The Red Book Magazine • March 2018

Page 1

An exclusive publication of The Red Book and

COUTURE for a CAUSE The POWER of the PORTRAIT

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plus

PEOPLE WHO IMPACT VALLEY NONPROFITS

and more

Full-Throttle Philanthropy Made-to-order mini racers fast-track fundraising


L U X U R Y

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V I S I T

FA S H I O N S Q U A R E . C O M

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DAVID YURMAN

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JOHNNY WAS

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M I C H A E L S TA R S

GUCCI

C A R T I E R

ST. JOHN O

N E I M A N

SPLENDID

M E G A

M A R C U S

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PARIS OPTIQUE S U R

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M A X M A R A

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content s March 2018

FEATURES 40

THE POWER OF THE PORTRAIT

46

DESIGNERS. WHO. CARE.

54

PHILANTHROPY GOES FULL THROTTLE

54 40

DEPARTMENTS

46

STYLE 6

SHOP THE SHADE: ULTRA VIOLET

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BREAKING BRIDAL RULES

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PACK AND GO TO KYOTO

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CLEAN CUT, COOL COLORS PARTY

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9 SPECTACULAR WINTER FUNDRAISING PARTIES PERSONALITIES

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3 PEOPLE WHO MAKE A DIFFERENCE CALENDAR

63

SPRING SOCIAL EVENTS CULTURE

70

TOUR THE WORLD AT VALLEY EXHIBITIONS AFTER-PARTY

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YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN

ON THE COVER Illusion evening gown with ostrich feather skirt by Monique Lhuillier, courtesy Neiman Marcus Diamond earrings, courtesy E.D. Marshall Jewelers Mini racer, Vintage Kart Company Model, The Agency Arizona Hair and makeup by Laura Flagler Photographed by Mark Lipczynski at the Scottsdale Waterfront


THE DAY-DATE 40 The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

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e d ito r ’s l et te r

T

he Valley – the world – lost a friend when Bruce Halle passed away in January. Halle, a philanthropist and founder of Discount Tire, lived by these simple lessons: “Be honest, work hard, have fun, be grateful and pay it forward.” Doing what you love, doing it well and accomplishing good at the same time might be the perfect formula for a satisfying life. In this issue, we highlight people who, like Halle, exemplify this concept.

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Each social season, the Valley is blessed by designers who lend their brand and fame to runway shows that support philanthropic causes. We capture six fashionable moments from this year’s social season in “Designers. Who. Care.” on p. 46. Creativity and imagination applied to fundraising can pay big dividends. As Andrew Bracanovich sat at a rooftop bar in Old Town Scottsdale, he had a vision of Monaco-style race cars speeding through the streets below. An idea was born. He and five partners founded Vintage Kart Company and built the colorful minis that now race through Scottsdale one weekend a year. The Scottsdale Grand Prix benefits Southwest Human Development. Michelle Jacoby tells the company’s story on p. 54. You can also read about how – and why – Natalie Niekro and her husband, Luke Woolsey, raise awareness and support for those who experience an aneurysm, AVM or a hemorrhagic stroke (p. 34). And learn how Kyle Bell turned his penchant for collecting autographs into millions of dollars for nonprofit organizations (p. 38). And finally, here’s a story just for fun. When our three daughters were growing up, year after year we took them to a studio to be photographed – individually, together, with their tennis racquets, in gymnastic leotards, with our golden retriever, with our wire fox terrier. Most of those photos are packed away. There is another option we didn’t consider: oil. But some parents do, and make a portrait in oil a priority. That cute young boy at the top of the page? My husband, Jim, at around age 10. Karen Fernau explores the resurging interest in portrait painting on p. 54. We hope you’ve enjoyed the first three issues of The Red Book Magazine. For the 2018-19 social season, we plan six. If you or someone you know would like to be added to our subscription list, please let us know. We would love to hear from you.

Cindy Miller Managing Editor cmiller@azredbook.com


Generosity Volume 1, Issue 3

Society • Culture • Luxury PUBLISHER AND CEO, ON MEDIA PUBLICATIONS

Linda “Mac” Perlich

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Mark Kochman

fueling innovation at ASU

MANAGING EDITOR

Cindy Miller

PR AND MARKETING MANAGER

Perrine Adams

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION

David Imes

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Mary Winters WRITERS

Perrine Adams Karen Fernau Michelle Jacoby Jake Poinier Lisa Van Loo PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tina Celle Scott Foust Gary Helland Photography Haute Event Photography Images by Kay Mark Lipczynski Ashley Lowery James and Elena Thornton

Philanthropy The heart of the organization

Education

Showcasing ASU

Networking

Connecting women

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES

Lisa Grannis Robyn Lambert Julie Osten Deidra Viberg Jennifer Woods

ACCOUNTING COORDINATOR

Cindy Blaisure

Copyright 2018 by ON Media Publications. All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reprinted or reproduced without the publisher’s permission. The Red Book Magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. Statements and opinions printed in The Red Book Magazine are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Red Book Magazine. 910 E. Osborn Road, Suite C, Phoenix, AZ 85014 Reach Us 602-445-7168 | info@azredbook.com | azredbook.com

Join us GiveTo.ASU.edu/WPRedBook


style

18K WHITE GOLD EMPIRE PENDANT with 8.63 ct. emerald-cut amethyst and 0.97 ct. brilliant-cut diamonds, $5,435, at Black, Starr & Frost

SILK AND COTTON BOW TIE, $59.50, at Ted Baker London, Scottsdale Fashion Square

Shop the Shade:

Ultra Violet

SWEETHEART-NECK STRAPLESS FLORALPRINT GOWN, $6,990, by Naeem Khan, at Neiman Marcus, Scottsdale Fashion Square

Celebrate Pantone’s Color of the Year in your closet and your home Text by Perrine Adams ❖ Photos courtesy companies

FUSION DESK CHAIR, price upon request, at Roche Bobois

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HERITAGE COLLECTION MOSAIC RING in 18-kt gold with 0.60 ct. diamonds and French enameling, price upon request, by Lord Jewelry, at French Designer Jeweler


“EVENING SOUND,” Italian watercolor on arches paper, 14.5" x 22", $1,400, by Claribel Cone at French Designer Jeweler

It’s one thing to help someone achieve success. It’s another to make it last.

