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NEWS STANDING STRONG McMaster Muslims for Peace and Justice stood in solidarity for Quebec Page 3

The Silhouette Thursday, February 9, 2017

DOWN SOUTH UP NORTH BAR SAZERAC, A NEW ORLEANS-INSPIRED SPOT ON JAMES STREET NORTH, PUTS A TWIST ON COCKTAIL CLASSICS PAGE 17

FEATURES GET BAKED Luv, Becky’s pies and baked goods make a home in Hamilton Page 6-7

SPORTS DEJA VU What the past can teach us about this year’s women’s basketball team Page 23


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The Silhouette

Volume 87, Issue 20 Thursday, February 9, 2017 McMaster University’s Student Newspaper

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EDITORIAL BOARD editor-in-chief | thesil@thesil.ca Scott Hastie @Scott1Hastie managing editor | managing@thesil.ca

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Nick Bommarito online editor | online@thesil.ca Haley Greene sections

Sasha Dhesi Steven Chen news reporter Emily O’Rourke features reporter Alex Florescu news@thesil.ca news editor

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Dissatisfaction with the MSU has always existed, but it never looked so good! 80s haircuts were the best.

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www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

The Silhouette

News Hamilton mourns in solidarity Following the terrorist attack in Quebec City, Hamiltonians joined together to support the Muslim community Saad Ejaz Contributor

Thousands of Canadians across the country have sought to show their support for the victims of the Quebec City mosque shooting, as the country struggled to understand how it became a setting for the tragic events on Jan. 29. On Jan. 30, as the flags in front of the Burke Science Building flew at half mast, McMaster University students, bundled against the cold, stood in solidarity to mourn the lives lost in the Quebec City Mosque shooting. Dareen El-Sayed, the co-president of McMaster Muslims for Peace and Justice, says the tragic events were a shock. “It was a lot closer to home – it was home,” said El-Sayed. MMPJ’s event on Monday held a Maghreb prayer outside of Burk Science Building to take a stance to remember the victims of Sunday’s attack. “The people who were killed were killed while they were in the mosque while they were going to pray… and our response to standing and taking that time to first of all stand in solidarity and secondly grieve and mourn...would be through prayer,” said El-Sayed. A prayer was also held in the McMaster University Student Centre, where McMaster president Patrick Deane spoke in solidarity. “The tragedy of the victims is fundamentally an incomprehensible reality… I don’t know how you get your mind around such things nor should one ever have to,” said Deane. All week long, messages of hope and support for the stricken community have ranged from vigils, to open-podiums, to forming a “ring of peace” around local community mosques. The attack took place amid protests around the world after the U.S president Donald

Trump enacted a travel ban on seven Muslim majority countries. “For a leader of a country to be saying these things – what kind of bar does that set for everyone else?” said Youssef Khaky the president of the McMaster Muslim Student Association. El-Sayed cited the focus on crimes done by marginalized groups in comparison to others as a key issue. “In each community there is the good and the bad. What is ironic is the fact that if an act may have come out of a marginalized community… the emphasis on the bad compared to other communities is much bigger… it is crazy how a crime can be labeled in two different ways based on the ethnicity of the person who committed it… contrary to being framed as a one person incident,” said El-Sayed. Member of the McMaster Muslim Student Association, Anas Alwan, pointed to the current political dialogue for being a part of the climate fostering hostility towards Muslims. “We need to recognize the need to identify that this is a problem that exists and need to look within our campus to find a solution that best fits the problem,” said Alwan, alluding to events earlier in the term when students on campus booked a Mills Memorial Library study room for a “Ku Klux Klan” meeting and the neo-nazi posters on campus in November. The events held by MMPJ have emphasized the prospect of being unapologetically Muslim. This means representing the Muslim identity regardless of what is going on around the world. “When we hear about these attacks, what we stress is that these types of things will not scare us and these things will not make us shy away from portraying our Muslim iden-

“It is crazy how a crime can be labeled in two different ways based on the ethnicity of the person who committed it… “ Dareen El-Sayed Co-president of McMaster Muslims for Justice and Peace tity to the world,” said Walid Abdulaziz the co-president of MMPJ. Following the events in the past few weeks, McMaster has recognized its multicultural and inclusive community open to all students. “We need to keep our eyes on what is at risk, and the importance of playing our parts to defend the values of inclusiveness and mutual support… the university will defend those values and every member of the community with everything at our disposal… that has to be said over and over again… I hope everyone regardless of how they are affected by the Quebec events or by what is going on will turn to the university for support,” said Deane. @theSilhouette

McMaster students joined together to mourn the loss of life which occurred on Jan. 29. MADELINE NEUMANN / PHOTO EDITOR

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NEWS

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

The future of the Pinehurst

The historic Pinehurst Mansion, home of the CHCH headquarters, is currently up for sale and local historians weigh in how to preserve its history

Emma Mullohand Contributor

There is more than a hundred years between the two structures that make up the CHCH building on Jackson Street West. While the back half of the television channel’s complex resembles something akin to the Starship Enterprise, at the front sits an inconspicuous limestone mansion that has been the home of some of Hamilton’s biggest entrepreneurs and dignitaries. Built in 1850 for Tristram Bickle, the mansion, called Pinehurst, is a rare example of pre-Confederation architecture and history. Constructing the mansion was a significant undertaking. “The masons were coming in [from Scotland] and [. . .] they were actually quarrying the buildings [from the escarpment] and putting [the stones] into the homes,” said local historian Robin McKee. The house changed hands several times throughout the following years. It was passed down to Bickle’s son, later sold to a local Anglican bishop and eventually purchased by William Southam in 1891. Among other investments, Southam owned the Hamilton Spectator and the Ottawa Citizen newspapers. After Southam’s death in 1932, Pinehurst was occupied by various groups, until CHCH began to use the building for its offices and studio in 1953. CHCH remained the owners of the property until late last year when it was announced that the property had been sold. The mansion remains in excellent condition, despite its age. McKee credits this to the continued use of the building throughout the years. “Prior to [its heritage designation] it was the will of the owner to keep [Pinehurst]

The Pinehurst mansion has held the CHCH station since 1953. MADELINE NEUMANN / PHOTO EDITOR

or knock it down. I think part of the good luck . . . is that whoever owned it at the particular time adapted a use to it that made it still useful, so it was cheaper to use it than to tear it down,” said McKee. Pinehurst became a designated heritage site in 2003, under the Ontario Heritage Act. “Designation essentially protects series of features that are identified in the designation bylaw,” said Jeremy Parsons, a cultural heritage planner with the City of Hamilton. “For [Pinehurst] there’s a number of different architectural features that are protected, the front façade, the three dormers. . . the Mansard roof itself, the central bay. . . the columns, and . . . each side of the building. That essentially not only recognizes the importance of the property,

but keeps the cultural heritage value intact,” said Parsons. Despite a heritage designation, Pinehurst faces development pressures. One particular trend is “façadism” as McKee calls it. “Façadism is if you have a designated property and the building itself is in disrepair because of neglect. What happens is that the [developers] apply for a demolition permit and promise to keep the façade on the new building.” McKee argued that this type of development does not preserve the historical integrity of the building. “You can put anything onto a new building and make it look old . . . it’s fake.” However, McKee doesn’t expect that Pinehurst will be facing a demolition crew anytime soon. “[Pinehurst] is well maintained. . . there’s no need for it to be torn down. . . it’s got good

bones.” And if worst comes to worst? “I’d tie myself to the door,” McKee said. McKee’s connection with the CHCH building goes beyond admiration of its heritage significance. He spent 31 years working for CHCH as an audio technician during which he helped cover several major historic events such as the Tiananmen Square Protests and the First Gulf War. “It was kind of neat to bring [the news] through Hamilton and send it to the people and inform them,” recalled McKee. It was not always easy getting the broadcast on air though, especially before the studio space moved to the larger, more modern addition. “The studio for the newscast [prior to the addition] was ten feet by six, you had to go in

and close the door…only then could you do the newscast,” said McKee. When Pinehurst was designated as a historic site, McKee was the one who wrote and placed the plaque that identifies the building as a designated historic site. While the property has been sold and it is unclear what exactly the future holds for the CHCH building, it can likely survive a few more changes. “Buildings last longer than people . . . [Pinehurst] is a footprint that’s been there for multi-generations,” said McKee. From the stonemasons who built Pinehurst, to the TV station that calls it home, Pinehurst leaves more than just a geographic footprint. It is also a footprint from some of the people who helped, and are helping, to make Hamilton the city it is today.

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www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

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Gardening in HamOnt

Locals gather to learn how to grow their own garden and promote sustainability Seedy Saturday saw both programming concerning gardening and environmental awareness.

