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The Chronicle

October 8th, 2013

The weekly student newspaper of The College of Saint Rose in Albany, New York www.strosechronicle.com - @strosechronicle

Volume LXXXII Issue 8

Rosenfeld Talks New Book at Saint Rose By LAUREN SEARS Staff Writer A former newspaper editor who managed coverage of the Watergate scandal for The Washington Post, and then led Albany’s largest newspaper, talked about his new book From Kristallnact to Watergate: Memoirs of a Newspaper Man, at The College of Saint Rose this past Monday. Harry Rosenfeld, 84, is an editor at large, consultant and an editorial board member for The Times Union. Rosenfeld was the former Metro editor of

The Washington Post, where he managed reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein who would become famous during the 1970s for breaking the Watergate scandal. Rosenfeld recalled the events of Kristallnact to a room filled with complete silence. He became choked up when he talked about arriving in the United States on May 16, 1939 at the age of 9. Rosenfeld addressed an overflow audience and told the crowd he rose from the life of a refugee from Nazi Germany to Continued on Page A4

‘House and Home’ Takes First Place at 15 Minutes Max By ASIA EWART Staff Writer

Fall Foliage Season ANTHONY CHAPIN

Send us your best leaf peeping photos of the season.

News & Features

Arts & Opinion

The Saint Rose community was invited to the second annual video festival, 15 Minutes Max, held in the Touhey Forum of the Lally School of Education on Friday. Hosted by the School of Arts and Humanities and the English Club here on campus, 15 Minutes Max was a screening of student submitted films of various backgrounds,

including musical, inspirational, and humorous, all no longer than 15 minutes. The festival began in 2012, by Silvia Mejia, an associate professor in the Department of World Languages and Culture and American Studies program at the College. “It started as a conversation among an interdisciplinary group of faculty…we agreed that in Continued on Page A2

Sports

Pine Hills Profile. See pages A5

The end of Breaking Bad. See pages B9

College coaches making the switch to the NFL. See page D15

Photos: Late Knight. See pages A7

Who’s going to blink first in the government shutdown? See page C13

Men’s Soccer: Golden Knights fall short again. See page D16


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News

15 Minutes Max

Audience enjoying the films in the festival. Continued From Front Page an era where almost anyone can record a video and make it public through digital platforms, students should be developing multimedia competency through a ‘hands-on’ approach,” she explains. “Saint Rose offers a wide range of opportunities for students to become creative producers and critical consumers of digital video. Thus, we decided it was about time to create an annual student video festival.” The process of choosing which films would ultimately end up in the festival was not an easy one. Submissions were viewed by a total of seven judges, including Mejia, along with other faculty member from the Communications, English, World Languages and Cultures, and American Studies departments. Factors from “storytelling and aesthetic values, to critical thinking and technical skills,” to copyright issues and individual votes among the judges were considered. The lineup for this year’s festi-

val included a promotional video for student band Drew and the Grand Spectacular and “Four Strings” by Derick Noetzel,

“Saint Rose offers a wide range of opportunities for students to become creative producers and critical consumers of digital video.” Silvia Mejia “House and Home” by Anthony Saxe, “Pelo Guerra/Hair War” by Katie Bouchard, Conor Brisner, Meaghan Hurley, and Kristina Laverde, “Stay” by Nicole DeMarco, and “These Lonely Streets” by Kathy Amendolara.

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Also featured was an outtakes portion, which were videos that didn’t quite make it into consideration for judging, but were great nonetheless. These included stop motion shorts “Fade” by Kelli Lovdahl, Sadie Poszdich, Kateri Edwards, and Jenessa Matis, and “I Want” by Morgan Denman, Natalie Leitman, Dorian Blanchard, Phil Prinzo, Dan Dayton, and Hannah Ellingwood. Announced at the end were the winners with “Four Strings” taking home third place, “Stay” second, and “House and Home” first. The winning video showcased a homeless man breaking into and taking shelter in a house whose owner left at the same time ev-

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Saxe’s mother accepting his first place certificate. ery day. While Anthony Saxe wasn’t present, his mother, also featured in the film, accepted the award on his behalf. Saxe thought ahead and recorded an acceptance speech in case he did win. 15 Minutes Max also proved to be a fun event to try for the first time for students who don’t usually dabble in film. “Silvia Mejia was my Spanish teacher, and my video was a project for the class. She encour-

aged me to submit it,” said junior Meaghan Hurley of her group film “Pelo Guerra/Hair War.” “I just hope that people enjoy[ed] it. It’s a silly film I made with my group members. I hope everyone gets a laugh!” “We definitely would like to make 15 Minutes Max an annual tradition,” Mejia added. From the festival’s turnout and interest in submitting, that hope looks very likely.

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October 8th, 2013

News

Volume 82 Issue 8

In Brief

New Burglary Trend Raises Concerns Albany Police are investigating a recent trend of burglaries throughout the city. Since mid-August, 11 burglaries have been reported in the city involving suspect(s) entering homes by pushing in portable air conditioning units. On seven of these occasions, the burglaries have occurred during the daytime hours.

Suspect(s) seem to be targeting unoccupied homes with portable air conditioning units installed in windows. Once inside, the suspect(s) have been stealing various electronic items. The Albany Police Department issues safety tips for residents to avoid this type of crime in their home. They advise securing first-floor air conditioners with a

bracket outside and a sliding window lock on each side of the window frame, and taking precautionary measures if leaving their home unattended for an extended period of time. Anyone with information is asked to call the Albany Police Detective Division at (518) 4628039.

Camerata To Perform Chamber Music for Wind, String, and Piano The Saint Rose Camerata, the College’s resident faculty ensemble featuring faculty and guest artists, will be showing off their string, wind and piano skills at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26. in the Kathleen McManus Picotte Recital Hall at Massry Center for the Arts. The concert is a presentation of Premiere Performances at The College of Saint Rose and

admission is free. The Camerata will play music by 19th- and 20th-century composers from Germany, Russia and the U.S. The program includes, Sonata for two violins, Op. 56 by Sergei Prokofiev, Sonata “Undine” for flute and piano, Op. 167 by Carl Reinecke, Serenade for oboe, cello and piano, Op. 73 by Robert Kahn, and Summer Mu-

sic, Op. 31 by Samuel Barber. Directed by Yvonne Chavez Hansbrough, the Camerata has presented a series of concerts with diverse programming for the past decade. For more information about the Saint Rose Camerata, visit www.saintrosecamerata.org.

Massry Art Exhibit Blends History and Natural Themes The Esther Massry Gallery at The College of Saint Rose is proud to present its newest exhibition, “Progeny” by Swedish artist Charlotta Westergren. The collection features paintings on

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Executive Editor Jackson Wang ‘14 wangj847@strose.edu

linen, lamé and aluminum as well as works on paper and video. The exhibit will open on Oct. 18, with a gallery reception held from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. Immediately following the reception, the

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artist will present a talk at 7 p.m. in Saint Joseph Hall Auditorium. All events are free and open to the public. The exhibit will remain in the gallery through Dec. 8.