PEACHY COLORBLOCK PUMPS with crystal collar, $1,150, by Gucci, at Gucci and Neiman Marcus, Scottsdale Fashion Square

We help you do both. ELAPHE WATERSNAKE BAG, $4,300, by Chanel, at Vintage By Misty

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T.C. Cannon (Kiowa/Caddo), 1946-1978. “Turn of the Century Dandy,” 1976, acrylic on canvas. Reproduced by permission of the Estate of T.C. Cannon. © 2017 Estate of T.C. Cannon.

LAST CHANCE TO SEE

T.C. CANNON O F G O D A N D M O R TA L M E N : M A S T E R W O R K S B Y T. C . C A N N O N F R O M T H E N A N CY A N D R I C H A R D B LO C H CO L L E C T I O N

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style

EARRINGS with two natural fancy vivid yellow diamonds total 2.81 ct. set in 18K gold and platinum with colorless diamonds, price upon request, by GRAFF, at Betteridge Jewelers, Seville Shopping Center

Breaking Bridal Rules Pore over unique bridal jewelry with colored stones, mixed metals and surprising designs

THREE-STONE RING in 18K rose gold with pear shape 2.56 ct. green diamonds and 0.68 ct. Argyle pink diamonds, $158,000, at Hyde Park Jewelers, Biltmore Fashion Park

SCHLUMBERGER CORSAGE BRACELET in 18K yellow gold and platinum with brilliant-cut diamonds and cultured pearls, $175,000, at Tiffany & Co., Scottsdale Fashion Square

SCHLUMBERGER FLEURAGE NECKLACE in platinum and 18K gold with diamonds, $625,000, at Tiffany & Co., Scottsdale Fashion Square

Text by Perrine Adams â?– Photos courtesy companies

PETITE BANGLES in 18K white, yellow and pink gold, with 2.4 ct. round brilliant diamonds, $5,900 each, at Oliver Smith Jeweler, The Shops Gainey Village

18K ROSE GOLD VIOLA AMETHYST FASHION RING, with 5.22 ct. amethyst, pink mother of pearl and 0.63 ct. diamonds, $2,995, by Doves, at London Gold March 2018 / 9


style

Cherry blossoms in Kyoto

Pack and Go to Kyoto

TEARS OF THE MOON CAT-EYE SUNGLASSES, hand-laid Swarovski crystal accents with cultured freshwater pearls, $3,450, by AnnaKarin Karlsson, at Neiman Marcus, Scottsdale Fashion Square

Cherry blossom-inspired styles for your spring travels Text by Perrine Adams Photos courtesy companies

SNEAKY VIV’ LEATHER LACE COVERED SNEAKERS, $1,595, by Roger Vivier, at Neiman Marcus, Scottsdale Fashion Square

TAFLOR PANTS, $395, at Escada, Scottsdale Fashion Square 10 / TRBM

ORIENTAL BLOSSOM SUITCASE, $448, at Ted Baker and Nordstrom, Scottsdale Fashion Square


MABAM JACKET, $1,250, at Escada, Scottsdale Fashion Square

LEATHER COLORBLOCK LUGGAGE TAG, $175, and PASSPORT COVER, $225, at Tiffany & Co., Scottsdale Fashion Square


style

EDEN BRONZE GARDEN CHANDELIER with clear glass cylinders, $678, by Crystorama, at Hinkley’s Custom Lighting

HEMINGWAY CLUB CHAIR, $1,399, by Apostrophe, at Paddy O’ Furniture

SOFTSCAPE STRAP ARM CHAIRS AND OTTOMAN, price upon request, at Brown Jordan, Scottsdale Quarter

DIAMOND POINT ROUND DECANTER in crystal glass, $195, and diamond point wine glass in lead crystal, $125, at Tiffany & Co., Scottsdale Fashion Square

Clean Cut, Cool Colors

Blend desert hues for an outdoor look that is both rustic and refined Text by Perrine Adams ❖ Photos courtesy companies

TRAVELER OUTDOOR ARMCHAIR with hood, price upon request, at Roche Bobois 12 / TRBM

NETWORK 130 SOFA, price upon request, by RODA, at bulthaup Scottsdale


Scottsdale Art Auction Saturday, April 7, 2018

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1. E. Martin HEnnings 14'' x 14'' Oil EstiMatE: $40,000 - 60,000 2. VictOr Higgins 12'' x 14'' Oil EstiMatE: $40,000 - 60,000 3. Maynard dixOn 25'' x 30'' Oil EstiMatE: $50,000 - 75,000 4. Ed MEll 24'' x 24'' Oil EstiMatE: $10,000 - 15,000

auctiOning OVEr 300 WOrks Of iMpOrtant WEstErn, WildlifE and spOrting art s a t u r d ay , a p r i l 7 , 2 0 1 8 For more information please call (480) 945-0225 or visit www.scottsdaleartauction.com. Color catalogue available $40.

SA SCOTTSDALE ART AUCTION

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party

Winter Fundraisers NOV. 18

58TH ANNUAL HEART BALL American Heart Association The 58th Annual Heart Ball, chaired by Char Hubble, attracted a sold-out crowd of more than 800 guests to The Phoenician. The theme of the black-tie soiree was Infinite Hearts, in recognition of the infinite possibilities of finding health and healing. The 2017 executive committee included vice-chairmen Jennifer Moser and Molly Stockley, Sweetheart Lynne Love, chairman-elect Carolyn Jackson, and honorary chairs Sylvia and Joe Shoen. Heart Ball funds support the work of the American Heart Association. 1

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1. Don Crawford and SambAZ dancer 2. Laura Zackart, Julie Belfer, Laurie Hunter and Logan Bolar 3. Cooper Davis and Char Hubble 4. Steve Gallagher, Anna Chung, Jen Powell, Leticia Zawadzki and Lisa Moore 5. Aimee Josette

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ACCEPTING FINE CONSIGNMENTS of FURNISHINGS & ART

Darlene Richert, Proprietor

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6. Lynne Love and Nan Howlett 7. Peter and Melissa Katz 8. Molly and Bob Stockley 9. Carolyn and Craig Jackson

very Lane could easily be found among the chic design and home furnishing shops of Paris, yet is only minutes from the Scottsdale Quarter. Avery Lane offers top quality, one-of-a kind consignments and unique French, Italian and American antiques from Scottsdale’s most fabulous homes – all at prices you won’t believe.

