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THE ROEPER SCHOOL COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

Keeping In Touch

EDUCATING THE WHOLE CHILD: Play, Passion & Purpose VOLUME 6: 4 SPRING 2013


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TABLE OF CONTENTS David Feldman Head of School david.feldman@roeper.org Denita Banks-Sims Director of Development denita.banks-sims@roeper.org Keeping in Touch Editorial Committee Katie Buchmann Editor Bonnie Schemm Art Director Contributors Laura Ambrose Lisa Baker Denita Banks-Sims Cecilia Cousins David Feldman Jeffrey Fox Daria Hurley Peyton Kinchen Jason McIntosh Emery Pence Linda Pence Laurel Robinson Marcia Ruff Bo Schloff Beth Schulman Colleen Shelton Dan Thibodeau Joshua Vens

The Roeper School 41190 Woodward Avenue Bloomfield Hills Michigan 48304 248/203.7300 www.roeper.org

Features

EDUCATING THE WHOLE CHILD . David Feldman, Head of School

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WHAT MAKES ROEPER UNIQUE? . . . . Lower, Middle & Upper School Students

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PLAY, PASSION & PURPOSE BEGINS IN STAGE I Bo Schloff, Stage I Student

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SENIOR PROJECTS . . . . . . Lisa Baker, Upper School Director

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TRYING NEW THINGS . . . . . . . . Laura Ambrose, Lower School Band Director

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A WELL-ROUNDED EDUCATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jason McIntosh, Department Chair, Fine Arts & M/US Band Director “CRITTER” CARE . . . . . . . . . . Linda Pence, Middle School Science Teacher

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class notes . . . . . . . . . . . Emery Pence, Alumni Relations Coordinator Katie Buchmann, Editor ALUMNI PHOTO GALLERY . . . . . An Engagement, A Wedding & Babies!

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PARTING THOUGHTS . . . . . . . . Denita Banks-Sims, Director of Development

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FRONT COVER ART (acrylic on board) by Lainy Lesnau, Grade 8

The Roeper School is an independent coeducational day school for gifted and talented children preschool through grade 12 and an equal-opportunity institution

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David Feldman Head of School

Educating the Whole Child

In talking with prospective families during Admissions’ open houses, I often find myself saying, “What makes The Roeper School unique is our focus on the whole child.” As I reflect on my use of language, I am reminded that the phrase, “whole child,” might seem like education-speak to someone outside the world of schools. After all, don’t all schools teach the whole child? When parents drop their children off in the morning, aren’t they sending whole children into the building to be educated? It’s not as though families only send fractions of young people into the classroom — right? Oddly enough, the answer may surprise you — indeed most schools would share that they have a very specific, and arguably, narrow focus when it comes to educating children.

But what if, as John Dewey wrote, “Education is not a preparation for life, but life itself?” What if, as George and Annemarie Roeper said, when asked about the guiding principles for running their school, “Ours is a philosophy for life”? If education is more than preparation, if education is about enriching our lives and helping us develop the tools to make a better world for all of us, then our focus and obligations as teachers must go beyond merely educating children about reading and computational mathematics. In educating the whole child we are certainly developing our students’ cognitive abilities, and of course we are preparing our students for college. As George Roeper wrote, “This is a matter of course. But I consider preparation for college as half of our job. We also want to help our students to be amply prepared for this world in a social and

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The richness of the academic program, the personalized relationship students have with teachers, the opportunity to learn to work collaboratively as part of a larger group or team, empowering students to have a voice in decision making, using our words to debate, argue and discuss issues, problem-solving, critical thinking, taking responsibility for your actions, respect for all, active listening, helping to build a sense of empathy — each of these concepts is at the core of The Roeper School program, and exemplify what it means to teach the whole child. This is more than the value added of a Roeper education, it is the heart of a Roeper education. Why do children love coming to school? What makes them eager to be on campus at extended hours and weekends? Our students have a deep affection for The Roeper School because they have a sense of belonging, a feeling of ownership for their learning. This is a community that treats its members as whole beings and values what they have to say. There is a basic understanding that with the significant rights granted our students come equally significant responsibilities. You want to be on an athletic team? We have a no cut policy — you’re on the team, but you are responsible to your coach and your teammates to keep your commitment to be at practice and at games, to keep up with your schoolwork, and carry the sportsmanship we expect from you on the playing field into the classroom and hallways of the school.

BOBBY ALCOTT

When we talk about educating the whole child at Roeper, we are referring not just to the academic needs of a student, but also the social, emotional and physical needs that young people have as they mature. Historically, schools have focused on developing academic skills, and in recent years with the larger emphasis on standardized test taking as a measurement of success, that focus has been further narrowed to specific reading and mathematical skills. The purpose of school was preparation for a next step, a next grade, a next division, a job, or for those academically able — college. School has been viewed, in a very mechanical way, as a step-by-step preparation for joining the work force.

human sense. We want our youth to have values, to understand their values, and to help them uphold their values.” This model of teaching and learning is more significant than what can be tested for on any standardized test. The goals George describes go well beyond what many independent college preparatory schools post as their mission. “Ours is a philosophy of life,” and we are therefore concerned with the richness and quality of that life as well as the impact each of us makes on the world — our interdependence, as Annemarie would describe it.

Our willingness to see play as part of learning; to bring passion and honor the passion of our students; and to see our work as having a greater purpose than merely preparing for the next stage is what separates our school from others.


You want to be in the play? We have lots of roles for actors and technicians — you will have a place in our production, but you have a responsibility to attend rehearsals and performances, to meet deadlines and to work collaboratively as part of the company.

Play, Passion and Purpose? These are ideas that don’t need to be reimagined in our school’s philosophy; they have existed, been implemented, and yielded powerful results at The Roeper School since 1941.

You want to study a course we don’t offer, play an instrument we don’t teach, or start an activity we don’t have? Let’s problem solve and find a way to make it happen; we’ll help with the resources to meet your interest, but you have the responsibility to put in the time — sometimes independently — to make the activity work. We know gifted students often have emotional intensities and a strong desire to control their own learning, and so as the educators in the community, we must offer a program that is responsive to these traits. To ignore these characteristics of our students is to ignore who they are as people. Schools often struggle with the question of whether they are content-centered or student-centered. In other words, what drives decision-making, what we teach or whom we are teaching? In a world where content is changing so rapidly that freshman science textbooks can be out of date before a student graduates, shouldn’t we be focusing on the skills children will need to problem solve, think critically, and work collaboratively? Speaking to Thomas Friedman of the New York Times, Harvard Professor Tony Wagner wrote, “Today, because knowledge is available on every Internetconnected device, what you know matters far less than what you can do with what you know. The capacity to innovate — the ability to solve problems creatively or bring new possibilities to life — and skills like critical thinking, communication and collaboration are far more important than academic knowledge. As one executive told me, ‘We can teach new hires the content, and we will have to because it continues to change, but we can’t teach them how to think — to ask the right questions — and to take initiative.’

