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THE CARABET COLLECTION ANTIQUE JAPANESE DOLLS

FLORENCE THERIAULT In consultation with Alan Scott Pate

FLORENCE THERIAULT In consultation with Alan Scott Pate

GOLD HORSE PUBLISHING


© Copyright 2016 Theriault’s Gold Horse Publishing. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information retrieval system, without permission, in writing, from the author or the publisher.

To order additional copies contact: Florence & George PO Box 2319, Annapolis, MD 21404 Tel. 800-966-3655 Fax 410-571-9605 www.florenceandgeorge.com

Acknowledgements Alan Scott Pate, learned Japanese doll scholar, for informative background material on the Japanese doll culture.

This book is based upon an antique Japanese doll collection auctioned by Theriault’s of Annapolis, Maryland. Design: Travis Hammond Photography: Gerald Nelson

$75 ISBN: 1-931503-98-2 Printed in Hong Kong


ABOUT THE COLLECTOR All collectors know this to be the truth: when it comes to collecting, one thing leads to another. You collect antique models of ships, and your mind wonders where those ships traveled – possibly the Far East. So you begin to collect Far East art and antiques. Then you narrow in on Japanese art and antiques. And then you focus on antique Japanese dolls. So it goes. So it went with Norman Carabet of California, whose fascination with these rare and wonderful objects not only led him to their collecting, but also to travels to Japan where he met many early collectors from whom he directly acquired some of his choice pieces. It is his complete collection – a one-person collection – acquired over several decades that is offered in “The Carabet Collection”.

Norman Carabet

A New Yorker by birth, a Californian by shift, a retired physician, and a caring father of an extended family, Norman Carabet has a curious mind. How do things work, how did this or that happen, why is one object so fine and another merely common, what has been the lifestory of the things we collect? Spending a day or two with this delightful and challenging person is a mind-prickling experience, as his stories of treasures sought and found unfold, and the wonderful details of his treasures that he has uncovered with his curious mind. “How was I so privileged to own these remarkable pieces?” is what Norman Carabet said when he was presented with a proof-copy of this book. It is a signal compliment to the ningyo herein and a mark of his perennial pleasure in their presence. 3


THE CARABET COLLECTION OF JAPANESE DOLLS IN HISTORY Alan Scott Pate “Historic” is a word that gets bandied about quite liberally, so I hesitate to use it to describe Theriault’s auction of the Carabet Collection of antique Japanese dolls. However, one would have to travel back in time almost exactly 100 years ago to February 8, 1916 and the important Yamanaka & Co auction of the Wakabayashi Collection from Kyoto to find a single-collector sale of antique Japanese dolls (ningyō) of this caliber. At the time, Yamanaka advertised this sale as the first of its kind outside of Japan. Two hundred-and-eighty lots of ningyō were offered for sale that day at the American Galleries at Madison Square South in New York City as part of a two-day oriental art extravaganza. Yamanaka at that time was one of the key suppliers for Chinese, Japanese and Korean art to developing museums, art houses and individual collections across the country. In 1916, a century ago, the first Yamanaka’s clients auction of antique Japanese ningyō included the Boston MFA, was held. The Carabet auction is the Brooklyn Museum, the only the second. 4

Metropolitan Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum in addition to a number of high profile individual collectors of Asian art such as Charles Lang Freer and John D. Rockefeller. You can imagine with what curiosity previewers of this auction viewed the wide and impressive array of Japanese dolls, the likes of which had never been seen outside of Japan before. Hina-ningyō for the Girl’s Day hina-matsuri celebrations with imperial provenance and dating to the 18th century; impressive gosho-ningyō (palace dolls) of brobdingnagian proportions, some truly child-size and fully articulated; impressive warrior dolls (musha-ningyō) with arrows bristling at their backs and swords in hand depicting fierce and noble samurai drawn from Japan’s martial past. The sale also included alluring and seductive bijin-ningyō depicting Japan’s celebrated courtesans of geisha fame and notoriety. The oldest doll, depicting a young boy sitting astride a great drum, was said to date to 1420. The largest grouping was a tableau depicting the famous revenge Tale of the Forty-Seven Ronin, which included fifty ningyō. The sale attracted wide attention and the active participation of such imminent figures of the day as the architect Isaac N. Phelps Stokes; the socialite, author and early feminist Marie Tudor Garland; Mary Dimmick Harrison, wife of the late president Benjamin Harrison;


and J. Arthur McLean, curator of the newly-formed Cleveland Museum of Art under director Frederick Allen Whiting. The single largest buyer at the sale was Marie Tudor Garland, who publicly announced that she intended to donate her acquisitions to the Boston Museum of Fine Art, while another large segment ended up at the newly commemorated Cleveland Museum’s and its fledgling children’s department. Frequenters of Theriault’s may remember their May 2008 sale in Chicago that featured a number of Japanese dolls from the Cleveland Museum whose origins were in this same Yamanaka 1916 sale. History. Here we are 100 years later and we are having a second sale of superlative antique Japanese dolls. What happened in the middle? It takes years if not decades to develop exemplary collections of any category. This is made all the more challenging when the materials required for this achievement are singularly scarce and largely exist in a land far away, when a strong knowledge base and connoisseurship are all but lacking, and with guidance and information difficult to obtain. The avid doll collector and habitué of galleries and sales, both in the auction house and on-line, will likely reflect that very few Japanese dolls of quality seem to appear on the market. There are, of course, scattered exceptions. For example, a few years ago a sensational set of gosho-ningyō appeared at a small auction in the Northeast where they were simply

listed as “Japanese dolls with big feet.” (Sigh!) But as a general rule, the average collector, even when looking, is generally exposed to only the mediocre or the mislabeled, making the task of creating a collection of merit all the more difficult. To be sure, other fine collections have emerged from 1916 to now, most notably the Eloise and Ronald Thomas Collection of Yesteryear’s Museum fame. Their collection of superb antique Japanese dolls was only a small part of their larger doll collection housed ultimately in their East Sandwich, MA museum. However, Eloise and Colonel Ronald Thomas had two distinct advantages over many other collectors of Japanese dolls. First, as a military family, from a collecting standpoint they had the great good fortune to be stationed in Japan soon following the war years when the Japanese yen was low and buying opportunities unprecedentedly high. However, there were many who were in Japan at this time, not a small number who purchased Japanese dolls, but without the singular panache and discerning eye that was a hallmark of the Thomas’ collection. Secondly, and perhaps most importantly, the Thomas’ relied heavily on the kind offices of Nishizawa Tekiho, curator at the Imperial Museum and perhaps Japan’s greatest authority on ningyō. The author of any number of books on ningyō in both Japanese and English, 5


Nishizawa Tekiho, curator at the Imperial Museum in the mid-1900s and his daughter at their private museum.

Tekiho was the premier ningyō ambassador to the world, educating both the Japanese about their own marvelous artistic heritage, as well as introducing interested foreigners to this unique aspect of Japanese art and culture. The Thomas’ were closely guided by Tekiho in their acquisitions, and as a result they started their collection on the highest level possible, 6

with access to ningyō from imperial, noble and wealthy merchant families. However, the ultimate devolution of the Thomas’ Japanese doll collection was less than ideal. There was no single-collector auction to showcase their beauty and importance. Instead the Japanese portion of the collection was whittled away bit by bit, with some pieces covertly sold back to Japan,


and others sold in large un-cataloged lots to collectors until nothing of import was left. History. I once had the great pleasure of spending the afternoon with Nishizawa Hōsui, Tekiho’s daughter at their private museum north of Tokyo. She lovingly walked me through their collection and told stories related to the acquisition of certain pieces, shared personal reminiscences about her father, and imparted some little known cultural facts about ningyō that I still cherish and share in my lectures to this day. Her son was a Shinto priest and he went to great lengths to emphasize the important spiritual role ningyō have played historically in Japanese culture. It was a truly memorable experience. When Nishizawa Hôsui was closing her museum, I was fortunate enough to help facilitate the sale of some of her pieces to American collectors. My favorite, and arguably one of the more noted and published sets of gosho-ningyō in Japan was acquired by Dr. Norm Carabet and is being offered here publicly for the first time as Lot #5. Depicting a trio of Noh performers, each dressed in courtlike costumes. To me this set exemplifies the beauty, mystery and cultural resonance that make ningyō so seductive. Personal history. I first met Norm Carabet and his wife Arlene back in 1995 at the Arts of Pacific Asia Show in Los Angeles, CA. Norm had already been collecting ningyō for many years, having had the great fun and privilege of travelling to Japan where he had been befriended by the venerable ningyō dealer Nakanishi-san in Kyoto. Nakanishi was from a by-gone era, selling select pieces out of his fabulously small shop front on Furumonzen Street, his personal living space just behind a set of sliding shoji doors. Old school. Norm also worked well with the noted Tokyo dealer Takehi-san, from whom he acquired some truly luscious pieces, my absolute favorite of course being the sumo gosho offered here

as Lot #9. In Japan, Norm also became acquainted with Asahara-san and her now sadly closed Hozukiya Ningyō-ten. Asahara-san was a specialist in ichimatsu and daki-ningyō (huggable dolls) and a number of the play dolls here can be traced to Asahara-san and Hozukiya. Asahara-san has been my personal mentor for decades and his connection with her helped cement bonds of friendship and mutual respect as I have watched his collection grow over the intervening 22 years. Deep involvement in JADE (Japanese American Doll Enthusiasts) increased Norm’s awareness of other collectors of ningyō in America and spurred a healthy sense of competition among the top-tier collectors. Of course, as English language publications and US exhibitions focused on ningyō emerged, Norm’s collection was well represented. Thus through a particular flow and course of fate, the current sale of the Carabet Collection of antique Japanese dolls, is arguably only the second in history. It represents a truly rare opportunity to select from the fruits of decades of informed collecting. Reviewing the catalog, I am amazed at the number of significant works that will be offered to the public. Some pieces I have a personal connection with, having passed through my own hands, sometimes having returned from Japan on my own lap during a NWA flight, way back in the days when you could carry pretty much anything onto a plane. Other pieces I have simply admired for many years, publishing them when possible, exhibiting them when possible and frequently sharing them in my lectures as superlative representatives of a type. I have my favorites, some of which I have touched on above, undoubtedly you will have your own. But the Theriault’s auction of the Carabet Collection of antique Japanese dolls will go down in history as a seminal event. One, I am hopeful, that will awaken the interest and collecting passions of a new generation of collectors. 7


A FOREWORD BY THE AUTHOR

It is a mystery to me that this rich and highly artistic genre of doll collecting has remained largely unexplored by Western world doll collectors. Perhaps it’s something as simple as language barriers, for, admittedly, Japanese is not a common language taught in American schools. Yet, how easy to start from this simple lesson. Ningyō means doll. Say the word. Ningyō. Ning rhymes with ring. Yo rhymes with go. Ningyō. Say the word ten times. Now you’re on your way. Perhaps it is feeling that these dolls are too strange, too apart from the common doll “experience” of Western children and Western doll collectors. We are taught that they are formal, stylized, historic, and never, never, play dolls. But consider these commonalities with the European dolls that American collectors so avidly seek. Just as Paris was the center of French doll-making in the 18th and 19th centuries, so was Kyoto the center of Japanese doll-making at that time. Small studios buzzed with activity throughout both cities – and, not incidentally, both cities were considered the apex of artistic and intellectual pursuits in their respective countries. •

Just as the Parisian (and English and German) dolls were constructed of wood or paper-mache in the 1700s and early 1800s, so, too, were those of Japan. In both cultures, •

the sculpting and painting of the dolls reflected current notions of elegance or refinement: the aquiline nose of the European aristocracy, and the distinctive “sky-brows” of dolls of Japanese nobility, as examples. Just as the Paris doll world was composed of a number of small ateliers, so was that of Kyoto. Even the construction of the dolls – largely a matter of assembly of parts from various specialists, wigs from one atelier, textiles and costumes from another, carved wooden parts from still one more – was a similar pattern in both cities. As a result, early 1800s dolls from both cultures were largely identified by the shop which sold the doll rather than the assembler; collectors of French poupees speak, for example, of their Simonne doll, although Simonne was a doll shop, not a doll maker. Although in France, by the end of the 1800s, large named doll-making firms, notably Jumeau, presented dolls under their own name, Parisian doll shops such as Au Nain Bleu, and even Parisian department stores such as Au Bon Marche who offered their Bebe Au Bon Marche, continued to offer assembled dolls, and in Japan, according to scholar Alan Scott Pate (Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyo, page 240) “Meiji-era manufacturing... was executed mostly by anonymous artists working closely with wholesalers and dolls shops which sold them under their own brand names”. •

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Costuming was of utmost concern in both worlds. So it can be of no small coincidence that in both cultures, the bodies of early dolls (except exposed hands and feet) were crude and simplistic: for these early dolls, swathed with luxury fabrics that were permanently affixed, the hidden body was of little consequence except that it be durable. Then, beginning in the late 1700s, dolls of both cultures were designed with the notion of dress/undress/re-dress and the style of body began to change to accommodate this. In Japan, the flexible padded upper arm was introduced to allow the doll to be easily undressed, as well as the mitsuore-ningyō or triple-jointed doll, designed for articulated play; in France, the early notion of tackingon or stitching the costume to the body evolved into costumes with drawstrings or hooks and eyes, and the construction of a doll body that was realistic as well as malleable became an industry obsession, hence the development of the articulated wooden body. In a delightful confluence of the two worlds, it was the Japanese mitsuore-ningyō, presented at the London Universal Exhibition of 1851, that is said to have been the major influence on the development of the Western articulated child doll. •

Entire industries concerning the costuming of the doll grew up in each culture. It is often remarked upon by admiring collectors of 18th/19th century Western dolls that even the scale of woven pattern was miniaturized to match the size of the doll. So, too, is this true with Japanese dolls. The use of woven symbols (fleur-de-lis in France, chrysanthemum in Japan, for example) is a commonality, just as the presence of luxury fabrics signaled the importance of a doll; in both cultures, velvets, brocades, or other fabrics with interwoven gold or silver threads were important statements of prestige. •

Just as the Western dolls celebrated their heroes and heroines in the form of dolls – from Empress Eugenie to •

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George Washington – so, too, did the Japanese – from Empress Jingu to military warlord Hideyoshi. And what of play? There is a commonly-held belief that Japanese ningyō were not play dolls. True, and yet not true. They were not play dolls in the rough-andtumble sense that we often associate with American play. Yet, they were play in that they were designed to visually stir the imagination, to teach proper societal roles, to instill a sense of fashion and style. Not unlike, in fact, their counterpart English wooden court dolls or French bisque poupees with fashionable trousseaux and elaborate coiffures. Further, the notion that Western world dolls were all subjected to vigorous play is distorted; in fact, in the 1800s owning a “store-bought” doll was a luxury and many a story has been recounted that “My doll was kept stored away and I was only allowed throughout my childhood to bring it out of its box at Christmas to display it under the holiday tree”. Not so very different than the Japanese hina matsuri or Girl’s Day dolls! •

Finally, in both cultures, there is a desire for preservation, a link with the past. Most simply, for the doll to remain in the family, to pass from generation to generation. As collectors know, this is not always possible. There, then, remains the next best choice. That is for dolls – for ningyō – to pass into the hands of other caring people who will preserve their significance, their beauty, their history. That is what Norman Carabet achieved over his decades of collecting, and the opportunity that he now offers to a new generation of those who cherish the past. Florence Theriault December 2015


Above: The kneeling pose, made possible by the triple-jointed legs, of which only visible here are the jointed ankles that are neatly tucked beneath the luxury-padded kimono hem. The rich blue silk sleeveless outer kimono jacket is beautifully woven.

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1. Early Carved Wooden Doll (Mitsuore-Daki) with Rare Four-Articulation Jointing and Family Provenance, Circa 1850 12� (30 cm.) Carved wooden socket head, lightly-tinted gofun complexion, glass inset eyes, painted features, pierced nostrils, closed mouth, defined philtrum, chin dimple, double chin, shaded crown, pronounced ears, human hair sidelocks and backlocks in slits, compositewooden torso, wooden legs and lower arms, textile upper arms, articulation at wrists, cradle hips, knees, and ankles. Wearing original costume comprising layered kimono with paulownia designs, blue silk obi, royal blue silk sleeveless outer jacket with patterned design and having an attached tag on the back likely indicating a child’s name and the family name of Yamakawa. A parchment-like cloth undergarment also bears markings. Generally excellent. Late Edo period, circa 1850. The doll genre, known as Mitsuore in reference to its triple-jointed legs, is actually even more remarkable having additional jointing at the wrists. $7000/9000

Above: Profile. Note the ample double chin and heavy eylids.


Above: The attached tags at the back indicates the child’s name on one and the family name of Yamakawa on the other, a very rare features offering clues to the life story of the doll.

Below: Further markings appear on the parchment undergarment.

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The rear view of the kneeling lady displays the flexibility of the jointed knees. Splendid is the “fawn spot” silk obi, considered a very luxury fabric.

2. Outstanding Carved Wooden Mitsuore Lady with Rare Jointed Body, Superb Costume and Six Interchangeable Wigs, Late 1800s 18” (46 cm.) Carved wooden head with elegantly-shaped face, full lower cheeks and chin, fine lustrous gofin finish, inset glass eyes in half-moon shape, painted lashes, slightly-parted lips, defined teeth, wooden body with slender torso and limbs (except original silk crepe padded upper arms), and with flat-cut jointing at hips, knees and ankles (triple jointing or mitsuore), and concave shaping of back legs to allow extra articulation, elegantly expressive fingers. Wearing vibrantly patterned purple silk crepe kimono with aqua and white patterned flowers, fawn-spot silk crepe obi with extended back train, and red silk under kimono. She has an elaborate silk fiber wig decorated with tortoise shell comb, that is interchangable with five additional wigs which are included; each wig with ornamental hair ornaments (kanzashi), each with original wooden stand. The orginal box with Namikawa signature is included. Excellent condition. Meiji era, circa 1890, by Namikawa of Kyoto. Kueueya Namikawa who specialized in this model of doll with finely-made wigs of silk fiber or human hair decorated with combs, sticks, hair tools, ribbons, and flowers. Namikawa created luxury dolls for the Japanese market, as well as exporting his works to the Western market as indicated by the English paper label in the doll’s original box. The doll is featured in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, by Alan Scott Pate, page 217. Rarity factors of the doll include her triple-jointed body articulation (mitsuore) and her interchangable wigs (katsura); to find them both in one doll, and in this impeccable condition with original box bearing the maker’s signature is extraordinary. $22,000/28,000

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The paper label of the doll’s original box suggests export to the Western market.

Above: The fine detail of gofun complexion contrasts the ebony black hair in a side view of one coiffure included with the doll. The shimada mage hairstyle simply referred to hair drawn away from side, neck and forehead and captured in a bun (mage) at the crown, The bun could be styled in various arrangements, even with waxed “wings” at the back given shape by a bincho comb.

Left: Superb wigs were created of individually inset fibers or hair, sometimes on hidden forms, waxed for shape retention, and decorated in luxurious manners. Each of the wigs is shown on its original stand. Right: The rare mitsuore jointing (hips, knees and ankles) allows the doll seemingly infinite posing possibilities.

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3. Miniature Carved Wooden Trio of Court Ladies with Rare Carved Hair, Late Edo Period 3” (8 cm.) and 5”. Each has wooden head with well-defined carved hair featuring widow’s peak and side wings, gofun complexion, painted features, slit along side of head for insertion of hair fibers (now lacking), costume-covered bodies, carved wooden hands peeking from sleeves. They are wearing a matched set of kimonos with brown silk crepe trousers (hakama), five silk collars, and with embroidered flowers at the sleeves and padded hem. Generally excellent. Late Edo period, circa 1840, with distinctive facial features, the ladies-in-waiting of the court (sanninkanjo) are rare to find with carved hair, matched luxury costumes, and tiny size. A fascinating history of these court ladies can be found in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 126. $1200/1800

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The greenaccented lips, are beautifully visible here, as are the tortoiseshell combs and hair sticks.

4. Beautiful Carved Wooden Courtesan with Stunning Costume and Luxury Plinth, Edo Period 17” (43 cm.) with base. 13” without base. Of carved wood with well-defined features on the perfectly oval head, aquiline nose, painted features, narrow eyes, painted lips with green accented lower lip, painted feathering detail of hair around the forehead and silk fiber wig in very elaborate coiffure that is decorated with elaborate tortoise-shell combs. Wearing a stunning costume suggesting a six-layered kimono with padded hems, blue brocade outer kimono with dragon and cloud motif and a dramatic fronttied obi indicating her courtesan status, and standing in a refined pose, her right foot peeking from beneath the layers of fauxunder-kimonos, and the padded hems designed to suggest a more sinuous strolling movement. Mounted upon a luxury wooden stand with painted decorations. Excellent condition. Edo period, circa 1850. An exceptional example of an exquisitely rendered and costumed courtesan (oiran). $3500/5500


The dragon and cloud fabric motif on the outer kimono is exquisitely woven.

Stunning beautiful courtesan (oiran) with dramatic front-tied obi indicating her status, beautifullypainted original base.

The aristocratic aquiline nose is evident as is her beautiful sinuous pose.

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T

he classic so-chubby youthful doll known as gosho-ningyō ranks among the most beloved of all

Japanese dolls, offering not only finest artistry of wood carving, but also, sublime gofun complexion, expressive features, and a legendary history as a celebration of youth. Fine early examples were intended as “palace dolls”, designed as gifts of auspicious wishes. One of the rarest variations of gosho-ningyō is the “noh-ningyō”, presenting characters from the beloved Japanese Noh theatre.

5. Outstanding Trio of Early Carved Wooden Dolls Known as “Noh-Ningyō”, 18th Century, with Important Provenance 15” (38 cm.) standing. 12” seated. Each of carved wood with large rounded face in the gosho style, and each with fine lustrous gofin finish, textile upper arms, each with different expression on the carved and painted face and variation of hair style on the human hair wig, highly-defined eye sockets, and defined ears. Each is wearing superb original costume comprising unusual checkered silk brocade trousers with melon crest design, green silk brocade coats (kariginu) patterned with butterflies and peonies and having tie strings at the wrists, and lacquered eboshi-style court caps; the standing doll holds a fan. The trio represent figures from an unidentified Noh drama. Their original box is included. Excellent condition overall, albeit minor restoration on left hand figure. Edo period, late 1700s. This iconic trio is arguably one of the most noted and written-of sets in Japanese doll history, once in the collection of Nishizawa Tekiho, who was curator of the Imperial Household Museum (forerunner of the Tokyo National Museum) and considered the most influential and knowledgeable Japanese doll collector of his day, Documents in the Nishizawa archives date the dolls to 1781. The dolls are shown and described in Ningyō, the Art of the Japanese Doll on page 47 and Japanese Dolls on page 29, both by Alan Scott Pate, and in earlier publications. Ninhon No Ningyō, 1955, page 37, and Ningyō no Sekkai: Gosho Ningyō, 1986. $38,000/48,000

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Each of the noh-ningyō trio has a distinctively different facial expression and hair style.


The rich design of the green silk brocade coat (kariginu) is patterned with butterflies and peonies.

The long silk trousers (nagabakama) are printed in a rich checkerboard design with interwoven melon crest design.

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7. Exceptionally Rare Grand-Sized Wooden Gosho in Distinctive Pose, Early 1800s 14” (36 cm.) Of carved wood in distinctive and unusual pose and with overall gofun finish with beautiful sheen, the big-headed boy has right foot extended forward as though for balance, his right hand extended upward as though reaching to the sky, and his left hand clasped for holding an object. His torso and limbs are shortened, depicting a young child, and his face is turned sideward, glancing upward in the direction of his extended right fingers. Sculpted and painted facial features are superbly rendered including detail of sculpted teeth, and raised eye lids. The doll has human hair, is sexed, has excellent detail of fingers, toes, dimpled elbows and knees, and is wearing a rare red silk crepe (chirimen) robe with silk lining. Generally excellent.

6. Carved Wooden Gosho with Painted Presentation Ribbons and Symbolic Turtle, Edo Period 4” (10 cm.) One-piece carved wooden figure of seated gosho, his very plump legs folded backward, and with large rounded head, and very plump hands which are holding tight to a green turtle. He has overall gofun finish, defined ears, painted facial features with very narrow eyes and formed eyelids, and with painted sidelocks and painted presentation ribbon (mizuhiki). He wears a decorated bib (haragake) which ties at the back. Very good condition, some light lifting of gofun at the back.

This style of gosho, known as Mizuhiki, is notable for the waterpainted gaily-tied presentation ribbons at his forehead which indicate his origin as a gift of auspicious wishes. The painted ribbons were inspired by the Japanese style of tying red and white paper tie cords around formal gifts.

Edo period, lst half of 1800s. A wonderful petite-size Gosho-Mizuhiki whose rarity features include presentation ribbons and green turtle with delightfully defined face, symbolizing longevity. $1800/2800

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Edo period, early 1800s. Rarity factors of the compelling figure include his dramatic and robust pose, his upperglancing head, very fine details of carving and features, and luxury costume of which Alan Scott Pate has noted “the dramatic combination of the thick black hair, the brilliant white of the gofun and the vibrant red of the textiles...such a 7 detail. dramatic counterpositioning of colors was seen as particularly auspicious and added to the overall giftgiving aspect that was inherent in the gosho form” (Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, page 43). $28,000/35,000


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A

s the popularity of gosho-ningyō “grew

and expanded behind the intimate court circles that had birthed them, gosho-ningyō began to be depicted in a variety of ways...all the while maintaining their youthful countenance and fleshy bodies...From opulent to minimalist, gosho-ningyō reflect the full panoply of Edo society, all in the guise of an innocent child”. (Ningyō, the Art of the Japanese Doll, by Alan Scott Pate, page 18) 8. Carved Wooden Gosho Brothers (Kyoday) in Playful Pose Including Presentation Ribbon on Younger, Early 1800s 6 ½” (17 cm.) l. 4 ½” h. Both are all-wooden with gofun finish and well-defined painting of facial features; the little brother detachable peg-mounted in piggy-back style to the back of his older brother who is merrily crawling forward. The larger brother has unusual painted detail of hair feathering at the crown and in front of each well-modeled ear with applied silk fringe locks, and the smaller brother has painted presentation ribbon (mizuhiki) on his crown, with sidelocks and bald pate. The brothers wear original (matching) silk bibs (haragake), and the smaller also wears a silk crepe sleeveless jacket. Generally excellent with beautiful sheen of gofun albeit some minor age darkening. Edo period, lst half century of 1800s. $4000/6000

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9. Extremely Rare Carved Wooden Gosho as Sumo Wrestler, Circa 1880 6 ½” (17 cm.) l. 5”h. 6”w. hips. All carved wood with immensely large round head and buttocks depicted in pose as sumo wrestler, overall gofun finish with painted facial features centered in the middle of face, well-defined knee wrinkles, curled hands, toes and fingers (both upper and lower sides), sexed, ears, and wonderful sculpted facial features including deeply-set outlined eye sockets, incised slits for human hair locks at sides of forehead and nape, and wearing his original silk bib (haragaka) with unusual painted designs and with cord and tassel ties at his back. Generally excellent, one hair forelock replaced, minor gofun lift line at back of right arm. Early Meiji era, circa 1880. The gosho is depicted in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 64, and in the Japanese language book featuring the collection of well-known Japanese collector, Tadayoshi Takehi. The theme of this gosho, is extremely rare, further enhancing his wonderful facial expression and robust body. $17,000/25,000


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Distinctive not only for their “pingpong ball� shaped heads, but also in the stylized features (hikime kagihana) which featured tiny dots for eyes and mouth, and carved hook-shape nose.