Emily O’Rourke News Reporter

The ground may be frozen, but it’s not too early to plan what you can grow come springtime. Seedy Saturday is an annual event held in several cities across the country. Inspired by Seeds of Diversity Canada, a national organization dedicated to the conservation of food biodiversity, the event focuses on local sustainability practices, education, and building communities with sustainable futures. Hamilton’s own event was hosted on Feb. 4 by Green Venture, a local, environmental non-profit organization committed to facilitating sustainable living practices while realizing a cleaner and healthier community. The event saw a seed swap, a gardening book exchange, seed and garden supply vendors and educational gardening workshops. The event also served as an opportunity for likeminded individuals and organizations to network and discuss moving forward with sustainable resources within their respected communities. Although the event’s focus pertained heavily to agriculture, discussion also revolved around what sustainability means for Hamilton, and what initiatives could further the city’s environmental practices. “[Seedy Saturday] is about awareness and connecting the dots within the community,” said Matt Carson, volunteer at the McQuesten Urban Farm, an urban farm developed as an initiative to increase food security within the McQuesten area. “Sustainability means working towards a city that is sustainable

C/O LAURA ANDERSON

for all to live in; addressing the lack of green spaces for lower income neighbourhoods, growing food deserts and lack of accessible transportation in large parts of the city.” Hamilton’s 2016 to 2025 strategic plan sees environmental sustainability as one of its top priority projects. The project’s key directions include a focus on natural features that the city has to offer, leadership

and awareness initiatives, and considering environmental impacts in decision making processes. From larger projects such as the light rail transit system to smaller, local initiatives like community garden plots, Hamilton is moving towards a more sustainable city, but there is always more work to be done. Initiatives concerning sustainable transportation, food

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security, environmental practices and education surrounding these topics are continuously coming to light from community organizations and events just like Seedy Saturday. “Sustainability means so many things for Hamilton, but moving forward with light rail transit and improving the current transit system and bike lanes is necessary. I really appreciate all the green space we

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have and I hope it always stays that way,” said Jacqueline Cantar, sustainable food systems assistant at Mohawk College’s Sustainability Office. “Hamilton has been changing a lot lately, and I think we need to remember our city and its residents who still require attention before we celebrate too much,” she said. @emily_oro


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FEATURE

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

MADE WITH LUV Rachel Katz Managing Editor

Bartender. Barista. Baker. Becky Sutherland is no stranger to the food industry. A combination of her mother’s home cooking and baking, childhood ambition and a penchant for creative work have seen Sutherland to the launching of her own baking company, Luv, Becky, at the age of 24. But as her reputation spreads through Hamilton, Sutherland finds herself asking how big her company can get, and how big she wants it to.

IN THE BEGINNING

Becky Sutherland can trace her love of baking back to two key influences: her mother and her independent nature. The youngest of five by the margin of six years, Sutherland was self-reliant from an early age. “I always had a thing in me that I wanted to do something on my own, and seeing my mom in the kitchen all the time just made me feel inspired. I wanted to do the things that she was doing.” Sutherland’s ambition to pursue baking began in elementary school. When asked what she wanted to be when she grew up, her response was always a baker. The allure of baking is familiar to those who not only enjoy eating the resulting treats but also appreciate the process involved. “With cooking, a lot of the time, you have, [for example], a vegetable, and you cook it and it’s a transformed vegetable. But with baking… you take all the elements and it turns into something completely new and different,” Sutherland said. Her own learning process may best exemplify Sutherland’s enthusiasm for her craft. She is almost entirely self-taught; a high school co-op in a professional kitchen gave her a set of basic cooking and knife skills, but her desire to perfect her technique came from a combination of her mother’s influence and a number of books by Sutherland’s idols. “I have tons of gurus…

My favourite baker is Christina Tosi, who started the Momofuku Milk Bar in New York City… I use a lot of her techniques, and that’s what got me more into the very technical side of baking,” she explained, adding that it takes a considerable amount of time to learn how to tweak her techniques to create certain flavours and textures. “[I’ve done] a lot of trial and error on my own… making a lot of mistakes to figure out my own thing. But that independence in me would rather experience things myself, make the mistakes and learn from them.” Over time, Sutherland’s hands-on approach to learning and mastering her techniques has allowed her to grow beyond the kitchens where she learned how to cook growing up.

THE BIG MOVE

Originally from Toronto, Sutherland moved to Hamilton in the spring of 2014, initially to help her friends, who were in the process of launching 541 Eatery and Exchange on Barton Street. “They knew I was a trained barista, that I’d done cafe management stuff and they reached out to me during times when they needed help before they opened [and] help train new staff,” she explained. “I wanted to move out somewhere,” she said. “I knew didn’t really want to stay in Toronto; I love the city but I don’t really like living there… so I

had a really strong draw back to a smaller city again.” After moving to Hamilton, Sutherland was taken on to revitalize the café side of Baltimore House on King William Street, giving her free time to also try her hand at baking. During this time, she perfected essential techniques and recipes, and when Baltimore House converted the café side to become part of the bar, Sutherland left to help 541 with their baking program. “At first there wasn’t very much of a system implemented there and I saw a need for that and I knew that I had a skill level where I could help them out… I just kind of have a heart for the place.” Sutherland committed her summer to volunteering with 541 Eatery and Exchange after which she worked as the baker at the then-new Saint James Espresso Bar and Eatery on James Street North. As Saint James grew in popularity, so did Sutherland’s baked goods. Eventually, her treats caught the eye of Erika McMeekin, the woman behind the Hamilton-based Academy of All Things Awesome, a local initiative that aims to increase the city’s creativity by partnering with local artists and organizations for various events. Sutherland ran a “Treat Yo’self ” workshop through the AoATA, and later participated in the Hamilton Flea event run by McMeekin and her sister, Whitney. “Ever since that first class

C/O ANGELICA FLORES

we did together, she [had] really put a fire under me and I started feeling more inspired to take ownership of my baking and making it my own thing,” Sutherland said.

I decided I was going to take January off to really crunch down and think more seriously about [whether] I wanted to pursue something more serious with my baking. Becky Sutherland Owner, Luv, Becky

THE SWEET SPOT

Since starting to take her baking more seriously, Sutherland has identified three main phases of her work, a system she picked up from her mother. “She would always go through these phases of making something and she’ll make it over and over and it’s her favourite thing to eat and then she’ll perfect it and then it’s like, on to the next thing.” Sutherland’s first phase was

creating what was, at least to her, the “perfect” chocolate chip cookie. “That was my first thing that I really developed my method and exact measurements for. So my recipe for that is totally perfect. I wouldn’t change anything about it,” she said. She then moved onto scones, a project she undertook when she returned to 541 as their main baker. “I was like, ‘alright, I have never made scones before but I’m going to take a whack at it’,” she said, chuckling. She then followed the same process, testing recipes and learning what, to her, went into the perfect scone. Currently, Sutherland is in the process of perfecting three different types of pie. “Pies I think I’m still working on,” she admitted. “I think pies are really fun because there are so many types of pie that you can make and they all have a few different techniques.” Sutherland’s three focuses are a traditional fruit pie, a graham cracker or cookie crusted custard pie and a cocoa and rice puff crust chocolate pretzel pie, which has become one of her signature items. “I don’t really put anything out there that I’m not really, really proud... I’m very much a perfectionist in that way. I want my product to be consistent and for people to connect to it in a way that each time they come back to get it, it’s the same thing.”


FEATURE

www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

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C/O NICK BOMMARITO / PRODUCTION EDITOR

LET’S TALK BUSINESS

Sutherland considers the Hamilton Flea her “big push” to creating her own brand. Her positive experience at the event led her to create her professional Instagram and name: Luv, Becky. In August, Sutherland took a step out of her comfort zone and left Saint James to pursue her own baking on a more fulltime basis. She briefly returned to Baltimore House to work as a bartender until December of 2016. “I decided I was going to take January off to really crunch down and think more seriously about [whether] I wanted to pursue something more serious with my baking,” she said, citing the need for a business license and a proper venue to bake her products. “I did get my business license so that’s been a good little push. But right now I’m still deciding how big I want it to grow.” Like many young business-owners, Sutherland is concerned about growing too big too quickly. “I’m not going to super commit to a bunch of places right now because taking that next step turns it from something that’s kind of still

With cooking, a lot of the time, you have, [for example], a vegetable, and you cook it and it’s a transformed vegetable. But with baking… you take all the elements and it turns into something completely new and different. Becky Sutherland Owner, Luv, Becky

hobby-like to something where I’m like ‘this is a real business now I need to take care of a lot of things’,” she said. Sutherland added that she will reevaluate

her growth once she feels more comfortable with her business and her audience has grown. Currently, Sutherland’s pies can be found at the Brain on James Street North, and she enjoys doing custom work for customers with personal requests.

THE WINDING ROAD TO SUCCESS While Sutherland was quick to say that she does not define her trajectory in terms of successes or setbacks, she was

able to identify multiple turning points in her career so far, the first being her decision to leave Saint James and start her own business. “That was a big step for me and just making that step was difficult but it empowered me to try to start something on my own; something I’d been thinking about but hadn’t made any moves towards doing,” she said. “I didn’t have the confidence to do it, but I just had to force myself out of my comfort zone so that I could grow that confidence myself.”

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Sutherland was adamant that while she is happy working for herself right now, she would also be happy to go back to working for another restaurant or café. For Becky Sutherland, it all just comes down to a love of baking. @RachelAlbertaKatz

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PRESIDENT’S PAGE

SHAARUJAA NADARAJAH

Vice President (Administration) vpadmin@msu.mcmaster.ca 905.525.9140 x23250

As of January 2017, McMaster University officially released its new policy concerning gender-based violence. Even though the official policy has been released for about a month, there are still a majority of students who are unaware of this important change that happened on campus. The Sexual Violence Response Protocol was created

February 9, 2017 | thesil.ca

from the government of Ontario’s “It’s Never Okay” policy, while aiming to be compliant with the guidelines set out in Bill 132. The bill mandated that university campuses develop and implement a policy that addresses how to handle sexual assault cases on an institutional level, that accommodate the needs of survivors. In addition, an official reporting system had to be integrated into the policy, along with a procedure on how complaints would be investigated and disciplined.

The official release of the Sexual Violence Response Protocol is just one step forward in the right direction.

critical that there was a differentiation in the course of action outlined when the accused is in different positions of power. Another nuance highlighted in the policy is the emphasis on a survivor-centric approach, when outlining how the investigation process for sexual assaults will work. In addition to being able to have support staff or legal counsel accompany a complaintant through the investigation process, survivors will also be able to access alternative work and study arrangements. The policy sets the framework for the procedural guidelines on how a survivor will be supported in an institutional environment. However, other forms of informal support for survivors of sexual assault can be accessed on campus.

The Women and Gender Equity Network (WGEN) located in MUSC 204, the Office of Equity and Inclusion (EIO), as well SACHA in downtown Hamilton, all specialize in addressing and supporting survivors of sexual assault. The official release of the Sexual Violence Response Protocol is just one step forward in the right direction. To truly build a safer community, we must all make a commitment to educate ourselves on the policy and support survivors, in order to end gender-based violence on campus altogether. The official policy, as well as support and information about sexual- and gender-based violence can be found at svrp.mcmaster.ca, or visit the offices of WGEN and/or EIO.

