’ line. The answer is: it isn’t. If you make jokes about people who identify as queer, or about people who are fat, or about people of colour, I will object to them just as strongly as I would if you made a joke about a woman being raped. It is possible for a performer to be funny without degrading people who are different to them, but unfortunately, many of our mainstream comedians don’t seem to have realised this.

words: Caitlin Field

“By   constantly referencing something like domestic violence in a humorous context, you normalise it” There are two real problems with jokes about gender-based violence: problems that Simon Caine completely ignores. The first is the fact that a joke about gender-based violence can act as a trauma trigger for people who have survived similar ordeals to the one the joke describes. Trauma triggers can exacerbate the symptoms of PTSD, a condition that many victims of domestic violence, rape and assault suffer from by varying degrees. The second problem is that by constantly referencing something like domestic violence in a humorous context, you normalise it. Many of the people who defend Jimmy Carr,

Joan Rivers and the countless other comedians who tell jokes of this type like to point out that really, these performers are ‘nice people’ who don’t believe in the jokes they tell. That they don’t really think it’s OK for people to rape women or abuse their spouses. That’s good – but it doesn’t change anything for the triggered survivor or the individual who goes home thinking they’re justified in hitting their partner because someone famous said they do it too. Furthermore, is the ‘nice guy’ get-out always the case? When I contacted the original poster of the tweet that had made me smile then recoil, his response was somewhat menacing. “You’ve gone too far,” he said, before sending several of his 3,900 followers to write threats and gendered abuse on my feed. The bottom line is, there clearly isn’t that much difference between thinking gender-based violence is funny, and thinking gender-based violence is OK. It’s time for comedians to think before speaking, and for audiences to think while they’re laughing.

“My gaydar is a hundred percent effective!” exclaimed a friend of mine a few weeks ago, in response to my concerns about how I’m going to locate lesbians after moving to Norway. To conclude that we’re both KD Lang fans does not require a gaydar – her with a buzz-cut and me dressed entirely in Topman’s finest, it would merely require a set of half-functioning eyes – but I started to wonder about this gaydar thing. In the queer community it’s entered quite smoothly into our common lexicon (we all remember that L Word episode where the gang loitered around Dana’s tennis club on “a mission to ascertain the disposition and intent of one Miss Lara Perkins”), but is there really such a thing? And if there is, does it transcend cultural borders? Some people describe tripping on salvia as experiencing infinity, but a number of others would argue that to achieve the same effect one could merely stroll into any gay club on a Friday night. Line after line of glittering, shimmying, slender gay boys ordering WKD Blues, continuing ad infinitum. Obviously that’s a huge generalisation, but isn’t it the same generalisation that lends credence to the concept of a quasi-Platonic Form of the Gay, of which all mortal gays are merely shadows reflected in the real world, and which forms the basis for this thing we call ‘gaydar?’ Surely, the entire concept relies upon this hegemonic notion that all gays share a certain characteristic – whether that is something as obvious as raging flamboyance, or something a bit subtler like body movements or face shape? Defenders of the idea that gaydar exists in a real, useful way could point to a recent study from the University of Washington. The study was conducted to find out if we are able to guess a person’s sexuality from their face or voice. The researchers found that we are correct a little more often than chance alone would predict. But, while this was a university study and is therefore fairly reliable as data, it also only used something like 200 students, which isn’t very many. This research, and similar studies, have been almost exclusively conducted in the United States so far, which provides us very little crosscultural evidence for the gaydar. In fact, anecdotal evidence from people I know who have travelled to other, vastly different parts of the world predicts that a western gaydar would be fried in cultures where it is normal for two men to walk down the street holding hands (as it is in parts of India). Faced with such a scene most of us would conclude that they’re definitely gay – I mean, they’re HOLDING HANDS – but surely what that actually represents is a collection of our own, westernised, perceptions about masculinity, femininity, social norms, and how each contribute to this idea of inherent gayness. We see two men holding hands as gay because it would be unthinkable in our culture for two bros to be walking to the pub hand in hand. So, unfortunately for me and my quest for Nordic lesbians, even though the concept of a gaydar is supported by some research, it probably works in much the same way as your region two DVD boxset of Queer Eye For The Straight Guy – disappointingly, only in the U.S.

November 2012

THE SKINNY 31


Showcase

The Sacred and Profane Love Machine

iain hales Iain Hales is a Scottish artist currently living and working in London. He completed his BA in Sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art in 2005, before moving to London in 2007 to undertake an MFA in Sculpture at The Slade School of Fine Art, which he completed in 2009. Since then he has continued to work and exhibit; earlier this year, he had his first London solo show at COLE, and participated in Switch, the inaugural exhibition at BALTIC 39 in Newcastle, selected by Phyllida Barlow. His works are primarily colourful assemblages that owe as much to the language of painting as that of sculpture. His influences and interests are wide ranging, citing architecture, the notion of the romantic ruin, history painting, 80s films, Memphis style, minimalism, Hockney in LA, memento mori, Arte Povera, Josef Albers’ Interaction of Colour, platonic solids, David Bachelor's Chromophobia to name but a few. The work is essentially formal, but he hopes that by layering up his materials, forms, associations, references, colours, textures, titles that some new complex, confused, sometimes surreal, meaning can be achieved.

“I know this will sound incredibly banal, but I love looking at things. I kind of collect all of those things in my head: things I see in the street, that I see in films and in magazines, things I read in books, art I've looked at. All those things are stored up there [in my head], not in a conscious way, and as I'm working something will pop into my mind and that's the start. Then the next thing comes, and how does that sit against the first thing, and what colour should that be, and is it complementary or contrasting. And most of the time I misremember the things anyway, they get mixed up, that's probably the best bit, and so the works grow. “My work is not really about anything, in the conceptual sense; it's very much in the nonverbal tradition. I feel that I'm trying to express something that I can't put into words; if I could, I'd just say it. It always seems to me that I'm feeling around the edge of meaning; it's in there, but it's always just out of reach, elusive. I hope I never catch it.” www.iainshales.com We Three

32 THE SKINNY

November 2012


SHOWCASE

After a Bigger Splash

Wink

from left to right: Your City's a Sucker, My City's a Creep; It Was Decided Before I Asked Why

November 2012

THE SKINNY 33


THE SKINNY IS LOOKING FOR A NEW STAFF WRITER The Skinny seeks a staff writer to etc) and will be prepared to enwork with us creating bespoke gage in research to increase their content for our print and online edi- knowledge of a subject as and tions. Supported and mentored by when it is required. An awareness THE SKINNY IS LOOKING A NEWforSTAFF WRITER Stuart Cosgrove, the writer bursary FOR of formatting online, of working The Skinny seeks a staff writer to etc) and will be prepared enis a unique opportunity designed to with content managementtosystems work with us creating bespoke gage in research to increase their provide a supportive structure for and embedding multimedia content content for our print and onlinetoedi- would knowledge of abeneficial. subject as and an emerging cultural journalist also be tions. Supported by when it is required. An awareness develop their skillsand in amentored fast-changStuart Cosgrove, the writer bursary Deadline: of formatting for online, of working ing media environment. 1 October 2012 is We’re a unique opportunity designed to with content systems looking for a talented writer This is a paidmanagement role. provide a supportive structure for and embedding multimedia content with a passion for subjects across Starting date – 09/2012 Find out more at: an emerging cultural journalist would also can be beneficial. the cultural spectrum, seeking to Full details be found at; develop their skills in a fast-changwww.theskinny.co.uk/about/get_involved to develop their journalistic skills www.theskinny.co.uk/about/ Deadline: 1 October 2012 ing media environment. within an established media comget_involved This is a paid role. We’re looking for a talented writer pany. They will possess a working Starting date – 09/2012 with a passion for subjects across knowledge of a variety of the areas Full details can be found at; the culturalcovered spectrum, commonly by seeking The Skinny www.theskinny.co.uk/about/ to develop skills (music, art, their film, journalistic books, theatre, get_involved within an established media comILLUSTRATION: WWW.VERBALSPICKS.COM pany. They will possess a working knowledge of a variety of the areas commonly covered by The Skinny (music, art, film, books, theatre,

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BRIGGS & COLE BASED IN Glasgow, Briggs & Cole is a new visual art and product design studio practice formed by creative partners Jane Briggs and Christy Cole. Having launched in March 2012, they specialise in functional limited edition or one-off pieces of furniture, products and objects. Collaborating with independent designers and artists who can produce unique pieces for a wide range of projects, the duo showcase work through experimental concepts and exhibition events. All of the products are locally designed and manufactured in Scotland as their ethos is offering an alternative voice within cutting edge contemporary design. The highly individual products and services intricately weave material, cultural story and placement within interior environments. “Frustrated by ubiquitous furniture design seen in magazines not living up to expectations, we were convinced we could do better. Knowing that we both had unique skills that complement each other, we were inspired to be committed to research and innovation with the goal of finding new materials and techniques and applying these to our products. “With a passionate vision for design excellence down to the last detail, we create honest and long-lasting products which exceed customers’ expectations. The unique collaboration of visual artist and product designer place collage imagery within furniture. This is carried out by a series of intricate processes through a focus on handcrafted and digital techniques, augmented by a whole host of unusual material combinations. “We applied to Starter for 6 to gain expertise, business knowledge and support in order to realise the potential of a ‘creative idea’ – and how that strand of innovation can be exploited to the sharing and benefit of others. “Our involvement in the programme took the form of active participation through workshops, presentations, talks, creative therapy – and cycling! It gave us confidence, assurance and conviction to communicate the importance of design ideas and translate the user’s need into a finalised product. The programme encourages rigorous questioning and experimentation of how to best demonstrate the differentiating drive of a company – and what makes it sustainable for future growth. “It’s the old dictum of ‘Starting up is easy but keeping your business going is hard’. I think you have to be in it for the long run, so if you’re dedicated, open minded to change, and can communicate the need of your product – then Starter for 6 is the best place to start.” WWW.BRIGGSANDCOLE.CO.UK STARTER FOR 6 IS SCOTLAND’S PREMIER START-UP AND INVESTMENT PROGRAMME FOR CREATIVE INDUSTRY ENTREPRENEURS. APPLICATIONS FOR THE NEXT ROUND OF STARTER FOR 6 ARE OPEN AND CLOSE ON MONDAY 10 DECEMBER 2012. WWW.CULTURALENTERPRISEOFFICE.CO.UK/STARTERFOR6

34 THE SKINNY

NOVEMBER 2012


fashion

LIFESTYLE

Hayley Scanlan: Selling Dreams Scottish Young Designer of the Year, Hayley Scanlan will launch the first collection of her diffusion line HS on 3 November with an event at The McManus: Dundee’s Art Gallery and Museum in conjunction with the launch of the garments on her website. Named Velvet Venom, the collection is full of her signature simple silhouettes combined with striking details and embellishment. “This new collection is a different direction for me. My main line is aimed more at the higher end of the market, and I’ll continue to do that. But I also wanted to make something available that was perhaps more appealing to a wider audience.” Like her main line collection, HS is about, “standing out from the crowd, for making an entrance, but it’s slightly more practical and affordable than the main line.” Her new project has been created out of the need to cope with the increasing demand for her work. “I am getting new enquiries all the time and the demand has been unbelievable,” she says.  This stunning new collection will be showcased

against the backdrop of Selling Dreams: 100 Years of Fashion Photography, an exhibition of some of the world’s greatest fashion images. It includes work by heavyweights of the 20th century including Edward Steichen, Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Helmut Newton and David Bailey, alongside contemporary works by Miles Aldridge, Corinne Day, Rankin, Tim Walker and Steven Meisel.  This exhibition runs until Sunday 6 January at The McManus: and is a must-see in its own right. Sadly, Hayley Scanlan’s event at The McManus gallery is invite only. However, there will be a chance for a lucky few members of the public to attend by winning a social media competition (for more information please visit Hayley’s Facebook page). The Velvet Venom HS collection will be available to buy through the designer’s new website from the 3 November. [Alexandra Fiddes] Selling Dreams: 100 Years of Fashion Photography, The McManus Gallery, Dundee, until 6 Jan, free www.facebook.com/hayley.scanlan.studio @HayleyScanlan www.hayleyscanlan.co.uk

Nightwalk AW12 Showcasing some of the biggest stars in independent Scottish fashion, the Nightwalk Fashion Show has descended upon Glasgow for the AW12 collections and will take place on 6 November (a rescheduled date). Now in its second year, the Arches will play host to the event, with good tunes, incredible clothes and stunning models for the occasion. It’s like a dream come true. Propelling fresh designs in for the new season, the event will feature sparkling new labels as well as some of the country’s more established underground brands. You can expect to see plenty of stand out designs from newbies like BrianChan, Betsabelle Latex, Mochmess, Natalie Traynor, Nothing, Aphrodite, POP/U/LAR, Laura Spring and Staysick. In keeping with the name of the event, expect to see plenty of galaxy- and space-inspired prints from Carousel Vintage. Their’s SS12 collection proved to be a massive hit, with pretty tie-dye effects and grungy embellishments being an instant success for the first line. Designer Nola Garven’s collection can

be easily found at Glasgow’s Gin in Teacups events or on the Carousel Vintage ASOS page for those looking for a more mystical and moody fashion fix this season. Dawntroversial has amassed a following for her quirky designs with some of her styles even being worn by X-Factor contestants. Previous seasons have included My Little Pony influences and vibrant glittery designs so expect to see more extravagant styles from this Nightwalk regular. Also taking the stage will be Betty Spoke, Fair Feathered Friend, NLM Design, Afraid, Jennie Lööf, Animinimal and Crikey so guests can expect an eclectic array of fashion throughout the night. Hair design will be from Sassoon Salon stylists to inspire new looks for the AW12 season and there will be DJ performances throughout the show. Get your tickets from the Arches website – it would be a nightmare for any fashion lover to miss this. [Laura Forsyth] Tue 6 Nov, The Arches, 8-11.30pm, £10. See website for tickets www.thearches.co.uk/events/clubs/nightwalk-aw2012

Ten30: Gentlemen’s Sewing Club

Laur a Spring: When The Wind Is High

The modern day man isn’t all football and beer guzzling. A fact that Ten30’s Alan Moore is determined to prove with his monthly gentlemen’s sewing evening. Girls need not apply to this stylish event. The sewing evening takes place on the last Wednesday of every month in Sloans, Glasgow, which will dish out whiskey sour cocktails while the men get creative (because sewing can be thirsty work). And Sloans, with its rustic wood and dark masculine furniture, seems to be the ideal setting for the event. As the creative brain behind award-winning Glasgow brand Ten30, Moore has decided that the local lads need to be able to work a needle and thread, saying: “Ten30 think all men should be able to sew on buttons and hem trousers, and maybe bring back a revival in decorative embroidery while they’re at it.

This November at The Lighthouse, Glasgow, textile artist Laura Spring will show her first two collections as well as a series of site specific works in an exhibition running until 3 December. Spring focuses on hand printed luggage and outerwear inspired by the Great British weather which explores how print relates to the objects it adorns. Laura Spring is originally from Staffordshire but came north of the border when she studied design at Glasgow School of Art. Since graduating in 2002 she has worked within the fields of costume design, theatre and TV, but decided to set up a textiles business (called Mouse and Bean) in 2007, before trading under her own name. She now designs and makes from her studio in Pollokshields. She currently draws inspiration from everyday things, including the weather. This theme was explored

“There appears to be a negative stigma around men who sew. Ten30 are changing that. How many of our fathers, grandfathers or great uncles knew how to sew way back when? Tailors, soldiers and sailors are all great men who sew. Not just for fashion or aesthetics but for necessity and survival,” he adds, careful to stress the class is more cool than school. Moore explains that the evening takes more of a “skill sharing event” form where Moore and the attendees could talk about anything from fashion to shoe polishing (and other manly pass-times too). The next sewing evening will be held on Wednesday 24 November, and costs £20 which includes a whiskey sour cocktail and all the material and equipment you will need. Spaces are limited to 10 gents per class, so get yout ticket now before they sell out! [Nadine Walker] www.ten30.co.uk/news/

during a recent residency at Cove Park, where she created and perfected the symbols and motifs which she uses within the work on show at The Lighthouse this November. As part of the exhibiton, and as an additional crafty treat, Charlotte Abrahams – a regular features writer at Crafts Magazine, Guardian Weekend and Elle Decoration (amongst others) will be holding a talk about ‘the joy of drinking from an imperfectly beautiful mug and the thrill of commissioning direct from the maker.’ This talk and Q&A will take place at 6pm on Tuesday 13 November. Definitely a must-see exhibition for any craft and textile lovers. [Alexandra Fidddes] The Lighthouse, Glasgow, until 3 Dec, free www.lauraspring.co.uk

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food & drink

L I F E S T Y L E : F OO D & D R I N K

The Terrible World of Food Food has been out to get you recently, with its chemicals and insect-eating competitions. Fear not, for we have some advice to help you through. ‘Don’t be so flipping stupid’ is the gist of it words: Peter Simpson

Illustration: joe todd stanton

Winter is here, and as the air turns crisp and the streets shimmer with frost, all is well in the world of food. Or, DANGER! DANGER! BEWARE OF THE DANGER! The air is thick with the screams of the fallen! The streets shimmer with blood... no, wait, that is actually frost. Still, there seems to have been something of a run of serious lunch-based mishaps in the news, as though food has gained sentience and is plotting to destroy us all. Don’t worry though, as we’re here to set your mind at ease through analysis and sarcastic comments. DON’T EAT COCKROACHES We’ll start with the tale of Edward Archbold, a Florida man who wanted a python. Rather than simply buying said python and getting on with his life, he entered an insect-eating competition to win one. After guzzling down dozens of live cockroaches, amongst other delights, he died, but not before spewing a load of the cockroaches back up in homage to every bug-based horror movie death ever. The interesting thing about the poor fella is that, according to various pathologists and insect experts, cockroaches aren’t inherently poisonous.

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All the other contestants in this bizarre event were perfectly fine afterwards. Having said that, this is a story about grown men eating cockroaches in order to win a snake, so ‘perfectly fine’ might be a stretch. SURVIVAL ADVICE: Don’t eat things which aren’t generally considered food. This applies to both organic (insects, trees, other people) and man-made (socks with food on them, plastic apples, cutlery). DON’T DRINK DEADLY CHEMICALS So you’ll have read the story of the 18-year-old girl who drank a cocktail containing liquid nitrogen, and gone through the standard enthralled-amazedsaddened emotional rollercoaster that those kind of stories rely on. Just so we’re all on the same page, here’s Professor Peter Barham, physicist at the University of Bristol: “As with any very hot or very cold liquid proper safety measures must be taken – just as no-one would drink boiling water or oil or pour it over themselves, so no-one should ingest liquid nitrogen.” There you go, simple and obvious words from the scientist. But the drinking of dangerous chemicals is not what this is really about, oh no. No, this is about this winter's ongoing beef with

Heston Blumenthal. You see, if Heston hadn’t spent the last few years mucking about with foams and chemicals and weird cooking methods while everyone remarked on how clever and benign his mad behaviour seemed, then maybe pubs wouldn’t be mucking about with canisters full of potentially deadly liquids. We’re not saying that Heston’s to blame for liquid-nitrogen-cocktail-gate, obviously he clearly wasn't involved. SURVIVAL ADVICE: If your drink appears to be smoking, or suddenly changing from liquid to gas, don’t drink it. If your drink contains hazardous chemicals, don’t drink it. If you see Heston Blumenthal, run away. EXPLOSIONS AND NOXIOUS GASSES Seeing as it’s fireworks season, we thought we’d throw on some knockabout chatter about the fact that gummy bears burst into flames when you drop them in fertiliser chemicals, and wouldn’t it be funny but dangerous if that happened tee-hee-hee. Then we learned about Surstromming. Surstromming is a Swedish ‘delicacy’ of pickled and rotting herring which straddles the borderline between ‘quaint and outdated local snack’ and

‘chemical weapon.’ It is banned by several airlines due to unconfirmed reports of its combustibility and entirely confirmed reports of it smelling like bin bags roasting on an open fire. Last month a Stockholm apartment block was evacuated following a gas leak that turned out to be nothing more than a can of the stuff being opened in the top flat. Noxious. We sadly don’t have the contacts of the globe-trotting travel section, so we can’t verify this, but if you’re ever in Scandinavia, be on the lookout. If any Scandinavian food envoys wish to send us to Sweden to be repulsed by their fish, they know where to find us. Back to something we can verify, though. Take a bottle of Coke, throw in some Mentos, and stand back. The thing should erupt in a firework-esque stream of foam and stain the area so badly that cleansing by fire might be your only recourse. Just don’t stand looking directly down the bottle as you begin, or you’ll break your glasses/jaw. Are you sensing a recurring, ‘food won’t get you if you just behave like a sensible human’-type theme here?!? SURVIVAL ADVICE: Prick your baked potatoes before putting them in the oven. Release your Coke bottle rockets in an open area. Learn Swedish.


Photo: Graham MacLean

west brewery

Food News with Peter Simpson It’s November’s Food News, and you know what that means... IT’S CHRISTMAS! Yes, thanks to the vagaries of our production schedule, this month’s column features the yuletide extravaganza that is Foodies Christmas. It has the usual mix of chef demos, produce stands and tasting sessions that you’ve come to know and love from the food festival/market scene, but this time it’s all Christmas-themed. That means forced festive cheer, more children than usual, and everything smelling slightly of cloves. ‘Tis the season, we suppose. EICC, Morrison St, Edinburgh. 1-2 Dec, £10. If the thought of Christmas, with its bountiful hams, sausages wrapped in bacon, and juicy, stupid turkeys leaves you cold, then don’t worry. November is World Vegan Month, as the mungbean enthusiasts of the world unite and take over. To celebrate the Vegans of Edinburgh and Glasgow are hosting ‘pot luck’ dinners, so if you’ve ever wondered what there is to eat once you’ve counted out meat, dairy and eggs, now’s the time to find out. Autonomous Centre of Edinburgh, West Montgomery Pl, 6 Nov; Flying Duck, Renfield St, 12 Nov.

From veganism, to fireworks! Fireworks and beer! WEST Brewery are set to go all out for the Glasgow Green fireworks once again, with an outside bar packed with their incredible beers, and a barbecue laden with big bits of juicy, tender meat (sorry vegans). Once all the pretty lights have gone bang, the brewers have got a DJ sorted, a DJ whom we assume will keep with the German theme by playing Kraftwerk all evening. WEST, Templeton Buildings, Glasgow Green. 5 Nov, 6.30pm And finally, bread. Join Neil Forbes of Cafe St Honoré for a class in bread-making. Advice on sourdough bread, the best way to knead, and the secret to a great brioche are all on the menu, as is a two-course lunch at one of Edinburgh’s top restaurants. Plus, if anyone is going to have tips on how to get a flour-and-water mix off of a pair of jeans, then Neil would be the man. Oh, and there’s this: “veering slightly from the bread theme, Neil will also share his recipe for the perfect Christmas pudding.” There truly is no escape, people. Cafe St Honoré, North West Thistle Street Lane, Edinburgh. 24 Nov, 11am, £25.

Around the World in 20 Drinks: kenya words: Myles Edwards In Iten, Kenya for 3 months of altitude training, we spent a fair while researching the food and drink that would be on offer to fuel our training. Ugali featured heavily in all of the travel guides and was largely attributed to being one of the main factors behind the worldwide dominance of Kenyan distance runners over the past few decades. Surely we would be foolish not to eat it? Ugali is made from maize flour and cooked with water until it forms a dough-like consistency. The traditional method of consuming ugali is to roll it into a lump using your hands and then dip it into a stew of vegetables or meat. I can only describe it as a dry, bland doppelganger of mashed potato As with the food, drink is a whole different ball game in Kenya. Obviously as we were training to further our respective running careers, alcohol was not on the agenda for the whole of the 3 month trip. Pubs were scattered all over the place but you could be forgiven for not noticing them as they were more like a garden shed or garage in appearance.  

On St Patrick’s Day, we met up with a couple of other Irishmen and went for some dinner. One of the first things to spring to our attention on the menu was Guinness. I should have known that going out on St Patrick’s Day with 3 Irishmen was never going to be a quiet night. We soon found out, however, that this was no normal Guinness it was at least twice as strong as your normal pint, and served in what can only be described as a flask-like bottle. It turns out that the black stuff changes depending on where you are in the world, and that the Kenyans love a strong drink. Numerous flasks and whiskies later, we ended up in an Eldoret nightclub, where we were the only ‘Mzungos’ (the term Kenyans use to refer to white people), dancing away until 6am the next morning. Somehow, we all still managed two training sessions the following day. Maybe there is something in the Guinness... As well as being a middle-distance runner, Myles runs a PR company offering photo, film, and design services www.mylesedwardsmedia.com

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music

p REV I E W : L i v e M u s i c

LIVE MUSIC HIGHLIGHTS

The Metal Column

Prepare for fireworks: November's gig highlights are ready to explode. Light the touch paper and stand well back

They’ve got the daftest Beatles-cum-Star Wars punning name since, well, ever as far as we’re aware and they’re coming to blow an Alderaan-sized hole of scuzzy shoegaze and jangly Mary Chain melodies in Edinburgh this month. Yes, Ringo Deathstarr play new Glasgow venue Broadcast (formerly The Local, on 2 Nov) and Edinburgh’s Third Door (3 Nov) in support of second album Mauve, a record in which the Austin trio seem to have found a more singular and concise sound. These are the indie, noise-pop revivalists you’re looking for. The classic album tour is now a staple of the old indie vanguard and so it’s the turn of The Wedding Present and their 1991 offering Seamonsters, which will be played in its entirety at The Liquid Room (7 Nov). Shorn of verbose song-titles and grittier in its Steve Albini-production, it was something of a change for David Gedge’s amorphous troupe. Yet this 21st anniversary dust-down is testament that it was a wise move and with a couple of well-received recent albums under their belts, we’d wager that the Leeds quartet can still pull off something of a ‘Dalliance’ with us. Strange how the perceived cutting edge music press can get all frothy about someone as quintessentially backwards-looking as Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti. Not that anyone should be complaining mind you, as 2010’s breakthrough album Before Today introduced the world-at-large to a hitherto cultish, lo-fi bedroom artist with little mainstream attention. This year’s Mature Themes is, for our money, the better record and all the more enticing with which to follow singer Ariel Rosenberg’s lyrical command: “Step into my time warp, now!” Get your flux capacitors from Glasgow’s Stereo (8 Nov). Another revivalist, who rose from relative obscurity over a decade ago, Jack White returns to the live arena minus his ‘sister-wife’ or any of his other myriad off-shoot personas. This year’s solo debut Blunderbuss may not have particularly stretched the rigid template he laid down with The White Stripes, but it was a rollicking good slice of the bluesy garage rock we’ve loved since White Blood Cells first brought the enigmatic musician to public consciousness. Get to know Jack at Edinburgh’s Usher Hall (8 Nov). In our last issue we awarded Moon Duo’s second long-player Circles our Album of the Month. Sounding both freshly invigorating and nostalgically warm, it’s an opinion we’ll be standing by as it continues to soundtrack our grey autumn days, giving a much-needed boost of sunshine and LSD. Hot on its heels, the San Francisco pair are playing Glasgow’s Broadcast (12 Nov), giving you the opportunity to fully appreciate their own brand of psychedelic, krautrock goodness. On the back of 2010’s fourteen-year hiatus-ending

Words: darren carle

Photo: alex woodward

ringo deathstarr

album My Father Will Guide Me up a Rope to the Sky, this year's follow-up The Seer cemented Swans as a musical force to be reckoned with, regardless of their impressive heritage. Their appearance at Glasgow’s Arches (16 Nov) is supported by Sir Richard Bishop, a one-time Sun City Girl who’s been going it solo since 2005. Bishop’s contemplative, acoustic-picking is sure to give a suitable contrast to Swan’s driving, monolithic intensity.   Edinburgh quartet We Were Promised Jetpacks play what is fast becoming their annual autumnal Liquid Room homecoming (24 Nov). Yet unlike, I dunno, say Christmas, these local lads come with only a smidgeon of the build-up and expectation but will absolutely in no way disappoint you with an

ever-depleting pile of presents from Santa, simmering family tensions or Noel Edmonds. Instead you’ll be treated to some class-A guitar-powered pop, bolstered by their two fantastic albums so far with nary a garish bauble in sight. The irrepressible Dirty Three, who returned this year with eighth album Toward the Low Sun, continue their world tour with a stop at Glasgow’s Òran Mór (25 Nov). Having witnessed their life-affirming grandeur in a muddy Dorset field this summer, we can only imagine what the veteran Australian trio will conjure up in this more suitably spiritual setting. But we highly recommend you attend this congregation with all the zeal you can muster from your heathen heart. Praise the Lord and all that.

Oh yes, there’s an abundance of catastrophic live acts to be savoured in the flesh this November. First up are Anti-Nowhere League – don’t miss them knock out the same kind of bratty British punk they helped pioneer back in the eighties at Ivory Blacks (2 Nov). Massively influential doom metal outfit Pentagram make an appearance at the same venue a couple of days later (4 Nov), supported by suitably psychedelic Leeds quartet Gentlemans Pistols. Next, French tech-metal outfit Gojira are heading back to Glasgow off the back of their best album yet. Check them out at the Garage (6 Nov), particularly if you missed them back in June.  If you’re up for a tongue-in-cheek take on the glam rock genre (but also secretly enjoy the music), your impending excuse to go balls-out is approaching: Steel Panther are rolling into the Edinburgh Corn Exchange (9 Nov). Expect horrendous outfits both on and off-stage, as well as plenty of dudes who look like ladies. However, if you like your excess dramatic and space-themed (and prefer dudes who sound like ladies), you’re better off heading to the O2 ABC to see Coheed and Cambria’s latest prog odyssey unfold on the same night. Next up is an unfortunate clash: hardcore vets Madball are set to tear up Ivory Blacks (11 Nov), but post-metal group Devil Sold His Soul are also playing the Cathouse on the same night. Your choice hinges on whether you’re after no-frills shredding or a night of introspective headbanging. It’s no wonder death metal titans Opeth are pairing up with ethereal rockers Anathema on their European tour; both parties are sounding lusher (and proggier) than ever on their latest albums. If that’s your bag, don’t miss this chance to see them together at the O2 ABC (13 Nov). After an unfortunate quiet spell, Liverpool riffmasters Conan save the day at the 13th Note along with local doom acts Sunsmasher and Headless Kross (22 Nov). Hold onto yer hats, ‘cause it’s gonna get heavy. If you’re Edinburgh-based, British death metal outfit Burial’s your ticket. What’s more, Auld Reekie’s finest black metal act Haar are supporting. That’s at Bannerman’s on the same night. You’ll want to be back at the 13th Note a couple of days later for a psych-punk attack courtesy of Lancaster bands Three Dimensional Tanx and Rapid Pig (24 Nov). Supporting is Galoshins, who will ease you in gently with some schizo art-pop. Get a load of this one: metalcore heroes Converge are playing at the Classic Grand (28 Nov), and they’re bringing their hardcore disciples – the stellar Touché Amoré – along for the ride. It gets better: U.S. sludge champs A Storm of Light and chaotic Italian hardcore band The Secret are also on the bill. If you don’t have a valid reason for not attending this one, you’ll be getting a personal slap from yours truly. Last are respected Irish legends Therapy?, who’ll be bringing the month to a satisfying end with their deranged and occasionally anthemic alt-rock; that’s at the Garage (31 Nov). [Ross Watson]

Do Not Miss: Aberfeldy Festival Now in its third year, Aberfeldy Festival returns after 2011’s sell-out event, with author Ian Rankin curating once more. Rankin and other local writers will provide a backdrop of talks along with art and craft displays throughout the town centre followed by local acts which the modern day crime writer has personally invited to play. Aberfeldy’s own Star Wheel Press, who conceived the idea with Rankin, make a suitable starting point followed by yet more of the cream of Scottish indie. Withered Hand nestles comfortably

with the all-new Meursault line-up, while the muchvaunted partnership of Aidan Moffat and Bill Wells returns with more from their critically acclaimed album Everything’s Getting Older. The excellent Phantom Band top Friday’s bill while Gummi Bako, The Pictish Trail and Rozi Plain ease us into Sunday. The always-impressive Found will then kick things up a gear, with proceedings fittingly brought to a close by King Creosote himself. Consider that the royal seal of approval. [Darren Carle]

the phantom band

www.aberfeldyfestival.co.uk

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photo: euan robertson

2-3 Nov


REV I E W : L i v e M u s i c

Dirty Projectors

Liars / The Haxan Cloak

The Arches, 15 Oct

photo: damien mcglynn

rrrrr

rrrrr context is simply astounding: in a set that covers much of their latest LP Swing Lo Magellan, peppered with highlights of 2009’s Bitte Orca, the sextet seem almost symbiotically entwined. Perhaps most striking is the virtuosic performance of the three female vocalists, whose high-pitched, staccato harmonies sound even more unearthly and disorienting in a live setting. Swing Lo Magellan has been hailed as a relatively normal record, but its subtle complexities are evident here; these songs, like Longstreth himself, possess an entrancingly odd combination of warmth and otherworldly distance, and their disparate elements are consummately united tonight. [Sam Wiseman]

The Haxan Cloak is crouched almost out of sight with a hood obscuring his face, building dense, textured bass loops into funereal, transcendental techno; like a colder, psychedelic Basic Channel. His set culminates in two minutes of sheet-metal white noise and face-melting strobe light, leaving the crowd shocked and confused. It’s a bold, excoriating performance, unapologetically avant-noise. Liars start with an incendiary, four-to-the floor rendition of Brats. A large proportion of the crowd seem unmoved, although the atmosphere created by the trio with looped analogue synth lines, echoing vocals and swathes of static and drone begin to reel them in by the time The Exact Colour of Doubt

www.dirtyprojectors.net

...And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead / Maybeshewill

photo: damien mcglynn

On most billings, Dirty Projectors’ fellow Brooklynites Callers would comfortably be the most inventive and striking outfit. Sara Lucas’ richly dramatic vocals provide a sense of tonal coherence to a set that skips quickly between moods: vertiginous, spiralling guitar lines trade places with hypnotic riffs and disorienting chord shifts, and the quartet’s no-bass, three-guitar approach allows them to pursue some impressively fleet-footed polyphonic melodies. Dirty Projectors, however, remain peerless among contemporary bands in terms of the sheer audaciousness and originality of their approach to song. If the scope of David Longstreth’s conceptual ambition is impressive enough on record, its flawless realisation in the live

SWG3, 11 Oct

emerges, followed by haunting takes on Who Is The Hunter and the title track from the virtuosic WIXIW. Throughout the show, Aaron Hemphill, Julian Gross and de facto leader Angus Andrews swap instruments, varying between synthesiser, guitar and percussion. Andrews is a magnetic frontman, unfeasibly tall; all Thom Yorke falsetto and

Nick Cave growl. The audience seems at its most receptive as Liars leave WIXIW behind for a delve into more abrasive tracks like Scarecrows on a Killer Slant from 2010’s Sisterworld. The result is a show of two halves; the band clearly enjoying their most recent evolution while the fans are still playing catch up. [Bram E. Gieben] www.liarsliarsliars.com

Omar Rodríguez-López Group Stereo, 30 Sep

rrrrr

The Liquid Room, 13 Oct

classic after classic with a masterful and edifying Perfect Teenhood hitting an atmospheric high, its fist-clenching ‘fuck you’ coda particularly invigorating. An encore seems on the cards, yet a disappointingly strict curfew sees Richter Scale Madness scored off the sheet. A frustrating finish to an otherwise rare occasion. [Darren Carle] Lost Songs is released via Richter Scale/Superball Music on 22 Oct www.trailofdead.com

Gallows / Feed the Rhino King Tut’s, 9 Oct

photo: jassy earl

rrrrr

40 THE SKINNY

Feed the Rhino evidently have some fans gathered here at King Tut’s tonight; as the stage lights dim, the band are greeted with a fair amount of fervency which only intensifies as they pile through their first few songs. Security have a hard time keeping them behind the barrier as crazed frontman Lee Tobin launches himself into the crowd, fully endorsing the growth of the accumulating circle-pit as the rhythm section pound out killer riffs, pulsating grooves and ear-shattering cymbal crashes. Despite hailing from Kent, there’s a real dirty southern bite to their sound. Opening with Grey Britain’s Misery – their caustic, troublesome anthem – Gallows categorically crush any lingering doubts about their ability to pull off the old material post-Frank Carter. By this stage, vocalist

November 2012

From the moment Omar’s guitar pierces the air, fluid and sharp over a low, menacing bass note, the two figures seem united in their own separate freak shows – her, morphing from juddering epileptic to narcotic siren to bubbling imbecile in a sequence of nightmarish spontaneity; him, a pillar of jerky angularity, circling on the spot as if controlled by the neck of the guitar he cradles. Storming through a cool hour of tight instrumentation and reined-in tracks sweetened by Teri’s commanding vocals and a surprising accessibility, the crowd’s vocal enthusiasm suggests that they really didn’t need to be thanked for their patience. [Rosie Davies]

photo: jassy earl

is betrayed by tonight’s setlist. Eschewing the bulk of their latter output, it’s a show that plants its feet firmly at their artistic peak, from Madonna through Source Tags & Codes and the divisive Worlds Apart; Though they dispatch two tracks from new album Lost Songs with little fanfare, lead single Up To Infinity comes across remarkably incisive, an adrenaline shot from safe hands. From there it’s cream-skimmed

The Omar Rodríguez-López Group is a chimera, not a band – a catch-all name to encompass an ever-changing line-up expounding Omar’s searing experimental energy. As such, it’s a revelation to some in the crowd that they’re actually witnessing one of the first shows of a brand new group called Bosnian Rainbows about two thirds of the way through the show when Omar thanks everyone for turning up  – “whether you’re into it or not.” If he’s genuinely concerned about fleeting attention spans, he needn’t be tonight; discarding the theatrical statementdressing of Le Butcherettes in favour of a plain black t-shirt and jeans, frontwoman Teri Gender Bender’s presence is electric.