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Winter Fundraisers DEC. 13

HOLIDAY LUNCHEON Arizona Costume Institute The Arizona Costume Institute Holiday Luncheon at Phoenix Art Museum featured New York costume and fashion designer Patricia Field, who has earned accolades for Sex and the City, The Devil Wears Prada and Ugly Betty. Field shared the story behind the iconic “Carrie Bradshaw tutu,” saying it was a $5 chance find in a bargain bucket. Libby Cohen chaired the event, and Chrissy Sayare, owner of To Be Continued in Scottsdale, was the presenting sponsor. Proceeds enhance ACI’s support of the fashion design department at Phoenix Art Museum. 1

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1. Natalee Sansone 2. Lisa Bell, Lisa Geyser and Tracy Serena 3. Patricia Field and Chrissy Sayare 4. Libby Cohen and Matthew Boland 5. Attendees wore their fashionable best PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 16 / TRBM


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Winter Fundraisers DEC. 16

64TH ANNUAL FASHION SHOW LUNCHEON The Board of Visitors More than 1,100 guests attended The Board of Visitors 64th Annual Fashion Show Luncheon at the Arizona Biltmore. The 2019 Flower Girls, grandchildren of BOV members escorted by their grandfathers and professional models wore fashions from Dillard’s on the runway. Margaret Beardsley and Kelly Sifferman co-chaired the event. Proceeds benefit The Board of Visitors Ryan House, Maggie’s Place, Phoenix Rescue Mission and Barrow Neurological Foundation. 1

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1. Bob Byram with his grandchildren 2. Caitie McGrath 3. 2018 Board of Visitors Flower Girls 4. Emma Bosworth 5. Molly Kuhl 6. Mark Sifferman with his granddaughter Olivia Sifferman PHOTOS COURTESY The Board of Visitors 18 / TRBM


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the Possibilities 8340 E. Raintree Drive I Suite B-9 I Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Phone: 480.538.1288 www.winecellardesigns.biz 3001 E. Skyline Drive I Suite 109 I Tucson, AZ 85718 Phone: 520.638.7821 ROC#299785


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Winter Fundraisers DEC. 22

52ND ANNUAL DESERT BALL Desert Foundation Auxiliary Families and friends gathered at Desert Foundation Auxiliary’s 52nd Annual Desert Ball to celebrate 12 young women from Scottsdale, Paradise Valley and Carefree who were presented to the community. In addition to the presentation, guests enjoyed dinner and dancing. Wendy Arendt chaired the evening, with Gina Forster as her cochair. Thomas Reahard presented the debutantes. Proceeds will be distributed to Maddie’s Daddy Foundation and Scottsdale Training and Rehabilitation Services (STARS).

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1. Front row: Gabriella Vatistas, Kathryn Eaton, Jordan Craft, Reilly Whittington and Kyla Christifulli. Middle row: Annalise Kusy, Claire Folger, Analyse Fuenning and Sarah Neil. Top row: Alexandra Gburek, Emily Weigel and Alexandra Meyer Photo by Duke Photography

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2. William and Analyse Fuenning 3. Thomas and Cathy Reahard, Kim and Steven Zeiser, Michael and Wendy Arendt, and Gina and Joseph Forster 4. Alison Getz, Streator Bates, and Julie and Stephen Jorgenson 5. Pearl and Bo Woodring 6. Douglas Eaton and Kathryn Eaton 7. Paula and Rachel MacWilliam, Kathleen McClain, and Beth and Michael Pryor PHOTOS BY Colleen Katz Pictures In Pixel, courtesy Desert Foundation Auxiliary 20 / TRBM


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For more information: Laurie Haas, CAPI Vice President Private Risk Services lhaas@lovitt-touche.com | 602-778-7042


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Winter Fundraisers JAN. 13

DRIVE THE DREAM GALA Childhelp The 14th Annual Drive the Dream Gala at the Arizona Biltmore netted a record $1.4 million-plus to benefit the programs and services of Childhelp. Ivy Ciolli, Erika Williams and Chrissy Sayare cochaired the Cinderella-themed soiree. This year’s awardees included John Stamos, Carolyn and Craig Jackson, and Brand Drivers. Jewel, CeeLo Green, the Philip Myers Band and Christopher Macchio provided the entertainment. Grimaldi’s Pizzeria was the presenting sponsor for the sold-out gala.

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1. Carol Hebets, Ivy Ciolli, Chrissy Sayare, Sara O’Meara, Yvonne Fedderson and Erika Williams 2. Jewel 3. John Stamos, Yvonne Fedderson, Sara O’Meara and Caitlin McHugh 4. Vanessa Arevalo and Cameron Mathison 5. CeeLo 6. Peta Murgatroyd, Maksim Chmerkovskiy and Dru Hammer 7. Jim Hebets, Carol Hebets, Carolyn Jackson and Craig Jackson

PHOTOS BY Phil Gudenschwager Photography 22 / TRBM


Creative Problem Solvers. Self Advocates. Empathetic Leaders. ConďŹ dent Communicators.

Setting the stage for lifelong success.

Arts Schools Network Exemplary School 2017-2019 AZ Civic Engagement School of Excellence 2013-2017 FIRST Lego League Regional and State Robotics Challenge Champions

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#1 High School Mock Trial Team in Arizona


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Winter Fundraisers JAN. 13

THE JUMP BALL Phoenix Suns Charities The annual Phoenix Suns Charities Jump Ball was held at Talking Stick Resort. For the 10th consecutive year, the party was presented by Annexus. The 800 guests enjoyed performances by Miami-based rapper and four-time Grammy Award nominee Flo Rida. Proceeds benefit Phoenix Suns Charities, which works to improve the lives of youth and families throughout Arizona by creating and supporting programs that focus on education, recreation, and health and human services. 1

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1. Flo Rida 2. Flo Rida performs 3. Jared Dudley, Brandon Knight, Greg Monroe and Devin Booker 4. Warren and Amy Forsythe 5. Chris Alvarez and Arlee Maracigan 6. Don Dady, Flo Rida and Gilda Rodriguez

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PHOTOS COURTESY Phoenix Suns 24 / TRBM


Over 100 specialists. Five hospitals. One focus. Cancer. Expert medicine works at Cancer Treatment Centers of AmericaÂŽ.