Several student groups on campus were consulted in the creation of the Sexual Violence Response Protocol, including the McMaster Students Union. With the complexities in dealing with sexual assault cases, it was

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The President’s Page is a space sponsored and used by the McMaster Students Union (MSU) Board of Directors (BoD) to communicate with the student body. It functions to highlight the Board’s projects, goals, and agenda for the year, as well as the general happenings of the MSU.


www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

The Silhouette

| 9

Editorial We don’t need hockey programs Beyond the idea that hockey is “Canada’s game,” University Sports hockey makes no sense for Mac Scott Hastie Editor-in-Chief

McMaster does not have hockey programs at the University Sports level, and it should stay that way. The men’s program ended in 1989 and people still talk about the McMaster Marlins. Numerous people have asked me about the lack of a men or women’s hockey program during my years as a Sports Editor. An alumnus emailed me this week asking if the athletic department had any plans to bring hockey back. In January 2015, Athletic Director Glen Grunwald gave the Hamilton Spectator a pretty simple answer to the question: “You never say never right, but right now it’s not in our plans to do that.” This is absolutely the right response. As it stands, McMaster boasts a strong athletic department. The results speak for themselves. Mac consistently sends teams to national championship tournaments and events. LETTER TO THE EDITOR

A rebuttal to “The decline of TwelvEighty” from the Feb. 2 issue: Aesthetics The execution of TwelveEighty club nights has never changed – including the lighting and ambiance presented every Thursday night. It is hard to understand how it has coincidentally become a problem now. Many clubs all over the GTA present the same type of dim-to-dark lighting that simultaneously promote said inconspicuousness. It is a disrespectful and egoistic claim to insult the appearance of the person you are dancing with. Refrain from blaming the lighting when your drunken goggles are the real reason for you misinterpreting the visuals of a face that’s been in front of you for an entire night.

Seeing a provincial or national championship banner in the halls of the David Braley Athletic Centre is almost expected at this point. The standard for athletics at Mac is as high as any school in the country. The idea that McMaster needs hockey programs stems from Canada’s extreme love for the sport. People romanticize the idea of a maroon and grey hockey team because the game is so deeply ingrained in the sporting culture of the country. If “hockey is Canada”, why wouldn’t it work at Mac? For one, university hockey by-and-large does not have a market in Ontario. Games are streamed online and the crowds are insignificant. Teams in urban markets draw in the low to mid-hundreds of people. These are universities with undergraduate populations over 15,000, plus the local communities to which the teams belong. People don’t pay attention to Ontario University Athletics hockey, and there is no reason to suggest it would be

different after the novelty of a hockey program wore off. Hockey fans are indifferent to OUA hockey is because it’s redundant. The Ontario Hockey League has teams throughout the province and in most university towns; 11 of the 17 Canadian teams also have a university hockey team (men’s or women’s) in their city. These teams feature National Hockey League prospects while OUA hockey offers little in terms of narrative for fans. Hamilton has the Bulldogs playing in the OHL and their attendance is middle of the pack. If you have a strategy for getting McMaster students out to their games, I’m sure the franchise would love to hear from you because they have been a struggle to engage the Mac community. And there is a cascading cost to getting a hockey program: the diminishing of other programs. Mac is already going through tough times financially, with their $600,000 “shortfall” this year set to force them to make some tough

Music In agreement, the music selection has not been the greatest over the last few months. However, TwelvEighty is employed by undergraduate students, (a rule implemented by the MSU), it is only possible to hire selected DJs. Due to the collaboration with Campus Events and the reduced number of club nights left within the year, we can now employ DJs who exceed the undergraduate title, and provide a wider range of music to accommodate the musical interests of all students.

can buy two more drinks for the price of Trust’s cover.

Price An average Thursday night at TwelvEighty consists of $2.00 coat check, $4.50 cover (or $2.00 before 11pm), and $4.25 drink. That brings you to a cumulative amount of $10.75. Now, lets compare a Thursday night at Trust. This consists of $10.00 cover, $3.00 coat check, and $6.00 drink, a total amount of $19.00. At TwelvEighty, you

Promotion Prior to the collaboration with Campus Events, TwelvEighty was limited in the space we had to put up promotional posters, and market our club nights. To counter the previous argument, McMaster’s Student Centre is the central hub of the university. That being said, it makes perfect sense for promotional posters to be placed in this strategic space. With the help of additional campus services, you will see more promotion. Janelle Hanson The Silhouette welcomes letters to the editor in person at MUSC B110, or by email at thesil@ thesil.ca. Please include name, address and telephone number for verification only. Letters should be 300 words or less. We reserve the right to edit, condense or reject letters.

decisions. If we add in a hockey team, you’re taking money away from some of the top-ranked programs in the country. Is an average hockey team worth making the rest of the programs suffer? Not a chance. Where would the teams would play or practice? McMaster does not have an arena on campus and they are unlikely to build one given the current issues with the DBAC. FirstOntario Centre in downtown Hamilton is too big of a venue and rinks in Ancaster are too far for a student population that rarely leaves the campus’ surrounding

neighbourhoods. I understand the sentiment: sports bring people together, and hockey programs could do that because it’s Canada’s sport. But the product has been a bust for nearly every urban university and Hamilton seems no different. Students should try following the top-level programs we already have – like the women’s basketball team that is poised to make a run at a national championship – instead of looking to build a new team that no one will care about in five years. @Scott1Hastie

to ginger molasses cookies.

to Big B, but not Big Bee.

to Josh Groban.

to people who don’t know Josh Groban.

to 2004 Wednesdays. to hot UG. to our growing list of banned phrases and words. “A blank canvas” is the latest addition. to senior citizens and wholesome grocery store conversations.

to Shane, questioning my thumbs. You’ve changed. to opera hours. to post-pho pukes. to the Fault in our Stars. to the rain on Tuesday.

to d.d. Congrats, dude.

to “Big Close-up.”

to new Ryan Adams jams.

to residence life. An unforgiveable sin.

CORRECTIONS

In the Feb. 2 issue, the Silhouette published an article titled “President-elects: by the book.” The article features four errors. We wrote that 40 per cent of president-elects have been of visible minority. In fact, the percentage is 20.8. We wrote that eight votes separated the closest race in McMaster Students Union history. In fact, the closest margin

of victory was one vote in 2004 after three recounts. We wrote that 13 per cent of president-elects have been female. In fact, the percentage is 8.3. We wrote that 47 per cent of president-elects have been on the MSU board of directors. In fact, the correct percentage is 29.2. For further corrections, email thesil@thesil.ca.


10 |

HUMANS

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

Sabrin Salim - Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour II Ezza Jalil - Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour II

Sabra Salim Biology and Psychology II

PHIL KIM / VIDEO EDITOR

Why are you in MUSC at 1:27 am on a Tuesday? Ezza Jalil: We both have a paper due tomorrow. Sabrin Salim: We both have a 100-word paper thing due tomorrow. It’s harder than you think, you have to take a whole scientific article and summarize it; yeah we’re dumb but not THAT dumb. Ezza Jalil: We left it to the last minute and now we’re struggling the night before. Sabrin Salim: We’re big procrastinators.

What do you like and hate most about being on campus this late? Ezza Jalil: I hate trying to buy food. I hate ordering pizza and spending 20 bucks. What I love is the company and my friends. Sabrin Salim: I like the people; always knowing that when you come to MUSC - even if you're dying at 6 a.m., people will be there. So even if you’re crying, somebody will hear you, but I hate the fact that everything is closed. Do you have an embarrassing story about each other?

Sabrin Salim: In first year, the way we relieved stress was through WWE matches in our room. Ezza Jalil: Whenever I needed a break, I would just get up and slap Sabra in the face. Sabrin Salim: It would make a lot of noise, a lot of people thought some dusty shit was... Sabra Salim: Anyways, we liked to clean our room occasionally for these WWE matches. Ezza Jalil: Sometimes. Sabra Salim: Once a month. Sabrin Salim: Once a year.

Sabra Salim: Yeah once a year because we needed a clear space to fight. One time, I was sitting, crying about CHEM 1AA3 and then got slapped in the face. Ezza Jalil: That was me! Sabra Salim: And in that very moment, I realized it was time to fight. but right when I stood up, those two shoved me into our COLDEX-brand mini fridge.

onwards, we decided that rap battling was the only way to solve our issues. Ezza Jalil: We literally rap battled for an hour and a half.

facebook.com/ HumansOfMcMaster

Sabrin Salim: We had to pay a fine. Sabra Salim: The freezer door stopped working and I knew in that moment that violence is not the answer. From that point

Phil Kim Video Editor


www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

The Silhouette | 11

Opinion Unpacking representation Women of colour need more representation at McMaster science events

C/O IWISCI Shruti Ramesh WGEN Contributor

As a woman in academic spaces, something that is too uncommon is the presence of women who look like me and whose names sound like mine. It’s not that these women aren’t out there. At McMaster alone, we have women of colour who are competitive in their fields across numerous disciplines. The caveat is that spaces meant to promote positive representation for women in academia, in politics and in leadership run the risk of not adequately representing and supporting the communities they are supposed to. An upcoming event in the McMaster community is the International Women in Science Day Conference to be hosted on Feb. 11. The purpose of the conference is to bring female-identifying science students and faculty together to “empower

one another, and engage in discussion about what it means to be a woman in science”. Upon speaking with a member of their executive and reviewing their materials, we had an overall positive impression of the team and the goals they set out to achieve with running this event. Of particular interest is the structure of the conference. It is divided into the past, the present and the future in order to chart the trajectory of the role women have played and continue to play in the field. The keynotes, panelists and workshops bring together women from different academic backgrounds to give prospective attendees a holistic perspective about what a career in science could look like and the narratives of lived experience that accompany such a career. With this in mind, there is one facet of the conference that is important to examine further. Looking at the lineup of pan-

elists and speakers leaves one with the impression that women in science are almost exclusively white. 11 of the 12 panelists and both keynote speakers are white women. We’d like to acknowledge that this was not entirely in the hands of the IWISCI executive team. When planning an event with speakers, you are limited by who agrees to participate and the recruitment process can be a difficult task. The executives did reach out to women from diverse backgrounds in keeping with the focus on identity and interplay of intersectionality that is central to the event. However, when over 92 per cent of the space taken up by panelists and speakers is filled with white voices, it is clear more needs to be done. There is nothing inherently wrong with the aims of this event. The narrative of women facing ongoing obstacles pursuing careers in science, technolo-

gy, engineering and math fields is one that continues to repeat itself, and remains a valuable conversation. Further, it is evident the care the executive team has put into giving women avenues to share their experiences and learn from each other. It is still important to be mindful that when labeling a space as intersectional, it naturally calls attention to gaps in representation. The voices missing from many conversations about women’s experiences speak to