PAWS / North American War CCA, 4 Oct

rrrrr Wade MacNeil looks comfortably engrossed in his role as the band’s frontman, and he’s rabidly received. Their recent self-titled album already has a place in this crowd’s collective heart, too – the lyrics to new songs like Last June and Outsider Art can be heard being belted from all angles in amongst the violence, and the shovefest hasn’t simmered down by the time they encore with Victim Culture/Orchestra of Wolves with a little help from their touring partners. We learn that bassist Stuart Gili-Ross is absent due to visa appointments at the U.S. embassy in London, forcing them to employ an Edinburgh-based stand-in, but – as the Watford boys have proven before – it’s going to take more than a member change to slow them down. [Ross Watson]

Tonight begins with a major disappointment: the promised rum and coke floats are unavailable. The CCA weren’t keen on the potential mess, explains a barman, and though he could maybe rustle one up for us, “it’d probably be expensive.” We opt for beers, dolefully wondering if the night will ever recover from such a damaging blow. It does, and then some. North American War light the match, bringing the crowd closer using squalling noise-rock and Anna Schneider’s aloof vocals as lure. The dynamic brings Sonic Youth to mind, an exalted point of comparison that NAW measure up to ably. By the time the last lick of feedback’s been stifled, the room is full and expectant. PAWS swiftly set about stoking the flames. Things start civilised: heartfelt opener Catherine 1956 is respectfully received, as are

photo: ross gilmore

Walking in to Leicester post-rockers Maybeshewill is a thunderous experience. Commanding attention with their skull-shaking bass sound, muscular riffage and the on-stage kinetic energy of the quintet ensures that they make their mark on the crowd from the off. Ending with the Peter Finchsampling, call-to-arms of Not for Want of Trying further solidifies their intensity. ...And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead know which side their bread is buttered on. It has been almost twelve years and six subsequent albums since the Texan rockers last graced the Liquid Room, yet that interim

photo: pete dunlop

rrrrr

the next couple of slices of crunchy fuzz-rock. But when Phil Taylor notes that the photographer leaping speakers front of stage is the most animated body in the room, the hint is taken with both hands. With no barriers or security, crowd surfing breaks out en masse, as the front rows take turns atop in a never-ending flow. Behind them, PAWS power through the bulk of Cokefloat

and more, with Jellyfish and Boregasm the ante-uppers and Misled Youth’s Bainz the pick of those offering space to catch breath amidst the sugar rush assault. Whoever nixed the actual cokefloats knew what they were doing: tonight was messy (and awesome) enough without. [Chris Buckle] Cokefloat! is out now on FatCat Records. www.facebook.com/wehavepaws


REV I E W : S in g l e s

records

ep reviews

Offshore

The Dirty Dozen

Bake Haus Big Dada, 5 Nov

rrrrr

Ahead of this month’s Scottish tour, noted 2am Twitter pop critic Aidan Moffat pops by to give the November singles the long-form review treatment. Yes: we take requests... interview: Chris Buckle

Photo: Neil Jarvie

Dead Sea Souls – Trendsetter (Big Rock Candy Records, 5 Nov) Aidan: Well first off, this is far too chirpy for my frame of mind. I’m glad the boy’s singing in his own accent but it’s not the sort of music that excites me at all. I don’t want to disparage local bands because I wish them all the luck, but… it’s not something I would listen to at home, shall we say. Can I abstain from marking anything Scottish? Anything Scottish automatically starts at 5 out of 10, and this gets a 6 for the guy’s voice. The Staves – Tongue Behind My Teeth (Atlantic Records, 5 Nov) Aidan: I think we can write this off as pretty bland. I can’t really say anything nice about that. It’s very, very dull isn’t it? This sort of music makes me angry, quite frankly. I find nice music most offensive. Just hurt me, I’d rather be hurt. Everything about this was so pleasant. It can have a 2. Tame Impala – Feels Like We Only Go Backwards (Modular, 19 Nov) Aidan: My girlfriend hates this band solely because of the stupid name. I’m actually quite surprised I like this, because it is a silly name, it’s a ridiculous name. I think the song lacks a strong chorus, but coming from someone who doesn’t bother with choruses when they write music, that isn’t really much of a criticism. I’m not blown away, but it’s good aye – 7. Swim Deep – Honey (Chess Club Records, 5 Nov) Aidan: I must admit, I like the look of this disgraceful cover, with the girl with honey dripping out her mouth. It’s piqued my curiosity, because if you’re going to have a bold cover like that, you’ve got to have a bold sound. [Approximately 10 seconds in...] No, I’m bored already. My curiosity ends after the first bar, so we can safely say we willnae bother with that one. [Chorus starts...] Nah, ‘ooh ooh baby’ is not allowed in this day and age I’m afraid. That is a cardinal offence – 1 out of 10, let’s move on… Two Door Cinema Club – Sun (Kitsuné, 19 Nov) Aidan: I’ve definitely heard this band before, and there’s a reason I don’t listen to them. I think the best thing I can say about this is I like that girl in the video’s hair. This just bores me completely. What is the point? I can guarantee you he’s a brilliant guy though – everybody I’ve met who makes records I can’t stand have been amazing people, then you meet people who make records you really love and they’re fucking wankers. It just seems to be a rule in music, so I bet he’s a brilliant

laugh down the pub – though I imagine he gets ID’d a lot. The Skinny: Marks? Aidan: I’ll give the girl’s hair 3. Actually, 4 – she was wearing nice shorts as well. Damn Vandals – This Amazing (Sexy Beast, 5 Nov) Aidan: I don’t like his voice, it sounds like he’s trying too hard. I quite like the sound of the band though. If Damn Vandals ever fall out with their singer, if they contact me then I might be into it. That’s not to say that they would be, but at least I’m willing to leave my ego at the door and turn my vocals down in the mix, if nothing else. An instrumental version of this would get 7. [skips to B-side] Actually, having heard another song from their repertoire I’d like to retract that. They’re doing one thing on the A-side and something entirely different on the B-side, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but unfortunately it seems to be at odds to me. That was a shame. I’ll bring that down to a 5. Heaven’s Basement – Fire, Fire (Red Bull Records, 5 Nov) Aidan: I don’t understand this at all. Originality isn’t important in all walks, but I’ve heard these noises so many times before that they’re wholly meaningless. It’s like they don’t care. I wonder why the uncensored version is longer – does he just scream ‘fuck you’ at the start or something? Can we hear it? Actually, no, I take that back – I’ve just realised we’d have to listen to it again. I’d rather we just end this torture now. I presume Heaven’s Basement is a reference to Hell, so rightly named: hellish indeed. Fucking zero – they don’t even merit a score, they’re not worth talking about. The Ramona Flowers – Dismantle and Rebuild (Distiller Records, 18 Nov) Aidan: This is horrible. Sorry, I must sound like a right curmudgeon. Will we listen to the D/R/U/G/S remix? You never know... [Still unimpressed] See, this remix has just highlighted what was annoying about the first version: that rhythm. That rhythm’s so prevalent in songs today, it fucking annoys me. Me and Hubby [RM Hubbert] were on a wee tour and we sat in a Travel Lodge one night watching the music channels with a carry out, and all the pop songs had the same shitty trance rhythm. If you watch any sort of pop thing, it’s such a limited palette of sound that people seem to be using. The Skinny: Even Girls Aloud, judging by their comeback single… Aidan: Oh, I haven’t heard the new Girls Aloud song, but after the Nicola Roberts album I don’t

see how they can come back, ‘cause that’s a fucking brilliant record. But [returning attention to Ramona Flowers] I’m afraid we have to ascertain from this remix that the old adage is true: you can’t polish a turd. They get 2, and only cause I quite like D/R/U/G/S. Can we hear the Girls Aloud song next? Is that allowed? The Skinny: Aye, why not… Girls Aloud – Something New (Polydor, 18 Nov) Aidan: Oh for fuck’s sake! What’s going on there? Is that Cheryl Cole’s influence? The title must be ironic because it sounds exactly like everything else that they’ll be competing against in the charts. Well, at least Kimberley will be in the video – that’s something to look forward to. But this is awful. And the bad news is I’m going to have to listen to that because I am undoubtedly going to go and see them when they play, and they’ll insist on playing their new record. I wish Girls Aloud had just stayed dead and let Nicola go on, but [shrugs] it didnae happen…

Aberdeen-born Ewan Robertson, aka Offshore, first came to prominence with a release on Stuff Records / Numbers, confirming him as one of the cream of the crop of Scottish beatsmiths alongside other up-and-comers like S-Type and Konx-Om-Pax. But where the longer-established likes of Rustie and Hudson Mohawke have tended towards a kind of super-polished space-age funk on their releases with Warp, Offshore is treading a more alternative, experimental path. Bake Haus contains moments of shambolic genius, like the post-rock flavoured Fraser, the tight, minimal drum-funk of Lifes Too, and the swaggering, fuzzed-out future bass of Name Brand, which sounds like Rustie circa Jagz The Smack. Black Bun is a gorgeous piece of minimal synth-funk and slide guitar, while 8-bit influences riddle the title track with a wonky, skewed charm. As a taster for his forthcoming full-length album on Big Dada, Bake Haus is full of promise; categorically ideas-led. [Bram E. Gieben] www.ninjatune.net/artist/offshore

Jack White – I’m Shakin’ (Third Man Records, 30 Oct) Aidan: It’s like a Sesame Street version of Tom Waits. Turn it off, I can’t be fucked with this. I liked a few of the early White Stripes records but lost interest pretty quick cause they basically made the same record about 5 times – which is rich coming from me but, you know… Zero. Animal Collective – Applesauce (Domino, 12 Nov) Aidan: I don’t quite know where I stand with Animal Collective. They’re the sort of band where I’ll hear a song like this one and like it, but find it difficult to get through their albums. I think I admire their inventiveness more than I enjoy their sounds – they make interesting sounds, but it lacks an emotional feel to me… I’ll give that 6.

Dizraeli & The Small Gods Never Mind

ECC Records, 26 Nov

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See our listings and Aidan’s website for full details.

Unlike Scroobius Pip, another artist who made the transition from hip-hop influenced poet to rapper with a record deal, Dizraeli’s flow is based on literate, witty wordplay rather than obvious jokes. His lyrics on Never Mind are alternately clever (“I’ve been thrown like the dice in the I-Ching”) or hilarious, but always intelligent (“I’m in effect! I’m ineffectual!”). Backed by folk-influenced live band The Small Gods, featuring the World Female Beatbox Champion Bellatrix, he makes a very English kind of rap music; tuneful, summery and infectious, driven by a marvellous accordion hook. B-side The Little Things is minimal and reflective, but just as tightly executed. This is how folk music should sound in 2012. [Bram E. Gieben]

www.aidanmoffat.co.uk

www.dizraeli.com

SINGLE OF THE MONTH: Stubborn Heart – Starting Block (One Little Indian, 26 Nov) Aidan: This is far and away the best thing I’ve heard so far. I’m a sucker for anything that has a frantic rhythm and a very calm vocal. Yes, I’m very fond of this actually, this is the sort of thing I’ll seek out and listen to at home. There’s a mystery about them that I quite like. I’ll give that 8. Aidan Moffat tours throughout Scotland with Bill Wells this November, starting at the Ian Rankin curated Aberfeldy Festival on 2 Nov and ending at Dundee Contemporary Arts on 28 Nov

November 2012

THE SKINNY 41


REVIEW : ALBUMS

ALBUM OF THE MONTH Godspeed You! Black Emperor ‘Allelujah! Don’t Bend! Ascend! Constellation, Out Now

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Of all the suspiciously frequent band reunions taking place over the past few years, elusive Canadian post-rock collective Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s reactivation in 2010 seemed to top everyone’s list for most unexpected. In typically low-key fashion, the group released this fourth offering out of nowhere at a show in Boston on October 1st, almost neatly a decade after previous effort Yanqui U.X.O.  Comprised mainly of reworkings – they had been known to play primitive versions of Mladic and We Drift Like Worried Fire live as far back as 2003 – ‘Allelujah feels as much like a lost relic as it does a gallant new statement, following on from the outright panic of Yanqui and spiralling into a whirlwind of dramatic aural beauty. There’s a Middle Eastern flavouring to these pieces; the aggressive, string-heavy flurry of Mladec – as well as the political nature of the record’s inserts – encourage vivid mental images of social revolutions in the Arab world, but, given the instrumental nature of the music, it’s difficult to form a concise narrative. It hardly matters; primarily, Godspeed have always connected with listeners on a primal level, and they’re as captivating and emotionally stirring now as ever. [Ross Watson]

Neil Halstead

DJ Yoda

Stumbleine

Sonic Cathedral, 5 Nov

Get Involved, 5 Nov

Monotreme, 19 Nov

Palindrome Hunches

Chop Suey

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Spiderwebbed

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On Palindrome Hunches’ penultimate song, Hey Daydreamer, Neil Halstead asserts the persistence of his idealistic outlook: “I don’t wanna be just OK / I wanna go everywhere / I wanna see everything.” It’s a statement that captures Halstead’s refusal to compromise, over a career spanning more than twenty years; but it also neatly summarises the impressive scope of his songwriting ambition, which began with Slowdive’s shoegaze soundscapes before moving into Mojave 3’s Americana-tinged indie in the ‘90s. The sparse, wintry folk of Halstead’s current solo work is a world away from Slowdive; the understated pieces here rarely feature more than gentle acoustic guitar, augmented with delicate piano and violin. Yet Palindrome Hunches never feels bland and repetitive; darker songs like Tied To You even channel some of Nick Drake’s arresting intensity. As Halstead has learned to strip away the embellishment, the richness of his husky, melancholy voice and the quiet assuredness of his songwriting have only become more evident. [Sam Wiseman]

DJ Yoda is arguably the single most important DJ to oversee the popularisation of turntablism as an art-form. Q-Bert may put on a more impressive technical display, but he hasn’t got the same sense of humour and zany, anything-goes approach. Yoda is the undisputed king party-rocker, his enduringly popular How To Cut & Paste series gracing many a student’s CD collection. With Chop Suey, he delivers pretty much exactly what you’d expect – chopped hip-hop breaks mutating into drum and bass (Charlie Sheen), upbeat, poptastic grime (The Interview, Pizza), funky cod-disco (Happy), danceable hip-hop soul (Big Trouble In Little China), and a slew of samples from cartoons, movies and YouTube clips. Not to mention a star-studded cast of guests – Action Bronson, Alice Russell, Sway and Scroobius Pip all pop up, but it’s Soom T and African Boy who steal the show on the carnival-esque dub of Rudies. Absolutely no surprises, but it’s a satisfying, diverse listen. [Bram E. Gieben]

Transcending the alternately melancholy and blissful post-dubstep of his self-released EPs, Stumbleine explores a breathtakingly broad range of sounds on Spiderwebbed. Opener Cherry Blossom features a house beat and familiar pitch-bent vocal samples, with a melodic, ambient warmth drenching the track in sunshine. The chiming guitar and understated beats of If You anchor the album to its creator’s indie-kid roots; as does the well-chosen and executed cover of Mazzy Star’s Fade Into You, with an achingly beautiful vocal performance from Steffaloo. Capulet is a more downbeat track, with a fragile piano melody underpinned by washes of ambient noise and half-heard vocal snippets. The album’s anthem is The Beat My Heart Skips, featuring CoMa – gentle guitar and beats underpin the song’s ethereal, hazy beauty, achieving a Cocteau Twins-esque atmosphere. The dub-influenced Solar Flare is also sublime. A strong, uplifting debut from an incredibly talented producer. [Bram E. Gieben]

www.neilhalstead.com

www.djyoda.co.uk

www.stumbleine.bandcamp.com

Clinic

James Iha

Ital

Domino, 12 Nov

The End, 5 Nov

Planet Mu, 5 Nov

Free Reign

Look to the Sky

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Dream On

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Now on their seventh LP, Clinic’s career has spanned a period in which rock that combines innovation and poppiness has become increasingly thin on the ground; but the Liverpudlians have always been hovering on the margins, quietly producing record after record of eccentric, leftfield, yet decidedly un-ostentatious indie. The key lies in their mining of influences that tend to be underappreciated by most pop-inspired guitar acts: Can, Neu! and the Monks, for example, are all shoehorned into Free Reign’s deliberately sketchy collision of catchiness and obliquity. It’s an approach that works most impressively on rockier songs like Seesaw and King Kong, when the trademark vintage organs take centre stage, and Clinic explore connections between post-punk angularity and driving krautrock. Some of the more indulgent pieces, such as the clarinet and wah-wah wig-out of Cosmic Radiation, can feel meandering; Clinic are at their best when their broad sweep of influences is kept in check by their melodic sensibilities. [Sam Wiseman]

James Iha’s first solo album (1998’s winsome Let It Come Down) served as a pleasant-enough, if underwhelming, soft rock missive from one of the alternative music scene’s most unassuming axe-men. Look to the Sky is a similarly unspectacular affair: opening with the startlingly pretty Make Believe before unleashing a couple of lush, layered dream pop numbers, it’s a frequently charming record that falls off disastrously in its second half. Iha wrote a handful of fantastic tunes during his years in the Pumpkins (Blew Away, Said Sadly, Go, etc etc) but even the highlights of Look to the Sky sound amateurish in comparison: Speed of Love provides one of the album’s strongest hooks in spite of its cringeworthy lyrics, whilst Till Next Tuesday is a serviceable facsimile of mid-nineties British indie. Unfortunately, Iha really lets himself down on the album’s home stretch, deploying a punishing string of clunkers that range from merely tedious to completely unlistenable. [Mark Shukla]

This is Ital’s second release on Mu this year, a followup to the understated but intriguing Hive Mind. On Dream On, Ital leads us firmly in the direction of the dancefloor. Opener Despot uses pitch-bent synths, chopped 808 kicks and vocal stabs to create the aura of a classic dance track, half Chi-house and half proto-Detroit techno. Boi is more minimal, with filtered vocal samples riding a beat that borrows from both footwork, juke and house. The dreamy Eat Shit (Waterfalls Remix) deserves a prettier name, with its tweaked, distorted and delayed synths, echoing shoegaze guitar stabs and downtempo beat. Elsewhere, Ital explores fractured techno, wonky soca and lo-fi electro, confirming him as a producer with a far-reaching, experimental approach to his music. The seven minutes of What A Mess, with staggering, rootless beats, half-heard machinespeak and undulating synths, is absolutely mesmeric, while closer Deep Cut, a live track, gives a flavour of Ital’s performance abilities. Strong, diverse work. [Bram E. Gieben]

www.clinicvoot.org

www.jamesiha.com

www.planet.mu/artists/ital

Brian Eno

Prince Rama

Andrzej Korzynski

Warp, 12 Nov

Paw Tracks, 5 Nov

Finders Keepers, 5 Nov

LUX

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Top 10 Hits of the End of the World

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Secret Enigma (1968–1981)

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After two patchy outings on Warp, LUX finds Eno returning to purely ambient pastures with a suite based on a recent gallery installation. A cursory listen reveals striking similarities to his sublime 1985 work, Thursday Afternoon: both are built around reverberant, minimal piano figures, subtle electronic textures and distant drones, and both effortlessly nail Eno’s ambient mission statement of “rewarding attention but not being so strict as to demand it.” LUX, however, is not holographic in the way Thursday Afternoon is – this music swells and peters in deliberate waves; its facets may catch the light in a similar way but there is a more tactile and deliberate agency behind their movement. True, Eno may not be breaking any new ground here but LUX’s patient susurrations remind us that whilst so called ‘ambient music’ has mutated in countless ways during the last quarter of a century, Eno’s singular ability to elicit its most nourishing qualities remains undiminished. [Mark Shukla]

For Top 10 Hits of the End of the World, Prince Rama have upped the ante, conceptually speaking, by delivering an album of ten pop hits by bands who died ‘during the apocalypse.’ As a comment on the impending/never-ending heat death of popular culture it’s clever enough, but as a listening experience it’s supremely unweildy and ultimately unsatisfying – especially coming from a band who had seemed so close to finding their own voice on 2011’s freewheeling, exploratory Trust Now LP. By deliberately taking themselves out of their psychedelic element and shackling themselves with the mandate of delivering pop songs the band have lost much of what made their sound fascinating. Too many tracks here sound like bare-bones synth/guitar jams that have been tarted up with a bit of jungle drumming – and while the vocals have a bit more mustard on them they don’t elevate the record above sounding like the work of a low-rent Gang Gang Dance. [Mark Shukla] Supporting animal collective at O2 abc on 7 Nov

Having already released two of his soundtrack recordings this year, Finders Keepers make good on their ongoing commitment to bring more of this eclectic Polish composer’s work to light with this fascinating anthology of rare cuts. Featuring everything from enchanting pastorals to dread ambience, Korzynski is revealed to have a particular penchant for decadent psychedelic freakouts – with throbbing porno bass and gloriously seedy funk guitar featuring prominently on numerous tracks. It really is a superbly diverse collection though: Tajemnica Enigmy is the song every Ghost Box artist wishes they had the chops to write; Saved from Oblivion will fill you with imagined nostalgia for your former life as a corrupt 1970s narcotics cop; and Opetanie Five provides a definitive answer to the question: does hell have a waiting room, and if so, what kind of Muzak are they piping in there? Wildly inventive, authentically odd and possessed of a rare elegance, it’s a ruddy essential collection, all told. [Mark Shukla]

brian-eno.net

www.princerama.tumblr.com

www.finderskeepersrecords.com

42 THE SKINNY

November 2012


REV I E W : A L B U M S

P.O.S.

Umberto

Mogwai

Rhymesayers, 5 Nov

Rock Action, 26 Nov

Rock Action, 19 Nov

We Don’t Even Live Here

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A Wrenched Virile Lore

Night Has a Thousand Screams

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Doomtree co-founder P.O.S. brings another sonically dense alt-rap assault with his fourth LP, and although the synth-heavy palette he’s working with this time somewhat marginalises his punk edge in favour of a more accessible, electroorientated sound, he can’t exactly be accused of dumbing down or mellowing out, as his witty, in your face lyricism – particularly on antiCapitalist banger Fuck Your Stuff – proves. The spacey, futuristic-yetretro vibe calls El-P’s production on his and Killer Mike’s latest efforts. An auto-tuned guest spot from Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon on Where We Land might work as well as he did on Yeezy’s last solo outing, but the rapid-fire electronics on Get Down and the album’s title track don’t quite marry with its smoother, poppier numbers. Despite this uneven dynamic, it’s an interesting change-up for the Minnesota-based rapper, brimming with other, more subtle nuances worth returning for. [Ross Watson]

Having honed his craft playing bass and synths in US prog/psych outfit Expo ‘70, Matt Hill focuses in his solo work as Umberto on horror and thriller soundtracks. Night Has a Thousand Screams is the result of a commission to score the 1982 Spanish slasher film Pieces at this year’s Glasgow Music and Film Festival. The title – a loose translation of the film’s Spanish name – gives an idea of what to expect; the tone throughout is taut, menacing and nightmarish, all pulsing synths and ever-rising arpeggios. Rather than update the conventions of slasher soundtracks, Hill’s approach feels like an authentic period piece, right down to the funk-inflected basslines that underpin the ubiquitous analogue synths. Although Screams never looks beyond its generic confines, that approach gives it a powerful concision and focus; its garish intensity places it alongside classic horror soundtracks like Goblin’s Suspiria, making Hill a contemporary master of the form. [Sam Wiseman]

A Wrenched Virile Lore is not strictly a remix album to Mogwai’s seventh studio record Hardcore Will Never Die, But You Will. In fact, Justin Broadrick’s opening take on George Square Thatcher Death Party is billed as a ‘reshape,’ whilst long-time friend R.M. Hubbert delivers an incongruous yet beautiful acoustic reworking of Mexican Grand Prix, mixing the original vocals and effects with his own sombre folk style. More conventional remixes are no less effective; synth duo Zombi concoct a bounding, eerie electro totem from the seemingly placid tones of Letters to the Metro whilst Hardcore’s highlight Rano Pano gets a double-whammy in the form of Klad Hest’s exuberant drum ‘n’ bass workout and Tim Hecker’s pulsing cyclical noise fest. In fact, AWVL rarely puts a foot wrong, feeling flush with invention and risk-taking, leading to moments which on occasion eclipse its parent album. No small praise. [Darren Carle] 

www.rhymesayers.com/pos

www.umberto.bandcamp.com

www.mogwai.co.uk

Deftones

The Twilight Sad

Trapped Mice

Reprise, 12 Nov

Fat Cat, 26 Nov

Armellodie, 5 Nov

Koi No Yokan

rrrrr Storming out of the gate with Swerve City – a brutally sexy sledgehammer of a song, and handsdown their best opener since White Pony’s Feiticeira – Deftones sound like a band brimming over with piss and vinegar on album number seven. Koi No Yokan may be a defiantly unprogressive collection, but that doesn’t render its emotional effect any less explosive. Romantic Dreams finds the band employing a beautiful time-sig change to underscore the super-sensual detonation of its euphoric chorus – and makes a convincing case for consideration as the band’s most breathtaking late-period song in the process. The album also serves as a vehicle for some of the most compelling lyrical missives of Chino Moreno’s career, with Tempest in particular feeling like a perfect realisation of his penchant for moody, hyper-vivid abstracts. Truth be told, Koi No Yokan is all the more remarkable for feeling like a vibrant recombination of the Sacramento veterans’ defining elements rather than a retread of past glories. [Mark Shukla] www.deftones.com

No One Can Ever Know - Remixes

Winter Sun

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rrrrr Winter Sun starts with An Ending: a two-minute instrumental in which plaintive accordion wheezes over traffic noise and sirens, conjuring an enticing air of mystery. It’s an evocative introduction, demonstrating that even without Ian Tilling’s studiedly poetic lyrics, Trapped Mice spin stories with skill. For the remainder of the band’s full length debut, Tilling’s passionate vocals are an upfront focal point, and his words prove extremely effective (Hermit Point and The Devil Wandered In in particular; awkward spoken-word piece Cameraman, less so). In terms of audible influences, Okkervil River continue to cast a pronounced shadow over the Edinburgh five-piece; a flattering comparison but one which exposes the occasional thinness of Winter Sun’s lo-fi production. While the home-recording perhaps undersells some of their music’s finer qualities, it can’t detract from the overall confidence with which they present themselves, best represented by ambitious centrepiece Quiet Place; a multi-part expedition with considerable impact. [Chris Buckle] Trapped Mice play Henry’s Cellar, Edinburgh on 10 Nov and 13th Note, Glasgow on 15 Nov

Guided By Voices

Jo Mango

Benjamin Gibbard

Fire, 12 Nov

Olive Grove , 5 Nov

City Slang, 12 Nov

The Bears for Lunch

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Murmuration

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Usually when a treasured act reforms, they hit the road, give fans an opportunity to hear the hits, and then go back to whatever it was they were doing beforehand, bank balances replenished and legacy topped up. Guided By Voices do things differently, with The Bears for Lunch their third album of 2012 – that’s 61 songs in 11 months (plus two solo albums from bandleader Robert Pollard to boot). Yet somehow, quantity hasn’t totally eclipsed quality. Opener King Arthur the Red gets everything right, its crunchy guitar solos setting a powerhouse pace. But Pollard never met an idea he didn’t consider worth committing to tape, and disposable tracks like Have a Jug could have done with spending a little longer at draft stage. In a parallel universe, Guided By Voices spent 2012 lapping up praise for one awesome album; instead, they settled for a trio of pretty good ones.[Chris Buckle]

It’s been six years since Jo Mango last released a full album. The Glasgow-based songwriter has been far from idle in that time, collaborating with artists as diverse as David Byrne, Roddy Woomble and Teenage Fanclub. But perhaps the most important influence on Mango has been her time spent in the touring band of freak-folk Godmother Vashti Bunyan. Her lyrical style and at times beguiling arrangements are similar, but Mango’s haunting child-like vocals are unquestionably her own, rendering songs like lilting lead single Cordelia all the more affecting. At times Adem’s production might feel a little slick for purists, and not quite every song can match the mesmeric, lofty highs of benchmark opener The Black Sun, but there is no doubt that this is an album expertly crafted by an unusually gifted talent. In the crowded field of contemporary folk, Murmuration is the living, breathing proof that Jo Mango is standing that bit taller than the rest. [Chris McCall]

www.robertpollard.net

Playing The Jazz Bar, Edinburgh on 1 Nov; The Glad Cafe, Glasgow on 3 Nov, and The Tunnels, Aberdeen on 7 Nov

Zombie Zombie

Tim Hecker and Daniel Lopatin

Versatile, 26 Nov

Software Recording Co., 19 Nov

Rituels d’Un Nouveau Monde

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Former Lives

Instrumental Tourist

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On Rituels d’Un Nouveau Monde, this French electro/neo-prog duo progress from their previous work – reinterpreting John Carpenter soundtracks – to forge similarly cinematic soundscapes of their own, combining analogue synths with contemporary technology, brass and live percussion. There’s an endearingly anachronistic spirituality and mysticism about their approach, even down to the period prog cover art and unashamedly hippified song titles – see opener The Wisdom of Stones (Do You Believe In...?).  The clearest influences here are from synth-oriented 70s instrumental acts like Tangerine Dream, but the hypnotic drumming on pieces like L’Age d’Or also brings Neu! to mind; elsewhere (on Black Paradise), the syncopated rhythms recall Sun Ra and other cosmic jazz. For an almost exclusively instrumental record (the chanted vocals on Rocket #9 being an exception), Rituels creates an impressive sense of narrative progression – although many listeners will find its epic conceptualism hard to take seriously. [Sam Wiseman]

The first of a series of proposed collaborations scheduled for release on the Software label finds these two kindred spirits embracing ‘jazz-based improvisation’ using sounds derived from ‘the acoustic resonance of digitally-sourced ‘Instruments of the World.’’ Whether or not that’s a euphemism for ‘getting smoked out and dicking around with keyboard presets,’ it’s a working method that has yielded some very fine results. The overall vibe of serenely psychedelic melancholy will be familiar to fans of either artist and while a couple of the pair’s experiments fall flat, the best work here (the exquisite, sensual modulations of Scene From a French Zoo; the yearning repetitions of Ritual for Consumption) really does hit the mark, pulling heavily from the history of kosmische, noise and ambient but never failing to bring through a bruised, human quality that is absolutely compelling. Instrumental Tourist will provide connoisseurs of resonant, emotional machine music with myriad psychic landscapes to explore. [Mark Shukla]

www.myspace.com/therealzombiezombie

www.softwarelabel.net

rrrrr If the key to unlocking former lives is regression, Ben Gibbard’s solo debut is perfectly titled: there’s scant sign of progress or advancement in these 12 tracks. Jettisoning the light experimentalism that’s characterised recent Death Cab for Cutie releases, Gibbard offers in its place a comparatively bland collection cobbled together over an eight-year period. A handful of relatively-strong cuts struggle for air: for instance, Teardrop Windows evokes Teenage Fanclub to decent effect, while Bigger Than Love overcomes its sickly slickness thanks to Aimee Mann’s soulful vocal contributions. But these are very much the exceptions – on the opposite side of the scales are the flavourless mariachi undertones of Something’s Rattling (Cowpoke); the insufferably wispy and wet lyrics to Lily; and the featureless plod of A Hard One to Know, which resembles Rilo Kiley on autopilot. Even these low-points aren’t catastrophic; they’re just a long, long way from their creator’s finest work. [Chris Buckle] www.facebook.com/bengibbardofficial

The Top five 1

Godspeed You! Black Emperor

'Allelujah! Don't Bend! Ascend!

2 Andrzej Korzynski Secret Enigma

Umberto 3 Night Has a Thousand Screams

4

deftones

Koi No Yokan

5 Mogwai

A Wrenched Virile Lore

November 2012

THE SKINNY 43


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44 THE SKINNY

NOVEMBER 2012


music

N E W B L OO D

Sunlight on Spiderwebs

One third of Bristol-based post-dubstep trio Swarms, Stumbleine is set to release his debut album Spiderwebbed, a hypnotic fusion of bass music, intricate beats, ethereal vocals and shoegaze guitar Interview: Bram E. Gieben

Stumbleine has been self-releasing his solo music since late 2011, but his association with the rise of the immaculate, sun-drenched post-dubstep sound sometimes termed ‘glo-fi’ or ‘chillwave’ goes back two more years, to the release of the first EP by Swarms, I Gave You Everything. As one third of Swarms, a Bristol-based trio originally from Malvern in Worcestershire, he contributed some exquisite, hazy shoegaze guitar textures and production to the three EPs and two albums by the band, including 2011’s Old Raves End, which was picked up by the Lo Dubs label and saw the band championed once again by the likes of Mary-Ann Hobbes. Much online hype followed, and before long Stumbleine’s Ghosting EP was picked up by Hijo De Colombia, in March of this year. Now signed to Monotreme, an independent UK label, he is set to release his achingly beautiful debut album Spiderwebbed. Swarms worked because they combined the talents of a bass music afficionado and DJ with the production nous of two musicians whose tastes lay more in the direction of shoegaze, ambient and post-rock. Stumbleine’s guitar-playing was a huge part of creating this sound. On his self-released EPs, there were many experiments with oddlypitched and timestretched vocals, dusted 2-step beats and washes of synth-noise – these elements remain present on Spiderwebbed, but Stumbleine’s guitar-playing is brought more to the fore. One memorable track is a blissful, narcotic cover of Mazzy Star’s Fade Into You. “I’ve been playing guitar for over ten years,” Stumbleine explains. “I was brought up on rock and indie really. I got into electronic music later through acts like Boards of Canada, M83 and FourTet. Burial’s self-titled album was a game changer for me.” This mention of the B-word pre-empts a criticism often levelled at ‘post-dubstep’ acts like Stumbleine, Swarms or Holy Other – that they are essentially Burial tribute acts. In the case of Stumbleine, this is totally unjustified. The way he uses vocal samples, and the intricate time-signatures of his beats, bears little resemblance to Burial’s cold, urban, hauntological beatscapes, other than the fact that they both create rich and atmospheric sonic worlds. “Vocal sampling has obviously got very popular again recently so I don’t think I stand out from the crowd in that sense, its just something I’ve always loved,” Stumbleine is quick to explain. His music has more in common with the

sun-drenched organic electronics of Balam Acab, or the reverb-swathed cathedrals of voice and guitar created by The Cocteau Twins. “I love walls of sound,” says Stumbleine. “I try to use guitars and piano to create layers reminiscent of my shoegaze and post rock influences. Many artists have a less organic style suited to DJing. I’m not dictated by tempos, and I like to experiment with irregular timings.” These shoegaze influences are really brought to the fore on Spiderwebbed, with some tracks invoking the ghost of perhaps those greatest of shoegaze pioneers, My Bloody Valentine: “Kevin Shields is one of my idols, his guitar playing and obsessive recording style is very unique,” says Stumbleine. “Loveless is a masterpiece, you can hear something new every time you play it. Shoegaze is a very nostalgic childhood sound for me. There’s something about the warm distortion consuming each track...” He is still close to his indie-rock roots. Stumbleine took his name from a Smashing Pumpkins B-side: “They’re one of the first bands I fell in love with,” he says. “I can remember as a kid stealing the double tape pack of Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness from my older brother and trying to figure out how to duplicate it on his hi-fi before he got home. I also took his tab book for Siamese Dream, and they were some of the first songs I learnt to play on guitar.” Like Balam Acab or The Haxan Cloak, he intends to use visuals if he starts to play live: “It goes hand in hand with the sound,” he explains. But that day is still a way off: “I’ve got no plans to gig at the moment, I produce for headphones mainly.” On headphones, his tracks evoke a particular feeling: “They’re all based on the idea of fading memories and nostalgia,” he says. This love for nostalgic images and childhood perspectives is echoed in the artwork for his releases, with “layers of images trying to tell a story,” he explains. “It seems to match the lo-fi dreamy sound.” Designed by his close friend Low Sun, his covers are like halfglimpsed memories of childhood summers. Another of the vital elements in Stumbleine’s sound is the presence of haunting, dream-like female vocals, provided by collaborators Asa, Mush Records signing and Blackbird Blackbird collaborator Steffaloo, and German singer CoMa, who has collaborated with the likes of Sorrow and Sun Glitters. “I’ve done a lot of work with Asa since I started Stumbleine, we share similar tastes