Business Manager Shawn Dixon dixons@strose.edu

Managing Editor Opinion Editor Chris Surprenant ‘14 Zachary Olsavicky surprenantc572@strose.edu olsavickyz977@strose.edu

Advertising Manager Shawn Dixon dixons@strose.edu

News Editor Lauren Halligan halliganl567@strose.edu

Arts Editor Rachel Bolton ‘15 boltonr413@strose.edu

Web Editor Christopher Lovell ‘15 lovellc083@strose.edu

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Faculty Adviser Cailin Brown

Staff Writers Tori Addison Katherine Bakaitis Kaylnn Day Asia Ewart Andy Gilchrist Tariq Kendall Katie Klimacek Kevin Jacob Lauren Klose Vanessa Langdon Nicholas Negron Alex Pecha Lauren Sears Michael Smith Staff Photographer Anthony Chapin

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Calendar of Events Tuesday, October 8th 11 a.m. Information Table - Internship Opportunities EAC 4 p.m. MAPS ALB 109 7 p.m. G4G (Girls For God) Sanctuary 7 p.m. Spectrum St. Joseph’s Hall 8 p.m. Outside the [Box] Lima Basement 8 p.m. Yoga Sanctuary Wednesday, October 9th 11 a.m. Information Table - New York State Senate Democratic Conference Internship EAC 2:40 p.m. Natural Science Association Science Center Room 352 3:30 p.m. Better Together Interfaith Group Sanctuary 5 p.m. Mid-Week Mass Sanctuary 7:30 p.m. BASIC Sanctuary 8 p.m. Colleges Against Cancer Meeting Albertus Room 210 8 p.m. Comedian St. Joes 10 p.m. Karate Club Practice EAC Room 110 Thursday, October 10th 8 a.m. Alcohol Awareness Main Lounge 4:15 p.m. Adventure Club Lima Basement 5:30 p.m. SEB Meeting St. Joseph’s Hall 7:30 p.m. Identity Main Lounge 8 p.m. Wind Ensemble Concert Massry Friday, October 11th 8 p.m. Free movie: The Conjuring St. Joe’s Saturday, October 12th 1 p.m. Women’s Soccer vs St Anselm Plumeri 1 p.m. Women’s Tennis vs Assumption Plumeri 3 p.m. Orchestra concert Massry Sunday, October 13th 6:30 p.m. College Mass St. Vincent de Paul Church Monday, October 14th 3:00 p.m. Environmental Club Meeting Community Service Office 5:15 p.m. Yoga Sanctuary 8:30 p.m. CEC Lima Basement If you have an upcoming event you would like to see in our weekly Calendar of Events, please e-mail chronicle@strose.edu. ANY student can join The Saint Rose Chronicle The Chronicle is published weekly on Tuesdays during the academic year and once during the summer months. The Chronicle is published at the facilities of New England Newspapers in Pittsfield, M.A.

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The Chronicle

Harry Rosenfeld Continued From Front Page

top editor “because America is a great country.” Rosenfeld is one of the most accomplished journalists in Albany who came to Saint Rose to talk about Watergate, and how journalism needs to have a place in the future. “Journalism is an essential ingredient in American democracy. You need a hardworking, responsible free press to keep seeking the truth,” said Rosenfeld. Rosenfeld said about reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, “They did great work and they deserve every award they have received, they earned it.” The Washington Post won a Pulitzer Gold Medal for their coverage of Watergate. "If it had not been for the reporters and editors and the people at the Post, we could have a very, very, different society than we do today," said Mary Alice Molgard, Professor of Communications at the College. In the film All the President’s Men, Harry Rosenfeld was played by actor Jack Warden. "What got me into journalism was when I saw the adventure in All The President’s Men. It seemed like such an exciting career...I found it inspiring to hear him (Rosenfeld) speak," said Cameron Castan, a student at UAlbany. Community members came

to attend the standing room only event. "I find him (Rosenfeld) fascinating. I think he is a treasure and that type of journalism, I don't know if it's the future of journalism anymore, but it certainly was representative of what journalism has been in the past," said Sylvia Lilly, a local librarian. Rosenfeld signed books for event goers before and after his conversation. "I definitely bought the book this afternoon and wanted to hear him speak and also wanted to hear Rex [Smith] interview him. It was very inspiring," said Eileen Roach, a Saint Rose alumna from the class of 2006. "I loved that Harry was able to reveal to this audience his great storytelling ability. He was able to show what real journalism is because he was relating to people not only the story of his life, but the larger meanings of it,” said Rex Smith, editor of The Times Union and the moderator for the conversation with Rosenfeld during the evening. “I think that is a lot of what journalism is. It’s not just telling people what happened, but it’s giving people the why and the how, and I think that all came out as Harry described his remarkable life, and the experiences he had, I think people drew great lessons from that as well,” Smith said.

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KELLY PFEISTER

Rosenfeld entertains a captivated audience as he recalls his life experiences, particularly with his involvement in breaking the story of the Watergate scandal

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Every chair in Lally was filled for Rosenfeld's interview with The Times Union editor Rex Smith.


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Volume 82 Issue 8

News

The Chronicle

Pine Hills Profile: Wing Lifts Career Skyward

to work on the kids that were little when they came and now they’re in their 20s,” Wing said. “We believe in cross training in our office and she is just as competent at running the front desk as she is at dental assisting,” said Pamela Alcombright, a registered dental hygienist at Family Dentistry. “She also has a nice rapport with our patients and that’s so important when you are dealing with people who have a fear of dentistry.” “She’s always willing to help anybody with anything,” said Lynn Kesseling, a receptionist at Family Dentistry. “She gives her

By JOHN LYDEN Contributing Writer As a young man, now 21, leaves the dentist’s office, the full-time dental assistant cannot help but to reflect back on her professional journey. She has known the young man since he first started coming to the office for teeth cleanings back in 1995. Karla Wing, 55, has been working as a dental assistant at Family Dentistry on Western Avenue for the last 31 years. As a dental assistant, Karla’s responsibilities encompass doing impressions, making temporary crowns, assist-

“I didn’t want to be stuck in a room for eight hours a day, scraping teeth.” Karla Wing ing the dentist, ordering supplies needed, and doing desk work. Although very satisfied and fulfilled with her career, Wing was not always certain about what occupation would sustain her. When Wing began attending Springfield Technical Community College in the 1970s as a biology student, her goal was to become a dental hygienist. Her professional goals soon shifted dramatically. “I didn’t want to be stuck in a room for eight hours a day, scraping teeth,” said Wing. Wing developed an interest in dental assisting work and consequently decided to pursue that as a career instead of dental hygiene. The dental field appealed to

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JOHN LYDEN

Karla Wing has been working as a dental assistant at Family Denistry for the last 31 years. Wing in large part because of the accomplishments of her older brother, Stanley Lis, who is now a dentist in Delmar, New York. Once Lis was accepted to dental school in the 1970s, Wing wondered if she could find success in the field, too. Wing’s dreams became a reality when in 1977 she became a registered and certified dental assistant. The job has sustained her for 36 years and she shows no signs of losing the enthusiasm that has made her successful in the field. For Wing, the field has not only given her a healthy income of roughly $42,000 a year, but also has given her some emotionally taxing experiences. “I worked on some Vietnam kids in Massachusetts. I did a lot of extraction work on them,” said

“It’s imperative to make the patients comfortable, to calm them down, and explain all the treatment.” Karla Wing

Wing. “It was really sad because their teeth were rotted out. And these were little kids.” On many occasions, Wing has had to try to console patients who have been petrified of getting dental work done. “It’s imperative to make the patients comfortable, to calm them down, and explain all the treatment,” said Wing. Wing’s duty of helping patients to relax has created some very meaningful relationships that have lasted decades. “It’s special

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“She gives her opinions, but she doesn’t sugar coat it. I really enjoy working with her. She’s a lot of fun.” John Bryant opinions, but she doesn’t sugar coat it. I really enjoy working with her. She’s a lot of fun.” For Wing, it is exciting to be in a field that is advancing so rapidly. “Dentistry is changing a lot. Virtual impressions. Everything is going digital. It’s getting a lot better,” said Wing. “It’s really exciting to see.”


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October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Technology to Help Get That 4.0

By VANESSA LANGDON Staff Writer With one particular new mobile app, the possibility for technology to be beneficial to students is now taking on a new meaning. With the Outlines Outloud app, students can get their notes onto mobile devices and listen to the information to study. This essentially allows the student to jam out to history notes the same way they would “Wrecking Ball” and “What Does the Fox Say” (minus the spontaneous 5 second dance parties).