Looking at the lineup of panelists and speakers leaves one with the impression that women in science are almost exclusively white.

the bigger picture. It reinforces that despite progress, there is a need to continue working to ensure feminist and academic spaces alike are inclusive in the face of systemic barriers. I take myself back to my first Chem 1A03 lecture in September 2013. If I were to look around, I would see black and Indigenous women, racialized women and white women as well. Amidst the crowd I could be certain there would be women who looked like me and whose names sounded like mine. Moving forward, in creating spaces for equity-seeking communities, we need to be more intentional. We need to give women in all fields of the future the representation they deserve. @MSU_WGEN


12 |

OPINION

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

From prisoners of education to free thinkers Problem-based learning should continue to increase at McMaster

C/O MCMASTER UNIVERSITY PA STUDENT RESOURCE Takhliq Amir Contributor

The transition from high school to university can be challenging for many individuals. While some of the difficulty stems from being in a new environment or leaving home, another component of this transition is also the difference in the style of education. High school is a playground for those with the ability to memorize. Few classes require significant critical thinking and application, though credit must be given to any teachers who try their best to use creative methods in a rigid curriculum. This style of teaching works well for those who either need their learning to be organized for them or only want a surface level of understanding about the topics taught. Paulo Freire, arguably one of the greatest educators in history and a vital component of the critical pedagogy movement, once stated that “Education makes sense because women and men learn that through learning they can make and remake themselves, because women and men are able to take responsibility for themselves as beings capable of knowing — of knowing that they know and knowing that they don’t.” He opposed the idea of a “banking” education where passive students are fed facts as ultimate truths with no

This is perhaps the best approach to allowing students to become individuals who feel comfortable to ask questions, fail, pave their own path and create their own successes. opportunity to question. He also believed that a “culture of silence” prevented individuals from critically reflecting on their world. Unlike high school, McMaster has felt like the opposite of these concerns with many of my courses requiring self-directed learning. This autonomy has been pleasantly surprising. While I will not be naive as to believe that every university course is worlds apart from high school, I have had a few that required minimal effort and maximum memorization. Most of my courses follow the style of problem-based and team-based learning that is inherently different from the traditional style of teaching. Unlike didactic learning, problem-based learning is student-centred and offers individuals the opportunity to, as Freire postulated, “read the

world.” Interestingly, the history of PBL essentially began in medical education here at McMaster. According to a report titled, Approaching PBL Practically: A Guide for Students by Students, the PBL model came to McMaster when John Evans, a University of Toronto graduate, became the dean of the medical school and wanted to challenge the way medicine was traditionally taught. Self-directed PBL focuses as much on learning as it does on problem solving. While students continue to work towards solving an issue, the learning process that occurs beforehand is emphasized in this model. In the most common cases, small group tasks of students have complete autonomy in the manner they go about solving a problem.

From formulating research questions, to identifying sources of information, to synthesizing your findings and reformulating your research questions, PBL becomes a constant loop of asking questions and refining them in your search for answers. It can be frustrating. From not knowing where to start to encountering constant failures, PBL sometimes makes you want to give up. Through all of my past and recent failures and successes learning in this model. I have gained a great appreciation of how tough critical thinking and critical analysis can be. Asking the right questions to directing your project with students who know as much as you do gives you a true taste of what practical application and learning should be. This is perhaps the best approach to allowing students

to become individuals who feel comfortable to ask questions, fail, pave their own path and create their own successes. Now being used worldwide, not just for medicine but for many other fields of study at many different levels of education, PBL is a proud component of McMaster’s history. It should continue to be applied to different programs so that all students can have the opportunity to become critical thinkers, learn how to embrace failure and turn theory into practice. Memorization will only take you so far. Questioning the world is what learning should truly be about.

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OPINION | 13

www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

Love affair with fries McMaster has fallen behind in terms of healthy eating accessibility and availability Prarthana Bhat Contributor

Every month of the academic year, I find myself attempting to create an ideal meal plan where my main focus would be cooking a wide spread of high nutritional value lunches and dinners. The reality is that convenience holds a higher priority than the quality of the meals consumed. Being a fulltime student who is constantly aiming to achieve a balance amongst academics and dietary preferences, convenient food attractions such as La Piazza or Centro have resulted in a deficit in my health and my wallet. The aforementioned eateries alongside other alternatives across the map provide appealing menus for their everyday meals in terms of convenience. However, as a concerned and motivated health activist, these food options do not fulfill the nutritional requirements for an average person. La Piazza is a sustainable and inclusive food system with several booths that cater to the fast-paced lifestyle of students. Referring to the menu hoisted up at Creation X, I noticed a classic take on the “all-American diet,” which includes items such as hamburgers, grilled cheese sandwiches and chicken fingers. Most of these advertised items are mainly processed and contain a high volume of sodium, trans fats and calories. Students who prefer to indulge in a well-balanced diet are told that they would be accommodated for, but examples like these demonstrate that the food services on campus are not upholding their side of the deal. While we have some access to fresh produce through Mac Farmstand, they are only present from June to October. A viable solution to this dilemma would be for the various cafeterias on campus to collaborate with Mac Farmstand more often to access fresh produce supplied by local farmers. Access to local vegetables would lead to fresh meals prepared daily, which are not preserved and served with accordance to Canada’s Food Guidelines. At Trent University, a student-led non-profit vegetarian

Hopefully in the upcoming years, we will notice a positive change in the food options available on campus that will sponsor a hearty way of life and serve an end to our love affairs with fast food. initiative called the Seasoned Spoon is a prime example of how we can promote and enforce a healthier lifestyle and environment on school grounds. Along with preparing fresh meals, the Seasoned Spoon hosts weekly culinary classes to guide students through a path of healthy eating and cooking. They also upload recipes of prepared dishes on their website, making it accessible to students who rely on independent cooking on day-today basis. A full café might be excessive budget-wise, but the other objectives of the initiative seem obtainable enough as part of a new or existing service. The Good Food Box, initiated by McGill University and included in Chukky Ibe’s presidential platform, is another source of inspiration that McMaster should be paying attention to. Ibe proposed cooperation between Mac Bread Bin and Mac Farmstand to hand deliver grocery boxes of various sizes to student households around McMaster in order to reduce the number of trips a regular off-campus student makes to the grocery store. With so many opportunities and options available, the university and McMaster Students Union should push past the variety of content available on campus and aim to be a healthier and flourishing unit. Hopefully in the upcoming years, we will notice a positive change in the food options available on campus that will sponsor a hearty way of life and serve an end to our love affairs with fast food.

MADELINE NEUMANN / PHOTO EDITOR

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14 |

OPINION

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

Keep technology in the classroom Despite distractions, the benefits of laptops and phones are too great to ignore

C/O FREE IMAGES Ivan Kovalev Contributor

Popular discussions about technology include the importance for students who want to succeed in school to own a cell phone and laptop, and the resistance from some professors in allowing students to use their devices in-class. Since education and the workplace are increasingly becoming more paper-free environments, it is in the community’s best interest to adapt and make sure every student is able to use a personal electronic device. It also seems to be the main method of communication for most users. College statistics from 2012 state that 95 per cent

The obstacle for students to procrastinate or not pay attention to their academics is always there, but it is the selfcontrol that one must conquer to continue with their homework. of students carry their phones to class, 92 per cent of students use their phones during class and 10 per cent bring their

phones to exams. It is fair to conclude that almost everybody looks at a screen at least once a day. With everything a smartphone can offer like reminders, schedules, business calls, calculators and e-mails, it is not hard to identify the pros of phone usage during school hours. This is in addition to the benefits students can get from spending time on their computers and laptops. Technology plays a key role in safety and protocol regulations. In case of an emergency, anyone is just three digits away from contacting emergency medical services for assistance. Even though there are many beneficial outcomes that are produced from technology,

Research Project: Call for Participants Undergraduate Youth Observations of Racism in Ontario Do you identify as white / Caucasian? Were your born in Ontario?

Are you an undergraduate between the ages of 19−25 enrolled at McMaster University?

Have you personally observed a racist / discriminatory / prejudicial event / act in Ontario?

If you answered YES to ALL of these questions, then Dr. James Baker, Banting Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, McMaster University, is interested in interviewing you.

Dr. Baker is looking for individuals who have personally witnessed (not experienced) racism in Ontario – it should not be a story told to you by a friend/family member; not something you saw on television/in a movie; not read in a book, magazine or newspaper; not experienced or witnessed in another province/country, etc. The research is related to your personal observations of racism in Ontario only. The interview should take no more than 40-50 minutes, and, for your time, you will received a $25 gift card.

The project is funded by grants from the Leslie Harris Centre for Regional Policy and Development at Memorial University and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

If you are interested in participating in this study, have questions, or would like more information, please contact Dr. James Baker at bakerj12@mcmaster.ca. If you know anyone who may be interested in participating in this study, please pass along the email.