“I   love walls of sound” stumbleine so it was easy to collaborate,” he says. They have released one EP as a two-piece, the enchanting Your Secret, on Inspected Records. “Our EP was a natural progression,” Stumbleine explains. “We’ve ended up living five minutes away from each other, randomly.” His other collaborators were discovered through Stumbleine’s own listening: “CoMa and Steffaloo were vocalists I admired from afar. I tried to produce tracks that might suit their style before getting in contact,” he says, describing them both as “amazing vocalists.” Between 2011 and 2012, Stumbleine has produced a frankly astonishing amount of music, both by himself and in collaboration. How does he manage to stay so productive? “Sometimes you can write two tracks a week and other times you can go months without writing anything,” he says modestly. “You need to make hay while the sun shines, I guess. Ghosting and Sunshine Girls are collections of early tracks, so some of those are over two years old. With the amount of samples I use, it’s difficult getting a release together... The Night Before is an EP of tracks that were in contention for my debut album but had too many sample issues. Spiderwebbed is my first legitimate release.” How did he approach the cover of Fade Into You? “I was worried I might butcher a classic track,” he admits, “but it didn’t turn out too bad. I specifically set out to do a cover instead of a remix. I don’t like the culture of artists remixing shit pop tracks to try and make a name for themselves so I thought I would cover an old track. I like to pay homage to my influences.” This is a key point – Stumbleine’s music wears its influences on its sleeve, but never feels derivative. Rather, Stumbleine has managed to bind together fragile strands of musical webbing, from Radiohead (his

first cover version was a haunting re-work of Fake Plastic Trees, featuring CoMa, from The Night Before EP) to Ride, to ‘90s R&B. Stumbleine thinks of the early ‘90s as “a great era for music,” when he was at “a very influential age.” Of the ‘90s R&B influence, he says: “It’s definitely engraved into the minds of our generation, you couldn’t really avoid it growing up. Old memories come flooding back when I hear some of the tracks these days, so the nostalgic style fits perfectly with Stumbleine.” There are very few interviews with Stumbleiene, or his collaborators, currently online. All three members of Swarms prefer to remain anonymous, known only by their chosen band names. Has Stumbleine deliberately created an air of mystery around himself, or is he just shy? “This is the first interview I’ve ever done,” he says. “I didn’t set out to be a faceless character, it can quickly turn into a gimmick. I just like the idea of people making up their own minds about the music, I don’t think it’s really about me as a person so I stay away from the limelight.” In an era where genres seem to be created and then disappear faster than bands themselves, how would he describe his music? Chillwave? Postdubstep? Ambient? “It’s funny how there’s always huge debates about genre definition,” he says. “I’ve taken to using ‘glo-fi’ and ‘nightbus!’” Glo-fi seems like a good term for Stumbleine, incorporating a sense of his music’s warmth and beauty. He is not worried about how people define the music: “I don’t think it really matters, some people just need to put things in boxes,” he says. “There are some terrible ones though, I don’t like ‘chillstep,’ it sounds like some shit ambient compilation...” In the final analysis, such reductive genre tags are worse than useless when trying to describe music as rich and enchanting as Stumbleine’s – far better to press play on Spiderwebbed, close your eyes, and drift away into memory. Spiderwebbed is out 19 Nov on Monotreme. Stumbleine’s previous EPs can be found at stumbleine.bandcamp.com

November 2012

THE SKINNY 45


clubs

P REV I E W S

CLUBBING HIGHLIGHTS Words: Omar J. Kudos

Illustration: Andrew Denholm

Remember, remember, it’s freezing-cold November; which means fireworks, parties, and guest-spots from some mouth-wateringly exciting international DJs in both Edinburgh and Glasgow. Things kick off on Friday 2 Nov as Numbers welcome future-garage star and remixer extraordinaire SBTRKT to the Sub Club (2 Nov, £TBC). If bass-led electronica isn’t your thing, there is a more house-oriented alternative the following night, as Gregg Wilson joins the alwaysawesome Melting Pot ressies (3 Nov, The Admiral, £12). Highlife also welcome Charanjit Singh, seminal creator of the classic Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat, to La Cheetah (3 Nov, £5 adv.). Over in Edinburgh, the first weekend of the month is packed with goodies: take your pick from club-night-meets-indie-gig Hypstonite, who welcome Chemikal’s Miaoux Miaoux and Fatherson for an early gig leading into some dancefloor-based shenanigans (2 Nov, Teviot, 8.30pm-3am, £TBC), and the cream of Edinburgh;s techno scene, who go head to head in different venues, with superlative dark techno pioneer Inigo Kennedy joining residents Patrick Walker and Neil Templar (check their DJ chart, also featured this month) at Unseen (2 Nov, Studio 24, £8/10), and Edinburgh Tekno Cartel (ETC), who bring Suburbass to their horror-themed fancy dress blow-out, this month relocated to the Wee Red Bar (2 Nov, £7 / £5 in fancy dress). Back in the Sub Club, the über-trendy High Sheen label’s head honcho Ben Martin joins the plucky young i-Am residents Beta and Kappa (6 Nov, £5) for some mid-week party action, and A-Trak brings the turntablist madness in aid of clothing label We Own (6 Nov, £TBC). One of the most exciting events happening this month is the Codeine Drums showcase at La Cheetah (9 Nov, £5/7), featuring live sets from Nightwave and Rob Data, and a promised old-school rave set from the ever-versatile KonxOm-Pax of Planet Mu. Back across the M8, Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston bring their acclaimed A Love From

Outer Space night to the capital (9 Nov, The Caves, £10/12), while bass music afficionados face the Hobson’s choice of picking between the hypercolour synth-funk of Rustie at Electrikal Fridays (9 Nov, Teviot, £TBC) and the charged-up drum-funk of Benga at Xplicit (9 Nov, The Bongo Club, £TBC). For the techno purists, there’s also the welcome return of Luke Slater, who plays Pulse the same night (The Annexe, £9). As Friday rolls around again, Glaswegians have a tough choice between Optimo residents, as JD Twitch joins Clouds, HaHaHa and a whole host of other local heroes at the Processed Beats showcase (16 Nov, The Arches, £7 adv.), and JG Wilkes joins Numbers main man Jackmaster at The Berkeley Suite (16 Nov, £4/7). Later in the month, the Optimo boys are joined by Horse Meat Disco (Sun 25, SuubClub, £TBC). Those looking for some fun on Fri 16 Nov in Edinburgh could do worse than check out long-running favourite Four Corners (The Bongo Club, £3/5), where they will hear a seriously funky blend of soul, reggae and the odd bit of hip-hop from the residents team, led by the always-on-form Astroboy. As November winds to a close, the Make Noise: Electronic Recycling Tour could well tempt you in with sets from Benji B and Martelo, not to mention a live performance by electronic / experimental sweethearts Conquering Animal Sound (22 Nov, Sub Club, £TBC). The undoubted highlight of the month is also a Sub Club-based adventure, as all three founders of the mighty, progressive bass music label Hessel Audio come to town – you’d be mad to miss Ben UFO, Pearson Sound and Pangaea (23 Nov, £TBC). And if you still haven’t had enough bass, there’s always the early-doors, Annie Mac-curated showcase featuring Magnetic Man, Redlight and Rudimental (O2 ABC, 7pm – 10pm, £10). Wrapping up Edinburgh for November, soundsystems clash as Witness take on Electrikal. They welcome Flostradamus, backed by Taz Buckfaster, Anarkid and Skanky B (28 Nov, Sneaky Pete’s, £5).  

Feel My Bicep Old and bitter house DJs will tell you that the movement never went away; young and stupid ones will cravenly compare it to the Second Coming (more like the twentieth); the rest of you are probably just hoping it doesn’t portend a demonic pact between Pat Sharp, Noel Edmonds and Mr Blobby. As is usually the case, there’s a bit more to it than that. Over the last few years, Andy Ferguson and Matt McBriar have assembled a not insubstantial body of 12” singles, many of which take a lead from Kerri Chandler’s roundhousing 909 kicks and the hopscotch arrangements of Marc Kinchen. But, as their Feel My Bicep blog illustrates, their tastes stretch a little bit beyond labels such as KMS and King Street Records. Records from acid house pioneers Phuture, French new wave producer Le Syndicat Electronique, and jazz musician Idris Muhammad count among their more outré selections, and though it’s not a breadth that can be ascribed to their production, it goes a long way to alleviating any suspicion that they’ve leapt onto the heaving, rickety 90s house bandwagon. With the exception of the somewhat overstuffed piano house of Vision Of Love, the majority of the Bicep catalogue bears an impressive clarity of purpose, and much of it has some semblance of

46 THE SKINNY

November 2012

emotive range, too. From the aptly-titled New Jersey house tribute $tripper (apt because a second-hand copy on Discogs fetches upwards of £28, and it’ll peel whatever’s left of your nearest club’s piss-poor paint job), to the sombre US garage skip of You (a song co-produced by fellow Northern Ireland native Ejeca, and released on Will Saul’s excellent Aus label) and the faintly sinister, Twin Peaks-esque swirl of Echo Vibes, there’s a degree of restraint at play that sets them apart from the raft of coked-up, cut-and-shut jobs rolling out from a production line staffed by dubstep chancers chopping R&B vocals with all the finesse of a drunken tugboat captain docking arse-first at Faslane. Now running a label (on which Visions of Love was released, and is going for a not inexpensive sum on the second-hand market) alongside their blog, Ferguson and McBriar are set to close the year with a run of singles that have been as popular as they have been impressive. Whether or not they’re spearheading some kind of Romero-style raising of the corpses of Strictly Rhythm, Dance Mania et al, you feel that the hack job will be left to someone else. [Ray Philp] Playing Castle Club, Edinburgh on 3 Nov and Sub Club, Glasgow on 24 Nov. 11pm, £12 www.feelmybicep.com


REVIEW: PREVIEWS

DJ CHART: PATRICK WALKER & NEIL TEMPLAR ( UNSEEN ) Edinburgh’s Unseen residents PATRICK WALKER and NEIL TEMPLAR bring you five tracks each from the cutting edge of techno WORDS: BRAM E. GIEBEN

LEADING THE resurgence of the Edinburgh techno scene, Patrick Walker (FSG / Perc Trax / ISM) and Neil Templar (Dogma) are the residents at UNSEEN, whose guests so far at the legendary Studio 24, the ancestral home of underground techno in the capital, have included Casual Violence, Adam X, IFORMAT, and DJs from seminal Berlin techno club Tresor. This month, they play host to Inigo Kennedy (Token / Semantica / Assymetric). They take us through five each of their most dancefloor-devastating electronic battle weapons.

NEIL TEMPLAR (UNSEEN / DOGMA) 1. MARK ROGAN – PARANOIA (Bas Mooy Remix) [DSNT] Dark, no frills, can’t-see-through-the-smoke-andstrobes dancefloor-stomping action. 2. KANGDING RAY – OISE (ORIGINAL MIX) [Stroboscopic Artefacts] Stroboscopic Artefacts are currently at the forefront of all that is techno. From ambient atmospheric works, to head-twisting foot pounders, the quality is consistently unshakable. 3. UNTOLD – MOTION THE DANCE (Original Mix) [Hemlock Recordings] The contrast between the rough and the smooth here makes for an unexpected ride for the listener. 4. GO HIYAMA – DYMAXION MAP (Original Mix) [Token] Japan’s finest with another excellent release on Token. Haunting, heavy hitting, percussive techno. 5. JOSEPH MCGEECHAN – FAILED BY THE CONFORMISTS (Ancient Methods Sgt. Howie Remix) [Prosthetic Pressings] Glasgow-based Joseph McGeechan (Iformat) is on an unstoppable trajectory towards great things right now. Here, the infamous and elusive Ancient Methods are on remix duties, keeping things industrial and heavy, the way we like it.

PATRICK WALKER (UNSEEN / FORWARD STRATEGY GROUP / ISM / PERC TRAX) 1. KETTENKARUSSELL – YOU N ME [Giegling] Haunted house vibes for lovers of endless space and sound. A warm, upbuilding vibe that can’t fail to win hearts and minds. 2. PANGAEA – INNA DAZE [Hessle Audio] Solid! Stepping rhythms combine with post-rave / Sheffield bleep vibes. Pangaea is proof that dubstep was never a final destination. 3. MILTON BRADLEY – ALIENATED [Alien Rain] Milton Bradley is one of the most authentic upand-coming producers working out of Berlin. The Faceless: Alien Rain series is a new chapter in the man’s work which sees him exploring tense, acidic techno reminiscent of the early material on Plus-8 / Probe / M_nus etc. 4. TRUSS’ME – SWEET MOTHER (Marcel Dettman Mix) [Prime Numbers] Prime Numbers is a very interesting label, mixing up discerning house, jazz, techno and more stepping-oriented grooves. This mix from Berghain Resident Detmann effortlessly combines afrobeat and subtle Latin vibes, then wraps the result in a 3am techno cloak. 5. LOKTIBRADA – UNTITLED (Female Remix) [RSB] Just about anything on the elusive / distro-driven RSB is essential for the harder, more discerning floors, usually geared around broken-beat / industrial or the Birmingham techno sound of artists such as Surgeon, Regis, Mick Harris etc, the output here is consistently bowel-loosening. INIGO KENNEDY PLAYS UNSEEN ON 12 NOV, ALONGSIDE PATRICK WALKER AND NEIL TEMPLAR. STUDIO 24, 10.30PM-3AM, £8 BEFORE MIDNIGHT / £10 AFTER

NOVEMBER 2012

THE SKINNY 47


REV I E W

film

november EVENTS

the master

The Master

Amour

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson Starring: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Jesse Plemons, David Warshofsky, Laura Dern Released: 2 Nov Certificate: TBC

Director: Michael Haneke Starring: Jean-Louis Trintignant, Emmanuelle Riva, Isabelle Huppert, Alexandre Tharaud. Released: 16 Nov Certificate: 12A

rrrrr The Master opens at the close of WWII with sailor Freddie Quell (Phoenix), our perpetually horny hero, caressing a crumbling female sand sculpture. The rest of the movie deals with his quest to achieve a similar moment of grace. After the navy he stumbles through a series of peripatetic adventures and into the life of avuncular cultist Lancaster Dodd (Hoffman). Any similarities to L. Ron Hubbard are entirely intentional, but this isn’t an incendiary attack on Scientology, more a spiritual Pygmalion with Phoenix a heretical Eliza Doolittle. There’s so much to adore here: the dead-on 50s detail; temporal shifts as dizzying as Freddie’s homemade booze; Jonny Greenwood’s unnerving cacophony of chimes and strings; and performances, particularly Phoenix’s self-loathing wild man, for the ages. Anderson also adds a fascinating female character into this daddy-son dynamic. Dodd may be master of his vessel of followers but, as we see in a charged scene played out in front of a mirror, his wife (Adams) has her hand firmly on the rudder. [Jamie Dunn]

rrrrr We’re used to Michael Haneke films being difficult viewing experiences, but Amour is something different from this great filmmaker. Often accused of being coldly remote, cynical even, Haneke has now created a film that hits you in the gut, and elicits a deeper emotional response than any of his features have in the past. To watch Georges (Trintignant) care for his stricken wife Anne (Riva) is to witness an almost heroic act of love and tenderness, and while a film about an elderly woman slowly deteriorating after a stroke may sound like the most depressing experience imaginable, there’s something inspirational about Amour. The title is appropriate because the film presents an aspect of love that few films have dared to explore, and while Haneke’s trademark intelligence and rigour is apparent in every frame, the compassion he shows towards these characters feels new. Of course, he is aided by two of French cinema’s great icons, with the courageous, dignified performances offered by Trintignant and Riva here being simply beyond praise. [Philip Concannon] artificial-eye.com

Laurence Anyways

Sightseers

Director: Xavier Dolan Starring: Melvil Poupaud, Suzanne Clément, Nathalie Baye, Monia Chokri Released: 30 Nov Certificate: 15

Director: Ben Wheatley Starring: Alice Lowe, Steve Oram Released: 30 Nov Certificate: 15

rrrrr

rrrrr

Xavier Dolan certainly isn’t lacking in confidence. Fortunately, he has the talent to match it. The young director’s third feature, Laurence Anyways, is his most ambitious effort yet; a 160-minute romp through the 1990s and the life of a cross-dressing teacher (Poupaud) and his lover (Clément). Given the number of critics (this one included) who accused Dolan’s Heartbeats of being style over substance, a decade-spanning melodrama may sound like a recipe for disaster, but Dolan has pulled it off with astounding aplomb. The style is still here, and Dolan can’t resist any opportunity to watch his characters walking in slow-motion to some uncannily appropriate soundtrack choice, but Laurence Anyways is really driven by the raw emotions that are so powerfully expressed by the superb leads. Many will argue that Dolan still displays his immaturity on occasion and will accuse him of self-indulgence, but plenty of viewers will fall in love. This is spectacular, passionate filmmaking from a director who’s growing up fast. [Philip Concannon]

Ben Wheatley’s absurdist Sightseers plays out like a trainspotters’ Badlands. There’s great wit at play as we follow simmering sociopath Chris and the childlike Tina (Steve Oram and Alice Lowe, who also take writing credits) through their murderous caravan trip around the Midlands’ cultural hotspots, which makes the harsh justice the pair mete out to assorted louts and toffs along the way all the more effective. Wheatley, Oram and Lowe have constructed an affectionate ode to the British heritage holiday and the inherent quirks of its various attractions, but also sharp social satire. Chris’s disenchantment and disenfranchisement is smartly drawn, as is the repressed Tina, whose confused romantic and sexual awakening is equally riotous and heartbreaking. Gorgeously shot in sumptuous surroundings, with a neat, Carpenter-inflected score and winning, low-key performances, Sightseers delivers tar-black comedy and a good deal of gruesomeness in spades. There’s even a cute wee dog thrown-in to help sweeten the slaughter. [Chris Fyvie] blog.sightseersmovie.com

Rust and Bone

Silver Linings Playbook

Director: Jacques Audiard Starring: Marion Cotillard, Matthias Schoenarts, Armand Verdure, Celine Sallette Released: 2 Nov Certificate: 15

Director: David O. Russell Starring: Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver, Anupam Kher, Chris Tucker Released: 21 Nov Certificate: TBC

rrrrr

rrrrr

Switching gear again after the brilliant yet very different The Beat That My Heart Skipped and A Prophet, writer/director Jacques Audiard comes slightly unstuck with intimate melodrama Rust and Bone. A work of breathtaking intensity, there’s nevertheless a point where so much misery has been thrown on screen that the narrative becomes predictable; imagine something terrible, and it’s probably going to happen. Ali (Schoenaerts) is a down-at-heel boxer headed to the south of France with young son Sam. While working there as a club doorman he meets the dazzling Stéphanie (Cotillard), an orca trainer. Following a grizzly accident, the bruiser develops a relationship with Stéphanie, which has a tenderness and attentiveness he struggles to replicate with his own flesh and blood. A grainy, handheld aesthetic and tight framing lend the piece authenticity, as do the wonderful performances, but the sheer emotional brutality of what unfolds alienates rather than envelops. The redemption is a long time coming, and ambiguous when it does, leaving this a slightly unsatisfying experience. [Chris Fyvie]

Silver Linings Playbook is a romantic comedy about two bipolar screw-ups trying to win a dance competition. Chris Tucker is in a supporting role. It should be unwatchable. But in the sure hands of America’s most effervescent humanist director, David O. Russell, it’s unmissable. Like The Fighter and Flirting with Disaster, Russell’s subject is a chaotic family. Pat (Cooper) is the prodigal son returning home after a spell in an asylum; Pat Sr (De Niro) is a gambling-nut barred from his local football team’s ground for going postal on opposing fans; and poor mum Dolores (Weever) holds everything together with meat-based game-watching snacks. Russell’s genius is that he can spin the most threadbare of scenarios into screwball gold. When Pat is introduced to Tiffany (Lawrence), who’s recently widowed, the meeting involves gags about her dead spouse and subsequent nymphomania. This is cinema at its most alive, with frantic zooms and breakneck edits adding fizz to a genre that had long lost its sparkle. [Jamie Dunn]

www.artificial-eye.com

www.silverliningsplaybookmovie.com

48 THE SKINNY

November 2012

The Cameo in Edinburgh is celebrating the works of Joel and Ethan Coen by screening one of their movies every Thursday this month. Miller’s Crossing starts the strand on 1 Nov, followed by Fargo, The Big Lebowski, multiple Oscar winner No Country for Old Men, Burn After Reading and True Grit. The Coen brothers have established a dedicated cult following over the years, and this retrospective, in chronological order to allow viewers to see the writer/director/producers’ development through the years, promises to be very popular. On 7 Nov a silent horror classic, Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror, is screening at the DCA in Dundee. An adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula in all but name, it features Max Schreck as Count Orlok, the eternally creepy yet oddly sympathetic vampire. In 2000 Shadow of the Vampire, a fictionalised account of F.W. Murnau’s production, suggested that Schreck really was one of the undead – watch his unsettling performance and decide for yourself. This screening is accompanied by a special live musical performance by Minima.

a trip to the moon

The French Film Festival is running across Scotland from 8 Nov-2 Dec, with several cinemas participating. A highlight is Georges Méliès’ 1902 sci-fi classic A Trip to the Moon / Le voyage dans la lune, showing at the GFT (20 Nov), DCA (24 Nov), Bo’ness (25 Nov), and Filmhouse (26 Nov). Accompanied by a documentary about the film’s complex restoration, Le voyage extraordinaire, this is a rare chance to view this iconic short in its original glory, with a new soundtrack by Air. The festival also boasts a wealth of contemporary films, including animation and documentary, as well as several special guests and events. Check out frenchfilmfestival.org.uk for more details.

a man escaped

November sees the launch of Trashkino, a new monthly film night from musician and filmmaker Adam Stafford. The inaugural screening is Robert Bresson’s 1958 masterwork A Man Escaped, a WWII-set prison-break movie about a French resistance fighter escaping a Nazi slammer. A deeply humanistic examination of mankind’s resilience to oppression, it’s as stripped back and frill-free as its title. As a warmup to Bresson there’ll be a programme of short films and “some very weird vinyl DJ’ed in between.” A free event, it takes place at Glasgow School of Art union on Sauchiehall St, 26 Nov. The GFT is hosting several films as part of the UK Jewish Film Festival, which aims to promote awareness of Jewish life and customs, between 1-18 Nov. Simon and the Oaks, based on a bestselling novel by Marianne Fredriksson, is screening 6-7 Nov, while The Matchmaker, from acclaimed Israeli filmmaker Avi Nesher, is showing on 13 Nov. [Becky Bartlett]


REVIEW : DVD

Casque D’Or

Margin Call

Director: Jacques Becker Starring: Simone Signoret, Serge Reggiani, Claude Dauphin Released: 5 Nov Certificate: PG

Director: J.C. Chandor Starring: Kevin Spacey, Paul Bettany, Zachary Pinto, Stanley Tucci, Jeremy Irons Released: 12 Nov Certificate: 15

rrrrr When Marie and Georges dance together in the opening scenes of Casque D’Or (1952) we know from their smouldering looks that we have a serious case of amour fou on our hands. We also know that their love is doomed because Marie runs with a gang of vengeful, dandyish gangsters – the Ant Hill Mob but with straw boaters, silk waistcoats and elaborate coiffures – who use their ornate flick knives for more than just cutting their fromage. Jacques Becker directs this handsome Belle Epoque period piece at a measured pace, giving the couple’s tragic path a terrible inevitability. His restraint is also in evidence in the staging of a nocturnal knife-fight, played out with desperate slowness while only the combatants’ laboured breathing and the distant barking of a dog break the silence. The great Simone Signoret infuses the role of Marie with a gutsy, playful defiance which raises her character far above the typical tart-with-a-heart. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

The Passion of Joan of Arc Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer Starring: Renee Maria Falconetti Released: 19 Nov Certificate: PG

rrrrr A silent film from 1928 depicting the trial of Joan of Arc for heresy is never going to be the first choice for a Saturday night’s viewing, but this stark, taut drama from Carl Theodor Dreyer is a revelation, a demonstration of silent cinema at its peak and a world away from the baggy melodrama and bombast often associated with the form. What is striking is how much of this silent film is concerned with talking – the wheedling interrogation of Joan is dense with theological argument. This is conveyed in part by lengthy intertitles, but primarily by looming close ups which contrast Joan’s smooth, regular features with the craven, ruined faces of the churchmen. Falconetti’s performance is extraordinary, capturing both Joan’s ecstatic faith and her fear of being burnt at the stake. Dreyer’s story of religious faith on trial under threat of torture and martyrdom, alongside his startling formal innovations, make a compelling case for his masterpiece’s continued relevance. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

The Castle of Cagliostro Director: Hayao Miyazaki Starring: Yasuo Yamada, Eiko Masuyama Released: 12 Nov Certificate: PG

rrrrr The Castle of Cagliostro is a 1979 animated film from Hayao Miyazaki, the anime maestro who would later direct such Studio Ghibli classics as Spirited Away and Ponyo. Opening with a frantic escape by the master thief Arsene Lupin III and his sidekick Daisuke Jigen from a Monaco casino they have just robbed, we soon find our heroes heading into the Alps on the trail of legendary forgers and a princess locked in the tower of a half-submerged castle. Coming on like a bizarre hybrid of The Count of Monte Cristo, Tintin, vintage Bond, and The Pink Panther, the film presents us with such conundrums as a French hero who eats with chopsticks and a semi-ruined castle with exterior glass elevators. But there is much to be enjoyed in this playful, frenetic adventure which lurches from cliffhanger to cliffhanger. If the animation is a little crude, the backgrounds are beautifully realised, a delightful mix of the fantastic and the retro. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

rrrrr “Remember this day, boys, remember this day.” When a young analyst at a sleek, Wall Street investment firm discovers that the mathematical model they have based their trading on has left the company exposed to billions of dollars of losses, the key players all come together for an all-night session to decide what they should do. The decision they make will not only affect their own future, but potentially that of the whole economy. Margin Call assembles an almost ludicrously heavyweight cast – from Kevin Spacey, through the Mentalist (sorry, Simon Baker) and Demi Moore, to Jeremy Irons – to ponder the rights and wrongs of the beginnings of the Great Recession. The film is refreshing in its determination not to simply glamourise or demonise these financial wizards, but its desire to sum up the whole crisis means that, at times, the film becomes just a series of static, over-determined conversations held in lofty offices and gleaming toilets. [Keir Roper-Caldbeck]

Santa Sangre Director: Alejandro Jodorowsky Starring: Axel Jodorowsky, Bianca Guerra, Guy Stockwell Released: 5 Nov Certificate: 18

rrrrr Jodorowsky’s unforgettable masterpiece of the macabre finally gets a welcome Bluray release, fully restored and remastered for UK cinephiles. Traumatised by childhood tragedy, a former circus magician struggles to overcome his crackpot mother’s influence. To say anything more risks spoiling the journey, one which continually surprises and delights. Cultists, murders, drugs, bizarre hallucinations. This has it all and none of it is dead weight or feels like filler. Jodorowsky’s brilliance lies in the way he understands that the gruesome can sit alongside the beautiful and that a film for adults can allow itself to be childish. It’s a horror film, it’s sad, it’s cruel, it’s often very funny. It commits to every moment on the screen and its passion puts lesser films to shame. Fans of the weird and wonderful will love this, but everyone else shouldn’t miss out. Put simply, it’s one of those rare films that remind us why we bother with cinema in the first place. [Scotty McKellar]

A Simple Life Director: Ann Hui Starring: Deanie Ip, Andy Lau Released: 19 Nov Certificate: PG

rrrrr In perhaps the ultimate example of method acting, Andy Lau has spent his life as godson to Deanie Ip before playing opposite her in a dramatic role that mirrors that real relationship. Ah Tao (Ip) is the nanny who has been with the family since youngest son, Roger (Lau), can remember, assimilating the nurturing role of mother in place of his own distanced blood. When she has a stroke the roles cruelly reverse and the weight of dependence shifts. Veteran Director Ann Hui paints in delicate strokes, but while this may seem soft he is playing with powerful emotions. There are some delightful silences, raised eyebrows; comfortable gestures of those who have known each other all their life. Lau takes a restrained backseat in what is basically a Rainman dynamic, yet Ip plays it far more subtly than Hoffman and rightfully won Best Actress at Venice. There’s no more original way to say it; she simply sparkles. [Alan Bett]

November 2012

THE SKINNY 49


art

REVIEW

UGO RONDINONE THE COMMON GUILD, UNTIL 19 NOV, FREE

rrrrr

SEMI RHUBABA

rrrrr It is a brave move to introduce an exhibition by quoting from Shelley’s Ozymandias - ‘Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!’ – but there is nothing to despair of in Rhubaba’s latest show. The gallery programmes as a group, yet Semi benefits from one coherently curated voice, producing a busy and awkward, yet occasionally brilliant show. The sublime and the ridiculous sit together throughout, often within the same work, and the vulnerable and pathetic position of the artist as performer is the theme from which the shows derives its ready humour. In Gelitin’s untitled photographs, naked men seemingly aroused by their natural surroundings are a funny and subversive reference to the male worship of the sublime by painters such as Caspar David Friedrich – do they also bring a further meaning to the

show’s polysemic title Semi? The nakedness of the artist is dealt with less literally yet possibly more effectively in works by Lucy Clout, Sian Robinson Davies of Internet, and in particular Josephine Flynn, whose work My Journey (based on true stories) exposes her naked emotion in response to Hollywood movies about the power of competition, creating one of the funniest yet most easily overlooked works in the show. Peter Amoore’s humour derives from making insignificance vital to the work and only David Blandy’s film Anjin 1600: Episode 1 feels shoehorned in – possibly for the sake of a big name. Yet Alan Currall’s work bookends the show well with a welcome and goodbye that unsettles and amuses in equal measure. [Kate Grenyer] WWW.RHUBABA.ORG

ADVERTISING FEATURE: OWN ART

DCA PRINTS WORDS: JAC MANTLE

JANE & LOUISE WILSON, FALSE POSITIVE, FALSE NEGATIVE_2012, EDITION OF 20_COURTESY THE ARTISTS AND DUNDEE CONTEMPORARY ARTS

Galleries across Scotland are members of the Own Art scheme. By offering interest-free loans of £100-£2,000 through Own Art, buying an original piece of quality contemporary art or craft couldn’t be easier. For more information about Own Art and a list of participating galleries see the Own Art website: www.ownart.org.uk Look for the pink logo. (representative 0% APR)

50 THE SKINNY

NOVEMBER 2012

The first few sculptures in Swiss-born, New Yorkbased artist Ugo Rondinone’s debut Scottish exhibition, primitive – hand-made birds cast in bronze, between six and eight inches in height – are placed on the floor, making the viewer actively engage with the works and the gallery space by kneeling or crouching to take in their fine detail. Their feathers bear the artist’s thumb and fingerprints, carefully moulded by Rondinone to express archetypal forms. Like carrion birds, the taller sculptures exude a deathly menace in their stillness. The smaller birds resemble inquisitive starlings; one tiny bird, called ‘the flora,’ crouches with head upturned, asking a mute question of a larger bird named ‘the earth.’ The birds crowd the staircase, suddenly at eye level, confronting visitors with their hollow, eyeless sockets. They become threatening, perhaps attempting to convey some dire ecological warning. Large mirrors reflect and double the space, affording the vista of an entire room carpeted with the creatures. The effect is undeniably Hitchcockian – turning from the mirror, there is a flicker of motion, but the birds remain inert. Their capacity for flight is imminent, implied, but never represented. Like Polly Morgan’s macabre taxidermy sculptures, these are creatures out of time – beyond or beneath the skin of reality.

Unafraid to experiment with myriad different forms and techniques, Rondinone’s exuberant, rainbow-coloured neon signs adorn the streets of New York’s fashionable Lower East Side, their messages life-affirming. The outsize character heads created for the Moonrise sequence of sculptures were comic-book caricatures; goon-faces, smiles edged with sharp teeth, adding a dash of menace to their kawaii-cuteness. In primitive, Rondinone creates a stripped-back effect – the bird sculptures are all similar, but no two are identical. Their repetition and placement create a sense of the unheimlich, as though one is trespassing on a frozen moment of time, embodied by Rondinone’s exquisite hour and minute-less stained glass clocks, which resemble watchful eyes. Catching the birds in their attitudes of rest and exploration, they provide the only splash of colour. Rondinone has whitewashed the windows of The Common Guild, creating a blank space. He uses the shape of the Victorian tenement to stunning effect, placing his sculptures in every nook and cranny to dominate and fill the rooms with their silent presence. A beautiful, unsettling exhibition, this is Rondinone at his most subtle and understated. [Bram E. Gieben]

IT PROBABLY isn’t art that springs to mind when you hear the phrase ‘Buy now, pay later,’ – it’s a three-piece suite or a new kitchen. But Creative Scotland’s Own Art scheme allows you to do just this. Wandering through contemporary art shows, even the most avid art-goer might have no notion of owning the work. Once you know where to look, though, Scotland is chock-full of work you can acquire at affordable prices. Like many top contemporary art spaces, DCA tends to show artists whose work isn’t primarily commercial – take last year’s Turner Prize winner, Martin Boyce, for example. His geometric aluminium shapes and hanging lanterns in school crayon reds, greens and yellows may seem to owe something to interior design as well as to the urban landscape, but it would never occur to you to covet them for your own home. You might well assume that this sort of work isn’t for sale (unless your name is Miuccia Prada). But in fact, you can own a Martin Boyce. DCA works with exhibiting artists to develop limited edition artworks, produced in their in-house Print Studio. Boyce’s print series features abstract compositions of coloured shapes that strongly echo his sculptural installations. Also on offer is a largescale, unique screen print commissioned to mark his installation No Reflections at the 2009 Venice Biennale. Unlike a park bench upended to resemble undulating waves, you can display these in your living room and they’ll look fantastic. Pretty exciting, eh? Don’t do all your Christmas shopping just yet, though, because you’ll want to have a shufty at the two newest editions, by Ruth Ewan and Rob Pruitt. ‘Nae Sums,’ proclaims the text by Ewan, who describes her work as ‘conceptually led but socially realised.’ The piece reinstates the gesture

of her exhibition, which referenced local histories of Dundee schooldays, with an installation of reclaimed school desks. The display in the Print Space overlooking the DCA shop generally changes in parallel with the main gallery exhibition, so it’s always worth your while popping in to see what’s new. You can also browse and buy using a ‘Bounce Pad’ in the lobby, or peruse the display cases if you’re feeling less digitallyinclined. The obliging Editions experts are happy to dig out any works that aren’t currently on display. Of course, you needn’t even leave home to bag your art – works can be purchased online at the Culture Label, as well as via the DCA online shop. You’d be a fool not to take a look around the facilities, though. The state-of-the-art Print Studio provides a variety of courses and workshops and if you can’t find one to suit you, you can arrange one-to-one tuition. Each year the Print Space shows a group exhibition of prints by Print Studio members. An exciting new edition that hasn’t even been launched yet is a work by Jane and Louise Wilson. Their major show at DCA last year featured a video that retraces the final movements of a Hamas operative before he was murdered in a Dubai hotel room. Faced with the challenge of negotiating Dubai’s notorious high-security to shoot the video, the artists donned black and white ‘dazzle camouflage’ to trick the face recognition cameras. The resultant photographic images are all the more enigmatic because the artists are twins. This edition will soon be available to buy from DCA’s website and Culture Label, where you can already peruse works by such diverse artists as Claire Barclay, Chicks on Speed, Neil Clements, Graham Fagen and Scott Myles. WWW.SHOP.DCA.ORG.UK/WWW.DCA.CULTURELABEL.COM/

Offer subject to age and status. Terms and conditions apply. You will need a UK bank account that can handle direct debits, proof of identity and address, and you will also need to be over 18. Own Art is operated by ArtCo Trading Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of Arts Council. Registered address: Arts Council England, North East, Central Square, Forth Street, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 3PJ

249 West George Street Glasgow G2 4QE


books

REV I E W

Recipes From the Kitchen Drawer By Helen Ashley

rrrrr Helen Ashley is a freelance illustrator who loves cooking, and this book melds those two pursuits – it was this or boiling a portfolio, presumably. This is ‘a graphic cookbook,’ where the author-illustrator shows how to make the recipes by drawing the process. ‘There is a happy correlation,’ the author writes in the introduction ‘between the kind of honest cooking with everyday ingredients that I wanted this cookbook to contain and the type of recipe uncomplicated enough to be illustrated on a single page in a certain number of frames.’ True, but it illustrates the limitations of this process as well – it’d be nice to see the format stretched a little. The format remains rigid though; the author gives a list of ingredients on the left-hand page, and then illustrates the cooking method on the facing right-hand page. This does work very well, and the illustrations are brilliantly done – good enough to act as a recipe guide, but restrained enough that they don’t detract from the business in hand. And going by this reviewer’s experiment with cooking the cheese and bacon baked potatoes, the recipes are pretty good too, basically exemplifying the ‘simple but delicious’ feel the author was going for. [John Inglis] Out now. Published by Square Peg. Cover price £10

The Raven By Lou Reed and Lorenzo Mattotti

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I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue: The Best of Forty Years By Various

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The Casual Vacancy By J. K. Rowling

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Lou Reed meant this quite sincerely, but it’s really rather dreary, Starting its life a staged and musical tribute to the works of Poe – When it transferred onto CD, the next step should have been easy, But from page to stage is queasy, a queasy way for art to go, Good intent, but still that meant an uneasy way for art to go –           Lou Reed fans will dig it though. The dialogue is overwritten, which editors should have forbidden, Consigned them to the midden, still, the songs have moments though – And while the writing can be coy, the illustrations are a joy, Making this a novelty toy, an uneasy place for art to go – Will its reputation grow? Right now it’s too hard to know.           Lou Reed fans will dig it though. (If this stuff offends your eyes, truly we apologise). [Keir Hind]

Books based on comedy series are often fairly cynical tie-ins, but not this one. This is the book to commemorate 40 years of Radio 4 panel game I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue, with, reportedly, the best material from that time. It’s hard to judge without hearing all 40 years’ worth of programmes of course, but the quality is pretty high, depending on how amusing each individual reader finds puns. Sections are devoted to each of the most commonly played games on the show, and so fans who enter into the spirit of the book will be greatly amused by the explanation of the rules of Mornington Crescent. Non-fans may be more in the dark. The sections on great Mornington players are also surprisingly informative, though at the same time it must be said that Ethan Janks is somewhat overrated here. The book, as might be imagined, rarely breaks into seriousness, but when it does so it’s to pay tribute to Humphrey Lyttleton, who hosted the game for 37 years. It’s safe to say that readers who’ve understood the references in this review will love this book. Those who haven’t should probably buy a Celebrity Juice annual or something. [Ryan Agee]

JK Rowling’s first post-Potter book is never less than readable, as expected, but it’s somehow unadventurous. There’s some superficial excitement, in that the plot almost strains at opportunities to get sex and drugs in – a teenager uses the ‘c’ word notably early on, almost as a warning to kids who may have picked the book up to put it back down.  But the book isn’t really adventurous where it counts, in plot or in form. It’s a deliberate throwback to the kind of 19th century novel set in a small community where everyone is linked to everybody else. There is interest in that the apparent ‘hero’ character, perhaps significantly called Barry, dies early on, leaving the casual vacancy of the title on the local council. Petty local villains then try and hijack his council spot, as well as the plot of the book. There’s some interest in the notion of the vacuum created by the book itself losing a hero here, but this isn’t a great fit with the notion that small-stakes infighting is all the more vicious for having so little to fight for. An okay read in the end, but it doesn’t find the magic in the mundane. [Johnny Chess]

Out now. Published by Fantagraphics. Cover price £16.99

Out now. Published by Preface. Cover price £20

Out now. Published by Little, Brown. Cover price £20

4G Hustle tech

4G speeds mean superfast internet. And... that’s about it words: Alex Cole

Dishonored rrrrr

THE FEED

Game trailers do strange things to the head, just like movie trailers, and sometimes the editor who makes three minutes of awesome can do more for game anticipation and early sales than just about any other factor. Nowhere has this been more true than in the game Dishonored, the heavily-styled dieselpunk assassination game from Arkane Studios. The fact is there’s just a bit of everything thrown into this game: whale oil powers an industrial revolution! Pistols and swords! Corruption and intrigue! Magic and kidnapped empresses! Stabbing! Just about no weird trope is off the table, and that’s as true for the gameplay (you can be super stealthy and never harm a soul, or burst in on your target after killing everyone in your path) as it is for the storyline. The game looks a treat, if a bit washed out and stylized, and once you get a play style down of how to approach your missions, movement around the city is dead fun.