The exquisite detail of costuming includes a finely embroidered crane on her sleeve.

Her fan is decorated with hand-painted details including a crane and pine tree, both symbols of longevity.

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10. Rare Early Pair of Imperial Couple (Imo-Bina) in Highly Distinctive Jirozaemon Style, Late 1700s 11 ½” (29 cm.) including base and crown). Each having carved wooden ball-shaped (so-called ping-pong) head with gofun finish, and simplistically-painted facial features in style known as “line eyes - dash nose”, painted black hair in stylistic skull cap style emphasizing the rounded head shape, posed seated on original stands and wearing finely woven and embroidered costumes, she with embroidered crane on sleeves, hand-painted fan and crown, and he with black silk outer coat (ho) and black lacquer Eboshi cap. Excellent condition.

Edo period, late 1700s. The uniquelycarved style originated with the doll maker Jirozaemon of Kyoto, who was appointed an official supplier to the imperial family, and whose dolls were avidly sought by the imperial elite. This rare early pair is notable for its exceptional detail of costuming, and intriging historical attribution which Alan Scott Pate describes as “perhaps the most idiosyncratic of the various hina forms”. (Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō, page 71). $9000/12,000

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mong the most popular genre of 19th century dolls

was Takeda, dramatically posed figures representing figures from the beloved Kabuki tradition. The figure represented here is Narihiri, (a man) known in Japanese legend for his extraordinary beauty, sensitivity, a poet, a lover. In legend, he has a love affair with a beautiful woman who has been promised to the emperor. Upon learning of the affair, the emperor banishes Narihiri. During his wandering, Narihiri writes poems, one concerning crossing the Iris Bridge. The poem was beloved, and later immortalized in a Kabuki parody performance, which was then presented as this takeda doll. That Narihiri is depicted as a woman is not surprising. Kabuki had originated as woman’s theatre until, in the mid1700s women were banned from roles in that theatre for moral reasons. Thereafter men played women’s roles, and in cases such as this parody, there can be found multi-layered roles of a man playing a woman who is playing a man.

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11. Fine Carved Wooden Takeda in Depiction of Narihira, in “Bridge over Iris Flowers” Scene, Mid-1880s 20” (51 cm.) Carved wooden head depicting a slenderfaced person with gofun finish, painted features, narrow eyes, teeth, feathering of hair around the forehead, silk fiber hair in elaborate upswept arrangement over shape-retaining form, costume-wrapped body except expressively-shaped wooden hands, and with body posed in animated manner, her head tilted and turned to the side, and arms extended, as she appears to elegantly stroll across a wooden bridge that is fronted by silk irises. The woman is garbed in a luxury silk crepe (chirimen) kimono with heavilyembroidered designs of peonies on the sleeves, and with brocade sleeveless outer jacket, court style Eboshi hat, and folding fan. Mounted on original black lacquer base with inset front panel of embroidered silk. Excellent condition. Edo period, 1800s. Shown and described in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, by Alan Pate, page 262/3. $7500/10,000

12. Well-Preserved Early Imperial Couple (Tachibina) in Rare Large Size, Circa 1850 18” (46 cm.) and 14”. Posed side-by-side on a wooden base are the Imperial Couple, each with carved wooden ballshaped head having gofun finish with distinctive line and dot facial painting, and black painted hair under human hair. The man has flattened tall body with tunic arranged as though his arms were extended, and the costume stiffened to permanent shape while the woman, scaled considerably smaller, has a stiffened cylinder form that represents her The detailed embroidery features symbols of the three friends of winter (name, plum and bamboo) which symbolize longevity.

costume. Each costume is of fine silk with rich embroidery representing the three friends of winter, namely pine, plum and bamboo (sho-chiku-bai) and symbolizing longevity. The pair is presented on wooden base. Excellent condition. Edo period, in the style of the Kyoto doll artist, Jirozaemon, circa 1850. An especially large size for this style, known as Tachi-bina; see also #57 and #58 of this book. This pair is featured in Japanese Dolls by Alan Scott Pate, page 66. $5500/7500

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13. Diminutive Carved Wooden Gosho with Three-Layered Kimono, Early 1800s 5� (13 cm.) The very plump gosho, posed standing, has a carved wooden head, torso and legs with fine gofun finish overall, over-sized head with very rounded face whose features are tightly centered, painted eyes in deeply-set sockets, downcast lips, defined ears and chin, slits for sidelocks and forelocks (now lacking), black velvet pate at crown, textile upper arms, carved wooden hands, right hand designed to clasp an object, sexed, defined navel. He is wearing a resist-dyed silk crepe kimono in beni red with ivory silk liner and having red silk inner kimono. Excellent condition Edo period, 1st half 1800s. Rare size with wonderful face and body sculpting, original three-layer costume of luxury fabric and color. $2500/3500

14. Very Rare Doll (Mitsuore) with Expressive Features and Fine Early Costume, Circa 1850 17� (43 cm.) Paper mache swivel head, slightly-tinted gofun finish, bald scalp with shadowed hair and cut slits at side and back with inset silk fiber locks, glass inset eyes, painted features, pierced nostrils, closed mouth in smiling expression, two upper teeth, impressed dimples at lip corners and cheeks, philtrum, paper mache torso and limbs with slingjointing at hips, and further jointing at knees, ankles and wrists, textile upper arms, The doll is wearing silk bib (haragake) with unusual ruffled collar edged with black velvet, and a padded plaid silk kimono and paste-resist dyed cotton obi. Generally excellent.

The hairstyle known as nakasori features a circular patch at the top of the crown; the patch was either finished with black velvet (as shown here) or sometimes with a gofun finish that served to accentuate the white gofun.

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Late Edo period, circa 1850. The mitsuore doll, introduced in the late 1700s, was revolutionary in Japanese culture, with its intricate articulation (mitsuore meaning triple-jointed but in this case actually four-jointed as the wrists swivel, also), and its constuction designed to allow a child to undress and re-dress the doll. The doll is photographed in Japanese Dolls by Alan Scott Pate on pages 232 and 243. $9000/11,000


The head shows rare impressed dimples, hair shading, and system of insert hair locks (here tied with matching fabric to the rare ruffled collar).

The kneeling pose of the undressed Mitsuore-jointed doll illustrates the exceptional articulation that was possible, from the cradle-slung hips to the easilypivoting ankles, and even swivel head.

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15. Delightful Mitate Gosho Depicting Ebisu, the God of Daily Provision 5” (13 cm.) h. 7” width of doll. 12” width base. Of carved wood, the gosho has large rounded head with painted features, laughing expression, teeth and fine lustrous gofin finish. Depicting a seated gosho with right foot extended and left foot doubled backward, hands held in front with pull-string for toy wagon, inserted forelocks and bangs, sexed, and wearing original embroidered silk bib (haragake) with ties at his back. He is pulling a wooden cart decorated with two sea bream fish amidst violent waves. The gosho is string-mounted on original wooden stand, and has original box. Excellent condition.

Early Meiji era, circa 1875, notable for fine state of preservation on the well detailed features. So popular was the gosho doll during the 19th century that doll artists sought to expand the original concept of the doll which was as an omen of auspicious wishes. One such concept was the mitate-gosho, that is an imitative parody of a legendary hero or story. This is one example as Ebisu, the God of Daily Provision, is portrayed as a cheerful child bringing home the fish for dinner. $3500/4500

17. Carved Wooden Mitate-Gosho as Monkey Trainer with Performing Monkey, Taisho Era 12 ½” (32 cm.) Carved wooden head in very rounded plump shape, face turned to the side, gofun finish, slits at side of face for insert of silk fiber hair that extends around the back of head

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to form a short queue that is captured in a little bow, painted facial features, narrow squinting eyes, painted teeth, wooden hands with expressive fingers and wooden legs with painted blue feet. He is costumed as a street performer with checkered sleeveless outer coat over green silk plaid kimono, straw sandals and is holding a spiral-striped staff used for monkey tricks, A brown wrap extends over his shoulders, encircling the little paper mache monkey at his back, the monkey wearing a chirimen silk crepe jacket with silk tie closure. Excellent condition with some minor frailty to silk of kimono. Taisho era, circa 1920. The doll is photographed on the frontispiece of NingyĹ?, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate. With the continuing popularity of the gosho doll, examples with variant body styles appeared, such as this rare monkey trainer gosho, a parody of activity found in Kyoto streets of the late 1800s. $2800/3500

Paper mache performing monkey wearing chirimen silk crepe jacket.

Above: detail of textile designs. Below: fine carving of wooden hands is shown.

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18. Very Important Carved Wooden Imperial Couple, Yusoku-Hina, for the Imperial Family with Artist Mark of Yamashina, Circa 1800 18” (46 cm.) with cap. Each with carved wooden head and hands, fine gofun finish, painted features, aquiline nose, narrow eyes, heavy eyelids, well defined sky-brows, blackaccented teeth, ears, feathering around hair line, black silk fiber hair, rare all-wooden body (he with folded ankles), and posed on original matching cushions. He is wearing distinctive costume of his position composing a billowing outer coat (ho) captured only by a belt and with hidden folds and pockets, layered undercoats of various colors and weaves, purple billowing trousers tied at the ankles and decorated with an undulating weave, and Eboshi cap with diamond patterns that match his inner garment and her outer garment. Her costume also is less formal than court attire, featuring an intricately-woven outer coat that extends 13” in length behind her; her trousers are equally long. Her hair is drawn away from her face into wide wings at the sides and captured into a long braid at the back with hair extensions that reach 40”. She carries a handpainted wooden fan with multi-colored long ties. Excellent condition. Continued on page 34

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A

lthough rigidly prescribed, their costumes were actually designed

as semi-formal wear in the home (noshi) as opposed to official court wear.

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Continued from page 32

Edo period, early 1800s, Yusoku-hina, and bearing the signature X mark of the Yamashina atelier on her tie belt and his collar. The Yusoku imperial couple was often commissioned to the celebrate the birth of a girl in a noble family. The style, with its distinctive colors and weaves was only available

A profile view of the female evidences the extraordinary length of her hair and train.

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to members of the imperial court, according to the Yusoku Manual which defined both costumes and behavior. This extraordinary pair is featured in NingyĹ?, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, on pages 110-113. $50,000/75,000


Left: The refined sculpting of the Yusoku-hina is most notable, enhanced by features such as the distinctivelypainted “sky-brows” (okimayu).

Right: His artfully-painted features are enhanced by sculpted details such as eyelids and aquiline nose.

Above: Attention to minute details such as hand-painting of fan underscores the artistry of the dolls.

Left: The embroidered mark of the Yamashina atelier appears on her tie belt and his collar.

Above and right: The Yusoku Manual rigidly detailed the do’s and don’ts of fabric designs, weaves and colors, as shown in these four photographs.

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20. Carved Wooden Imperial Couple in Rare Small Size, Mid-1800s

19. Carved Wooden Courtier in Rarer Standing Pose, Mid-1800s 12� (30 cm.) Carved wooden head, hands and feet depicting a court figure in standing pose, gofun finish. gold-edged black painted hair, painted facial features, heavily-lidded eyes, wood-block torso under padded costume comprising brown silk kimono with padded sleeves, and textured outer tunic, painted blue feet with upturned toes, black lacquer cap, black wooden stand with embreoidered fabric inset. Very good condition. Late Edo/Early Meiji period, mid-1800s. $1100/1400

A profile view of me-bina defines the length of her hair, the painted designs on gauze train, and textile design.

4� (10 cm.) Each has carved wooden socket head, gofun finish with fine gleaming lustre, painted features including sky-brows, formed bodies in seated pose, man with crossed ankles, wooden hands, silk fiber hair (hers in extended length). Each wearing its original costume, the me-bina (woman) wearing multi-layered silk kimono with silk embroidery, gauze train with painted scene, and very elaborate crown and the O-bina (man) wearing black kimono (ho) and lacquered cap, carrying sword. The pair are mounted upon wooden platform. Excellent condition, some light frailty to black silk. Edo period, circa 1850, rare to find the imperial couple in this tiny size, beautifully preserved. $1800/2500

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The elegantly aquiline shaped face has painted detailing of hair around the edges of the silk fiber wig in Shimada style and decorated with luxury silk crepe bows.

21. Carved Wooden Courtesan (Oiran) with Refined Pose and Nicely-Detailed Costume, Circa 1840 14� (36 cm.) Of carved wood with well-defined features on the perfectly oval head, aquiline nose, painted features, narrow eyes, painted lips, painted feathering detail of hair around the forehead, silk fiber wig in very elaborate coiffure that is decorated with silk crepe bows. She is wearing a dark plum silk costume suggesting a sixlayered kimono with padded hems, a dramatic front-tied embroidered obi indicating her courtesan status, and is standing on black lacquer base, her right foot peeking from beneath the layers of faux-under-kimonos, whose padded hems are designed to suggest a more sinuous strolling movement. Generally excellent. Edo period, circa 1840. $3600/4200 Designed to portray afluent fashionable ladies, it was absolute that finest textiles and detailing appear on the costume such as the embroidery on the wide front-tied obi (indicating her courtesan status) and superb textile design shown on sleeve.

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Box label: The paper on the original wooden boxes indicates the atelier of Maruhei Okiheizo. Stack of boxes: The set has been preserved in its original boxes for more than a century.

22. Outstanding Processional Set (Daimyo Gyoretsu) Featuring Young Lord on White Horse, with Four Attendants by Atelier Maruehei in Original Labeled Boxes, Circa 1900 17” (43 cm.) lord on horseback, 17” l. horse, 10” attendants. Each of the five dolls has sculpted head, gofun finish, glass eyes, and exquisitely-painted detail of painted features, the young lord in seated pose with hands clasped for holding reins, and wearing purple silk crepe kimono with crest design on the lapels, sleeves and back that is a symbol of military nobility, and unique very bold design with gold thread embroidery on the lower sleeves, silk padded cap under gold lacquered jingasa helmet with crest design, and gold brocade trousers. The four attendants are uniquely sculpted and painted, each with distinctively different face, lightly tinted complexion, bald pate with slit-attached silk fiber sidelocks and backlock, mounted standing on pebbled wooden bases with chip-carved edging. They are wearing matching kimonos with crested designs on the lapel, behind the elbows and center of the back (which match the crest on the young lord’s kimono), and tightly woven flat hats. The attendants wear identically-styled trousers and inner jacket with a variety of silk fabrics and designs, and each carries two swords. The paper mache horse has a white silk crepe “fur” and real hair mane and tail, silk fiber skirt, purple and white chirimen reins, black lacquer saddle with silk print seat. Meiji era, circa 1900, the processional set is known as Daimyo Gyoretsu. Each year the daimyo lords were obliged to relocate, alternating between residing in their own domain and residing in Edo, in an attempt to weaken their local influence. By 1900, the procession was largely ceremonial, providing Continued on next page

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Left: The face of the young lord has a refined aristocratic shape; his hair style differs, too, and he wears a jingasa helmet with crest design, indicating nobility, which matches the design on his and his attendant’s costumes.

Right (top to bottom): A unique gold thread embroidery on the lower sleeves of the lord is a very luxury detail; the matching crest design on costumes of lord and attendant appears in the proscribed manner on the lapels, sleeves and center back, indicating nobility; gold brocade trousers appear on one attendance; a variation of brocade trousers appears on another. Continued from previous page

a grand festival day for entire communities. The set is impeccably preserved in original boxes, two with original paper label crest indicating the atelier of Maruhei Okiheizo of Kyoto. In the mid-1800s Maruhei Okiheizo became recognized as one of the premier ningyĹ? dolllmakers in Japan, officially designated as supplier to the imperial household of very luxurious ningyĹ? in all categories.

Above: The face of each attendant is individually sculpted with very fine gofun finish.

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To find such a set intact, with signatures by such a noted dollmaker, and extraordinary details such as symbols of nobility on each, signature on original boxes, and wonderful facial modeling with distinctive expression on each is extraordinary. $18,000/28,000


23. Wooden Gosho in Black Silk Cherry Blossom Kimono with Rare Yellow Lining, Early 1800s All carved wood with very plump rounded face having centered painted features, gofun finish with very fine lustre, deeply-set sockets of half-moon-shaped eyes, downcast lips, fiber upper arms, right hand clasped for holding an object, sexed, black velvet inset crown, slits at sides of head for forelocks, wearing wonderful black silk crepe kimono with vivid cherry blossom embroidery and rare color yellow padded silk lining, gold silk obi, silk brocade charm pouch attached at the back. Excellent condition except hair forelocks frail. Edo period, early 1800s. an outstanding costume of rare colors and rich designs. $2800/3200 Above: Details of lot 22.

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24. Superb Large Wooden Dolls Depicting the Legend of Takasago in a Rare Youthful-Persons Variation, Mid-1800s

Cranes are embroidered on the dangling belt ties at Jo’s waist as well as on the sleeves of his inner kimono; phoenix designs are woven into his jacket.

A very unusual silk fabric of banded silk in variegated colors forms the trousers of Jo.

22” (56 cm.) Each has distinctively-carved wooden head, lustrous gofun finish with painted facial features, she with modest downcast eyes and he with well-defined gazing eyes, mouths painted as though open with suggestion of teeth, black human hair with painted feathering around the face (the woman with long straight hair to her hips, and the man with elaborately pulled-back hair that is captured in a coil at his crown), formed body, carved wooden hands and feet with one hand sculpted to hold Close-up view of Jo’s face with fine lustrous gofun, detailed hair style and a view of red under-jacket. a rake or broom. Wearing superb silk costumes of unusually rich textiles with embroidered designs, the man (Jo) with banded silk trousers, green brocade jacket with phoenix design, red under jacket embroidered with crane and lattice design, holding a gilded garden rake; the woman (Uba) with an extraordinary outer coat (uchigake) with incense designs, obi with plum designs, and a red silk inner panel with heavily embroidered designs of turtle, plum and pine, holding a broom in her right hand. The pair are presented on their original fabric-edged wooden platform. Excellent condition. Late Edo period, circa 1860, representing the classic figures from the Noh performance of Takasago, in which a long-wedded couple, residing under the “pine tree of abiding love” work steadily to freshen,

The red silk inner panel of Uba’s kimono is heavily embroidered with turtle, plum, and pine, all symbols of longevity.

Uba holds the sceptre handle of her gilded fauxbamboo broom in beautifully posed hands; her obi is decorated with plum designs.

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In the traditional manner, the long hair of Eba falls to below her hips, held only by a tie tassel at the back neck.

The gentle expression of Uba is beautifully rendered here as are the layered details of her costume.


In this rare variation of classic Takasago legend, the wedded couple are presented as young rather than aged.

preserve and prolong their love by sweeping and raking away the fallen needles, thus symbolizing the constant renewing of their love. The pair is usually presented as aged; this pair is notable for the youth of its couple, their grand size, luxury details, and superb state of preservation. This pair

is shown in NingyĹ?, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 211. Other less luxury examples of the Takasago legend appear as #134 and #207 in this book. $18,000/23,000

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Jingu’s long black hair is inserted in a center slit in her crown; her painted high brows (so-called sky-brows or okimayu) are an indication of her royal lineage. A rear view of Empress Jingu delineates her long hair, and and elaborate layers of costume.

Construction of the gold paper lacquered armor.

The baby Ojin, Son of Empress Jingu, tended by Takenouchi.

25. Important Early Dolls in Rare Size Depicting Empress Jingu, Takenouchi and Infant Ojin, Early 1800s 21” (53 cm.) including helmet. 15” seated. Each with carved wooden head having very fine lustrous gofun patina, his with ivory-like tones, and with stylized characteristics. Jingu with black silk fiber hair inserted in center crown slit, drawn back and extending to her hips, has painted features with aristocratic detailing including sky-brows (okimayu), carved hands with expressive fingers and carved feet, and is wearing an elaboratelylayered silk brocade robe with cloud and dragon motif, and with gilt paper lacquer armor with paulownia crest on chest, carrying a quiver of arrows, bow, sword with fur cover, and with lacquered eboshi and curved boots. Takenouchi, in classic kneeling pose, is wearing silk brocade costume with dragon-crested armor, straw sandals and has wizened aged features enhanced by inset thick grey brows, moustache and beard; he holds the wrapped infant Ojin in his arms. Generally excellent. Edo period, early 1800s. The figures depict the Empress Jingu (the only female figure to be included in Boy’s Day displays), her minister Takenouchi, and her infant son, Ojin, the

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Facial detail of Takenouchi, with agewizened features and gentle expression.

Close-up of armor worn by Takenouchi.

Textile details on costume of Takenouchi.

Further textile details on costume of Takenouchi.

future Emperor. Jingu and Takenouchi wear unusual matching crests (tsuta design) possibly indicating a comissioned set for a family with that same crest. History and legend concerning Empress Jingu are intricately woven and impenetrable, a scholar’s pleasure to disentangle. Yet both versions of the life of this remarkable woman, remain compelling story lines to this day. $10,000/13,000

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The mitsuore doll was designed to be dressed and undressed, here wearing its original yuzen-dyed silk crepe kimono with wonderful peony design.

26. Very Rare Early TripleJointed (Mitsuore) Nodding Gosho, Circa 1800 20” (51 cm.) The carved wooden head with fine lustrous gofun finish, is pin-attached to the hollow torso which allows a “nodding” action (the distended stomach allowing movement of an inner weight that facilitates the nodding action), painted features, narrow eyes, feathered brows, open mouth with tongue, shadowed bald pate, well-defind ears, silk crepe (chirimen) upper arms, carved wooden limbs with pin-jointed articulation at cradle-shaped hips, knees and ankles, concave openings at back legs to allow realistic posing possibilities, large feet designed for self-standing, curled fingers, sexed, wearing red under-kimono jacket with fawn-spotted silk crepe sleeves, and a richly-colored yuzen-dyed silk crepe (chirimen) kimono with peony design. Excellent condition. Edo period, circa 1800. The original wooden box with signature is included. The development of the articulated ningyō signaled a radical change in how the Japanese ningyō was perceived: originally as a static object of display, and, then, with the mitsuore as a doll designed to be handled and re-dressed that is, a play doll. This doll is photographed and described in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, pp 70-71. $20,000/26,000

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The design of the articulation included nodding neck, cradle-hips, and ability of the ankles to be front or side-posed.

Above: The noddingforward pose of the head is evident here - a rare feature - as well as the stomach shape which was designed to allow space for the nodding weight.

Left: The label on the original wooden box of the nodding mitsuore.


27. Rare Carved Wooden Articulated Doll (Mitsuore) with Unique Talisman Bag, Circa 1850 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head and torso with gosho-shaped large round head, gofun finish, painted features, deeply-set eye sockets, painted brows, child’s style hair with sumi-ink-painted forelock and sidelocks, impressed philtrum and chin line, black velvet circle patch at the crown, silk crepe (chirimen) upper arms, carved wooden legs, feet and hands with flat-cut edging at joints and concave cut-out at back thighs to allow high degree of articulation, feet sculpted to allow the doll to stand freely by itself, well-defined fingers and toes. Wearing black silk crepe “growth” kimono with paulownia crest, double padded hem, and beni-red silk lining, along with an inner red silk kimono and a green silk brocade obi with paulownia design and an attached talisman bag (mamori-bako) of luxury red velvet with raised chrysantheum design. Excellent condition, some frailty to back of kimono. Late Edo period, circa 1850. Rare jointed gosho doll with wonderfully sculpted and painted face. Details of body construction, and fine original luxury costume whose paulownia and chrysantheum designs indicate a doll for the noble family. $18,000/22,000

Right: Back view of the Mitsuore illustrates the deliberate placement of the paulownia crest design on the kimono. Above: The eyes are so deeply set as to appear to be glass rather than painted, and the side and forelocks are artfully painted with sumi ink.

Above: A rear view of the kneeling Mitsuore gives definition of the body details; note the flexibility of the ankles and the luxury black velvet circlet at the crown. Right: The hip, knee and ankle jointing is designed to rest flat when the doll is standing.

Left: The paulownia symbol is considered an imperial crest. Right: Dangling from the obi is a luxury red velvet talisman bag (mamori-bako) with imperial crest of chrysantheum design.

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Above: The mechanical (karakuri) gosho is designed to lift his arms up and down, raising and lowering the fox mask. Right: Close-up of the simple wooden turning mechanism which moves the arms up and down.

28. Large Mechancial Gosho (Karakuri) with Fox Mask, with Original Signature and Box, Early 1800s 10� (25 cm.) with cap, 8� without). Extremely plump paper mache gosho with large round head, fine gofun complexion, painted features, very narrow eyes, smiling expression, painted teeth, black sumi-ink painted forelock and sidelocks with feathering, attached silk fiber sidelocks, jointing at shoulders, wearing original silk bib (haragake), red silk crepe (chirimen) sleeveless outer jacket with cherry blossom embroidery and silk cap. He is holding a paper mache fox mask, and when the lever at his back is moved up and down, he lifts and lowers the mask in a playful manner. Generally excellent.

The signature found on the torso of the gosho.

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The atelier signature on the original gosho box.

Edo period, early 1800s. The torso bears the artist signature, and the doll is preserved in its original box. Karakuri is the name for the ningyĹ? with simple mechanical movements. The fox mask was a favored theme, the fox believed to have particular human connections, and appeared in many Japanese legends and theatrical performances. $5000/7500


29. Mechanical Gosho (Karakuri) as Lion Dancer, Early 1800s 8� (20 cm.) Of sculpted paper mache, the very plump gosho portrays the Shishi-mai dancer, and has fine gofun finish with tiny centered painted facial features, downcast eyes, smiling expression, teeth, silk fiber sidelocks and forelock inserted in slits with painted feathered detail, jointing at shoulders with mechanical turn lever at the back allowing the arms to alternately raise and lower the baby rattles which he holds in each hand.