McMaster Research Ethics Secretariat

This study has been reviewed by the McMaster University Research Ethics Board and received ethics clearance. If you have concerns or questions about your rights as a participant or about the way the study is conducted, please contact:

Telephone: 905.525.9140 ext. 23142 Email: ethicsoffice@mcmaster.ca c/o Research Office for Administrative Development and Support

the main con of the distracting nature of technology is a strong one. The obstacle for students to procrastinate or not pay attention to their academics is always there, but it is the self-control that one must conquer to continue with their homework. You could argue that phones and laptops should be banned from schools, but that just limits any user in regards of communication. While it can be a distraction in the classroom, the accessibility for those that are willing to use it to complement their in-class learning is simply too high to ignore. Students elected Chukky Ibe for McMaster Students Union president and one of his promises caught the public’s

attention the most. He promised for better Wi-Fi all around campus for all; something no other candidate this year placed any emphasis on. Internet access seems to be the number one priority. This is no surprise as it is an issue that can affect every student taking classes at McMaster. You should care about the issue pertaining cell phones. Not because it may lower a student’s grade point average, but because they may become too attached to their technology. In today’s society, this is all you can expect from an average student at McMaster University as their phone is just another one of the mandatory tools their school supplies holds.

Write for the Sil! We are always looking for more contributors. Flip to page 2 for meeting times and contact info and get involved with your favourite McMaster newspaper!

S


/1280BarGrill

@MSU_1280

@MSU_1280

msumcmaster.ca/ twelveighty


QUIGLEY SPORT HALL

START TIME: 9:00 AM, MEDALS 3:00PM

NON-MAC STUDENTS.....$5 ADULTS.....$10

MAC STUDENTS.....FREE (MUST WEAR MAROON AND PRESENT MAC ID)

EVENTS CALENDAR Bridges: BDC Charity Trivia Night When: February 09, 2017 from 08:00PM until 11:00PM Where: Bridges Café Students will compete against their fellow classmates in an effort to raise money for charity and show off their smarts!

Locks for Love When: February 13, 2017 from 10:00AM until 02:00PM Where: MUSC Atrium An event where McMaster students donate 12 inches of hair to raise awareness and fundraise for Angel Hair for Kids, an organization that provides free wigs to disadvantaged children with medically-induced hair loss. This event also features various dancing and singing performances, as well as wonderful raffle prizes.

All proceeds will go towards charity.

McMaster Indian Association Karaoke Night When: February 13, 2017 from 08:00PM until 11:00PM Where: Bridges Café MIA presents karaoke night and McMaster’s first lip sync battle. Come enjoy a wonderful evening filled with music, food and performances with your friends.

A Date Night with Craig Cardiff When: February 14, 2017 from 08:00PM until 10:30PM Where: TwelvEighty Bar & Grill Need a Valentines Day idea? Join us in 1280 on February 14th for an acoustic show with McMaster’s favourite, Craig Cardiff and special guest Matthew De Zoete!

Whether you have a date or just need to grab a beer with friends, unwind with live music this evening! Student Tickets: $5.00 Guest Tickets: $15.00 Available at: mcmaster.tickit.ca/events/2494-a-date-nightwith-craig-cardiff-and-friends

Bridges - Clay Coffeehouse When: February 14, 2017 from 08:00PM until 11:00PM Where: Bridges Café This is CLAY fundraising Coffehouse that aims to collect money to cover the cost of the CLAY conference as well as to pay for more students to be able to attend the conference.


The Silhouette

www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

| 17

Arts & Culture Meet your new favourite cocktail Diverse offerings of New Orleans cocktails and oysters at new Hamilton bar Nick Incretolli (left) and Kyle Ferreira (right). NICK BOMMARITO/ PRODUCTION EDITOR

S’mores milk punch.

Barrel-aged rum Negroni. Hess Sahlollbey Contributor

At Bar Sazerac, cocktail culture and seafood reign supreme. Even if you know nothing about artisan mixed drinks, co-owner Kyle Ferreira and Nick Incretolli, who run the bar program, will tailor a custom drink just for you. The James Street North bar was opened last month by Ferreira and co-owner Shane McCartney, who owns the neighbouring restaurants Saltlick Smokehouse and Knead Pizza. Sazerac’s seafood, cheese and charcuterie are sourced from the nearby Hamilton Farmers’ Market and the Niagara Falls Tide & Vine Oyster House. Sazerac is a standout addition into the local food scene. Its Gatsby-esque sign and unique Art Deco vibe harkens back to the Roaring Twenties and the diverse food and drink culture of New Orleans. “New Orleans was the

best place to start with food. It contains French, Créole, Canadian and Spanish influence amongst many others,” Ferreira explained. The name Sazerac comes from the oldest known American cocktail, a pre-Civil War New Orleans style Cognac drink that has become ubiquitous with Cajun culture. But Ferreira was quick to add that his own culture also influences him. “Trinidad comes out in my drinks and the food… you can’t give up who you are. Whether or not you’re completely aware of it, you’re going to be going back to something you love.” Ferreira and Incretolli both developed dozens of rinses and bitters that were inspired by the Trinidadian Angostura bitters, and use Trinidadian bitters for the first drink of the afternoon, a barrel-aged rum Negroni. “It takes several days to make some of the ingredients, then it’s an additional seven

day process where we age it in a cask,” said Ferreira while Incretolli made the cocktail. The beverage is based in Incretolli’s favorite spirit, campari. Incretolli has won multiple national bartending competitions, including the 2015 Made with Love cocktail competition in Toronto, and the 2015 Hamilton Cocktail Showcase. He can make any cocktail based on your favorite fruit, candy or breakfast cereal. “Our gateway cocktail is the gin and tonic. We make the tonic syrup in-house but about 30 per cent of our guests every night simply tell us what flavours they like and we go from there. One preparation that we’re really happy about is the Fruit Loops milk punch,” explained Ferreira as Incretolli prepared the next drink. “Cocktails are getting better and better in Hamilton. There’s a passion in Hamilton to be the best or to get out.” Sazerac’s unrelenting desire

for top quality can be seen in the execution that goes into making every drink. Making cocktails is an art form that Ferreira and Incretolli hold with the same regard top chefs do their food. The process is reminiscent of Walter White on Breaking Bad, as Incretolli placed a multitude of mixing glasses and tools on the bar while Kyle narrated each step. “[Incretolli] is consistently telling me about ideas and creative spurs that he’s experiencing. Working with someone that won’t stop pushing the envelope… fuels me as well.” Our second cocktail, and the one that Ferreira and Incretolli were the most proud of was the S’mores milk punch. “The milk punch dates back to Benjamin Franklin in the 1860s who had his own recipe, but we set out to make this our own and more interesting and that’s where we got the idea to use Golden Grahams cereal,”

said Ferreira. Imbibing the cocktail, the Golden Grahams are the first notes you experience on your palate followed by the unique smooth smoky roasted marshmallow taste of bygone camping trips. Incretolli used a blowtorch to roast a campfire marshmallow for a s’mores cocktail while Ferreira polished a tool set. Even the ice in the various cocktails is made crystal clear and hand carved with ice sculpture tools. That uniqueness and attention to detail is what elevates Bar Sazarac from the rest of the locales on James Street North. With New Orleans-style cocktails and seafood now available alongside downtown’s other eateries, James Street North too continues to become its own the melting pot of cultures and traditions. @theSilhouette


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A&C

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

Second year and social anxiety Learning to live with social anxiety through the most difficult undergraduate year Hafsa Sakhi Contributor

I confess: second year was lonely. I saw the university campus as intimidating and developed social anxiety. I would spend my time outside of class huddled in a corner with my laptop, feeling incredibly isolated. I viewed campus life as something I could never be a part of, overanalyzing social interaction to the point where I separated myself from the friends I promised to keep in touch with. When I entered first year, I was optimistic. I walked into my first class, Advanced French, and forged new friendships. I was carefree and energetic, bonding with one person in particular. However in second year, our friendship came to an end. He wanted something more than friendship but I didn’t feel the same. I lost someone who I felt understood me, someone who I could be myself around. I met new people but the friendships never extended outside of class. I began to feel disconnected from campus life, obsessing over my lack of involvement. I wanted to eliminate the lonely thoughts, but I didn’t know where to start. When I landed a new retail job, one that I’d dreamed of having since high school, I was too scared to get to know my co-workers. I was afraid they wouldn’t like me. My negative thought process fed my insecurities and I was unable to show my true self because I felt I wasn’t impressive enough.

NICK BOMMARITO / PRODUCTION EDITOR

I lost someone who I felt understood me, someone who I could be myself around. I met new people but the friendships never extended outside of class. I didn’t realize I had social anxiety until I came across a site online about its symptoms. I understood that I needed to allow myself time. I began to fill my days with new experiences, going to a cool café, taking long walks and paying attention to the simplicity of nature.

BETA-H STUDY

I remember one night specifically. I was walking home from night class, the air was warm, the full moon glowed, and I took out my headphones to stop and look at it. In that moment, I felt genuinely happy. I didn’t worry about people or myself, but stopped to look at the world in a different light. On my saddest days, I wrote. Sometimes it was poetry, other times it was a small paragraph or a personal story. Writing allowed me to express what I was too afraid to say out loud. I was able break out of my negative thought process by reaching out to an old friend from high school. I decided to be impulsive and texted her how I felt. I apologized for acting dis-

tant, telling her I wasn’t happy. I thanked her for being a loyal friend and promised that this time, I’d be there. Before I hit send, I thought to quickly erase it. I was afraid that she would find the message stupid. Deep inside, I knew I needed to send it. I worried over what she would say, praying she wouldn’t judge me. She asked me what was wrong and that she’d be there for me. She told me she loved me, both of us laughing at my sappy message. When we met up, our conversation was just as sweet, laid-back and loving as on the first day I met her. We laughed hard at each other’s jokes, our sarcasm hand in hand, giving each other endless compliments. It was after that day I

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investigating changes in drinking over time among young adults.