“Purchasing Outlines Outloud will cost you a whopping $4.99 but the price is worth it if you’re an exclusively auditory learner.” The app, while seemingly helpful and a wonderful idea, is harder to set up than would be appreciated. The app works in outline format as the name implies, however the need for the .OPML format creates a bit of a hassle. In order to use the app, a standard outline program needs to be downloaded first. The parent company of Outlines Outloud does make the search for a program easier by providing the option of free software downloads for both Macs and PCs. This first step of creating the outlines is generally the hardest, mainly because the program they provide isn’t very user friendly. Once the controls are mastered it will not seem as complicated, but it will take about an hour before your outline will resemble an outline in the most general sense. The download process isn’t over yet; there are still a few more steps before you can finally listen to the notes for upcoming

midterms. After downloading the outline software, the next step is to find a service that will allow the desired files to be transferred to an iPod touch or iPhone, and this leads to Dropbox. Ironically, Dropbox is a free service that almost seems more useful than the app itself! Dropbox allows for the transfer and upload of files via the internet to a personal account. Once uploaded, those files are accessible from any computer with your accounts login information. The free account can hold up to 2 GB, allowing it to act as an intangible flash drive and alleviating the constant inbox clutter of files sent to your own account. Dropbox is also extremely user friendly- it becomes a folder on your computer like any other to which files can be dragged or saved. The process of getting the outlines themselves onto the phone is easy enough. You simply save them to Dropbox and the app will instruct you on how to connect the two. From there, with just two clicks, you have all the files ready to use on the app. The company claims that they have created the best text to audio program available, and that it generates a flowing speech that seems life-like. The reality, however, is that the speech is closer to a robot, more specifically a British robot. The app is a nice back-up weapon to keep in mind, but it’s not free, unfortunately (and the price tag is pretty hefty). Purchasing Outlines Outloud will cost you a whopping $4.99 but the price is worth it if you’re an exclusively auditory learner. Or better yet, if you’re avid runner, you could perhaps benefit from being able to review work while running the streets of Albany. If the idea is intriguing but the price is too steep, (or if the robotic voice might throw you off) the voice memos app is a free alternative. Voice memo comes standard with both the iPhone and iPod touch, and allows the recording of short audio files for playback. Simply create a basic outline, handwrit-

Students can make use of Outlines Outload to study on the go. ten or typed, and read it off while recording. No robot voice, just your regular speaking voice (although keep in mind some people tend not to like the sound of their own voice). Considering Voice memo is free and offers most of the functionality of Outlines Outloud, they could even be consid-

ered a rival. The long and short of it is that the app fills a real need for college students. We tend to be inherently busy, but studying is, and will always be, a must. Studying via audio could be a great tool considering song lyrics stick so easily. Maybe this could make the basics

COURTESY JOURET MOBILE

of the Silurian age or all those biology facts stick in your head just the same! Good luck with impending midterms, and maybe by this time next year Outlines Outloud will be the flashcards of the digital age, synonymous with studying.


October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Late Knight

News

The Chronicle

Photos By Chris Alvarado

Stuffed animals and water bottles were just some of the prizes to be won. Brittany Carusone serves cotton candy.

John Paine tries his luck at a game.

At Late Knight on Friday, students took advantage of the activities in St. Joe’s.

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Arts

October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Motion City Soundtrack and Bayside Co-headlining and Co-rocking

By LAUREN HALLIGAN News Editor Though Motion City Soundtrack’s upbeat poppy dance rock might sound different in comparison to Bayside’s dark, melodic, technically complex music, the two bands are meeting in the middle this fall for a coheadlining tour. “We’re excited to finally be able to tour with Bayside,” Motion City Soundtrack bassist Matt Taylor said. “The idea has been running through our heads for a few years now.” Despite differing styles, both bands are respected veterans of the same maturing pop punk music scene. “We feel that our bands make a lot of sense together musically and that we have some mutual fans,” Taylor said. As the two bands, both familiar with touring the United States in the name of rock music, embarked on their dual journey last week, they made sure to include Clifton Park’s Upstate Concert

Hall in their travel plans. “It’s been a long time since we’ve been up there, so we’re looking forward to it,” Taylor said before the show about playing Clifton Park. The band last played the venue in 2011 on a headlining tour. Last Saturday, Oct. 5, the two bands brought their talents together at the local venue, and delivered a show that will not soon be forgotten. The show began with local pop punk heroes State Champs warming up the crowd. Their first hometown show in months, State Champs is back on the road, supporting Bayside and Motion City Soundtrack on the entire tour. “We started out as a local band working so hard selling tickets around the Capital Region to our shows at Upstate Concert Hall and other local venues alike. Now, to be part of an actual tour package with these bands that we’ve always looked up to, and have the opportunity to travel the country and be exposed to so many new markets and fans is

unreal,” State Champs frontman Derek DiScanio said. A fast-growing pop-punk sensation, who are becoming popular beyond the local market, State Champs are releasing their debut full length album “The Finer Things” Oct. 8. Also on the tour bill was What’s Eating Gilbert, featuring founding member of the pop punk band New Found Glory: Chad Gilbert. Dressed in suit and tie, Gilbert was more pop than punk Saturday evening, playing upbeat songs such as “Babe,” which he jokingly dedicated to Anthony Raneri from Bayside and the band’s latest single “Complaining.” Gilbert is also known for his role as significant other to punk rock’s leading lady Hayley Williams of Paramore. Next on stage was the first of the evening’s dual headlining acts, Motion City Soundtrack. Frontman Justin Pierre, and his staple mad scientist hair-do, took the stage front and center, as the band powered through songs like “Fell In Love Without You,”

LAUREN HALLIGAN

Bands performed at Clifton Park’s Upstate Concert Hall.

Fans were not disappointed by the music. “When You’re Around,” and “A Life Less Ordinary.” Crowdsurfers poured over the barricade as the band played their new release “Inside Out,” which they released last month by streaming it via Rolling Stone. The band is currently working on preproduction for their sixth album, which they are hoping to record in a few months, said Taylor, giving fans something to look forward to in 2014. Motion City Soundtrack finished their set with the 2005 poprock anthem “L.G.FUAD” and a feel-good closer of “Everything Is Alright.” Fellow New Yorkers from just down the Hudson, Bayside then took the stage in front of an eagerly awaiting audience. The first portion of their set included “They’re Not Horses, They’re Unicorns,” and “Devotion and Desire.” Although the band hasn’t released any new music since their 2011 “Killing Time,” the rock band had six full-length albums of material under their belts to play. The setlist included a good variation including “Montauk” and “Dear Tragedy” (their encore), off of their 2005 self-titled

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album, to “Sick, Sick, Sick,” off of their most recent release. Raneri thanked fans for their eversupporting enthusiasm, as the crowd sang word-for-word songs written a decade ago to the band’s latest hits. Though Raneri took the spotlight, guitarist Jack O’Shea showed off his fancy fingerwork without missing a note. Raneri also thanked Step Up Presents CEO Ted Etoll for creating and maintaining “an incredible scene in this town.” Bayside has been continually playing the Clifton Park venue since their start as a touring band. Show-goers left the venue pleased that night. “Seeing Motion City Soundtrack is like fulfilling a high school dream,” said Motion City Soundtrack fan and Saint Rose junior Courtney Carr. On her first time seeing the band perform live, “I really enjoyed the concert and venue,” she said, adding “Although I specifically went to see Motion, all of the bands were awesome.” Carr’s highlight of the evening was when Motion City Soundtrack finished their set with hit song “Everything is Alright.”