Phoenix | Chicago | Philadelphia | Atlanta | Tulsa cancercenter.com 888.214.9488

Š 2018 Rising Tide


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Winter Fundraisers JAN. 19

DANCE WITH ME Ballet Arizona More than 350 guests attended Dance With Me at Phoenix Art Museum. The party raised more than $500,000 to support Ballet Arizona and honored Rose and Harry Papp for their longtime support of the ballet and the community. Following dinner, the tradition from which the gala received its name brought attendees to their feet to dance with the professional dancers. Daryl Weil chaired the evening, with Adrienne Schiffner as her co-chair.

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1. Adrienne Schiffner and Daryl Weil with School of Ballet Arizona students 2. Barbara and Don Ottosen 3. Dr. Robert and Camerone McCulloch 4. Lindsay Fletcher and Sarah Dworkin 5. Dr. Robert Spetzler 6. Ballet Arizona dancers 7. Kory and Abby Leadon, Gail Traister and Jean Marley

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PHOTOS COURTESY Ballet Arizona 26 / TRBM


March 2018 / 27


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Winter Fundraisers JAN. 20

BARROW GRAND BALL Women’s Board of Barrow Neurological Foundation The 2018 Barrow Grand Ball, co-chaired by Jan Cacheris and Carrie Hall, raised $3 million for Barrow Neurological Institute. This year, the Women’s Board of Barrow Neurological Foundation raised funds for Alzheimer’s disease research. More than 300 guests, including some of the Valley’s most well-known leaders, attended the black-tie affair at the Arizona Biltmore. Founded in 1965, the Women’s Board has donated more than $58 million to support medical research at Barrow. 1 2 3

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1. The table setting 2. Jacquie and Bennett Dorrance 3. Dr. Michael Lawton, Jessie Sanai and Dr. Nader Sanai 4. Dr. Robert and Nancy Spetzler 5. Vicky and Lance Ross 6. Dionne and Francis Najafi

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PHOTOS BY Brad Armstrong Photography 28 / TRBM


DISCOVER PINE CANYON AND GET INSPIRED Pine Canyon is the perfect place to enjoy the high country, and the perfect place to discover an all new you. Stay in our recently completed Club Cabins and enjoy our amenities including world-class dining, spa services, state-of-the-art fitness center, award-winning golf and miles of hiking and jogging trails. Our Club Cabins are situated between the Clubhouse and Camp Pine Canyon, with easy access to all our amenities. Best of all, the cabins are designed to accommodate both large and small groups. Let us customize a package designed around you. Discovery Visit packages start from $1,050. It’s time to get inspired. CUSTOM ESTATE HOME SITES

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HomesAtPineCanyon.net | 888.719.5973 P I N E C A N Y O N R E A LT Y, L L C | 1 2 0 1 E J O H N W E S L E Y P O W E L L B LV D | F L A G S TA F F, A R I Z O N A Obtain the Property Report or its equivalent required by Federal and State law and read it before signing anything. No Federal or State agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offering in any state where prohibited by law. Prices are subject to change without prior notice. All plans, intentions and materials relating to Pine Canyon and the Pine Canyon Club, or any townhome, condominium or single family homes within Pine Canyon, are subject to addition, deletion, revision, change or other modification from time to time at the discretion of the developer without notice.

OWNED AND M A N AG E D B Y


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Winter Fundraisers JAN. 30

INDEPENDENT WOMAN LUNCHEON Phoenix Art Museum Guests at Phoenix Art Museum’s Independent Woman Luncheon enjoyed a menu created by Santa Barbara Catering at 59 tables created by 59 Valley designers. The theme of the eighth annual event was Kaleidoscope the Art of Contrast, reflecting the brilliant hues favored by Amy Lau, the afternoon’s keynote speaker. Lau, a New York-based interior designer, grew up in Paradise Valley. Matthew Boland chaired the luncheon, and Amy Cohn was the honorary chair. Kathy Petsas was the designer chair. The sold-out event drew 600 guests, raising money for education and exhibitions at the museum. 3 4

1. Table by Katherine Mueller, CeTerra Accents & Interiors 2. Matthew Boland 3. Amy Lau and her mother, Patti Lau 4. Stefanie Blaney, Rebecca Salcito and Madonna Newman 5. Amada Cruz, the Sybil Harrington Director Phoenix Art Museum, and Lisa Andrew Portigal 6. Amy Cohn and Kathy Petsas 7. Lauren Reese and Kristen Hancock

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PHOTOS BY Tina Celle 30 / TRBM


Champions. Philanthropists. Friends.

Carrie Hall, Co-Chairman, 2018 Barrow Grand Ball; Ann Denk, Chairman, Women’s Board; Jan Cacheris, Co-Chairman, 2018 Barrow Grand Ball

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or 53 years the Women’s Board of Barrow Neurological Foundation has championed Barrow as the international leader in the treatment of debilitating brain and spine disorders like aneurysms and AVMs, stroke, brain tumors and Parkinson’s disease. Members of the Women’s Board have also been dedicated philanthropists working tirelessly to raise funds for research that has led to countless discoveries, treatments and hope for the future of our patients. And because the Women’s Board raised funds at the Barrow Grand Ball for Alzheimer’s disease, their members have become friends to every clinician who treats those afflicted with this crippling disease, to every researcher who is pushing the boundaries of discovery, and to every patient who is looking to prolong their decline in order to enjoy those extra special moments in life. Barrow Neurological Institute and Barrow Neurological Foundation offer our heartfelt thanks to the members of the Women’s Board for their unwavering dedication to the institute. Because of their support, our scientists will continue to investigate ways of boosting an Alzheimer’s patient’s immune system to battle amyloid, explore ways of using MRI imaging to improve diagnosis and treatment, and provide outstanding clinical care for all of our patients. Congratulations on a successful Ball, and thank you for being our champions, philanthropists, and most importantly, our friends.