To find out if you are eligible, call 905.522.1155 ext. 39009 or 39712 OR email: beta@mcmaster.ca Version 1.0 August 17, 2016

realized I had people who still wanted to be my friend and loved all the awkward things about me: something my anxiety told me was impossible. A year later, I look back at second year as an experience I needed to go through. Although I still have days where I feel inadequate and insecure, anxiety also allowed me to discover what made me happy. I was able to enhance my writing skills, a hobby which relieved the sadness and showed me new career possibilities. I learned to appreciate the overlooked and that it was okay to open up to others. I no longer wallow in the loneliness but instead view it as a necessary independence. @theSilhouette


A&C | 19

www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

Take the stress out of this year’s Valentine’s Day

La La Land. C/O SCREENRANT.COM

C/O FACEBOOK@MANCALAMONK

Your go-to guide of what to do with your significant other in Hamilton Michelle Yeung A&C Reporter

For some, Valentine’s Day is imbued with feelings of romance. For others, Feb. 14 is just another day. The holiday has always been marketed as the celebration of romantic love, making in an exclusionary holiday that often falls short of expectations. Amidst the stresses of midterms and an astounding lack of love around the world as of late, you can use this holiday as an opportunity to spend some time with those we cherish in our lives. Coupled with the fact that Hamilton has so much to offer, there is little reason not to celebrate all the different types of love in our lives. If you’re unsure about what to do beyond the Westdale bubble, here is a mock-Valentine’s Day guide for you to either enjoy some alone time, reconnect with old friends or celebrate with significant others.

Landmark Cinemas 6 2 King Street West

There was a time when Jackson Square was worth avoiding, but things have changed. Landmark Cinemas has done their bit and renovated their theatre. With their plush reclining leather Lazyboy seats and competitive pricing, just check out their student deal “Film 10.1”. What’s playing right now: Split, XXX: Return of Xander Cage, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter, La La Land, Rings, Hidden Figures, Sing.

Mancala Monk Board Game Cafe 1229 Cannon Street East

If you’re up for a longer bus ride, Mancala Monk Board Game Cafe is a great option on Cannon Street. The list of games they have is exhausting just to scroll through on your computer, so you won’t lack options. If you’re worried about your competitive spirit getting the best of you, bring a slew of friends to keep you in check; we know Guess Who can get heated. Don’t forget to stop by Cannon Coffee for waffles before going home!

Quatrefoil

16 Sydenham Street, Dundas Dundas has plenty of gems and Quatrefoil is definitely one of the brightest. Recently ranked one of Canada’s Top 100 most romantic restaurants by Opentable, you can be sure your choice will impress your date. Just remember to get your reservation in early, and to share your Quebec Duck Breast.

Hamilton Farmers’ Market 35 York Boulevard

If you want to show off your culinary skills, or you just loathe to overspend on a day that restaurants normally make a killing, Hamilton Farmers’ Market is your one-stop shop for all your cooking needs. The finest meat, fish, and produce are all available from the friendly vendors, the only thing you have to do is decide what you’re making.

Quatrefoil’s Venison with Foie Gras Au Jus. C/O OPENTABLE.COM

C/O FACEBOOK @HAMILTONFARMERS’MARKET

C/O INSTAGRAM @AMOGELATOCAFFE

C/O INSTAGRAM @HERECOMESTHEBRAIN

The Brain

199 James Street North If you’re looking to unwind with a little drink after dinner, there is no better place to do it than the Brain. Generally a little less crowded than places like the Mule, the Brain also offers an extensive cocktail menu that never fails to disappoint (my personal favourite is the Epicurean). The dim lighting and copious amounts of candles also provide a nice ambiance.

w/ very special g u est

Amo Gelato

171 Locke Street South Don’t they say sweets are the way to someone’s heart? If so, Amo Gelato fits that bill and then some. One look at the delicious offerings that the recent Locke Street addition boasts will have you in the permanent good books of your date. Don’t be sad if there’s a flavour you didn’t get to try, odds are you’ll be back soon enough.

March 9 Fi rstO nta r i o Co n c ert H a ll TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE AT THE FIRSTONTARIO CENTRE BOX OFFICE.

DOORS 7PM • SHOW 8PM ALL AGES

All dates, acts and ticket prices subject to change without notice. Ticket prices subject to applicable fees.


20 |

A&C

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

Marauders and Bandicoots Home grown indie-rock outfit balance studies, concerts and upcoming EP Vanessa Polojac Contributor

The Bandicoots took their haunting bass-driven sounds and low vocals to another soldout show at Baltimore House. The quartet, all native Hamiltonians, hope to focus their efforts on another year of local shows, and their upcoming EP. Despite only forming in 2014, Justin Ross (guitar & vocals), Lorant Polya (bass), Andrew Parkinson (drums) and Nicolai Kozel (guitar) have made themselves a household name across Hamilton over the past three years at venues such as the Casbah, This Ain’t Hollywood and Baltimore House. They group formed out of their shared love for early British alt-rock groups such as The Last Shadow Puppets. They combined the nonchalant rocker attitude of Alex Turner, the lead singer of the Arctic Monkeys with popular genres in Hamilton. “We have known each other loosely since Grade 6 or 7. We formally met many years later at a house party in downtown Hamilton,” Ross explained. “There was a drum set and a few guitars. That’s when [Parkinson] and I started jamming covers of songs from bands like The Strokes and the Arctic Monkeys. The other guys joined us shortly after.” Their first EP, This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things was mastered by Grammy-winning Brian Lucey, who has worked with bands such as The Black Keys and Arctic Monkeys. Lucey polished their songs and guided them towards the British alt-rock sound they had been strongly influenced bywhile helping them find their individuality as a band. “The EP was produced by Michael Keire who knew [Lucey] and he got our EP mastered by him. It’s all about the connections,” said Polya. The group also took their connections to the city when conceptualizing their sound and look, especially when it comes to creating their music videos. Both singles “Mind Your Manors” and “Overnight Innovator” feature Jackson Square

and Westdale Village respectively. They also secured a key space at Threshold Studios when recording their album and have befriended many local Hamilton bands in the scene. Ross, currently in his fourth year at McMaster studying English, writes all of his own melodies and lyrics while taking inspiration from McMaster classrooms. Sitting through countless hours in lectures he always finds a way to incorporate his studies to his music. The Bandicoots’ most recent single “Overnight Innovator” is based around the character Iago from Shakespeare’s Othello and is one example of how literature impacts The Bandicoots’ music. “In one of the first-year courses that I was taking at McMaster there was a comma usage lecture and the prof used the sentence ‘No turn off red,’ and he explained that where you put the comma was the key factor for what the sentence meant. When I heard that, I wrote the sentence down right away and put it in one of our songs,” explained Ross. “I read a lot in and outside of school and it effects my writing a lot. I use my own personal experience when writing as well, but after reading all of these great novels I had to take inspiration from them. The English and musical world intertwine together.” While their ability to bridge the classroom with the musical affected the band in many positive ways but there is also a negative side. In the past, they have not spent as much a time as they would like when conceptualizing the music, however the group hopes to change that for the new year. “2017 should be a great year. We’re being given much more time in the studio and plan to focus on the band more than ever before,” said Poyla. The Bandicoots’ new EP is tentatively set for release later in 2017, with a string of local shows to be announced in the future. @theSilhouette

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22 |

GAMES

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

FREE PIZZA! Answer these simple questions, tweet the answers to @theSilhouette and we will give you $15 in Pizza Pizza gift cards! Only 10 available per week, and only allowed one gift card per year!

What recipe did Becky Sutherland strive to perfect?

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Name one of the bartenders from Bar Sazerac.


www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

The Silhouette | 23

Sports The battle against adversity Connor Gilmore and David McCulloch shine during the Marauders’ bumpy season Justin Parker Contributor

The up and down season for the McMaster men’s basketball team continues, as they dropped a rough 83-62 decision to the Waterloo Warriors on Feb. 4. Despite David McCulloch’s 13 points, the Marauders struggled to contain the Warrirors on defence, allowing Waterloo to outscore them in every quarter. Poor shooting efforts kept the Marauders off the scoreboard multiple times throughout the game, shooting 32.9 per cent from the field and 20.8 per cent from three. The team was also out-rebounded 43-32, with Connor Gilmore leading the Marauders with eight rebounds. “We haven’t been shooting the ball particularly well, and that’s been a problem for us,” Gilmore said. “I think we’re executing and moving the ball well, but I think once we start knocking down shots and getting into a groove we’ll be fine.” Gilmore has been a consistent bright spot on the team throughout the season. He leads the Marauders in points and rebounds, nearly averaging a double-double (19.8 points, 9.3 rebounds). Gilmore’s stats are good enough to rank him third in points and fourth in rebounds in the province. Gilmore is emerging as a leader amongst a relatively young team. After losing four starters from last year, the Marauders needed more players to step up and take some ownership of the team. “Dave [McCulloch] stepped up - he’s gone from playing 20 minutes a game last year to now playing close to 40…he’s a great defender and a great leader on the court,” Gilmore said. “Elliot Ormond stepped up a lot… he’s provided tons of energy on defence. He’s a great rebounder, finishes well around the basket, so he’s been great too.” As of publication, McCulloch is leading the Marauders and Ontario University Athletics in minutes this year,

averaging 36.2 per game. In that time he has been showing off his all-around game, averaging 12.9 points, 4 rebounds, and 2.9 assists per game. McCulloch has put in a lot of work in the offseason to fit into a larger role this year.