Left: The wooden lever at the back torso of the Lion Tamer allows the arms to alternately move up and down, shaking the rattles.

He is wearing a richly-embroidered haragake bib under a red silk crepe (chirimen) sleeveless jacket, and on his head is tied a gilded paper mache cap in the shape of a lion’s head. Excellent condition.

Above: Detail of the gilded lion mask cap attached to the gosho head with red silk crepe (chirimen) ties.

Edo period, early 1800s. The mechanical action gosho are known as Karakuri; this example is designed for alternate movement of the arms, as opposed to #28, with synchronized arm movement. According to Alan Scott Pate in NingyĹ?, The Art of the Japanese Doll, the style and painting of a number of these rare dolls is so similiar as to suggest a common maker, although further research to identify that maker is needed. $6000/8500

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30. Splendid Carved Wooden Set of Seven Musicians for the Imperial Court in Rare Large Size, with Original Instruments and Signed Boxes, Edo Period 11� (28 cm.) Each has carved wooden head and hands with lustrous gofun finish, painted facial features with refined expression, narrow eyes, teeth, painted sky-brows indicating nobility, black painted pate under silk fiber hair

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in rare very extended length, and each is wearing a lavish 12-layer padded silk court robe (junihitoe) with extended gauze train (mo) having hand-painted leaf and floral design; the outer jackets feature a chrysantheum pattern, and there are dragons interwoven on the outer sleeves. Notably each face is distinctive, as are the hand which are posed to hold the particular instrument which each plays. The instrument include lute, zither, long flute, short flute,


flame drum, drum, and pipe flute, and are executed of particularly fine quality. Excellent condition, minor typical frailty to silk edging on few. Edo period, ealy 1800s, Shichinin-Bayasha. The splendid set is notable for three very distinctive reasons: their luxury grand size, their number of seven figures (usually five), and their being women (usually boys). Too, the

sumptuouness of costume, the quality of musical instruments, the unique posing of each body to accomodate to the instrument being played, the superb quality of gofun, and that each owns its original signed wooden box, enhances their value. The set is shown in NingyĹ?, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, pages 122 and 123. $35,000/45,000 Photograph details continued on next page

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That each of the seven faces is painted differently underscores the luxury of the set. Evident are the highpainted “skybrows”, symbols of nobility. The hair is combed smoothly away from the face.

Each musician is wearing a lavish 12-layer padded silk court robe (junihitoe) with chrysantheum and dragon patterns.

Each of the musicians has been preserved in its original wooden packing boxes labeled “court ladies” or “seven musicians”.

The silk fiber hair is very long, extending down the back in a single long braid.

The gauze train is decorated with painted pampas grass and flowers.

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Close-up of the signature on the wooden boxes.


Detail of musician playing the lute with hand-painted designs. note that her hands are posed to hold this particular instrument only.

Detail of musician playing the flame drum.

The seven musical instruments include lute, zither, long flute, short flute, taiko drum, drum, and pipe flute.

Detail of musician playing the taiko drum which is superbly constructed.

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31. Rare Diminutive Carved Wooden Doll as Lion Tamer, Early 1800s 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gleaming gofun finish, highly-defined facial expression of laughing child, painted features, heavily-lidded eyes, impressed dimples and teeth, well-modeled ears, silk fiber cap-shaped hair, carved wooden feet and hands, wearing fine early silk crepe (chirimen) kimono with embroidered floral design on the sleeves, his outer jacket worn as though tossed off of his shoulders and his sleeves tied for ease of movement, classic silk Zukin cap, and holding a paper mache lion mask with black bead eyes and hinged open/close mouth in his right hand. Mounted on original black lacquer base with inset painted floral design. Generally excellent, light dustiness of costume. Mid-Edo period, early 1800s, the charming doll was inspired by the Noh theatre performance of Shishi-mai, or the Lion Tamer. In the legend, a priest approaches a bridge at which a roaring lion appears at the other end; the priest is cautioned to wait for a miracle, which he does. Suddenly the lion appears again, cavorting merrily in a wreath of colorful peonies, and the priest passes over without problem. The symbolic story is beautifully presented in this wonderfully sculpted doll with beautifully-detailed costume. $3000/4000

32. Carved Wooden Bunraku Puppet Depicting Osome with Outstanding Costume and Articulated Fingers, Circa 1900 45” (114 cm.) All-carved wood with rich gofun finish, glass eyes which open and close by lever mechanism in the neck, dramatically-painted features include outlined eyes, open mouth, teeth, accent lines around the nostrils, swivel head on wooden shoulders and wooden hands with articulation at three knuckles which is operated by a lever at back torso. The internal construction allowed the puppeteer to manipulate the figure in intricate ways to depict anguish, horror, piety and devotion, including backward fling of the head, lowering of the eyes, and articulation of the fingers. This figure depicts Osome, playing the role of the merchant’s daughter from the Bunraku theatrical play “Osome of the White Tie-Dyed Sleeves” who falls in love with a lowly worker. Her costume is designed to both reflect and constrict her societal position; since the sumptuary laws of Japan forbade her to wear the luxurious embroidered and brocade silks favored by the upper classes, she is adorned in simple fabrics enhanced with ingenious techniques including tie-dyeing. silk crepe with fawn spot, and a dramatic back panel with bells. Excellent condition. Paper mache lion with hinged open mouth, an important element in the Lion Dancer story.

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Especially fine sculpting including laughing expression, heavily-impressed dimples, and teeth is enhanced by gleaming patina and contrasts his silk Zukin cap.

Defining features on early ningyō are stitchtightened cuffs, designed to allow fluidity of movements.

Meiji era, circa 1900. Alan Scott Pate writes in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, page 237, “over time, this particular costume with its tie-dyed sleeves executed in large blocks of red alternating with a light blue green, with a black satin or velvet lapel, became the stock costume for Osome and a ready signifier of her role.” $11,000/13,000


Grandiloquent Osome is replete with softly padded fabrics which, strictly speaking, adhered to the sumptuary laws, yet still created an impression of opulence.

Rear view of Osome in her classic costume of tie-dyed red silk crepe alternating with bands of green and accented with black velvet.

Elaborate detail of the decorations on the silk fiber hair seen from the right side.

Left: Signature appearing on the mechanical lever of Osome.

Below: The threepoint articulation of the fingers features jointing at each knuckle, designed to be manipulated by the puppeteer. The silk crepe fabric with luxury black velvet trim is visible behind.

A detail view of the articulated fingers.

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33. Carved Wooden Portrait Ningyō of the Celebrated Hero, Kusunoki Masahige, Circa 1850 10” (25 cm.) (including cap). Carved wooden head with highlycharacterized features and expression, slightly-pigmented gofun finish, painted features, chin shadowing, outlined eyes, pronounced brows, strong nose, fiercely downcast lips, black silk fiber hair in style that emphasizes the bald crown, extended sideburns and topknot. Posed kneeling, he has carved wooden hands, and a padded body which is richly-costumed in a silk brocade kimono under green silk sleeveless jacket with combined trousers (kamishino), body armor with crest that is his characteristic symbol, wrist guards with black velvet detailing, The sculpted crest on the and unusual high pointed cap. Generally chest armor that is the excellent. characteristic symbol of Kusunoki Masahige.

Edo period, circa 1850, portrait of the legendary hero noted for his loyalty. $1800/2500

34. Carved Wooden Takeda-Ningyō Depicting “Man at Bamboo Wall”, Circa 1800 16” (41 cm.) Carved wooden head, hands, and lower legs and feet, gofun finish on head and hands with fine sheen, posed with head sharply to the side and body in extreme dramatically-twisted pose, having the right leg askance with toe lifted. The face is painted in high drama with special attention to the curled brows and brown eye shadow, and with downcast lips, painted teeth, deeply-set fierce-looking eyes, and shadowed chin, He has silk fiber hair with extended sidelocks and topknot, and is richly costumed in silk and brocade with unusual waterwheel embroidery on the sleeves, and luxury black velvet (birodo) accents, and his legs are painted to simulate striped stockings, with blue painted shoes and uplifted right toe. He stands upon original base with embroidered fabric insert. Generally excellent, some typical frailty to velvet. Edo period, 1800s. $3000/4500

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35. Early Carved Wooden Ishō-Ningyō Depicting Chinese Immortal in Rare Brown Velvet Costume, Circa 1800 9” (23 cm.) Carved wooden head posed dramaticially to the side and forward, gofun finish and painted Kabuki theatrical make-up (kumadori), painted thick brows, moustache and goatee, red accent lines on scowling face, black painted hair, posed in dynamic manner with arms outstretched, wearing rare costume of brown velvet with gilt thread embroidery, and silk edging, lacquered paper collar, silk brocade trousers, Chinese style fitted paper mache cap, and mounted on black lacquer base with painted insert. Generally excellent, some fabric frailty on edging. Edo period, circa 1800. Especially fine carving and painting of face, rare brown velvet costume on the unusual Chinese themed character. $3200/4200

36. Carved Wooden Takeda Courtier in Sumptuous Silk Costume, Circa 1850 16” (41 cm.) Carved wooden head, hands and feet, gofun finish with fine lustrous sheen on head and hands, painted facial features with highly-dramatized fierce expression including exclamatory brows, deeply-downcast lips and shadowed chin, and with painted black

hair under silk fiber short sidelocks, and attached cap. Posed in highly-dynamic manner with twisted torso, right foot extended to the side with uplifted toe, and extended arms in counter-pose to face. He is wearing a sumptuous costume of red silk crepe (chirimen) with gold thread sleeve embroidery known as futami-gaura (wedded rocks), with green silk brocade outer coat, silk crepe armor leg protectors and with two long swords. Mounted on original black lacquer base with embroidered textile insert. Generally excellent. Edo period, circa 1850. The takeda-ningyō provides an unusual and fascinating combination of courtier and warrier costumes. $5000/6500

Detail of fine gold thread sleeve embroidery known as futami-gaura (wedded rocks).

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38. Important Trio of Carved Wooden Child Dolls Representing Three Classes of Society Early 1800s

37. Outstanding Carved Wooden Laughing Ishō-Ningyō with Drum in the Chinese-Style (Karako), Late 18th Century

The ishō-ningyō is a broad category of Japanese doll designed simply for play, with emphasis on opulent costuming. It includes fashionable ladies, legendary historic heroes, and playful children of society.

11” (28 cm.) Carved wooden head and hands, lustrous gofun finish, painted facial features, very narrow eyes with pronounced eyelids, painted features, closed mouth with painted teeth and smiling expression, impressed dimples, black silk fiber hair in Chinese knot decorated with silk crepe pom-poms, padded body arranged in seated pose with carved wooden feet posed counterpoint to the head, carved hands with right hand having curled fingers to hold drum stick. Original Chinese style costume of blue silk brocade with red silk crepe (chirimen) trousers, tie cords on sleeves, and neck and wrist ruffles, holding a silk-wrapped drum. Generally excellent, light costume fading. Edo period, late 18th century. Rare Chinese influence on the delightful early Japanese ishō-ningyō with captivating facial expression. The doll is featured in Japanese Dolls by Alan Scott Pate, page 137. $13,000/17,000

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14 ½” (37 cm.) standing, and 8” seated. Each has a carved wooden head whose facial shape and expression varies from the other two, gofun finish with fine sheen, painted facial features, black silk fiber hair in classic “tea whisk” style and long forelocks indicating its youthful age. Each has carved wooden gofunfinished hands and feet (the seated ningyō with feet hidden behind). Included are the Merchant, the Nobleman, and the Samurai. On the left is the Merchant (chonin), wearing a brocade surcoat over a kosode kimono; this highly patterned kimono with opulent decorations had evolved from a commoner’s jacket and although worn by all three classes, was particularly the province of the Merchant. In the center is the Samurai wearing the matching winged coat and trousers in rare silver paper weave and paulownia regal crest, with decorative elements of netsuke, inro and tobacco pouch. To the right is the Nobleman wearing green


silk gauze coat, considered formal wear, and trousers with undulating line weave. Excellent condition. Edo period, early 1800s. The trio was originally sold as a set, known as Fuzoku, and is alternately referred to as gosho style (in reference to

rounded shape of head and childlike expressions) or ishĹ? style (in reference to the importance of the costumes) and are celebrated for the highly artistic blending of two. Included is the original wooden box and display platform.The trio is featured in NingyĹ?, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 66. $18,000/25,000

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39. Important Early Pair of Imperial Couple in Superb Gold Lame (Kinran) Brocade, Early 1700s. 13” (33 cm.) Each with carved wooden head in distinctive shape, very refined gofun finish with painted features, narrow downcast eyes, blackaccented inner lip line, she with defined “sky-brows” denoting nobility, each with wooden hands with very extended fingers, his feet peeking out in unusual sole-to-sole pose, silk fiber hair. The costumes are quite notable, their textiles highlighted by the use of gold kinran technique. He is wearing a robe with extensive kinran whose reflective qualities give an illusion of pattern, along with gold lacquered cap of state (kanmuri). She is wearing a 12-layer kimono, each layer with red silk crepe (chirimen) edging

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on elaborately woven brocade with kinran accents, and a gilded metal headdress with suspended glass or wooden beads to simulate jewelry. Excellent condition. The set is preserved in matching Japanese wooden boxes labeled Imperial couple (dairi-bina). Edo period, early 1700s. Known as Kyoho-style hina, the pair are extremely important in the evolution of hina, this style reflecting the artistic sensibilities of its affluent era, notable for larger size, inclusion of feet on the male, very fine textiles, and superb nuanced sculpting and painting of facial features. This pair is shown and discussed in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, by Alan Scott Pate, page 97. $29,000/35,000


Right: The lavish layering of her brocade costume is especially evident from this back view.

Right: Her sleeves are edged with thickly padded red silk crepe (chirimen) for added opulence.

Right: The use of Kinran interwoven in the fabric was a very luxurious detail, lending an illusion of rich patterning.

Right: A close-up view of padded sleeves and kimonos; note the tiny hand within the sleeves.

The pair have been preserved in these wooden boxes labeled Imperial couple (dairi-bina) with signature.

Right: The intricate technique of kinran was first developed in China during the Sung Dynasty (960-1127). Gold leaf was applied to paper which was cut in very fine strips and interwoven into silks, creating infinite reflections and changeable designs. The Kyoho-hina, as shown here, were the first Japanese hina to make use of the technique.

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40. Carved Wooden Portrait of Kato Kiyomasa in Superb State of Preservation, Late 1800s 15� (38 cm.) including helmet. Of carved wood, the fierce warrior (aramusha) is posed kneeling on his right leg, his left leg outstretched and his head uptilted, having gofun finih with slightly-tinted complexion, exaggerated painting of

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features including sharply-downturned mouth, strong nose, upturned thick brows, shadowing facial hair including moustache and chin stubble, and carved wooden hands and feet. He is presented in full regalia, of rich gold silk over black brocade, very rare red lacquered armor with chased metal fittings, green Kabuto helmet with crescent moon motif, black velvet tabi,


The highly-characterized portrait is achieved not only by dramatic painting, but also by crisp sculpted lines of nose, chin and jaw.

straw sandals, striped velvet shin guards, unusual woven mesh cover on his left sleeve, gold lacquer wrist guards, a Shishi lion crest on his chest and holding a halberd in his right hand with a long furcovered sword at his hip. Near mint condition. Edo period, late 1800s. The ningyĹ? depicts the legendary hero and warrior, Kato Kiyomasa, and is photographed and descripted in Japanese Dolls, by Alan Scott Pate, page 94. $8000/13,000

Above: Kato Kiyomasa in full regalia costume seen from the side/back.

Right: The Kabuto helmet with crescent moon motif and gilded designs and has a protective neck guard of rare red lacquer armor.

A close-up view of the chased metal fittings over rare lacquer armament.

His feet are protected by black velvet tabi, woven straw sandals, and striping velvet shin guards.

His carved wooden hand is seen peeking from the elaborately-layered costume, with cord tied sleeve-wrists and protective hand guards.

Detail of the underside of the woven sandals.

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41. Carved Wooden Ningyō Depicting Ebisu, The God of Daily Provisions, Circa 1860 13” (33 cm.) 14”l. base Having carved wooden head in rounded gosho style with gofun complexion, painted facial features enhancing the detailed sculpting around the eyes and laughing mouth, painted details of hair at sides with emanating long silk fiber sidelocks, carved wooden hands posed to hold a fishing rod, and his body posed as though about to capture the large paper mache sea bass that is at his feet. He wears a silk crepe kimono wth fan embroidery, silk brocade outer coat, black lacquer cap, and carries a sword. Mounted on original wooden base with embroidered textile center. Generally excellent. Late Edo era, circa 1860. The ningyō combines the animated pose of the popular takeda doll with the parody nature of the mitate doll and expresses this in the very plump rounded childlike face of the gosho. The ningyō represent Ebisu the God of Daily Provision, portrayed as a cheerful child about to provide the night’s dinner of a wholesome sea bream and symbolizing good fortune and a bountiful harvest for the coming year. $4000/6000 Left: Close-up of the textile designs on Ebisu’s costume, back view.

Ebisu’s left hand is carved to precisely accommodate his fishing rod.

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His right hand is carved realistically to capture the sea bream.


Detailed are the long silk fiber sidelocks enhanced by feathered painted of hair, unusual shape of the lacquered cap, and fine quality of gofun.

The costume is constructed of rich silk brocade textiles, and enhanced with gold thread embroidery.

42. Carved Wooden Laughing Ishō-Ningyō in a Lively Animated Scene, Late 1800s 15” (38 cm.) Having a carved wooden head, hands (sculpted to hold drum sticks) and bare feet (peeking from beneath trousers), with lustrous gofun finish, inset glass eyes, painted features, laughing expression, teeth, feathering detail of painted hair at sides of head and slits for silk fiber sidelocks in long lengths to indicate youthfulness. He is posed dynamically, leaning to the side, his left foot playfully balanced atop a wooden drum with gold painted designs, his right foot extended with upraised big toe, and his hands posed to begin drumming. He is wearing a silk brocade outer coat, red silk crepe (chirimen) kimono with embroidered designs, and lacquered musician’s cap, and is mounted on a wooden base designed to appear as a rock-strewn countryside. Generally excellent. Meiji era, Late 1800s. $3500/4500

The carved wooden hands are sculpted for their particular purpose, in this case, holding the drumsticks.

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43. Extremely Rare GrandSized Gosho-Ningyō with Elaborate Presentation Ribbon, Early 1800s

The extraordinary presentation ribbon (mizuhiki) is detailed here, perfectly balanced by the rounded facial shape and centered facial features.

The grand size of the extremely rare gosho is dramaticized in this photo; its actual foot is the same size as the 4” gosho (#6 this book) which is alongside.

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17” (43 cm.) Sculpted wooden or paper mache child with very plump modeling and over-all fine gofun finish, over-sized large rounded head, depicted seated with his right leg extended forward and left leg bent at the knee. His arms are extended forward and he clasps a wooden toy top in his right hand. He has a bright eager expression with painted features including outlined eyes in deeply set sockets, smiling mouth painted as though open with suggestion of teeth, painted feathering of hair at sides under silk fiber hair and an extraordinary presentation ribbon (mizuhiki) at his forehead. The doll is sexed, has dimpled knees and elbows, defined ears, and is wearing a teal green silk robe with gold brocade obi. Generally excellent. Edo era, early 1800s. The painted presentation ribbons were inspired by the traditional Japanese system of ribbon tying on boxed gifts, substantiating the purpose of the doll as a gift or honorary gesture. The grand size of this gosho and elaborate detail of the presentation ribbon indicate the doll’s original presentation as an imperial court gift or omen of auspicious wishes. $28,000/34,000


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44. Diminutive Carved Wooden Ministers (Zuijin) of The Left and The Right, Circa 1870 6” (15 cm.) (7” with base). Posed seated are two men, one depicting a youthful man and one depicting an aged man with sculpted detail of age lines and silk fiber grey hair, brows, moustache and beard, each with carved wooden head, inset glass eyes, gofun finish, painted facial feature including sky-brows indicating their position as court dolls. each with wooden hands and posed upon matching silk-wrapped base. They wear elaborate silk court costumes with cloud and dragon design on the kimono, patterned trousers, black lacquer kanmuri court cap,and each carries a sword and bow and swords. Generally excellent. Meiji era. circa 1870. The pair, representing Ministers of Left and Right, or old man and young man, served as court attendants, accompanying noblemen on their voyages outside the palace. Their history is welldetailed in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 124/125. $1500/2000

45. Carved Wooden Ministers of The Left and The Right, Early 1800s 11” (28 cm.) Two men, posed standing, one depicting youth and one depicting an aged man, each with carved wooden head having distinctive very pronounced nose, gofun finish, painted facial features, and carved wooden hands. The older man has sculpted detail of age lines, and silk fiber grey hair, sidelocks, brows, moustache and beard, and the youthful man has black silk fiber hair, sidelocks and elongated beard. Each is wearing elaborate silk costume with dragon design, accented by luxury black velvet trim, along with a textured Eboshi cap, and each carries a sword, and bow and arrow. Generally excellent. Edo period, circa 1800, representing the Ministers of the Left and the Right, they trace their historical connection to the Shinto shrine guardian figures, their function as attendants having more symbolic significance than actual physical protection. $1800/2300

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The strong lines of Tenjin’s face are especially evident in the profile view, as is the detail of feathered painting along the edges of silk fiber hair.

A distinctive portrait look is achieved by angular cheek and jaw lines, enhanced by impressed forehead and mouth lines.

46. Portrait Ningyō of the Legendary Poet Courtier, Tenjin, Early 1900s 13” (33 cm.) The seated portrait doll has finely-sculpted head and hands, pigmented gofun finish with fine sheen, very angular features, impressed age lines on forehead and sides of mouth, glass inset eyes, painted moustache and thick black brows with feathering, strong nose, closed mouth, short chin beard in slit, painted pate with feathering under silk fiber short hair, topknot. He is posed seated with cross-legs, his sculpted feet tucked under his silk brocade silk court costume patterned with undulating lines (tatewaku), and with plumcolored lining and brown silk trousers that are imprinted with circular motif. Excellent condition.

Tenjin’s hands are beautifully-sculpted with defined nails.

Taisho era, circa 1915. He represents the poet-courtier, Sugawara No Michizane known as Tenjin, who became the victim of court politics and was banished from Kyoto. As years passed, his poetry was re-discovered, outstanding theatrical performances were presented as well as the Tenjin festival (Tenjin-Matsuri). Details of this story are told in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 168. $1600/2100

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47. Outstanding Carved Wooden Courtesan (Oiran) and Her Procession, Mid-1800s 15” (38 cm.) courtesan, 12” attendants, 13 ½” male chaperones. Each has carved wooden head, hands and lower legs, and is mounted on pebbled wooden base, The courtesan with glass eyes, refined nose, green accent on lips, teeth, silk fiber hair in elaborate upswept fashion ornamented with tortoise-shell decorations (two in the shape of a fan), and wearing superb costume comprising purple silk outer kimono (uchigake) with embroidered

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crane and wave designs, inner red kimono with embroidered wisteria pattern, and with six interior kimono collars with embroidery, six kimono hem borders whose padding was designed to allow a more sensuous presentation when strolling, and platform sandals (geta). Her elaborate obi, tied in front to indicate her role and status, is richly embroidered, including gold threads, with design of a dragon amidst swirling clouds (the dragon with glass inset eyes). Her lady attendants are apprentice courtesans (kamuro) and have painted facial features including accented


green lips, silk floss hair with different coiffure and hair ornaments and are wearing rare matching costumes of red silk crepe (chirimen) with cherry blossom design, fawn-spotted silk obi, and platform sandals (geta). Also included are two male chaperones with unusual highlydistinctive features, each with different expression, glass inset eyes, bald pate with stylized black silk fiber hair inset at the sides and as topknot, thickly-padded silk plaid or striped kimono with unusual red, white and blue streamers on the side of obi, bare feet, one with umbrella, and one holding a staff. Excellent condition. Late Edo period, circa 1860. The artistry and luxury quality of this Courtesan Procession indicates her status as a high ranking courtesan (Oiran-Gyoretsu), The fiveperson set is remarkable to find complete and has exceptional details of characterization, textiles, accessories, presence, and fine state of preservation. $18,000/25,000

Left: Close-up of the courtesan face and elaborate coiffure with tortoiseshell combs.

Left: A side view of the courtesan and the elegant padded folds of her kimono hems. Back view of the attendant displays the grand size of the fawn-spotted silk obi.

The attendants wear red silk crepe (chirimen) kimonos with cherry blossom design and fawn spotted obi.

Above: Face view of second attendant. Note the variation in facial model and painting, and decoration of hair. Above Right: Face view of the other attendant.

The dragon design on the front-tied obi of the courtesan (indicating her status) is intricately embroidered and includes glass eyes.

The purple silk outer kimono features an embroidered crane in flight.

Left: The second male chaperone.

Back view on male chaperone with highly stylized pose.

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48. Carved Wooden TakedaNingyō Inspired by Kabuki Theatre Performance, Circa 1850 16 ½” (42 cm.) overall. Carved wooden head and hands with lustrous gofun finish, painted facial features, smiling expression, aquiline nose, painted feathering of hair around the forehead edges, sculpted hair in upswept fashion with arranged silk fiber coiffure and hair ornaments, posed in sideways manner with counter-posed head and extended arms. Wearing lavish A profile view distinguishes the regal aquiline shape of nose and forehead, as well as kimono of red silk crepe (chirimen) elaborately coiffed and decorated hair. with rich embroidery of leaves and large white bellflowers on the sleeves, silk brocade sleeveless outer coat, and with fan and hand drum. Standing upon a carved wooden boat with painted waves along the side, and overall mounted on a wooden base with gold feet, inset fabric panel. Excellent condition. Edo period, circa 1850. The figure represents a man playing a female role (onnagata). $4000/6000

49. Outstanding Carved Wooden Two-Figure Takeda Tableau Depicting the Legend of Otohime, The Under-Sea Dragon Princess, Circa 1850

Left: Detail of the costume includes rich embroidery of leaves and bellflowers on the sleeves of the red silk crepe kimono.

12” (30 cm.) h. 19”l. base. Posed on a wooden base in a very animated dynamic manner are two carved wooden figures, each with gofun complexion and painted features; including the Dragon Princess Otohime clothed in extraordinary Chinese style silk brocade costume with silk hakama trousers, ruffled silk collar and sleeve edging, and tied sleeve closures to allow fluid movement as portrayed in the scene; her exceptional hair is dramatically upswept. Urshima, the man, is clothed in rich textiles including wide leg silk brocade trousers, with embroidered details of cranes on his sleeves; he has a bald pate, with youthful long sidelocks drawn back to a long queue, and he holds the “Box Containing Time” in one hand, a fishing basket and pole in the other, and a turtle is at his feet. Generally excellent. Late Edo, circa 1850. The legend of Otohime, the Dragon Princess who lived under the sea, is complex, tragic, and yet a love story. The “Box Containing Time” is said to symbolically hold immeasurable treasures, and the turtle is a symbol of fertility. $9000/12,000

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Above: Close-up views of the fine textiles and embroideries of their costumes.