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Arts

Don Jon: In Love and Lust, Romance Wins Out

By CHRIS SURPRENANT Managing Editor

It’s no secret that romantic comedies in the 21st century are often filled with clichéd, cottoncandy tropes that rot the teeth of the idealistic dreamers who watch them. Boy always meets girl, boy disappoints girl, boy and girl break up, boy and girl make up, and finally boy and girl get married. The beauty of Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Don Jon is that he removes the saccharine sweetness from the genre, giving viewers Sour Patch Kids instead of Good & Plenty. Gordon-Levitt’s Jon Martello is the kind of guy who has a girl on each arm and enjoys deciding which one will have the honor of going home with him that night. Jon admits, “There are only a few things I really care about in life: My body. My pad. My ride. My family. My church. My boys. My girls. My porn.” All things considered, it sounds like he has his priorities in order—minus that last one. You see, Jon is addicted to pornography, so much so that it

prevents him from having truly meaningful relationships with any of the multitude of women he meets. In fact, he prefers his fantasies to the real thing. For the majority of the film, Jon lives in a world where he juggles women and fantasy. First he meets the brassy Barbara Sugarman—a so-called “dime” in Jon’s book—who compels him to meet her family and friends (something Jon never does with his girlfriends), as well as put a hold on sex until it means something to the both of them. Barbara, gamely played by Scarlett Johansson, is an updated “girl next door.” However, she is only half of what Jon needs. Enter Jon’s middle-aged classmate, Esther (Julianne Moore). Esther is a grieving widow who realizes, thanks to Jon, she can’t keep her grief bottled up in private, and cries in public. She and Jon form an unlikely intimate friendship, teaching Jon that although he must give up part of himself to another person, his other half must also be willing to sacrifice. In other words, sex, and by extension, love, is a two-way

Joseph Gordon-Levitt stars as Jon Martello.

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street. The film’s emphasis on the give-and-take aspect of relationships is on full, graphic display via Jon’s addiction to pornography. As both Barbara and Esther point out, his love of fantasy allows only Jon fulfillment. He isn’t required to give anything back. Ultimately, Don Jon is a feminist film, despite the literal focus of the male gaze. Barbara’s character turns out nothing like Jon expects her to be, despite her “dime” status. In fact, she’s not right for Jon in any sense. Esther, the older woman who would perhaps ordinarily be looked over by Jon, becomes his compass. The film does not, however, let women off the hook. Jon enjoys cleaning his apartment, but Barbara demands he not speak of vacuuming in front of her because “It’s not sexy.” While Jon certainly must alter his behavior to have a meaningful relationship, he is not defined solely by his muscles and personality. Just because he likes to clean does not make him less of a man, as Barbara implies. While the film’s ending may be unsatisfying to many, Don Jon will certainly leave people talking. My friends and I rarely discuss the meanings of films once we’re out of the theater, but we talked about it the whole way home. How do two people act when they’re in love? Should only one person devote his or herself to the other, body and soul? Or is it a two-way street that requires both parties to lose themselves in each other evenly? While the film is certainly frank in its discussion of love, sex, and everything in-between, it sends a clear message of balance and equality. Each person deserves to be treated and respected as an individual, man or woman. In the vastly over-populated, creatively devoid world of rom-coms, Don Jon isn’t just another one-night stand.

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The End of Breaking Bad By KATIE BAKAITIS Staff Writer WARNING: spoiler alert! The much anticipated conclusion of television’s finest drama has finally revealed itself from behind Vince Gilligan’s golden script. From the very beginning, we fans have observed with a critical eye Walter White’s noticeable transformation to Heisenberg and then to Mr. Lambert. Though Walter’s transformation into Heisenberg is the cliché and generally accepted character analysis, I believe that Walt had a large part of Heisenberg within himself all along, he was just stuffing him down with a teacher-like politeness and the final episode proves just that. Before I go onto say any details about the series finale, I just want to say that I totally guessed the very ending! Who could forget that perfect conclusion? The money Walt earned is now secured for his family through Gretchen and Elliott, Marie is now able to find peace knowing where Hank is buried, the Neo-Nazis are dead and so is Lydia, Jesse is free and Walt has died on his own terms (not by cancer). The journey he took to arrive at that outcome was pretty amazing, to say the least. For the finale, Breaking Bad let viewers feast on and appreciate seeing one frail man topple expectations and get out of impossible situations through cunning and know-how. It was a parade of “Yeah, science!” moments, though that science was sometimes a mere understanding of human nature (the Gretchen and Elliott moment- brilliant). Breaking Bad has proven itself to be a tremendously affecting show, but “Felina” sought to stir additional emotions. Jesse cracking up as he sped away was somewhat liberating. Walt saying goodbye to Walt Jr. (even if it was from a distance) and Holly conveyed some sense of loss. There were some nice, classical moments of humor; the one last dose of Skinny Pete and Badger’s antics. Overall, the episode’s style was solid and no holes were left uncovered; it was as solid as Walt

seemed carrying out his clever scheme. Speaking of clever schemes, let’s discuss the scene where Walt wastes the Neo-Nazis. In this fanfavorite diversion, Walt managed to avenge Hank’s death and free Jesse all while looking dangerously remarkable in the process. Making the machine gun contraption in the trunk was no doubt a Heisenberg moment, but when he dove on top of Jesse (his second “son”) and took a bullet, that was Walt. I think one of my favorite parts was when Jesse took down Todd in a slow, agonizing and fulfilling choke-hold. I think many fans weren’t too sad to see psycho “Meth Damon” meet his maker. Walt even took the time to conceive Lydia’s demise, though I still don’t understand how he pulled it off so accurately. How did he know Lydia was going to sit there and how did he get the ricin in the sugar packet without making it look suspicious?! Heisenberg is too good for logic. Walter finally admitted to Skyler that he was not doing all of this meth-making for his family’s security. Walt basically said that he needed to cook in order to satisfy his inner self after finding out that his days are numbered. It was kind of like a bucket list; a dark, violent, drug-infested and short bucket list. Walt needed to go out with a bang, knowing that he had done something to reach his full potential, even if it was highly illegal (but you got to find something you’re good at). The last amazing scene really pulled at the audience’s heartstrings. I couldn’t help but grin when Walt, still bleeding out, strut into Todd’s meth lab, picked up the gas mask and smiled. I was sitting at the edge of my seat thinking there would be one last cook, but, alas, Walt collapsed and died, dragging Heisenberg with him. This was the perfect ending for a perfect show. Well, nearly perfect. Part of me still expected Walt to go into witness protection, be given a new family and that would be the start of Malcolm in the Middle.


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The Chronicle

Arts

Interview with TruTV’s Impractical Jokers By DOMINGA GLEASON Staff Writer TruTV’s Impractical Jokers is a hidden camera prank-based show that involves four hilarious comedians that have been friends since high school. For those who aren’t familiar with the show, the four jokers compete in competitions. The loser at the end of each show must perform some kind of punishment that is chosen by the members. Brian “Q” Quinn, James “Murr” Murray, Joe Gatto and Sal Vulcano call themselves the Tenderloins and are currently on an 11 city tour. The tour started in September and will continue into December, making a stop at our own Palace Theatre in Albany. I had the pleasure of talking with James of the show and asking him a few questions about both the tour and the TV show. James has been practicing comedy his whole life, on top of helping start the Tenderloins, he also helped start the Georgetown Players, an improv group, at his college. Now not only does he work on the show, he also is the Senior Vice President of Development for his company, North South Productions. Here is what James had to say: What made you decide to do this tour? It was second nature- we love performing and we love doing shows so it only made sense to go on a tour. What is this tour going to consist of? Well, it’s a live show; it’s everything you love about the show, but in person. There will be a mixture of stand up, telling stories, and showing lots of deleted clips from the show. The clips have been taped but were cut from the show usually because they were too crude for television, but they are “golden and exclusive.” You wouldn’t want to miss out because you cannot see them anywhere else. What would you say the most exciting part of this tour is going

to be for either you or the fans? For the fans they love seeing those exclusive clips, and they also love seeing how we truly are best friends and that we were not casted together. On TV we all look like we are so close, but when the fans get to see us in real life they see how it is all real, and we all truly do feel that way. For us, the best part is getting to see the crowd’s reaction. It’s a great feeling when the fans have memorized lines from the show and they’re shouting out bits from the show to you. How did the show get started? Well, we had formed the Tenderloins and then we had sold the two TV shows before but neither one of them stuck. One was an improv based show and the other was a sketch comedy. Then finally we thought, why not make a show about what we love doing, which is the same thing we’ve been doing for 24 years, playing jokes on each other. So we snuck into businesses and stores and filmed ourselves doing pranks, then we showed the idea to TruTv and they loved it. Not so much as how popular, but how much it affected people. The dedication of the fans is truly amazing, and during the tour when they are screaming lines and chanting, we really did not expect that kind of reaction. What is your inspiration and how do you keep coming up with new ideas? Right now we are upstairs actually writing season 3, and we begin shooting in three weeks. It’s easy because we know everything about each other because it has been so long, like I know what really gets Sal mad and vice versa, so it makes it easy. As for our challenges we just think “what would we never want to do in public” and then we do it. What is your favorite part of the show? My favorite part is that it’s a dream job, it’s four best friends making each other laugh, and making America laugh.