Sadly, if this game should be compared to anything, it’s Batman: Arkham City, and few games can stand up to a comparison like that. While Batman has a lot of the mythos and world-building already established, the game makes Gotham feel like a living, breathing world that extends far beyond what your character can see. The little details give it so much life and the movement, combat and skill progression feel so natural that it stays with you long after it’s over. Dishonored, by contrast, feels a bit like a theme park ride, where there’s lots of set dressing and style, but scratch the surface too far and there just isn’t much there. No mistake, Dishonored is fantastic fun, and if any game has earned a franchise and a sequel, it’s this one. There’s a lot of ambition here, and while not all of it pays off, the parts that do make for a great few hours. [Alex Cole]

4G! It’s like data-mana from heaven! For how long have we languished in this forsaken digital landscape with measly 3G speeds (or HSDPA+, if you’re lucky and nerdy)? This month, Everything Everywhere, the preposterously-named unholy union of T-Mobile and Orange, will launch the first 4G service in the UK, with more to come later from the other carriers (who are less than pleased at having to wait). Ostensibly, this means that if you have the right kind of handset, and the right signal area, you’ll see speeds on your mobile that are as good or better than many Wi-Fi connections. What this really means for most people differs depending on what you really want to do with your mobile in the first place. On the good side, if you’re a media fiend, you’ll see HD YouTube videos loading almost instantly, be able to run video chats without a stutter, download huge files quickly, and get complex data like maps as fast as you can view it. Even more, if you tether your laptop and tablet to your mobile internet connection, then you can see those speeds on all of your devices, which may mean, for some people, not even needing a home Wi-Fi connection at all, and taking your internet with you wherever you go. On the more practical side, most people still

just use their mobiles for texts, emails and adding vintage effects to photos, none of which will really change for being a second or two faster. 4G also destroys most mobile batteries and depending on your phone to last all day becomes a risky affair again. And while speedy video on demand has its appeal, the realities of your internet being subject to the annoyances of mobile signal haven’t really changed. When many people started doing away with their landlines in favour of mobiles only, it was a bizarre idea at first, that then became understandable for some people, then everyone, and now landlines are a vanishing breed. Replacing your internet with a single account that follows you anywhere may be the next step, but even with 4G, we’re still a ways away. Right now the service is available only in predetermined cities (Scotland gets its due), rolling out to more later on, but this highlights the one problem mobile internet has yet to solve. It’s all well and good to have great service in the city, but most of the time I spend in cities is in places that already have Wi-Fi I can use. I need mobile internet when I’m far away from all that, which is sometimes in the bare landscape between Croy and Glasgow. Do that, and then this 4G will start to have my attention.

Kickstarter game projects collapsing as developers all quit, which is beautiful poetry • Google and Windows both sliding out new tablets, right ahead of Apple shrinkifying theirs • Apple has to apologize to Samsung with banner ad, will probably coincide with launch of the iSorry • 4K renamed Ultra High Definition, because you needed a name for a resolution you’ll never use • UK tech was monitoring high-altitude jump, measured Baumgartner’s massive balls

November 2012

THE SKINNY 51


theatre

P REV I E W

The Red Hourglass

blue orange

Venue of the Month: The Theatre Royal Glasgow On the first day of the month, the Royal plays host to a one-off performance by the Richard Alston dance company. Essentially a fusion of old and new, the company’s work includes Madcap by choreographer Martin Lawrance, set to the music of Bang On A Can Of All-Stars. Alston also revives The Devil In The Detail to wrap up the show. The next theatrical must-see appears from the 6 to 10 Nov, in the form of Blue/Orange. Having won major awards when it premiered in 2000, Blue/Orange is brought to Glasgow by Theatre Royal Brighton Productions. It follows the tale of a patient in a psychiatric ward (played by Oliver Wilson) who believes a military dictator to be his father. His psychatrist Robert (Robert Bathurst) wishes to release him back into the ‘wild’ urban jungle, while a younger doctor (Gerard

McCarthy) contests his decision.  A lighter-hearted performance is the hilarious One Man Two Guvnors, presented by National Theatre, running from the 13 to 17 Nov Another awardwinning play and now Broadway hit, it tells the story of Francis Henshall, ex-skiffle band-member who takes on two jobs at the same time, and in order to prevent discovery, decides to keep his two guvnors apart. Nonetheless, as in any self-respecting comedy, things are not as simple as they seem.  Finally, The LadyKillers come to wrap up the comedy runs. Based on the film, this comedy has a sweet little old lady facing ruthless criminals, who are pretending to be amateur musicians. This is a poor front for their real intentions; they plan to involve Mrs. Wilberforce, their elderly landlandy, in

their latest heist. However, the sweet yet strict old lady uncovers their plot and they decide there is only one way to keep her quiet. In the last few days of the month – from 26 Nov onwards – the Royal slips into darker territory with The Woman In Black. Susan Hill’s gripping, bestselling novel provides the backstory for Stephen Mallatratt’s adaptation. When one man asks for help from a young actor to tell his story, it all appears pretty simple. Yet as the play progresses, and they delve deeper into his memories, and the boundary betweeen what is real and what is not begins to slowly blur. It will chill you to the bone. [Eric Karoulla]

Alan Bissett’s The Red Hourglass is a tale of human authority shown through the institutionalisation of a bunch of exotic insects. Between the framework lectures of a smug and human academic we are given a secret view into the artificial environment where our poor subjects are trapped. Quick costume changes allow the lauded Scottish writer to switch from Scotch House Spider to the anxious Recluse Spider or southern temptress Black Widow. Bissett gives an engaging, comic performance, owning each caricature. In particular, his portrayal of the title-inspiring promiscuous spider is scarily hypnotic. As she describes the ‘bows and curtseys’ of her cruel lure it is easy to see similarities between the rituals of nature and our own bizarre methods of courting. The characters are developed only within certain human stereotypes though. For example the ‘oh so macho’ South American tarantula flexing his muscle and ignorance or the career savvy wasp determined to be everyone’s favourite employee (until she lays her eggs in you), are both fairly predictable. It is sometimes unclear whether the stereotyping is a means of ridiculing human attempts to brand one another, or just to provide the audience with a jolly laugh.  Either way the performance is well written and convincingly performed, the polar personalities of characters allow Bissett to explore different types of humour and keep each section of the performance fresh and fun – but of course with a bit of bite. [Christiana Bissett] 13-14 Nov 7.30pm @ The Arches, Glasgow

See website for full details

16 Nov 7.30pm @ Harbour Arts Centre, Irvine

www.atgtickets.com/venues/theatre-royal-glasgow

www.alanbissett.com/

Photo: Ken Dundas

Nicky Spence and The Magic Flute

52 THE SKINNY

November 2012

“Just come with no preconceptions” says Nicky Spence “give it a bit of bravery and just turn up.” Spence, who starred in Intermezzo last year, is to join the Scottish Opera’s production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute, directed by Sir Thomas Allen and designed by Simon Higlett. The story is of Tamino (Spence) who falls madly in love with Pamina, the daughter of the Queen of The Night (played by acclaimed soprano Mari Moriya), having seen a picture of the young maiden. She has been abducted by her mother’s nemesis Sarastro: Tamino embarks on a rescue mission with only a flute and a blundering bird-catcher to help him. On the way, the men begin to query the intentions of people surrounding them and discover there is more to things than meets the eye. The Scottish Opera advertises the production as ‘a beguiling mix of comedy, fantasy and pantomime’ with Mozart’s music inspiring a spectrum of emotions from ‘heartfelt love songs’ to ‘comic exchanges’ and ‘explosive coloratura’ arias. “This opera is special as it is done in English and the story is not complicated,” laughs Spence. “There is so much there for everybody and it can be just as appealing as seeing Sister Act or Dirty Dancing (on stage) or watching a film. You get as much guts and

glory and passion and sex scenes in opera as you would in any blockbuster.” This version has been inspired by ‘steampunk’ Victoriana: “It’s a bit like Scrapheap Challenge or something because you’ve got this bird attached to a music box or you’ve got pipes which blow smoke out of them and it’s just something you wouldn’t expect to see,” explains Spence. “So this style offers a whole other fantastical world which goes hand in hand with the story of The Magic Flute. I think it works really well. The set itself is very visual and stimulating to the eye which is important especially because it’s a three hour show so you want to be stimulated and intrigued the whole way through.” So with an intriguing theme, a professional cast and an easy to follow story, Spence insists this would make a good first opera for the novice. “The whole thing has something for everybody and it’s something you can bring your granny or your first date to - whatever you like, bring them all!”  [Victoria McGilp] The Magic Flute is sung in English with English supertitles It begins October 17th at Theatre Royal. See website for further dates and venues www.scottishopera.org.uk/ouroperas/12-13/the-magic-flute


comedy

REVIEW

NO LAUGHING MATTER

Comedy is currently ablaze with arguments about offensive humour, especially jokes about rape. Will Setchell offers the opinion of one up-and-coming comedian on this controversy WORDS; WILL SETCHELL

ILLLUSTRATION: GUILTY GUN STUDIO

I’D LIKE to start out by making a controversial statement if I may: I fucking hate rape jokes. Now there’s probably a few of you wondering where the controversy in that statement lies; but in a comedy scene populated by young men clad in checked shirts and detached irony, that sentiment can be seen as contentious. Which is why, right now, before we go any further, I’m going to make a clarification of sorts; I am against rape jokes, not jokes about rape. A joke about rape can be something told from experience, providing a release for a comic – male or female – should they wish to explore it through humour, from a dark and troubling experience. Or it can be a clever piece of satire; for example, Louis CK has a great bit about wanting to travel back in time to rape Hitler, which I don’t really have a problem with at all because, and this is important, the power structure is balanced in the right direction. The victim of the joke is Hitler who, I think we can all agree, was not a very nice fellow and he’s also dead, rendering the joke largely victimless. The power structure in jokes is something that is all too often ignored by many comedians, preferring, in a post-Frankie Boyle and Jimmy Carr world, to clumsily go for the ‘dark’ the ‘edgy’ and the ‘ironic’ rather than the ‘good’ or ‘funny.’ Which brings me on to the main reason why I don’t like rape jokes; they’re crushingly unimaginative. I wish it was more than that. I wish it were personal experiences that drove me to hate rape jokes but the truth is I’ve disliked them for a long time, even before finding out how many people close to me have been affected by rape. By clumsily flailing your comedic arm around and grasping for the first thing to come

to hand you show a distinct lack of originality, a two-dimensional and derivative view of the world that does nothing to showcase your inner self and personality. You can be dark in comedy, but you can do so in so much more of a creative way than just plumping for rape. I honestly believe that all of that darkness and misused irony is unnecessary and in a way can hold you back. There’s plenty of comics whose names I’ll never remember who have banged on with the ‘ironic’ rape material but the comics who stick in my head are the ones who don’t bother with that stuff – they stand out because their view on the world is fresh and unique, not just a trudge through the well-worn paths of shock and edginess. Steering clear of the darkness doesn’t mean dumbing down either, in fact once you remove rape, paedophilia and ironic sexism from your toolkit you find you have to work all the harder, the jokes are more delightful, your mind trips gaily down new lanes finding ideas and juxtapositions that, I believe, will make you a better writer and comedian. I know because I used to make the odd rape joke and since I foreswore it I think my writing has vastly improved. I’m not saying I’m better than any comic reading this, I’m saying that now I am better than I used to be. While these clumsy jokes are still being made, imagination is still being squandered and countless people affected by rape are turned off comedy. Let’s just admit that most of us don’t know enough about the dynamics of comedy, foreswear the rape joke and leave it to the people who understand it enough to make it really funny. WWW.TWITTER.COM/WILLSETCHELL

NOVEMBER 2012

THE SKINNY 53


WIN TICKETS AND WIN TICKETS TO THE PRIVATE AFTERSHOW PASSES TO VIEWING OF THE EDINBURGH THE TWILIGHT SAD ART FAIR

THE TWILIGHT Sad’s homecoming headline show at Glasgow’s Barrowlands on Saturday 15 December has had tongues wagging, and ears and livers prepping, ever since it was announced. Sure to be an amazing night and a truly memorable gig, we’ve got a prize lined up to trump all others. Not only are we giving away five pairs of tickets to the show and five pairs aftershow passes, we also have a load of signed merch courtesy of Fat Cat Records for those lucky winners to take home. To enter visit www.theskinny.co.uk/competitions, or scan the QR code with your smartphone, and answer the following question: Q. The title of which song by The Twilight Sad is a reference to the Rob Reiner film Stand by Me? A. That Summer, At Home I Had Become The Invisible Boy B. I Became a Prostitute C. Walking for Two Hours Competition closes Fri 30 Nov Entrants must be 18 or over. Winners will be notified on the day of closing and will be required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. For full terms and conditions, go to www.theskinny.co.uk/about/terms

PHOTO: EUAN ROBERTSON

comps

COMPETITIONS

BRINGING TOGETHER 60 galleries from around the world the Edinburgh Art Fair is renowned for its quality. With work from both established artists, and the future stars of tomorrow selling original artworks priced from £50 to £50,000+ there is always something to suit all tastes and budgets. Open to the public on Friday 16 and Saturday 17 from 11am to 6pm and Sunday 18 Nov from 11am to 5pm, the fair launches with an exclusive ticket only private view and drinks reception on Thursday 15 November from 6:30pm to 9:30pm. We have 25 pairs of tickets to the private viewing and drinks reception to give away, for your chance to schmooze along to the event head to www. theskinny.co.uk/competitions and answer the following question:

Q. Gerhard Richter's Abstracktes Bild sold for $34.2 million at Sotheby's recently, a new auction record for a living artist, but who was the painting’s former owner? A. George Harrison B. Eric Clapton C. Keith Richards Competition closes Wed 14 Nov Winners will be notified on the day of closing and will be required to respond within 48 hours or the prize will be offered to another entrant. For full terms and conditions, go to www.theskinny.co.uk/ about/terms Further information can be found at www.artedinburgh.com or join the fair on Facebook at www. fb.com/edinburghartfair to be kept up to date.

www.thetwilightsad.com

IT’S ALL ABOUT

SANTA’S GROTTO ES ST JATMTO GRO WAY THIS

K VISIT SANTA’S GROTTO! K WIN A SLEIGHFUL OF PRIZES THIS CHRISTMAS WORTH £2,000!* K STORES OPEN LATE FOR CHRISTMAS WITH GREAT PARKING OFFERS

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www.stjamesshopping.com *TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLY

54 THE SKINNY

NOVEMBER 2012


LISTINGS

G lasgow music Tue 30 Oct

Maximo Park (La Femme)

TOY

The British alternative rock quartet take to the road for their first full UK tour in three years, in advance of the release of their fourth LP.

The frontman of Welsh band The Alarm goes it alone.

XSM

Three-time Grammy nominated country singer/songwriter from the US-of-A, who’s penned tunes for the likes of Dusty Springfield and the Dixie Chicks.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £8 adv.

Korg Delta led five-piece fueled on a chugging motorik rhythm.

2:54 The Art School Union, 20:00–22:30, £7

London sister duo made up of lead vocalist Colette Thurlow and sister Hannah, fueled on riot girl punk with bursts of heavy riffing and the odd psychedelic meander.

Two Gallants King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12

San Franciscoan rock duo expertly matching melodic fury with eloquent, confessional lyricism.

Wed 31 Oct

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

New wave rockers made up of former Simple Minds band members Derek Forbes, Brian McGee and band.

Sat 03 Nov Wilko Johnson (Virgil and The Accelerators) O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £17.50

Inimitable guitarist and founding member of Dr. Feelgood.

Mike Peters King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £14

Matraca Berg The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £15

Mon 05 Nov King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

English indie-styled singer/songwriter and filmmaker, aka Harrison Cosmo Krikoryan Jarvis. Phew.

Tyler Hilton (Dion Roy) King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £15

Acoustic rock-meets-pop singer/ songwriter, who also dabbles as an actor on the side.

Plain (Esperi, Sarah J Stanley)

Mono, 19:30–22:30,

£10

13th Note, 19:30–23:00, £5

London eight-piece fronted by Cardiacs and Guapo guitarist Kavus Torabi, and including members of Chrome Hoof, delivering dense, soaring, kaleidoscopic prog.

Thu 01 Nov Adam Ant and The Good The Mad And The Lovely Posse O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £25

The frontman of new wave popsters Adam and the Ants tours with his current live band in support of their upcoming new release.

Miniature Dinosaurs (The Alter-Natives) Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £6 adv. (£7 door)

Indie-pop foursome hailing from the fiery musical furnace of Stirling.

Broken Records Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

The Edinburgh mainstays treat the newly-opened Glasgow venue to a set encompassing a selection of new and old material.

Lucy Rose The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £9 adv.

The singer/songwriter who has contributed vocals to Bombay Bicycle Club tracks strikes out on her own.

The Bots (Sneaky Pete) King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £6

Feral punk-rock duo made up of Anaiah and Mikaiah Lei.

Traquair (Jim Dead, Mathew Dickson) 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £4

Glasgow-based one-man psychedelic army (aka Stewart Traquair) taking his influences from the 60s right through to the present day.

Fri 02 Nov The Civil Wars O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Minimalist duo comprised of Californiato-Nashville transplant Joy Williams and her Alabaman partner, John Paul White, all delicately shimmering and harmonic like.

Reptile Youth (The Dead Certs, Soulcircus) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

Post pop/punk duo from Denmark, founded in 2009 by Mads Damsgaard Kristiansen and Esben Valloe, now resplendent with added drummer action.

Polica SWG3, 19:00–22:00, £10

Super slick electronic pop-meets-soul outfit fronted by icy cool vocalist Channy Leanagh.

Julia Stone Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

The Australian songstress takes to the road, sans her brother Angus.

Ed Scharder’s Music Beat (World Peace, Ex-Servicemen) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

A night of DIY post-punk and experimental sounds, headered by hard rockers Ed Scharder and Devlin Rice.

Ringo Deathstarr (St Deluxe, Young Philadelphia, Ursula Minor) Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Alternative rock quartet hailing from good ol’ Austin, Texas.

Bill Wells and Aidan Moffat Cottiers Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £14

The esteemed musical chums take to the road as part of a special six date Scottish tour, where they hope to preview some recently-recorded new material following a few days in the studio.

Ladyhawke

Lemmy et al take to the stage for their now annual sell-out November tour, letting rip with a growl of incomprehensible lyrics and battering of thrash metal.

Christy Moore Barrowland, 19:00–22:00, £26.50

The Irish singer/songwriter celebrates the release of his new album, Folk Tale.

Half Moon Run (David McKellar, Lost Ghosts) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6

The introverted New Zealander delights with her 80s-inflected pop grooves and propelling bass beats.

Honningbarna Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Punk-rock ensemble (whose name literally translates as honey children) from Norway, singing in their native language.

Talented young trio from Ottawa, Ontario and Comox, British Columbia, working their magic across elements of indie, pop and folk.

Exitmusic (Crash Club, The Calm Fiasco) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

Husband/wife duo fusing haunted melodies with chilled arrangements and a wee touch of goth.

Opeth (Anathema)

Waiting On Jack (People Places Maps, The Little Illusions, Gentle Threat)

The Swedish progressive metal kings return to Scotland following their sold out Edinburgh show last year.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6

Fife foursome of the indie persuasion, playing their first headline Glasgow show.

Ryan Bingham Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £12

American singer/songwriter who won an Oscar and a Grammy for his songs written for the film Crazy Heart.

Holograms (Eagulls, Baby Strange) Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Swedish quartet, at once gothy and poppy in their approach.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Asthmatic Astronaut (Yuan Mekong, krowne, texture) 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Snarky Puppy (Federation Of The Disco Pimp) Oran Mor, 19:00–23:00, £12

Jessie Ware (Two Inch Punch)

Eddy and The T-Bolts (A Fight You Can’t Win)

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £10

North London singer/ songwriter who’s also sung vocals for SBTRKT.

13th Note, 20:00– 23:00, £tbc

Animal Collective

Metallic punk-rockers fae Glasgow, all bishy-bashy and that, launching their new EP (free copy with entry).

O2 ABC, 19:00– 22:00, £18.50

LAU Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

Rather fine experimental folk trio made up of Kris Drever, Martin Green and Aidan O’Rourke, touring their new concept album, Race The Loser.

Jo Mango (Louis Abbot, Adem) The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:30, £7 adv. (£8 door)

The latest artist to enter the Olive Grove Records family, Jo Mango launches her new album, Murmuration, with stellar support from Adem and Admiral Fallow’s Louis Abbot.

Matthew Herbert: One Pig Tramway, 19:30–22:00, £14 (£10)

Bizarre music show all about food, for which Matthew Herbert has spent eight months recording the birth, growth, and eventual butchering of a single pig, with a five-person band playing crazy instruments and various local chefs cooking up a storm.

Spaced in the City: Roots and Ruins (Holy Mountain, Woodenbox, Blank Canvas, Palms, Honeyblood, North Atlantic Oscillation, Robin Adams, Dead Temple, Galoshins, Los Tentakills, Siobhan L Wilson) The Barras Centre, 12:00–03:00, £10 adv. (£13 door)

The multi-arts venture returns with another mini festival of wonder, taking in live music, installation art and cutting edge fashion, with doom’n’roll Glasgow trio Holy Mountain headering the live bill.

Darkstar (Jen Bosteen) Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Moody synth-pop trio channeling everything from OMD to Kraftwerk.

Tom McRae (Trevor Moss and Hannah-Lou) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £15

Essex-born singer/songwriter adept at imbuing his songwriting with his innermost worries and woes.

Tame Impala (Young Dreams) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

Psychedelic rock project of Aussie chap Kevin Parker and chums.

Sun 04 Nov No Lights at Lockdown (StakeOut, The Apex Collective, Refuge Point) O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £7

Welsh pop-rock outfit who’ve experienced the joys of touring with Cher Lloyd.

Lee Scratch Perry (Mezzanine Allstars, Samson Sounds) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £20

Hugely influential reggae and dub producer who was behind Bob Marley’s early studio output.

The Glad Cafe, 19:30– 23:00, £6

The Fence Records’ lady tours her most recent release, her delightful home-built electric guitar and catherine wheel vocal harmonies all well and in place.

Terra Naomi The Art School Union, 20:00–22:30, £8.50

The breakout star plays the melodic acoustic compositions that earned her over 21 million Youtube views, in support of her new Live and Unplugged album.

Conor Maynard O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £16.50

Fresh-faced Brighton singer/songwriter currently celebrating his debut number one album.

Tue 06 Nov Sonic Boom Six (Imperial Leisure, The Hostiles, From The Cradle to the Rave) King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £8

Compelling Manc soundclash of punkheavy, dancefloor-savvy beats mixing elements of reggae, jungle and ska with the rigorous commentary of hip-hop.

Emeli Sande SECC, 19:00–22:00, From £22.50

The Scottish singer/songwriter of the moment plays the intimate, ahem, surrounds of SECC.

Laetitia Sadier Broadcast, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

One half of seminal post-rockers Stereolab, Laetitia Sadier shines as a solo talent in her own right, with a set taking in tracks from her mesmerising solo debut, The Trip.

Julian Cope’s Copendium Mono, 18:30–22:00, £8 adv.

An expedition into the rock’n’roll underworld with musician Julian Cope in support of his new book, Copendium, including a live set, DJ set and a film screening.

Maybeshewill O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £8

Post-rock instrumentalists from Leicester.

More cerebral electronic pop par excellence, as the Baltimore experimentalists bring their latest LP, Centipede Hz, to a live setting.

Nightwish (Pain) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

The Finnish metal legends provide our quota of heavy sounds and long-flowing locks.

Thu 08 Nov Struggle (Cry Wolf, No Island, Notebooks) Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Monthly punk and post hardcore selection from DIY collective Struggletown.

Still Corners (Wake The President, Tops) Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Greg Hughes-led emotive pop outfit.

Blood Diamonds Mono, 20:00–22:30, £5

21-year-old electronic producer and musician from Kansas, all dreamy and ambient in his approach.

Steffen Basho-Jungans, Al Doum and the Faryds The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:30, £6 adv. (£7 door)

Showcase double-header featuring two innovative artists: solo instrumentalist Steffen Basho-Junghans and the psychedelic-infused ethnic sounds of Al Doum and the Faryds.

Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti Stereo, 19:00–23:00, £12.50

The LA goth specialists make a welcome return to Glasgow on the back of their new album, Mature Themes.

Carter USM (The Frank and Walters) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £20

English indie-rockers formed in 1988 by singer Jim Morrison and guitarist Les Carter. FYI, the USM stands for Unstoppable Sex Machine.

Fri 09 Nov Alvin Stardust Cottiers Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £17

The glam rock legend lives, no doubt still sporting leather and big hair.

Israel Nash Gripka (Anthony d’Amato) Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £11

NYC-based singer/songwriter known for his barnstorming gigs, strewn with rootsy rock and folk influences.

Buck 65 (The Levee Strollers)

J Dilla: Guilty Simpson, Frank Nitt, Phat Kat, DJ Bunty

Canadian hip-hop artist Richard Terfry takes in Glasgow as part of his current European tour to road-test material from his new album, which he’s in the midst of recording. He also promises to play a few audience requests (Centaur, please!).

Southpaw (Johnny and the Bomb, Chairman Wow)

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12.50

Deaf Havana O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £5

Four East Coast Village lads making a rammy of rock sounds.

Sat 10 Nov

Ugly Duckling (Hector Bizerk, Spee Sixnine, Bigg Taj )

Glasgow-based punk rockers led by vocalist Dave Shedden.

Ben Howard O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Devon-based folk rocker using his guitar to build percussive beats around his melancholic ditties.

Bon Iver SECC, 18:30–22:00, £tbc

The tender-voiced Justin Vernon plays under his Bon Iver guise, awash with hypnotic piano loops and heart-searing strings.

Devlin Classic Grand, 19:30–22:00, £11.50

Dagenham-born grime MC James Devlin, better known as just Devlin.

Sandi Thom (Scarkette Fever, Carrie Mac) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12

The Scottish singer/songwriter and mulit-instrumentalist tours her new album, Flesh and Blood.

Live n Spittin’ Pivo Pivo, 19:00–00:00, £5 adv. (£7 door)

Live rap tournament where 16 emcees will put their freestyle skills to the test, battling it out for a cash prize.

Pivo Pivo, 19:00–22:00, £5 adv. (£7 door)

Conscious Route and Blasfima Sinna showcase their talent alongside guests including homegrown hip-hop acts Louie (of Hector Bizerk) and Mr Mackenzie (of CatchKlick Emcees).

Mono’s 10th Birthday Bash Mono, 19:00–01:00, £tbc

To celebrate 10 years of being alive Mono host a special birthday night of drinking and dancing, with a bill of rather special guest bands and DJs to be revealed.

Matt Corby (Bear’s Den, Lucy Mason)

German singer who fronted synthpop groups Propaganda and Act, providing one of the most distinctive female voices of the mid-80s. O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £12.50

The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:30, £5

Conscious Route Vs Blasfima Sinna

Instrumental rock foursome hailing from Irvine on the West Coast of Scotland

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

New tour celebrating the late producer, J Dilla, featuring Guilty Simpson, Frank Nitt, Phat Kat and DJ Bunty touring on the back of the new album of unreleased material.

Fri 16 Nov TeenCanteen

Wed 14 Nov What The Blood Revealed (The Cherry Wave, Fat Janitor)

O2 ABC, 18:30–22:00, £18.50

Co-headline tour blazing a trail through the UK this November.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £7

Las Vegas dwelling indie-popsters headered by Dan Reynolds.

The new all-girl pop kids on the block (formed from the ashes of Futuristic Retro Champions) play a special set down’t The Glad Cafe.

The American hard rock powerhouse return to the live arena.

Barrowland, 19:00–22:00, £20

Imagine Dragons

Glasgow-based music-maker providing the mega glitches and monstrous beats, taking in genres of electronic and hip-hop.

Coheed and Cambria

The Road to Warped Tour (New Found Glory, Less Than Jake, Man Overboard, The Story So Far)

bash, film and special live Audio and an by Julian

Knifeworld (Trojan Horse, The Fierce and The Dead, We Are The Physics)

Wed 07 Nov

Sun 11 Nov

Claudia Brucken

The Ghostbox Belbury Youth Club at All Hallow’s Eve Eclectic Halloween Mono-style, with DJing by Ghost Box, guests Pye Corner exhibition of artwork House.

O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

Cosmo Jarvis (Mad Dog McRea)

Rozi

Motorhead (Anthrax, Diaries Of A Hero)

Mon 12 Nov Stereo, 20:00–22:30, £10

Classic hip-hop group who we will forever love for their witty ditty, Meatshake (‘Meat to the shizzake’, etc).

Moon Duo (Ela Orleans) Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

The San Franciscoan rock duo take in Glasgow at the tail-end of their monthlong EU tour.

Snowgoose King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £10

Glasgow folk-rock ensemble who bonded over a shared passion for 1960s British folk music and West Coast American sounds.

Gong (Battery Face) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18

Franco-British progressive and psychedelic rockers formed by Australian musician Daevid Allen back in’t day (as in 1967).

Tue 13 Nov Mystery Jets Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

The

London indie-

With a rotating schedule of some 25 players, the US-ofA collective share their unique musical enthusiasm for jazz funk and world music.

Jack Savoretti (Karima Francis) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £10

Italian English solo acoustic singer and his trusty guitar.

The Rock Sound Riot 2012 (Billy Talent, Awolnation) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £17

Toronto punk-rock ensemble Billy Talent headline this year’s Rock Sound Riot, calling at venues throughout the UK.

Jakwob O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £9

Talented multi-instrumentalist James Edward Jacob (aka Jakwob), who’s been making music since the tender age of 10.

Thu 15 Nov The Crookes (Hey Sholay, The Puppet State, The Seven Deadly Sins) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

Guitar-led pop all the way as the Sheffield quartet bring the jangly joy.

Walls Mono, 20:00–22:30, £6

Live set from London duo Sam Willis and Alessio Natalizia, utilizing the best that old and modern technology has to offer.

Trapped Mice 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

The Edinburgh quartet do their alternative folk-meets-indie racket of a thing, launching their new LP as they go.

Natalie Pryce (Adopted As Holograph, Scunner) Bloc+,

Willy Mason Mono, 13:00–15:00, £tbc

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8

Aussie singer/songwriter known for his captivating live performances.

Swans (Sir Richard Bishop) The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

Michael Gira’s NYC-based post-punk outfit take their latest two-hour epic of an album on the road.

AlunaGeorge Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £7

London-based hip-hop coupling of Aluna Francis and George Reid, hence AlunaGeorge. Geddit?

The Neighbourhood King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

Alternative Californian quintet led by heavily-tattooed frontman Jesse Rutherford.

The Boscos (We Found Out, The Mathletics Team, Rough Feedback) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £8

Glasgow-based alternative indie lot touring in advance of their debut EP.

Band Of Horses (Goldheart Assembly) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Ben Bridwell and his Band of Horses hold true to their whooping country-rock formula.

Sat 17 Nov Yashin O2 ABC, 18:00–22:00, £10

Scottish post-hardcore sextet who enjoy screaming, ear-splitting riffs and guitar arpeggios.

Gabrielle Aplin Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £8

Young Bath singer who became a bit of a YouTube sensation with her cover versions.

The Coronas (Hudson Taylor, Mick Hargan) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

Irish indie-rockers led by Danny O’Reilly, who started penning tunes at the tender age of 13.

The Band Perry

The distinctive-voiced New York-born singer/ songwriter plays a special afternoon set of deeprooted country tunes twinkling with pianos, a little swing and a little blues.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

US-of-A band of siblings combining classic country with an eclectic infusion of rock, gospel and soul.

Beak> Stereo, 19:30–22:30, £12.50

Bristol-based trio of made up of Geoff Barrow, Matt Williams and Billy Fuller, touring in support of their new album, freshly released on their hometown label, Invada.

Stereo’s 5th Birthday Party Stereo, 20:00–03:00, Free

Stereo celebrate 5 years of being with live guests including Jazzfinger, Special Hits, Vom, Undulating Gland and Pulse, plus karaoke, DJs, free scran and free entry for all!

SambaYaBamba: 16th Birthday Bash SWG3, 20:00–02:00, £5

SambaYaBamba celebrate a pretty impressive 16 years of being, joined by guests Banda 71, Brass Aye? and Colonel Mustard and the Dijon 5.

Gaslight Soirée

A Howlin’ Hoe-Down (Howlin’ Radio, Last National band, Papa Shandy and the Drams)

pop quintet tour their fourth album.

The Glad Cafe, 19:30–23:00, £5

Barrowland, 19:00–22:00, £16.50

Southside Sessions presents a night of country, roots and bluesgrass. Yee-haw, etc.

Ingrid Michaelson Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £12

New York indie-popster who’s music you may well recognise from many an American TV show.

The Velveteen Saints (The Mix) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £3

Bright new Glaswegian rock’n’roll trio.

ALT. Waves Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Brand new monthly night, with the first edtion bringing you the sounds of Blindfolds, Tijuana Bibles and The Amazing Snakeheads.

Lord Finesse

Alabama Shakes

Glasgow University Union, 19:00–02:00, £15 (£12)

21:00– 01:00, Free

Brittany Howard-fronted blues rockers responsible for the earworm that is Hold On.

Mark Swan-led band of weirdos, with Swan likely rambling away into a vintage mic, helped along by murky projections and a bass-heavy rhythm section.

Citizens (Huevo and the Giant)

Stubborn Heart

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

Hardcore Glasgow trio fueled on raw aggression, rhythmical inventiveness and DIY aesthetics.

Soft Bullets Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Bournmouth alternative rock duo made up of Christopher Wall and Dan Capaldi.

Hooded Fang (Secret Motorbikes) Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Toronto-based indie-pop quartet, fusing a bit of rock into their mix.

The Berkeley Suite, 19:30–22:00, £5

Steampunk-styled evening of comedy, burlesque and musical entertainment, featuring local band Trongate Rum Riots. Dress code: Neo-Victorian or Black Tie.

Magic Eye Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £1

The Noisettes

Dream pop from Edinburgh’s Magic Eye, before turning into a late night party care of eclectic DJ hits from Fielding Hope of Cry Parrot.

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

La Shark

Supersilent and John Paul Jones (Aki Onda)

London-based ensemble tourng in support of their debut LP, Limousine Mmmm.

Electronic-meets-soul duo Luca Santucci and Ben Fitzgerald hit Glasgow. London-based indie-rockers known for their high energy live performances. The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £15

Hardcore Norwegian jazz-rock unit Supersilent join forces with Led Zeppelin’s legendary multi-instrumentalist, John Paul Jones, for a series of special dates.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £6

Feeder O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £20

The Newport pop-rock ensemble chock with guitar-fueled choruses.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Hip-hop artist and producer hailing from The Bronx, New York.

November 2012

THE SKINNY 55


LISTINGS

Sun 18 Nov

Conan (Sunsmasher, Headless Kross)

Royal Republic (Kopek)

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £5

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £7.50

Swedish punk and funk-influenced four-piece, who specialise in making a big ol’ racket.

Ken Stringfellow American singer/songwriter best known for his work with The Posies, R.E.M. and the re-formed Big Star.

Band Against Bono (Casey Ryback, Constance, Momentus, Portionfed) 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £4

Young singer/songwriter hailing from the US-of-A, moving from classic soul to R’n’B as he goes.

Neu! Reekie! @ The Poetry Club

Eddie and the Hot Rods (Media Whores, The Zips)

The favourited night of avant-garde poetry, music and film makes its second Glasgow appearance, taking to the rather cool surrounds of the Jim Lambie built poetry club with Tam Dean Burn, Liz Lochhead and Remember Remember in tow.

Tongue-in-cheek night where various Glasgow bands rise up against Bono and his wearing of sunglasses indoors.

Billy Kelly Songwriting Award: Final

Mon 19 Nov

Grand final for the Billy Kelly Songwriting Awards, with seven acts playing for a chance to win a cool £5000.