“I think we surprised a lot of people with how great we were playing in September through November; now it’s a different story. “ David McCulloch Third-year guard McMaster men’s basketball “It’s been tough, but in a good way,” McCulloch said. “I’ve been fortunate enough to have some very talented players that I’ve learned from in my first two years, so I felt fully prepared when the season came around to fill that larger role.” Despite the recent struggles, the team is looking ahead. “This season has taught me a lot about how much you need to grow as a team and gel in order to be successful,” Gilmore said, “I think this is a great group of guys, it’s been really fun playing with them. We’ve gone through ups and downs, but it’s taught me to persevere and stick with everyone and come together as a team.” McMaster hosts the Algoma Thunderbirds this Saturday, who currently sit at 4-12 on the season. The Thunderbirds average the second-lowest points per game in the OUA and are tied for the second most points per game allowed. In order to obtain a good spot in the playoff picture, the Marauders must stabilize their play and win out their last three games. “This season has been a

The Marauders, who have lost four of their last five games, have a lot to work on if they hope to make it far in the OUA playoffs. C/O KYLE WEST

roller coaster so far,” McCulloch said. “I think we surprised a lot of people with how great we were playing in September through November; now it’s a different story. We’ve lost a few games and now we’re in a spot where we may not even host a playoff game. But I think with this adversity will come some very good things.” There is no time like the present to iron out the kinks and figure out their gameplan. A streak of competitive efforts could be the momentum the Marauders need in order to make a strong impression come postseason play. @theSilhouette


24 |

SPORTS FEATURE

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

past and present The McMaster women’s basketball team has made its presence felt this season and have postitioned themselves to make a deep run in the OUA playoffs. Their success and expectations have drawn parallels to the 2008 women’s team, who paved the way for a successful Marauder basketball program.

Lauren Beals Sports Reporter

It is always the little things that bring you back. It is a string of two games that becomes 10, as headlines report on win after win with building optimism. It is a few extra spectators rolling into Burridge Gym, eager to see what all the fuss is about but cautiously managing their expectations; whispers in the nezzanine that maybe this is the year, hushed only by the nervousness of weathered fans still reeling from playoff heartbreak. For anyone in the McMaster basketball community, there is something about these unspoken moments that signals the dawn of something much greater. But there is also something about the air that surrounds this year’s women’s basketball team that feels oddly familiar. A sense that maybe, just maybe…

We have seen this before.

C/O SILHOUETTE ARCHIVES

The year was 2008. Iron Man had just hit theatres, Barack Obama was set to become president of the United States, and most of today’s current Marauders were still shooting hoops during recess in their local elementary schools. But here at Mac a storm was brewing, as a group of seniors had one more shot to claim what had so far eluded them: a Canadian Interuniversity Sports national title. Leading the way was fourthyear guard Lindsay Degroot, the First-Team All-Canadian and eventual Ontario University Athletics Athlete of the Year who was averaging 18.8 points and just shy of 11 rebounds per game. By her side was thirdyear player Taylor Smith, who chipped in 12.6 points per game while shooting 40 per cent from beyond the arc. On the defensive side of the ball the Marauders had a stroke of luck welcoming fifthyear transfer Rachel Hart to

the lineup after four successful years with the Manitoba Bisons. Hart was a defensive phenom, whose 134 rebounds and 53 steals during the regular season would go on to earn her CIS defensive player of the year. Add in the stellar play of OUA All-Star post Chiara Rocca and the ‘08 Marauders were ready for a winning playoff run.

Flash forward to 2016, and the similarities are striking.

The scoring prowess of Lindsay Degroot has been replaced by current all-star senior Danielle Boiago, a First-Team All-Canadian and McMaster all-time leading scorer who has been averaging 19.6 points and 7.5 rebounds per game. By her side is third-year forward Linnaea Harper, who has added 12.8 points per game while shooting 35 per cent from the three-point line, just shy of the mark set by Smith. This year’s Mac women have also benefitted from the play of a standout transfer in Vanessa Pickard, who switched to McMaster for her final two years of eligibility and rounds out the top three in scoring, despite missing the first half of the season to injury. With OUA AllStar Clare Kenney in the post, you couldn’t help but think this year’s team was destined to follow in their predecessors’ footsteps. “We had so much depth on our team it was crazy,” said 2008 guard Cari te Boekhorst. “If someone was having a bad game, there was someone on our bench that could fill it. Yeah we had our all-stars, but there were always so many people we could rely on. It was one of our strengths” Roaring out of the gate the 2008 Marauders went 21-1 en route to an OUA championship. The only dent in their perfect season came in the form of a late loss to the Western Mustangs, a tough game reminiscent of this team’s early loss to OUA rival Carleton. “I remember losing to

Western,” said 2008 player Rachel Hart. “It was near the end of the season, it was our first loss. You sort of give your head a shake… but when you come from a successful program you are used to that; you expect to win. It is not necessarily going to put more pressure on you than you already put on yourself.” Managing that pressure will become increasingly important for this year’s Mac squad. Ranked first in the University Sports national top ten for more than half the season, the women have yet to fall out of the top three in the country, floating around the same position that the team did in ‘08. “Being number one, you have a lot of expectations,” said te Boekhorst. “You have them from your coaches, your teammates, your friends… but psychologically, they shouldn’t be putting a huge amount of pressure on themselves because they are ranked in the top three. Regardless they have to be modest and know that the tournament can go to anyone, but confident enough to know they can take it.” Rankings aside, the latter half of the season will pose no shortage of challenges for this year’s team. With three games left to cap the year the Mac woman still have games to contend with, with OUA rivals Queen’s, Carleton and Windsor all set to play spoiler come playoff time. “[For these] last games, they have to focus on themselves,” said Hart. “Play their own game, keep working as a unit, and do what they can day to day.” “As an alumna, this year’s team [has had] an extraordinary season so far,” said 2008 guard Taylor Smith. “We are all so proud of what they have accomplished… but as one of the top teams in the country they need to understand that everyone they play will bring their A-game to McMaster. [They can’t] take a night off.” Those words ring true


SPORTS

www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

more than ever after a heartbreaking loss to Queen’s at home. Trailing for most of the game the Marauders ended up dropping a 70-68 contest that saw Boiago put up her second lowest scoring game of the season, while the team gave up 24 points on turnovers alone. For all their strengths, it is not just the depth and versatility that both teams are known for. The majority of their offensive production still rests on the shoulder of a few veteran players, which while effective in most games will always be called into question after close loses. Particularly when star players fail to hit the staggering numbers to which fans are accustomed. “Whether people agree with it or not, I would always put [the end of a game] on us,” said Hart. “With the amount of experience we had… we needed to be able to get it done. We were all seniors, we knew who our best scorers were, and we should be able to out-play who we needed to.” There is also one other element that separates these teams from other Marauder teams. Often overlooked but never to be underestimated, togetherness will always be a special part of what it means to be a part of women’s basketball at McMaster. “Looking back, we did have a lot of strengths,” said te Boekhorst. “[We had] experience, [we had] a lot of people that came from winning backgrounds, depth for sure, but we were also just a tight knit group. We fed off of each-other, we respected each other, we knew how to motivate and encourage each other… you see that in this team.”

“Being number one, you have a lot of expectations,you have them from your coaches, your teammates, your friends… but psychologically, they shouldn’t be putting a huge amount of pressure on themselves because they are ranked in the top three.” Cari te Boekhorst

2008 women’s basketball guard

So how can they turn around and capitalize on the traits that fans have come to expect from the Mac women?

“They have to be able to establish themselves early and stick to their game-plan,” said Hart. “They are a team that can get out and run, so controlling the game from the beginning becomes important. Tough [defense], one shot only, you can’t let them score and set up where they are waiting for you on the other side of the court. But they know that, and they know it’s never one person’s job to stop another team’s best player, it’s a group mentality. That’s the game [I know] they can play” The team of 2008 never did win that elusive CIS championship. An injury to Degroot in the semi-final set up a devastating loss to the number two ranked University of British Columbia Thunderbirds. But the team battled back in last day of tournament play to bring home a bronze medal against the Laval Rogue et Or in an 83-79 thriller. The same Laval team that currently sits number one in the national rankings. So can fans hold out hope for a déjà vu rematch? Perhaps, but sometimes even sports don’t write themselves that well. For now, all they can do is trace the narratives of past and present. Two teams crafted from the same pieces — natural scoring ability, defensive work ethic and a deep bench. Both born from local talent, but honed from years of hard-earned experience. Yet one key difference remains. While the triumphs and heartbreak of ‘08 remain

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written in the record books, the fate of this year’s team has yet to be sealed. And they have history to learn from. “If I could tell the team one thing… it would be to stay positive,” said te Boekhorst. “If you have a bad game, if you have a bad quarter, if you have a bad shot, keep your chin up. Stay positive with yourself and with each other… and remember it is the team that will get through everything together.” “Going into the playoffs, expect to be down at some point,” said Hart. “You didn’t get to where you are by not facing adversity; I know you are used to it. To have such high expectations means every other team gets to play as the underdog, playing loose with nothing to lose. Having the confidence to stick together whether you are

up or down, and the patience to let go of the things you can’t control, that will go a long way.” “Count on what has worked all season,” said Smith. “You can’t look farther than one day at a time.” Maybe. But when the spectators become fans and the whispers become chants, it doesn’t always hurt to look a few games back.

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www.thesil.ca | Thursday, February 9, 2017

more than ever after a heartbreaking loss to Queen’s at home. Trailing for most of the game the Marauders ended up dropping a 70-68 contest that saw Boiago put up her second lowest scoring game of the season, while the team gave up 24 points on turnovers alone. For all their strengths, it is not just the depth and versatility that both teams are known for. The majority of their offensive production still rests on the shoulder of a few veteran players, which while effective in most games will always be called into question after close loses. Particularly when star players fail to hit the staggering numbers to which fans are accustomed. “Whether people agree with it or not, I would always put [the end of a game] on us,” said Hart. “With the amount of experience we had… we needed to be able to get it done. We were all seniors, we knew who our best scorers were, and we should be able to out-play who we needed to.” There is also one other element that separates these teams from other Marauder teams. Often overlooked but never to be underestimated, togetherness will always be a special part of what it means to be a part of women’s basketball at McMaster. “Looking back, we did have a lot of strengths,” said te Boekhorst. “[We had] experience, [we had] a lot of people that came from winning backgrounds, depth for sure, but we were also just a tight knit group. We fed off of each-other, we respected each other, we knew how to motivate and encourage each other… you see that in this team.”