What are most people’s reactions when you tell them they’re on TV? Most people are cool with it and they love it. Because it’s about us embarrassing ourselves and it’s funny. What was your worst punishment? The lie detector test because it was so embarrassing and I did not want to answer those questions. Also, a few weeks ago they made me be a nude model for an art class. I was completely naked and I had to do different poses. Plus the class had no idea it was for TV. What is your favorite punishment for the other members? A few weeks ago we snuck into Sal’s house while he was on vacation and filmed ourselves doing a bunch of crazy stuff in his house. We did a lot of things we knew he hates like playing with a cat on his bed, drinking out of the carton because he is a germaphobe, etc. Then when he was doing a presentation [about not stressing out in life] we kept showing little clips of it and he flipped out. Do you have any favorite memories? My favorite memory is from the dentist skit, when Sal reclined the guy all the way back. There have only been a few moments in my life where I have laughed that hard, my knees actually buckled from underneath me and I could not hold myself up. That one and also the foot doctor challenge. How much longer do you think you will be doing the show? Hopefully as long as we can, we love the show. We’d like to do a “Joker’s After Party” which would come on after the show and it would be kind of like a talk show, and showing of deleted scenes. We also have many other projects but you’ll have to wait and see. Make sure you stop by the Palace Theater on Saturday, October 19 and see this hilarious show! By RACHEL M. BOLTON

October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

I Can’t Believe You Watched that:

Gravity (2013) Arts Editor So who wants to go to space? Not me, especially after watching Alfonso Cuaron’s masterpiece Gravity. That is not to say that the film is bad. Gravity is an achievement in special effects and bringing science and filmmaking into a perfect blend. Gravity begins with Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) repairing the Hubble Telescope while attached to the Explorer Space shuttle. Suddenly she is forced to get away from the telescope when mission control tells her and fellow astronaut Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) to return to Explorer. A debris cloud caused by a Russian anti-satellite test missile is rapidly approaching and will collide with them. However, the debris hits before Kowalski and Stone can escape and the shuttle is destroyed, making them lose contact with mission control. The two are the only survivors of the disaster and must slowly make their way towards the International Space Station in the hopes that they can take an escape pod back to earth. But what is most freaky about Gravity is that it could happen in real life. The shuttle and technology are what we have now. The debris cloud in the film is the result of Kessler Syndrome, a dangerous and possible scientific scenario that would screw us over big time with space exploration. The scariest part of the movie was when Stone and Kowalski find what happened to the other astronaut out with them and the remains of the two who were in the shuttle.

On a lighter note, George Clooney steals all the moments he is in, acting as benevolent comic relief during the less dramatic moments. As an added bonus the voice of Huston is Ed Harris, who played Gene Krantz, the head of mission control in Ron Howard’s Apollo 13. Sandra Bullock needs some sort of an award for her performance as Dr. Ryan Stone. For most of the movie she is alone, making her the audience’s only connection to another person. Stone is a woman filled with pain after the death of her daughter. Her character gradually finds her way to strength and peace in the terrors of space. To my great joy, I did not get motion sick during the film as I feared I would. Yes, the camera moves in nontraditional angles, but they are not extreme. Many moments in the movie are filmed from the perspective of the astronaut’s helmet, giving it a “you were there, too” feel. I saw the film in 3D and it is worth it. The 3D is not pointless and adds to the dimensions of the film in a subtle way. I loved Gravity. It was the most unique and tense movie I have seen in a while. I had no idea how the film was going to end. The soundtrack was eerily wonderful and almost mimicked the atmosphere of space. If you are a fan of films such as Alien or Moon, you will enjoy this movie. Gravity is a fantastic, yet uncannily real look at what could go wrong in space, and a personal look at survival.

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October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Arts

The Chronicle

Ironside: A Cop Show That’s Trying Too Hard

By ANDY GILCHRIST Staff Writer

The most popular genre on television today is easily the cop show. Every week, fans tune in to see their favorite TV detectives, with their own quirks to make them stand out, get a new case, interview suspects, and follow a red herring or two, before finding out who the killer is and arrest them, all in 42 minutes (plus credits). Every police procedural follows this formula, making them often boring and predictable, with only the uniqueness of the characters causing viewers to tune in. The thing that makes NBC’s newest cop show Ironside different at first seems to be utterly brilliant: the lead character is in a wheelchair. With such an intriguing premise and a very talented cast, it seems like a series that can’t miss. But it does. The show tries way too hard to be like other dark and bleak crime dramas, like The Wire or The Shield. Other than Ironside himself, most of the characters come off as unlikeable, one-note anti-heroes, partially due to the focus of the show being almost entirely on Ironside himself. Though he is a compelling character, the rest of the cast and the story must be given their time if this series wants to last longer than one season. The series revolves around NYPD detective Robert Ironside (Blair Underwood), a cop shot in the line of duty and paralyzed from the waist down two years ago. After his injury, Ironside sued the NYPD after they let him go and got himself reinstated as a detective, along with being appointed commander of an elite team of cops he got to handpick. They are Holly (Spencer Grammer), the tough daughter of

a mob boss, Teddy (Neal Bledsoe), a former investment banker turned New York cop, and Virgil (Pablo Schreiber), the toughest of the bunch so far. Ironside’s team technically reports to Captain Ed Rollins (Kenneth Choi), but he has absolutely no power over Ironside’s justice-at-all-costs mentality. Finally, there’s Ironside’s expartner Gary Stanton (Brent Sexton). Before Ironside’s injury, he and Gary were best friends and New York’s toughest duo, closing cases by any means necessary. Gary was there the night Ironside was shot, but couldn’t save him. Since then, Gary lost his badge and nerve, and has descended into a life of alcoholism. After he has to bail him out of jail one night, Ironside makes it his mission to help Gary turn his life back around and become one of New York’s finest once again. The series is based on a 1960s to 70s crime drama of the same name that saw TV legend Raymond Burr, best known for playing Perry Mason, portray the disabled detective. This new series has almost nothing in common with the original, other than the name and paralysis of the lead character. Even the setting has been moved, from San Francisco to New York. Gone is Raymond Burr’s plumpish figure, always wearing a suit, replaced by Blair Underwood’s muscular, headstrong near-rogue cop, who wears a leather jacket instead of dress clothes. Underwood’s performance as Ironside is impressive. There was initial controversy over whether or not a paralyzed actor should have been hired, but since Ironside is shown walking and running in flashbacks, this was impossible. Underwood commits fully to his character, playing him as a

confrontational, clearly on-theedge detective, who is still haunted by his accident years later. Here is a man who will literally get into the backseat of a car alone with a child molester in order to find out where his latest victim is. A man who will order a hostage be shot in the leg so the shooter can be taken down. And yet, he’s still a man who will break down crying and screaming when he’s alone over the pressure of his job and his disability. As for the rest of the cast, there’s not just not enough information yet, as the audience knows almost nothing about them

after one episode. Granted, any show’s pilot episode is often light on characterization, focusing on story and action to get network execs to order more episodes, where the characters are then fleshed out. But this is ridiculous. Ironside’s entire team is described above as tough because that’s all that’s known about them so far. They don’t even have last names yet! The Holly and Teddy characters are given their defining quality in one scene and a line of dialogue, respectively. It’s so bad that Pablo Schreiber, perhaps the best actor of the three

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Blair Underwood plays paralyzed detective Ironside.