Clock Opera (Bright Light Bright Light, It Girl)

Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, Free

China Crisis (Thomas McConnell)

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

London experimentalist Guy Connelley brings his eclectic avant-pop ensemble Glasgow-way.

The Aislers Set (Stevie Jackson)

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £17.50

The Liverpudlian pop-rockers stop by Glasgow as part of their 30th anniversary tour.

Europe (Stonerider) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Mono, 20:00–23:00, £10 adv.

The cult San Franciscoan indiepopster play what will be their first Scottish date in almost a decade.

The Swedish hard rock ensemble bring the noise.

Falcovo, The Rusty Nails Band, Beached Whale, Gotham City Killers

The Imagineers

Fri 23 Nov Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £5

Glasgow four-piece offering an intriguing blend of 50s rock’n’roll, Scottish twang and cinematic flair, launching their new EP on the night.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £5

A mixed batch of bands play in aid of Oxfam.

Ryan O’Shaughnessy O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £8

Fresh-faced Britain’s Got Talent finalist.

Tue 20 Nov

Trongate Rum Riots (The Coffins, The Mitre 5)

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £8

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Alex Cornish The Edinburgh singer/songwriter and his effortlessly laid-back DIY folk-pop songs, sewn together with some live musical trickery.

Scottish ensemble comprising seven lads and one lass making their own brand of folk-punk songs, or ‘hyper-sea shanties’ as they call ‘em.

MRMA (MagneticNW) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

One-off collaboration between two unique musical minds; Mannheim Rocket and Mount Analogue.

The Rifles (Stevie Dunn) London indie-rock outfit on the go since 2003, when principle members Joel Stoker and Lucas Crowther met at college.

Levellers (Citizen Fish) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

Classic Grand, 18:30–22:00, £12 adv.

Californian ska-punk ensemble combining elements of rock and roots reggae.

Wed 21 Nov

Menomena

The Fall

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £7

The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Seminal 70s post-punk outfit led by the inimitable Mark E Smith.

Vessels

Portland, Oregon experimental pop outfit on the go since late 2000.

Juan Zelada (Robin Adams) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Talented Spanish singer/songwriter and musician, doing vocals and piano while accompanying himself with the acoustic guitar.

Impressive Leeds quintet trading in jilting melodies, soaring waves of feedback-driven noise and vocals that possess an almost crystalline clarity.

Mythical Creatures (We Came From The Sea, Have Mercy Las Vegas)

The Milk Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £10

Essex rock’n’rollers led by Rick Nunn, throwing some soul, pop, dance and R’n’B into their mighty mix.

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £6

LAID (Hector Bizerk, Solareye) Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Favourited gig-in-a-club night offering up an ever-impressive live line-up of bands, this time headered by Glasgowbased alternative hip-hop duo Hector Bizerk, made up of Louie and Audrey, MC and drummer respectively.

Fur Hood, Battery Face Big Band, The Cherry Wave Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £4

Experimental folk-meets-nu jazz ensemble from the US-of-A.

Sat 24 Nov Mainstage (The Core, Revolve, Perpetual Motion, Proud Honey, Life on Standby) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £10

Showcase event of local Scottish talent, featuring The Core, Revolve, Perpetual Motion, Proud Honey and Life on Standby.

The Wolfe Tones

Leftfield indie, hardcore and punk sounds from Glasgow’s DIY underground.

Barrowland, 19:00–22:00, £18

Alternative Irish chaps, incorporating elements of traditional Irish music into their sound.

Jake Bugg King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £8

Miaoux Miaoux (Japanese War Effort)

Nottingham-born singer/songwriter, known to his mammy as Jake Edwin Kennedy.

The Glad Cafe, 19:30–23:00, £6

More subtly layered beats and rushes of distorted guitar from yer man Julian Corrie, touring on the back of his rather ace debut LP, Light of the North.

Thu 22 Nov Withered Hand (Charles Latham)

First Aid Kit

Twisted folk fairytales are the order of the day as Dan Willson (aka Withered Hand) performs a full band set.

56 THE SKINNY

The Glad Cafe, 20:00–23:00, £7 adv. (£8 door)

The Mad Caddies

The longstanding Brighton rock ensemble tour their tenth studio album.

Mono, 20:00–22:30, £8 adv.

Encounter (Scottish Clarinet Quartet, Gameshow Outpatient, Matt Hulse) Multimedia event bringing together the usually distant worlds of contemporary classical music, electronica, and film, featuring the four musicians of the Scottish Clarinet Quartet, Londonbased composer Matt Rogers and international filmmaker Matt Hulse.

King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £11

Classic Grand, 19:30–22:00, £13.50 adv.

Caveman doom warlords from Liverpool, who bring the baw-destroying riffs. The Poetry Club, 19:00–22:00, £10 (£7.50)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £10

Allen Stone

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

More charming country-led harmonies from the Soderberg sisters, actualising the sound of their favourite country records to joyous effect.

November 2012

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Barrie Masters and his Hot Rods do their inimitable rock’n’roll thing, honed over 30+ years.

Bonafide Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8

Swedish hard rockers headered by singer/guitarist and founding member Pontus Snibb.

Mother Ganga

Algernon Doll (Roscoe Vacant and the Gantin’ Screichs, Tango Rhums, Lovers Turn To Monsters) 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £5

Off-kilter alternative folk project from Glasgow’s Ewan Grant.

Tue 27 Nov Rizzle Kicks O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

Teenage talents Harley Alexander-Sule and Jordan Stephens do their thing, mixing pop with some oldschool hippity-hop. In baseball caps. Obviously.

Gallon Drunk (Jacob Yates and the Pearly Gate Lock Pickers)

Keser

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

The Glasgow and Edinburgh-straddling electronic duo launch their new album, fusing synthesised beats and guitars in one happy whole.

The London-formed swamp rockers return on ripsnorting form.

Marika Hackman (Gabby) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

Young folk singer/songwriter whose debut music video was produced by Burberry, for whom she is also official ‘eyewear model’, FYI.

Gentleman’s Dub Club O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Suited and booted dub collective who also take in elements of ska and roots reggae.

Ben Folds Five O2

Stereo, 23:00–03:00, £1

The transcendental techno-pop Glasgow duo bring the lush soundscapes, followed by psych, garage and punk from DJ Rafla.

The three original members of Ben Folds Five return to the UK for the first time since Christmas 1999.

Diiv

Sat 01 Dec

Broadcast, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

Beachy pop project of Brooklyn’s Zachary Cole Smith, also a member of the like-minded Beach Fossils.

Alabama 3 O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Turbonegro (Daniel P Carter) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £13.50

Band Skulls

Three Dimensional Tanx (Rapid Pig, Galoshins)

London-based alternative garage rock trio who supported The Black Keys on a string of dates earlier in the year.

Norwegian punk-rockers who reformed in 2002 after a four year break. 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

Of

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £15

More psyched-oot punk-rock from the Lancaster sextet.

Purity Ring (Doldrums)

Sun 25 Nov

Future pop duo offering a vision of synth pop as polished as bloody crystal, with Corin Roddick’s productions incorporating sugar-sweet melodies, with a liberal use of side-chained beats and synths. Amen.

Matthew Collings (theapplesofenergy) The Glad Cafe, 19:30–22:30, £5 adv. (£7 door)

Icelandic-based musician who traverses the line between quiet and loud, ranging from tiny delicate moments of intimacy to all consuming noise.

Patrick Wolf Cottiers Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £15

Experimental London singer/songwriter Patrick Wolf and his kit-bag of electro-pop gems, as fanciful and offbeat as ever.

The Vaccines O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £10

London-based indie-rockers of dubious musical merit.

My Extraordinary (The Maddigans) 13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £tbc

All-out alternative rock quartet hailing from Newcastle-Upon-Tyne.

Dan Mangan Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £10

Canadian singer/songwriter touring on the back of his latest LP, an alternative folk meets occasional brass fanfares joy of a thing.

Classic Album Sundays: The Blue Nile The Berkeley Suite, 17:30–20:30, £6

A hit down’t London way, Classic Album Sundays do what they do best: dip the lights and play a classic album in its entirety – in this case The Blue Niles’ A Walk Across The Rooftops.

Dirty Three Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £18

Bad Seed Warren Ellis and his crew do their instrumental rock thing in Oran Mor’s grand auditorium space.

Sam and The Womp King Tut’s, 20:00–23:00, £8

Technicolor explosion of comic book superheroes and pop art who brew a potent cocktail of ska, dubstep, brass ‘n’ bass.

Jens Lekman The Arches, 19:30–22:00, £10 adv.

More humorous, romantic and stringladen guitar-based pop from the lovably twee Swedish singer/songwriter.

Noise Complaint (Clocked Out, D.T.P.) Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £5

The London noisemakers provide the really fast hardcore, allied with thrash and skate punk influences.

Peter Andre SECC, 19:00–22:00, From £26

The mysterious girl, sorry, we mean Peter Andre, excites Glasgow with his tropical sounds.

Netsky (Ayah Marar) O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £11.50

Hospital Records’ DJ Netsky plays a live set incorporating live drums, synths, keys and guest vocalists.

Stereo, 20:00–23:00, £8

Colour The Atlas (Kith and Kin, Those Who Wait) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £6

More sumptuous acoustics from the Swindon band of teens.

Wed 28 Nov Sparrow and the Workshop Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–23:00, £tbc

Electric and brooding country-tinged trio, led by the ethereal tones of Jill O’Sullivan.

Dead Rider (TutVuVu, John McFarlane) Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Talented ensemble featuring ex-members of US Maple and Singer, touring their new album, The Raw Dents, a deft juxtaposition between harmony and noise.

John Wheeler Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £14

The Hayseed Dixie man takes to the road solo.

Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson SECC, 18:30–22:00, £35

The two renowned shock rock heavyweights lock horns for a co-headline set. Tempers may well flare.

Spear of Destiny (Breakglass_Emergency) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12.50

Dark rock outfit founded in 1983 by singer and songwriter Kirk Brandon and bassist Stan Stammers.

The Buddhist Punks (Luca, Handsome Cadavers, Glasgow Capoeira)

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £16

Shhhh (Gravenhurst, Emma Pollock, meursault, Rick Redbeard, Laura J Martin, Seamus Fogarty, Wounded Knee, Woodpecker Wooliams, I Build Collapsible Mountains, Finn Lemarinel, eagleowl) Platform, 15:00–23:00, £12 earlybird

Brightening our December (yes, it’s December already – keep up) is Shhhh festival’s celebration of quiet music and art, featuring music from the likes of Emma Pollock, Meursault and Rick Redbeard, alongside a visual art programme curated by Luke Drozd.

Sun 02 Dec Yeasayer The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £14

The Brooklyn duo preview tracks from their latest album, deftly morphing their previously tribal-heavy sound into something altogether more lovestruck and danceable. Rescheduled date.

Sons of Fionn, Ulysses Jones, Ms Fi and the Lost Head Band, Johanna Crossley-Zels, Mr Wishart Henry’s Cellar, 19:30–23:30, £5

Mixed evening of alternative, acoustic and folk acts for your aural pleasure.

Fri 02 Nov Lucy Rose (Pete Roe) Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £9 adv.

The singer/songwriter who has contributed vocals to Bombay Bicycle Club tracks strikes out on her own.

Enos (Gareeda, Robot Death Monkey, Bodacious) Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

Fuzzed-out psychedelic stoner rock from the Brighton trio.

Euros Child

Tue 30 Oct HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £14.50

The Glasgow alternative rock four-piece do their Brit rock-inspired thing.

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

O2 ABC, 19:00–22:00, £14

Detroit underdogs with enough joyful hooks, mischievous wordplay and unexpected pathos to worm their way into your heart.

Big Sean The Arches, 19:00–22:00, £15.50

Detroit-based rapper known to his mammy as Sean Michael Anderson. The yoof call him Big Sean.

Madina Lake (Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, Action Blast) King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £12

Chicagoan alternative rockers with some, erm, interestingly-styled bonces.

Fri 30 Nov Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £8

The Raveonettes Oran Mor, 19:00–22:00, £12.50

Danish garage rock duo who draw their influences from the likes of The Jesus and Mary Chain and The Velvet Underground.

Soil (Fozzy, Breed 77) The Arches, 17:45–22:00, £16 adv.

The Chicago heavy rock act return refreshed after last year’s tenth anniversary tour.

Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

The American rocker takes control of Halloween with his guts and gore filled horror show, with full band tearing into the classics. Dressing up a must.

Saint Saviour Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £5 adv.

The former Groove Armada soloist does her thing.

Reptile Youth (Miniature Dinosaurs) Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £5 adv.

Post pop/punk duo from Denmark, founded in 2009 by Mads Damsgaard Kristiansen and Esben Valloe, now resplendent with added drummer action.

Thu 01 Nov The Twang The Liquid Room, 19:00–22:00, £12

Indie-rockers that take their inspiration from Madchester and Britpop times, celebrating the release of their third album.

Tommy Smith’s Karma The Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:30, £15 (£12)

Scottish saxophonist Tommy Smith explores new sounds and atmospheric textures with his brand new band, Karma.

The Irish singer/songwriter celebrates the release of his new album, Folk Tale.

Matthew Herbert: One Pig The Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:00, £15

Bizarre music show all about food, for which Matthew Herbert has spent eight months recording the birth, growth, and eventual butchering of a single pig, with a five-person band playing crazy instruments and various local chefs cooking up a storm.

Jack White Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, £29

Mr White arrives in Edinburgh with his first solo album under his arm, a mixture of classic rock, country, blues and straight-up rock’n’roll. Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £6 adv.

Fri 09 Nov The inimitable Scottish singer/ songwriter and her live band showcase a selection of classics.

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £7

Benefit gig in aid of the Sick Kids Friends Foundation, featuring local stalwarts Broken Records and ballboy.

Mike Peters Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £14 adv.

The frontman of Welsh band The Alarm goes it alone.

Sun 04 Nov Kilwinning experimental rockers headed by the rather magnificent (read: at screaming) Janine Shilstone.

Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy Edinburgh Playhouse, 19:30–22:00, From £30

Unique multimedia experience employing symphony orchestra, choir, renowned vocal and instrumental soloists, and exclusive HD video direct from the Final Fantasy game developers.

Mon 05 Nov Lostprophets (We Are The Ocean) HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

The Welsh emo-mongers return to Scotland, following their Glasgow set earlier in the year.

Thu 29 Nov Electric Six

Festival Theatre Edinburgh, 20:00–22:00, £26.50

Horse

Alice Cooper’s Halloween Night of Fear III

Florida quartet in possession of fine rock riffs and long, flowing locks.

Thu 08 Nov Christy Moore

Sick Kids Friends Foundation Benefit (Broken Records, ballboy)

Hugely influential reggae and dub producer who was behind Bob Marley’s early studio output.

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £16

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £7 adv.

One half of seminal post-rockers Stereolab, Laetitia Sadier shines as a solo talent in her own right, with a set taking in tracks from her mesmerising solo debut, The Trip.

The Livi quartet offer up another smack-to-the-face slice of alternative rock.

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £6 adv.

Twin Atlantic

Laetitia Sadier

Sat 03 Nov Penfold (Benny Monteux, The Barrels)

Mono

EDINBURGH MUSIC

Billy Walton and co. churn out their singular brand of funky blues.

Vic Galloway returns for his monthly showcase slot, headered by punk-rock ensemble Honninbarna (whose name literally translates as honey children) from Norway, singing in their native language.

The ex-Gorky’s/Jonny frontman plays tracks from his new album, Summer Special.

Vukovi (The Mirror Trap)

Oran Mor, 19:30–22:00, £12.50

The Caves, 19:00–22:00, £10

Vic Galloway Presents (Honningbarna)

Mon 03 Dec The Japanese instrumental postrockers grace Glasgow’s Oran Mor once more (having wowed us back in March 2010), touring their new album, For My Parents. Trust us, it doesn’t get much more epic than their immense cinematic soundscapes.

Billy Walton Band (WT Feaster Band)

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £8

Shinedown

Shoegaze dream-pop all the way from Virginia.

Torontoan electronic experimentalists comprised of show-stealing frontwoman Alice Glass and the seemingly reclusive beat maker Ethan Kath.

Stereo, 19:00–22:30, £10

The Subway Sect frontman, songwriting legend and, erm, postman does his solo thing.

The longstanding British singer/ songwriter and guitarist showcases songs from her new album, Starlight, alongside a selection of hits.

Glasgow-based ska/punk/reggae oufit riding high on their energetic performances and tongue-in-cheek sci-fi references.

Wild Nothing

Crystal Castles

Vic Goddard

Usher Hall, 19:30–22:00, From £24.50

Lee Scratch Perry

Mon 26 Nov King Tut’s, 20:30–23:00, £10

The Brixton collective do their blues-rock-acid-house thing to pleasurable effect.

Joan Armatrading (Chris Wood)

Wed 31 Oct

13th Note, 20:00–23:00, £5

Father John Misty American folk singer, guitarist, drummer and songwriter Joshua Tillman, currently performing under the moniker, Father John Misty.

Academy, 19:00–22:00, £27.50

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £5

The Liquid Room, 19:00–22:00, £18.50

Tue 06 Nov Rozi Plain Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £6 adv.

The Fence Records’ lady tours her most recent release, her delightful homebuilt electric guitar and Catherine wheel vocal harmonies all well and in place.

LAU The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, From £13 (£11)

Rather fine experimental folk trio made up of Kris Drever, Martin Green and Aidan O’Rourke, touring their new concept album, Race The Loser.

Wed 07 Nov The Wedding Present The Liquid Room, 19:00–22:00, £15

Some 25-odd years after forming, David Gedge brings his cult 80s concern north of the border for a rare Scottish date.

Sat 10 Nov The Jackals (Caravan Club, Plastic Babies, Window Seats) Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Guitar-driven psychedelic sounds crossed with gritty songsmithery, served up with a good dose of attitude.

Eddi Reader Festival Theatre Edinburgh, 19:30–22:00, From £22.50

Reader weaves her velvety vocals around a selection of traditional and contemporary songs, as is her way.

Dead Sea Souls Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £5 adv.

Singalong West Lothian quartet touting their funky ska wares across the Central Belt since 2006.

The Cathode Ray (The Ettes) Citrus Club, 19:00–22:00, £6 adv. (£8 door)

Songwriting collaboration between singer and multi-instrumentalist Jeremy Thomas and former Josef K frontman Paul Haig, touring with their full band line-up.

Trapped Mice (The Scottish Enlightenment, Simon Herron) Henry’s Cellar, 19:00–22:00, £5

The Edinburgh quartet do their alternative folk-meets-indie racket of a thing, launching their new LP as they go.

The Idiot Bastard Band HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

Music-meets-comedy as Adrian Edmondson, Phil Jupitus, Neil Innes and Roland Rivron perform a selection of comic songs by the likes of George Formby and Half Man Half Biscuit.

Limbo: 5th Birthday (Delta Mainline, Zed Penguin, White Lightnin’) The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–01:00, £6 adv. (£7 on the door)

The Queen’s Hall, 18:30–22:00, £18

Edinburgh’s Delta Mainline return for their third appearance at Limbo, helping the much-loved gig-in-a-club night celebrate its 5th birthday, joined by Zed Penguin and White Lightnin’.

Ded Rabbit

Booze and Glory (Running Riot, Steel Comb, Big Fat Panda, Hooligan UK)

Henry’s Cellar, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

Band of brothers playing an eclectic mix of indie and sax funk.

Steel Panther Corn Exchange, 19:00–22:00, £17

LA quartet churning out the tonguein-cheek glam metal tunes to a happy bunch of dedicated followers.

Chris Helme (The Holy Ghosts, Sonic Templars) The Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £6

The Seahorse frontman plays a selection of solo material and old Seahorse favourites.

Empire! Empire!, The Reptilian, Your Neighbour The Liar, Carson Wells, Smithsonian Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £7

Mighty mix of emo and post-punk, including headline sets from a duo of Michigan bands – Empire! Empire! and The Reptilian.

Academy Strangers, The Sunset Clause, Benny Monteux Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

Indie and alternative rock showcase, raising funds for charity.

Simon McBride (Red Stone River) The Voodoo Rooms, 19:00–23:00, £15

Virtuoso Irish guitar player of the blues-rock variety.

Stan Webb’s Chicken Shack The Caves, 18:45–21:45, £13.50

Frontman Stan Webb and his merry band bring the blues.

The Slow Show (Easy Tigers, Dave Stuart) Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £6 adv.

The recently-formed Manc band chock with American alternative folk references, but with a distinctive Northern English touch.

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £12

Classic Oi-street punk from the longtime veterans of the scene, with suitably lairy support.

Monsters On Movie Posters (Bravo November, Donnie Willow) The Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

Alternative synth-rock trio playing a hometown gig.

Sun 11 Nov Punch Brothers The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, £15

Former Nickel Creek man Chris Thile and his band continue to bend the boundaries of American roots on mandolin, fiddle, guitar and double bass.

Catherine Feeny (Kat Healy) The Voodoo Rooms, 19:00–23:00, £8.50 adv. (£10.50 door)

The American folk singer tours in support of her fourth solo album, riding along on her incisive lyrics and mellifluous voice.

Natural Dread Killaz (Mesajah) The Jam House, 21:00–23:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

Reggae and dancehall ensemble from Poland.

Mon 12 Nov Ed Sheeran Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, £22

Suffolk singer/songwriter adept at getting the radio airwaves in a twist, fusing hip-hop and folk in one beatready whole.

Sandi Thom HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £15

The Scottish singer/songwriter and mulit-instrumentalist tours her new album, Flesh and Blood.

Tue 13 Nov Ugly Duckling Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £10 adv.

Classic hip-hop group who we will forever love for their witty ditty, Meatshake (‘Meat to the shizzake’, etc).

Hey Rosetta! The Voodoo Rooms, 19:00–23:00, £10

Canadian six-piece of the indie-rock variety, layering their live sound with piano, video and cello.

Jack Savoretti (Karima Francis) Electric Circus, 19:30–23:00, £9 adv.

Italian English solo acoustic singer and his trusty guitar.

Sad Cafe HMV Picture House, 18:45–22:00, £17

The 70s-formed English rockers return augmented by new lead vocalist Steve Whalley.


E D I N B U R G H music Wed 14 Nov

Citizens Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv.

Hardcore Glasgow trio fueled on raw aggression, rhythmical inventiveness and DIY aesthetics.

Victorian Trout Conspiracy

John Corabi (Colorblind, Death Trap City) Bannermans, 19:00–22:00, £10

Solo acoustic set from the ex-Motley Crue and Scream classic rocker.

Communion (Bird, Thomas J Speight, The Shipping Forecast) Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £5 adv.

Bill Wells and Aidan Moffat The Pleasance, 19:30–22:00, £tbc

The esteemed musical chums take to the road as part of a special six date Scottish tour, where they hope to preview some recently-recorded new material following a few days in the studio.

The lads from The Dark Jokes host a broken down set of original tunes.

Ben Lovett (of Mumford & Sons) brings his touring night Edinburgh-way, featuring acts from around the UK.

The Beat (A Band Called Quinn)

Thu 15 Nov

Mon 19 Nov

We Were Promised Jetpacks

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, Free

Zappa Plays Zappa HMV Picture House, 19:30–22:00, £29.50

Frank Zappa’s eldest son and his live band perform a selection of Zappa classics from the seminal decades of his career.

Edinburgh Unlimited (Gerrybhoy, Jo Hill, The Ferny Brackens, Cancel The Astronauts) Meadow Bar, 20:00–23:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Rather fine regular live acoustic session with a four-strong line-up of performers.

Les BOF! Institut Francais d’Ecosse, 20:30–22:00, Free

The Edinburgh-based, French language garage outfit play a special free set down’t Institut Francais d’Ecosse.

Greg Lake The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, £26.50

The founding member of Emerson, Lake and Palmer and King Crimson returns to the stage for a solo set.

Trampled By Turtles Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

The chaotic Minnesota country-rockers play a sold out set.

Fri 16 Nov Snarky Puppy The Bongo Club, 19:00–22:00, £12 adv. (£14 door)

With a rotating schedule of some 25 players, the US-ofA collective share their unique musical enthusiasm for jazz funk and world music.

Hold The Suspect (Breakfast on Pluto, Penfold, Gary Ovens) Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £6

Edinburgh-based progressive rockers led by Jake Poynter.

Scots Fiddle Festival: Kevin Henderson and Mattias Perez, Celtic Fiddle Festival The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, £18 (£15)

Shetland fiddler Kevin Henderson joins forces with Swedish guitarist Mattias Perez for a special set, also featuring folk violin trio Celtic Fiddle Festival.

Sat 17 Nov Vantage Point (Tergazzi, Dirty Rose) Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £6 (£5)

The Edinburgh metallers launch their new album, fusing vocal histrionics, screaming guitar solos, thumping bass and pounding drums. Noisy, yes.

Scots Fiddle Festival: Liz Carroll, Frank Rochford, Rant The Queen’s Hall, 19:30–22:00, £18 (£15)

Fiddle-heavy showcase featuring Chicago-born Liz Carroll, Campbeltown youngster Frank Rochford and Highlands and Islands quartet Rant.

Song, By Toad: BAD FUN! 3 St John’s Church, 20:00–03:00, £7 adv. (£10 door)

Music blogger Song, By Toad’s new night, this time boasting sets from local stalwarts Broken Records, alongside Easter and LeThug.

Matt Corby (Bear’s Den, Lucy Mason) Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv.

Aussie singer/songwriter known for his captivating live performances.

The Gold Lions (Shooting Stansfield, Last Minute Glory, Universal Thee) The Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

Edinburgh-based rock-meets-blues duo who met at Edinburgh University in 2007.

Volitante Henry’s Cellar, 19:00–22:00, £4

Alternative rock with a good line in soaring vocal melodies.

Sun 18 Nov

Stiff Little Fingers (Spear of Destiny) HMV Picture House, 18:30–22:00, £15

Original punk-pop four-piece par excellence, celebrating an impressive 35 years of being.

Keane Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, £27.50

Tom Chaplin et al return to a live setting, with new material to boot.

Michele Stodart Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv.

Magic Numbers’ lass Michele Stodart temporarily hangs up her bass, taking to the road lonesome in celebration of her debut solo album.

Tue 20 Nov Albert Lee and Hogans Heroes The Voodoo Rooms, 19:00–23:00, £20

Legendary musician known for his impeccable country music and rock pedigree that stretches back over more than 40 years.

Martin Rossiter Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £12 adv.

Lucero (Curators, Taking Chase) Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £8

Melodic gruff-punk from the States, being touted as Memphis’ answer to Bruce Springsteen.

The Indos (Sunset Abbey, The Phantoms) The Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5

Edinburgh-based indie rockers led by Michael Knowles on lead vocals and guitar.

Sun 25 Nov Rodriguez Usher Hall, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

Mark Gardener

Alex Cornish

The lead singer, guitar player and songwriter for alternative rockers Ride continues to do his solo thing, some 16 years after the band split.

The Caves, 19:00–23:00, £8

The Edinburgh singer/songwriter and his effortlessly laid-back DIY folk-pop songs, sewn together with some live musical trickery.

Safehouse (Cafe Jacques) The Voodoo Rooms, 20:00–23:00, £10

Classic blues rock drawing influences from the 60s, rock, blues, psych and beyond.

Bellowhead The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, From £18

Beast of a contemporary English folk ensemble (there’s 11 of ‘em) fusing folk, funk, rock, world, jazz, music hall and classical music into their mix.

John McCain Band Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £4

Earthy blues rock, just how we like it.

Frankie & The Heartstrings Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £7 adv.

Sunderland-based indie rockers touring their latest LP, produced by Mr Ryan Jarman of The Cribs, no less.

Thu 22 Nov Burial (Acolyte, Haar, Stob Dearg) Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

More evil offerings of the death and black metal persuasion.

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £10 adv.

Mon 26 Nov Sam and The Womp Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv.

Technicolor explosion of comic book superheroes and pop art who brew a potent cocktail of ska, dubstep, brass ‘n’ bass.

The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, £15

The Borders lass brings the loveliness with her provokingly poetic and bittersweet folk tunes, performing with her regular band mates and a selection of guests.

Cauldron (Toledo Steel, Black Talon, Atragon) Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £8

Retro-thrash from Canada, unashamedly 80s in their apporach.

Kung Fu Academy (Last Minute Glory, The Rahs) Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £4

Post-punk Edinburgh quartet combining infectious funk rhythms with lush harmonies and poptastic hooks.

Cancel The Astronauts (Shooting Stansfield, Letters, Kid Canaveral DJs) Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £6 adv.

More hook-friendly indie-pop, as the chirpy Edinburgh quintet bring smiles to faces once more playing tracks from their debut album, Animal Love Match.

Mon 03 Dec Paper Aeroplanes The Voodoo Rooms, 19:30–23:00, £6

Wild Combination Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Kilmarnock’s hairy disco legend, David Barbarossa, digs out some vinyl gems.

Totally Visual The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

DJ Garry plays the biggest and best anthems, all night long.

Panda: Halloween Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £3

Halloween edition of the deep, disco, tech and electro house night, with dressing up very much encouraged.

Killer Kitsch Vs The Afterparty Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Tue 27 Nov Sonics

Voodoo Voodoo

Warm and bubbly disco-styled chillwave courtesy of the one-man band that is Hugo Manuel.

Wee Red Bar, 19:00–22:00, £6 (£5)

Icelandic-based musician who traverses the line between quiet and loud, ranging from tiny delicate moments of intimacy to all consuming noise.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Weekend welcoming mix of rock and metal, with guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Monthly dose of industrial, EBM and electronic. We hear it’s very danceable. O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 adv. (£5 door)

Chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

Shaka Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Boom Thursdays The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Chart and indie classics, plus a live Twitter feed where you can log tune requests (#Garagelive).

The Afterparty

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (free via iamclub.co.uk)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Scottish Storytelling Centre, 19:30–22:00, £25

King Creosote plays a special set with Edinburgh trio and fellow Fencers, FOUND, as part of the 15th ‘Bits of Strange’ Homecomings tour, for which yer ticket gives you gig entry, access to the end of tour party and a set of limited edition tour merch.

Fri 30 Nov Saw Doctors HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £22.50

The Irish collective of songwriters celebrate their country of origin through song, as is their way.

White Heath (Academy Strangers, Culann, Lost City Souls) The Cabaret Voltaire, 19:00–22:00, £5 adv. (£6 door)

Edinburgh-based quintet layering dark, sombre ballads with a diverse range of live instrumentation, incorporating strings, guitar, trombone and piano as they go.

Sleazy’s host their annual Halloween bash, with DJs Scary Sean, Claudia Noooova and Creepy Parrot (we’ll let you do the guessing as to who they all are), preceded by gang documentary 80 Blocks From Tiffany’s. Free entry for all.

Stay Freaky Chambre 69, 23:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£7 door)

Club nights Stay Fresh and Freaky join forces for a Halloween bash that promises to resurrect some of history’s freakiest and freshest musical monsters.

Night of the Zombie Hipsters La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

La Cheetah’s take on Halloween, with residents from Void, Offbeat and G.B.S. radio supplying the soundtrack.

Halloween All-Nighter Strathclyde Students’ Union, 20:00–06:00, £7

Strathclyde Union host their 10-hour marathon of a Halloween bash, for the hardiest of students only.

Octopussy: Neon Halloween The Arches, 22:30–03:00, £6

Octopussy host their 7th Halloweenthemed bash, this year taking place on All Hallow’s Eve itself.

Cathouse Halloween Cathouse, 21:30–04:00, £8

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Camden Nights Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Old Skool

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

The official after party of the Glasgow premiere screening of new documentary, Heartbeats, featuring the Heartbeats music collective live.

Too Darn Hot Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £5

Lou Hickey and Tony Poprock play a speakeasy mix of rock’n’roll, R’n’B, big band and swing.

Sat 03 Nov Nu Skool Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels, with the residents manning the decks.

Booty Call The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mixed bag of indie, rock, underground hip-hop and chart classics across four rooms.

Jamming Fridays

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Formed from the ashes of Pandemic, Chad Palestine plays everything from vintage rock’n’roll to soul, leftfield pop to the best in alternative indie.

Dia De Los Muertos

Mon 05 Nov Burn Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats.

Space Invader The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, with DJ Muppet holing up in The Attic.

Tue 06 Nov

Take It Sleazy Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

An unabashed mix of 80s pop, electro and nu-disco. They will play Phil Collins.

Sub Rosa Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Weekly student night, with residents Ray Vose and Desoto joined by various live guests.

Traffic Jam Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Reggae, dub, dancehall and hip-hop midweeker from DJ Greenman and friends.

ICHI Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

New midweeker playing house, bass and old school hippity-hop.

Wild Combination

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Metal, industrial and pop-punk over two floors.

Subculture Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£10 after 12)

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks.

Cathouse Saturdays Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet. Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free

Love Music Saturday night disco with Gerry Lyons and guests. The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Kilmarnock’s hairy disco legend, David Barbarossa, digs out some vinyl gems.

Totally Visual

The very best in bass, featuring the talents of the Mungo’s Hi-Fi and Chungo Bungo collectives, and DJs Kokoro and Breezak.

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Subversion

Nightwalk AW2012

Alternative pop from the 80s and 90s, with a bit of industrial dance and classic rock thrown in for good measure.

DJ Garry plays the biggest and best anthems, all night long. The Arches, 20:00–23:30, £10 adv.

Nightwalk present their celebration of fashion, electronic beats and dancing ‘til you drop, with a selection of local designers showcasing their Autumn/ Winter 2012 picks, backed by an electro soundtrack. Rescheduled date.

Voodoo Voodoo Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Duncan Harvey and pals play a mighty mix of swing, R’n’B, soul, rockabilly, ska and vintage pop.

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Taking Back Thursdays Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Weekend welcoming mix of rock and metal, with guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

Jellybaby O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 adv. (£5 door)

Chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

The Afterparty Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Euan Neilson handpicks a selection of classic R’n’B and hip-hop.

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Freakbeats The Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Mod, soul, ska and groovy freakbeat 45s, with DJs Jamo, Paul Molloy and Gareth McCallum. Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Deathkill 4000 (Death Rattle) Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Industro-rock noise party with a schedule of live players to boot.

Melting Pot (Greg Wilson) The Admiral, 23:00–03:00, £12

The Melting Pot residents welcome back one of their favourite guests, Greg Wilson, who’ll churn out an electro, boogie and funk workout like no other.

Set In Motion Saint Judes, 23:00–03:00, £8 (£10 after 12)

London-based underground electronic DJ, Jozif, takes control of the Set In Motion decks for the evening. Shed, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£6)

Hot Mess: Glasgow The Poetry Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

DJ Simonotron hosts the gay disco party like no other, playing disco, house and acid on vinyl in a special Glasgow outing at Jim Lambie’s rather ace Poetry Club.

Highlife (Charanjit Singh) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 adv.

Tongue-in-cheek Halloween night based upon the annual Mexican festival, with performances from macabre duo The Creative Martyrs and local DJ scallywag David Barbarossa.

Music from across the globe with the ever-capable residents Auntie Flo and Esa Williams, joined all the way from Bombay by Charanjit Singh, the 76 year old behind the acclaimed acid house record, Ten Ragas to A Disco Beat.

Double Halloween Weekend Extravaganza

Empty (Animal Farm)

Shed, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£6)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Craig McGee’s staple eclectic mash-up midweeker.

Thu 08 Nov

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5

The Shed host their Halloween bash across two weekends (26/27 October and 2/3 November), with party games, dressing up and four bloody bars!

Compact Disco

Garage Wednesdays

Walk ‘n’ Skank

The Shed host their Halloween bash across two weekends (26/27 October and 2/3 November), with party games, dressing up and four bloody bars!

Liquid Sky

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Dilated Retro hip-hop extravaganza for your Friday night pleasure manned by the Glaswegian institution that is DJ Muppet.

Renegade

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Chart, indie and electro student favourite, with a bouncy castle an’ all.

Electronic music of all ages, for all ages.

Double Halloween Weekend Extravaganza

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Garry and Andrew Kilgour incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath.

Wed 07 Nov Octopussy

Absolution

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

Sunday Roaster

Killer Kitsch

Damnation

Cathouse Fridays

Choice nu-disco and house picks from the Instruments Of Rapture label, hosted by Ali OOFT and The Revenge.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk.

Brand new night from Wild Combination man David Barbarossa, specializing in leftfield disco, post-punk and far-out pop.

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual mix of electronica and bass, joined by High Sheen label boss Ben Martin.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Sabbath celebration of quality house, disco and electronica.

Strange Paradise

Propaganda

Instruments Of Rapture

Project. Heartbeats: Official After Party

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

i AM (Ben Martin)

Rock, metal and punk requests all night long with yer man DJ Mythic.

I Heart Garage Saturdays

DJ Paddy plays the newest in indie, rock, disco and pop. You do the dancing.

Sun 04 Nov

Mark Henning mans the decks, his sound sitting somewhere between house and techno, with a healthy dose of groove, funk, swing, deepness and weirdness.

Come and Get It

Skinny Molly (David May)

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv.

Nomad (Mark Henning)

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11.30)

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Sleazy’s Halloween Party

Colours’ Halloween trance fest, featuring the first ever Scottish club show for Leeds label and promoters Digital Society.

Eclectic new party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra.

LAID: Halloween Party (Carnivores, Ice Sea Dead People, Honeyblood)

The Caves, 19:00–23:00, £12

The Arches, 22:00–04:00, £16 adv.

Shore

Teenage talents Harley Alexander-Sule and Jordan Stephens do their thing, mixing pop with some old-school hippity-hop. In baseball caps. Obviously.

Bloc+, 21:00–03:00, Free

Colours’ Halloween: Digital Society

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney.

Euan Neilson handpicks a selection of classic R’n’B and hip-hop.

Alternative rock, metal, punk and ska.