Rear view of the Takedo vignette of Otohine and Urshime.

The symbolic turtle at the feet of Urshima.

Urshima holds the “Box Containing Time�. A finely embroidered crane is on his sleeve.

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Seated view with legs posed.

Rear view of the costume detailing beautiful textiles.

50. Carved Wooden Fashionable Lady (Bijin) with TripleJointed (Mitsuore) Articulation Circa 1880 14� (36 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass inset eyes painted features, open mouth with painted teeth and green accented lower lip, black silk fiber hair in elaborate upswept manner trimmed with chirimen fawn spotted bows, silk crepe upper arms, wooden torso, legs and lower arms, peg-jointing at hips, knees and ankles, concaveshape of back thighs to allow greater flexibility, large toe separated to wear sandals, wearing yuzen-dyed silk crepe outer kimono with dramatic floral and fan designs, patterned inner kimono, red silk obi, Generally excellent, albeit some frailty to inner kimono.

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Meiji, circa 1880. The fashionable lady (bijin) has exquisite refinement, her triplejointed body allowing elegant posing. $3700/4600


51. Petite Carved Wooden Fashionable Lady (Bijin) with Double-Jointed Legs, Circa 1900 9� (23 cm.) Carved wooden socket head with gofun finish having fine lustre sheen, narrow glass eyes, painted lashes, slightly-open mouth, teeth, painted feathering of hair around forehead edge, black silk fiber hair in very elaborate upswept coiffure with hair ornaments, silk crepe upper arms, wooden torso, lower arms, and legs, jointing at hips and knees, concave cut-out at back of legs allowing for greater flexibility, wearing yuzen-dyed silk crepe kimono with wonderful patterns and red silk lining, white silk inner kimono, blue silk obi with floral designs. Generally excellent. Meiji era, circa 1900. $2300/2700

52. Carved Wooden Bijin with Double-Jointed Legs Wearing, Red Silk Crepe Hand-Painted Kimono, Circa 1900

Rear view of the yuzen-dyed silk crepe kimono.

Rear view of the hand-painted kimono and triangularpatterned obi.

11� (28 cm.) All-carved wood except silk crepe upper arms, gofun finish with fine lustrous sheen, glass eyes, painted features, open mouth, teeth, tongue, feathered details around forehead edge, black silk fiber hair in very elaborate upswept fashion, articulation at hips and knees with concave cut-out at back of thighs for extra flexibility, unjointed ankles, wearing red silk crepe kimono with hand-painted designs over green silk inner kimono, with triangular-patterned obi having silk crepe bustle sash (obiage) and tie closures. Generally excellent. Meiji era, circa 1900. $4200/5300

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Detail of facial modeling and grey silk fiber hair, beard and moustache of the elderly figure, a rare presence in this youthful group.

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53. Set, Five Carved Wooden Court Figures in Matching Costumes, Including Rare Elderly Man, Mid-1800s 8 ½” (22 cm.) The five men are posed seated, each with carved wooden head having fine gofun finish, very fine detail of facial expression; four depict young men with black silk fiber hair, each with slightly different face; and the fifth depicts an elderly man with wizened features, white/grey silk fiber hair with topknot, moustache, and long beard. All five are costumed identically in rich green silk brocade with gilt thread weave and plum accents, over floralpatterned under-robe, gold sash, black court cap, and carrying a matching faux sword with gilt embellishments, Excellent condition except minor hair wear under caps. Edo period, mid-1800s. The set was designed for presentation at a Girl’s Day (hina matsuri) display. $4000/5000


Symbolic motif on the sword handle.

Profile of Hideyoshi; the ningyĹ? was an accurate dimensional portrait rendered from the numerous portrait paintings of him during the final years of his life.

54. Carved Wooden Portrait Doll Depicting the 16th Century Japanese Emperor, Hideyoshi, Circa 1925 14� (36 cm.) Carved wooden head with ivory-like gofun finish, strongly-modeled features with heavy eyelids, strong nose, full jowls, incised frown lines at sides of closed somber mouth, painted brows, inset glass eyes, painted feathering of hair edging the hair slits which have inserted silk fiber hair arranged in a formal style, padded body which is posed seated in cross-leg style, carved wooden hands (designed to hold objects) and feet (peeking beneath trousers), and wearing a richly-patterned brown silk kimono with ivory silk lining, patterned plum-colored trousers, metal-detailed breast plate, winged Chinese style gilded court cap (koburi), and with sword and metal gumbai fan. Generally excellent, wear to gilding finish on cap wings. Showa era, circa 1925, the figure portrays the 16th century Japanese Emperor Hideyoshi, considered the great unifier of Japan. $3000/4000

Detail of gumbai fan and sword handle held by Hideyoshi.

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56. Extremely Rare Carved Wooden “Imperial Nunnery Gosho” in Standing Pose, Circa 1770 16” (41 cm.) All carved wood including upper arms, large rounded head and facial shape, gofun finish, painted black hair with very delicate feathering lines around the forehead, unpainted bald spot at top of head (nakasori), painted features, very narrow defined eye sockets with heavy eyelids, mouth sculpted as though open with painted teeth, sturdy legs posed for standing, sexed, arms held in front of body with cupped palms, wearing a red silk crepe (chirimen) kimono with padded hem, rare narrow sleeve openings (kosode), matching narrow tie belt, and rich embroidery of a variety of flowers and long-tailed birds. Generally excellent, few very minor paint rubs on hair, age wear at lower left hem of kimono, and the original wooden box is included.

55. Fabulous Pair of Carved Wooden Playful Gosho in Rare Matching Costumes, Early 1800s 8” (20 cm.) Each is of carved wood with classic large rounded head and centered facial features, legs posed for self-standing and with outstretched very plump arms, fine lustrous gofun finish, painted facial features, defined modeling of eyelids and nose, mouth posed as though open with painted teeth, black human hair, very fine detail of body sculpting especially of hands, toes, chubby wrinkles, dimples, and sexed. The two playful gosho are wearing matching red silk crepe (chirimen) outer coats and matching classic bibs (haragake) which are each richly embroidered, and with one holding a red lacquered tray with painted flowers to match. Generally excellent, one has minor craze line at side bridge of nose, small flake at heel of one. Edo period, early 1800s. The dolls are performing the Odori folk dance and are wearing very rare and beautifully-preserved costumes. $8000/9500

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Edo period, circa 1770. It was the tradition that ladies of the court, eventually being retired to a nunnery, brought with them the ningyō they had assembled during their court days. This doll, whose age, workmanship, and fine state of preservation is indication of its court origin, is an example of that doll referred to as “Imperial Nunnery Gosho”, very few examples are known to exist today. The doll is photographed and discussed in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 42. $35,000/50,000


The profile view of the doll details its posture and finely-painted hair.

Detail view of satin-stitch floral embroidery and long-tailed bird with interwoven gold threads.

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Details of facial painting and hair, include the “sky-brows”, symbols of aristocracy, and his rare extended height cap.

57. Very Rare Standing Imperial Couple (Tachibina) with Superb Presence, Early 1800s 20” (51 cm.) (including stand and crown). Both have carved wooden heads with burnished gofun complexion, painted features including very narrow eyes, brows and sky-brows, blackened accent line between teeth, wellformed wood hands. He has wooden feet with tabi socks, and she has exceptional black silk fiber hair extending to her hem. Their matching gold brocade costumes are very rare to find; she with a twelve-layer kimono over red trousers, an elaborate crown, and wooden fan with painted pine tree designs and multicolor silk tassels; and he with eboshi court hat with rare tall extended “eri” Each is posed on its original wooden striped-fabric base. Generally excellent. Edo period, early 1800s. The Imperial Couple in a standing pose and with fully-rendered bodies are very rare to find, a shortlived style that evolved from the earlier paper Tachi-bina. This pair is photographed and described in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 84. $9500/12,000

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Detail of the luxury gold brocade textile, extremely rare to find on the matching couple.


Her painted wooden fan features hand painted symbols including pine tree.

The floorlength hair of the female is shown in this rear view, as well as the multi-layered kimono.

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each with original richly-designed silk brocade costumes of Yusoku textiles, and presented on wooden base in original signature box. Excellent condition. Taisho era, circa 1920. $1800/2100

59. Carved Wooden Folk Style Imperial Couple in Rare Diminutive Size, Circa 1870 4 ½” (11 cm.) and 5” dolls. 10” l. base. Of carved wood, depicting an Imperial Couple seated upon their original tatami base, having tiny narrowest eyes, painted features and painted hair. He (obina) posed with hands and crossed ankles, modeled Despite her tiny 4” size, the sculpted planes of her face are artistically rendered. feet, wearing silk brocade outer coat and lacquered court cap; and she (mebina) with elaborate crown and silk costume with embroidered flowers. Generally excellent. Early Meiji era, circa 1870, known as Keshi-bina in reference to their small size, their production likely influenced by government rules on opulence. These smaller yet charming folk sets were often made outside of the doll-making center of Kyoto,

58. Pair, Tachi-Bina Imperial Couple in Original Box, Circa 1920 11” (28 cm.) Each with carved wooden head, gofun complexion, painted features Close-up of finely-painted including “skydetails of her face. brows”, she with feathered details of hair framing her forehead and with black silk fiber hair drawn back and extended low on her back, and he with black silk hair, topknot and lacquered court hat. He has the traditional T-shape body of Tachi-bina male and she the cylindrical shape,

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their small size and simplicity rendering them more perishable, and thus, today, quite rare. $1700/2200

60. Carved Wooden Portrait Doll of the Tea Server, Sen no Rikkyu, with Superb Costume, Circa 1830 9” (23 cm.) Carved wooden head with bald pate indicative of Buddhist monk, fine gofun finish, painted facial features, narrow angled eyes, arched brows, closed mouth with solemn expression, posed seated with legs hidden under costume, carved wooden hands, wearing costume comprising a patterned brown sleeveless coat with green cord ties over figured silk kimono with Buddhist “sayagata” pattern, four layered collars, bast fiber trousers with silver thread accents and silk cap. Excellent condition. Edo period, circa 1830. The historical figure, Sen no Rikkyu, is considered the premiere master of the art of the Japanese tea ceremony. Mingling his zen education to the earlier formal tea ceremony, he urged that the tea repast must be simple, honest, and respectful; his teachings not only impacted the world of tea, but extended to include aesthetics, architecture, and gardens. $3000/4000 Left: Bald pate, symbolic of Sen no Rikkyu’s Buddhist education, enhanced by his very fine gofun complexion.

Right: detail view of the padded four-layered collar that is enhanced with green cord ties.

Detail of fabric weave on the sleeveless outer jacket.

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61. A Quintessential Grand-Sized MushaNingyō Portraying the Legendary Yoshitsune, With Outstanding Face and Costume, Early 1800s 25” (64 cm.) (including helmet, excluding arrows). Carved wooden head with very fine detail of sculpting, gofun finish with very fine patina, painted facial features with stern visage, angular eyes and thick brows, black silk fiber hair, carved wooden lower arms and hands with curled fingers for holding object, and wooden lower legs with defined boots. Wearing an extraordinary costume of rich textiles whose rarity features include very unusual silk brocade trousers (hakama), elaborate heavy metal neck, shoulder and chest guards, dragon medallion on chest, Kabuto helmet with figural dragon (maedate), and wrist guards of luxury black velvet. Accessories include very fine baton (saihai) with paper-backed silk streamers, arrows with bird feathers, and sword with fur-wrapped handle. Excellent condition. Edo period, early 1800s. The short tragic 30-year life of Minamoto no Yoshitune (1159-1189) embodied the qualities of all legendary heroes, ensuring his place not only in theatre, literature, and traditional art, but also as the most notable figure of the traditional Boy’s Day celebrations, This particular example is especially notable for its size, quality of construction, intricate details, and superb state of preservation. $18,000/28,000

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Photographs detailing superb quality of sculpting and rich fabric and armor details.


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62. Rare Carved Wooden Woman (Isho-NingyĹ?) Known as Yamauba with Bare-Breasted Costuming, Circa 1900 11â€? (28 cm.) Well-modeled woman with one-piece head and torso with very fine gofun finish, oval face with inset glass eyes, aquiline nose, open mouth, tongue, slender elongated throat, upper torso with shapely bosom, black silk fiber hair drawn from face and captured at the back into extendedlength, feathered painting around the sides of face to enhance the wig, armature upper arms and legs, carved hands and feet, expressively-posed fingers, posed seated, wearing cloth kimono in tiny checkered pattern, red silk lining at collar and sleeve edges, and very rare black velvet (birodo) accents. Excellent condition. Meiji era, circa 1900, portraying Yamauba, although well known in Japanese legend, few actual examples of her as a doll are known to exist. Bountiful legends, some quite cruel, exist about her, yet in other instances she is depicted as the loving mother of the orphan Kintaro, or simply as a woman of nature. $2500/3500

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63. Rare Carved Wooden Gosho Doll Depicting Samurai Nobility with Jade Miniature Netsuke, Early 1800s 11” (28 cm.) Carved wooden head, torso and legs posed in a sturdy plump forward-facing stance, gofun finish Uniquely-styled hair with tied hair over bald pate, with fine lustrous known as “tea whisk”. patina, sexed, cloth textile upper arms, wooden lower arms and hands with right hand posed to clasp an object and left hand extended, very large round head with centered painted facial features, outlined eyes with pronounced upper eyeliner, tight smile, human hair wig with bald crown (nakasori) accented by topknot (socalled “tea-whisk” style) and shaped Rear view of the well detailed costume. bangs, wearing original costume comprising a jacket/coat combination (kamishino) of bast fiber, which signified military class, over brown striped silk kimono with blue silk obi, and with attached jade netsuke gourd looped to the outer belt. Excellent condition. Edo period, 1st half of 1800s. Rare large size gosho with outstanding costume, wig, and accessories. $12,000/16,000

The jade netsuke is attached by woven brown cord.

The intricately woven bast fiber of the kamishino which was a jacket/coat combination.

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64. Superb Portrait Ningyō of Jimmu Ten’no, First Emperor of Japan, by Maruhei Okiheizo 24” (61 cm.) Carved wooden head with lustrous gofun finish, glass inset eyes, painted facial features, black silk fiber and human hair and beard, well-defined fingers, depicted seated with extraordinary costume of archaic garb in the Chinese style, including lacquered and gold leaf leather armor, brown leather boots, elaborate strands of jade-like glass “sacred jewels” that signify Emperor status, white brocade robe with kinran detail and raised dragon and cloud motif, green and gold brocade obi with demon head medallion, gold lacquered winged cap, faux-fur treatment at the thighs and shoulder guards, with bow, arrows, and heavy metal sword with chased details and elaborate beadwork and having original stand. Excellent condition. Circa 1930. the musha-ningyō, portraying Jimmu Ten’no, the first emperor of Japan, is of a quality and grand size indicating its important private commission. The superb piece was made in the Kyoto atalier of Maruhei Okiheizo as a special comission. $18,000/27,000

64.1. Carved Wooden Portrait of Yoshitsune in Court Attire, Mid-1800s 17” (43 cm.) seated, excluding hat. Carved wooden swivel head, finely burnished gofun finish, narrow brown enamel eyes with defined ridge of eye rims, strong nose, closed mouth with firmly-set downcast lips, grey shadowed detail around his hair line. defined black hair set in slits, carved wooden hands, the right hand posed to clasp an object. He is wearing a rich green stiffened brocade kimono with gold threading over a plum-colored silk inner jacket and trousers with royal court pattern, paper lacquered armor with rich gilt trim, and a black court cap (eboshi). Excellent condition albeit hair is quite worn. Meiji era, circa 1870. Depicted is Minamoto no

Yoshitsune, one of the more popular warriors of his 12th century era, and, to this day, considered one of the most famous samurai. He is depicted here in unusual court attire. $5500/7500

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65. Carved Wooden Yusoku-Style Imperial Couple Attributed to the Atelier of Maruehei Okiheizo, Circa 1950 12” (30 cm.) Each has carved wooden head with gofun finish, inset glass eyes with heavy eyelids, painted features, black accented teeth, “sky-brows”, silk fiber hair having feathered painting around forehead. Her hair is arranged on a form to create wide wings and then gathered at the back with extensions that reach to the bottom of her hand-painted silk-gauze train, and she is wearing a red and green silk brocade gown, gilt metal crown and carrying a wooden fan with orange designs. He is wearing a gold silk brocade outer kimono with paulownia crest, black lacquered cap, and carrying a metal and brass sword. Excellent condition. Circa 1950, the Yusoku-Style Imperial Couple were created in the atelier of the renowed Japanese doll maker, Maruehi Okiheizo. Each is signed on the neck dowel. $2500/3500

He is posed seated with soles of feet.

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The artist’s red seal appears on the neck dowel of each ningyō.

Profile view of the man, with notable painting of “sky-brows” and feathered painting of hair around the face.


Rear view of the woman with wonderful hair extensions.

Hand-painted details of her fan.

The profile of the woman shows her aristocratic presence and superb painting and gofun complexion.

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Right: Red was believed to have very dominant powers; thus the extendedlength red hair, shown here, could attract evil diseases to itself rather than to a child.

66. Exceptionally Rare Talismanic Wooden Doll (Hōsō-Ningyō) with Characteristic Red Hair, Circa 1800 12” (30 cm.) h. overall. 8 ½” ningyō. Standing upon a wooden plinth with carved legs is a wooden socket-headed ningyō with tinted gofun complexion, painted facial features, narrow eyes, mouth designed as though open with painted teeth, hip-length straight red hair with bangs, wooden block torso, wooden hands and feet, wearing red silk coat (uchigake), three inner collars of variant colors, dense trousers of gold-leafed silk (kinran), and holding a long-handled sake scoop and tray. The plinth has original (rubbed) gold finish with umber borders. Very good overall condition with some fading of complexion. Edo era, circa 1800. The ningyō, depicting a sake-loving imp (Shogo), designed as a talisman to ward against devastating childhood diseases, the doll was designed to be placed near a child, with the belief that diseases would be attracted

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Left: In the rear view, details such as his helmet now slung on his back, and his bandaged ankle on battle-scarred leg, reinforce the portrayal of battle-weary warrior. The helmet bears the mitsudomoe crest.

to the red hair of the doll, rather than to the child. Few examples exist today of this exceptionally rare ningyō. This doll is shown and discussed in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, by Alan Scott Pate, page 271. $16,000/22,000

67. Outstanding Carved Wooden Iki-Ningyō (Living Doll) Portraying Wearied Samurai Warrior Returning from Battle, Meiji Era 17” (43 cm.) All carved wood in the classic hyper-realistic style characteristic of iki-ningyō, portraying a weary and wounded samurai warrior returning from battle, having darkened complexion, highly defined expression, human hair, inset bone teeth, glass eyes, separated toes, battle-scarred painted legs pierced by arrow shafts, his right hand on the pommel of a long sword which is being used for support, wearing a full suit of metal armature with leather details and silk lacing over a battle-stained hachimake, silk brocade under-kimono, helmet hanging at his back with mitsudomoe crest, sandals, carrying sword, arrows, and holding by its topknot the severed human head of his vanquished opponent, mounted on rosewood base. Generally excellent.

Detail of highlyrealistic facial sculpting with weary half-lidded eyes.

Meiji era, mid/late 1800s. A series of hyper-realistic ningyō in large exhibition size had been made for some time in Japan, and then, toward the mid-1800s they were created in this smaller scale, designed for the developing Western market. $21,000/28,000

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69. Carved Wooden “Beautiful Lady” (Isho-Bijin) with Unusual WesternStyle Parasol 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head, hands and feet, delineated big toe, glass eyes, gofun finish with painted features and double row of teeth, ornate black silk fiber hair with red silk crepe hair ornaments, wearing unusually-colored brown brocade short coat with cord bows and ties, over a padded blue brocade kimono with red lining, and carrying a woodenhandled Western-style silk parasol. Mounted on wooden base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, circa 1920. $1100/1500

68. Carved Wooden “Beautiful Lady” (Isho-Bijin) with Sacred Treasure Motif on Obi, Circa 1912 8 ½” (22 cm.) kneeling). Carved wooden head and expressively-posed hands, glass eyes, gofun finish with painted features including teeth, black silk fiber hair which flows to her hips and with long sidelocks, painted feathering of hair at forehead, metal foil hair ornaments, and wearing a richly padded red silk kimono with embroidered details of pine boughs, cherry blossoms and rippling water augmented with gold threads. Her gold brocade obi is patterned with sacred treasure motifs, and she holds her original hand drum (tsutsumi) of lacquered wood with gilt accents. Excellent condition. Taisho The embroidery on the kimono is era, circa 1912. $1100/1500 augmented with gold threads.

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70. The Carved Wooden Courtesan Procession, Oiran and Her Attendants in Resplendent Costumes, Circa 1920 10” (25 cm.) and 9”. Each having carved wooden head, expressively-posed hands and feet, glass eyes, painted features over rich gofun complexion, rudimentary body form, and original wooden stand. The courtesan (oiran) has elaborate silk fiber hair with long strands gracefully arranged at her front torso, a formal arrangement of hair at the crown and back of head that is decorated with metal foil hair ornaments, and painted feathered hair tendrils around the forehead. She is wearing a vibrant red silk kimono (uchigake) with embroidered trailing cherry blossoms and having long red tasseled sleeve ties, purple brocade obi secured with red cord string (obi-jime), red silk inner kimono with padded hem, raised sandals (geta), and a silk cosmetic purse (hakoseko) which holds additional hair pins. There is a young attendant in training wearing a purple crepe yuzen-dyed kimono with autumnal leaf pattern, red an gold brocade obi, carrying fan pouch, and with elaborate hair decorated with combs and a gilded metal hair comb/ear cleaner. The second, more matronly, attendant is wearing a distinctive open kimono (uchigake) of blue


Back detail of the vibrant red silk kimono with embroidered trailing cherry blossoms worn by the courtesan.

Extravagant metal foil decorations ornament her formallyarranged hair.

silk brocade with cherry-blossom patterned pale green silk underkimono, sandals, and has elaborate hair combs, fan, cosmetic bag, and gilded metal hair comb/ear cleaner. Excellent condition overall. Taisho era, circa 1920. The trio is featured in Japanese Dolls by Alan Scott Pate, page 125 who notes “structurally, emphasis was placed on the heads - finely executed features and immaculate coiffures and on a sophisticated presentation of the textiles, positioning them to their greatest advantage.� $18,000/25,000

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71. Pair, Carved Bone Imperial Court Couple in Rare Tiny Size, Mid-1800s 4” (10 cm.) The man and woman each has carved bone head including hair in elaborate manner, carved and painted facial features, wooden body with elaboratelyformed silk costume in court style, each posed on rounded base of carved bone. Excellent condition. Mid-1800s. $800/1100

72. Extremely Rare Wooden Fashion Lady (Ishō-Ningyō) with Maker’s Signature, Early 18th Century 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden swivel head with full rounded face, carved black hair in distinctive manner with attached decorative comb designed to expose her welldefined ears, gofun-finish with ivory-like patina, painted features, very narrow eyes, aquiline nose, small lips with fashionable green accents, wooden block torso and left leg which is posed in a sinuous manner, carved wooden lower arms and right foot which is posed as though peeking from kimono, elegant hands with right hand posed to hold her attached fan. She is wearing a richly patterned silk brocade kimono with gold thread dragon and cloud motif, under a brown silk gold-patterned gauze outercoat worn with sleeves thrown back. Posed on original stand. Overall fine condition, the hair comb is possibly replaced. Early Edo period, circa 1700. The maker’s mark of Maru I of Osaka appears on the underside. Extremely rare swivel head doll notable for its early age, fine state of preservation, and maker’s mark. The doll is featured in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 177. $17,000/21,000

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Rear view of the ishō-ningyō details the splendid textile designs of her silk brocade costume with gold thread dragon and cloud motif. Her outercoat is slung over her shoulders, the sleeves thrown back in a casual yet formalized manner. Rear view of her carved coiffure.

The maker’s mark of Maru I of Osaka appears on the underside of original base.


Semi-profile views of the face defines the unique carved coiffure and wonderfully-defined features.

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73. Carved Wooden Gosho-Ningyō in Standing Pose with Rare “Growth” Kimono, Circa 1800 7” (18 cm.) Carved wooden head, torso and legs with very plump rounded head, gofun finish with lustrous patina, centered facial features, half-moon shaped eyes in deep sockets, mouth modeled as though open and with rare green lip accents, defined chin crease and ears, slat above each ear for insertion of hairlock, small black velvet circle patch at crown, defined chubby creases on torso, sexed, well-defined hands (the right hand close-curled) and flat feet for selfstanding. He is wearing a purple striped silk kimono of abstract pattern with constructed “growth pleat” to allow the kimono to be lengthened as a child grew, matching obi, and with charm pouch (mamori bako) attached at the back. Very good condition overall, slight gofun separation at back of head by velvet patch, forelocks lacking. Edo period, circa 1800. $4500/5200

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The rear view depicts the tying strings of both cap and bib.

Detail of the long silk fiber sidelocks and black lacquer good luck box.