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based on recent performances on Orange is the New Black and Law & Order: SVU, is given literally nothing to do but kick in doors and mess up apartments “looking for clues” in the first episode. The show’s tone, meanwhile, is uninspired. The series wastes no time telling audiences that Ironside is New York’s toughest cop: The opening scene shows Ironside in the back of that car with the pedophile, literally punching him the face every time he refuses to give Ironside the location of the girl. But we’ve seen this done before and done better. Shows like The Sopranos and Breaking Bad gave us psychotic anti-heroes who not only did dark and evil things, but were also developed characters right from the start. Ironside’s team is merely a group of loose cannons who all unequivocally follow the philosophy of breaking the law to enforce it. Quite frankly, the writers and producers of Ironside seem to be trying to remake the pinnacle of dark cop shows, The Shield, instead of the Raymond Burr original, making it unclear as to why the property was dusted off in the first place if almost everything was going to be thrown out and replaced with a more contemporary show. NBC’s newest crime drama, Ironside, is trying to give viewers something new by putting its lead character in a wheelchair. But it’s still something we’ve seen before: the dark, troubled anti-hero leading those just like him. The series is so far off to a rocky start, with poor characterization and bland storylines. The series will need to address these problems immediately if it hopes to maintain viewers and become as respected and long-lasting as the show it claims it’s based on.


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The Chronicle

Movie Hangovers: How films are having a lasting impact on viewers By: KATIE KLIMACEK Staff Writer You are sitting in your seat as the last and final credit rolls up on the large movie screen in front of you. The lights brighten just enough for you to see your feet, and you leave the movie theater. As you walk from the dark theater out into the bright lobby, you can’t seem but to shake the feeling of the movie that you have just seen. Whether it was a romantic comedy or suspenseful thriller, you still feel like the movie is going on. For the past two hours you sat in the same seat, watching a story unfold in front of you. You watched as the man down on his luck won the lottery and the little girl battled the evil witch, and in a sense you were in that story. You felt the emotions when the character laughed or cried; you understood the motives that each person had. It was like you were a part of that story, and now that story is over, but yet you still feel like it is going on. After that final credit rolled, the story keeps on playing in your head. As defined by Urban Dictionary, a movie hangover is “Just like a book hangover, when you have finished a movie and you suddenly return to the real world, but the real world feels incomplete or

surreal because you’re still living in the world of the movie.” You know you have seen a good movie if you leave the theater with a great movie hangover. Movies were made to excite the audience and take them to a different realm. Whether it is two dimensions away on another planet, or ten years in the past, films transport you to that singular place. Movies allow you to think about things that you normally wouldn’t. And when you have a movie hangover, you are allowed to think about the story for as long as you want. You think about why the guy couldn’t have the girl and why that one had to die. In a sense, having a movie hangover almost helps you reevaluate your thoughts. It assists in bringing your wants into the forefront of your mind, and helps you find out what you really want. To a certain degree, that thought can be very liberating. Not only are you caught up in the story, but the music behind the film as well. The music in the film plays in your head for days, even weeks, after you have left the theater. Composers add that finishing touch to the film, and without their music, the films would not have that much of an impact on the audience. Some composers

are able to put together an amazing score for a film that propels the audience into an even greater state of a movie hangover. One example of a great movie score would be by Thomas Newman, for American Beauty. The film alone is fantastic; a perfect embodiment of a drama, but Newman’s score takes the film up to a spectacular level. In his score, Newman is able to bring that little something extra to the film through his composition; the music alone really makes you think about what is going on. Even after the film is over with, you can still see the story play out when you hear the score alone. If a film is able to change your life for just a small amount of time, you know you have seen a great film. In a sense, having a movie hangover is the greatest feeling in the world. You, as an audience member, are able to stay, for just a little bit longer, in the films that you love the most. You are able to make your own story and live it out the way you want it. Having that movie hangover gives you that feeling of imagination and fantasy and allows you to have a quick escape from reality, and sometimes that is all we need in our lives.

A Look Back at Strose... If you have any pictures of Saint Rose or Albany from ten years ago or before, send them in with the location and date to chronicle@strose.edu!

October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Best-selling Author Tom Clancy dead at 66 years old By SHAWN DIXON Advertising Manager Bestselling author Tom Clancy, the inventor of the “technothriller” and a prolific creator of numerous intellectual properties, died Tuesday, Oct. 1 at The John Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. With seventeen #1 New York Times bestselling novels and a number of bestselling non-fiction works, Clancy became one of the most well-known and profitable writers of his time, rivaling the likes of Stephen King in sales and name recognition. Clancy lives on with the upcoming release of a new novel on December 3, a new movie on Christmas Day, and a new video game during holiday season of next year. Clancy’s cause of death has still not been released. Tom Clancy was known for his tireless research, insider knowledge, and detailed descriptions of military tactics, spy craft, and cutting-edge technology. With plots ripped from the headlines, Clancy’s novels often were prescient to an almost alarming degree. His latest novel, Threat Vector is about Chinese cyber-attacks on the U.S. infrastructure. Threat Vector was released on December 4, 2012. Not a year later in September 2013, a report was released that determined a group of hackers in China was responsible for cyberattacks on the U.S. In one of his older novels, Debt of Honor, released in 1994, a terrorist flies a 747 into the Capital Building, eerily foreshadowing 9/11. Clancy’s first novel, The Hunt for Red October, won universal acclaim and was even praised by President Ronald Reagan. His second novel, Red Storm Rising, which is a depiction of the U.S. against Russia in World War

III, was so well researched that it became required reading at the U.S. Naval War College. Clancy’s creations and what was termed the “Ryanverse,” after his main creation and often the hero of his novels Jack Ryan, spanned nearly every medium; books, movies, video games, and board games. Jack Ryan was a U.S. Marine and CIA analyst who often found himself in over his head and must find ingenuitive ways to come out on top. The following novels were turned into movies: The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, Clear and Present Danger, and The Sum of All Fears. Jack Ryan has been portrayed by Alec Baldwin, Harrison Ford, and Ben Affleck, respectively. In the upcoming movie Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit, the eponymous hero is to be portrayed by actor Chris Pine, of recent Captain Kirk fame. It is the first movie based on Tom Clancy’s character since the The Sum of All Fears in 2002. If the reboot does well, it will launch a new series of Jack Ryan movies. Another Jack Ryan novel, titled Command Authority, debuts in hardcover on December 3. The movie, Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit premieres in movie theatres this upcoming Christmas Day. The newest video game based on his ideas is “Tom Clancy’s The Division” and will be released holiday season of next year. As someone who has nearly every one of Tom Clancy’s works on my shelves, I highly recommend diving into the “Ryanverse” he created. Though Tom Clancy will be sorely missed by millions of fans, his legacy lives on in his upcoming works, and all future works based in the rich world he created.


October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Kimmel-Kanye Feud: Does Host Get the Best of West? By KAYLYNN DAY Staff Writer To no one’s surprise, the infamous Mr. West topped entertainment news headlines once again for one of his outlandish public outbursts. This time, Kanye’s rant was directed at comedian and host of his own late night TV show, Jimmy Kimmel. Kanye had some very interesting words for Kimmel after he premiered a spoof of an interview West had conducted with BBC Radio only days before. After Kanye learned of the parody, he went on a late night Twitter rant to let his 9 million plus followers know his take on the issue. Using all capital letters, some occasional profanity and even a couple memes, West took a shot at Kimmel’s looks, talent, and even made some comments about his family. One of the most memorable out of Kanye’s dozen tweets was when he decided it was a perfect opportunity to bring up Jimmy Kimmel’s ex-girlfriend comedian Sarah Silverman. And as if bringing up an ex-girlfriend wasn’t enough to humiliate Jimmy, Kanye threw salt in his wounds by letting it be known that Silverman is indeed much funnier than Kimmel, and that we all see it. Kanye tweeted “SARAH SILVERMAN IS A THOUSAND TIMES FUNNIER THAN YOU AND THE WHOLE WORLD KNOWS IT!!!” Jimmy Kimmel took the stage on his late night show the same night Kanye began his outburst and spoke on the issue. Kanye West made a personal phone call to Kimmel an hour before his show started and asked him to publically apologize for belittling his interview. West told Kimmel “Your life is going to be much better if you apologize.” During the one-on-one phone call, Kimmel claims Kanye referred to himself as “the most powerful voice in media.” To me, it seems Kanye, or “Yeezus,” as he