Corn Exchange, 19:00–22:00, £15

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Numbers crew invite London musician and producer Aaron Jerome’s alter ego, SBTKRT (pronounced ‘subtract’, obviously), into their lair for the night.

The Rock Shop

Wed 31 Oct

Wed 28 Nov Rizzle Kicks

Numbers (SBTRKT)

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul.

King Creosote (FOUND)

Matthew Collings (Talvihorras, Hiva Oa)

Taking Back Thursdays

The i AM boys transform Sub Club into a haunted wonderland in honour of All Hallows’ Eve, providing a safe haven for the freaks and faux pas of Glasgow.

Bannermans, 20:00–23:00, £5

Copenhagen-based post-punk foursome of noise, bringing back the visceral thrill of 1976.

The very best in bass, featuring the talents of the Mungo’s Hi-Fi and Chungo Bungo collectives, and DJs Kokoro and Breezak.

Fri 02 Nov

Thu 29 Nov

Sneaky Pete’s, 19:00–22:00, £7 adv.

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

i AM: All Hallows

Sneaky Pete’s, 21:00–00:00, £5 adv.

Engines of Vengeance (Blackjack)

Sneaky Pete’s, 21:00–00:00, £8 adv.

Walk ‘n’ Skank

Chad Valley

Ian Svevonius of The Make Up and Nation Of Ulysses fronts his boy-girl beat combo side project.

The Leningrad-born DJ and producer mixes up all things hip-hop, soul, reggae and electronica in a late night gig set down’t Sneaky’s lair.

Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

The Danse Macabre regulars unite those two happiest of bedfellows, goth rock and, er, classic disco, in their new home of Classic Grand.

New indie club from local promoters PMCJ Presents.

Headline set from Communion Records all-female folk harmony trio.

DJ Vamin

Danse Macabre

Duncan Harvey and pals play a mighty mix of swing, R’n’B, soul, rockabilly, ska and vintage pop.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 19:30–03:00, Free

Henry’s Cellar, 22:30–03:00, £5

Monthly mish-mash of electro, dance and dirty pop with DJ Drucifer.

Washington-hailing American garage rockers, touring with new bass player and singer Freddie Dennis.

Chain and the Gang (Casual Sex)

Alternative rock trio playing a hometown gig down’t Henry’s Cellar Bar.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

The extreme sports accolites host their mixed media party night, backed by their own unique brand of rhythm, sound and vision.

Fri 23 Nov

Cowboy Horrorshow (Saints Of Bliss, Lucille Le Seur)

Misbehavin’

Tue 30 Oct

Essex rock’n’rollers led by Rick Nunn, throwing some soul, pop, dance and R’n’B into their mighty mix.

Balls-out classic metal, just how it should be.

Thu 01 Nov

glasgow clubs

Hard-working rock ensemble founded by Mike Estes (of Lynyrd Skynyrd) Dave Hlubek (of Molly Hatchet) and drummer Kurt Pietro.

The Pleasance, 19:30–23:00, £9 adv.

The Garage open every room for their massive Halloween blow-out, with a £500 prize for the best dressed and a late 4am licence.

Jellybaby

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £10 adv.

The Staves

The Garage, 22:00–04:00, £5

Cryotec

The two massive Buff Club student mainstays join forces for Halloween, with Killer Kitsch playing electronic upstairs and The Afterparty providing the classic R’n’B downstairs.

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £20

The Garage Halloween Party 2012

Acoustic alternative folkies from Wales, led by vocalist and songwriter Sarah Howells.

Halloween edition of the favourited gig-in-a-club night, with a trio of live bands, spooky decorations, a hefty dose of cocktails. Oh, and math-rock headliners Carnivores promise to dress up as Batman villains!

The Milk

Sat 24 Nov

Electric Circus, 19:00–22:00, £8 adv.

The Queen’s Hall, 19:00–22:00, £15

The Edinburgh-based ensemble play a trademark set of Scottish and Irish traditional music, mixed with Latin American salsa.

Wed 21 Nov

Iceage

Irish indie-rockers led by Danny O’Reilly, who started penning tunes at the tender age of 13.

Salsa Celtica

After years in the wilderness the Mexican-American folk musician returns to the stage, in no small part due to the film Searching for Sugar Man.

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £sold out

The Coronas

The Liquid Room, 19:00–22:00, £tbc

More rolling drums, big guitars and massive effing finales from the WWPJ’s gang, playing their rescheduled hometown show.

After an eight year sabbatical from the music industry, Martin Rossiter returns to showcase his first solo album, The Defenestration of St Martin.

Frank Turner The former Million Dead singer turned folk troubadour does his solo thing, full of his usual rockabilly charm.

HMV Picture House, 19:00–22:00, £15

Popular ska and 2-tone revivial band, founded way back in 1978.

LISTINGS Karine Polwart

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

More thunderous beats from the weekly delight, this time with Animal Farm spinning a selection of house and techno.

Cathouse bring the mayhem with their version of a Halloween party, featuring a £500 prize for best costume and DJs Muppet and Billy churning out the rock hits.

November 2012

THE SKINNY 57


LISTINGS

G lasgow Hot Dub Time Machine The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Time travelling dance party taking revellers on a journey through 60 years of music.

Shore

Come and Get It Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

We Own: Glasgow (A-Trak) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The extreme sports accolites host their mixed media party night, backed by their own unique brand of rhythm, sound and vision.

Cathouse Saturdays Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet.

The Rock Shop Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney.

Love Music O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11.30)

Saturday night disco with Gerry Lyons and guests.

Camden Nights Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

New indie club from local promoters PMCJ Presents.

Fri 09 Nov Old Skool Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul. Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Genre-spanning mix of 60s psych, leftfield pop and Krautrock with resident Charlotte (of Muscles of Joy).

Propaganda O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Delightful clubber’s mash-up of alternative pop, indie and electro.

Cathouse Fridays Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels, with the residents manning the decks.

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£7 after 12)

Phantasy’s Daniel Avery plays back-toback with Glasgow talent JD Twitch (of Optimo) in support of the launch of his Fabric Live album.

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks, joined by legendary electronic figure Chez Damier.

Wrong Island (Andy Blake)

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £15 adv.

The electronic duo par excellence take to the decks to play a full live show. Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

The legendary Teamy and Dirty Larry spin some fresh electronics for your aural pleasure, inviting veteran disco and house DJ Andy Blake to join ‘em for a one-off special.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Eclectic mix of electronic dance from the Dirty Basement duo.

Empty (Matthew Craig)

Booty Call

More thunderous beats from the weekly delight, this time offering up an aclectic mix of electronic dance from Matthew Craig.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mixed bag of indie, rock, underground hip-hop and chart classics across four rooms.

Jamming Fridays Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

Unpop Glasgow Blackfriars Basement, 22:30–03:00, £4

The Edinburgh indie-pop institution return for a second outing in Glasgow.

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Craig McGee’s staple eclectic mash-up midweeker.

Not Moving Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

South African house, grime, jungle, R’n’B and hauntology. A tropical mix, ayes.

Sub Rosa Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Weekly student night, with residents Ray Vose and Desoto joined by various live guests.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Reggae, dub, dancehall and hip-hop midweeker from DJ Greenman and friends. Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

New midweeker playing house, bass and old school hippity-hop.

Thu 15 Nov Walk ‘n’ Skank The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

The very best in bass, featuring the talents of the Mungo’s Hi-Fi and Chungo Bungo collectives, and DJs Kokoro and Breezak.

Taking Back Thursdays Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Weekend welcoming mix of rock and metal, with guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

Jellybaby O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 adv. (£5 door)

Chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

Boom Thursdays The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Chart and indie classics, plus a live Twitter feed where you can log tune requests (#Garagelive).

Garry and Andrew Kilgour incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath.

Thunder Disco Club

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Shore Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Sabbath celebration of quality house, disco and electronica.

Laidback Luke and La Fuente

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Teenage Lust Mutant disco of wedding standards, 80s and 90s indie and American punk from the Aberdonian night, now relocated to Glasgow.

Mon 12 Nov Burn Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats.

Space Invader The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, with DJ Muppet holing up in The Attic.

November 2012

Fri 16 Nov Old Skool Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul.

Damnation Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative rock, metal, punk and ska.

Propaganda O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Cathouse Fridays Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels, with the residents manning the decks.

Bottle Rocket Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Indie dancing club, playing anything and everything danceable.

Innovative D’n’B beats in a relaxed, bass-rich environment complete with guests DJs and live visuals from Altronix.

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

The Old Hairdressers, 20:00–01:00, £3

Young talent Gerry Read provides his dark, twisted take on house and techno.

Jackmaster and JG Wilkes The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£7 after 12)

Numbers’ chap Jackmaster plays back-to-back with Optimo’s JG Wilkes, all night long.

Sensu (Kolsch) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Sensu regulars welcome German producer Kolsch for a turn on the decks.

Rumours: Strictly Techno Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

One-off special with the Rumours Crew and friends sticking strictly to techno.

Sat 17 Nov Nu Skool Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk.

Black Tent Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Audio, 22:00–03:00, Free

.GHOST.

Come and Get It Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Symbiosis (Dark D)

Basement Jams (Gerry Read)

Indie, electro and anything inbetween with Pauly (My Latest Novel), and Simin and Steev (Errors).

New indie club from local promoters PMCJ Presents.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

The eclectic electronic night returns with a beastly line-up featuring a headline set from bedroom-produced techno scamps, Clouds, alongside JD Twitch, HaHaHa, Death By Repetition, Roman Nose, IndianRedLopez, Any Colour Black and Ginger Beard Men.

Eclectic new party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra.

Compact Disco

Monthly night from Soma Records, with producer/DJ duo Slam (aka Stuart McMillan and Orde Meikle) joined by Heidi.

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Absolution Metal, industrial and pop-punk over two floors.

Subculture Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£10 after 12)

DJs Colin Walker and Colin Cook host their inaugural occasional event, with a back-to-basics set pumping out the best in deep house, rare techno and electronic sonics.

Empty (Solid Gold Safari) Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

More thunderous beats from the weekly delight.

Highlife Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Music from across the globe with the ever-capable residents Auntie Flo and Esa Williams.

Renegade Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Rock, metal and punk requests all night long with yer man DJ Mythic.

Compact Disco Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Sabbath celebration of quality house, disco and electronica.

Mon 19 Nov Burn Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Space Invader The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Rock Shop

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, with DJ Muppet holing up in The Attic.

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Tue 20 Nov

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney.

Killer Kitsch

Love Music

Electronic music of all ages, for all ages.

Saturday night disco with Gerry Lyons and guests.

Code (Tommy Four Seven) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 adv. (£10 door)

CODE welcome back returning guest Tommy Four Seven (aka T47) for another night of Berghain-style deep and driving techno.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Wild Combination Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Kilmarnock’s hairy disco legend, David Barbarossa, digs out some vinyl gems.

Totally Visual The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

DJ Garry plays the biggest and best anthems, all night long.

Hessle Audio (Pearson Sound, Ben UFO, Pangaea) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £12 adv.

Sub Club hand over the reins to electronic label Hessle Audio for one night only, known for their consistently inventive take on underground electronic music. The full trio of founders will be on hand to make this pretty damn unmissable. Chambre 69, 23:00–03:00, £15 adv.

G.B.S. Radio: Launch Party (The Analogue Cops) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £6 adv. (£8 door)

Marieu and Lucretio (aka The Analogue Cops) play G.B.S. Radio’s official La Cheetah launch, using only hardware analogue gear in their live shows.

Sat 24 Nov Nu Skool Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk.

Boom Thursdays

Absolution

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Chart and indie classics, plus a live Twitter feed where you can log tune requests (#Garagelive).

The Afterparty

Death Disco: 10th Birthday (Crookers) The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £10

Italian DJ/production duo Crookers return to Death Disco to help ‘em blow out the 10th birthday candles.

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Metal, industrial and pop-punk over two floors.

Cathouse Saturdays

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Offbeat (New York Transit Authority) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

The Offbeat crew welcome Bristol dubstep producer New York Transit Authority (aka Mensah Anderson) to the wheels of steel.

Empty (Rebecca Vasmant) Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

More thunderous beats from the weekly delight, with a playlist of jazz-inspired house from Ministry of Sound tour resident Rebecca Vasmant.

Sun 25 Nov Slide It In Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Nicola Walker plays cult rock hits from the 70s, 80s and 90s.

Sunday Roaster The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Garry and Andrew Kilgour incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath.

Renegade Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

Rock, metal and punk requests all night long with yer man DJ Mythic.

Compact Disco Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Sabbath celebration of quality house, disco and electronica.

Optimo (Horse Meat Disco) Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

JD Twitch and JG Wilkes take to the decks for a night of pure Optimo goodness, joined by mighty London disco quartet Horse Meat Disco.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Euan Neilson handpicks a selection of classic R’n’B and hip-hop.

Contagion Classic Grand, 23:00–03:00, £3

Shore

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Garry and Andrew Kilgour incite more mayhem than should really be allowed on the Sabbath.

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Eclectic mix of underground house, techno, disco, garage and UK bass from Feedback Junkie and friends.

Chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

Sun 18 Nov

Cathouse Saturdays

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11.30)

O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 adv. (£5 door)

Sunday Roaster

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats.

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Jellybaby

Alternative metal and punk playlists with DJ Scapegoat on the last Thursday of the month.

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks. Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet.

Weekend welcoming mix of rock and metal, with guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £12

Long-running house night with residents Harri & Domenic manning the decks, joined by Belfast-based old school house duo Bicep.

Globetrotting music, art and all-round party crew LuckyMe welcome LA resident and Frite Nite boss Salva to mix up a selection of West Coast bass.

Thu 22 Nov

Taking Back Thursdays

Subculture (Bicep)

Tremors

Dance specialist Fake Blood returns to Glasgow, this time bringing his Blood Music label with him, joined by label mate Ado and Glasgow resident (and one half of i AM), Beta.

The very best in bass, featuring the talents of the Mungo’s Hi-Fi and Chungo Bungo collectives, and DJs Kokoro and Breezak.

Chambre 69, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Scotch Bonnet crew welcome the man with the flair for selecting the sweetest of reggae beats, David Rodigan, to their lair.

LuckyMe (Salva)

Blood Music (Fake Blood, Ado, Beta)

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Scotch Bonnet (David Rodigan)

Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

DJ Paddy plays the newest in indie, rock, disco and pop. You do the dancing.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Walk ‘n’ Skank

Traffic Jam

Euan Neilson handpicks a selection of classic R’n’B and hip-hop.

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Return To Mono (Slam, Heidi)

58 THE SKINNY

Messy Saturday night uber-disco featuring a rotating schedule of live talent.

Rock’n’roll party with live bands playing on the floor.

Camden Nights

Myriad noisemakers come out to play, with Nightwave providing the supertight ghettotech, techno, house and R’n’B mixes, alongside an old school rave set from Planet Mu signing Konx-OmPax and Rob Data.

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Weird Wednesdays

Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£1)

La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£7 after 12)

Fantastic Man

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Sunday Roaster

Rock, metal and punk requests all night long with yer man DJ Mythic.

Codeine Drums (Nightwave, Konx om Pax, Rob Data)

Andy Divine and Chris Geddes’ gem of a night deciated to 7-inch singles from every genre imaginable.

Weekly student night, with residents Ray Vose and Desoto joined by various live guests.

Renegade

The Arches, 22:00–03:00, £24.50 adv.

Come and Get It

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

NYC-based talent Tim Sweeney takes control of the Berkeley Suite decks, having been spinning since the tender age of 15.

Electro-house sensation Laidback Luke takes to the decks, joined by afroheaded house specialist La Fuente.

Garage Wednesdays

The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5

Reggae, dub, dancehall and hip-hop midweeker from DJ Greenman and friends.

DJ Paddy plays the newest in indie, rock, disco and pop. You do the dancing.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Singles Night

Garage Wednesdays

Sun 11 Nov

The Thunder Disco Club residents churn out the 90s house, techno and disco hits.

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Chart, indie and electro student favourite, with a bouncy castle an’ all.

Traffic Jam

ICHI

The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £5

Octopussy

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

The Afterparty

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 12)

Tim Sweeney

The Arches, 20:00–03:00, £7 adv. (£10 door)

Crimes Of The Future Scott Fraser and Timothy J. Fairplay host a new Thursday music club playing a decidedly left-field selection of Krautrock, electronic, dub and everything inbetween.

New midweeker playing house, bass and old school hippity-hop.

Common People

Dirty Basement

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual mix of electronica and bass, joined by house revivalists Dusky.

Wed 21 Nov

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

Notorious mash-up party starters, using their agile cut-and-paste mixing to chop up classic party and dance hits from Dolly Parton to 10cc.

The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £19.50

ICHI

Simian Mobile Disco

Celebration of the 90s, with hits aplenty and a pre-club bingo session.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual mix of electronica and bass, joined by vinyl fanatics Kokoro and Floyd for what will be their i Am debut.

Sub Rosa

All singing, all dancing Balkan orgy, with live guests, belly dancing, bespoke visuals and free plum brandy for all. As in, we’re sold. The Flying Duck, 21:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

i AM (Dusky)

Processed Beats (Clouds, JD Twitch, HaHaHa, Death By Repetition, Roman Nose, IndianRedLopez, Any Colour Black, Ginger Beard Men)

Jamming Fridays

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Craig McGee’s staple eclectic mash-up midweeker.

Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £12

Chambre 69, 22:30–03:00, £8

Duncan Harvey and pals play a mighty mix of swing, R’n’B, soul, rockabilly, ska and vintage pop.

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

2manydjs

i AM (Kokoro, Floyd)

I Heart Garage Saturdays

Subculture (Chez Damier)

Balkanarama (Nema Problema Orkestar)

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Jamming Fridays

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Mixed bag of indie, rock, underground hip-hop and chart classics across four rooms.

Chart, indie and electro student favourite, with a bouncy castle an’ all.

DJs Ewen Foley and Elliot Castro host a repeat of their crazy party night, enlisting a host of friends to help out with the soundtrack – amongst ‘em Barrientos, Dirty Basement and Square Kush.

Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Voodoo Voodoo

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

I Heart Garage Saturdays

Duncan Harvey and pals play a mighty mix of swing, R’n’B, soul, rockabilly, ska and vintage pop.

Blair and Gary play Italo, disco, synthpop, funk and a whole bunch of other stuff aimed at making you throw yourself about with abandon.

Bloc+, 22:00–03:00, Free (£2 after 12)

New Life

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

DJ Garry plays the biggest and best anthems, all night long.

Wed 14 Nov

Foley and Elliot’s Megadisco Birthday Bonanza MKII

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Kilmarnock’s hairy disco legend, David Barbarossa, digs out some vinyl gems.

Octopussy

Daniel Avery and JD Twitch

Kino Fist

Wild Combination

Osmium

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Alternative rock, metal, punk and ska.

Electronic music of all ages, for all ages.

Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Damnation

Totally Visual

Mixed bag of indie, rock, underground hip-hop and chart classics across four rooms.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

The We Own clothing crew bring a concentrated version of their famed party blowouts to Glasgow, with guest A-Trak providing a signature eclectic fusion of his hip-hop turntablist roots with heavy electro basslines.

Booty Call

Killer Kitsch

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

DJ Paddy plays the newest in indie, rock, disco and pop. You do the dancing.

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Nu Skool

Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Shaka

Metal, industrial and pop-punk over two floors.

Booty Call

Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Vintage 50s and 60s dancefloor sounds handpicked from genres of R’n’B, rock’n’roll and soul.

Tue 13 Nov

Nick Peacock spins a selection of vintage disco, soul and funk.

Voodoo Voodoo

Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Bloc+, 21:00–01:00, Free

Sat 10 Nov

Absolution

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Eclectic new party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra.

CLUBs

Shout Bamalama

Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Eclectic new party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra.

Make Noise: Electronic Recycling Tour Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Electronic special with Benji B and Martelo taking to the decks, alongside a live set from lo-fi Glasgow noisemakers Conquering Animal Sound.

Camden Nights Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

New indie club from local promoters PMCJ Presents.

Fri 23 Nov Old Skool

Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Punk, rock and metallic beats with DJs Billy and Muppet.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

The Rock Shop

The Hot Club

Rock, indie and golden indie classics with resident DJ Heather McCartney.

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul. Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, £3

Tearin’ it up with 60s psych-outs and modern sleaze, provided by Rafla and Andy (of The Phantom Band).

Damnation Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative rock, metal, punk and ska.

Propaganda O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Cathouse Fridays Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock, metal, punk and emo over two levels, with the residents manning the decks.

Super Trouper The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Clubber’s delight dedicated to allSwedish indie, pop and rock. They will play ABBA.

Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Love Music O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, Free (£5 after 11.30)

Saturday night disco with Gerry Lyons and guests.

Mon 26 Nov Burn Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3/Free with wage slip)

Long-running trade night with Normski, Zeus and Mash spinning disco beats.

Space Invader The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Andy R plays chart hits and requests past and present, with DJ Muppet holing up in The Attic.

I Heart Garage Saturdays

Tue 27 Nov

The Garage, 22:30–03:00, £7 (£5)

Killer Kitsch

Student superclub playing everything from hip-hop to dance and funk to chart.

Misanthropy Blackfriars Basement, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3.50)

Debut night for new D’n’B purveyors on the block.

The Saturday Sessions Vespbar, 15:00–00:00, Free

A rotating selection of Glasgow’s finest DJs dig oot tunes from their personal collections, with a pop-up vinyl stall open from 3pm-8pm.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Electronic music of all ages, for all ages.

I Am Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa play the usual mix of electronica and bass, joined by various live guests.

Wild Combination Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Kilmarnock’s hairy disco legend, David Barbarossa, digs out some vinyl gems.

Totally Visual The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

DJ Garry plays the biggest and best anthems, all night long.


Fri 30 Nov

I Love Hip Hop

Duncan Harvey and pals play a mighty mix of swing, R’n’B, soul, rockabilly, ska and vintage pop.

Old Skool

Selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be.

Wed 28 Nov

Damnation

Voodoo Voodoo Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Octopussy The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Chart, indie and electro student favourite, with a bouncy castle an’ all.

Garage Wednesdays The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Craig McGee’s staple eclectic mash-up midweeker.

Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £6

Connoisseur’s mix of old-school jazz, funk and soul. Classic Grand, 22:30–03:00, £6

Alternative rock, metal, punk and ska.

Propaganda O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Cathouse Fridays Cathouse, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£5)

Rock, metal, punk and emo over two

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Hector’s House The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Electronic basslines allied with homecooked house beats.

Wed 31 Oct Teviot House of Horrors (Bwani Junction, The LaFontaines) Teviot, 21:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Teviot transforms into a House of Horrors for your Halloween pleasure, with live sets from Bwani Junction and The LaFontaines. Dress scary.

Witness the Spookiness Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of garage, dubstep and bassline house goes ‘spooky’ for the evening in honour of Halloween.

When Dinosaurs Become Modernists: Post Show Party Wee Red Bar, 22:00–03:00, Free

Following the preview of Andy Hope’s exhibition of the same name, Inverleith House embrace the spookiness with a Halloween-themed after-show party down’t the Wee Red. Prizes for best costume.

Full Moon Halloween Party HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

HMV Picture House get in on the Halloween action with a themed night offering the added fun of glow sticks, UV paint and fire poi shows.

Sub Rosa Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Weekly student night, with residents Ray Vose and Desoto joined by various live guests.

So Weit So Good Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

One-off free entry event to see off the summer, featuring Ean, Smiddy and Kenny White on decks.

Traffic Jam Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Reggae, dub, dancehall and hip-hop midweeker from DJ Greenman and friends.

ICHI Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

New midweeker playing house, bass and old school hippity-hop.

Thu 29 Nov Counterfeit Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Full-on mix of nu-metal and hard rockin’ tunes, with yer man DJ Muppet.

Walk ‘n’ Skank The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

The very best in bass, featuring the talents of the Mungo’s Hi-Fi and Chungo Bungo collectives, and DJs Kokoro and Breezak.

Taking Back Thursdays Cathouse, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

Weekend welcoming mix of rock and metal, with guest DJs mixing it up in the Jager Bar.

Annie Mac Presents (Magnetic Man, Redlight, Rudimental) O2 Academy, 19:00–22:00, £10

The Radio 1 DJ brings her club night north of the border, joined by a host of handpicked live talent.

Jellybaby O2 ABC, 23:00–03:00, £3 adv. (£5 door)

Chart, disco and party tunes. Can’t say fairer.

levels, with the residents manning the decks.

Friday Street Blackfriars Basement, 22:00–03:00, £5

Classic mod sounds, northern soul and 60s-styled R’n’B.

Booty Call The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

Mixed bag of indie, rock, underground hip-hop and chart classics across four rooms.

Jamming Fridays Maggie May’s, 22:00–03:00, Free (£5/£3 student after 12)

Indie rock’n’roll from the 60s to the 00s, with resident tune-picker DJ Jopez.

A Love From Outer Space The Berkeley Suite, 23:00–03:00, £8

Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston’s rather ace London night makes its now regular trip north, with the mighty duo playing back-to-back all night long.

Shake Appeal Bloc+, 23:00–03:00, Free

Damn fine evening of hip shakers and neck breakers, combining everything from Buddy Holly to Motorhead.

The Shed Fridays Shed, 22:30–03:00, Free (£6 after 11)

Pop and chart hits with Andy Robertson in the main room, plus hippity-hop in the Red Room.

Mirrors Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, Free

Eclectic mix of electronic from the Mirrors crew and friends.

Loop: 3rd Birthday Brunswick Hotel, 20:00–02:00, Free

The house and techno specialists celebrate turning three with live sets from BCR Boys’ Colin Bain, Monox’s Smartie and Relentless’ Sewelly.

Sub Club 25: Blawan Vs JD Twitch Sub Club, 23:00–03:00, £10 adv.

The Garage, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

For the penultimate installment of Sub Club’s 25th year celebrations, percussive maestro Blawan locks horns with one half of Optimo, Mr JD Twitch.

The Afterparty

Mighty deep house and techno monthly, with special guests to be revealed.

Boom Thursdays Chart and indie classics, plus a live Twitter feed where you can log tune requests (#Garagelive). Buff Club, 23:00–03:00, £3

Euan Neilson handpicks a selection of classic R’n’B and hip-hop.

Shore Nice ‘n’ Sleazy, 23:30–03:00, Free

Eclectic new party night playing everything from the electronic aquatic funk of Drexciya to the outer-space jazz of Sun Ra.

Pressure The Arches, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Motor City Electronics (Juan Atkins) La Cheetah Club, 23:00–03:00, £10

For the final instalment of Motor City Electronics, innovative Detroit techno master Juan Atkins debuts a special live set as ‘Metroplex’.

DJ Paddy plays the newest in indie, rock, disco and pop. You do the dancing.

IZU The Flying Duck, 23:00–03:00, £2

Brand new club nght for The Flying Duck, promising to play everything that is ‘braw and gid’.

Camden Nights Flat 0/1, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£2)

New indie club from local promoters PMCJ Presents.

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£3 after 10)

Usual midweek fun night Bangers & Mush gets its gore on in honour of Halloween, with the added joy of themed shooters and vodka jelly syringes: only for the brave.

Thu 01 Nov Dapper Dans Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Disco, house and party classics from Picassio and D-Fault, with Decks FX and OSX.

Frisky The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Chart, dance and electro fare, plus punter requests all night long.

Spare Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Danco and Kami play some hench beats. Nuff said.

i AM: Halloween Fright Night The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

The i AM boys transform Cab Vol into a haunted wonderland in honour of Halloween. Free drink with entry.

Dirty POP! HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night of pop and indie fare.

Tue 30 Oct The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk.

Soul Jam Hot Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul, disco and hippity-hop from the Soul Jam Hot DJs.

Teviot, 20:30–03:00, £tbc

Brand new gig-in-a-club night, this edition boasting a live set of subtly layered beats and rushes of distorted guitar care of Miaoux Miaoux (aka Julian Corrie). In the Debating Hall

Sic The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

New Friday night party for Liquid Room featuring big guests in EDM music.

Mambo Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£4)

Old school hip-hop, R’n’B, reggae, dancehall, afro beats and plenty more eclecticness besides.

Unseen (Inigo Kennedy) Studio 24, 22:30–03:00, £8 (£10 after 12)

Stripped-down techno with a back-tobasics warehouse style, with techno specialist Inigo Kennedy providing the introspective and emotive beat-led soundscapes.

ETC: Hammered House of Horrors (Suburbass) Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5 in fancy dress)

Edinburgh Tekno Cartel bring the sleazy bass and techno beats, this month taking to their new home of the Wee Red for a Hammer Horror-themed special, in honour of Halloween weekend an’ all that.

Tick Tick Boom The Annexe, 22:30–03:00, £5

Underground dance tunes, all night long.

Bangers & Mash

The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£7 after 12)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 11)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Paul playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk.

Witness

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Re-launch of the eclectic fun night transporting late-night party people to an imaginary jungle voodoo den-cumlost township shebeen.

Musika: Halloween (Eats Everything) The Liquid Room, 22:00–03:00, From £7 adv. (£15 door)

Musika hold their first ever fullyfledged Halloween bash, featuring homegrown UK talent and one of the Ibiza heroes of 2012, Eats Everything. Fancy dress encouraged.

Fake: Farewell Party Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

The favourited bass, house and techno night calls time after a mighty six years.

Bassment Carousel: Halloween Party Summerhall, 20:30–01:00, £8 (£6)

The new monthly eclectic club night launches with a Halloween special in Summerhall’s creepy Dissection Room, featuring hell-bound Edinburgh blues ten piece The Black Diamond Express and Glasgow ska ensemble Capone and the Bullets.

Sun 04 Nov Coalition Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dubstep, breaks and bassline house from AF Meldrum and a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs.

Sat 03 Nov

The Sunday Club

Tease Age

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of.

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night.

The Egg Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£4 after 12)

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Paul playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk.

Bubblegum The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard.

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Rack and Ruin The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, Free

Monthly offering of electronic dance music of all types and stripes, be it underground or otherwise.

Sin City The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student blowout playing the best in house, electro and hip-hop.

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dr No’s

Moving from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£5 after 12)

Tue 06 Nov

New night from the Evol DJs valuing all kinds of indie-pop, as long as it’s got bite.

Antics The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk.

Soul Jam Hot Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul, disco and

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5

Fri 09 Nov Misfits The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms.

Planet Earth Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top.

This Is Music Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Indie and electro from the Sick Note DJs.

A Love From Outer Space The Caves, 22:30–03:00, £10 adv. (£12 door)

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

American Prom-styled fun night celebrating all that is great about pop, new and old.

Oh No! HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £3

Friday night student party with the emphasis on Skittlebombs... Don’t ask.

XY (Karma Kid) The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Anthology of house, electro and D’n’B for your aural delectation.

Electrikal Fridays (Rustie) Teviot, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Special edition of the bass-heavy club night featuring a 90-minute set from Glasgow-based man of the moment, Rustie.

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Heavy jungle and bass-styled beats from the inimitable Xplicit crew, joined by guest Benga.

Shake Yer Shoulders: Handbag Party

This Is Music Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £5

Celebration of all things techno, with a one-off handbag (as in, dance around your) party, with £2 off entry with a handbag and prizes for the best.

Indie and electro from the Sick Note DJs.

Cream Soda

Wee Dub Festival 2013: Launch Party

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

Anthology of house, electro and D’n’B for your aural delectation.

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5

Upfront house and electro with DJs Craig Wilson and Tommy Kay.

Xplicit (Benga)

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top.

The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Warehau5

New night of rare funk and Afro sounds, ripe for dancing feet.

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

XY

HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night of pop and indie fare.

The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, £3

Planet Earth

Celebration of all things techno with DJs Beatmaster General and Octophant.

Dirty POP!

People!

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms.

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass.

New Friday night party for Liquid Room featuring big guests in EDM music.

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Shake Yer Shoulders

The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Misfits

Friday night student party with the emphasis on Skittlebombs... Don’t ask.

I AM Edinburgh

Sic

Fri 02 Nov

American Prom-styled fun night celebrating all that is great about pop, new and old.

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Chart, dance and electro fare, plus punter requests all night long.

Cream Soda

Nu Fire

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £5

Thu 08 Nov Frisky

Mixed Up

HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Speaker Bite Me

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of garage, dubstep and bassline house.

Mon 05 Nov Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics.

Danceable mix of the best in 60s ska, rocksteady, bluebeat and reggae.

Midweek student rundown of chart and cheese classics.

Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston’s rather ace London night makes its now regular trip north, with the mighty duo playing back-to-back all night long.

Propaganda Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Thunder Disco Club The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

The Thunder Disco Club residents churn out the 90s house, techno and disco hits.

Elements (Neal Scarborough)

hippity-hop from the Soul Jam Hot DJs.

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £1

Official launch party for Wee Dub 2013, with earlybird tickets exclusively on sale, a raffle, and live sets from the likes of Astroboy and Nem.

Hector’s House

Pulse: 3rd Birthday (Luke Slater, Shifted)

I Love Hip-Hop Selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be.

The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

The Annexe, 23:00–03:00, £9

Dedicated trance night featuring the best in local talent.

Electronic basslines allied with homecooked house beats.

Pulse’s 3rd birthday brings electronic music and techno pioneers, Luke Slater, out to play.

Messenger

Wed 07 Nov

Sat 10 Nov

The Annexe, 22:00–03:00, £7

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, 36 (£7 after 12)

Sweet reggae rockin’ from the original sound system, plus MC Ras Ista Lion on special guest duty.

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£4 after 12)

Samedia Shebeen: Re-launch

Upfront house and electro with DJs Craig Wilson and Tommy Kay.

HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £3

Antics

Hypstonite (Miaoux Miaoux, Fatherson)

Warehau5

Oh No!

Come and Get It Maggie May’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Bangers & Mash: Halloween Hive

edinburgh C L U B S

LISTINGS The Egg

Split The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Weekly residence for the long-running Edinburgh D’n’B night.

Bass Syndicate The regular Edinburgh breaks and bassline Manga crew takeover.

Mumbo Jumbo (Bubble)

Wed 14 Nov Split The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Weekly residence for the long-running Edinburgh D’n’B night.

Bangers & Mash The Hive, 22:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 11)

Midweek student rundown of chart and cheese classics.

Witness Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of garage, dubstep and bassline house.

Bubblegum

Dapper Dans

Party soundtrack of funk, soul, disco and house Trendy Wendy, Steve Austin and guests. The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard.

Propaganda

Thu 15 Nov Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Disco, house and party classics from Picassio and D-Fault, with Decks FX and OSX.

Frisky The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Chart, dance and electro fare, plus punter requests all night long.

Balkanarama (Nema Problema Orkestar)

The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by. Studio 24, 21:30–03:00, £8 (£9 after 10)

All singing, all dancing Balkan orgy, with live guests, belly dancing, bespoke visuals and free plum brandy for all. As in, we’re sold.

Rewind The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Journey back through the ages, digging out anthemic gems from the last 40 years.

Ad Hoc Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

Mighty mix of indie, alternative rock, punk, grunge, new wave and more besides.

Beep Beep, Yeah! Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

Retro pop stylings from the 50s to the 70s.

Fever The Annexe, 22:30–03:00, £8

Eclectic selections of house and techno from DJs Fisher & Price, supported by Miss Chris.

Think Twice The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Think Twice resident Craig Smith is joined by his partner in crime, The Revenge, for a four-hour set to launch the first single from their joint EP.

Sun 11 Nov Coalition Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Dubstep, breaks and bassline house from AF Meldrum and a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs.

The Sunday Club The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of.

Rack and Ruin The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, Free

Monthly offering of electronic dance music of all types and stripes, be it underground or otherwise.

Sin City The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student blowout playing the best in house, electro and hip-hop.

Mon 12 Nov Mixed Up The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics.

Nu Fire

I AM Edinburgh Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass.

Dirty POP! HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night of pop and indie fare.

Gimme Indie Rock Wee Red Bar, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

A night dedicated to American (and sometimes Canadian) indie rock – for fans of fuzz, distortion and huge choruses.

Warehau5 The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5

Upfront house and electro with DJs Craig Wilson and Tommy Kay.

Fri 16 Nov Misfits The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms.

Four Corners The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £3 (£5 after 12)

Soulful dancing fodder, from deep funk to reggae beats with your regular DJ hosts Simon Hodge, Johnny Cashback, Astroboy and Wee-G.

Planet Earth Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top.

This Is Music Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Indie and electro from the Sick Note DJs.

Infexious (Alex Kidd) The Annexe, 22:30–03:00, £10 adv.

Hardstyle, hard dance and rawstyle (yes, we’re not sure either), featuring none Alex Kidd on decks.

Cream Soda Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

American Prom-styled fun night celebrating all that is great about pop, new and old.

Oh No! HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £3

Friday night student party with the emphasis on Skittlebombs... Don’t ask.

XY The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Anthology of house, electro and D’n’B for your aural delectation.

Moving from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Basics

Tue 13 Nov

Retro mix of 50s and 60s R’n’B and northern soul.

Antics The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk.

Soul Jam Hot Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul, disco and hippity-hop from the Soul Jam Hot DJs.

I Love Hip Hop The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £1

Selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be.

Hector’s House The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Electronic basslines allied with homecooked house beats.

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £3

Sic The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

New Friday night party for Liquid Room featuring big guests in EDM music.

Bigfoot’s Tea Party: Edinburgh (Christopher Kelly, Wrick, Dave Scott) The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, £5 (£3)

The Nomadic techno and tech-house night makes its first trip to Edinburgh, with a trio of residents taking to the decks.

Sat 17 Nov Tease Age Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night.

Tease Age Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night.

November 2012

THE SKINNY 59


LISTINGS

edinburgh C L U B S

The Egg

Superclub

Dr No’s

Zzzap

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£4 after 12)

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£5 after 12)

Castle Club, 22:30–03:00, £5

New club offering from the rather ace gallery of the same name.