74. Carved Wooden Gosho-Ningyō with Rare Long Side-locks and Matching Cap and Bib, Mid-1800s 4” (10 cm.) All carved wood doll depicting a very plump kneeling boy with gofun finish overall, highly-characterized carved and painted features, shaded brows, deeply-set eye sockets, downcast lips, unusually long silk fiber sidelocks with interspersed gold threads, applied Zukin cap and bib (haragake) with raised maple leaf and stream designs, cloth ties for cap and bib at his back, carrying a black lacquer box which is actually carved into the crook of his right arm. Excellent condition. Edo period, mid-1800s, the doll is known as the Good Luck (Gofukunoinori) gosho, has rare long sidelocks and is wearing rare matching bib and cap. $3200/3900


75. Delightful and Very Rare Trio of Wooden Gosho-NingyĹ? in Noh Theatre Parody, Circa 1800 5â€? (13 cm.) Each has carved wooden head, torso, legs and lower arms with gofun finish, and rounded plump face with carved and painted facial features that is different on each (one, for example, with a wide smile), and each has a different hair style. The sword-carrying gosho wears a Chinese court cap over sidelocks, the center gosho wears a red-wig over his black hair, the gosho on the right wears a cap over his black hair and carries a battle fan. Each has a well-detailed sexed body, with right hand curled for

holding fan or sword. They are wearing identical costumes of bib (haragake) and matching sleeveless coat made of chirimen silk crepe with embroidered designs of flowers and rippling water. Excellent overall, boy with battle fan has line in gofun across his lower face. Edo period, circa 1800. The dolls were created as a humorous parody (mitate) of a particular Noh theatre performance, and were designed for the amusement of Japanese nobility of the era. They are extremely rare to find in a complete set with matching and well-preserved costumes. $9000/12,000

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76. Two Carved Wooden “Beautiful Ladies” (Isho-Bijin) in Sumptuous Costumes, Circa 1920 10 ½” (27 cm.) Each has a carved wooden swivel head, wooden hands in expressive manner, wooden feet, gofun finish, narrow glass eyes, open mouth with teeth, green accent on lips, painted brows, (“sky brows” on one indicating aristocracy), and painted feathering of hair around the forehead which edges the elaborately-arranged silk fiber coiffure. Each is wearing a superb luxury costume in shaded purple-to-cream silk crepe with delicate floral embroidery, silk brocade obi with tie string, and carries a cosmetic bag, one with fan. Each is posed on original wooden stand. Excellent condition. Taisho era, circa 1920. $2200/3000

77. Wooden Seated Court Page (SandaiChigo) with Distinctive Hair Style, Circa 1880

The ishō-bijin were designed to be posed in dynamic interactive manner as seen in the larger photograph as well as this in which they appear to turn away from each other to gaze at another sight.

8” (20 cm.) Carved wooden head with rounded facial shape, gofun finish with lustrous sheen, painted features with heavily-lidded eyes, closed mouth with painted teeth, painted feathering of hair around the forehead, black painted pate beneath a human hair wig arranged in distinctive double-looped topknot indicative of his status as a court page, posed kneeling with carved wooden hands. Wearing a vibrant red silk kimono with layered ivory collars and sleeve edges, and with matching trousers decorated with black pom-poms, holding a fan. Excellent condition, some age spotting of trousers. Meiji era, circa 1880. $800/1200

78. A Trio of Carved Wooden Court Ladies-in-Waiting with Original Accessories, Circa 1930 9 ½” (24 cm.) standing. 7” seated. Each has carved wooden head and hands, glass eyes, silk fiber hair in elaborate coiffure that extends completely to her ankles, open mouth, tongue, teeth, painted features (the seated lady with “sky-brows”) and wooden structure under the costumes on the two standing

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ladies allowing for free-standing poses. Each is wearing classic costume of Shinto court ladies-in-waiting (San’nin Kanjo) in vibrant red silk with patterned ivory silk top and sleeves, seven-layer collar, layered sleeve edges, holding sake ladles and posed around a wooden immortality tray with pine tree and plum decorations. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1930s. Each sleeve is embroidered with a design that is likely a maker’s mark, and they are preserved in original signed wooden boxes. $800/1100

79. Carved Wooden Diminutive Figure in Black Silk Kimono, Late 1800s

The luxury detail of their construction includes extended floor-length hair and multi-fold sleeves and collars.

Original label “San’nin Kanjo” on box.

9 ½” (24 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes and facial features, black silk fiber hair, wooden hands, and feet, wearing black silk kimono with embroidered loin cloth, patterned silk under-kimono, and black lacquer eboshi court cap in unusual curved shape. Excellent condition. Meiji era, late 1800s. $700/900

The embroidered mark appears on the sleeve of each lady-in-waiting.

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80. Portrait of Jimmu Ten’no, the Legendary First Emperor of Japan by Maruhei Okiheizo, Circa 1930 18” (46 cm.) Posed standing, having well-defined sculpted facial features with fierce expression, rare sculpted black moustache and flowing beard, inset glass eyes, painted features including upangled brows, black silk fiber hair in archaic Chinese style, heavy wooden lower legs on attached wooden stand with scallopededge border, sculpted hands designed for holding objects. He is wearing an extraordinary costume in archaic Chinese style

Rear view of Jimmu Ten’no.

Close-up detail of the facial modeling, helmet, and sacred “jewels” for which Jimmu Ten’no was noted. The finest quality of construction includes glass eyes on the belt.

A sculpted hawk appears on the finial of his staff.

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The label on Jimmu Ten’nu’s original wooden box.


including leather helmet with heavy metal fittings, white silk under kimono, elaborate studded leather armor with metal fittings, mask-face belt buckle with rare inset eyes, fur boots, necklace with sacred “jewels” which center a mirror, and is carrying a staff with hawk finial and an elaborate sword with bells surrounding the grip. Excellent condition. Included is his original wooden box with maker’s signature. Showa era, circa 1930. Depicted is Jimmu Ten’no, the legendary first Emperor of Japan. The masterful ningyō was presented by the Kyoto shop Maruhei (Okiheizo) supplier to the Imperial Family, and considered among the finest ateliers of the early 1900s. $3500/5500

81. Sculpted Samurai Mounted Atop a White Horse, Circa 1900 20” (51 cm.) h. 18”l. The samurai has a sculpted head with tinted gofun complexion, inset glass eyes, sculpted and painted Fine sculpting and painting of facial features enhanced by tinted complexion portray a handsome samurai. moustache and goatee, silk fiber hair, sculpted hands with painted gloves, sculpted feet with applied fur boots. He is wearing an elaborate lacquer-paper armature over silk brocade shirt and trousers, leather helmet with rich gilt accents, metal knee guards with original cord ties, and carries a sabre. He is posed seated upon a white horse which has a rare white implanted-hair coat (keue saiku), glass eyes, hair mane and tail, and is fitted with an elaborate saddle and stirrups, and decorated with red silk fringe, and purple and white harness. The horse and samurai are posed on their original wooden base. Excellent condition. Meiji era, circa 1900. $3000/4000

The lacquered armature and leather helmet, seen from a back view.

Detail of sleeve textiles, and painting decoration of his gloved hand.

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82. Grand Carved Wooden Courtesan (Oiran) in Stunning Silk Costume with Attendant, Circa 1820 28� (71 cm.) Courtesan. 20� Attendant, The courtesan has a carved wooden shoulderhead with slender and refined shape and pose of face, elongated throat, gofun finish, narrow enamel eyes with heavily-defined eyelids, painted detail of hair feathering around the sides of face with a widow’s peak at the center forehead, black silk fiber hair that is very elaborately-arranged and decorated with silk crepe (chirimen) in a fawn-spot pattern, tortoise hair combs. and tinsel. She is posed in an elegant, yet sensuous, manner with carved wooden hands and feet and outstretched arms and is wearing an exceptionally lavish costume of silks and brocades with paddedhems, pale green inner kimono having red silk crepe panels, red brocade outer kimono (uchigake) arranged as though falling off her shoulders and accented with silver threads (ginran), and a superb brown brocade obi with chrysanthemum pattern that ties at the front to signify her highranking courtesan status. The courtesan appears to be advising her young attendant who stands modestly alongside, with gofun finish, enamel eyes, painted features including feathering of hair around her forehead, with black silk fiber hair arranged elaborately in a coiled topknot and decorated with chirimen bows, silver paper flowers and tinsel, and wearing a floral-patterned silk crepe kimono with padded hem, and brown brocade silk obi with silk crepe ties, holding a gilt metal hair ornament. The pair are posed on original wooden black lacquer base. Generally excellent. Taisho era, circa 1920. The pair are notable not only for their grand size, but also for superb details of costume and coiffure. $8000/11,000

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83. Carved Wooden Imperial Couple as the Classic Kokin-Bina of the Meiji Era, Late 1800s 15” (38 cm.) Each has carved wooden head and hands (he with wooden feet), with fine lustrous gofun finish, narrow glass eyes, painted features, open mouth with defined tongue tip, “sky-brows”, and feathered detail of hair around the forehead. She has long black silk fiber hair under an Her crown is elaborately-decorated with a phoenix and jeweled pendant design, and her painted “sky-brows”, indicating court presence, are strong evident.

elaborately decorated crown with phoenix top and jeweled pendants, and is wearing a multi-layered kimono with embroidered sleeves in paulownia design, with a silk gauze train with painted designs, and carrying a wooden fan with a painted scene. He is wearing Sokuti style black kimono (ho) and a tall black lacquered cap, and carries a sceptre. She is in excellent condition; he is excellent except costume silk is quite frail. Meii era, late 1800s, the classic style of that era, known as kokin bina. $6500/8500 Hand-painted designs decorate her gauze train which is centered by extended-length hair.

Well-detailed facial modeling including tongue tip, and aquiline nose are evident on the male of the Imperial Couple.

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84. Early Carved Wooden Portrait of Hideyoshi in Elaborate Armor, Circa 1840 11” (28 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted facial features, heavily-modeled eyelids, painted features, closed mouth with firmly-shaped lips, silk fiber hair in side-slits and drawn his The imperial Hideyoshi’s battle from face into a topknot, bald crest appeared fan, and sword on Hideyoshi’s with elaborate pate, carved wooden hands and armor. wooden case. feet, arranged in cross-legged seated pose. He is wearing a silk coat with black velvet details, and has lacquer paper armor, black velvet wrist guards, a textured gold lacquer cap, and is holding a battle fan (gumbai) and a sword with wooden case having green velvet loops and painted designs. Excellent condition. Late Edo period, circa 1840. Hideyoshi, 16th century, is considered the great unifier of Japan, with a profound cultural influence including the development of the tea ceremony, including the construction of a portable tea room, replete with gold leaf decorations, which accompanied him on his travels. This particular portrait of Hideyoshi, in rare diminutive size, is notable for its fine detail of costume and accessories. $1100/1500

85. Wooden Carved Portrait of Jimmu Ten’no with Elaborate Accessories, Mid1900s 13” (33 cm.) including base. Carved wooden Detail view of head with head with gofun voluminous hair, moustache finish, tinted and beard. complexion, inset glass eyes, painted features, black wiry silk floss beard and moustache, with hair drawn into a doubleA back view of Jimmu Ten’no shows the detail looped topknot, carved wooden hands and feet, of textile weave. and painted black boots. He is wearing a gold stiffened-brocade kimono with ivory silk fringe, sacred treasures necklace, and is carrying a sword, battle fan, arrows, and staff, and is posed upon his original wooden base that also displays a branch upon which is perched a falcon. Excellent condition. Mid-1900s. $200/300

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His armor crest is a chrysanthemum-in-water design.

86. Carved Wooden Seated Samurai with Finely Detailed Costume, Circa 1870 16â€? (41 cm.) Carved wooden head and hands with especially expressive carving of fingers, gofun finish with fine smooth complexion, glass eyes, painted features, aquiline nose, closed mouth with firm expression, painted feathering of hair around the forehead, and black-silk fiber hair. He is posed seated, wearing trouser and coat combination (kamishimo) with paste-resist chrysanthemumson-water design, kimono with bold chrysanthemum pattern, breast-plate armor with chased metal fittings which repeat the chrysanthemum-on-water design and a black lacquer court cap. Generally excellent. Meiji, circa 1870, representing a samurai (musha-ningyĹ?) in very fine costume with repeated image representing the imperial symbol of the chrysanthemum. $2500/3500

A gold chrysanthemum is woven into the sleeve fabric.

The sleeveless outer jacket has a repeated interwoven design of chrysanthemum-inwater.

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87. Carved Wooden Nara-Ningyō Dancer, Early 1900s 16” (41 cm.) All-wooden ningyō carved in a deliberately angular roughhewn manner (itto-bori) with natural wood finish on the partially-revealed face, painted black hair, sculpted and painted costume in elaborate dynamic designs and colors, holding a carved wooden fan in his right hand, and with a whitened mask with smiling expression covering the face; so artful is the carving that the mask appears as a separate attached piece of wood, but is actually the same piece of wood as the entire ningyō. Excellent condition. Showa era, early 1900s. The nara-ningyō traces its sophisticated roots back to the 17th century, with inspiration drawn mostly from the Noh theatre. This particular nara-ningyō is shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 166. Meiji era, early 1900s. $1200/1500

A maker’s symbol appearing on the doll.

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The fan is not only deeply-carved, but also richly painted with traditional themes.

Profile of the face clearly elucidates the dimensional carving of the mask.

The artistic carving appears to be richly draped and multi-layered fabrics.


88. Carved Wooden Bunraku Puppet Depicting a Sambaso Dancer, 20th Century 23� (23 cm.) including hat. Carved wooden head with highly-characterized features is loosely-jointed on tall wooden neck, ruddy complexion, black painted hair under the tall hat, black painted side brows, hinged lower lip, painted hint of moustache and beard, glass movable eyes. The head is attached to a firm paper-lined torso with attached rod upper arms and carved wooden lower arms, carved wooden lower legs, and the puppet is designed to have manipulation of the arms, as well as the movable large eyes and hinged jaw. Costume in classic manner of Sambaso dancer highlighted by a teal blue silk kimono with silk lining and orange silk banding on the very wide sleeves, that matches the orange silk inner kimono, with classic striped pointed hat, and holding three-tiered brass suzu bells on a wooden stick. The puppet is displayed on original wooden stand. Excellent condition. Showa era, 20th century. The puppet, with infinite moving possibilities, portrays the Sambaso dancer, whose ritual dance was purposed to drive off demons. $6500/8500

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A

mong the tiniest and less known of the Japanese ningyō are the kamo-

ningyō. Generally only 1”-2” tall, they seem to have originated during the early 1700s, from left-over scraps of willow wood used in the construction of Shinto shrines. At first a simple personal amusement of the workers, the figures began to be in demand by an appreciative public. The figures are notable not only for their unique construction known as kimekomi, (rather than being painted, an actual fragment of textile is applied to the carved wooden body) but also because they depicted everyday people in their everyday life, rather than the grand aristocratic or court figures. A fine history of the kamo-ningyō appears in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of the Ningyō, by Alan Scott Pate, pages 156-161. 90. Miniature Carved Wooden Doll with Painted Costume, Early 1900s 4” (10 cm.) All carved wooden ningyō depicting a standing child with painted gold Eboshi cap, and painted colorful kimono. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 20th century. $200/300

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89. A Trio of Miniature Carved Wooden Kamo-Ningyō, Mid-1800s 2” (5 cm.) The trio are of carved wood depicting The rear view of the trio shows details of carving and variations of textile fragments. three kneeling children with broadly-smiling expressions, having painted sidelocks and whisk topknot, with fabric remnant costumes which are tightly-adhered to the body forms by means of carved slits in the wood. Excellent condition. Mid-1800s. The trio is shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 160. $1600/2100

91. Miniature Carved Wooden Kamo-Ningyō with Rare Painted Presentation Ribbon, Mid-1800s 2 ¼” (6 cm.) Of carved wood, the one-piece kneeling figure has outstretched arms, gentle expression on the carved and tinted facial features, painted sodelocks and a painted presentation ribbon (mizuhiki) at his forehead indicating his original purpose as a gift. His The detail of the painted presentation ribbon is evident in this costume, seemingly multi-layered, close-up. Note that the entire doll is just over 2” tall! is actually a single layer of fabric fragments which are inserted into slits cut in the wood, designed to appear as though richly draped. Excellent condition. Edo period, mid-1800s. The ningyō is shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō, by Alan Scott Pate, page 158. $500/700


92. Rare Larger Pair of Carved Wooden Kamo-Ningyō with Toy Hobby Horse, Late 1800s 5 ½” (14 cm.) Both are of carved wood with single-layer fabricapplied costumes in the classic kamo-ningyō manner and with natural wood finish on face and hands. One has natural-finish bald pate, and the other has painted and carved hair; both have an original slit at the crown suggesting possible originallyadhered topknots or caps. One is holding a detachable carved wooden hobby horse. and the other stands with arms outstretched as though awaiting its turn. Excellent condition.

Back view of the pair.

Meiji era, late 1800s. A rare size of kamo-ningyō, presented in their original box with original label. $900/1200

Detail view of the carved wooden hobby horse.

A view of the crown of each doll detailing the carved slit.

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94. Miniature Paper Mache Ichimatsu Doll in Silk Crepe Kimono, Early 1900s 4” (10 cm.) The paper mache or wood-composite doll has gofun finish with shadowed bald pate, tiny glass eyes, painted features, open mouth, teeth, black hair sidelocks, paper mache lower arms and legs and is wearing a silk crepe kimono with transfer printed design and colorful chirimen edging. Excellent condition with some light frailty to chirimen edging. Early 1900s. $200/400

95. Miniature Paper Mache Doll with Signature Costume and Toy, Early 1900s 4 ½” (11 cm.) Paper mache head with very expressive delight on his painted facial features, shadowed crown with sidelocks and topknot, paper mache hands and lower legs with painted white stockings. He is posed standing on original base, wearing black open-front guild coat with unusual lettering on the lapels, pleated skirt, painted shirt front and is holding a toy in his outstretched hand. Generally excellent. Early 1900s. $300/400

93. Miniature Paper Mache Ningyō of A Young Boy Hoisting a Koi-Nobori Carp Banner, Early/Mid 1900s 4” (10 cm.) overall 11” h. The paper mache doll with tinted gofun complexion, painted facial features, black silk fiber hair, and paper mache lower limbs is standing alongside a wooden pole on a black lacquer base. Atop the pole are two windmills, a large fish and a gold ball. Excellent condition. $300/500

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96. Miniature Paper Mache Doll as Butterfly Dancer with Drum, Early 1900s 5 ½” (14 cm.) Having paper mache head wih tinted gofun finish, painted facial features, grey shadowed hair, the young child wears original costume with red silk trousers, rare tied wrists on the brocade jacket, and paper butterfly wings attached to his back. He is posed in a very animated manner, holding a drum in his hands. Generally excellent. Early 1900s. $300/400


97. An Exceptional Original Pair of Ichimatsu Dolls with Artist Signatures, Mid-1900s 15â€? (38 cm.) Each with paper mache or wood-composite socket head and lower arms and legs, lightly-tinted complexion, glass inset eyes, painted features, closed mouth, The boy has brush-stroke painted hair, and is wearing silk brocade hakima trousers and black silk kimono with embroidered designs of fans; and the girl, with black human hair, is wearing a red silk crepe kimono with embroidered details of fans, symbols and flowers, a cord-tied obi with exuberant fawn spotted bow at the back and carries a little necessities pouch. Generally excellent. Mid-1900s. Each of the pair has a matchng artist signature on the front torso, and were likely given as a wedding presentation set. The dolls are photographed in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of NingyĹ? by Alan Scott Pate, page 239. $1800/2300

The elaborate embroidery on the red kimono.

Visible in the back view of the pair are the intricate design of their costumes including the girl’s fawnspotted sash.

Vibrant fans decorate the costume of the boy.

Her necessities pouch is decorated with silk fringe and silver ornaments.

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98. Carved Wooden Lady (Kyoto-Bijin) with Beautiful Robes in Seated Pose, Early 1900s

Detail of the superb fabric design of her kimono. hair: Her elaborate coiffure as seen from the back.

98.1. Carved Wooden Court Lady (Isho-Bijin) with Dog, late 1800s 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden swivel head, gofun finish, very narrow inset eyes with heavy eyelids, painted facial features, slightly parted lips, teeth, “sky-brows”, black silk fiber hair in elaborately-arranged wings and then tied at the back in a cascade that reaches to the floor, carved wooden hands. She is wearing an exquisitely-embroidered ivory silk kimono with pink flowers on the sleeves and red silk edging; the kimono is tucked inside extended-length pleated silk pants, and she holds a fringed-end cord leash which attaches to a white and black paper mache pup with inserted-silk fiber “fur” and which is wearing a fawn-spot patterned collar with bells. Generally excellent. Meiji era, late 1800s, her “skybrows” indicate her status as a lady of the court. $1200/1800

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9 ½” (24 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass inset eyes, open mouth, teeth, heavily modeled eyelids, painted feathering of hair around the forehead edges, black silk fiber hair in elaborate upswept fashion with lacquer-paper and tortoise shell ornaments, carved wooden hands with posed fingers, carved wooden feet tucked bemeath her. She is wearing plum silk crepe costume with dynamic floral designs in red and pink. and with red and white silk padded linings, red pants, five-layered collar, and a red silk brocade obi with chirimen and cord ties. Generally excellent. Meiji era, early 1900s. $1100/1500


99. Carved Wooden “Beautiful Lady� (KyotoBijin) with Especially Exquisite Face and Unusual Shapely Legs, Circa 1900

Rear view of distinctive obi.

Two profile views reveal her aristocratic bearing and different angles of her elaborate coiffure.

At her front waist, the obi is edged with pink silk cord, and tied with a rare obi-jime belt closure whose metal clasp also has the paulownia crest.

20� (51 cm.) Posed standing, with carved wooden head, fine lustrous gofun finish, inset glass eyes, heavy eyelids, painted brows, painted feathering of hair around the forehead, gently-parted lips, teeth, slightly-smiling expression, black silk fiber hair in elaborate ornamented coiffure, wooden hands with finely-formed fingers, fulllength wooden legs having well-shaped calves and defined knees. She is wearing a patterned purple silk outer kimono with classic bellflower designs and paulownia crest, a sophisticated silk brocade obi with distinctive design, supplemental embroidery and a superb obi-jime belt closure, pink under-kimono of figured silk, white kimono lining, silk tabi socks. floral rondeles, and is mounted on a silk covered base. Generally excellent. Meiji era, circa 1900. The exquisite lady with superb hair and costume, is especially notable for her fully-sculpted legs with deliberate slightly-bent knees designed to lend her an elegant posture. $7500/9500

The embroidered paulownia crest on the kimono back indicates nobility.

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100. Takeda-Ningyō Depicting Empress Jingu and Takenouchi no Sukune Presenting the Tide-Shift Gems to Ryujin, The Under Sea Dragon King, in Very Rare Matched Ensemble 19” (48 cm.) Each has carved wooden head with gofun finish and is posed on a matching wooden platform with sea-rock outcroppings and palace balustrades, designed to be displayed as a pair. Including Empress Jingu with highly-defined “sky-brows” (okimayu) indicating her imperial lineage, wearing gilt-lacquered paper armor with richly-embroidered chrysanthemum design on her silk crepe sleeves, and brocade outer jacket with dragon and cloud motif. And Takenouchi no Sukune, her faithful minister, having wizened features, white silk fiber hair, wearing dragondecorated armor, two swords, arrows, and carrying a tray of tide-shift gems to Jingu. Especially well-preserved excellent condition. Meiji era, late 1800s. An unusual theatrical presentation of Empress Jingu, enacting the beloved sea-shift Takeda drama, and especially rare to find the two matching figures. $10,000/15,000

Details of intricately woven and integrated textiles in costumes of the pair.

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Detail of woven crane design on sleeves of kimono.

Details of the lacquered paper crest on the breastplate of the young man.

101. Carved Wood Young Man in Kneeling Pose with Crane-Patterned Kimono, Circa 1850 9 ½” (24 cm.) A young man, posed kneeling, has a carved wooden head with ivorylike gofun finish, glass inset eyes in dramatic side-slant, painted lashes, strong nose, closed mouth with scowling downcast expression, black silk fiber hair drawn back from his face into a topknot with extended backlocks and queue, and having a bald spot at his crown which indicates his youthfulness. He is wearing a rare indigoblue kimono and pant combination of bast fiber with paste-resist designs of flying cranes, an under-kimono of gold brocade, padded silk brocade hand guards, paper armor, and carries a sword and fan. Generally excellent. Edo period, circa 1850. An unusual diminutive size for this musha-ningyō model. $2100/2500

101.1. Carved Wooden Musha-Ningyō from Boy’s Day Exhibition, Circa 1850 11” (28 cm.) seated. Carved wooden head with narrow enamel eyes and heavy eyelids, wing-shaped painted eye brows, strong nose, closed mouth with firmly-set lips, bald pate with whisk-tied topknot, inserted black silk fiber hair, carved wooden hands. He is wearing a very fine black silk sleeveless outer jacket emblazoned with crests at front and sleeves and extending to form into long pants, green brocade kimono with gold threading (kinran), lacquer armor with gilt metal frame, heavy paper lacquer handguards, and holds a sword with silver mounts on the scabbard and purple and gold tassels. Generally excellent, small piece of armor lacking. Late Edo era, circa 1850. $3500/5500

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102. Carved Wooden Portrait Doll of the Historic Hero Yoshitsune, Early 1800s 17� (43 cm.) Posed seated, with carved wooden head, fine gofun finish, painted facial features with outlined eyes in deeply set sockets, closed mouth with stern expression, shaved pate with black silk fiber hair in long sidelocks and backlocks, carved wooden hands holding a battle whisk and battle fan (gumbai), painted black wooden boot tips, He is wearing a blue silk brocade kimono with attached trousers, lacquered paper armor having dragon crest on his chest and rare black velvet accents, Kabuto helmet with dragon crest, and carries a sword and arrows. Generally excellent.

Detail of his kimono textile includes interwoven gold threads.

Edo period, early 1800s. Considered by most to be the most important figure of the annual Boy’s Day display, Yoshitsune was a brilliant and valiant leader forced into exile by his brother, then dying at the age of only thirtythree $3500/4500 A profile face view of Yoshitsune offers a close view of his elaborate helmet including the dragon maedate.

The dragon crest also appears on his armor breastplate.

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103. Outstanding Pair of Gosho-NingyĹ? as Parody (Mitate) of Odori Folk Dancers with Presentation Ribbon Painting, Circa 1915 13â€? (33 cm.) Each of carved wood with very rounded and plump face, body and limbs, and each in a different animated pose as though performing the Odori folk dance. Each has gofun finish with very fine lustrous sheen, painted features including a beautifullyinked presentation ribbon at the top of the forehead, and wearing a traditional costume embroidered with paulownia and cherry blossom designs, and with an unusual garlanded peach crest and silver-couched geometric border at the back, sandals, and a lacquered paper cap. One holds a fan and the other holds a drum, and each is mounted on an individual red lacquered wooden base. Generally excellent. Early Taisho era, circa 1915. The set, known as mitate-gosho, are performing a parody of the traditional Odori folk dance. Special features of this rarely-found still-together matched pair include the unusual detail of costume, the painted presentation ribbon (mizuhikide) indicating their original gift purpose, and their original labeled wooden packing box. $8000/10,000

Detail of original label on the wooden box.

Detail of the painted presentation ribbon on the forehead.

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The wooden box which has preserved the pair of gosho for a century.

Embroidery on the costume back.