SupportBarrow.org


celebration of fine art 2018

Open Daily 10am-6pm | Jan. 13-MaR. 25, 2018 Loop 101 & Hayden rd, Scottsdale, Az 480.443.7695 Tickets Available At

celebrateart.com

For 28 years, the Celebration of Fine Art has been the place where art lovers and artists connect. Meet 100 of the finest artists in the country, watch them work and share in the creative process. Where Art Lovers & Artists Connect

Matthew Sievers, Riverhead


In Their Own Way

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people who make a difference March 2018 / 33


personalities

A Pitch for Life When life threw Natalie Niekro a curveball, she responded with a Knuckle Ball

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atalie Niekro walked out of a Florida hospital in 2006 in an absolute fog. On just the previous day she had been preparing for a big meeting at work and talking to her dad on the phone about the details for her upcoming wedding. But over the course of just a few hours, everything changed. Following a desperate call from her brother, she dropped everything and flew to be with her dad, Joe Niekro, a longtime pitcher for several Major League Baseball teams. A few hours later, she was holding her dad’s death certificate, and she didn’t really understand why.

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Text by Lisa Van Loo ❖ Photo by Tina Celle

“I didn’t even know what an aneurysm was,” Natalie Niekro says of the ailment that took her father’s life. “I was so lost.” She became a determined student. She needed to understand what had taken her dad so quickly. And she needed to find others who could empathize with the grief that comes with sudden loss. She hasn’t strayed from that path since. Niekro, along with her husband, Luke Woolsey, founded the Joe Niekro Foundation to offer support for those who experience an aneurysm, an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or a hemorrhagic stroke. The foundation now boasts 43 support groups across the country.

“The first meeting, I had no idea if I would be the only person who came,” Niekro says. “And there ended up being 35 people. They all felt alone and isolated and depressed. I knew there was a need for this.” Niekro, who lives in Scottsdale, left her corporate job following her father’s death to focus exclusively on forming and growing the new foundation. Beyond support groups, the foundation also raises money to fund research that will further the treatment options and recovery therapies for those who suffer an aneurysm, AVM or hemorrhagic stroke. The foundation organizes two major fundraising events every year, one in Phoenix and one in Houston, a city


Luke Woolsey and Natalie Niekro March 2018 / 35


Joe Niekro with his daughter Natalie

where Joe Niekro, known for his knuckle- ball, spent the majority of his major league career. The first Knuckle Ball was held in Houston in 2008. The same event was introduced to Phoenix in 2015, with the express goal of raising money

to support a three-year AVM study at Barrow Neurological Institute. The study was recently concluded. “We were raised to believe that philanthropy was what you did,” Niekro says of her childhood. She and her brother watched as their father supported a number of worthy causes. “If he was here, he would be doing it himself. He was incredibly philanthropic, and he raised our family to be giving.” Niekro used a pitching term, “curveball,” to describe how shocking her father’s sudden death was. And, earlier this year, life pitched her another. Niekro was diagnosed with two

aneurysms, giving her a new perspective as a patient, too. “I’m reliving it all again. It’s definitely not something I thought would ever happen to me,” Niekro, who now works for a medical device company, says. “It’s been quite a whirlwind.” She takes solace in knowing her foundation is making strides in the medical community by funding important studies and providing physicians with valuable insights about a condition that requires a sensitive bedside manner. “He’s with me every day. I always feel like he is kind of doing this for me,” she says of her father. “It’s kind of like him working through me.” ❖

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personalities

38 / TRBM


Signed, Sealed and Delivered Kyle Bell makes auctions easy through Charity Benefits Unlimited Text by Jake Poinier ❖ Photo by Tina Celle

Y

ou never know when a hobby might evolve into a business, let alone a multimillion-dollar one. As a kid, Kyle Bell avidly collected signatures from professional athletes and celebrities – to the point that he launched a sports memorabilia business while attending Fountain Hills High School. The enterprise paid his way through Arizona State University, and was successful enough to help him befriend some stars and, eventually, pay for signatures in volume. “Around 2006, people asked me all the time if I could donate something to their events,” he says. “A light bulb went off when I realized how it could really be a benefit for charities.” Today, Bell’s Charity Benefits Unlimited is approaching the $5 million mark in money raised with its authentic certified memorabilia for Valley and national charities. Notable names have included Celebrity Fight Night, MakeA-Wish Arizona, the Arians Family Foundation and Thunderbirds Charities at the Waste Management Phoenix Open. Over the course of time, athletes from NFL stars Jerry Rice, Emmitt Smith and Rob Gronkowski to NBA legend Magic Johnson and countless others have come to Bell’s office to do signings witnessed by an authentication company.

In 2017, Charity Benefits Unlimited worked more than 300 events across six states, raising in excess of $800,000 for charity and nonprofit organizations. Highlights included a new partnership with the Los Angeles Rams, working with the OdySea Aquarium in Scottsdale and donating nearly $100,000 to its foundation, and making a significant donation to Special Olympics Arizona on behalf of Mountainside Fitness through its popular onsite Auctions in Action program. “With Auctions in Action, we set up a silent auction on one or two tables at business locations such as restaurants, health clubs, bars, hotels and home centers,” Bell says. “We handle everything and change the items weekly. It’s basically a passive revenue stream for their charity of choice.” In May 2018, the Charity Benefits Unlimited staff will head to the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles for the 2018 American Icon Awards’ Tribute Celebration, which will honor Academy Award-winning actor Al Pacino. Charity Benefits Unlimited offers a full-service approach, starting with consultation for event coordinators on selecting appropriate items from the showroom, based on the number of attendees and the demographics. Equally

important, the team also helps with incorporating donated items, printing bid sheets and assisting during the event. “We’re there to add to the entertaining elements of the auction and raising money, but we’re also a shoulder to lean on,” Bell says. “We make sure that the charity is perceived the right way and that we’re doing the best we can for them.”