“We teach and test things most students have no interest in and will never need, and facts that they can Google and will forget as soon as the test is over,” said Wagner. “Because of this, the longer kids are in school, the less motivated they become. Gallup’s recent survey showed student engagement going from 80% in fifth grade to 40% in high school. More than a century ago, we ‘reinvented’ the one-room schoolhouse and created factory schools for the industrial economy. Reimagining schools for the 21st Century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” Play, Passion and Purpose? These are ideas that don’t need to be reimagined in our school’s philosophy; they have existed, been implemented, and yielded powerful results at The Roeper School since 1941. Our alumni’s preparation for life began with these concepts back in Stage I. Teaching to the whole child is an understanding that learning is organic, not mechanical. Children are more than machines to be filled with information; they bring into the classroom the emotional challenges that fill their lives; they come to school trying to manage friendships and relationships. They are growing and maturing with physical needs: to have good nutrition, proper rest, and to be active. To ignore these components of human life by only valuing testable content knowledge is to close our eyes to what it means to be human. Our willingness to see play as part of learning; to bring passion and honor the passion of our students; and to see our work as having a greater purpose than merely preparing for the next stage is what separates our school from others. It’s so interesting to see education reformers, business people, and reporters return to the timeless traits of our philosophy, and the understanding that children are indeed whole people. f

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what makes roeper unique?

NICK PUDAR

Peyton Kinchen – 8th Grade My experience at Roeper has been AMAZING! I remember taking my math placement test. Who would have thought that the girl I was sitting next to would become one of my best friends? Since my first day of 6th Grade I have felt welcomed by everyone — the administration, teachers and students. I really enjoy learning in an environment that embraces and inspires everything I do. The Roeper community has also taught me to appreciate differences — in others and in myself.

Roeper has been a second home to me. I have always felt close to my classmates and teachers because of the emphasis on community and equality. Roeper has educated me well with excellent courses taught by the best teachers who truly care about development and education. Roeper has offered me a huge amount of opportunity in every field. I have been able to play many sports with success as well as being involved in plays and my own academic endeavors. I believe that this is what Roeper has that is most special: immense opportunity to participate in everything and find what you enjoy.

Beth Schulman – 7th Grade

DOUG ELBINGER

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Jeffrey Fox – 11th Grade I have been going to Roeper since before I can remember. Roeper has been a place for me to become whoever I want. Each and every passion of mine is just as important to me as any other, and Roeper has allowed me to amplify and explore all of them. In Middle School I was able to run cross country, play basketball, be in the musical, act in forensics, sing at Solo and Ensemble, run track, play in concert and jazz band, sing in choir, and

DOUG ELBINGER

What makes Roeper so unique is the fact that there are so many things you can do. For example, you can do many sports such as volleyball, baseball, basketball and soccer! Also, you can be in the play or do forensics. What is also great about Roeper is that we have a fantastic art program where you can make sculptures and work with clay and paint. Plus, you can also do choir! That is what makes Roeper so unique!

A group of students was asked to tell us what makes Roeper unique. Here’s what they said …

I believe that this is what Roeper has that is most special: immense opportunity to participate in everything and find what you enjoy. —Dan

There are tons of extracurricular opportunities for Roeper students, and I sure have tried a few, from Volleyball, Basketball, Soccer, Theater and Archery! I couldn’t imagine attending any other school, and I am looking forward to the next four years!

Joshua Vens – Stage IV I have been playing soccer at Roeper since I was in Stage II. My team is really special to me because the coaches don’t push you too hard; they are like friends, and they always give you compliments. My teammates are also my friends, and they don’t say, “Why didn’t you do this, you should have done that.” They say, “Nice job, nice try, or maybe you could have done this instead.” It’s fun just playing with each other, and we play better as a team because we trust each other and know we won’t be criticized. It’s great to be at a school where you can be who you want to be and do what you want to do and have your friends support you no matter what.

DOUG ELBINGER

Dan Thibodeau – 12th Grade

It’s great to be at a school where you can be who you want to be and do what you want to do … — Joshua I really enjoy learning in an environment that embraces and inspires everything I do. — Peyton


Jeffrey Fox in his role as Chip in RTC’s fall production of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee PHOTO BY WENDY FOX

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What makes Roeper so unique is the fact that there are so many things you can do. — Beth

Roeper accommodates every student’s needs. — Laurel

I would not be the performer I am today without being an athlete, and I would not be the athlete I am today without being a performer. I am so thankful for the opportunities this place has given me, and I will never forget what that has done for me. I am allowed to be the singing, acting, dancing kid and also be the running, jumping, shooting kid at the same time, and it just is. No one tells me I can’t do that, and everyone embraces it; everyone knows I love both and doesn’t think twice about it. I can be the kid playing the clarinet during the day, and then after school I can be the kid jumping over the hurdles, and it just is. No one tells me I can’t do that and everyone embraces it; everyone knows I love both and doesn’t think twice about it. Roeper is truly an incredible place where I have been able to become anyone I want, and that’s pretty cool. Thank you, Roeper, for allowing me to be me.

Laurel Robinson – 9th Grade The most amazing thing about Roeper is that you can do anything you want — participate in any activities that you want. The best part about that is that you don’t have to “audition” or “try out” for anything; you just say that you want to do it, and you can.