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104. Carved Wooden Diminutive Gosho in Standing Pose, 1930s 5 ½” (14 cm.) Of carved wood with fine gleaming gofun finish, the very plump child is posed standing with rare uptilted head pose and arms held backwards, one hand clasping a gold wooden gourd. With painted facial features including tiny eyes, closed mouth, teeth, smile, clothed in unusual floral-decorated bib (haragake), sleeveless silk patterned kimono, silk brocade cap with silk banding and with tall wooden geta and mounted on an unusual fan-shaped base. Generally excellent. Showa era, 1930s. $300/400

105. Carved Wooden Kimekomi-Ningyō, 1930s 5” (13 cm.) including cap. All wooden doll with classic plump gosho modeling, gofun finish on face, smiling expression, painted features, deeply set eyes, painted forelock. The gosho is costumed as a sambaso performer in the kimekomi manner comprising, silk brocade kimono and sleeveless jacket permanently applied to the carved body form (designed to appear as though richly-draped and multi-layered although actually only a single silk layer) and enhanced with painted detailing. He has a detachable paper-backed silk cap and holds a juzu bell-tree rattle. Generally excellent. Showa era, 1930s. $300/400

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106. Petite Carved Wooden Standing Gosho, Late 1800s 4” (10 cm.) Very plump carved wooden head, torso, legs and lower arms, well-detailed fingers and toes, overall gofun finish except cloth upper arms, painted facial features with deeply set eye sockets, solemn expression, painted feathering of hair around the forehead, silk fiber hair with topknot, and wearing a white silk layered kimono under brown bast fiber pants. Generally excellent, except frailty to trouser fabric at front. Meiji era, late 1800s. $700/900

107. Diminutive Carved Wooden Gosho with Eboshi Cap, Late 1800s 4” (10 cm.) (with hat). Posed kneeling, of carved wood with large rounded head and very plump oversized arms and legs, hands posed as though resting on legs, gofun finish with fine sheen, painted facial features, deeply set sockets, slightly smiling expression, feathering details around the slit-inset sidelocks, and with haragake bib with silk fabric edging and a black paper mache eboshi cap with textured detail and original cords. Generally excellent. Meiji era, late 1800s. $900/1300

108. Diminutive Carved Wooden Gosho with Delightful Pose and Costume, 1930s 3 ½” (9 cm.) All carved wood in standing pose with very plump head and body entirely covered in rich gofun finish, its head turned to the side and with upper glancing eyes, arms sculpted to the front and with right hand clasping leaves, wearing an applied silk brocade bib and sleeveless kimono in classic kimekomi-ningyō manner, and with red silk crepe cap with gold banding. Generally excellent. Showa era, 1930s. $200/300


109. Carved Wooden Gosho-NingyĹ? with Hobby Horse (Haru-koma), Early 1800s 8â€? (20 cm.) All-carved wood with large rounded head and centered facial features, gofun finish with fine lustrous sheen, deeply-sculped eye sockets, painted eyes and mouth with delicate serious expression, black silk fiber hair with bald pate at the crown, textile upper arms, carved wooden torso,

legs, and hands posed to clasp, and holding the chirimen silk reins of its paper mache hobby horse which is decorated with gilt finish and painted beading, and with bells and harness, and unusual braided detail of silk fiber mane. The doll is wearing a red silk crepe kimono with original crimped lines and gold silk brocade obi with dragon designs. Very good condition, gold paint on hobby horse is worn, Edo period, early 1800s. $5000/7000

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crepe (chirimen) costume with embroidered sleeves, and an outer silk kimono attached as though his sleeves have been tossed back for greater mobility in his dance. He holds a banner in his right hand and is mounted on a black lacquer base with fabric insert panel. Generally excellent. Edo period, mid 1800s. $2500/3200

Fine gofun finish and wonderful laughing expression are detailed on the dynamically-posed young man.

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110. Carved Wooden Character (Ishō-Ningyō) Depicting a Dancing Boy, Mid-1800s

111. Pair of Carved Wooden Ningyō with Variations of Facial Expression, Early 1900s

14” (36 cm.) Carved wooden head with rounded shape, gofun finish, painted features depicting a delighted child with laughing expression, small eyes below heavy eyelids, defined tongue, chin crease, and painted black pate with attached silk fiber topknot. He is posed standing in an animated manner, balanced on one foot, his head turned sharply to the left, and counter-balanced by his right-extended arms, and is wearing a red silk

10” (25 cm.) Each has a carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features, silk fiber hair attached in slits, arms posed in expressive manner, carved wooden hands and feet, and each is wearing a stiffened silk brocade kimono, one with rare multi-panels. The pair, united on a common lacquered wooden base are notable for variations, one having both forelock and sidelocks, and a wideeyed shy expression, and the other with side locks only, smaller eyes and an impish slight smile. Generally excellent, except one with minor gofun lifting behind sidelock slit. Early 1900s. $900/1400


112. Early Carved Wooden Ningyō as Falconer, Late 18th Century 9 ½” (24 cm.) Posed in a semi-kneeling crouched manner, the young lad has a carved wooden head in rounded shape, lustrous gofun finish, centered painted features, very narrow eyes, closed mouth with slightly protruding tongue, human hair over painted black pate and having an attached silk cap, carved wooden hand styled for holding an object, and wearing a padded silk crepe kimono with resist dye design of cherry blossoms on sleeves, with five layers of collars and with under sleeves having ties at the wrists and a bast fiber obi with black bow at back. A paper mache falcon is perched on his shoulder held by the leash in his right hand. Good condition albeit, loss of hair, and extensive fading of early costume. Edo period, late 1700s, a rare early doll complete with all costume features and falcon. $4500/6500

113. Very Rare Carved Wooden Presentation Doll (Uizan-Ningyō), 18th Century 14” (36 cm.) kneeling. Posed kneeling with carved wooden hands posed in its lap, the early doll has a carved wooden head with rounded shape, gofun finish, painted features including tiny

eyes with heavy eyelids and tiny mouth, black silk fiber hair, and is wearing a red silk crepe (chirimen) sleeveless outer coat with gold thread embroidery, black silk kimono with gold thread embroidery and white bell flowers, and blue silk brocade obi. Fair condition, gofun and textiles quite worn. Edo period, 18th century. A very rare doll, the uizan-ningyō was a traditional gift to young Noh actors on the occasion of their first performance, In Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll, Alan Scott Pate notes “Extant examples of this type of ningyō are quite rare...Given their nature as a gift, and the importance of the recipient, the textiles used for uizan-ningyō and the sculptural qualities of the face and hands were frequently of the highest order”. After 1790, it was forbidden to create this doll in a size over 12”. $2500/3300

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114. Very Rare Grand-Sized Portrait Ningyō of Empress Jingo and Her Minister 35” (89 cm.) Each with carved wooden head with gofun finish and finely-painted facial features (she with “sky-brows”) including Empress Jingu, posed standing, wearing a finely-wrought gauze outer robe with interwoven gold threads in a scroll foliate pattern, a silk crepe (chirimen) breastplate with metal crest of a dragon and with black velvet detail and repeated lion (shishi) ornamentation which is repeated on the thigh guards, and with fur boots and gold brocade hakama trousers, Eboshi cap, thick purple silk crepe obi, and carrying a reed battle fan (gumbai). And her attendant Takenouchi no Sukune, with sculpted wizened features and white silk fiber hair, beard and moustache, posed seated on camp stool, wearing a silk brocade outer robe with dragon and cloud motif, black velvet detailing and repeated shishi, blue silk brocade trousers with cloud and lightning pattern, yellow silk crepe obi, red silk crepe armature, white silk under-kimono with flying crane designs, black lacquered Chinese style cap with scroll motif, silk brocade shoes with toe block, and carrying a battle fan (gumbai) which matches hers. Generally excellent. Edo period, circa 1800. Depicting the Empress Jingu and her minister Takenouchi, in rare combat pose and with rare matching battle fans (most extant examples are in postcombat pose, he holding the baby). History and legend concerning Empress Jingu are intricately interwoven and impenetrable, remaining a compelling story to this day. The pair are shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 87. $16,000/21,000

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Detail of metal crest of a dragon on her breastplate.

Lion (shishi) ornamentation on her breastplate and thigh guards

Interwoven gold threads in scroll foliate pattern on her robe.

Pattern design on her battle fan.

Woven flying crane design on his underkimono.

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116. Miniature Tableau Depicting Jingu and Takenouchi with Ojin, Early 1900s 7” (18 cm.) Standing upon a black lacquered wooden base is the Empress Jingu with her minister Takenouchi and her son Ojin, each with carved wooden head with gofun finish and painted features, she with black silk fiber hair and “sky-brows”, and he with pigmented complexion and white silk fiber hair and beard. They wear stiffened silk brocade costumes, she with gold lacquer cap and having a sheath of arrows, and he posed seated, holding baby Ojin in his arms, all posed on wooden lacquered black base. Generally excellent. Meiji era, early 1900s. $300/500

115. Carved Wooden Portrait of Empress Jingu with Beautifully Detailed Costume, Circa 1850 12” (30 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, deeply-defined eye sockets, painted features, “sky-brows”, mouth painted open with teeth, black silk fiber hair, gofun finished carved wooden hands and feet with especially expressive fingers, wearing silk crepe inner kimono with embroidered chrysanthemum and scrolled foliage Detail of chrysanthemum and patterns, lavishly embroidered red silk crepe scrolled foliage designs on outer kimono arranged with sleeves thrown back sleeve. for ease of movement, silk and lacquered paper armor, silk brocade head band, and carrying a bamboo fishing pole and long sword with faux-fur scabbard. Posed on (later era) black lacquer wooden stand. Generally excellent, Edo period, circa 1850. $2500/2800

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117. Miniature Carved Wooden Court Man in Especially Fine Costume, 1930s 6” (15 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes and features, shadowed front crown, black silk fiber hair drawn back at sides of head into broom topknot, wooden hands extended expressively to his front, wearing a very fine silk brocade kimono with unusual elongated legs, plaid silk under-kimono, ivory sash with cord tie, lacquered black textured paper hat with embroidered edging. Excellent condition. Showa era, 1930s. $300/500


stockings and shoes. Generally excellent. Late Edo period, circa 1850, a rare unidentified person in Takeda presentation, on original black lacquer wooden base. $1100/1600

118. Carved Wooden Takeda Theatrical Figure in Dramatic Pose, Circa 1850

Detail of face and rare extended length sidelocks of the mystery theatrical actor.

13� (33 cm.) Carved wooden head with tinted gofun finish depicting an old man in highly dramatic pose, with one leg extended and the other posed upon a stump, having wizened features on the scowling face, white silk fiber topknot and elongated sidelocks, and elaborate costume with a dramatic dragon embroidered on sleeves, very stylized velvet trim, and painted

119. Carved Wooden Theatrical Figure (Takeda) in Unusual Small Size, Circa 1850 11� (28 cm.) Carved wooden head of fierce-faced man who is posed in very dynamic manner, his arms flung to the right in counterpose to left-leaning head, and his right foot posed on a paper mache log; having gofun finish on face and hands, painted features with downcast lips, large dramatic eyes, silk fiber hair in tied-topknot, red silk crepe kimono sleeves with embroidered detail, sleeveless outer coat, painted wooden stockings and shoes. Very good condition with some darkening of features. Late Edo period, circa 1850, rare smaller size. $800/1300

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121. Carved Wooden Legendary Figure of Dojoji, Early 1800s 120. Carved Wooden Noh-Ningyō Depicting Performance of Drama Shojo with Detachable Wooden Mask Face 12” (30 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish depicting a handsome young man with painted features, modeled open mouth with teeth, black silk fiber hair in topknot over a detachable long red silk fiber wig, carved Face and hair of young man under the mask and red wig. wooden arms and legs and wearing a red silk brocade costume with purple and ivory brocade inner sleeves having gold accents, painted decorative stockings, red silk crepe sewn-on shoes with defined big toe, holding a fan and posed on original wooden base. Worn over his handsome “real” face is a detachable carved wooden theatrical mask having painted features and smiling expression. Generally excellent. Mid-1900s. $900/1300

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12” (30 cm.) Paper mache carved head with gofun finish, sculpted and painted demonic features including a very wide evil smile, painted fangs, and two horns peeking from her long black unbraided hair which tumbles down her back. Her attire, signifying a noble background, includes a long outer uchigake with osode long sleeves having ties at the wrists, layered underkimonos (one layer with gold thread embroidery), silk crepe hakama skirt, and trailing silk gauze train, and she carries a mallet as a symbol of her rage. Generally excellent, mallet not original. Edo period, early 1800s. The figure depicts Dojoji, a young noblewoman who, in legends, has determined to win the favors of a handsome - albeit celibate - young priest. He evades her, hiding in the Dojoji temple, and incurs her wrath which is depicted in this transformative figure. The legend, with many adaptations, was told for many centuries, and then popularized in the 19th century Kabuki theatre. This particular Dojoji is shown and discussed in Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll by Alan Scott Pate, page 207. $2300/2600


Detail of carved red hair at the back.

122. Chip-Carved Wooden Nara-Ningyō Depicting The Peony and Lion Dancer from the Noh Drama Shakkyo 10” (25 cm.) All-wooden ningyō carved in a deliberately-angular rough-hewn manner known as one-knife-cut (ittō-bori) depicts a character with wide grimacing expression, deeply carved scraggly red hair which extends below the hips at the back, sculpted and painted costume in elaborate dynamic designs and colors. Excellent condition. Showa era, early 1900s. The nara-ningyō traces its sophisticated roots back to the 17th century, with inspiration drawn mostly from the Noh theatre. $200/400

123. Benkei in the Kabuki Performance Kanjincho, Mid-1900s 9” (23 cm.) Composite wooden head with tinted gofun complexion, glass inset eyes, painted features, serious expression, black silk fiber hair, sculpted hands in expressive manner to enhance the scene, sculpted feet, wearing silk brocade pants and tunic, black net outer kimono with silver banner designs, brocade straps with white pom-poms, small black lacquered six-sided cap, and carrying sword and weapon, posed on black wooden base. Excellent condition. Mid-1900s. $200/300

124. Carved Wooden Awaji Puppet with Movable Eyes and Eye Brows, Mid-1900s 29” (74 cm.) Carved wooden head with white complexion, theatricallypainted (kumadori) facial features, glass eyes which open and close from lever at the back, and thick hair brows which raise up and down in a stylized theatrical manner from the lever at the back, stick-style body with loosely-attached feet, wearing richly-draped brocade costume. Excellent condition. Post-war mid-1900s. Made in the Awaji region of Japan, the wooden puppet with animated brows and eyes continued the tradition of the earlier Bunraku puppets. $2200/2800

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125. Kintarō, Known as Golden Boy, with Classic Battle Ax, Circa 1930, Possibly by Hirata Giro 11” (28 cm.) Of wood composition with pigmented gofun finish, the plump young boy is posed leaning to the side with weight on right foot, his head turned to the left and with intense grimacing expression, glass inset eyes, painted features, firmly-closed downcast lips, impressed dimples, rosy cheeks, silk fiber hair in original unkempt style, well-defined fingers and toes, sexed, wearing silk loin cloth and carrying original wooden battle ax with painted decorations and tassel ties on carrying cord. Excellent condition. Showa era, circa 1930. The rare ruddy-pigmented complexion was a sign of strength and virility. $1900/2400

126. Miniature Carved Wooden Standing Ningyō with Wonderful Expression, Circa 1850 7” (18 cm.) Carved wooden head with rounded facial shape in the gosho manner, slightly-tinted gofun finish, painted features, heavy eyelids, double chin, tiny closed mouth, black silk fiber hair with sidelocks from slit at center forehead, bald spot on pate indicating youthfulness, short queue, carved wooden hands and feet, and wearing plum and gold kimono with bakshi-style graduated tinting, tucked into wide brocade trousers, matching obi, bare feet, posed on fine wooden base, Excellent condition. Edo period, circa 1850. $1500/1800

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127. Miniature Sculpted Gosho Child with Spinning Top, Late Showa Era 4” (10 cm.) All paper mache with tinted gofun finish depicting a young plump child posed seated with arms outstretched, holding the string of a top in one hand and the top in the other, having painted facial features and an attached silk cap with gold edging, wearing a silk sleeveless coat over classic brocade haragake bib. Very good conditon. Shoaw era, 1930s. $300/500


128. Early Carved Wooden Ningyō with Delightful Character Face and Rare Costume, Early 1800s 11” (28 cm.) Carved wood head, hands and feet with fine gofun finish, the head posed in rarer uptilted pose with full cheeks, carved and painted facial features, narrow eyes, wide smiling expression with dimpled cheeks and philtrum, double chin, and black silk fiber hair. The doll is posed as a comedic dancer, wearing rare black velvet outer coat with gold embroidery, red silk brocade trousers, red silk crepe (chirimen) cap, and stands upon its original black lacquer base with inset silk crepe fabric panel. Excellent condition. Edo period, early1800s. $1200/1800

129. Carved Wooden Character Ningyō Kintarō Astride a Black Bear, Circa 1930s 9 ½” (24 cm.) h. 10” l. Having a carved wooden head with pigmented gofun finish, glass eyes, smiling expression, black silk fiber locks, wooden hands and feet, wearing a plaid silk kimono with red lining, holding a wooden battle ax,

and seated on a carved wooden black bear with glass eyes and applied silk fiber hide. Generally excellent. Showa era, circa 1930s. $700/900

130. Miniature Doll with Elaborate Silk Costume from Noble Family 7” (18 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck, slightly-tinted gofun finish, painted features, “skybrows”, slightly open mouth, black silk fiber hair, wooden hands and feet with unusual silk slippers, wearing costume of especially fine quality for this size of ningyō, comprising a tucked-in orange silk jacket, five-layered collar, blue silk blousy trousers with matching tie belt. and posed on original wooden stand. Generally excellent. Early Meii era, circa 1880, especially fine expression and quality costume for this tiny doll, the painted “sky-brows” indicating noble lineage. Taisho era, early 1900s. $100/200

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131. Carved Wooden Gosho with Most Endearing Playful Expression, Late 1800s

Design on back of jacket.

11” (28 cm.) h. 14”l. Sculpted of composition wood with very plump face, full cheeks and chin, very large ears, tinted rosy gofun finish with shadowed detail at the edge of hair, enamel eyes, strong nose, closed mouth with well-defined smiling lips, black silk fiber hair, bald spot at crown indicating youth, on original body with matching finish, posed with sprawling legs and extended arms as though beseeching, fingers curled, and wearing his original red silk-edged purple bib with gold thread embroidery, under brown velvet jacket with applique design at the back. Good condition, fine original finish, repair at torso under jacket, hair sparse at the back. Meiji era, late 1800s. $1200/1600

132. Paper Mache Ichimatsu in Rare Size with Fine Silk Crepe Costume, Late 1800s 9” (23 cm.) Paper mache swivel head with tinted gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features, wonderful smiling epression with tongue and teeth, impressed chin and cheek dimples, shadowed forehead and bald spot on crown, black silk fiber hair, larger ears, paper mache and wooden lower arms and legs with jointed ankles and wrists, and wearing original red silk crepe (chirimen) kimono having vibrant designs, red silk crepe padded lining, and fawnspot crepe collar. Generally excellent. Meiji era, late 1800s. $600/900

133. Diminutive Ichimatsu Child Doll with Endearing Expression and “Growth” Kimono, Early 1900s 8” (20 cm.) Paper mache head with gofun finish, plump cheeks, glass inset eyes, painted features, dimpled chin, black silk fiber hair with sidelocks and crown hair, paper mache lower arms and legs, and wearing red silk “growth” kimono designed to allow easy lengthening as the child grew, with padded ivory and patterned linings, plaid silk sash. Generally excellent. Early 1900s. $200/300

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head and arms, fine gofun finish, painted features, deeply set eye sockets, gentle expression, bald pate with shadowed crown, sidelocks drawn into a small tied knot at lower back crown, arms extended, well defined toes and finger, having silk brocade bib and kimono which are permanently applied to the carved body form (designed to appear as though richly-draped and multi-layered although actually being only a single silk layer). Generally excellent. Mid-1900s. $800/1000

136. Miniature Ningyō in Ceremonial Costume 134. Wonderful Pair of Gosho Children in Parody (Mitate) of Takasago Legend, Early 1900s 8” (20 cm.) Each, depicted in a standing pose on red silk covered bases and with expressively-posed hands, has carved wooden head, torso, legs, and lower arms with gofun finish, painted features, narrow eyes, smiliing, teeth, and impressed dimples. He has bald pate and delicately feathered painted hair at forehead under a silk cap with gold brocade rim, and is wearing stiffened ivory silk pants with painted floral design, plaid silk kimono, brocade sleeveless outer coat, sash, slippers and is carrying a wooden rake She has black silk fiber hair, and is wearing a red silk padded kimono with thick padding, four-layered collars and sleeves, green silk print sleeveless outer kimono, brocade obi with red cord tie and is carrying a wooden broom. Generally excellent. The pair of gosho are parody ningyō (mitate) of the beloved Takasago legend; (see #24 of this book). Taisho era, early 1900s. $1300/1700

135. Diminutive Carved Wooden Sumo Wrestler in Kimekomi Style 4” (10 cm.) Carved wooden gosho depicting a young child with a large chubby

8” (20 cm.) Carved wooden head with rounded facial modeling, painted facial features, slightly smiling expression, shadowed hair, inserted sidelocks, armature body, carved wooden hands and feet, wearing vibrant black silk costume of kimono and trousers combination in brilliant green and yellow designs, distinctive paper lacquer hat with gold and black striping and red circle, tassel ties, patterned silk undersleeves, silk socks, holding two bells and posed on wooden handled stand. Generally excellent. Mid-1900s. $300/500

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137. Rare Pair Carved Wooden Young Lord as Martial Arts Student and His Attendant, Circa 1920 10� (25 cm.) Each having carved wooden head with gofun finish, inset glass eyes, and painted features, with wooden hands and feet, and mounted on original wooden chip-carved stands. Including the young lord with whitened complexion, black silk fiber hair in topknot fashion with extended backlocks, wearing plum silk crepe (chirimen) jacket with five-petal cherry blossom crests indicating his noble status, embroidered sleeve panels, and brocade silk trousers, carrying sword. And attendant with pigmented complexion, bald pate with topknot and sidelocks, wearing black silk kimono with gold thread diamond-shaped embroidery on sleeves and back, silk obi, unusual painted socks and sandals, and carrying martial arts equipment. Very good, finish rubbed lending an aged patina. Taisho era. 1920s. $1800/2500

138. Rare Early Takeda Depicting Watonai in Exceptionally Dynamic Portrayal, Early 1800s

Detail of martial arts equipment and carriers.

The five petal cherry blossom design indicates the noble status of the young lord.

136

19� (48 cm.) Carved wooden head with very expressive features accented by red theatrical accents (kumadori), gofun finish, painted facial features with dramatic brows, wide downcast fierce mouth, black silk fiber hair drawn from face with long sidelocks, carved wooden hands and feet, and posed in exaggerated theatrical manner as though debarking from a paper mache boat surrounded by painted scenes of ocean waves; he leans forward with arms posed to the side for balance, his right foot extended and his left foot bent at the knee. He has carved detail of painted striped stockings and blue shoes, and is wearing a superb original costume of chirimen silk crepe with silk peony embroidered on the sleeve, and with uusual woven rush hat in folded design, and is holding a paper mache cannon with textured lacquer and gold finish. The dynamic figure is posed on his orginal base with inset fabric panel. Excellent condition. Edo period, early 1900s. Watonai, the legendary hero, of Japanese/Chinese lineage, was a popular figure on the Kabuki stage during the Edo period, noted for his exaggerated braggadocio and dramatic poses which are perfectly portrayed in this Takeda presentation. $8000/12,000


The distinctive chrysanthemum embroidery on his sleeve.

The highly-dramatic expression is achieved not only by sharp facial planes, but also by the richly-painted theatrical painting of features (kumadori). His woven reed hat is distinctive.

Detail of textile designs.

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The well-defined “sky-brows”, symbols of nobility, are evident here, as is her gentle expression. The profile view evidences her heavy eyelids, aquiline nose, and feathering of hair around the sides of her face.

139. Carved Wooden Imperial Lady with Kokin Style Costume, Circa 1850 10” (25 cm.) seted. Carved wooden head with beautifully-shaped face, dowel-attached to body, gofun finish, painted features, narrow painted eyes with heavily-modeled eyelids, detailed “sky-brows”, gentle expression on beautifully-painted lips, painted feathered hair edges the black silk fiber hair that is drawn back and extends to her waist, carved wooden hands. She is wearing the distinctive costume known as “kokin” with notable detail of fine embroiderey on front sleeves and narrow bands of alternate silk patterns with brown edging, seven layered collars, coral silk sash, elaborate tassels and cords, and gauze train at the back with hand-painted flowers. Generally excellent, crown is not original Edo period, circa 1850. $800/1000

140. Well-Detailed Hina Matsuri Arrangement on Original Display Stage, Circa 1920

Rear view shows the hand-painted gauze train and silk fiber hair extending to her waist.

138

Arranged upon a finely-crafted wooden staired platform is the complete assemblage of figures from the Hina Matsuri (Girl’s Day) celebration, each wearing its elaborately-layered and arranged original silk costume, including the lord and lady (dairi-bina), three ladies-in-waiting (san’nin), ministers of the right and left (zuijin) five musicians (gonin-bayashi) and three footmen (shicho), and various symbolic accessories including the folding screen and flowering trees. The set is preserved in its original box. Excellent condition. Taisho era, 1920s. $2200/3100


139


Wide wings of shaped hair extend above the ruffled chirimen bands, the spectacular coiffure framing her diminutive face with delicately-painted feathering of hair details around the edges of her face.

The back view of her coiffure evidences the unusual ruffled bands of chirimen as well as folded foil ornaments and metallic gilt tassels.

wooden lower arms with expressive hands, wooden legs with defined toes, wearing richly patterned silk kimono with red silk padded lining, red and white silk inner kimonos, silk brocade obi with pronounced tie at the front indicating her status, carrying a lantern and posed upon a silk covered wooden base. Excellent condition. Meiji era, circa 1900. An especially fine example with superb details of coiffure and costume, wonderfullypreserved. Taisho era, circa 1920. $2700/3100

Detail of design of the front-tied obi; its front position and imposing size being symbols of her high-ranking courtesan status.

142. Outstanding “Beautiful Lady” (Kyoto-Bijin) in Rare Side-Seated Pose, Circa 1890 141. Carved Wooden Courtesan (Oiran) with Splendid Coiffure and Costume, Circa 1920 15” (38 cm.) Carved wooden socket head with fine gofun finish, inset glass eyes, heavilymodeled eyelids, painted brows, closed mouth with hint of smile, painted feathered detail of hair at forehead edges, elaborate black silk fiber hair in spectacular upswept coiffure that is decorated with metal and foil ornaments and unusual ruffled bands of chirimen,

140

13” (33 cm.) seated h. Carved wooden head with rounded shape of face that is unusual for this genre, gofun finish, glass eyes with heavy eyelids, aquiline nose, slightly open mouth with teeth and tongue, feathering of hair around the forehead. Her black silk fiber hair in very ornate fashion is decorated with red silk crepe ribbon, an ornately-coiled bow of fawn-spot silk crepe (which matches her obi) and an elaborate foil hair pin. She is posed in unusual seated manner,


Details of luxurious textile weave. A rear view of the doll depicts her extended obi train of luxurious fawn-spot patterned silk crepe.