“ If somebody told me in 2006 that I’d be able to raise $5 million, I would’ve laughed.” In addition to providing those auction services free of charge, Bell’s company donates 25 percent of the starting bid and 100 percent of everything above it – meaning a $100 item that sells for $1,000 earns $925 for the organization. “When I started this side of the company, making sure the charities made money was very important to me,” says Bell, who lives in north Scottsdale with his wife and identical-twin daughters. “If somebody told me in 2006 that I’d be able to raise $5 million, I would’ve laughed. Yet, lo and behold, here we are.” ❖ March 2018 / 39


Cassidy Kuhle by Chris Saper

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The time-honored tradition of portraiture gains renewed interest Text by Karen Fernau ❖ Photos courtesy artists

W

hen Shelley Kuhle’s four children were young, she decided to freeze-frame her family. Instead of photographs, she commissioned a portrait. It was her way to record the present she was living and one day remind her of the past. The portrait of Kuhle, her husband,

Richard, and their now grown children has graced a wall in their Paradise Valley home for 16 years. “Artwork comes and goes, but that portrait of us will hang on our wall wherever we go,” says Kuhle of the oil painting by Phoenix artist Chris Saper. Kuhle next commissioned Saper to paint portraits of each of her children at age 10, posing with their passions of the day, from snowboard, horse or dog to surfboard. “Canvas has such a powerful feel and tells a story of my children,” she says. Today, art experts credit March 2018 / 41


Molly, Maggie and Samantha Perlich by William Miller

Kuhle and like-minded others for a resurging interest in portraiture, an art form that can be traced back to the earliest civilizations of Egypt, Italy and Greece. At the very least, oil portraits are 42 / TRBM

holding their own, no small feat against a proliferation of cellphone photos snapped and shared on social media sites. “It’s quite amazing that portraiture has remained stable in the era of selfies,

but they have and for good reason,” says William Miller, a retired radiologist turned Paradise Valley portrait artist. One of the art form’s saving graces is that it offers an antidote to the relentlessness of modernday technology. “We live in a high-tech world where everything travels so fast,” says Sherri Aldawood, president of Portrait Artists of Arizona, a collaboration that has mushroomed from a handful of artists in 2008 to 60 current members. “A portrait is a way to slow down. It takes much longer to paint a person than to take a photograph, but it also lasts longer. It’s homemade and personal,” Aldawood says. Until George Eastman began selling his Kodak camera and film in 1888, the painted portrait enjoyed a monopoly. Soon photos, less time-consuming and expensive, began chipping away at the portrait painted in oil on canvas. “The camera single-handedly changed portraits. People without means to pay or the time to sit in a salon for hours while an artist painted their likeness turned to photographs,” says Trudy Hays, executive director of the 35-year-old Scottsdale Artists’ School. WHAT THE BRUSH REVEALS Oil portraits survived, in large part, because of their


tenacious lifespan and storied tradition. Photographs fade within 100 years, but with proper care, oil paintings last for centuries. “They are a way to love, honor and respect a person, a treasure to hand down through generations,” Saper says. Painted portraits also serve as historical markers, a lasting tribute to presidents, senators, judges, doctors, celebrities and business titans. Equally important, they offer more than just a camera’s replication of the person. Miller explains it best: “An oil portrait, unlike a photo, is not an exact likeness. A portrait is our best self on our best day. “No one wants absolute reality in a portrait. They don’t want to see every fold in the neck painted, but rather a sterling likeness of themselves. You look terrific because the artist captures the best of you.” Artists like Miller, who paints about six portraits a year, incorporate a hint of the subject or “sitter’s” personality, intelligence, hobbies or passion. “I get to know my subjects as well as possible before I begin painting because a portrait should reflect who they are inside,” he says. Art experts cite this meticulous attention to the inner self for the reason so many of the powerful images

Janet Napolitano and Dr. Ernest Moniz by Chris Saper. Chris Saper photo by Bill Dooling

A GLIMPSE INTO THE SOUL A

rtist Chris Saper considers painting a portrait to be a bit like developing any successful relationship. “I tell those I paint that we are going steady,” she says. “We are going to be spending a lot of time together, and to go steady, we need to be a good match. We both need to be confident that I can meet their expectations.” For the growing corps of portrait artists in Arizona, Saper reigns as the undisputed godmother. She’s painted 400 portraits in 27 years, her subjects including Janet Napolitano, president of the University of California, former Arizona governor and secretary of Homeland Security under President Obama. Saper, a former health-care executive, also has written books, filmed DVDs and teaches portraiture. As a portrait artist, she employs the same exacting qualities and techniques from her corporate career – a targeted marketing plan, research and technical expertise. “It’s easy to be an artist, but it’s hard to make a living being an artist,” she explains.

Working in her Zenlike studio, Saper brings her life experiences into each portrait. “I see things differently than a 30-yearold male artist,” she says. “I bring my maturity to the easel.” To guide her paintbrush, she begins each commission by taking as many as 300 photographs with her trusty Canon Rebel. “I need good photos to make sure everything is just right, the dimple deep enough, the eyes the right color,” she explains. As she snaps the photos, Saper learns as much as possible about the people she will be painting. She asks what the subject likes best and least about his or her face. She asks parents to describe their child. “Their answers help guide how I paint, and in what light and colors,” says the Wisconsin native, who holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and a master’s degree in health-care administration. Additionally, these answers help her capture a glimpse of the subject’s soul, because as she knows, a portrait is more than just a face.