DOUG ELBINGER

I am allowed to be the singing, acting, dancing kid and also be the running, jumping, shooting kid at the same time, and it just is. No one tells me I can’t do that, and everyone embraces it … — Jeffrey

be a student all at the same time. It was a struggle for me, but it taught me a lot about time management. Now, being a junior in high school, things have gotten a little busier, but I still am able to be involved in almost all of those. I have always been the kid with a thousand different interests and never knowing how to just pick one and go with it. I have always had to try everything just to see if it was for me. Roeper made it possible for me to be a theatre kid and an athlete. I really cannot imagine how different my life would be without that opportunity to be both. The importance of teamwork, the feeling of group accomplishment, learning to work as hard as I can to get what I want, and never stop playing until the buzzer goes off — I have taken all of these lessons and applied them to everything in my life. I will be auditioning for musical theatre programs in universities across the country next winter, and if I had been limited to just being an athlete, I really don’t think I would be going off to audition next winter to work for my dream life. If I had been limited to just being an athlete, I would have never known the other side of me. Theatre has changed my life, and Roeper is so much a part of that life. The experiences I have had in my shows at Roeper are experiences I would never trade for anything in life. The Roeper Theatre Company has shaped me into the person I am today; I have become who I am today on that black stage. The amount of myself I have to give on that stage is massive. When I stand there, throw my hands in the air and belt the loudest note I can, it takes a lot of me to do, and it takes a lot of courage. I have to get past the fear of completely blowing the note and just let it out. That sense of no fear and freeness is an essential experience that I use in my sports each and every practice and game. I can’t be scared to shoot the ball and miss it; I can’t be afraid to jump over that hurdle and knock it over because the only way I will make it is if I just let go and put all of myself into it. Every moment has to be treated like the most important moment, and then I am bound for success. These different experiences are experiences I would never have without Roeper.

I play violin, so I’m in the orchestra. I love that because I didn’t have to try out to get in or anything like that. It’s the same with Choir. I really like to sing, but I’m not the best, but that doesn’t matter because the teachers at Roeper don’t care if you’re the most amazing soprano they’ve ever heard; they just care that you enjoy doing it. Roeper accommodates every student’s needs. If you’re in the play, then they work around the schedule of the play to work things out better for you so that you will still have the same chance of

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getting a lead role in a play as someone who has a completely free schedule. I know at other schools if you can’t come to rehearsals, then you’re part of the background singers, and that isn’t fair. Roeper lets me express myself through music because if I want to sing a solo in choir, I can have one because I have the passion and drive to do so. The main thing that makes Roeper so special is the teachers, and Roeper would be a completely different school if we didn’t have them.

Last year I played MS Girls soccer as a 5th grader. They needed more players so they asked me to help, and I am so glad they did because the girls I played with were so nice, and understood that I was younger than they were and really helped include me. Everyday when I woke I was excited for practice after school because we had so much fun, and they didn’t get mad at me when I made a mistake. We never did win a game, but those girls had spirit that I have never seen before. We had practice on my birthday, and once I got off the bus and walked to the field they all shouted, “Happy Birthday!” and after practice we ate doughnuts that they had bought from Kroger. I was so shocked because these girls that I didn’t really know had gotten me a present! At one of our games I took a free kick from outside the 18 yard box, and it went in right over the goalie’s head, and all the girls swarmed me chanting my name and giving

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Daria Hurley – 9th Grade DOUG ELBINGER

Cecilia Cousins – 6th Grade

me high fives, which was really special given the fact that we had never even scored a goal before. And at our end-of-season party Michelle Ratchford and Maha Hashwi brought out a trophy that read “Cecilia Only Goal Cousins.” It was the best experience playing with them, and a memory that I will never forget.

Roeper is very unique. The tight-knit community really lets people express themselves and be who they really are. Roeper is a very small school, so you can become really close with your teammates and classmates, whereas at other schools you barely know everyone’s name. With being so close to people and knowing them so well it allows people at Roeper not to be defined by what extracurricular they do and how they look because you really know everyone. Also at Roeper there is such a wide variety of clubs and the flexibility of coaches is rare to see in schools because at Roeper people want to do a lot and are able to. Just last year when I was in Middle School I played basketball, did forensics and the play all at one time and still had time for homework. Roeper is also unique in the way that if you really want to change something or talk to someone who will try to change something that you don’t like or think should really be changed about the school there is always someone who wants to listen like the Head of School, Middle or Upper School Director, Student Government or even your classmates. Things such as the no homework day started with ideas that students had and is now applied and greatly appreciated. F

Last year I played MS Girls soccer as a 5th grader. They needed more players so they asked me to help, and I am so glad they did because the girls I played with were so nice, and understood that I was younger than they were and really helped include me. — Cecilia The tight-knit community really lets people express themselves and be who they really are. ­— Daria


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Bo Schloff

Stage I Student

PLAY, PASSION & PURPOSE BEGINS IN STAGE I

DOUG ELBINGER

Bo Schloff is a Stage I student in Colleen and Nicole’s class who is wildly in love with all things mechanical — ceiling fans, lawnmowers, edgers, sinks and toilets — you name it. He can imitate exactly the sound of a lawnmower versus an edger, or the start-up sound depending on whether you pull a cord or push a button. His favorite toy to carry is a (new and clean, we assure you) plunger. When it came time to make a class project for the auction, his passion supplied the inspiration. Colleen painted a canvas black, and the students dipped plungers into different colors of acrylic paint to make a pattern of circles all over the canvas. Naturally, Ray and Ryan on the Maintenance staff are like gods to Bo — men who get to work with these marvelous tools and devices all day long. Learning of Bo’s fascination, Ray and Ryan stop by the Stage I class to take him along whenever they have to fix something in Hill House. Bo even set up a phone on the window-sill, protected by a wall of blocks, like his very own “Batphone.” Of course, when Colleen asked him if he talks to Ray on the phone, Bo looked at her with a pitying look and gently informed her, “Colleen, it’s not a real phone.” One day, while Bo was drawing photos of lawnmowers and chattering about Ray and Ryan, Colleen asked him if he’d like to write a story about them. So Bo dictated this charming story that we’d like to share with you here.