“Being number one, you have a lot of expectations,you have them from your coaches, your teammates, your friends… but psychologically, they shouldn’t be putting a huge amount of pressure on themselves because they are ranked in the top three.” Cari te Boekhorst

2008 women’s basketball guard

So how can they turn around and capitalize on the traits that fans have come to expect from the Mac women?

“They have to be able to establish themselves early and stick to their game-plan,” said Hart. “They are a team that can get out and run, so controlling the game from the beginning becomes important. Tough [defense], one shot only, you can’t let them score and set up where they are waiting for you on the other side of the court. But they know that, and they know it’s never one person’s job to stop another team’s best player, it’s a group mentality. That’s the game [I know] they can play” The team of 2008 never did win that elusive CIS championship. An injury to Degroot in the semi-final set up a devastating loss to the number two ranked University of British Columbia Thunderbirds. But the team battled back in last day of tournament play to bring home a bronze medal against the Laval Rogue et Or in an 83-79 thriller. The same Laval team that currently sits number one in the national rankings. So can fans hold out hope for a déjà vu rematch? Perhaps, but sometimes even sports don’t write themselves that well. For now, all they can do is trace the narratives of past and present. Two teams crafted from the same pieces — natural scoring ability, defensive work ethic and a deep bench. Both born from local talent, but honed from years of hard-earned experience. Yet one key difference remains. While the triumphs and heartbreak of ‘08 remain

THE UNION MARKET. WE ACCEPT CASH, DEBIT, AND CREDIT OPEN LATE, WITH EXTENDED EXAM HOURS!

written in the record books, the fate of this year’s team has yet to be sealed. And they have history to learn from. “If I could tell the team one thing… it would be to stay positive,” said te Boekhorst. “If you have a bad game, if you have a bad quarter, if you have a bad shot, keep your chin up. Stay positive with yourself and with each other… and remember it is the team that will get through everything together.” “Going into the playoffs, expect to be down at some point,” said Hart. “You didn’t get to where you are by not facing adversity; I know you are used to it. To have such high expectations means every other team gets to play as the underdog, playing loose with nothing to lose. Having the confidence to stick together whether you are

up or down, and the patience to let go of the things you can’t control, that will go a long way.” “Count on what has worked all season,” said Smith. “You can’t look farther than one day at a time.” Maybe. But when the spectators become fans and the whispers become chants, it doesn’t always hurt to look a few games back.

C/O FRASER CALDWELL

GRAB + GO MEALS

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SPORTS

Thursday, February 9, 2017 | www.thesil.ca

Pin to win

A look at the McMaster wrestling team as they host OUA championships Cullum Brownbridge Sports Editor

It is an incredible feeling for varsity athletes to be able to represent their school colours. It is even better when you are able to compete in front of your friends and family. As is such for the McMaster wrestling team, who close out the season as the hosts for the Ontario University Athletics Championships on Feb. 11. The Marauders have performed well throughout the 2016/2017 season, with both individual wrestlers and the team finishing on the podium in multiple events.

“We’ve been second at the national level for the past two years. For anyone to get close to beating Brock, all the stars need to align.” Nick Cipriano Head coach McMaster wrestling Heading into the OUA Championships, the men’s team is ranked third in the University Sports top ten rankings behind powerhouses Brock and Alberta, while the women’s team sits ninth after starting the season unranked. Both teams will look to improve on last year’s competition, in which they placed second. “Brock is the perennial favourite, and for good reason,” head coach Nick Cipriano said. “We’ve been second at the national level for the past two years. For anyone to get close to beating Brock, all the stars need to align.” Other teams within Ontario will look to make their mark this weekend and look to spoil any homecoming festivities that Marauder athletes may enjoy. “Within the province, Guelph will be competitive,” Cipriano said. “Same with Lakehead and Western.” Hosting the championship at home will have special meaning for fifth-year wrestler and

team captain Ahmed Shamiya, who will compete in his final OUA championship in in the 76kg weight class. He is the defending OUA gold medalist and two-time defending Canadian Interuniversity Sports champion in the weight division. A podium finish this weekend will give Shamiya the opportunity to be a three-time U Sports champion. There is plenty of other talent to look for on the Mac team. Freshman phenom Ben Zahra has enjoyed immediate success this season, having won a gold medal at the Brock University Open on Jan. 14. Third-year Robert Smith has been ranked no. 1 in the 54kg weight class for the year, and should have a great opportunity to make the finals this year. “There are at least half a dozen wrestlers on the men’s side that I expect to make a big noise in the OUA championships,” Cipriano said. “The same goes for the women’s side; Nicole Roach in particular has been a finalist in the past, and there is no reason she can’t be one again.” Fifth-year senior Roach has made impressive strides this year, recently winning a silver medal in the 63kg weight class at the Western Open on Jan. 28. Other wrestlers on the women’s side to look for include fifth-year Monica Wood and second-year Cassandra Rufenach, who both also won silver in their respective weight classes in the most recent wrestling event in Western. To compete in the U Sports Wrestling Championships at the University of Winnipeg on Feb. 24-26, wrestlers must finish in the top three of their weight class. Cipriano, along with the rest of the team, will rely on their hard work to carry them through, with the added benefit of playing in front of a home crowd. “We’re looking forward to the championship,” Cipriano said. “The team is looking forward to competing at home in front of their friends and family.” On a weekend filled with other varsity action, it will be the wrestling mat that will take centre stage.

Omar Ahmed and the rest of the Marauder team look to reach the podium in front of a home crowd. C/O DOK VOANLANDER

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Keep Hamilton Warm has been collecting new and gently used clothing, footwear, blankets and sleeping bags for those on the streets, in shelters and inner city schools since February 2014. The donations are NOT resold and go directly to those in need. Distribution locations include: Salvation Army Booth Centre and Soup Truck on York Blvd, the Good Shepherd Family and Women’s Shelters on Pearl St., the Good Shepherd Venture Centre on Cannon and Ferguson, Mission Services on Wentworth St N and a couple of inner city schools yet to be determined.

Donations can be dropped off at Dalewood Recreation Centre on 1150 Main St W and Dalewood Ave. Contact Keep Hamilton Warm at keephamiltonwarm@gmail.com or 905.515.5755 for further drop off or pick up arrangements. www.keephamiltonwarm.com

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BANDJOBS The trend of band k ids give handies during bus trips is having its renaissance A5

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HAMILTON SPECULATOR Wearing sunglasses at night since 1934

Februar y 9, 2016

NOTSPEC.COM

Temporary buildings were actually temporary

Campus mourns the loss of two “iconic” buildings SHIT HASTINGS Was not allowed to dance at Charity Ball

The Eiffel Tower. The Sydney Opera House. The Colosseum. Saint Basil’s Cathedral. The Empire State Building. T-28 and T-29. This is a list of some of the greatest buildings in the world, except it’s a little shorter now. In Jan. 2017, McMaster University committed murder on two hallmarks of the university: temporary buildings 28 and 29, in order to create the new Living and Learning Centre. The buildings were beloved on campus by both student and faculty. “I failed Chemistry 1A03 in T-28 and T-29... yeah, I failed it twice,” said third-year life sciences student Zoe Stuart. “I thought they were iconic buildings. They had a post-apocalyptic feel to them, I really dug the ‘nuclear bunker’ aesthetic.” Professors thought the buildings were a good addition to campus because it made students treat their education more seriously. “I literally paid off the registrar’s office to schedule all of my midterms and exams in those buildings. Putting the tests in the athletic centre sent the wrong message. You aren’t here to play games, you’re here for business,” said Lawrence Bulaga, an economics professor. It is unclear when the buildings were originally erected. I Googled it and couldn’t find an answer immediately, so I gave up and I’m just using my own memory. The buildings have definitely been here since

The scene of the crime.

at least 2011 when I started. So why did the university name these buildings as “temporary” if they were here for at least six years? “Well, if you think about it, we are really all temporary, right?” said Bill “The Thrill” Easterbrook, vice-president (Administration) at McMaster

University.. “But are you seriously questioning me on why we destroyed the buildings? You teens wanted more space. You got it. Now get out of my fucking office!” While the buildings are gone, McMaster can never take away the memories. Or T-13.

“I literally paid off the registrar’s office to schedule all of my midterms and exams in those buildings. Putting the test in the athletic centre sent the wrong message. You aren’t here to play games, you’re here for business.” Lawrence Bulaga Professor, Economics

Pour one out for T-29.

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DISCLAIMER: This is the Speculator, a joke page. The stories and continuing plot lines are fake. We have only received like, two complaints this year, and one was from a priest who didn’t know this was a joke page. Sorry, bud!

Tweets to the Editor If you don’t understand memes, STOP using them. It’s a crime. - Danny Boy, 20

I just went through my prof ’s likes on Twitter and it’s all titty pics ... - Janet, 19 (and a half)

INSIDE SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE IS CULTURALLY RELEVANT AGAIN A3 HOW TO KILL TIME WAITING FOR ELECTION RESULTS A7 DBAC THAT ASS UP C2 I’LL SHOW YOU A SUPERBOWL B2 THE ARKELLS CONCERT IS ACTUALLY JUST AN MSU BUBBLE REUNION D9

FEATURE We visit James Blunt’s Ibiza nightclub: “Where Everybody’s Beautiful” A10-11 PER ISSUE: Your blood. Seriously, please donate! The next blood drive on campus is Feb. 28.

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The Silhouette - February 9, 2017  

Pull up a seat at Bar Sazerac, Hamilton's newest must-visit spot! The bartenders give us the scoop on their New Orleans-inspired bar. In spo...

The Silhouette - February 9, 2017  

Pull up a seat at Bar Sazerac, Hamilton's newest must-visit spot! The bartenders give us the scoop on their New Orleans-inspired bar. In spo...

Profile for thesil
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