Saper also paints backgrounds that reveal something about her subject. Take Dr. Ernest Moniz, former secretary of energy under President Obama. In his official portrait that hangs in Washington, D.C., Saper painted Moniz leaning on working files next to books he completed while he was at MIT and the Iran nuclear deal he helped negotiate. These small, but telling, details also include the flag that flew over all 22 Department of Energy sites. Saper has painted subjects, living and posthumously, from coast to coast. The lion’s share of family portraits, however, come from the South. “Southern families put money away for their kids’ college, portrait and car, in that order,” she says. “Walk into most homes and you will find a portrait on the wall as often as a vacuum cleaner in the closet.” With each painting, Saper aims for a universal goal: “I want my subjects to say they are so glad they had me paint them. It’s my way of knowing that our shared vision, our short relationship, worked for both of us.” March 2018 / 43


Scottsdale resident Jo Flittie by William Miller

44 / TRBM


“ Jim’s Dad” by William Miller

“ An oil portrait, unlike a photo, is not an exact likeness. A portrait is our best self on our best day.” William Miller portrait artist

from the past are paintings, not photographs. Would a picture of Mona Lisa be as powerful? MORE THAN A PAINTING Today’s portrait artists, swept up in a renewed interest in traditional realistic art, are considered the best in generations. “There’s a friendly competition, and portrait artists keep raising the bar, forcing everyone

to improve their work,” Aldawood says. “It’s a difficult form of art. Nobody will notice if an artist moves a branch on a tree, but people will notice when the eyes are ‘off.’ It takes years of study and knowledge of anatomy to become a portrait artist.” Miller began painting portraits after his parents took a portraiture painting class at his elementary school and piqued his interest. He

began painting with their leftover paints and canvas and continued through undergraduate and medical school at Northwestern University, and while practicing medicine. “Some today might think of oil portraits as old-fashioned, but they will be around a millennium from now,” he explains. “They are more than just a painting. They are a family heirloom.” ❖ March 2018 / 45


DESIGNERS. WHO. CARE. Couture brings light to philanthropic causes Text by Perrine Adams

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C

elebrity favorite fashion designer Monique Lhuillier set the Valley on fire

when she showcased her spring 2018 collection in support of the Brophy College Prepatory Fashion Show this past November. She graced the crowd with a romantic couture runway show that included exclusive dresses. The collection, an ode to Paris, was designed as an echo of her French heritage. A designer, Lhuillier is also the mother of two. For her, participating in the 34th Annual Brophy College Preparatory Fashion Show was meaningful. “It’s very important to empower young men not only to educate themselves, but also to give back to their community,” says Lhuillier. “These are the foundations that all boys should have.” Lhuillier’s desire to support the community is no exception in the world of fashion. Numerous designers lend their brand and fame to bring light to philanthropic efforts in the Valley.

TRAINING TOMORROW’S PHILANTHROPISTS

T

he 2017 Brophy Fashion Show “Set the World on Fire” featured Monique Lhuillier on Nov. 3. at

the Fairmont Scottsdale Princess. Fashions from Monique Lhuillier’s spring 2018 collection PHOTO BY IMAGES BY KAY & CO.

March 2018 / 47


VINTAGE BENEFITS CHILDREN

T

he Gatsby Under the Stars Gala featured vintage pieces by Fashion by

Robert Black and raised funds for Southwest Human Development on Nov. 3, 2017. Circa 1960s chiffon dress by Jack Bryan PHOTO BY GARY HELLAND PHOTOGRAPHY

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HEARTWARMING RUNWAY

T

he 58th Annual Heart Ball Addressing Luncheon on Oct. 28, 2017, at The

Phoenician featured fashions by Elizabeth Kennedy, Naeem Kahn, Iro, Oscar de la Renta, Zac Posen, Carolina Herrera, Marchesa, Pamela Roland, Jenny Packham, Veronica Beard and Roland Nivelais. Asymmetrical sleeve and peplum ball gown, fall 2017 collection by Elizabeth Kennedy SCOTT FOUST STUDIOS

March 2018 / 49


STYLE FOR THE ARTS

H

oliday Prelude XXXII featured fashions by Ella Zahlan and benefited

Phoenix Theatre Guild and Phoenix Youth Symphony on Dec. 8, 2017, at the JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn & Spa. PHOTO BY JAMES AND ELENA THORNTON

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CURATED COUTURE

P

hoenix Art Museum hosted a preview of “A Tribute to James Galanos” and reception with

designer Ralph Rucci and model Tatiana Sorroko. The Oct. 5, 2017, event benefited Arizona Costume Institute. PHOTO BY HAUTE EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY

March 2018 / 51


FASHION FIGHTS CANCER

T

he 19th Annual Key to the Cure presented by Saks Fifth Avenue

featured fashions by Etro. The morning event on Oct. 6, 2017, benefited the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGEN). Pants and jacket by Etro, earrings by Coomi PHOTO BY HAUTE EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY

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An Arizona Icon

needs you!

A feature of the Sonoran landscape since 1797, Mission San Xavier del Bac is Arizona’s oldest European influenced structure. A National Historic Landmark, Mission San Xavier continues to inspire generations world-wide. The preservation project to save the Mission for future generations needs an additional $18 million.

Photo by Balfour Walker Photography

To find out how you can help or to schedule a private tour of the preservation projects, call (520) 407-6130.

Our Mission:

RESTORATION & PRESERVATION PatronatoSanXavier.org 2015 WATCH LIST

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Full-Throttle Made in Arizona, these mini racers do not come off an assembly line Text by MICHELLE JACOBY Photography by MARK LIPCZYNSKI

Vintage Kart Company mini racers kick up the dust at Usery Pass 54 / TRBM


Philanthropy

I

n the 1989 Oscar-nominated film Field of Dreams, farmer Ray Kinsella (played by Kevin Costner) stands in the fading afternoon light of his cornfield and hears an urging whisper in the wind: “If you build it, he will come.”

It is a quintessential moment in movie history, one that has been an inspiration to many. Just ask Jack Gee and Ron Kotloff, two of the six co-founders of Grand Prix of Scottsdale, a unique fundraising event inspired by Monaco Grand Prix, the renowned Formula One race event held each year in the French Riviera. Their “Field of Dreams” moment came in the form of a race car and a desire to give back to the community.

March 2018 / 55


“ At the first race in 2015, we had about 10,000 attendees, this year’s race expected up to 20,000. That’s double in just three years.”