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Lisa Baker

Upper School Director

SENIOR PROJECTS

Over the last six years I have watched as our scientists became wood workers, our community activists built boats, our athletes created music and film, and our artists wrote novellas and challenged social convention. These students take a leap of faith. They take a risk to say, “This idea and these questions are important to me. I want to take this journey — I will build my own road map.” While attending Lauren Walkiewicz’s ’09 senior art show at the University of Michigan, I saw a number of Roeper alums. When I asked what their senior projects had meant for them, Tom Hickey ’08, who went on to win the Hopwood Award at

Michigan last year said, “Doing my project gave me confidence to take on the next project.” He also observed, “And participating in the festival wasn’t even about my project. It was being a part of a night where Ali Van Overbeeke ’08 did a fashion show and Ned Baker ’08 presented an original play based on Edgar Allen Poe. Then we went upstairs to eat great food prepared by David Lauer ’08 while admiring artwork by Nick Hurwitz-Goodwin ’08. We were all in it together.” For some students, these projects mark the beginnings of what may be their life’s work. Jake Mickley ’08 is pursuing a career as an elementary school teacher. Carter “Cartier” Sims ’10 is finding increasing success in the world of video and music. Liam Kirby ’09 continues to push the bounds of the art world and to do what his professors describe as “doctorate level work” at the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto, while his sister Emma ’12 is recognized as one of the most outstanding writers at Sara Lawrence College. For others like Andrew Romano ’11, the project was a chance to learn something new and to follow an interest and passion outside his everyday school experience. Ultimately, we want our graduates to make the most of their gifts, to be unfettered, and to participate positively in the larger community. Senior Projects allow our students to practice the skills they will need to pursue a full life beyond school. Building confidence and camaraderie are at the center of a Roeper education, and when you attend the GAR Festival of Senior Projects you leave energized and filled with hope — our students are inspiring! F

DOUG ELBINGER

This year our community gathered at the end of May to celebrate the 6th Annual George A. Roeper Senior Project Festival. Over the course of two nights, more than one-third of the class of 2013 presented their individual projects. In most schools, seniors are required to do a project, and frequently projects are a stopgap measure to occupy rather than inspire seniors in the spring, following AP exams. At Roeper we take a different approach. Roeper seniors choose to explore an idea or concept deeply and consider their projects a capstone experience — without it, their Roeper education would be incomplete. Some spend a semester, others a full year exploring and developing their project around central questions that are theirs alone. Projects range from oneact plays to 100-page history papers. Students build and design; they organize and strategize; they create and inspire — mostly they persevere on a journey that is uncharted because it is theirs alone. What impresses me every year about these students is that they are unafraid, or at least they put their fears aside.

Students build and design; they organize and strategize; they create and inspire — mostly they persevere on a journey that is uncharted because it is theirs alone.

Far left: Andrew Romano ’11 and Matthew Baker-Grunza (Stage IV) sit on Andrew’s handmade wooden senior project. Adjacent: An early performance at Syracuse University by Cartier Sims.

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Laura Ambrose

Director/Lower School Instrumental Music

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trying new things Instrumental music at the Lower School begins with Stage III second year music class as they study the recorder. Jennifer Evenson teaches the music students basic fundamentals and rehearsal techniques for playing the recorder. She also introduces the instruments of the band and demonstrates them and helps the students form embouchures and blow on some of the mouthpieces.

DOUG ELBINGER

During the spring sign-ups Laura Ambrose, the Band teacher, “fits” the students to instruments of their choices. The band instruments played in our bands are: flute, oboe, clarinet, alto saxophone, trumpet, cornet, French horn, trombone, baritone and percussion. The Stage III students who are interested in playing in the band in Stage IV make their decisions and choose their instruments.

“… experiment and try new things and play with a friend.” Wesley Reed

In the fall, the students become part of the Stage IV Beginning Band classes. Band classes are electives, and the children have made educated choices of their band instruments. We offer a Woodwind class which consists of flute, oboe, clarinet and alto saxophone. The Brass and Percussion class includes the trumpet, cornet, French horn, trombone, baritone and percussion. Parents have the opportunity to rent their child’s instrument from a local music store that brings the instruments to Roeper, or they can choose their own music store to rent an instrument. The Woodwind class and the Brass and Percussion class meet separately for half of the year. Then the two classes become one band and meet together for the remainder of the year. There is a concert in February in which the Beginning Band performs. The Beginning Band also performs for Stage I or Stage II classes when they visit our band room. Sometimes the Beginning Band plays for

Grandparent’s Day. Every May there is an AllSchool Instrumental Concert that involves all of the bands and strings from The Roeper School. The ensembles perform in the Community Center Gym, and it is a wonderful night of music and community building. There is another band in Stage IV called the Advanced Band. The students in this group are usually second years in Stage IV. It is a continuation of the Beginning Band from the year before. This band plays more technically challenging music and learns advanced rehearsal techniques for young bands. They also perform in the Stage IV Bands February concert and Grandparent’s Day and the All-School Instrumental Concert in May. When asked what makes Band a unique class or what they enjoy about playing their instruments, Jacob Gladney said that in band “we talk through playing our instruments.” Cooper Blankenburg said, “You have a responsibility when playing your instrument. You are responsible for practice and you get a chance to own your own instrument.” Julia Degazio likes “playing her instrument and not talking.” Gianni Miliotto says, “It is pretty cool to play as a full band,” and he “feels it is boring to play by himself.” Grace Popp enjoys “writing her own songs and playing them for the class and her family.” Andy Grekin likes “using new keys and learning new notes.” Wesley Reed likes to “experiment and try new things and play with a friend.” Alex Calderwood is looking forward to Sixth Grade Band next year. The ensemble has the chance to develop their skills through Middle School and Upper School, and they are excited about the opportunities presented in band. F

The Lower School Advanced Band performs at the Spring All-School Instrumental Concert. PHOTO BY JENNIFER EVENSON

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Jason McIntosh

Chair/Fine Arts Director/Middle & Upper School Instrumental Music

A WELL-ROUNDED EDUCATION

I’ve always believed that music education develops both the mind and the body, linking the intellectual, emotional and physical realms of being. In every one of our performing ensembles, Roeper students are provided with opportunities to explore the elements of music and develop expressiveness to the music they hear, perform and create. They gain personal values and awareness to respond with sensitivity to many types of music, as it is a fundamental means of expression in all cultures around the world. Music has its own powerful language which requires students to analyze, compare, contrast, sequence, remember and problem-solve. When children perform, they receive immediate feedback and opportunities for reflection. It’s difficult to argue with the research showing that the study of music improves academic achievement, enhances critical and creative thinking, social skills, attitudes and personal responsibility. The point of music at Roeper is not (necessarily) to make professional musicians out of our students. When we speak of a “well-rounded” education, we mean to describe one which balances the arts with Roeper’s academic and athletic programs. Gifted students thrive when they feel a part of a larger entity, even as their personal needs are being met.