likes to be called, is taking this whole “I am a God” thing to another level. Kanye was obviously very angry over the situation, but Jimmy Kimmel, on the other hand, laughed the entire thing off. The real question at hand is why exactly is Kanye West so mad? I mean Kimmel really did nothing to Kanye personally. He was only doing his job, which is to be funny! Kanye’s reason for his obnoxious Twitter rant? He believes his BBC interview was in his words, “the first honest piece of media in years.” He tweeted “JIMMY KIMMEL IS OUT OF LINE TO TRY AND SPOOF IN ANY WAY THE FIRST PIECE OF HONEST MEDIA IN YEARS.” Kimmel, like the rest of us is very unsure as to why the spoof bothered Kanye as much as it did. The child who played the role of Kanye West said the exact same things that Kanye did in the interview. But comparing Kanye to a child was what made the entire thing funny and probably what pushed him over the edge. After it was all said and done, West’s tweets were later deleted and the media focused on much more important things than one rappers anger over a minute long comedy parody. So, was Kanye’s outburst a publicity stunt or just Kanye being…well…Kanye? I think it’s safe to say that Kanye West will forever take to public forms to express his opinion on things that we honestly could care less about, hence the 2009 MTV VMA’s incident. But we have to appreciate Kanye’s ambition to be a front runner in not only music, but everything he finds valuable of his time. All he wants is for his ideas and opinions to be heard, even if he goes about it the wrong way. I’m sure it won’t be long before Yeezy is back at it again, making more outrageous public statements and shifting all eyes in his direction. You can contact the author at dayk737@strose.edu.

Opinion

The Chronicle

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Federal Government Shutdown: Who Blinks First, and When?

By NICHOLAS NEGRON Staff Writer The government shut down on Oct. 1, 2013. Previous shutdowns were in 1995 and 1996. They lasted a total of 27 days. The government’s current shutdown is because Congress failed to pass a spending bill. This is their sole duty in the Constitution. When the budget is not passed, all government programs deemed non essential become dormant. An estimated 800,000 federal employees will stay at home until this conflict is resolved. A percentage of workers in the Department of Commerce, Education, Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and more will be asked to stay home. Even 14 percent of the Department of Homeland Security will not be working during the shutdown. Military protection, postal services, and social securities are examples of government agencies that remain working. 3.3 million workers are left working for the time being. The government fiscal year runs from Oct. 1 to Sep. 30. The stall is because Republicans are fighting on mending the budget. This would include measures to defund or lessen “Obamacare,” for lack of a better term. The Democrats are fighting to keep their budget. This shutdown does not affect Obamacare. “Most of the money for Obamacare comes from new taxes and fees, as well as from cost cuts to other programs like Medicare and other types of funding that will continue despite the government shutdown” writes Holly Yan of CNN. Health care is seen as an essential. Medicare, Medicaid and other medical related funding and programs will not be shutdown. Unfortunately, the National Institutes of Health was forced to

suspend clinical trials for patients who have cancer. The Head Start Program under the Department of Health and Human Services has been suspended. This program supports preschool and other services for young children. “The health care law isn't directly tied to funding the government, but it's being used as a bargaining chip. A group of Republicans, led by freshman Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, believe the President's signature domestic policy achievement is so bad for the country that it is worth dis-

Republicans and Democrats feel they need to be extremem in order to keep thier rules and regulations in place. rupting government funding to undercut it,” continues Yan. So far, the only thing House and Senate have agreed on is legislation Sep. 30 to keep paying troops, should there be a shutdown. This government pause does not come cheaply. Estimates show a $55 billion cost to the economy should the shutdown last three to four weeks. The media has turned the shutdown into a blame game. President Obama has been blamed. Speaker of the House John Boehner is also being criticized for this. “Many people in Congress

...believe that the President treats them with contempt and so the atmosphere for negotiating is not very good,” says Bob Walker, a Republican, former House member, to CBS News. When America hears the words “government shutdown,” right away, people go into a panic. They imagine riots, and anarchy. They think of no police or protection. People make witty Facebook posts and tweets about the country being a free-for-all. Republicans and Democrats are becoming more extreme in their views and more ignorant in negotiations. They feel they need to do so in order to keep their rules and regulations in place. The 80’s and 90’s saw more moderate presidents. Of course, there was the usual political scuffle, however, the country managed to get more things accomplished than it is now. There are strong feelings on both sides of the political spectrum. Instead of a country united, we are a country in red and blue. We are a country that wants our way or no way. We do not want to look at the other color unless it is absolutely required. America did not listen to George Washington’s advice. He wanted us to not become involved in political parties. Washington knew it would divide America, and it has. One result of this lack of mediation between the two parties just happens to be the shutdown of the federal government. It is unfortunate on both sides. Hopefully, Congress can balance the budget quickly. If experts are right, the economy cannot be put through another government shutdown.

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The Chronicle

Opinion

October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Pasta Maker’s Anti-Gay Comments Draw Scrutiny By ZACHARY OLSAVICKY Opinion Editor

Few things bring a smile to my face like business people who don’t know when to shut up. The more you know about their personal beliefs, the better you can gauge if you want to support their business. Maybe they treat workers poorly, like Wal-Mart, or are anti-gay, like Chick-Fil-A, or are

Anti-gay arguments rest on the notion that ‘traditional’ family values will be damaged by gay couples. Does any credible example exist? just pure evil, like the New York Yankees; I won’t spend money on businesses I consider unethical. The latest business to make a splash for its ignorance is Barilla pasta. In an interview for Italian radio program Radio 24, company president Guido Barilla said gay families would not be in their commercials because they support the “traditional family.” He encouraged gay families to buy another brand of pasta. I’m amused by the “tradition

al family” angle tossed around when discussing LGBTQ rights. I support traditional families; I grew up, as many people do, in a household with two heterosexual parents. And while I disliked some core components of traditional families as a child, like making my bed and the whole ‘listening to my parents’ thing, I have a soft spot in my heart for things like family dinners, going on vacations, and yelling at the TV when Republicans say stupid things on Rachel Maddow. Of course, none of those things are under any threat from gay parents; in fact, LGBTQ parents could perform all of those ‘traditional’ family activities just as well as heterosexual parents. To a degree, the kind of statement made by Barilla is becoming old hat. As LGBTQ rights begin to take stride, and roadblocks to opposition continue to fall for the most part, these statements become less credible; what once was an expression of frustration over how slow LGBTQ rights were advancing now elicits mockery and dismissal. But that’s not going to stop people like Barilla, who seem to think their social commentary has the influence to change consumer habits. Honestly, it boggles my mind as to why people make these kinds of statements; they only put businesses on the wrong side of history. If Barilla’s initial statement looks bad, his response was even worse. When the statement was

Will this pasta be welcome in fewer pantries? criticized, Barilla the executive pulled off a double whammy of insults by saying the ads are designed to focus on a mother’s “central role” in the family. I’m beginning to wonder if his brain wasn’t placed in a time capsule for 50 years and recently re-inserted in his body; the ‘women belong in the kitchen’ notion has been mocked and parodied into oblivion. I’m not sure what comes next: Barilla insisting that black people can’t play sports, or saying cigarettes are good for your health. Actually, Barilla’s next statement was more bizarre than the first two: in the interview, he went

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on to criticize gay adoption, saying he had “no respect” for allowing gay families to adopt because it “concerns a person who is not able to choose.” Unless he has no respect for adoption by heterosexual parents, his argument goes flying off the tracks by this point, as children have no more or less of a say when they’re adopted by a straight couple. Making matters even more confusing is Barilla voicing support for gay marriage in Italy, which is currently not allowed. There’s a logical step missing here—how are two people allowed to marry but not have children? Barilla might as well support gay marriage while opposing gay couples from driving. Barilla’s argument comes off as a mess, but this isn’t much of a surprise. Clichéd as it is, love makes things complicated, including arguments against love. Trying to put down two parents because they don’t fit traditional gender roles is silly; he would be more adept to criticize how economic conditions call for two working parents, giving them less time to spend with their children. The only silver lining is that peo-