The rounded facial shape is very rare for this style of doll.

her bent knees and legs folding to the side, and has arms and legs sculpted up to her elbows and knees, bare feet peeking from beneath her kimono, and extended arms with expressive fingers. She is wearing a bold purple silk crepe (chirimen) kimono with a repeated pattern of presentation ribbons (noshi) highlighted with couched gold thread, and a fawn spot patterned silk crepe obi with an extended train at the back. She is posed upon her original wooden base. Excellent condition.

The fawn spot patterned silk crepe was also used for the elaborate bow at the back of her coiffure.

Meiji era, circa 1890. The beautiful lady with rare side-seated pose and exceptional costume is a portrait doll of a merchant’s wife, likely a private commission, and a very rare genre of which few other examples are known to exist. The doll appears in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of NingyĹ? by Alan Scott Pate, page 124. $8000/9500

141


143. Carved Wooden “Beautiful Lady” (Kyoto-Bijin) with Exquisite Hair and Ornaments, Early 1900s 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass inset eyes, painted features, closed mouth, black silk fiber hair in elaborate upswept coiffure that is trimmed with shaped multi-colored flowers of silk crepe and with foil ornaments, wooden hands with expressive fingers, wooden feet, wearing silk crepe costume in unusual pattern and colors, red patterned under-kimono, and fawn-spotted red silk crepe obi with extended train and cord tie, posed on wooden stand. Excellent condition. Meiji era, early 1900s. $400/600

Detail of back of head reveals feathered painting of hair at her nape, and red silk crepe bow.

144. Beautiful Lady (Kyoto-Bijin) with Unusual Bronze Silk Patterned Kimono, Circa 1930s

Rear view of costume showing extendedtrain of luxury fabric obi.

Close-up detail of hair ornaments.

142

9” (23 cm.) Carved wooden head with slender face, gofun finish, glass inset eyes, open mouth, teeth, painted features, painted feathered detail of hair around the face and also at the nape of neck, black silk fiber hair with fawn spot, red silk crepe hair bows, and wearing a bronze silk patterned kimono with red silk lining, brown collar and sleeve edging, and gold brocade obi, Posed on original wooden stand. Generally excellent. Showa era, circa 1930s. $300/400


145. Carved Wooden “Beautiful Lady” (Kyoto-Bijin) Wearing an Unusual Rose Silk Crepe Kimono, circa 1930s 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass inset eyes, painted features, closed mouth, black silk fiber hair arranged in an elaborate coiffure that is lavishly trimmed with shaped multi-colored flowers of silk crepe, wooden hands with expressive fingers and wooden feet. She is wearing a very fine pale rose silk crepe (chirimen) costume with patterned white flowers, red silk lining, red under-kimono, and a silk brocade obi with long train at the back, fawn-spotted silk crepe sash, and rose cord waist tie. She carries a fan and stands on original wooden base. Excellent condition. Showa era, 1930s. $800/1100

145.1. Carved Wooden Court Lady with Unusual Costume of YuzenDyed Kimono, Silk Skirt and Parasol, Circa 1920

The luxury silk crepe kimono is made of a rare rose color with beautifully-printed flowers.

Profile view of her face indicating feathered painting of hair around her forehead, and elaborate hair ornaments.

10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, inset glass eyes, slightly open mouth, teeth, painted feathering of hair around her forehead, black silk fiber wig drawn from face into two large tied-down loops at her crown, wooden hands and feet. She is wearing an unusual costume comprising a kimono of yuzen-dyed silk crepe with rippling waters pattern which is tucked into a green silk skirt with green silk sash tied at the front, and is holding a woodenhandled green silk parasol, and mounted on her original base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, circa 1920. $400/500

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146. Beautiful Bride Doll (Hanayome-Ningyō), Mid1900s 18” (46 cm.) Very refined portrait of lady with slender face and elongated slender neck, gofun finish, glass eyes, black silk fiber hair in upswept coiffure which is nearly covered by an elaborate and richlydraped white coiffe with ornamental tinsel, bows and foil ornaments, wooden hands. She is wearing an extraordinary white silk brocade bridal gown with extended train, white layered inner collars, and has a red brocade pouch with silver coin trim, and fan, presented on original wooden base. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. The doll is shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō, by Alan Scott Pate, page 140. $900/1300

Her red silk brocade pouch is neatly tucked into the bodice of her gown.

144

Various views of her extraordinary coiffe.


147. Petite Bride Doll (HanayomeNingyō) with Beautfully Painted Kimono and Rare Bridal Coiffe, Circa 1880 8 ½” (22 cm.) Carved wooden head with fine gofun finish, painted facial features, open mouth, teeth, tongue, fine painted feathering of hair edging her forehead, black silk fiber hair in very elaborate upswept fashion and decorated with paper lacquer and metal hair ornaments peeking from her wide coral silk hair band coiffe, wooden hands and feet. She is wearing a blue silk kimono with painted flowers, red and white faux-inner kimonos, gold brocade obi, and sandals, and is carrying a wooden bowl and flowers, posed on original wooden base Excellent condition. Meiji era, circa 1880. $1100/1400

148. Carved Wooden Lady of the Court with Rich Purple Robe in Rare Stance Three detail views of her rare wedding coiffe. Note its similarity to the coiffe of #146.

12” (30 cm.) Carved wooden socket head, inset glass eyes, heavy eyelids, aquiline nose, “sky-brows”, open mouth, teeth, tongue, black silk fiber hair in upswept manner with elaborately looped curls, and tortoise shell hair ornaments, wooden hands with expressively-posed fingers, wooden lower legs posed in rare original “bow-legged” stance, wearing purple silk kimono with padded red silk lining and delicate embroidery, five-layered collar, white faux-inner kimono, socks, sandals. Excellent condition. Meiji, circa 1900. $900/1300

145


149. Dramatic Grand-Sized Imperial Couple, 20th Century

Rear view of the lady reveals her handpainted gauze train and extended hiplength wig with rich decorations.

146

22” (56 cm.) h. kneeling. 17” l. base. Each with carved wooden head with slender refined shaping, fine gofun finish, enamel eyes, painted features including shaded detail of “sky-brows”, carved wooden hands with elegantly-posed fingers. She has black hair in classic style and is wearing multilayered silk robe with hand-painted gauze train at the back, with elaborately-decorated crown, and holding a hand-painted fan. He is wearing very distinctive rich silk brocade robe with dragon and cloud woven pattern, black court cap, and holds a fan. Both are seated on original fabric-covered bases. Excellent condition. Early/mid 20th century. The pair are notable for their grand size and luxurious detail of costumes. $2600/3000


Rear view of the lord characterizes the firm “wings’ of his costume, and cloud and dragon detail of textile.

147


150. Trio of Footmen (Shicho) from Girl’s Day Celebration (Hina Matsuri) with Rare Accessories, Mid-1900s, Attributed to Maruhei 6” (15 cm.) Each has wood composite head with gofun finish in white, rosy or very ruddy complexion designed to enhance the characterization of either happy, sad or angry person. Each, with glass inset eyes, painted features, black silk fiber hair in topknot behind bald pate, is seated cross-legged with bare feet, and wearing gauze outer kimono over silk under coat (in variant colors with matching plaid sleeve borders), embroidered green pom-poms, sandals and caps. Included are various carved wooden miniature foods on hand-painted wooden dishes (one added porcelain dish), along with a teepeeshaped cooking area with carved wooden “flame”. Excellent condition. Showa era, early 1900s. The set is shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 63. $800/1200

151. Carved Wooden Lady of the Court with Dog, Early 1900s 8” (20 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes and facial features, “sky-brows” indicating her position in the Imperial Court, painted feathering of hair around her forehead, black silk fiber hair, wooden hands. She is wearing an elaborately wrapped silk brocade kimono and holds the leash of a paper mache dog with white silk crepe hide and black bead eyes. Excellent condition. Early 1900s. $250/350

148


152. Diminutive Set of Five Musicians (Gonin-Bayashi) from Girl’s Day Celebration, Mid-1900s 5” (13 cm.) Each has carved wooden head with slightlytinted gofun finish, tiny glass inset eyes, painted features, closed mouth, black silk fiber hair under tied-on black lacquered caps, and is posed seated with hands arranged to hold designated musical instrument. Included are two shoulder drummers, flutist, and chanter, each wearing a rich green or red silk costume with embroidered designs of sacred treasures, and having crested Imperial emblems on kimono at the elbows, chest and back. Original box is included. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. $500/800

crane designs, tassels, red silk pants, and elaborate gilded metal crown with “jewel” trim. Excellent condition. Late-Meiji, early 1900s. $250/500

153. Tableau Doll Depecting Hagoromo in Celestial Feathered Robe

154. Pair, Carved Wooden TachiBina in Petite Size

8” (20 cm.) height includes crown and base. Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, gofun finish, painted facial features including eyes and “skybrows”, black silk fiber hair, and carved wooden hands held in front of torso. She is wearing a multi-layered kimono with embroidered

6” (15 cm.) man. Each has carved wooden head with gofun finish painted features including “sky-brows”, black silk fiber hair, and flat-dimensional body with wrapped silk costume over folded or curled paper form. Generally excellent. Taisho era, circa 1920s. $400/600

149


155. Carved Wooden Samurai with Very Expressive Features and Rare Black Velvet Costume, Early 1800s 15 ½” (39 cm.) The portrait doll depicting a samurai with very idiosyncratic expression, posed standing, is all carved wood except textile upper arms, and has gofun finish, bald pate, well-defined bulging eyes that are slightly glancing sideways, furrowed brows and age lines, broad nose, downcast lips, bare feet, and well defined toes and fingers. He is wearing a very rare black velvet (birodo) kimono with gold painted and embroidered designs, and has a long sword at his hip and a leather belt. Good condition, with faded complexion, frailty to silk edging on kimono and some losses of gold on kimono. Edo period, early 1800s. Rare detail of characterization and rare velvet kimono. $2200/2800

The facial profile further details his unusual modeling as well as hair detail at nape.

156. Tableau Doll Depecting The Tale of The 47 Ronin, Early 1900s

Rare black velvet fabric with gold embroidery.

150

11” (28 cm.) x 13”h. base. Posed upon a wooden base with unusual theatre-like background are two 8” courtiers in dynamic poses, with carved wooden heads, gofun finish (one with tinted complexion), painted eyes and facial features, one with shadowed bald pate and silk fiber sidelocks, his legs posed in defensive manner; and the other with painted details on the edging of his kimono. Very good condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $300/400


157. Carved Wooden Attendant in Kneeling Pose with Animated Expression, Late 1900s 11” (28 cm.) Carved wooden socket head, tinted gofun finish to denote fierceness, inset glass eyes, wing-shaped brows, broad nose, open mouth, shadowed suggestion of moustache and beard, bald pate with silk fiber hair inserted in side slits and pulled into tied topknot, carved wooden hands and lower legs. He is posed kneeling, wearing patterned trousers that extend to fitted stockings and shoes, leg guards, silk brocade kimono, paper lacquer armor with gilt trim, silk waist tie, and carrying a sword. Very good some rubs to complexion. Meiji era, late 1900s. $400/600

158. Grand Paper Mache Ishō-Ningyō with Dramatically Painted Face, Early 1900s 24” (61 cm.) Paper mache head with whitened complexion, painted features with theatrical painting (kumadori), bulging eyes, thick dramatic brows, red accented details to indicate ferocity, large ears, black human hair and topknots, shadowed crown, wooden armament with straw-filled padded costume of silk brocade, wooden hands and feet with painted blue shoes, sword. Fair condition, some frailty of silk, loss of complexion pigment, some craquelure. Taisho era, early 1900s. $800/1100

151


161. Fierce Musha-Ningyō in Armor Astride a Black Horse, with Original Box, Early 1900s

159. Carved Wooden MushaNingyō, of the Warrior Monk Benkei,

11” (28 cm.) overall h. seated, 9”l. Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, pigmented gofun finish, inset glass eyes, fierce expression, thick black silk fiber brows, moustache, hair and elongated very full beard, wooden hands and feet. He is wearing a red silk kimono beneath lacquer paper chest armor, leg guards, paper lacquer helmet, painted boots and gloves, and is posed seated on sculpted horse having black silk crepre hide and lacquered paper mache saddle with stiffened brocade saddle blanket and decorative silk fringe, and posed on original wooden base. With original box having original store label on interior. Excellent condition. Late Meiji era, early 1900s. $300/400

10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, small glass inset eyes, chiseled features of angst-ridden man, pigmented gofun finish, black brows, painted beard, head enclosed in thick ribbed fabric with black velvet at side to suggest hair, wearing paper armor, short silk brocade jacket, and gold short trousers with horizontal ribbed weave, wooden hands and legs, painted stockings and boots, holding a halberd, and posed on original wooden stand. Generally excellent. Taisho era, early 1900s. $300/600

160. Diminutive Carved Wooden Musha-Ningyō of Shōki the Demon Queller 8” (20 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, gofun finish with very reddened complexion, painted features, very thick applied black brows, bald pate, wiry long black beard and flowing hair, carved wooden hands and feet, wearing original silk brocade costume with sleeve ties at wrists and black lacquer hat with “wings”, holding sword and posed on original wooden base. Showa era, mid-1900s. $200/300

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162. Miniature Carved Wooden Musha-Ningyō with Moustache, in Well-Detailed Armament 8 ½” (22 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, gofun finish, glass eyes, painted details, painted moustache, black silk fiber hair with tieddown topknot, wooden hands with painted glove detail, painted black boots, and wearing well-detailed paper mache armor over red silk jacket, ivory silk trousers, black paper mache hat with lacquer finish, and carrying sword and wooden baton with fringed streamers, posed on original wooden stand. Excellent condition, especially fresh and with fine painting for such a diminutive figure. Taisho era, early 1900s. $100/200


163. Diminutive Carved Wooden Musha-Ningyō of Kato Kiyomasa Mid-1900s 7” (18 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, gofun finish, painted features, enamel narrow eyes, stern expression, downcast lips, long back hair captured under an elaborate helmet, posed kneeling on one leg, and wearing an ivory silk tunic and purple pants under black lacquer armor, with painted gloved hands and shoes, and carrying a very long weapon. Posed on original on base. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. $300/500

164. Complete Musha-Ningyō Yoroi Suit of Armor with Original Box, Mid-1900s 12” (30 cm.) h. body armor overall, 8” h. helmet. 4” boots. 9½” leg guards. The armor is of thick lacquered paper and includes breastplate, and helmet with four tiers of armor to protect the back torso, and with brass wings at the helmet crown. Including sword and with original box with incised markings. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. $600/900 Detail of presentation box for the set of musha-ningyō armor.

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166. Miniature Carved Wooden Archer (Yabusame) with Unusual Costume, Early 1900s 5” (13 cm.) Carved wooden head, slightlytinted gofun complexion, painted features Details of including rare costume at the moustache, back include unusual pant wearing an design, arrow unusual costume sling, and tigerof silk brocade tail sword handle. with fur leg guards over orange silk pants, silk brocade shoes, unusual paper mache lacquer hat designed to appear as though woven, and carrying double swords attached at the front of his belt, and sling with arrows. Posed on original base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $300/400

167. Miniature Paper Mache Archer (Yabusame) with Unusual Brown Painted Hat, Early 1900s

165. Rare Archer (Yabusame) with Unique Details of Costume, Early 1900s 13” (33 cm.) Wood composite head with slightly pigmented gofun, glass inset eyes, shadowed chin and pate, black silk fiber Detail of painted gloves and tied hair with tied-down topknot, and painted cuffs on the mercenary warrior moustache. He is wearing an unusual costume with gold silk brocade jacket whose right arm and shoulder are stitch-attached to another color jacket, blue leg guards over yellow silk blousy trousers, painted blue shoes and matching gloves, woven wide-brimmed hat with finial, and carries two swords, one with brush edging, and is posed on original base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $300/500

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7” (18 cm.) Paper mache head with lightly-tinted gofun finish, painted facial features including moustache, high-domed bald pate, black silk fiber sidelocks extending in a tied-down topknot, and wearing a silk brocade costume with unusual variation of sleeves, cuff ties at wrists, silver metallic short trousers, painted blue stockings, unusual brown painted paper mache hat in woven design to simulate reed, and carrying two swords attached to his front belt, bow and a sling of arrows. See #165 for large version of a similiar ningyō. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $300/500


168. Diminutive Tableau Depicting Samurai on White Horse with Two Attendants, Mid-1900s 12” (30 cm.) h, rider on horse. 12” l. horse. 7”h. attendants. Each of paper mache with pigmented gofun complexion, and each with individual expression and characterization, including samurai with glass eyes, black silk fiber beard, lacquered paper armor and helmet, and painted gloves on hands; and two attendants in purple or blue silk trousers, with brocade coats and lacquered paper armor, each with shaved heads with topknot. And with a decorated white horse with glass eyes, straw sandals on feet, silk fringe trappings, black lacquer saddle and stirrups, and with purple and white reins. Generally excellent. Showa era, mid-1900s. $200/400

169. An Elaborate Musha-Ningyō Yoroi Suit of Armor Including Weapon Stand, Mid-1900s 13” (33 cm.) h. body armor. 7” h. helmet, 4 ½” boots, 8” leg armor, Including paper mache lacquered body armor with decorative trim, elaborate Kaboto, helmet with brass dragon and very elaborate brass wings, silk brocade arm shields with brass guards, brocade obi, fur-trimmed boots, leg guards, and a tasseled lacquer stand which exhibits a wooden bow and arrows, Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. $600/800

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170. Petite Hina Matsuri Arrangement for Girl’s Day Celebration in Original Presentation, Mid-1900s A black wooden shelved arrangement with lacquer finish and gilt accents is designed to resemble a traditional court presentation and includes many decorative architectural details including front steps. Posed at the back on

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a separate level are the lord and lady of the court, and on the level below them are three seated ladies-in-waiting, one standing lady, and three footmen, each with original costume. Excellent condition, Showa era, mid1900s. $800/1200


171. Set of Footmen from Girl’s Day Celebration (Hina Matsuri) in Original Wooden Box, Late 1900s 6 ½” (17 cm.) Each has paper mache head with gofun finish in various tints and sculpting to enhance the highly-defined character moods of happy, angry or sad, and each has black silk fiber hair. They are posed seated, cross-legged with bare feet, and wear silk brocade costumes, each holding an accessory. Presented in original box. Excellent condition. Late 1900s. $200/300

172. Five Musicians from Girl’s Day Celebration (Hina Maturi) with Original Box 4” (10 cm.) Each with paper mache head with slightly pigmented complexion, each face individually rendered, painted features, black silk fiber hair, wearing patterned silk brocade matching costumes. The players include two shoulder drummers, taiko drummer, flutist and chanter (all instruments included). Presented in original box. Excellent condition. Mid20th century. $350/550 Label on original box.

173. Six Carved Wooden Heads 2 ½” (6 cm.) largest head excluding dowel. 12” x 6” box. Each head is carved wood with gofun finish, four with glass eyes, one with “sky-brows” and elaborately arranged hair on winged form and with extended braid, another with “sky-brows” and feathered details around edges of silk fiber hair with topknot, Generally excellent. Early 1900s. $200/300

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175. Diminutive Carved Wooden Portrait of Samurai in Full Armor, Early 1900s 8” (20 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, gofun finish, painted facial features with narrow eyes, painted moustache, stern expression, long back wiry hair under black net hat with paper banding, ornate silk kimono, patterned pants under black lacquer armor with unusual knee guards, painted striped stockings, fur-tipped boots, painted gloves, silk obi, carrying sword. Taisho era, circa 1920. $200/300

Paper label on interior of box.

174. Tableau Ningyō Depicting Hagoromo in Celestial Feathered Robe

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15” (38 cm.) including crown and base. Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted facial features, deeply-set sockets with outlined eyes, painted brows and “sky-brows”, aquiline nose, closed mouth with painted teeth, black silk fiber hair extending to waist, posing standing with costume completely enclosing her body, her right arm appearing to be upraised, wearing stiffened silk and silk brocade robes wih embroidered details of cranes, wooden fan, and gilt metal crown with ornaments. Excellent condition.

176. Rare Small Size Metal Armor and Helmet in Original Signature Box, Mid-1900s

Meiji era, late 1800s. Hagoromo is a celebrated Noh drama featuring a deity dancing within a Celestial Feathered Robe, which became a popular subject for the Tableau ningyō during the Meiji era. This particular example has very fine details of embroidery on sleeves and kimono. $1100/1500

8 ½” (22 cm.) Of metal rungs with cord attachment allowing flexibility of movemet, and with matching helmet, presented on wooden mannequin in original wooden labeled box and with original labeled stand. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. $350/550


177. Carved Wooden Gosho in Parody (Mitate) of Samurai, Circa 1930s 14” (36 cm.) including helmet. Carved wooden head with very rounded shape, gofun finish, centered facial features, glass eyes, sculpted details including heavy eyeliner, closed mouth with row of teeth, smiling expression with impressed dimples, painted feathering of hair around the forehead, black silk fiber hair extending to bottom of back armor, wooden hands with curled fingers, wearing silk brocade kimono with layered collars under red lacquer paper armor, painted stockings, fur-tipped boots, and with helmet of stiffened red silk crepe with gold banding, embroidered pom-poms, and an elaborately carved dragon; and carrying sword and sabre. Mounted on wooden base with chip-carved edging. Excellent condition. Showa era, early 20th century. A similiar piece is shown in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 120. The mitate ningyō were designed as a parody of their classic counterparts, and are a delightful expression of Japanese whimsy. This present example is notable for the unusual childlike gentle expression. $2200/2600 Rear view of the armor costume and extended-length silk fiber hair.

Fine details of sword indicate luxury production.

Details of the dragon design on the Kabto helmet.

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178. Carved Wooden Kimekomi Gosho in Parody (Mitate) of Armored Warrior, Late 1900s

So detailed is the kamo costuming as to include a folded-back jacket revealing suggestion of armor below.

10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass inset eyes, painted features, black silk fiber hair in youthful style, elaborate costume of brocade jacket with tied cuffs over armor, and trousers adhered to the doll in the technique known as kimekomi in which fabric is glued directly onto the body into edging slits, but made to appear as though elaborately draped. He has a helmet, arrows, attached faux-sword and painted shoes, mounted on original base. Excellent condition. Late 1900s. $300/500

179. Carved Wooden Gosho in Parody (Mitate) with Helmet and Cannon 9 ½” (24 cm.) h. doll. 4 ½”l cannon. Carved wooden onepiece very chubby gosho with gofun finish, posed with arms extended and legs as though bracing himself, painted centered facial features, bald pate and inserted black silk fiber sidelocks, wearing embroidered bib which ties at the back (haragake). He is posed on a wooden base and holds a red cord which is attached to a wooden cannon that he appears to be pulling. The cannon has painted details, and he is further accented by an elaborate helmet and sword, each with painted designs. Excellent condition. Showa era, 1930s. $1100/1400

Details of the sword, helmet and bib ties, seen from a back view.

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180. Carved Wooden Ningyō as Sambaso Dancer 16” (41 cm.) including hat and platform. Carved wooden head with rounded gosho-like face, gofun finish, painted facial features, well-outlined eyes, thick brows, little mouth, bald pate with closely-cropped silk fiber hair at sides and back, and carved wooden hands and feet. He is posed standing, wearing silk socks, black silk kimono with gold embroidered leaves and threads, and with thrown-back sleeves to reveal elaborate embroidery which is repeated at the kimono back, with distinctive black and gold striped hat with red circle sun. Excellent condition. Early 20th century. $1800/2400

Rear view of the ningyō shoes the elaborate embroidery on kimono back.

Distinctive shape and decoration of his hat is show as well as winglikeembroidery on thrown-back sleeves.

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Richly textured fabrics form into his protective gloves and armor which he carries slung over his practice sword.

The variety and quality of fabrics are evident in this close-up view as is his distinctive hair style.

181. Fine Carved Wooden Gosho as Kendo Martial Arts Student Attributed to Maruhei, Circa 1930 10â€? (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun complexion, glass eyes, feathered painting of hair stippling around the forehead, bald spot on crown with silk crepe cover, black silk fiber hair with topknot behind bald spot, and wooden hands and feet. The gosho depicts a young martial arts student wearing a banded kimono with scroll foliate designs, purple silk collar with sacred gem symbols, unusual horizontal style hakama trousers, and simulated leather tabiad sandals. He carries two long swords at his hip, and has a kendo practice sword held over his left shoulder, gloves and protective armor slung at his back, and is posed on original chip-carved base indicative of Maruhei. Excellent condition. Showa era, circa 1930. The dollmaking firm of Maruhei was founded in Kyoto in 1779, and for 250 years have continued to create prestige ningyĹ? of the highest order, winning prestigious awards and creating commission pieces for the imperial family. $1800/2500

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A profile view of the ningyĹ?.