Participation in music at Roeper significantly contributes to our students’ sense of belonging to their community. The band and orchestra classes in the Middle and Upper Schools are built around the instrumentation of the performers. Ensembles include: 6th Grade Band, MS Band, MS Jazz Band, US Concert Band, US Jazz Band, and String Orchestra. Experimentation in a variety of musical styles allows for tremendous growth in all of the students who participate. Diverse literature is selected to challenge individual strengths within the instrumentation of the ensemble, with an emphasis on achieving the best musical sound and balance as possible. Classes meet every other day and act mainly as rehearsals, with time given to historical background and theoretical information to support the repertoire. Although the faces change year to year, and the characters are always quite distinct, they are a group of individuals who have excelled in so many areas. To look at the Class of 2013 is to see a tradition of excellence continue. A sneak peak at the latest yearbook photo I’ve taken of the band this year reveals quite a lot. My students are artists, athletes, actors, dancers, scholars and, of course, musicians. They’re a young group with an already long story to tell — full of experiences that have shaped who they are today, and the memories they’ll leave us with. I’m thrilled that when they’ll talk of their days at Roeper, of their days growing up with opportunities to explore just about anything, they’ll fondly remember how important a role music has played in their lives.

DOUG ELBINGER

If you haven’t ever been to one of our concerts, you’ve yet to hear me brag about all of the wonderful young people I get to teach every day, and about the brilliant things they achieve. They are the times in the year when I am reminded of just how lucky I am to teach in this community every day. Our concerts are more than a display of student performances, but more of a celebration of their lives and our time spent together in them, exploring incredible music and sharing what just might turn out to be what they’ll remember most fondly about their years here at Roeper. I’ll never forget my first concert, a turning point in my life which I’m happy to share with my students every time another one rolls around.

I’ve always believed that music education develops both the mind and the body — linking the intellectual, emotional and physical realms of being.

You can hear Roeper musicians perform throughout the school year — the annual Winter Concert, Senior Showcase and the All-School Band and Orchestra Concert.

The 2012/13 Sixth Grade Band PHOTO BY JASON McINTOSH

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From when I was little in kindergarten, I would see all the older kids walking with their instruments and couldn’t wait until I was old enough to start. The day I got to try out the saxophone in Laura’s class was the best day of my year. Band became one of the highlights of my day every day for the next nine years. Being a math and science intensive student, my time in Roeper music was a getaway from intense academics and time to let my brain think in a different way. Being at Penn now, there are so many really talented artists in every field, especially music. It was hard at first realizing that I wasn’t necessarily a star, as I sometimes had

been in the Roeper music program. But I think that’s what makes Roeper band great; you don’t have to be a musical prodigy to be a musician, think like one, or play like one. You just get to be yourself in a whole new domain. Rebecca Michelson ‘12 Roeper’s instrumental music program has challenged me and helped me grow more confident as a performer. It’s been great fun, and I know moving forward that I’ll always want music to be a part of my life. Mikayla Konst ‘13 F

Clockwise from upper left: Middle School Concert Band. String Ensemble. Upper School Jazz Band. PHOTOS BY JASON McINTOSH

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KIT

Linda Pence

Middle School Science Teacher

“CRITTER” CARE

What do Madagascar Whistling Cockroaches, hedgehogs and Axolotls have in common? Well, if you visit many of the Lower School classrooms and general science rooms on either campus you will find a variety of winged, scaled, furred, multi-legged, soft bodied, shelled and slithering creatures. Throughout the years our students have been provided with the opportunity to observe, care for, talk to and find a loving, listening ear, take comfort in, form small social networks around and learn about interdependence among all living things on Earth because of our classroom critters. Some animals began their residency at school as teaching tools; others came to us seeking a new home. Homes were found for a wide variety of creatures including: bearded lizards, doves, meal worms, brine shrimp, cockatiels, tarantulas, turtles, rabbits, hamsters, mice, rats, guinea pigs, green tree iguana, chinchilla, varieties of snakes, fish, errant, visiting cats and dogs (including a Manx that lived under Court Building 1, Louie and Maude on the Birmingham campus and Shanty who came each day from the neighborhood to cavort with the kids as they crossed the Bloomfield campus), … and the list goes on. Vying for the longest time at Roeper are Fred, the dove (resident in Michelle Lane’s room), who outlived partners Ginger and Wilma, and Teddy the Wonder Lizard, a green tree iguana and denizen of the 6th Grade science room. The stories of these animals, like the list above are many, varied and downright quirky. Here are just few of the stories from the last four decades. On my arrival to Roeper in the ‘70s, I inherited a room that housed chickens (they always managed to get loose, running as if headless), rabbits, gerbils, fish, guinea pigs, chinchilla, garter snakes and crayfish. Notable among many of these animals was the rate of reproduction from donated pairs guaranteed to be of the same sex. What a miracle! However, none of the science room animals outproduced Alvin Hill’s ’84, Gerry and Gerbilina resident in Kristin Casey’s Stage III classroom. Out of a need to attend to the growing menagerie, a class called Curators met Mondays and Fridays. Among the stalwart, members of this class were, then Stage IV students, A.J. Lo Cicero ’82, Tim Hague ’82 and Marc Gorelick ’83. There was

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always a demand to just hang out with the animals. The years brought lots of creatures to hang with. Among those most in demand were the various canines that visited or took up residence. Notable among these was Patches, a tiny terrier who suddenly appeared sleeping in Court Building 3 to a surprised Jane Kyriacoupolous and her homeroom as the room was opened for the day. Patches came and stayed for many years. She was walked and groomed, curled up with kids during silent reading, attended to those having a hard day and generally brought a smile to all who knew her as did Shanty mentioned above. Bristol, a new puppy in need of care during the day helped a few timid students gain confidence and independence; Sheba who lived in Emery’s back room kept kids in line; Dianne O’Connor’s Brady brightened days in Stage II; and Dan Jacob’s Zoe, Toaster and Max can be seen between Forensics practices taking students for a walk. But of all these animals, the one I know the best is Carly ’98 and Michelle ’95 Efros’s Boris — better known as Teddy the Wonder Lizard. Donated to Emery as not much more than a hatchling, the tenacious Teddy has been the source of many adventures for three decades! For the annual Lower School holiday assembly, Emery dressed as Emery Claus adorned with a Santa hat, dreidel earring and Kenti cloth, would be accompanied by a reindog, reinrabbit or other antlered hybrid reincritter. However, the year he and David Lauer ’08 tried to put antlers on Teddy, there was no reiniguana. Next time you see Emery, ask him about the scar on his index finger. Then ask Jarie Ruddy about her lack of privacy in a Court Building 2 lavatory that brought her toes to nose with a wandering reptile. Refusing to have such a surprise perpetrated on her in the future, Emery’s Electricity and Magnetism class was inspired to rig an Iguana Alert Alarm between the two rooms. Much preferring the ministrations of the girls, and in particular Sarah Ewing, Courtney Shuert and Nicole Rosenthal (all Class of ’07), Teddy inspired a sign that read: “Boys, if Teddy charges, stand on a chair and call a girl.” As vicious and frightening as this might sound, please know that every morning Courtney, Sarah and Nicole would enter the science room with the words, “Okay,