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Paul playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk.

I AM Edinburgh The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Bubblegum

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass.

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard.

Heady bout of cosmic house, punk and upside-down disco with yer man Kris ‘Wasabi’ Walker.

Clouds

The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

The Caves, 22:30–03:00, £5 adv. (£7 door)

The bedroom-produced, Tiga-signed, Scottish techno duo take over for the night. We’ll do the screaming.

Propaganda HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

DBG Wee Red Bar, 22:30–03:00, £2 (£4)

Big ‘N’ Bashy

Masked ball with electro, synthpop, electroclash, new romantic, new wave and indie rock blasting oot the soundsystem.

The Bongo Club, 23:00���03:00, £4 (£6 after 12)

Mighty mix of reggae, grime, dubstep and jungle, coupling as the Edinburgh Outlook launch party.

Warehau5 The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5

Gasoline Dance Machine The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Classic Italo and straight up boogie allied with contemporary house and disco.

Pop Rocks

Misfits

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top.

Hardstyle breakcore night, for your dancing pleasure.

Confusion is Sex The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

Xplicit (Chase and Status) The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £18

Heavy jungle and bass-styled beats from the inimitable Xplicit crew, joined by Manc DJ duo and dance music’s hot property, Chase and Status.

Glam techno and electro night with the usual themed party shenanigans, staging its last ever outing at the current Bongo HQ .

Sounds of Soul The Annexe, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

Soulful house tunes with Ladies on Rotation.

Sun 18 Nov Coalition

Stepback

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wee Red Bar, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£3)

Dubstep, breaks and bassline house from AF Meldrum and a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs.

Mixed bag of electronic bass, from Baltimore to dubstep.

Cream Soda

The Sunday Club

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of.

Rack and Ruin

American Prom-styled fun night celebrating all that is great about pop, new and old.

The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, Free

Oh No!

Monthly offering of electronic dance music of all types and stripes, be it underground or otherwise. The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £12 adv.

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

The DJ extraordinaire known for his tight productions and damn good remixes, Erol Alkan, joins the Sic and Sound of C gang for a one-off special.

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics.

Nu Fire Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Moving from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Tue 20 Nov Antics The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk.

Soul Jam Hot

LuckyMe (Salva) Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £5 (members free)

Globetrotting music, art and all-round party crew LuckyMe welcome LA resident and Frite Nite boss Salva to mix up a selection of West Coast bass.

Sat 24 Nov Tease Age

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul, disco and hippity-hop from the Soul Jam Hot DJs.

I Love Hip Hop

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Long-running indie, rock and soul night.

The Egg

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £2 (£4 after 12)

Selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be.

Art School institution with DJs Chris and Paul playing the finest in indie, garage, soul and punk.

Hector’s House The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Electronic basslines allied with homecooked house beats.

Bubblegum

Wed 21 Nov Split

Handpicked weekend mix of chart and dance, with retro 80s classics as standard.

The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Playdate

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Weekly residence for the long-running Edinburgh D’n’B night.

Bangers & Mash The Hive, 22:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 11)

Midweek student rundown of chart and cheese classics.

Witness Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Sneaky’s resident bass spectacular of garage, dubstep and bassline house.

Thu 22 Nov Frisky The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Chart, dance and electro fare, plus punter requests all night long.

60 THE SKINNY

The Sunday Club The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Two rooms of all the chart, cheese and indie-pop you can think of.

Rise Opal Lounge, 22:00–03:00, £6 (£4)

Johnny Frenetic spins his usual mashup mix of funky house, electro, indie and urban.

Rack and Ruin The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, Free

Monthly offering of electronic dance music of all types and stripes, be it underground or otherwise.

Sin City The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5 (£4)

Student blowout playing the best in house, electro and hip-hop.

Mon 26 Nov Mixed Up The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Request-driven night of pop-punk, chart, indie and good ol’ 90s classics.

Nu Fire Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Moving from hip-hop to dubstep with a plethora of live MCs.

Tue 27 Nov

XY

SiC Vs Sound of C (Erol Alkan, Daniel Avery)

Mixed Up

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Alternative anthems cherrypicked from genres of rock, indie and punk.

Anthology of house, electro and D’n’B for your aural delectation.

Mon 19 Nov

Sun 25 Nov

Antics

The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

Student blowout playing the best in house, electro and hip-hop.

Movember special of the hodgepodge night playing quality tracks chosen by JP’s spinning wheel. Expect anything from 90s rave to power ballads, and a lot of one-hit wonders.

HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £3

Friday night student party with the emphasis on Skittlebombs... Don’t ask.

Sin City

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £6 (£7 after 12)

Dubstep, breaks and bassline house from AF Meldrum and a cast of Edinburgh’s best underground DJs.

Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £5

Magic Mo’stalgic (The Wheel)

Fri 23 Nov

Planet Earth

Audacious

Dance-inducing party with an anything goes attitude and rotating rota of guest DJs.

Coalition

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms.

Pop and rock gems, taking in motown, 80s classics and plenty danceable fare (well, the Beep Beep, Yeah! crew are on decks after all).

Pocket Aces

Upfront house and electro with DJs Craig Wilson and Tommy Kay.

The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £4 (£5 after 12)

The Annexe, 22:30–03:00, £tbc

HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night of pop and indie fare.

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Heavy Gossip Vs Ultragroove (Waze & Odyssey) The heavyweights of Scottish house join forces, playing the most original music from the genre, joined by various special guests.

Dirty POP!

Wasabi Disco

Danceable mix of the best in 60s ska, rocksteady, bluebeat and reggae.

Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

House specialists Stewart and Steven play, er, some special house.

Propaganda HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated indie night with guest DJs dropping by.

Soulsville The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £5

Swinging soul spanning a whole century with DJs Tsatsu and Fryer, plus live dancers a-go-go.

Madchester The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £8 (£6)

Indie classics and baggy greats, from Primal Scream and the like.

November 2012

The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Soul Jam Hot Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Fresh mix of funk, soul, disco and hippity-hop from the Soul Jam Hot DJs.

I Love Hip Hop The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Selection of hip-hop classics and brand-new classics to be.

Hector’s House The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £6 (£5)

Electronic basslines allied with homecooked house beats.

Wed 28 Nov Split The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, Free

Weekly residence for the long-running Edinburgh D’n’B night.

Bangers & Mash The Hive, 22:00–03:00, £1 (£3 after 11)

Midweek student rundown of chart and cheese classics.

Club Together (Kissy Sell Out) Potterrow, 22:00–03:00, Free

New weekly student rip up at Potterrow, with a selection of high profile live guests taking to the decks – this edition with Radio 1 dance supremo Kissy Sell Out.

Witness Vs Electrikal (Flostradamus, Taz Buckfaster, Anarkid, Skanky B) Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £5 (members free)

Witness and Electrikal join forces for a special night headlined by Chicagobased DJ duo Flostradamus, alongside Glasgow native Taz Buckfaster and a back-to-back set from Anarkid and Skanky B.

Thu 29 Nov Ride Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, Free

Ride girls Checkie and Lauren play hiphop and dance, all night long.

Frisky The Hive, 22:00–03:00, Free

Chart, dance and electro fare, plus punter requests all night long.

Post-everything dub, house, bass, garage and hippity-hop from this promising young collective of artists and DJs, in support of Edinburgh Charity Fashion Show.

I AM Edinburgh The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Resident young guns Beta & Kappa make their now regular trip east, playing the usual fine mix of electronica and bass.

Dirty POP! HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £4

Student-orientated night of pop and indie fare.

Warehau5 The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £5

Upfront house and electro with DJs Craig Wilson and Tommy Kay.

Fri 30 Nov Misfits The Hive, 21:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 10)

Chart, electro, indie-pop and alternative anthems over two rooms.

Planet Earth Citrus Club, 22:30–03:00, Free (£5 after 11)

Distinctly retro selection from 1960 to 1999, moving from Abba to ZZ Top.

Kapital (Matador) The Caves, 23:00–03:00, £7

The Kapital crew welcome an exclusive set from recent Minus signing Matador, who’ll likely play a trademark set of deep driving techno.

This Is Music Sneaky Pete’s, 23:00–03:00, £3 (members free)

Indie and electro from the Sick Note DJs.

Stacks Wee Red Bar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£3)

Bawlin’ R’n’B, soul, swing and motown from the Stacks residents, plus free mix CDs on the door.

Cream Soda Electric Circus, 22:30–03:00, £3 (£4 after 12)

American Prom-styled fun night celebrating all that is great about pop, new and old.

Oh No! HMV Picture House, 23:00–03:00, £3

Friday night student party with the emphasis on Skittlebombs... Don’t ask.

Black Science The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

House, disco, funk, soul and hip hop, where dancing becomes a science.

Jackhammer (Samuel L Session) The Annexe, 22:30–03:00, £10 (£8 before 12)

The Jackhammer crew provide our dose of all things techno, bolstered by a guest set from Swedish techno producer Samuel L Sessions.

Substance The Bongo Club, 23:00–03:00, £tbc

The Substance crew present the usual stellar dose of techno tunes, having just about recovered from their 6th birthday bash last month.

Robigan’s Reggae (Rhoda Dakar) Henry’s Cellar, 23:00–03:00, £4 (£5 after 12)

Dub, reggae and dancehall clubbing spectacular, featuring a guest DJ set from the queen of 2-tone, Rhoda Dakar.

SiC Vs Xplicit (Rusko) The Liquid Room, 22:30–03:00, £10

Dubstep pioneer Rusko joins the Sic and Xplicit gang for a one-off special.

Sat 01 Dec VEGAS! The Voodoo Rooms, 20:30–03:00, £5

50s-themed fun night, with Frankie Sumatra, Bugsy Seagull, Dino Martini, Sam Jose and Nikki Nevada. Plus Vegas showgirls a-go-go, natch.

Thunder Disco Club The Cabaret Voltaire, 23:00–03:00, £7 (£5)

The Thunder Disco Club residents churn out the 90s house, techno and disco hits.

Sun 02 Dec Rack and Ruin The Third Door, 23:00–03:00, Free

Monthly offering of electronic dance music of all types and stripes, be it underground or otherwise.

DUNDEE music

Tue 20 Nov

Wed 07 Nov

Fat Sam’s Saturday Nights

Clock Opera (Bright Light Bright Light)

Friendzy

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms.

Wed 31 Oct

London experimentalist Guy Connelley brings his eclectic avant-pop ensemble Glasgow-way.

Trick or Treat: Halloween Party The Doghouse, 20:30–03:00, £5 adv. (£6 door)

Dress to impress Halloween bash featuring live sets from Bags of Rock, State of Emergency, Silverbox and Overspill.

Thu 01 Nov Go!Zilla The Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £5 (£3)

Fledgling psychedelic duo formed in Florence at the beginning of 2012, influenced by West Coast sounds and 60s garage.

Reptile Youth Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £5

Post pop/punk duo from Denmark, founded in 2009 by Mads Damsgaard Kristiansen and Esben Valloe, now resplendent with added drummer action.

The Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £8 adv. (£10 door)

Sat 24 Nov The Mouse That Ate The Cat The Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £6 (£3)

Glasgow-based scamps making delightful electro-indie-pop that uses synths, samples, guitars and layered vocals.

Fridge Magnets (Van Damn, Josh Moncrieff) Beat Generator Live!, 19:00–22:30, £tbc

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–03:00, £3.50

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and jelly shots.

Fri 09 Nov

Fat Sam’s Fridays

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative.

Sub Club’s Saturday night house specialists Harri & Domenic make the trip Dundee-way for one night only. Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £3.50

Party-styled Friday nighter. Beware the six quid fishbowls.

New Noise Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Sun 25 Nov

Lockdown

Barrie Masters and his Hot Rods do their inimitable rock’n’roll thing, honed over 30+ years.

Beat Generator Live!, 23:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 12)

Metal, rock and alternative playlists all night long.

Sat 10 Nov

Sat 03 Nov

Wed 28 Nov

A Love From Outer Space

The Anti Nowhere Here

Bill Wells and Aidan Moffat (RM Hubbert)

Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnston’s rather ace London night makes its now regular trip north, with the mighty duo playing back-to-back all night long.

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £10

Longstanding hardcore punk hellraisers formed back in 1980.

Sun 04 Nov Matthew Herbert: One Pig Dundee Rep, 19:30–22:00, From £10

Bizarre music show all about food, for which Matthew Herbert has spent eight months recording the birth, growth, and eventual butchering of a single pig, with a five-person band playing crazy instruments and various local chefs cooking up a storm.

Shoogar (Redwire)

DCA, 19:00–22:00, £8 (£6)

The esteemed musical chums take in a special date as part of Book Week Scotland, joined by RM Hubbert and live reading from acclaimed Scottish author Gordon Legge.

Peace The Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £6.50 adv. (£8 door)

Alternative indie up-and-comers who describe their sound as ‘music to fuck you in the heart’, which is nice.

Thu 29 Nov

The Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £5 (£3)

Loaded 44

LAU

Ass-shakin’ punk rockers hailing from the North East of England.

The Gardyne Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £12.50

Fri 30 Nov

Boozed up desert rock’n’roll trio from Dumfries and Galloway.

Rather fine experimental folk trio made up of Kris Drever, Martin Green and Aidan O’Rourke, touring their new concept album, Race The Loser.

Fri 09 Nov The Mirror Trap (Vukovi, The Little Kicks, Broken Boy) The Doghouse, 20:00–23:00, £5 (£3)

Alternative indie-rock quartet born and bred on the means streets of Dundee.

Meursault (Man Without Machines, The Won Over) Beat Generator Live!, 19:30–22:30, £6 adv. (£8 door)

Neil Pennycook and his Meursault cohorts make the trip Dundee-way to promote their third album, Something for the Weakened.

Sat 10 Nov The Cundeez (Root System, The Begbies, Homesick Aldo) The Doghouse, 19:30–23:00, £5

The Dundee folk-rockers launch their third album, fusing raw Dundee dialect with punching guitars, pounding drums and the occasional bagpipes.

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £5

The Rhymney Valley metallers tour their new album, Ruthless.

Mon 12 Nov Oh No! Yoko (Darren Campbell) Beat Generator Live!, 19:00–22:30, £4

Canadian math-indie merchants playing Dundee as the only Scottish date of their current European tour.

Superheroes Night Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

One-off superheroes-themed night (i.e. an excuse to break out the spandex and wear yer pants over your trousers).

Wed 14 Nov Friendzy Fat Sam’s, 22:30–03:00, £3.50

Bass Orgy Soundsystem

Sat 01 Dec

Full-on electro, D’n’B and dub orgy, complete with a massive soundsystem and live visuals over eight screens.

The Scottish national metal battle of the bands reaches the semi-finals stage.

DUNDEE clubs Wed 31 Oct Book Club: Halloween Party (Rory Phillips) Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Friendzy

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £8

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative.

Fri 16 Nov

Beat Generator Live!, 19:00–22:30, £7

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–03:00, £3.50

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Gorilla In Your Car Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Hardcore, emo, punk and scenester selections. Also perhaps the best-named club night in Dundee’s existence.

Sat 17 Nov

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £8

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms.

Asylum Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative.

Wed 21 Nov Fat Sam’s, 22:30–03:00, £3.50

Thu 22 Nov

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Erol Alkan and Daniel Avery

Fat Sam’s Fridays

Remix DJ extraordinaire Erol Alkan takes to Reading Rooms with his Phantasy Sound Collective pal, Daniel Avery.

Headway Vs Spectrum: Part 2 (Gary Beck)

Party-styled Friday nighter. Beware the six quid fishbowls.

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £8 adv.

Lockdown

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £10

Damned-inspired London punksters in their fifth decade on the scene.

Fat Sam’s Saturday Nights Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £8

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms.

Asylum Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Best of selection of rock, metal and alternative.

16 Nov, 9:00pm – 10:00pm, £9 (£6)

The collaborating pair debut a live performance piece, which explores their relationship to dance and electronic music. Part of Sonica 2012.

Citizens Theatre Glasgow Girls: The Musical 31 Oct – 17 Nov, 7:30pm – 9:00pm, From £12

Inspiring story of the seven teenage girls who became known collectively as The Glasgow Girls following their campaign to bring back their friend who’d been forcibly removed from her home in a dawn raid.

Here We Stay 15–17 Nov, times vary, Free (but ticketed)

A global community chorus share evocative stories of their lives through song, spoken word and live music, celebrating the diverse life stories of asylum-seekers, refugees and local residents in Glasgow.

2–3 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, From £8

All My Sons 13–17 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, From £10

Arthur Miller’s first commercial and critical success, based on a true story about a successful self-made businessman whose factory supplied the US military during the war.

Death of a Salesman 20–24 Nov, 7:30pm – 10:00pm, From £10

Reworking of one of Arthur Miller’s best-known plays, inspired by an encounter Miller had with his uncle, a salesman, at a performance of his first hit play. All My Sons.

Oran Mor

Fri 23 Nov Reading Rooms: Resident’s Party

Fat Sam’s Fridays

UK Subs (Patrol, The Eddies)

CCA Sonica 2012: Luke Fowler and Jean-Luc Guionnet

Afternoon session showcasing new work from a selection of talented playwrights. Plus a pie and a pint, naturally. See oran-mor.co.uk for schedule details.

Sat 03 Nov

Fri 16 Nov

GLASGOW theatre

A Play, A Pie And A Pint

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £6 adv. (£8 door)

The two Reading Rooms’ favourites go head-to-head in the second of a series of collaborative nights, with inventive electronic producer Gary Beck their guest for the evening.

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £3.50

Party-styled Friday nighter. Beware the six quid fishbowls.

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £10 adv.

Kunt and the Gang The inimitable Kunt sings his way through a variety of obscene subjects, taking in such hits as Fucksticks and Use My Arsehole As A Cunt. Nice.

Fat Sam’s Fridays

Fat Sam’s Saturday Nights

Fri 02 Nov

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £tbc

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Electro musings with a danceable beat, with Clouds and Ado sharing deck duty.

A trio of Scottish playwrights in the shape of Stephen Greenhorn, Rona Munro and Isabel Wright combine forces for a tale in which seven characters collide and interweave in a modern mosaic about money and love.

Rockabilly, doo-wop, soul and all things golden age and danceable with the Locarno regulars.

Ska, screamo and pop-punk offerings, featuring additional live performances from a selection of choice noisemakers.

Thu 15 Nov

Fri 30 Nov CTRL ALT DFT

Cottiers Theatre

Reading Rooms: Resident’s Party

Warped

Fat Sam’s, 22:30–03:00, £3.50

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and jelly shots.

Gilt

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and jelly shots.

Party-styled Friday nighter. Beware the six quid fishbowls.

Wed 28 Nov Friendzy

Reading Rooms, 22:00–02:30, £5 (£7 after 12)

Friendzy

Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £3.50

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Locarno

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and jelly shots.

The Reading Room residents hold the fort for the evening.

Asylum

Asylum

Beat Generator Live!, 19:00–22:30, £7

The Gardyne Theatre, 19:30–22:00, £11

Revoker (Sacred Mother Tongue, Excellent Cadaver)

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £8

Massive Saturday night party spreading its wares over three floors and no less than six rooms.

The Scottish national metal battle of the bands reaches the semi-finals stage.

Big Boy Bloater The Jools Holland-prasied bluesmeets-roots guitarist and singer/ songwriter tours on the back of his new album.

Fat Sam’s Saturday Nights

Messy student midweeker of party tunes and jelly shots.

London club mainstay Rory Phillips makes the trip Dundee-way to help along the Book Club’s Halloween celebrations.

Sun 11 Nov

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £12 adv.

Molten Magazine Metal Battle: Semi Final

Molten Magazine Metal Battle: Semi Final

Kage, 23:00–02:30, £4

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £5 (£8 after 11)

Harri & Domenic

Alternative mixtape night taking in rock, punk, screamo, electro and hippity-hop.

Beat Generator Live!, 20:00–22:30, £9

Big Muff Mighty celebration of all things 90s grunge, raising funds for Make-ThatA-Take Records. Also perhaps the best-named club night of our month.

New electro-rockers on the block, headered by the sing-shouty tones of Steven Winton.

Eddie and the Hot Rods

Fat Sam’s, 21:00–03:00, £8

Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

The Reading Room residents hold the fort for the evening. Fat Sam’s, 20:00–03:00, £3.50

Beat Generator Live!, 23:00–03:00, Free (£4 after 12)

Metal, rock and alternative playlists all night long.

Sat 24 Nov Book Club Reading Rooms, 22:30–02:30, £tbc

Selection of DJs on rotation all night, covering genres of electro, disco, techno and anything else they damn well fancy.

various dates between 24 Oct and 30 Nov, 1:00pm – 2:00pm, From £8

SECC American Idiot 29 Oct – 3 Nov, times vary, From £17.50

Musical based on Green Day’s multiplatinum album of the same name, telling the story of three lifelong friends forced to choose between their dreams and the safety of suburbia, with Tom Hank’s feature film version to follow (yes, really).

Scotland Street School Museum Sonica 2012: Remember Me 8 Nov, 14 Nov, 15 Nov, times vary, £12 (£8)

Mini, multi-media opera set inside an antique desk, telling the story of an imagined friendship between two ill-fated opera heroines, sans singing. Part of Sonica 2012.


THEATRE THE ARCHES

TRAMWAY

THE RED HOURGLASS

SONICA 2012: SANDGLASSES

13–14 NOV, 7:30PM – 8:30PM, £9 (£7)

8–9 NOV, 7:30PM – 8:30PM, FROM £10 (£7)

Alan Bissett presents his first new work since the Moira Monologues, in which he’ll all five parts – three male, two female, all of ‘em spiders – locked up together in a mysterious facility.

I HEART ALICE HEART I

Three-dimensional, audio-visual exploration of the acoustic, visual and symbolic meaning of sand-timers, performed by the Gaida Ensemble. Part of Sonica 2012.

31 OCT – 2 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:00PM, £11 (£8)

14–18 NOV, TIMES VARY, £12 (£8)

A human and oft humourous piece from fresh new company HotForTheatre, exploring the monumental journey of a somewhat unlikely couple.

IN THE INSTANCE OF ARRIVAL 3 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, £6 (£4)

Ensemble exploration of multidisciplinary performance improvisation from On The Stage Of The Present, looking in depth at the role of myth, dreams and folk culture as sources of storytelling.

THE GLUE FACTORY SONICA 2012: LASER SHOW 17 NOV, 9:00PM – 9:45PM, £9 (£6)

For one performance only, performance artist Robin Fox uses lasers, smoke and electronic composition to create an awe-inspiring, three-dimensional, synaesthetic experience. Part of Sonica 2012.

THE KING’S THEATRE CHICAGO 19–24 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £15

Award-winning musical set in the 1920s, based around the tale of a nightclub singer, a double-murderess and a smooth-talking lawyer.

I, TOMMY 5–10 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, FROM £10

Expect fluffy handcuffs, lies and swingers clubs in this imaginative and irreverent reinvention of Tommy Sheridan’s escapades.

9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 12 NOV AND 1 DEC, TIMES VARY, FROM £15

Musical tale of the buxom blonde queen of country-tinged pop, based on the film of the same name.

THE SOUND OF MUSIC 30 OCT – 3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £10

Classic retelling of the von Trapp family tale, in full singalong glory.

THE OLD HAIRDRESSERS FIVE WOMEN WEARING THE SAME DRESS 6–8 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:30PM, £8

Glasgow-based theatre group All About Eve present a production of Alan Ball’s (aka the writer of Six Feet Under) play centred around five female characters at an ostentatious wedding reception in Tennessee.

I TRUST YOU TO KILL ME 13–14 NOV, 7:00PM – 10:00PM, £7

Dark drama with comedic touches, centred around the story of an office which decides if people live or die.

THEATRE ROYAL ONE MAN, TWO GUVNORS 13–17 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £10

Farcical comedy based on Carlo Goldoni’s The Servent Of Two Masters, with the delightful James Cordon headering the cast.

THE LADYKILLERS VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 5 NOV AND 24 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

Retelling of the classic Ealing comedy, brought back to extra-humourous life by Graham Linehan (aka the writer of Father Ted).

RICHARD ALSTON DANCE COMPANY 1 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, FROM £10.50

Richard Alston and co present their new piece, Buzzing Round the Hunnisuccle, inspired by Alston’s long held fascination with the music of Jo Kondo.

HALFWAY TO PARADISE: THE BILLY FURY STORY 4 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, £21

Now in its 16th year of touring, Bill Fury’s own band re-live his timeless hits backed by personal movie footage.

BLUE/ORANGE 6–10 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £7.50

Gripping psychological tale of a man who believes that a notorious military dictator is his father, caught in a battle of wills between his psychiatrist and a young doctor.

THE WOMAN IN BLACK 26 NOV – 1 DEC, TIMES VARY, FROM £10

Stage adaptation of Susan Hill’s best-selling novel combining the power and intensity of live theatre with a cinematic quality inspired by the world of film noir.

SONICA 2012: BLUEBEARD New interpretation of Bartok’s opera, for which artists Douwe Dijkstra, Jules van Hulst and Coen Huisman work around a white cube to create multi-media representation of Duke Bluebeard’s metaphorical dungeon. Part on Sonica 2012.

SONICA 2012: TALES OF MAGICAL REALISM (PART 2) 14–18 NOV, 8:00PM – 9:30PM, £12 (£8)

Following Part 1’s unveiling at Cryptic Nights last year, Sven Werner once again invites you to embark on an illusion-fuelled journey to darkly poetic places. Showing half-hourly. Part of Sonica 2012.

SONICA 2012: ECSTATIC ARC 8–11 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

Installation piece featuring sonickinetic sculpture, mechanical puppetry and recorded composition, showing as an exhibition and a series of multisensory live performances. Part of Sonica 2012.

SONICA 2012: PALIMPSEST 10 NOV, TIMES VARY, £10 (£7)

Artists Daniel Skoglund and Kathy Hinde create live sketches, drawings and video projections which, using graphite sequencers, they’ll then translate into a musical score of techno rhythms and electronic pulses. Part of Sonica 2012.

RING 20–21 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, £10 (£7)

Sound journey in complete darkness for which the audience wear headphones that amplify the intimate details of the room. Part of Fuelfest.

BLACK T-SHIRT COLLECTION 22 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, £10 (£7)

Fringe First-winner Inua Ellams presents a new story about two brothers building a global t-shirt brand.

TRON THEATRE LONDON 13–17 NOV, 7:45PM – 10:00PM, FROM £7

Duo of emotive stories of family and choices from the new writing powerhouse that is Paines Plough.

THE AUTHORISED KATE BANE 24 OCT – 3 NOV, NOT 27 OCT, 28 OCT, 29 OCT, 8:00PM – 10:00PM, PRICES VARY

Ella Hickson’s painfully comic new work, where the excavation of a family history leads to questions of whether there is an authorised version of the past – or just the one we can live with.

HAROLD AND MAUDE 30 OCT – 3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £7

The Scottish premiere of Colin Higgins’ stage play of the cult 1971 movie Harold and Maud.

IRON 6–17 NOV, NOT 11, 12, 13, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

Emotionally-charged production featuring Blythe Duff as the convicted murderer who reveals how terrifyingly easy it is to kill the things you love.

8 4 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:30PM, £6 (£4)

The real life story of two couples taking aim at Proposition 8, a law that took away the right of LGBT couples to marry in California in 2008.

EDINBURGH EDINBURGH PLAYHOUSE 42ND STREET 6–10 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £15

Retelling of the timeless tale of small town Peggy Sawyer’s rise from chorine to Broadway star.

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT 13–17 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £12

Bill Kenwright’s production of Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical retelling of the Biblical story of Joseph, his eleven brothers and the coat of many colours.

9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 12 NOV AND 1 DEC, TIMES VARY, FROM £15

Musical tale of the buxom blonde queen of country-tinged pop, based on the film of the same name.

FESTIVAL THEATRE EDINBURGH BATSHEVA ENSEMBLE: DECA DANCE 30–31 OCT, 7:30PM – 9:00PM, FROM £12.50

The younger wing of Israel’s world class Batsheva Dance Company makes its first visit to the UK, performing a greatest hits piece by artistic director Ohad Naharin.

SCOTTISH OPERA: THE MAGIC FLUTE VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 25 OCT AND 24 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

12 DANCERS/DELIBERANCE 21 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:30PM, £15.50 (£11.50/£6 UNEMPLOYED)

Sir Thomas Allen and Simon Higlett take on the fantastical charms of Mozart’s beloved opera, set in a visual world inspired by steam punk Victoriana. No ‘magic flute’ jokes, please.

New choreographed dance work set in a jury room, where 12 strangers come together one night and slowly begin to express their opinions. Featuring a cast of 12 leading male dancers from Scotland.

SOME LIKE IT HIP HOP

THE INTOXICATING ROSE GARDEN

6–7 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £11.50

Comical tale of love, mistaken identity, cross-dressing and revolution, all played out in ZooNation’s trademark hip-hop style.

MATTHEW BOURNE’S SLEEPING BEAUTY 27 NOV – 1 DEC, TIMES VARY, FROM £16

Keeping the festive season alive, Matthew Bourne (y’know, he who is tirelessly reimagining just about every classic in theatrical existence) presents a re-telling of the classic fairytale, set to Tchaikovsky’s original score.

22 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:30PM, £15.50 (£11.50/£6 UNEMPLOYED)

Red Note return with a new hybrid piece using poems by Hafez, the 14th century Persian mystic, as its starting-point.

SONATA FOR A MAN AND BOY 23–24 NOV, TIMES VARY, £10 (£8)

Retelling of the classic Ealing comedy, brought back to extra-humourous life by Graham Linehan (aka the writer of Father Ted).

DUNDEE DUNDEE REP SINGIN’ I’M NO A BILLY, HE’S A TIM 6–8 NOV, 7:30PM – 10:00PM, £16

EDINBURGH GANG SHOW 2012 Colourful annual music-meets-comedy show performed by over 200 young things from the world of Scouting and Girlguiding.

ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN EDINBURGH - JOHN HOPE GATEWAY ENSO 3–4 NOV, TIMES VARY, £5 (£3)

Using paper, fabric and stones, a selection of dancers weave poems, movement and images into one unique show that aims to explore how contrasting spaces affect the experience of a piece.

ROYAL LYCEUM THEATRE A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 24 OCT AND 14 NOV, 2:30PM – 5:00PM, FROM £14.50

Matthew Lenton’s bold and inventive new production of Shakespeare’s classic comedy tale of unrequited and unwanted love.

THE OLD AMBULANCE DEPOT

THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES Eve Ensler’s Broadway and West End hit returns with an all-new cast.

BEAUTIFUL BURNOUT 31 OCT – 3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £9

Following its rehearsed reading back in April as part of Traverse’s Write Here festival of new writing, Morna Pearson previews her (now-finished) humourous and surreal portrait of a spectacularly dysfunctional relationship.

WITHIN THIS DUST 23 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:30PM, £15.50 (£11.50/£6 UNEMPLOYED)

Hauntingly programme of three live dance works, film and animation exploring the events surrounding 9/11.

WE HOPE THAT YOU’RE HAPPY (WHY WOULD WE LIE?) 8–10 NOV, 8:00PM – 10:00PM, £15.50 (£11.50/£6 UNEMPLOYED)

Humourous yet unsettling examination of what it means to be a tuned-in, delusional and unwitting consumer in a hyper-communicative world.

IRON 6–17 NOV, NOT 11, 12, 13, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

Emotionally-charged production featuring Blythe Duff as the convicted murderer who reveals how terrifyingly easy it is to kill the things you love.

AGNES & WALTER: A LITTLE LOVE STORY 20 NOV, 7:30PM – 9:30PM, £15.50 (£11.50/£6 UNEMPLOYED)

Poignant little love story told via physical and visual performance, dance, physical theatre, clowning and live music.

THE BUNGO, 20:00–22:30, £6

MICHAEL MCINTYRE SECC, 20:00–22:00, £35

The English comic (of Michael McIntyre Comedy Roadshow) takes to the road, playing a five-night run at SECC.

ANDI OSHO: ALL THE SINGLE LADIES THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £15 (£13)

The award-winning comic tours her second stand-up show, a brutally honest dissection of the perils and pitfalls of dating.

TUE 06 NOV AMATEUR TRANSPLANTS: ADAM KAY’S BUM NOTES ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £14.50 (£10)

Darkly humorous re-imaginings of songs, brought to you by the Club Noir folk.

MICHAEL MCINTYRE

FRI 16 NOV

THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

SUN 18 NOV CHRIS MOYLES O2 ACADEMY, 19:00–22:00, £17.50

The former Radio 1 Breakfast Show host tours his live music and comedy show, fueled on audience participation and cheekiness..

MON 19 NOV CHRIS RAMSEY: FEELING LUCKY THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10

SDT: AUTUMN 2012

WICKED WENCHES

21–22 NOV, 8:00PM – 10:00PM, £16 (£9)

Scottish Dance Theatre present a double bill of two of their most favourited works, Dog and Luxuria.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3 MEMBERS)

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond.

THU 22 NOV

All-female stand-up, with a suitably varied mix of headliners and newcomers.

THE THURSDAY SHOW (BEN NORRIS, JOHNNY CANDON. PHIL DIFFER, EDDIE MCCABE)

GLASGOW

THU 08 NOV

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£7/£4 MEMBERS)

WED 31 OCT

THE THURSDAY SHOW (PAUL TONKINSON, HARI SRISKANTHA)

BEST OF IRISH COMEDY THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£6/£3 MEMBERS)

THE THURSDAY SHOW (TONY LAW, CAIMH MCDONNELL, MARTIN BEYER-OLSEN, MICHAEL DOWNIE) THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£7/£4 MEMBERS)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

FRI 02 NOV THE FRIDAY SHOW (TONY LAW, CAIMH MCDONNELL, LARS BERRUM, MICHAEL DOWNIE) THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£9/£5 MEMBERS)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

CRAIG HILL: JOCK’S TRAP! TRON THEATRE, 22:00–23:30, £15 (£12)

The kilted cheeky chappie plays his annual sell-out show as part of Glasgay! 2012.

STEWART FRANCIS: OUTSTANDING IN HIS FIELD THEATRE ROYAL, 19:30–22:00, £19.50

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£7/£4 MEMBERS)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

FRI 09 NOV JIMEOIN ORAN MOR, 19:00–22:00, £15

Inspired ramblings from the stand-up Northern Ireland comedian and actor (aka Jimeon McKeown).

KEVIN BRIDGES

THE SATURDAY SHOW (PAUL TONKINSON, HARI SRISKANTHA) THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

SUN 11 NOV

The Mock the Week star does his jolly thing, touring a show of brand new material.

MICHAEL REDMOND’S SUNDAY SERVICE

SAT 03 NOV

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond.

MICHAEL MCINTYRE SECC, 20:00–22:00, £35

The English comic (of Michael McIntyre Comedy Roadshow) takes to the road, playing a five-night run at SECC.

THE SATURDAY SHOW (TONY LAW, CAIMH MCDONNELL, MARTIN BEYER-OLSEN, MICHAEL DOWNIE) THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

KEVIN BLOODY WILSON THEATRE ROYAL, 20:00–22:00, £20.50

After first bringing his unique brand of unPC Aussie humour to our shores more than 25 years ago, Kevin Bloody Wilson returns for his final concert tour of the UK.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 MEMBERS)

HAIRY BIKERS: LARGER THAN LIFE OVERVIEW

THE THURSDAY SHOW (MITCH BENN, KEITH FARNAN, DEREK JOHNSTON, LARS BERRUM) THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4 MEMBERS)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

FRI 02 NOV COMEDY CENTRAL THE PLEASANCE, 20:00–23:00, £5 (£4)

Comedy Central present the best from the comedy world in their monthly showcase. In the Cabaret Bar.

THE FRIDAY SHOW (MITCH BENN, KEITH FARNAN, DEREK JOHNSTON, MARTIN BEYER-OLSEN) THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5 MEMBERS)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 MEMBERS)

Chilled comedy showcase to cure your Sunday evening back-to-work blues.

MON 05 NOV FIT O’ THE GIGGLES CITY CAFÉ, 20:30–22:30, £3 (£2)

Keara Murphy hosts a selection of acts taking in sketches, stand-up, mime, musical comedy, poetry, magic, and, well, pretty much anything else they fancy.

TUE 06 NOV WICKED WENCHES (SUSAN MORRISON, DIANE SPENCER, BECKY PRICE, ALLYSON SMITH) THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3 MEMBERS)

All-female stand-up, with a suitably varied mix of headliners and newcomers.

WED 07 NOV ANDI OSHO: ALL THE SINGLE LADIES THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £15 (£13)

The award-winning comic tours her second stand-up show, a brutally honest dissection of the perils and pitfalls of dating.

SUN 25 NOV MICHAEL REDMOND’S SUNDAY SERVICE THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 MEMBERS)

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond.

MON 26 NOV ROB ROUSE: LIFE SENTENCES THE STAND, 17:00–19:00, £12 (£10)

Crude comic par excellence, Rob Rouse is back on the road following the birth of his second child, for which the majority of his chat centres around, well... pretty much crapping and peeing.

WED 28 NOV BEST OF IRISH COMEDY THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £7 (£6/£3 MEMBERS)

THE THURSDAY SHOW (DAN NIGHTINGALE, COLUM MCDONNELL, DOGSHIT JOHNSTON)

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £5

After a two-year break from the live circuit, Noble bounds back on stage for another bout of fiery freewheeling, as unprepared and demonic as ever.

SUN 04 NOV THE SUNDAY NIGHT LAUGH-IN (VLADIMIR MCTAVISH, JIM PARK, HARI SRIKANTHA, WAYNE MAZADZA)

THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £15

MON 12 NOV A selection of comedic academics do a stint of stand-up for your entertainment and enlightenment. Laughs and learning in one neat package: tick.