182. Tableau Depicting Momotarō and the Ogres’ Treasure 11” (28 cm.) h. including base. Carved wooden head with slightly tinted gofun complexion, glass inset eyes, expressive features, black silk fiber hair with tied-down sidelocks, and topknot, wearing purple and white silk crepe chirimen checkered kimono with red lining over armored breast plate, and with silk trousers, fabric-covered boots with tied-on leg guards, richly-tied sash, Detail of faux-coral handled tray with a bevy of sea treasures. and, hand guards. He carries a sword with fabric cover and is posed seated on original wooden base, alongside a tray with faux-coral handle which displays various shells and sea treasures. Excellent condition. Early 1900s. $1600/2200

183. Carved Wooden Ningyō with Superb Costume and Hair 12” (30 cm.) Carved wooden head with slightly-tinted gofun finish, glass inset eyes, heavy eyelids, broad nose, closed mouth, large ears, shadowed hair under elaborately-arranged silk fiber hair with bald spot on crown indicating his youth, and a gilt metal-wrapped topknot and queue. Finely carved wooden hands and feet, defined big toes, and wearing a silk costume comprising a gold brocade jacket printed with flowers, silk gauze sleeveless kimono, ivory brocade trousers and sandals and posed on his wooden stand. Showa era, circa 1930s. $2000/2500

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185. Carved Wooden Ningyō with Unusual Costume 8 ½” (22 cm.) Carved wooden head with slightly-tinted gofun finish and well-painted features, closed mouth with downcast lips, moustache, elaboratelyarranged silk fiber hair with topknot, finely carved wooden hands, and wearing an unusual costume of somber black and grey colors and posed on his wooden stand. Early 1900s. $200/300

184. Two Pilgrims with Distinctive and Superbly-Detailed Costumes Including Matching Hats 8” (20 cm.) Each has carved wooden head with gofun finish, wellpainted facial features including shadowed grey on his bald pate, elaborately-arranged silk fiber hair, and Rear view of the pair shows more detail of elaborate costumes including their carved wooden hands. matching hats. They are wearing very elaborately-layered and embroidered costumes, she carrying a long staff, and with matching hats having symbolic designs. They are posed on fabric-covered bases. Excellent condition. Meiji era, circa 1900. $1500/1800

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186. Paper Mache Ningyō Depicting Scholar 7 ½” (19 cm.) h. kneeling. Paper mache modeled head with gofun finish, painted eyes and facial features, shadowed crown, black silk fiber hair in stylized manner, carved hands, and wearing a silk crepe striped kimono with gold inner kimono, black sash, posed kneeling holding a learned book in his front-posed hands. He is posed on wooden base and has his original wooden labeled box. Early 1900s. $400/600


187. Paper Mache Kyoto Bijin Playing a Zither (Koto) 6” (15 cm.) Paper mache with gofun finish, painted eyes and facial features, elaborate black human hair, wearing, very fine silk crepe costume with fawnspot designed obi, posed kneeling on original wooden base with zither. With original labeled box. Excellent condition. Mid-1900s. $200/300

188. Paper Mache Miniature Ningyō in Elaborate Costume and Coiffure, Early 20th Century 8” (20 cm.) Paper mache with gofun complexion, painted facial features, carved wooden hands and feet, wearing a grey silk crepe chirimen kimono with unusual designs, padded red silk crepe lining and layered collars, and having a highly-stylized elaborate coiffure. Excellent condition. Early 20th century. $200/400

189. Paper Mache Miniature Kyoto Bijin in Unusual Costume, Early 20th Century 8” (20 cm.) Paper mache with gofun finish, painted facial features including eyes in deeply set sockets, shy smile, fancy human hair coiffure with painted feathered detail, wooden hands and feet, wearing an unusual outer kimono of pasteresistant dyed silk over red silk kimono, and carrying a little bag. Excellent condition. Early 20th Century. $200/400

190. Carved Wooden “Beautiful Lady” (Kyoto Bijin) in Petite Size, Early 20th Century 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, deeply set eye sockets, refined expression, closed mouth, black silk fiber hair in very ornate coiffure that is decorated with silver foil ornament, wooden hands and feet, wearing a purple and cream silk crepe costume in yagasuri pattern with inner kimono of printed design, gold silk brocade obi with red tie, and carrying a small pouch for accessories or toiletries. Excellent condition. Early 20th century, especially fine detailing on the diminutive lady. $300/500

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191. Pair of Carved Wooden Dolls Depicting The Butterfly Dance 10” (25 cm.) Each has carved wooden head The attached wings on each have richly-designed painted with gofun and lacquered wings. finish, enamel inset eyes, open mouth with double tow of tiny teeth, black silk fiber hair drawn into a long backlock, carved wooden hands, and is wearing an elaborate matching silk brocade costume with red cord trim, red silk trousers, and attached richly-designed painted and lacquered butterfly wings at the back. Each holds silk flowers and is posed on its original base. Generally excellent, one with some paint loss on wings. Taisho era, circa 1920. $1500/1800

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192. Carved Wooden “Graduation Doll” with Presentation Flowers, Early 1900s 12” (30 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes, open mouth, teeth, tongue, very fine feathering detail of hair around her forehead, black long silk fiber hair, refined carving of wooden hands, unusual costume of gold silk patterned kimono with red lined sleeves and multilayered collar, the kimono tucked under a purple silk skirt with sash. She is holding a bouquet of graduation flowers and is presented on original wooden base. Excellent condition. Early 1900s. $400/500


193. Wooden Carved Gosho with Distinctive Childish Coiffure, Circa 1920s 10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted facial features, painted eyes, mouth appearing as though open with painted teeth, pierced ears, black hair in childish arrangement with double loop at crown, carved wooden hands with expressive posing of fingers, carved wooden feet, wearing a luxury costume of fine silks with very fine embroidery of flowers on the red silk crepe sleeves, gold brocade trousers, obi. Generally excellent. Circa 1920s. $800/1100

194. Carved Wooden Child Ningyō with Extended Length Trousers, Circa 1920s 9” (23 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes closed smiling mouth with defined teeth, dimpled chin, black hair arranged in youthful fashion, wooden hands posed in front of torso with defined fingers, wearing bronze green silk kimono with exquisite detail of embroidery on sleeves, and red silk trousers of extended length. Excellent condition. Circa 1920s $900/1400

195. Tableau Doll Depecting Momotaro with Armor, Sword and Banner 14” (36 cm.) Paper mache head with tinted rosy gofun finish, gentle expression, glass eyes, black human hair, Detail of the lettered banner held by the ningyō. carved wooden hands and feet, with bald pate indicating youth and with sidelocks and tied topknot, painted gloves and legs, including striped stockings, and wearing elaborate paper lacquer armor, furtipped boots, and carrying a fur-edged sword and decorated lettered banner. Excellent condition. Mid1900s. $250/350

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197. Petite Early Yusoki-Style Carved Wooden Seated Lady, Circa 1850 5 ½” (14 cm.) seated. Carved wooden socket head, gofun finish, painted facial features, heavy eyelids, closed mouth, painted feathering of hair around her forehead, very long black silk fiber hair captured on a form at the back, wooden hands, luxurious green silk brocade kimono over red silk crepe under-kimono with embroidered white flowers, and layered collar, Generally excellent. Edo era, circa 1850. $1400/2100

198. Carved Wooden Doll in Formal Court Attire

196. Carved Wooden Ningyō in Formal Court Costume 13” (33 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features with aquiline nose, black silk fiber hair extending to her waist at the back torso, wooden hands and feet, wearing an unusual gold brocade costume with very full sleeves, red inner kimono/trouser combination, three-layered collar, black tall pointed hat, painted shoes, and posed on wooden base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, circa 1920. $600/800

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10” (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes and facial features, downcast heavy eyelids, black silk fiber hair, bald crown, wooden hands and feet, wearing bast fiber tunic with wide sleeves, silk crepe trousers, gold lacquered cap, on original wooden stand. Generally excellent. Meiji era, circa 1900. $900/1300


Detail of facial expression and hair arrangement of the nobleman.

Detail of textile.

199. Fine Paper Mache Nobleman in Kabuke Stage Presentation, Circa 1915

200. Carved Wooden Ningyō as Chanter, Mid-1800s

17” (43 cm.) Presented in a dynamic pose, the nobleman (as indicated by his luxury costume) has a paper mache head with slightly-tinted gofun finish, glass eyes, dramatic expression with painted features, shadowed crown with inserted sidelocks and topknot, wooden hands and feet, and wearing hakama trousers with displayed extended length, unusual coat with wide shoulders and green lining and collars, posed on original base. Generally excellent. Taisho era, circa 1915. $2500/3500

7” (18 cm.) With childlike shaping of face, and presented in kneeling pose, the ningyō has a carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes and facial features, inserted sidelocks and forelock, and a topknot which is attached to a circular velvet crown indicating youthfulness, refined carved wooden hands, and wearing a luxurious costume of patterned silks in various colors and rich golden trousers. Generally excellent. Meiji era, circa 1870. $600/800

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201. Carved Wooden Doll Depecting Kabuke Performance of Shibaraku! 8 ½” (22 cm.) A dynamically-posed ningyō has carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted features and eyes, fierce expression, bald crown with shadowed coloring, black silk fiber hair with sidelocks and knot-tied topknot, head band, wooden hands and feet, and is wearing an unusual red silk crepe inner kimono with gold threading, black silk kimono tossed off the shoulders for ease of movement and with gold metallic threads and gold fringe, presented on wooden base. Generally excellent. Early 20th century. $300/400

202. Paper Mache Miniature Ningyō as Butterfly Dancer, Circa 1930s. 5 ½” (14 cm.) Posed dynamically with outstretched arms, and having paper mache head with gofun finish, painted features, gentle smiling expression black silk fiber hair, wooden hands, wearing an elaborately patterned costume including butterfly hat, and butterfly wings, carrying a drum, and posed on gilt-accented lacquered wooden base. Generally excellent. Circa 1930s $200/400

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203. Miniature Carved Wooden Doll Depicting Yamabushi Warrior Monk 7 ½” (19 cm.) Carved wooden head with pigmented gofun complexion, glass eyes, inserted black silk fiber brows and moustache, black silk fiber hair with sideburns, wooden hands, and wearing original red silk crepe kimono with elaborate silk brocade sleeves, pom-pom trim, sevenlayered collar, green patterned trousers, and black cap. Generally excellent. Early 1900s. $200/300

204. Petite Carved Wooden Doll Depicting Daikoku, The God of Daily Wealth 6 ½” (17 cm.) Carved wooden head with pigmented gofun finish and very expressive painted features including wide smile, teeth, and moustache, with black silk fiber hair, wooden hands and feet, and wearing an unusual silk brocade costume with pleated collar, gold trousers, and fitted cap, holding a money mallet in his right hand, and posed on wooden base. Early 20th century. $350/500


205. Miniature Red-Haired Shojo Character with Fine Original Costume 5” (13 cm.) Paper mache head with gofun finish and very expressive painted features including smiling expression, very unruly long red hair, expressivelyposed gofun-finished hands, and wearing an elaborate costume comprising a silk brocade kimono over five-layered collar, and wide trousers. The red hair had special symbolic powers, believed to ward off evil spirits and childhood diseases. Generally excellent. Early 1900s. $200/300

208. Miniature Theatrical Doll with Symbolic Red Hair, Mid1900s 6” (15 cm.) Posed seated with arms upraised in dynamic pose, the doll has a carved wooden head wth gofun finish, painted features, black silk fiber hair under bright red wig, wooden hands and feet, and wearing a green silk brocade kimono over layered collars, silk pants and metal crown, holding a drum, on wooden base. Excellent condition. Mid-1900s. $200/300

206. Miniature Ningyō as Shirabyoshi Dancer, Mid-1900s 7” (18 cm.) Paper mache head with gofun finish, painted features, heavy eyelids, closed mouth, black silk fiber hair, wooden hands in dynamic pose, wearing a silk brocade costume, elaborate crown, carrying a drum and posed on gilt-accented wooden base. Generally excellent. Mid-1900s. $200/300

207. Pair, Miniature Theatrical Set of Aged Couple Depicting Legend of Takasago, Early 1900s 6” (15 cm.) Depicting an aged man and woman, each with paper mache head, gofun finish, painted features, white hair (he with white beard), wooden hands, bare feet and wearing matching silk brocade outer kimonos, she holding a broom and having multi-layered inner kimono, and he holding a rake and with wide trousers for him, each posed on wooden base. The pair depict the legend of Takasago (see #24). Generally excellent. Circa 1920s. $300/500

209. Miniature Carved Wooden Aged Man with Broom 6 ½” (17 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish and wizened painted features of aged man, tinted complexion of face but not back of head, white beard and hair pulled into topknot, wooden hands and feet, wearing gold bast fiber kimono with gold thread, over silk pleated trouser, carrying broom and with original wooden stand. Excellent condition. Early 1900s. $200/400

210. Miniature Figure Depicting The Old Man from The Tale of The Tongue Cut Sparrow, Early 1900s 6” (15 cm.) Carved wooden head with dowel neck attachment, tinted gofun finish, painted features with incised age lines, applied white silk fiber brows and hair, wooden hands and feet with painted white shoes, wearing an unusual costume comprising green silk kimono tucked into brocade trousers that are fitted below the knees, sleeveless brocade kimono, fitted green cap, and carrying a lacquered “woven” basket at this back, posed on original wooden base. Excellent condition, wonderful depiction of peddler in daily life. Early 1900s. $200/400

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211. Standing Carved Wooden Court Figure, Early 1900s 13” (33 cm.) Carved wooden head, gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features including “sky-brows”, black silk fiber hair drawn away from face and captured in hip-length arrangement at the back, black painted pate, closed mouth with slight smile, wooden hands, wearing teal blue silk brocade short kimono over underkimono, five-layered collars, red silk crepe extended-length trousers, gold textured cap and holding a hand-painted fan, posed on original stand. Generally excellent except hair is sparse. Meiji era, early 1900s. $400/500

212. Paper Mache Ningyō Holding Hobby Horse and Kabuto Helmet, Mid-1900s 10” (25 cm.) Paper mache head with tinted gofun finish, painted features, black hair in child fashion with topknot, and wearing a red silk brocade embroidered kimono with pom-pom trim and white silk crepe inner sleeves, holding a kabuto helmet in one hand, and a toy hobby horse in the other. On original base with artist signature. Excellent condition. Mid-1900s. $300/500

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213. Fine Carved Wooden Art Doll (Sosaku-Ningyō), 1935 17” (43 cm.) Carved wooden head with refined painted features on gofun finish, very narrow eyes, closed mouth, feathered details of hair around forehead edge and with elaboratelyarranged coiffure including tied topknot, carved wooden hands and feet, superb costume of vintage textiles, including green/gold silk outer kimono that is arranged to also display the inner kimono, sandals, and posed on a silk crepe


covered base. Excellent condition. Circa 1935. The art doll (sosaku) movement, whereby an entire doll was made and costumed by one artist, gained strength in the mid-1900s in Japan, offering a variation from the traditional method of doll assembly by various specialists. Excellent condition. Circa 1935. $2000/2400

215. Portrait Warrior Kato Kiyomasa with Roaring Tiger 10” (25 cm.) h. warrior 10” l, tiger. Paper mache with pigmented gofun finish, glass eyes black silk fiber brows, moustache very long beard, and topknot, shadowed crown, wooden hands with painted black gloves, wooden feet, painted stockings and fur-tipped shoes, wearing lacquered paper armor over silk brocade kimono. He is posed in warrior stance, as though holding off the paper mache tiger which has a silk crepe hide with stripes and claws, fierce open mouth, defined teeth and fangs, glass eyes, and upheld tail. Generally excellent. Taisho era, circa 1920. $900/1300

215.1. Pair of Ministers from Girl’s Day (Hina Matsuri) Presentation, Circa 1950

214. Diminutive Takeda-Ningyō in Dynamic Pose, Late 1800s 13” (33 cm.) Posed dynamically in dramatic theatrical manner, having carved wooden head with pigmented gofun finish, painted fierce features, moustache, black silk fiber hair with whisk-style topknot, carved wooden hands and feet, painted stockings and blue shoes, wearing elaborate stiffened silk-brocade costume, and carrying sword. Mounted on original base. Good condition, weapons at back are not original. Meiji era, late 1800s. $600/900

9” (23 cm.) The classic seated figures representing Ministers from the Girl’s Day celebration, depicting an aged man and a young man, each of sculpted paper mache with gofun finish and painted facial details; the aged man wearing a red silk robe, and with white long whiskers and beard, and bushy brows; and the younger wearing a black silk costume with black silk fiber hair worn in topknot. And each with black court cap having rarer side blinders, and with arrows and bows. Included is original box. Excellent condition. Post WWII. $200/300

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216. Pair, Miniature Doll in Playful Scene with Hobby Horse, Early 1900s 4 ½” (11 cm.) Posed on a wooden stand are two children, each with carved wooden head having gofun finish, painted features, black silk fiber hair with inserted sidelocks, wearing silk layered costumes and playing with a cloth hobby horse. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/300

217. Pair of Miniature Carved Wooden Dolls with Packages and Paper Scroll, Early 1900s 4” (10 cm.) standing doll). Each has a carved wooden head with gofun finish, shaded crown, painted features, wooden hands and feet, silk floss sidelocks and backlocks, and is wearing a simple cotton kimono and outer jacket. The kneeling child guards a tied lot of packages, and the standing child guards a paper scroll. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/400

218. Miniature Paper Mache Ningyō Carrying A Precious Box, Mid-1900s 4” (10 cm.) Paper mache head with gofun finish, painted features, silk fiber sidelocks and topknot on shadowed crown, wooden hands and bare feet, wearing an intricately-layered cotton and silk costume and carrying a wooden treasure box, posed on original base. Excellent condition. Showa era, mid-1900s. $200/400

219. Miniature Carved Wooden Doll Depicting a Seated Elderly Man, Early 1900s 4” (10 cm.) Posed seated with right arm resting on bent right knee, having carved wooden head with tinted gofun finish, glass eyes, painted facial features on wizened age, white silk fiber beard and brows, wooden hands and feet, wearing simple cotton and silk crepe costume with variety of fabric patterns, and holding mallet in his right hand as though about to pound at the tree trunk block which is at his front, posed on wooden base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/400

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220. Miniature Carved Wooden Ningyō Depicting an Aged Lady Spinning Cotton, Early 1900s 4 ½” (11 cm.) Posed kneeling, her head turned to the side, and with carved wooden head, tinted gofun finish, painted features with incised age lines, white silk fiber hair drawn away from her face, paper mache hands, wearing a simple multi-patterned cotton costume, posed by spinning wheel and holding a rod of flax in her hands, on original wooden base. Generally excellent, Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/400

The yellow bucket carried at her back.

Unusual red panel at the costume back.

The handpainted panel at the back of the costume.

221. Miniature Carved Wooden Ningyō Depicting an Aged Woman with Bucket, Early 1900s 5” (13 cm.) Posed as though walking with stooped back in a labored manner, the doll has carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features, wizened age lines, white silk floss hair, paper mache hands and feet wearing simple cotton costume, sandals and carries a wooden bucket strapped on her back, posed on original wooden base. Generally excellent. Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/300

222. Diminutive Carved Wooden Ningyō Depicting Fireman in Guild Coat

223. Miniature Carved Wooden Ningyō Depicting Fireman in Guild Coat

8” (20 cm.) Posed dynamically, with legs braced for support and arms held up in mannered stance, with carved wooden head having dowel neck attachment, shadowed grey crown, enamel eyes, closed mouth, silk floss sidelocks and backlocks, and wearing an unusual costume having lettering on front straps and a red panel at the upper back, posed on original stand. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/400

6” (15 cm.) Posed standing, his arms braced for holding a wooden staff, the ningyō has carved wooden head, tinted gofun complexion, shadowed crown, painted features, black silk fiber hair, wearing a black silk costume with lettered straps and with a whiteedged hand-painted black panel at the upper back, and holding a staff with white and black banner, on original wooden base. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $200/400

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Detail of fabric design seen from back view.

224. Carved Wooden Gosho-Style O-Bina Imperial Lord for the Hinamatsuri 11” (28 cm.) Posed seated on woven base with textile front, with carved wooden head in plump rounded shape (gosho), with gofun finish, painted facial features, black silk childlike hair with attached tall gold textured hat, wooden hands, and wearing an elaborate brocade costume, with sword. With its endearing impish face, yet presented as a member of the Imperial court. Excellent condition. Late Meiji era, circa 1900. $800/1100

225. Miniature Tableau Scene Depicting The Jealous Maiden in The Tale of Dōjōji 6” (16 cm.) Posed upon a wooden base are two figures in highly-dramatic stylized scene, each with gofun finish, painted facial features, one with long flowing human hair posed with protective covering disguising her head, and the other a warrior posed as though drawn back from the frightful sight, each with very elaborate original costumes. Excellent condition. Taisho era, circa 1920. $200/400

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226. Theatrical Ishō-Ningyō Depecting a Shirabyoshi Dancer, Circa 1900 13” (33 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features, black silk fiber hair that extends down her Her silk fiber hair extends entire back, wooden down her entire back and is hands and feet, centered by hand-painted designs on kimono. wearing an unusual bast fiber kimono with painted designs, over padded silk chirimen kimono in vivid shades of orange and blue, with ivory silk lining, gold textured hat and holding a drum and fan, posed on original wooden stand. Excellent condition. Taisho era, early 1900s. $700/900


227. Diminutive Carved Wooden Lady (Kyoto-Bijin) with Unusual Embroidered Outer Kimono, Late 1800s 10” (25 cm.) With carved wooden head having gofun finish, painted features, black silk fiber hair, wooden hands and feet, she is posed with her head turned to side and her arms posed to display her silk outer kimono which has exquisite and well-detailed embroidery. She also wears a plum silk crepe kimono with padded layers at the hem, and fawn-spot patterned obi, posed on fabric covered base. Generally excellent. Late Meiji era, circa 1800s. $500/900

228. Paper Mache Ishō-Ningyō as Nanny with Unusually Patterned Kimono, Holding a Child, Circa 1930s 13” (33 cm.) Paper mache head, gofun finish, glass eyes, painted features, painted feathering detail of hair around her forehead, black silk floss hair in upswept manner with chirimen bow and foil ornaments, wearing an unusual silk crepe kimono printed with designs of little children, plaid under-kimono, print skirt, sandals. She is holding a toy, and a little child is strapped to her back. Taisho era, 1930s. $700/1100

Detail of hand-painted designs of children playing on kimono.

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Rear view of costume.

229. Carved Wooden Lady (Kyoto-Bijin) in Embroidered Red Silk Robes, Late 1800s 10� (25 cm.) Carved wooden head with gofun finish, painted eyes in deeply-set sockets, heavily modeled eyelids, aquiline nose, teeth, black silk fiber hair in ornate fashion with long sidelocks and looped crown curls that are decorated with hair bows, carved wooden hands and bare feet, and wearing a red silk kimono with welldetailed embroidery, padded silk crepe sleeveless kimono, black brocade obi with chirimen ties. Excellent condition. Meiji era, late 1800s. $800/1100

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230. Splendid Beautiful Lady (Kyoto-Bijin) in Grand Size, by Daiyu Circa 1950 38” (97 cm.) Posed in a dramatic stance as drummer, she has a carved wooden head with most appealing shy expression, lustrous gofun finish, glass inset eyes, painted features, very fine painted feathering of hair around her face, ornate coiffure with ornaments including ivy (tsu) design, wooden hands and feet, beautiful elongated fingers that are elegantly holding a drum with lacquered handle and gold details. She is wearing a Uchigake kimono with its left sleeve tossed back to reveal an under sleeve with crane pattern, and is posed on original wooden stand with wooden artist plaque having signature “Daiyu”. Post-war 1950s. $4700/5300

Rear view of costume with thrownback kimono sleeve.

Finely painted feathering of hair is evident here.

Artist signature on base.

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231. Sculpted Clay Hakata-Ningyō with Painted Costume 15” (38 cm.) Of low-fired clay, the portrait of the sea-salt maiden from the drama Shiokumi is richly-sculpted to suggest actual folds and drapes of fabric, and hand-painted with vibrant colors and designs, and carries original painted pots. Excellent condition. Showa era, circa 1925. The doll is shown and discussed in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 183. $300/500

232. Seated Clay Child as Gosho with Turtle and Bird 5 ½” (14 cm.) Sculpted clay gosho posed seated with one leg drawn back has very plump face and limbs, suggestion of painted presentation ribbon under modeled cap (with real ribbon ties), painted features, hair, and sleeveless jacket, and is holding a bird in one hand, and a turtle resting on his ankle. Excellent condition, some light fading of colors. Mid-1900s. $450/600

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233. A Quartet of Paper Dolls (Anesama) 6” (15 cm.) -9”. Each is of patterned or plain paper, folded and draped in various manners to create an illusion of form and costume and elaboratelydecorated hair. As is tradition, the dolls are designed without facial features. Each is posed upon its original base. Mid-20th century. $300/500

234. Contemporary Paper Mache Art Doll as IshōNingyō 15” (38 cm.) Paper mache with gofun finish, painted features with narrow line indicating eyes, black silk fiber hair in unusual style and of exceptional length and detail including silver foilwrapped topknot, sculpted hands held modestly in front of her torso, wearing luxuriously-draped ivory silk gown with gold thread embroidery, the outer kimono loosely worn to reveal inner kimono which also has embroidered detail, presented on original base. Excellent condition. Late 20th century. $900/1300

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236. Clay Folk Doll (TsuchiNingyō) of Young Lad, Early 1900s 7” (18 cm.) Made in the folk art manner, the clay doll with natural finish depicts a young lad, his head peeking over the top of the large package he holds in his outstretched hands, painted features, with sculpted curl at the back of his head held with a little bow, striped details of costume and black apron, posed on original stand, and with original label attached. Excellent condition. Early 20th century. The doll is shown and discussed in Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō by Alan Scott Pate, page 180. $300/500

235. Five Wooden Kokeshi Dolls with Artist’s Signatures 4 ½” (11 cm.) -12”. All are simply-constructed with a turned wood shaft topped by a round head, decorated with paint to simulate hair, facial features and costume, and each bears its artist signature. Excellent condition. Late 19th century. In his book, Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō, Alan Scott Pate describes the genre as “a celebration of minimalism... that delight the adult and entertain the children for which they were originally celebrated” (page 168). $300/500

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237. Pair, of Miniature Carved Wooden Kimekomi-Ningyō Depecting the Gods of Good Fortune, Daikoku and Okame, Early 1900s 3” (8 cm.) The attached pair of carved wooden dolls with gosho-style faces having gofun finish and well-defined smiling expressions are posed seated, with fabric costumes applied permanently to their bodies in hidden slits, posed alongside a brocade cushion with kami-technique cover, and disguising a little white mouse. Excellent condition. Early 1900s. $200/400


238. Fine Large Carved Wooden Portrait of Emperor Ojin in Court Attire, Late 1800s 18” (46 cm.) seated. Carved wooden swivel head, gofun finish, narrow enamel inset eyes with well-defined eyelids, black feathered brows, strong nose, firmly-set lips, painted detail of hair around the edges of forehead, inserted black silk fiber hair. carved wooden hands and shoes. Posed seated, with arms extended, as though at court, he is wearing a lined silk brocade kimono with chrysanthemum pattern over grey brocade trousers with matching design, and has inner kimono, multi-layered collars, elaborate paper laquered armor, gold lacquer cap, holds a fan in his wrist-guarded hands, and carries a sword with tiger tail trim. Very good condition albeit sparsity of hair. Meiji era, late 1800s, he depicts the Emperor Ojin, a popular mushaningyō created for Boy’s Day festivities. $5000/7500

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BIBLIOGRAPHY Pate, Alan Scott. Ningyō, The Art of the Japanese Doll. Japan: Tuttle Publishing, 2005. Pate, Alan Scott. Japanese Dolls, The Fascinating World of Ningyō. Japan: Tuttle Publishing, 2007.

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The Carabet Collection - Antique Japanese Dolls  

January 10, 2016 at the Fairmont Hotel in Newport Beach, California

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