Throughout the years our students have been provided with the opportunity to observe, care for, talk to and find a loving, listening ear, take comfort in, form small social networks around and learn about the interdependence of all living things on Earth because of our classroom critters.


sweetheart it’s time for your bath,” as they scooped up a compliant and happy lizard to be dunked into a sink of warm water and cooed over. Lunch times would find Teddy being dressed up, participating in weddings, and paraded on his leash through the halls and outside on hot sunny days, much to the delight and surprise of all. Summers have found him once vacationing with Kim Ewing who fed him kiwi and mango much to the consternation of the three Ewing daughters who got none. For all summers since, he goes to Iguana Camp to cavort with other iguanas in the home of the Rosenthals, despite the fact that Nicole graduated six years ago. Teddy is indeed a charming fellow. He has inspired Lego Robotics teams who have taken the names

The Tedsters and Teddy’s Heroes. Class discussions on adaptation, natural selection and comparative anatomy find Teddy in the spotlight lending himself for close observation. Visitors from Stage II through adults approach him with some trepidation but quickly turn to smiles, lots of questions and the ultimate query, “Can I touch him?” The answer is always yes. So, if you want to meet Teddy or rekindle an acquaintance, he is taking visitors and interested observers in Room 12 of the Birmingham campus. Come and learn from a longtime, beloved and instructive classroom critter. F

Linda and Teddy’s Sixth Grade Homeroom.

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KIT

Emery Pence

Alumni Relations Coordinator

Katie Buchmann

KIT Editor

class notes

1970s, ’80s & ’90s KRISTIN CLARK TAYLOR ’75 This distinguished alum with her careers in politics, journalism and marketing received Michigan State University’s Distinguished Alumni Award on April 16th as part of the College of Arts & Letters 50th Anniversary celebration. While in town, she visited Roeper and talked with both US and Stage IV students. She then toured the Bloomfield Hills campus with Marcia and Emery, stopping frequently to reminisce.

PHILip HAGUE ’87 I am going back to school, pursuing my MBA from Notre Dame. The philosophy of the program mirrors so much of the perspective I gained at Roeper. It’s about our personal obligation to make a positive impact on our companies, our communities, and our planet. Learning certainly makes one feel young again, even with family and kids thrown into the mix! It’s going to be an invigorating 17 months. I hope all is well at Roeper.

HERMAN MARABLE ’80

SABRINA DEMIO ’92

Herman who has served as a Judge at Flint 68th District Court since 2000, was re-elected to his third six-year term on the Court in the November 2012 election. All of his races have been contested, and he scored his largest margin of victory ever. He defeated two opponents to win his seat, and he beat back a highly funded and nasty campaign launched by the Genesee (County) Landlords Association.

Sabrina has been working with a great new group Performers Under Stress (PUS) [http://mail.yimg. com/ok/u/assets/img/emoticons/emo1.gif]. They opened Sam I Am in April at the Bindelstiff Theater in San Francisco. This work is an assembled selection of Beckett’s prose and short plays. The audience was led through the building into unique playing spaces created specifically for each play. Highlighting the vaudeville elements in Beckett’s works, the processional took on the feeling of a carnival sideshow.

Herman served as the Alumni Representative and now as a trustee on the Roeper Board of Trustees.

SARAH NISHIURA ’85 Thanks to Mike Ruddy, we have news of Sarah as she was featured in Chicago Home & Garden magazine describing her success as an accomplished quilter.

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DANIEL WOLFE ’95 I am still working for the same venture capital firm leveraging my chemistry knowledge for making investments in startup companies commercializing nanotechnology enabled products. I am having a blast! On the personal side, my daughter, Ashlyn (pictured in the insert above), just turned two, and her parents are beginning to experience the fun and entertainment of the terrible twos.


2000s JOSH SCAFE ‘02 Josh is currently a graduate student in Jewish Thought at Spertus Institute of Jewish Studies and Leadership in Chicago. As well as a Rabbinic Intern at Congregation Shir Tikvah in Troy, where he teaches the 6th – 12th graders. He is hoping to begin Rabbinic studies in the summer of 2013. I am a Roeper “lifer” and feel very fortunate to be involved with both Roeper and Congregation Shir Tikvah, both places where I grew up outside the home. My sister Shayna and brother-in-law Scott Thomas, are both Roeper alums from 2005. Some of my favorite classes when I attended Roeper were, Science with Emery, P.E. with Ed Sack, Photography with Michelle Stamler, History and Philosophy with Dave Crawford, and Butch Ashman, as well as English with Mary Kay Glazek. While at Roeper I also played on the Varsity Golf Team and made sure to take at least one Art class every semester from 6th – 12th grade.

Championship. The Bloomfield Hills, Mich., native graduated from Michigan in 2007 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Sport Management, and he is currently working on obtaining his MBA at Boston University.

JACOB HURWITZ-GOODMAN ’05     Jacob’s film Threat Management was shown Saturday, December 15, 2012 at Jam Handy in Detroit. Many local alums joined us for the premiere of the long-awaited documentary feature about Detroit’s own urban paramilitary organization operating out of a hanger off East Jefferson. Jacob has been following the group for over three years, chronicling the complex dynamic of the group and its work. The screening was followed by a reception. Photography courtesy of Dan Epstein ‘04. For more information visit: www. detroitthreatmanagementfilm.com. The evening premiere was a Nick George ‘06 event.

RYAN SOSIN, ’03 Ryan Sosin was appointed Operations Assistant for Water Polo Programs — the first in this position in the history of Harvard water polo: CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Ryan Sosin was recently added to the Harvard water polo staff as the first Operations Assistant in program history. Sosin comes to Harvard after serving as the Interim Director of Communications for the Collegiate Water Polo Association in 2012. Prior to his time with the CWPA, he worked at Michigan as an Assistant Director of Athletic Media Relations, serving as the primary contact for women’s water polo, women’s soccer, men’s and women’s swimming and baseball. In his four-year tenure with the Wolverines, the water polo team won the CWPA Eastern Championships three times, and the men’s swimming and diving team won the Big Ten Championship in 2010-11. Sosin was also a four-time CWPA Western Division Sports Information Director of the Year, and he helped Michigan host the 2011 NCAA Women’s Water Polo

MARYSE RICHARDS ’05 Maryse Richards (pictured above, third from left) won the National Collegiate Ice Carving Championship with her partner. Their carvings are amazing, and their win includes a trip to Jamaica.