ZACHARY OLSAVICKY

ple like Barilla are on the down and out, and as barriers are broken down as time passes, people of his mindset will no longer be part of the conversation. On the consumer end, a boycott of Barilla pasta is the ideal, but it’ll be more difficult than it sounds. Case in point, Barilla is my family’s go-to pasta, and I’m partial to making pasta dishes. This sounds like it should be an easy switch, but shopping habits die hard, and as long as it’s the cheapest at BJ’s Wholesale, it’s gonna be what’s on the table. Don’t be surprised if the same thing happens with most families; while people are socially conscious, they’re also cost-conscious. Barilla’s statements underscore the importance of not being discriminatory in the marketplace. Had he kept his mouth shut, people likely would not know the wiser and Saint Rose students wouldn’t be reading a column about anti-gay pasta, or whatever. Regardless of your views on gay marriage, I think there is common ground in hoping that the CEO of Chipotle Mexican Grill never says anything like this.


October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

Sports

The Chronicle

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Game Day, From Saturday to Sunday By TORI ADDISON Staff Writer As a Cowboys fan, I was both flabbergasted, and extremely annoyed, at how remarkable the Philadelphia Eagle’s offense looked under Chip Kelly on their first drive of the season versus the Washington Redskins. Kelly’s memorable hurry-up, no huddle offense he implemented in Oregon when he coached for the Ducks last season was being executed not only successfully at the NFL level, but also at an astonishing speed. The Eagles, however, continued to disappoint, as always, as the weeks rolled on. Simply put, their defense cannot keep up with their offense and their offense cannot perform in the red zone. Was it too soon for Kelly to move to the pros or are the Eagles just blowing their

season, as usual? This far into the season, nothing can be determined, but Kelly is not the only coach who has had to make the decision to move upwards in the ranks. Not all college coaches who go professional have a happy-go-lucky experience, although some fortunately do. Nick Saban is the man, myth, and legend when it comes to coaching college football. He holds an all time record of 16355-1 and is the only coach in the history of college football to win three BCS Championships. But, believe it or not, Nick Saban is not NFL coaching material. Saban’s brief stint away from the collegiate level occurred when he accepted the head-coaching position for the Miami Dolphins. It’s not that the Dolphins were bad; it is just that they were not very good either. His team had

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Nick Saban belongs in college football, not the NFL.

more loses than wins during the two seasons he was in Miami. To make things worse, Saban experienced his first losing season as a head coach in 2006 when the Dolphins went 6-10. I will give Saban some credit, as the 2006 seasons’ failure was in part due to the loss of quarterback Daunte Culpepper. Luckily, Saban accepted the job as head coach for the Alabama Crimson Tide and has been taking names ever since. Jim Harbaugh knows all about quarterback troubles and how they can unexpectedly lead to triumph. Thanks to Harbaugh, America now knows the beloved art of “Kaepernicking” and also what it is like to watch two brothers go head to head in the Super Bowl. Before Harbaugh led the San Francisco 49ers to become NFC Champions last season, he was coaching college ball at Stanford. Interestingly enough, he coached Andrew Luck, who would go on to become the Indianapolis Colt’s first round draft pick in 2012. Harbaugh had a decent four-year run while at the collegiate level, holding a record of 29-21 and earning the program two bowl wins. He stepped in as the 49ers head coach in 2011 and he has shown steady progress since his arrival. San Francisco has been to the playoffs each season since Harbaugh has started coaching and has also made a Super Bowl appearance. Despite their so-so start this season, I have no doubt that the 49ers will continue to flourish under Harbaugh. Not all coaches can be as great as Harbaugh; in fact, some can prove to be much worse. Yes, I am talking about Mike Riley. Unfortunately, he can’t even claim success at the collegiate level, let alone the professional. He led Oregon State to two losing seasons his first time around, but would eventually return after an epic failed attempt at coaching in the NFL. Riley would sign a five year deal with the San Diego Chargers, but would only end

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Jim Harbaugh has had success at both the collegiate and pro levels. up lasting three of them. His all time record is one to gawk at, 1434 and that is counting the 2001 season where the Chargers went 1-15. Luckily for Chargers fans, Riley was booted out of San Diego and is back at Oregon State, performing slightly better than he did initially. When I think of iconic American football coaches, I always think of Jimmy Johnson. He not only won a championship at the collegiate level, but also multiple at the professional level. His run with the Miami Hurricanes is his most well-known from his experience coaching college football. Johnson earned the Canes a national championship in 1987 with wide receiver Michael Irvin, who he would later be reunited with when he moved to Dallas. His overall record for the four sea-

sons he coached at Miami was an astonishing 52-9. To clarify, he had a total of nine losses during four seasons. He was untouchable even when he reached the NFL as the Dallas Cowboys’ head coach. The first season he coached the team ended with a record of 1-15. However, circumstances changed quickly as the Cowboys would go on to win two Super Bowls in the four seasons that Johnson was there. Unfortunately, a fall out between Johnson and Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones would force the two to go their separate ways. Despite his early departure from coaching what could have been one of history’s biggest dynasties, it is safe to say that Jimmy Johnson will always remain a legacy. Jimmy may be one of the best collegiate coaches to go pro, but he will also not be the last.


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The Chronicle

Sports

October 8th, 2013

Volume 82 Issue 8

that had a bit too much mustard on it which sailed right around the far post fifteen minutes into the contest. Scrambling to come up with points after Merrimack’s lone goal, sophomore Tyler Pomakoy tried to head home a shot which was blocked but found its way to senior forward Juan Garzon who also tried to connect on a header but was sent over the crossbar by Silva who just did not let up between the posts on

his way to his third shutout of the year. Next up on the docket, both teams head on the road for 7:00 p.m. road contests Wednesday. The Golden Knights will engage in some non-conference play against the Roberts Wesleyan Redhawks in Rochester, New York, while Merrimack heads to Manchester, New Hampshire to face the Penman of Southern New Hampshire University.

Golden Knights Lose by One for Fourth Time

TOM KILLIPS

The College of Saint Rose Golden Knights were upended by Merrimack Saturday 1-0. By JOSHUA NATOLI Sports Editor The College of Saint Rose Men’s Soccer team suffered another heartbreaking setback this past Saturday. This time, the killing blow came from the Merrimack Warriors in the 72nd minute of a Northeat-10 Conference matchup at Sullivan Field at the Plumeri Sports Complex. One goal was all it took to propel the Warriors over the Golden Knights 1-0. The date marked the fourth time this season that the Golden Knights (3-6/1-5 NE-10) had lost by just one goal. The gears were

turning for Saint Rose but they just could not get anything going against Merrimack, (7-2/51 NE-10) who generated a shot advantage of 16-9 along with a four to four split in shots-on-goal on their way to a seventh win in eight contests. Warriors’ freshman midfielder Joseph Briers headed in his second goal of the season, which turned out to be the game-winning strike after Merrimack put the ball in play during one of their 18 resets. The goal came after sophomore back Ronald Reid drove the ball from the right flank which deflected off of sophomore midfielder Augusto Silva’s head

then found its way onto Briers’ for the finish. Reid was credited with the assist. Keepers on both ends of the field got in their share of work as well. Freshman keeper Christian Esposito of the Golden Knights controlled his side of the pitch with three saves. On Merrimack’s end, junior keeper Jose Silva held onto four saves which shut out Saint Rose. Missed opportunities were the story of the game for the Golden Knights. Saint Rose came across a few chances to put points on the board but ultimately came up short. Sophomore midfielder Nick Iuorno just missed a shot

Christian Esposito ended his day with three saves.

TOM KILLIPS

The Saint Rose Chronicle  

Week of October 8 2013

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