EDINBURGH PLAYHOUSE, 20:00–22:00, £25

THE STAND, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

SAT 24 NOV

Top comics from the contemporary Irish circuit.

BRIGHT CLUB

THU 01 NOV ROSS NOBLE: MINDBENDER

THE SATURDAY SHOW (MITCH BENN, KEITH FARNAN, DEREK JOHNSTON, LARS BERRUM)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

THEATRE ROYAL, 19:30–22:00, £25

The Hairy Bikers combine food and laughter as per, sharing tales of decadent dinners and culinary catastrophes.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3 MEMBERS)

The Mock the Week star does his jolly thing, touring a show of brand new material.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£9/£5 MEMBERS)

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

SAT 10 NOV

WED 31 OCT

FESTIVAL THEATRE EDINBURGH, 19:30–22:00, £20

FRI 23 NOV

THE FRIDAY SHOW (PAUL TONKINSON, HARI SRISKANTHA) THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£9/£5 MEMBERS)

The English comic returns to the live circuit with his first stand-up tour in 16 years, at which he’ll be test-driving a selection of new material.

STEWART FRANCIS: OUTSTANDING IN HIS FIELD

THE FRIDAY SHOW (BEN NORRIS, JOHNNY CANDON. PHIL DIFFER, EDDIE MCCABE)

THE SATURDAY SHOW (BEN NORRIS, JOHNNY CANDON. PHIL DIFFER, EDDIE MCCABE)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £13

BRUNTON THEATRE, 20:00–22:00, £17.50

The very first female Perrier Awardwinner returns with her new stand-up show, marking some 30 years in the business.

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

SECC, 20:00–22:00, £30

The Glaswegian funnyman continues his series of hometown gigs in the not-sointimate surrounds of SECC.

ALEXEI SAYLE

SAT 17 NOV THE SATURDAY SHOW (GARY LITTLE, SILKY, WOUTER MEIJS)

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 MEMBERS)

The English comic (of Michael McIntyre Comedy Roadshow) takes to the road, playing a five-night run at SECC.

TUE 30 OCT

Top comics from the contemporary Scottish circuit, plus added Halloween spookiness.

MICHAEL MCINTYRE SECC, 20:00–22:00, £35

EDINBURGH

BEST OF SCOTTISH COMEDY: HALLOWEEN SPECIAL

Rumination on the way the world has changed seen through the eyes of one Dundee family, for whom the affects can be seen across all of the generations and throughout their daily lives.

SECC, 20:00–22:00, £35

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£9/£5 MEMBERS)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£9/£5 MEMBERS)

MICHAEL REDMOND’S SUNDAY SERVICE

16–17 NOV, TIMES VARY, £10 (£5)

THU 01 NOV

30 OCT – 17 NOV, NOT 4 NOV, 5 NOV, 11 NOV, 12 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

GREATER SHAWLANDS REPUBLIC

WED 07 NOV

CL CHANCES ARE...

7–10 NOV, TIMES VARY, FREE (BUT TICKETED)

THE ARTIST MAN AND THE MOTHER WOMAN

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£7/£4 MEMBERS)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

Following two consecutive sell-out Edinburgh shows and a sell-out UK tour, panel show regular Chris Ramsey embarks on his biggest ever live tour.

ENTARTET

TRAVERSE THEATRE

THE THURSDAY SHOW (GARY LITTLE, SILKY, WOUTER MEIJS)

The English comic (of Michael McIntyre Comedy Roadshow) takes to the road, playing a five-night run at SECC.

Deeply human story following five young fighters as they aim for the bright lights, far from Glasgow’s grey streets.

Top comics from the contemporary Irish circuit.

Unique audio installation fused with live performance, using original text from an infamous Munich exhibition to create a guide to audio spaces.

THU 15 NOV

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

9 NOV, 10 NOV, 17 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

20–24 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £9

The British comic presents her new show questioning the ideas of community and responsibility. In a funny way, o’course.

MON 05 NOV

19:00–22:00, FROM £19.50

9 NOV, 10 NOV, 17 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

Eve Ensler’s Broadway and West End hit returns with an all-new cast.

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 MEMBERS)

THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

USHER HALL,

Oft-poignant snapshot of the sectarian divide, that finds a Celtic supporter banged-up in the same cell as a Rangers supporter on the day of an Old Firm match.

THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES

MICHAEL REDMOND’S SUNDAY SERVICE

JENNY ECLAIR: ECLAIRIOUS

THE FRIDAY SHOW (GARY LITTLE, SILKY, WOUTER MEIJS)

A leading exponent of flamenco, Paco Pena brings his breathtaking work back to Edinburgh post its sell-out run at Edinburgh International Festival 2010.

VARIOUS DATES BETWEEN 5 NOV AND 24 NOV, TIMES VARY, PRICES VARY

SECC, 20:00–22:00, £35

The English comic (of Michael McIntyre Comedy Roadshow) takes to the road, playing a five-night run at SECC.

SAT 03 NOV

THE FRIDAY SHOW (DAN NIGHTINGALE, COLUM MCDONNELL, DOGSHIT JOHNSTON)

Bruce Morton and Andrew Learmonth invite Des Clarke and Fern Brady into their lair for the latest edition of GSR.

PACO PENA FLAMENCO DANCE COMPANY

THE LADYKILLERS

MICHAEL MCINTYRE

FRI 30 NOV

AVA VIDAL GOES DUTCH

Duet featuring live cello music, chat and movement, where an everyday cello lesson becomes a journey into the unexpected for a young boy and a 30-something man.

KING’S THEATRE Agatha Christie’s play famous for being the longest-running show of any kind in the history of British theatre, this year celebrating its 60th year.

SUN 04 NOV

WED 14 NOV

Chilled Sunday comedy showcase with resident Irish funnyman Michael Redmond.

THE MOUSETRAP 29 OCT – 3 NOV, TIMES VARY, FROM £11.50

COMEDY

LISTINGS

THU 29 NOV THE STAND, 20:30–22:30, £8 (£7/£4 MEMBERS)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

NOVEMBER 2012

THE SKINNY 61


LISTINGS

Thu 08 Nov

Sun 18 Nov

Fri 30 Nov

The Thursday Show (Craig Hill, Damian Clark, Diane Spencer, Dan Petherbridge)

Chris Ramsey: Feeling Lucky

The Improverts

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4 members)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10

Following two consecutive sell-out Edinburgh shows and a sell-out UK tour, panel show regular Chris Ramsey embarks on his biggest ever live tour.

Mon 19 Nov

Fri 09 Nov

Fit O’ The Giggles

The Improverts

Keara Murphy hosts a selection of acts taking in sketches, stand-up, mime, musical comedy, poetry, magic, and, well, pretty much anything else they fancy.

City Café, 20:30–22:30, £3 (£2)

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5 (£4)

Long-standing improv comedy troupe fae Edinburgh, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Tue 20 Nov

The Friday Show (Rev Obadiah Steppenwolfe III, Damian Clark, Diane Spencer, Dan Petherbridge)

Jo Caulfied’s Comedy Collective The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Sat 10 Nov Hairy Bikers: Larger Than Live The Queen’s Hall, 20:00–22:00, £25 (£23)

The Hairy Bikers combine food and laughter as per, sharing tales of decadent dinners and culinary catastrophes.

The Saturday Show (Craig Hill, Damian Clark, Diane Spencer, Dan Petherbridge) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

Sun 11 Nov

The Thursday Show (Bennett Arron, Tom Allen, Davey Connor) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4 members)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

We Need To Talk About James The Stand, 17:00–19:00, £5 (£3)

Five comic historians will be putting the case to keep their chosen King James in a metaphorical deflating hot air balloon and you, the audience, will be the judge and the jury.

The Friday Show (Bennett Arron, Tom Allen, Davey Connor) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5 members)

Fit O’ The Giggles City Café, 20:30–22:30, £3 (£2)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Keara Murphy hosts a selection of acts taking in sketches, stand-up, mime, musical comedy, poetry, magic, and, well, pretty much anything else they fancy.

Sat 24 Nov The Saturday Show (Bennett Arron, Tom Allen, Davey Connor)

Tue 13 Nov Ava Vidal Goes Dutch

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £10 (£8)

The British comic presents her new show questioning the ideas of community and responsibility. In a funny way, o’course.

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

Wed 14 Nov

Rock and Roll Ping Pong

The Melting Pot

The It’s Funtime jokers present a free, fun, table tennis evening, with dancing discs from DJ Ding Dong (ahem).

Sun 25 Nov The Bongo Club, 19:30–23:00, Free

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £5 (£4/£2.50 members)

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

A rt

GLASGOW CCA Olivia Plender: Rise Early, Be Industrious various dates between 24 Oct and 15 Dec, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Series of room-sized installations which include sculpture, banners, posters, board games, architectural models and video, focusing on Berlin-based artist Olivia Plender’s research into how attitudes towards mass education have evolved.

Aimee Campbell: Tender Brink 27 Oct – 10 Nov, not 28 Oct, 4 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

New work from the Glasgow born-andbased artist, specifically created for the CCA’s Intermedia space, exploring the more intuitive aspects of animation and drawing.

Sonica 2012: Extended Play 8–15 Nov, not 11, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Thought-provoking installation reflecting on the lives of children who have survived conflict, for which artist Janek Schaefer’s score is played on nine multi-speed record players arranged within the space. Part of Sonica 2012.

Sonica 2012: #UNRAVEL 8–17 Nov, not 11, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Collaborative project between FOUND and Aidan Moffat, consisting of a reactive sound installation through which the audience will unravel the truth about The Narrator (Moffat)’s life through playing records from his collection. Part of Sonica 2012.

Comedy sketches picked by the audience and performed by a troupe of actors and musicians.

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (Tom Allen, Martin Bearne, David Burke, Jamie Andrew)

David Dale Gallery and Studios

Thu 15 Nov

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 members)

Pavilion

Chilled comedy showcase to cure your Sunday evening back-to-work blues.

The Thursday Show (Trevor Cook, Dag Soras, James Kirk, Fern Brady)

Mon 26 Nov

The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4 members)

Fit O’ The Giggles

Gigging Jock

Keara Murphy hosts a selection of acts taking in sketches, stand-up, mime, musical comedy, poetry, magic, and, well, pretty much anything else they fancy.

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

City Café, 20:30–22:30, £3 (£2)

The Stand, 17:00–19:00, £5 (£3)

A selection of funny Scots look back at the work of their ancestors, such as Rikki Fulton and Chic Murray.

Tue 27 Nov

Transylvanian Nights

Daniel Sloss

The Voodoo Rooms, 19:15–22:00, £donation

The Pleasance, 20:00–22:00, £15 (£10.50)

Brand new vampire-styled improv comedy show, which will obviously be a-mazing.

Award-winning comedian and internationally acclaimed half-man-half-Xbox Daniel Sloss brings the laughs.

Rob Rouse: Life Sentences

Fri 16 Nov

The Stand, 17:00–19:00, £5 (£3)

Crude comic par excellence, Rob Rouse is back on the road following the birth of his second child, for which the majority of his chat centres around, well... pretty much crapping and peeing.

The Improverts Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5 (£4)

Long-standing improv comedy troupe fae Edinburgh, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

The Friday Show (Trevor Cook, Dag Soras, James Kirk, Fern Brady) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £10 (£9/£5 members)

Prime stand-up from the Scottish and international circuit, hosted by a rotating selection of Stand stalwarts.

Sat 17 Nov The Saturday Show (Dag Soras, James Kirk, Fern Brady) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £15

Packed Saturday bill of stand-up headliners and resident comperes.

62 THE SKINNY

Music & Liberation: Women’s Liberation Music Making in the UK (1970-1989) 29 Oct – 23 Nov, weekdays only, 9:30am – 4:30pm, Free

Special exhibition showing how feminists used music as an activist tool to entertain and empower women during the 1970s and 1980s.

House For An Art Lover

Thu 22 Nov

Long-standing improv comedy troupe fae Edinburgh, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

Mon 12 Nov

The Friday Show (Addy Van Der Borg, Susan Morrison, Janice Phayre, Daniel Webster)

Glasgow Women’s Library

24 Oct – 26 Nov, weekdays only, 10:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5 (£4)

Chilled comedy showcase to cure your Sunday evening back-to-work blues.

The Pleasance, 20:00–23:00, £5 (£4)

Comedy Central present the best from the comedy world in their monthly showcase. In the Cabaret Bar.

Solo exhibition from Glasgow-born and based artist David Palmer, who takes his inspiration from simple domestic objects, in particular, erm, jugs.

No... Seriesly

The Improverts

The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£1 members)

Comedy Central

2 Nov – 2 Dec, not 5 Nov, 12 Nov, 19 Nov, 26 Nov, times vary, Free

A bright collective of comedians experiment with the medium of stand-up, under the watchful eye of Jo Caulfield.

Fri 23 Nov

The Sunday Night Laugh-In (Susan Morrison, Becky Price, Gareth Mutch)

Bedlam Theatre, 22:30–23:30, £5 (£4)

Long-standing improv comedy troupe fae Edinburgh, whose rather fine show is built entirely on (oft daft) audience suggestions.

David Palmer

Wed 28 Nov Best of Scottish Comedy The Stand, 20:30–22:30, £6 (£5/£3 members)

Top comics from the contemporary Scottish circuit, aye.

Thu 29 Nov The Thursday Show (Addy Van Der Borg, Susan Morrison, Janice Phayre, Daniel Webster) The Stand, 21:00–23:00, £8 (£7/£4 members)

Handpicked selection of headline acts and newcomers over a two-hour showcase.

November 2012

various dates between 26 Oct and 11 Nov, 12:00pm – 5:00pm, Free

Unique new body of work by James Clarkson developed from an interest in the Silberdistel vase, featuring contributions by Rachel Adams, Laura Aldridge, James McLardy, Ciara Phillips and Kevin Pollock.

Stuart Whipps: Tick, Tack, Tick, Tack, Tick various dates between 24 Nov and 16 Dec, 12:00pm – 5:00pm, Free

Showcase of work from Birminghambased artist Stuart Whipps, whose practice takes its inspiration primarily from ideas relating to shifting ideologies and change.

Gallery of Modern Art Tales of the City (Gallery 3) 24 Oct – 20 Jan, times vary, Free

As part of the gallery-spanning Tales of the City exhibition, Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art display a selection of broad range of portraiture in Gallery 3, taking in work by Eve Arnold, Frank Auerbach and Beagles & Ramsay.

Tales of the City (Gallery 2) 24 Oct – 23 Jun, times vary, Free

As part of the gallery-spanning Tales of the City exhibition, Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art display a selection of mixed media objects in Gallery 2, encompassing work from Alex Frost, David Hockney, Scott Myles, David Sherry and Simon Starling.

Glasgow Print Studio Academicans II 1 Nov – 2 Dec, not 5 Nov, 12 Nov, 19 Nov, 26 Nov, times vary, Free

Following on from 2011’s exhibition Glasgow Print Studio once again present the work of four well respected Royal and Royal Scottish Academicians: Norman Ackroyd, John Byrne, Chris Orr and Philip Reeves.

Glasgow-based artist Sheena Russell exhibits a selection of figurative work spanning over 10 years, focusing predominantly on paintings of the human face counterpointed by recent pencil drawings of cityscapes.

Mary Mary Mathew Cerletty, Sean Kennedy and Mateo Tannatt various dates between 2 Nov and 12 Jan, 12:00pm – 6:00pm, Free

Triple-hander exhibition featuring the work of Mathew Cerletty, Sean Kennedy and Mateo Tannatt.

People’s Palace Scotland Can Make It! various dates between 24 Oct and 13 Jan, times vary, Free

Unique collaboration between Creative Scotland and Panel, presenting a series of souvenirs – designed and manufactured entirely in Scotland – to be ready for the 2014 Commonwealth Games, the prototypes of which will make up the body of the exhibition.

Project Ability Connect various dates between 24 Oct and 24 Nov, 10:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Retrospective exhibition marking the 16-year history of Project Ability’s Connect programme, with past artists producing an image that represents what Connect meant to them. Part of Scottish Mental Health Art & Film Festival.

Recoat Gallery Bricks & Sticks & Mortar 2 Nov – 2 Dec, not 5 Nov, 12 Nov, 19 Nov, 26 Nov, times vary, Free

Joint exhibition from graffiti artists Erms and Eko, consisting of murals and brand new original paintings by the pair, as well as a limited edition collaborative print and 44-page zine.

SWG3 Folklore Contemporain various dates between 3 Nov and 30 Nov, 12:00pm – 6:00pm, Free

Investigation into the folkloric heritages and the new folklores of the 2010’s, through the practices of two young artists: Laura Aldridge and Travess Smalley.

Sharmanka Kinetic Theatre Gothic Kinetic various dates between 24 Oct and 30 Nov, times vary, Free

The acclaimed touring set – created by theatre sculptor-cum-mechanic Eduard Bersudsky – comes to Glasgow, after entertaining audiences of over 200,000 people across Europe.

Street Level Photoworks Andy Weiner: Life Stories various dates between 3 Nov and 9 Dec, times vary, Free

New exhibition premiering Andy Weiner’s new series of photographs, Life Story Work, where he explores his heritage – as well as different childhood and adult identities – to provide an insightful view of his male identity.

The Common Guild Ugo Rondinone: Primitive various dates between 24 Oct and 17 Nov, times vary, Free

Solo exhibition by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone – his first ever presentation of work in Scotland – featuring a group of recent bird sculptures reconfigured specifically for the domestic space.

The Duchy Aereated Bread Company various dates between 26 Oct and 17 Nov, times vary, Free

Annual pairing of a recent art graduate with an established artist – in this case Andrew Black and Tony Swain – exploring links between the processes of making and presenting bodies of work.

The Lighthouse Laura Spring 25 Oct – 3 Dec, times vary, Free

The GSA Graphic Design graduate displays a new series of pieces, currently focusing on the relationship between print and its function through the design and production of a range of bespoke luggage and clothing.

The End is the Beginning 1–25 Nov, times vary, Free

Joint project from textile designer Mhari McMullan and visual artist Urara Tsuchiya, exploring a series of symbiotic relationships: between art and craft; dance and narrative; performance and environment; pattern and movement; and work and the audience.

Designing for the Future 1–28 Nov, times vary, Free

Exciting new work by graduates from Scotland’s four main schools of art, showcasing concepts designed in response to issues around sustainability, health, education and equality, shown alongside a selection of architectural designs for V&A at Dundee.

The Visual Identity of Slovenia: Designing for the State 26 Nov – 9 Dec, times vary, Free

In celebration of prominent Slovenian graphic designer Miljenko Licul, The Lighthouse present some of the significant components that defined the visual appearance of The Republic of Slovenia and helped to shape its identity.

Above Scotland 26 Oct – 23 Jan, times vary, Free

New exhibition allowing visitors a unique birds eye view of Scotland and to explore stunning aerial photography from the National Collection of Aerial Photography.

The Modern Institute Cathy Wilkes 27 Oct – 24 Nov, not 28 Oct, 4 Nov, 11 Nov, 18 Nov, times vary, Free

The Irish artist displays a selection of her trademark installations, whose signature elements are set amongst, and outfitted with, accoutrements of an abject, quotidian nature.

Shio Kusaka 27 Oct – 24 Nov, not 28 Oct, 4 Nov, 11 Nov, 18 Nov, times vary, Free

Japanese-born, Los Angeles-based artist Shio Kusaka displays a selection of her fine ceramic work, which falls more on the utilitarian end of the art-craft.

The Whisky Bond Sonica 2012: Enlightened Sound various dates between 27 Oct and 17 Nov, 2:00pm – 6:00pm, Free

Exploration of the relationship between Glasgow’s music and arts culture, with a group of artist-cum-musicians visually expanding on a piece of music they have made through light, installation, film and sculpture. Part of Sonica 2012.

Tramway Sonica 2012: Our Contemporaries 9–18 Nov, not 12, 12:00pm – 8:00pm, Free

Korean artist Mookyoung Shin presents her response to the growing repetitive nature of everyday life; an installation piece where hundreds of giant, skeletal, kinetic ‘fingers’ surround you, tapping on individual desks. Part of Sonica 2012.

Insight and Outlook 3–25 Nov, not 5, 12, 19, times vary, Free

III: Studio to Showcase

Exhibition of artwork and writing from prisons, secure hospitals, secure children’s homes and criminal justice services in Scotland, taking in painting, drawing, sculpture and creative writing selected from entries to the 2012 Koestler Awards.

26 Oct – 16 Nov, weekdays only, times vary, Free

8–11 Nov, times vary, prices vary

The Briggait Victoria Evans, Graham Lister and Stephanie Spindler present their solo exhibitions together as part of the Briggait Project Space 2012-2013 programme, each showcasing their distinct practice alongside a chance to peek within their working studio space.

Sonica 2012: Ecstatic Arc Installation piece featuring sonickinetic sculpture, mechanical puppetry and recorded composition, showing as an exhibition and a series of multisensory live performances. Part of Sonica 2012.

EDINBURGH City Art Centre Wilhelmina Barns-Graham 24 Nov – 17 Feb, times vary, Free

Major exhibition exploring the work of the late Wilhelmina Barns-Graham (1912 -2004), who settled in St Ives and became an integral part of a group of artists working there, including Ben Nicolson and Barbara Hepworth.

talbot rice gallery Zoe Beloff 17 Nov – 16 Feb, times vary, Free

Solo exhibition bringing together the final installation and film part of Zoe Beloff’s The Days of the Commune project, for which she assembled in various public spaces in New York City to work on scenes from Bertol Brecht’s The Days of the Commune.

Collective Gallery Adaptation 24 Oct – 25 Nov, not 29 Oct, 5 Nov, 12 Nov, 19 Nov, 11:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Institut Francais d’Ecosse

Mama Baer and Kommissar Hjuler

Changement De Decor

Eclectic work from husband/wife artists Kommissar Hjuler (known for creating small boxes containing sculptures which star fictitious animals made of bread) and Mama Baer (known for her large expressionist canvasses filled with monsters). What a team.

various dates between 15 Nov and 19 Jan, times vary, Free

Exhibition of images by Scottish photographer Albie Clark, who, working on and off the stage, captured a series of images of the Institut Francais in action during a busy summer 2012.

Inverleith House Andy Hope 1930 various dates between 1 Nov and 27 Jan, 10:00am – 5:30pm, Free

German artist Andy Hope 1930 interprets a lifelong fascination and engagement with popular culture, fantasy and science fiction, often using paintings found in charity shops as the basis for his own surreal and mysterious paintings.

Out of the Blue Drill Hall KIGALI, KIGALI 31 Oct – 7 Nov, 10:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Phased, year-long research project considering the effect that change can have on form and content, with all the participating artists taking a multistranded approach to their practice.

Contemporary art from a collective of young Rwandan artists, The Ivuka Arts group, in Kigali one of only a handful of nascent and groundbreaking collective studios in Rwanda..

Dovecot

Royal Scottish Academy (RSA)

Reiko Sudo 26 Oct – 24 Nov, not 28 Oct, 4 Nov, 11 Nov, 18 Nov, 10:30am – 5:30pm, Free

Exhibition from the artistic director of Nuno textiles, Reiko Sudo, and her team, exploring the ways in which their designs respond to the human form, reflecting the importance of cloth for protecting, adorning and creating social well-being.

Carpets of Distinction various dates between 10 Nov and 12 Jan, 10:30am – 5:30pm, Free

Showroom of six hand-tufted rugs, produced by Panel as part of a unique collaboration between seven artists exploring connections between the spheres of art and craft and the massproduced culture of industrial design.

Edinburgh Printmakers Feral Landscape various dates between 17 Nov and 22 Dec, 10:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Edinburgh Printmakers’ host their largest annual members’ exhibition showcasing some of Scotland’s best printmaking talent. For it, each artist will explore the idea of feral landscape, fusing the natural and manmade, and the tamed and untameable.

Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop Art Repair Shop 12 Nov – 7 Dec, not 18 Nov, 25 Nov, 2 Dec, times vary, Free

Month-long public workshop looking at the value, production, display and distribution of the art object, led by Berlin-based artist Tobias Sternberg, for which broken or non-functioning objects will be transformed into artworks by Tobias and his team.

Fruitmarket Gallery Galápagos 2 Nov – 3 Jan, times vary, Free

Unique exhibition bringing together work by twelve artists who traveled to and spent time in the Galápagos archipelago through a residency programme initiated in 2007, taking in a vast variety of approaches and disciplines.

Ingleby Gallery Kevin Harman various dates between 3 Nov and 22 Dec, 10:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Solo showcase from Edinburgh artist Kevin Harman, well-kent for exploring the everyday to find the extraordinary, oft using the found objects in which he finds his inspiration as the principle component of his artworks.

Harland Miller: On Overcoming Optimism various dates between 3 Nov and 26 Jan, 10:00am – 6:00pm, Free

First exhibition in Scotland for artist and novelist Harland Miller, presenting a group of new paintings alongside a selected survey of work from across several years.

RSA Open 2012 24 Nov – 31 Jan, times vary, Free

24 Oct – 24 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Punk Politics Posters: 35 Years of Fighting Racism through Music 24 Oct – 24 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Selection of DIY punk politics posters, for which local activist groups made their own designs to promote concerts that brought the anti-racist message home to the country’s youth.

A Hero Of The True West 24 Oct – 24 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Insightful series of never-before-exhibiteed portraits of Johnny Cash taken by his close friend and photographer of choice, Jim Marshall, consisting of 30 images from a period when Cash was struggling with his demons.

The Candlish Hall The Portiere Curtain 5–7 Nov, times vary, Free

Visual Arts group called They Hyssop Branch hold their second exhibition, taking in fine art painting, mixed media, photography, jewellery, sculpture and textile art.

The Old Ambulance Depot

Exhibition of small works sourced by open submission from artists across Scotland, including paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints and photographs – all available to buy – with this year seeing the addition of a room dedicated solely to architecture.

Sator Square

Scottish National Gallery

dundee

John Bellany: A Passion For Life 17 Nov – 27 Jan, times vary, £7 (£5)

The Scottish National Gallery mark John Bellany’s 70th year with an exhibition of paintings, watercolours, drawings and prints from all the key periods of his career.

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art The Scottish Colourist Series: SJ Peploe 3 Nov – 23 Jun, 10:00am – 5:00pm, £7 (£5)

The second in the Scottish Colourist Series of exhibitions takes in a retrospective of Samuel John Peploe (1871-1935), the eldest of the four artists popularly known as The Scottish Colourists.

Scottish National Portrait Gallery Lucknow to Lahore 24 Oct – 7 Apr, times vary, Free

Series of photos by Scottish commercial photographer Fred Bremner spanning his travels in the Indian subcontinent from 1882 to 1922, exquisitely detailing the people and places of Imperial India.

Jitka Hanzlová 24 Oct – 3 Feb, times vary, Free

Since defecting from the communist regime in Czechoslovakia and settling in West Germany, Jitka Hanzlová has explored her condition of exile through photography. In the only UK showing of her work, this showcase displays the profound fruits of her labour.

Leading Lights: Portraits by KK Dundas 29 Oct – 3 Mar, times vary, Free

In 2011, to celebrate its 60th anniversary, the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland commissioned portraits of its students past and present, with this selection featuring some of their most illustrious alumni.

BP Portrait Award 2012 3 Nov – 27 Jan, times vary, Free

Annual showcase of the very best in contemporary portrait painting from around the world, this year featuring 55 works selected from over 2,000 international entries.

Summerhall Bob Dylan in the “Judas” Years 24 Oct – 24 Nov, 11:00am – 6:00pm, Free

Summerhall play host to twelve of 60s celebrity photographer Barry Feinstein’s vintage images of Bob Dylan – including the iconic image him striding along Princes Street surrounded by adoring fans and autograph hunters.

31 Oct, 7:00pm – 10:00pm, Free

Mini exhibition held over Halloween evening, with exhibiting artists exploring and comparing ancient fears and preoccupations with new ones. Obviously including a freaky painting of a creepy baby.

Cooper Gallery Edgar Schmitz: Surplus Cameo Decor (Episode 2) 8–27 Nov, not 11, 18, 25, times vary, Free

First major Scottish exhibition for Edgar Schmitz set over three episodes, expanding on recent works that develop modes of escape from our contemporary situation.

DCA From The Edge 24 Oct – 18 Nov, not 29 Oct, 5 Nov, 12 Nov, times vary, Free

Selection of video works from Danishborn, London-based artist Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen, including Tales from the Periphery – a pair of films exploring the lives of young people living in deprived areas of Europe.

Imagine Being A World Leader 24 Oct – 18 Nov, not 29 Oct, 5 Nov, 12 Nov, times vary, Free

British artists Dash Macdonald and Demitrios Kargotis create a new work around a fictional political event which enables young people’s voices to be heard, who in turn provide the inspiring, thought-provoking and often funny content of the exhibition.

Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design Comics, Manga & Co: The New Culture of German Comics 2 Nov – 8 Dec, 12:00pm – 4:30pm, Free

Special exhibition of works from the leading lights of German comic book art, including autobiographical, surrealist and historical narratives alongside comic reportages and literary adaptations. Get to.

Hannah Maclure Centre Imagination Will Take You Anywhere 24 Oct – 26 Nov, weekdays only, 10:00am – 5:00pm, Free

Digital Art exhibition exploring the inspiring creativity, technical excellence and innovation of Abertay’s students, alongside contributions from the local Gaming industry.

The McManus Selling Dreams: One Hundred Years of Fashion Photography 24 Oct – 6 Jan, times vary, Free

Fashion photography showcase celebrating the lead up to the opening of the V&A in Dundee, exploring the work of international fashion photographers from the early twentieth century to the present day – from Helmut Newton to Rankin.


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Basic Instincts

Having tapped another rich vein with seventh album Koi No Yokan, frontman Chino Moreno explains how Deftones found a way to become lifers Interview: Mark Shukla

Crystal Baws with Mystic Mark

ARIES Your soul is so jam-packed and weighed down with demons that your local witch-doctor finally classifies it as ‘morbidly obese.’ You should concentrate on doing as much exorcising as you possibly can this November – a regime of 100RPM head spins and a course of projectile bulimia should do the trick.

a

b

TAURUS Thanks to the miracle of nanotechnology there is finally a condom that will fit your penis.

GEMINI In November your spirit animal gets run over by the out-of-control drugged driver of a love bus on the Road to Spiritual Enlightenment. On your knees next to its spasming body you weep tears that turn into tiny rainbows.

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d

CANCER You do the most obscene handshakes.

LEO This month you do drugs and lose everything. You lose your girlfriend, your car, your keys. You even lose your drugs.

e

VIRGO Fanatical about paranormal romance stories you go camping in the woods in the hope of meeting the werewolf of your dreams. Searching all night, you happen upon a mangeyhaired stray beast cleaning his arse beneath the full moonlight. Beckoning him towards you with treats, he timidly licks your face, which you escalate into a passionate kiss. Trying to put your knickers back on after making love he takes them up in his mouth, forcing you to tug back and forth because he thinks it’s a game.

f

If you’d have been forced to pick one band from metal’s class of 1995 whose star you thought would still be burning brightly some 17 years later, chances are you’d have gotten pretty long odds on Deftones. Not that anyone ever doubted their talent, but it would have seemed improbable that a band whose existence was predicated on such raw, physical intensity could have survived intact for almost two decades. As mid-nineties sparring partners like Korn resort to courting the likes of Skrillex in an attempt to stay relevant, we ask bandleader Chino Moreno just what it is that separated Deftones from the pack: “In all honesty, we’ve gone through a lot of ups and downs in our career but we’ve never really exploded overnight. We were never as big as some of these other bands, but at the same time I feel like we’ve been very consistent. I never ask myself ‘why are we still making records?’ – it’s just what we do. I think it comes down to something as simple as us being friends – we’re buddies and we’ve known each other since we were kids. We’re just lucky to have each other and to enjoy what we do. I still get burned out sometimes, but honestly, playing the show is the fun part of the day. The rest of it – like being at the mercy of whatever fucked-up city you might happen to be in, or whatever – those are the kind of things that drive you crazy after a while.” If his band’s own sense of camaraderie has only been reinforced in recent times, it is surely attributable in some part to the tragic events of four years ago which brought Deftones as close as they’ve ever been to calling it a day: “Chi’s back home now but it’s still a daily battle for him to come out of this state,” he says of the band’s original bassist, who this year emerged from coma to partial consciousness following a near fatal road accident in 2008. “It’s four years now and he’s still fighting and I think we all still have hope that one day he could possibly come out of this. To what extent, nobody really knows – but we try to keep positive and hope for the best.” Moreno admits that if it hadn’t been for the presence of Sergio Vega (also of recently reformed NYC post-hardcore kings Quicksand), he “couldn’t see the band continuing on, trying to find some bass player to fill in Chi’s spot. We’re very close as friends; it’s not like he’s some hired hand. He’s just as close to me as Abe and Steph and everyone else. We’re very lucky to have him.” Speedily recorded with Vega in late 2009, the band’s Diamond Eyes LP won favour with both

fans and critics, bringing a new sense of purpose to the re-organised unit: “As difficult a time as it was, we were really able to turn around our whole work ethic and the way that we approached writing music together. We reconnected to what it’s like to be in a room with your friends and appreciating this moment in time – and trying to capture that moment. It gave us a lot of confidence, both individually and as a band,” says Moreno. “I mean, we were coming off a couple of hard records. Saturday Night Wrist took three years to make and it’s not like it was that great for taking three years. With Diamond Eyes we felt like we made a great record and it got this great response. The whole touring cycle for Diamond Eyes was really great too – everybody was very physically and mentally in shape and feeling good. So we came off the road fired up and ready to go in and do it again.”

“If   you try to write music for any other reason than to make a great song, that shit will drive you crazy” chino moreno Buoyed by fresh focus, the band applied the same sense of discipline to the recording of their latest album, Koi No Yokan: “We’d all come in around noon at a little rehearsal spot close to my house in north Hollywood and we’d spend five or six hours with the door shut, coming up with ideas – everybody just getting in the moment. We’re at a point right now where everybody’s inspired, you know? The songs really wrote themselves, in a way. “One of the problems we used to have [in the studio] was that nothing was ever finished. What it really was was a lack of communication. Stephen [Carpenter, guitar] would go into the studio and record a part and I’d come in a week later and be, like, ‘that’s cool’ but sometimes I’d change it a little bit or I’d put a vocal over a certain part, or something wouldn’t fit and I’d move it around and he’d kind of get pissed – which I can totally understand. But when we actually write the songs in the same room – all five guys at the same time – we eliminate that from happening.” When discussing the album’s title (a Japanese

phrase which approximates the idea of love at first sight), Moreno is upfront about his uncomplicated reasons for choosing it: “I think it’s pretty. I read it and it really caught my eye. The way it sounds is very poetic – just the words themselves – and I think that when you read the meaning it’s definitely something that speaks to a lot of people – people that have been lucky enough to experience something like that. Funnily enough, Stephen was the one that was pushing for it because he felt that it captured how the record feels to him, and I think that’s great because usually he doesn’t say anything about my lyrics. It made me feel really good that he read them and liked them enough to make a comment to me about it – and really felt a connection with it.” Packed to the gills with riffs of an almost psychedelic intensity, but shot through with disarmingly sensual melody lines and intriguing romantic allusions, Koi No Yokan is unmistakably the work of a band with total confidence in their own abilities. And whilst Moreno is the first to admit his preoccupation with the textural and sculptural qualities of sound, he professes the belief that this time around the band’s pursuit of an elemental sonic intensity has not come at the expense of accessibility: “Honestly, I feel that some of these songs are more commercial than anything we’ve ever written – and we didn’t consciously try to do that at all. It seemed like in the past we would get so much pressure to make music for the radio – that would fit into a radio format or whatever. That used to suck. If you try to write music for any other reason than to make a great song, that shit will drive you crazy.” With the interview winding down, we wonder out loud if Moreno still has the insatiable curiosity for new music which made him such a notorious anomaly in the metal community: “Personally, I still listen to music all day, every day – probably even more than I did when I was a kid. I still get lost in music; finding new music... and that inspires me all the time to just create different sounds.” And the sounds that have been most inspiring to him of late? “I have to say that I’ve been listening to a lot of trap music recently; a lot of beat oriented stuff.” [Pregnant pause] “Definitely not dubstep...” Koi No Yokan is released via Reprise on 12 Nov. Deftones play Glasgow Barrowland on 15 Feb. www.deftones.com

LIBRA Your dream is to have a house full of furniture upholstered in human skin. Long ago you let that dream die because it was simply impractical and you needed to concentrate on your career. This month though, feeling unfulfilled, you dig your dreams up from their shallow graves and start sewing.

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SCORPIO You spend the whole month hobbling around your flat with your partner like a pair of rutting dogs after you accidentally use UHU glue instead of lube.

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SAGITTARIUS This month you invent a new drinking game. The rules are to drink as much booze as quickly as you can.

i

CAPRICORN You often find that sex is little more than a dead-eyed hump towards a barely-remembered goal.

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AQUARIUS Working late into the night at the jewellery workshop you fire up the foundry deciding that it’s about time you smelt your own ring. Sulphurous fumes fill the air and your face becomes drenched in the warm glow. You try it on for size, but your finger gets stuck and you have to cover your hand in soapy liquid before you can squeeze it out.

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PISCES You have a soft-hearted, kinder side. After stomping someone’s skull into a brain and bone jigsaw puzzle because they didn’t like your hat you’ll visit them in hospital and helpfully push grapes into their shattered jaw to say sorry as they writhe around and moan at all the delicious flavours.

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@MysticMark www.facebook.com/themysticmark

November 2012

THE SKINNY 63



The Skinny November 2012