PHILLIP-MICHAEL SCALES ’05

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On Dec. 9, 2012 Phillip-Michael and his band Briar Rabbit had an online concert that you could have attended without leaving your home. You could have watched Live from the Briar Patch on Stage IT.

CHARLIE WHITE ’05 Charlie White, and his partner Meryl Davis (pictured below) swept the National Figure Skating Championships for their fifth straight First Place in this competition. Only four other ice dance teams have achieved this level in history. They had near perfect scores, and commentators are praising their continuing growth. On NBC TV former champion Canadian ice dancer Tracy Wilson referred to them as the “benchmark of excellence” and “perfection.” (Thanks to ace reporter Sandy Shoshani for this story).

DAVID GOLDEN ’06 While working as a social studies teacher in the Dominican Republic, David began volunteering as an English as a second language teacher with the Dominican non-profit organization Guanin Inc. This NGO provides educational, medical and basic humanitarian services to some of the most impoverished people in the country. A majority of the people that Guanin Inc. serves live on less than a dollar a day and live without electricity and a clean water supply. Now as the Fundraising Manager for Guanin Inc., David plans fundraising projects in order to fund the many programs aimed at increasing the quality of life for these people desperately in need of help.

VICTORIA MOORE ’08 Vickie graduated from Kettering University this winter, and by strategic planning and hustle, snagged a job with Consumers’ Energy right out of college. She is currently living in Jackson.

LIAM KIRBY ’09 Liam just graduated from Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto. He received the Project 31 Integrated Media Award 2013 from his department at OCADU. He has been accepted to the prestigious MFA graduate program at Hunter College in New York City.

EMI RUFF WILKINSON ’09 & TINA KRYSINSKI ’09

PERRI SILVERSTEIN ’06 Perri and two of her friends won the Yokohamasponsored Miles of Fun road trip by submitting a video they filmed. They again hit the road at the beginning of May and ventured out West. The road trip was the basis for a documentary they produced. Perhaps once it is completed, Perri can share it with the Roeper community in some way!

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It seems worthy of note that two members of the Class of 2009 served as Presidents of their Alpha Phi Omega chapters during their senior years. APO is a co-ed, national community service fraternity that organizes projects and provides volunteers for university, local and national causes. Tina was president of the Gamma Pi chapter at the University of Michigan, and Emi, president of Eta Phi chapter at American University. Congratulations!


TINA KRYSINSKI ’09 Tina graduated in May from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor with a B.S. in Biology and a minor in Women’s Studies. This summer, she will be going back to Washington, DC for June and July (she spent last summer there), to finish her job as student coordinator for the Public Service Intern Program at U of M. Tina will be working out of the University of Michigan DC Office to plan networking events, career panels, and professional development events for U of M alumni and students who are interning in DC. In August, she will be moving to southern Minnesota to begin her Americorps year of service which entails joining the Americorps LEAP Initiative service team which is a part of the Southern Minnesota Initiative Foundation. Tina will be working in a Head Start or other early childhood education organization to build social/emotional school readiness skills of preschool children and support parents in learning dialogic reading techniques to build bonds within home routines for school readiness skills. In addition she will also be working to engage community youth in service learning opportunities in early childhood development and education. She is really excited about this opportunity! After her Americorps year, which ends in July 2014, Tina plans to go to graduate school to get her Masters in Public Health.

EMILY RUFF WILKINSON ’09 I graduated from American University with a major in Sociology and a minor in Creative Writing. My final semester was largely consumed by researching and writing my capstone, a content analysis of how the NRA creates and maintains hegemonic masculinity using advertising during the 2008, 2010, and 2012 election cycles. I received an award for best presentation by a junior or senior in the social sciences at the annual College of Arts and Sciences research conference and was also awarded the Carla Howery Award for contributions to the field of Sociology at the undergraduate level.

I also interned at A Wider Circle, a social services and basic needs provisions nonprofit in Silver Spring, MD, working with economically disadvantaged clients to furnish their homes. Starting in September, I’ll be living in Federal Way, WA (just outside of Tacoma) to take a position with AmeriCorps working in either a middle or high school to provide academic support and college prep in an AVID program. In between, I’ve been taking this summer to travel, and just got back from working for two weeks on a farm in middle Tennessee through WWOOF. I’ll spend the rest of the summer splitting my time between DC, Maine, and Detroit before road-tripping out West with my mom.

LAUREN WALKIEWICZ ’09 Lauren graduated this year from the University of Michigan Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design and has completed another self-directed art project, Mocking Birds. In this show her oilpainting work is about things such as dead animals in museum drawers, her experiences working in prison, ornament and authority, symmetry and ADD, intelligence and justice, and the study of ornithology. Works from Mocking Birds was part of a show entitled Aggro Craggr which had its grand opening Friday April 19th. A large group of Roeper teachers came to the gallery the next day (Saturday) to visit with Lauren in an unsanctioned artist meet and greet. Lauren’s work can be viewed at http://www.flickr. com/photos/laurenpaige/sets/72157613134268217/ with/4030334608/

KEVIN MERSOL-BARG ’09 Check out Kevin, who was named one of 11 “Students of the Year” at U of M!. He has taken the lead at U of M on the issue of more equitable tuition for the children of undocumented immigrants. http://www. michigandaily.com/article/kevin-mersol-barg and Students of the Year: Kevin Mersol-Barg www. michigandaily.com.

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CACHET COLVARD ’11 Cachet has been accepted in the prestigious Global Scholars Program at the University of Michigan.  The Global Scholars Program (GSP) prepares sophomore, junior and senior University of Michigan students to be interculturally competent global citizens, champions for meaningful change, and innovative leaders of tomorrow. GSP is an academically supported living-learning community that provides sophomore, junior, and senior University of Michigan students the opportunity to engage with both U.S. and international students on campus and around the world. Students will learn about global issues from multiple cultural perspectives. Also, coursework and collaborative projects will assist students as they begin to develop and hone their intercultural communication skills. Finally, Global Scholars residents are encouraged to study, intern, or work abroad to reap the full rewards of the program — learning from intercultural experiences and engaging with the world.

KAITLIN VENS ’11 Kaitlin was recently chosen for Roosevelt University’s Honors Program Student Spotlight. A Psychology major with a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies and Social Justice, Kaitlin enjoys the smaller community feel of the Honors program.

ALUMNI STAFF DIANA ELSHOFF, Alumni Teacher Diana, long-time Lower School teacher, is retired now and spends a lot of time helping out around Roeper when she is not globetrotting to visit family. Here she is catching us up: Torin Elshoff, age eight months, visited from Vietnam over the holidays. Torin’s parents, Brian and Madelina Elshoff, are teachers at the Saigon International School in Ho Chi Minh City. Brian teaches Middle School Math and Madelina teaches English as a Second Language. Torin and his parents really enjoyed playing in the Michigan snow, quite a contrast from tropical Vietnam.

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Brian and Madi have accepted teaching positions at a Korean boarding school on an island off the coast of South Korea for the next two years. Guess where we’ll be going next …

JEANNE SIROTKIN HAYNES, Alumni Teacher & Alumni Parent Jeanne’s new book Wrestling the Bear won the Stephen F. Austin Prize in fiction and is now available. You can order it from your local indie bookstore or through either Amazon or Barnes and Noble. She is on the circuit visiting a few book clubs and venues like the Warren Public Library. She was the featured artist at 2013 Alex Frank Poetry Collective Celebration at the Birmingham campus on April 25th. Michael (who retired last June) and Jeanne sold their house in Huntington Woods and moved full-time to Traverse City. She has announced that all are welcome to visit.  They hosted Sara (Puzey) ’96 and Luis Mendez this past summer, and they can vouch for Jeanne and Michael’s hospitality.

CHRIS TYSH, Alumni Parent & Poet Chris, mother of Julian ‘98 and Bruno ‘03, and partner of alumni teacher, George Tysh, has a new work of poetry, Molloy: The Flip Side (BlazeVOX Books).  Critic Charles Bernstein writes:  Chris Tysh reads in, around, and through Molloy in this ingenious transformation of Beckett’s French prose into compulsively vernacular English tercets. The narrative echoes in Molloy: The Flip Side makes for an unsettling familiarity, spiked with the verbal equivalent of dark chocolate and homemade rum. F


KIT

AN ENGAGEMENT & A WEDDING

Stephanie Torres ’10 & Austin Mueller ’10 Things have gotten crazy with school and work, but Austin and I wanted to share some news ... On New Year’s Eve we got engaged! Austin came with me and the rest of the Torres clan to Hawaii to visit our family for Christmas and popped the question while swimming in the ocean that day. We are super-excited!

Carl Mätter ’98 & Laura Westphal were married on

November 17, 2012

Carl is the Analytics Manager in charge of Chevrolet.com on the GM account at MRM Worldwide in Birmingham, and Laura is the corporate practice manager in charge of marketing for Smithgroup-JJR, an architectural firm, in Detroit. They live in Bloomfield Hills with their two dogs Buddy and Lexi. carl sends a well-deserved “thank you” to all those great Roeper teachers who helped hone the math and critical thinking skills he uses every day. Coincidentally his office building is shared by another Roeper Alum, Jon Citrin ‘94 whom Carl runs into at Starbucks from time to time!

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KIT BABIES!

Beth Zick Meehan, ‘95 & Kevin Meehan announce the birth of

Francine Zick Meehan November 29, 2012 • 8:43am 8 lbs, 8 oz. Brooklyn, NY Franny with big sister Willa & big brother Russell

“Franny” is named after her grandmother, Francine Zick, long-time Development Office volunteer.

Melissa Sommerfeld Gresalfi ’95 & Jason Gresalfi welcomed

Annika January 18, 2013 6 lbs, 1 oz. Everyone is excited she arrived , but her big brother Ansel is particularly enthralled with her.

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KIT

Denita Banks-Sims

Director of Development

PARTING THOUGHTS Lately I have been reminded of the enduring power of Annemarie Roeper’s sentiments on the significance and privilege of “witnessing” — the simple, but elegant, exchange of just being there and beholding the moment.

The profound and sometimes subtle significance of “witnessing” is also evident in the seemingly mundane occasions that are too numerous to mention, but culminate in an inextricable bonding to the Roeper community.

Some of those moments occur within the context of “school” life experience, and we are delighted to bear witness to a grand solo in the Stage IV musical; nailing the ensemble dance for the Spring Concert; writing a “perfect” paper for AP Euro; striking the winning goal for the Girls Varsity Soccer districts and more. Those are the moments that demand our full attention and elation! The profound and sometimes subtle significance of “witnessing” is also evident in the seemingly mundane occasions that are too numerous to mention, but culminate in an inextricable bonding to the Roeper community. Thankfully, the privilege of serving as a witness does not end with the final Pomp and Circumstance chord. Roeper faculty and staff often remain deeply connected to students and families, and there is an astonishing intimacy that extends to parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, nannies, neighbors and even the family pet … we know everyone! So, when the formal occasions invite our presence once again, then it is a distinct and treasured gift. We revel in the weddings, births, notices of good fortune, retirements and news of noteworthy life experiences. They mean something to all of us and, in part, we hope that Keeping In Touch — the school’s magazine — conveys our intent to continue the privilege on your behalf as well. Yours,

We witnessed three Roeper alumni siblings celebrate a poignant moment at the celebration of Kristin Morris’s wedding. Kristin is an alumna from the Roeper Class of 2004, shown here with her big sister, Sondra Morris from the Roeper Class of 2002, and big brother Robert Connor, Roeper Class of 1995.

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THE ROEPER SCHOOL

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION

U.S. POSTAGE

Paid PERMIT NO. 16 BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI 48304

41190 WOODWARD AVENUE BLOOMFIELD HILLS • MI 48304-5020

return service requested

ROEPER HISTORY to come alive! A permanent history exhibit

is being created, and we need your help. We are seeking artifacts, photographs and film/video. Any items that capture the spirit of your years at Roeper — whether you called it

CCS, RCCS or Roeper — are most welcome.

Photographs • slides • Film/video • Sports Uniforms • spIrit Wear • Yearbooks • Newspaper Clippings • Memorabilia To dona te, or to help organize i tems, please con tac t

Marcia Ruff, School Historian 248/203-7371 or marcia.ruff@roeper.org

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Keeping In Touch (Vol. 6:4)  

The Roeper School Community Magazine. Educating The Whole Child: Play, Passion & Purpose