Jack Gee Vintage Kart Company

56 / TRBM


PHOTO BY DEVIN BERKO/SOMETHING NEW MEDIA

Vintage Kart Company founders Andrew Bracanovich, Sean Gillespie, Ron Kotloff, Bret Rowe, Gary Tarr and Jack Gee

MONACO, MEET SCOTTSDALE “Grand Prix of Scottsdale came about when one of our co-founders, Andrew Bracanovich, sat having drinks at a rooftop bar in Old Town,” says Gee. “Looking down at the streets below, he envisioned Monaco-style race cars speeding by and all the fanfare and excitement that comes with it. The idea was born.” But before the event could officially get off the ground, Bracanovich and Gee realized they needed one thing: the cars. Enter Kotloff, owner of AEI Fabrication in Mesa. “Ron was a friend of a friend and that’s how we connected with him,” Gee continues. “We wanted the cars to be built in the United States; better yet, in the Valley. So when we met Ron, we knew he’d be a great fit.” While Monaco has its full-size Formula One race cars, Scottsdale has a scaled-down version, fashioned after the cyclecars of the early 20th century. The founders were introduced to the vehicle concept by Dennis Thomas, an expert in the world of cyclekarting who designs and builds these handcrafted

machines in his home garage in south Phoenix. “We call him our godfather,” says Kotloff. “Dennis is a craftsman, and his knowledge of cyclecars is impressive. He’s been a great resource and advocate for us.” Technically, Gee explains, the cars are miniature race cars. “They have a 6.5-horsepower Honda engine, automatic clutch, hydraulic disk brakes, rack and pinion steering, engineered suspension and steering setups. They’re not simple go-karts meant to look good; they’re precision race cars.” According to Gee, the cars are capable of speeds close to 50 mph, but with standard gearing, top speed is about 30 mph. “On race day, we use a restrictor to get that top speed down to 25 mph.” ON THE FAST TRACK With a car design and build plan in place, the founders – now made up of Bracanovich, Gee and Kotloff, along with Sean Gillespie, Gary Tarr and Bret Row – made things official by starting Vintage Kart Company. Housed inside March 2018 / 57


PHOTO COURTESY SOUTHWEST HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

Grand Prix of Scottsdale, Nov. 3, 2017

58 / TRBM


“ W here else can you drive a vintage mini racer through city streets with 15,000 people cheering you on?” Jake Adams

Southwest Human Development

AEI Fabrication, the company manufactures vintage mini racers and was launched to go hand in hand with Grand Prix of Scottsdale. At the beginning, the company’s focus was solely on designing and building cars for the race. After presenting the idea – and some thrilling time behind the wheel – to Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane in early 2015, the company had less than a year to build enough cars for the race, which was slated for November that same year. “Thankfully, Ron and his crew got on the ball and immediately started designing and building the cars,” Gee says. “It took us until about the middle of March to have a good, working prototype, and by November, we had 36 cars branded, painted and finished. Of those, 27 competed in the first Grand Prix of Scottsdale that year.” Today, Vintage Kart Company runs like a well-oiled machine, producing cars in about three weeks. “After building the body, it can be ready for paint in about a week. Then add a few more days for assembly, a few more for decaling and testing, and we’re ready to go,” Kotloff says. CAUSE DRIVEN For the founders, seeing their idea become a reality in such a short time has been incredible, Gee says. “At the first race in 2015, we had about 10,000 attendees,” Gee says. “This year’s race expected up to 20,000. That’s double in just three years.” During the weekend event, the Grand Prix of Scottsdale transforms the streets of downtown Scottsdale into a 21st century version of the

historic Monaco Grand Prix, complete with vintage race cars and drivers, spectators dressed to the nines in their Gatsby-inspired garb and a slew of parties where the champagne flows – all to benefit Southwest Human Development. “The Grand Prix of Scottsdale is a truly unique event,” says Jake Adams, the nonprofit’s chief development officer. “Where else can you drive a vintage mini racer through city streets with 15,000 people cheering you on?” Now in its second year as the race’s nonprofit partner, Southwest Human Development, which serves Arizona’s youngest children with disabilities, hosted the Grand Prix of Scottsdale’s social events. The Gatsby Under the Stars Gala kicked off the weekend on Nov. 3 and featured the “It’s a Date!” singles auction. The Gatsby Garden Parties were held Nov. 4 and 5, and gave attendees the opportunity to see the cars, meet the drivers and cheer on their favorite teams while enjoying craft beverages. “This year, we saw gross revenues of $80,000 to $100,000, and netted over $45,000,” Adams says. “But what’s even more valuable is meeting people who aren’t familiar with us and sharing with them our mission and what we do. Some of the relationships we’ve formed are getting more people into the fold for Southwest Human Development.” WINNING WAYS With three races under their belt, the founders are busy planning the 2018 race, which is slated for early November and will, once again, partner with Southwest Human Development. And while this may be considered “down time” March 2018 / 59


GALA PHOTOS COURTESY SOUTHWEST HUMAN DEVELOPMENT; ANDREW BRACANOVICH BY MARK LIPCZYNSKI

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Tony Bennett and Doug Buxhaum, Gatsby Under the Stars Gala, Nov. 3, 2017; Andrew Bracanovich; Missie “Darque-Chaklit” Smith, New Groove Entertainment, Gatsby Under the Stars Gala, Nov. 3, 2017

60 / TRBM

for them, their schedule is as busy as ever. “We’re at an event almost every other weekend,” says Gee. “We’ve been at Parada del Sol in Scottsdale, the Ostrich Festival in Chandler, Fantasy of Lights in Tempe – many of the signature events around the Valley.” The cars, Gee explains, are a great driver for charitable giving. Vintage Kart Company showcases the mini racers at events, giving people the opportunity to get into the cars, take photos with them and drive them. On a corporate level, they host get-togethers during which sponsors can drive the cars and get a feel for them before the big race. “Sponsors are allowed to have six drivers. This

is a great way for companies to reward clients or employees by giving them a spot on the team,” Gee says. “They can also hold a raffle for a seat and raise money for their own charities or for the sponsorship itself.” The mini racers are also available to car hobbyists and enthusiasts to own, anyone who appreciates classic motor sporting and the timehonored tradition of fine craftsmanship. “Car collectors, the people who really know the cars, are the ones that recognize the quality and attention to detail we put into making these vehicles,” Kotloff says. “They are impressive machines and true works of art.” ❖


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î‚ťe 14th Annual Childhelp Drive the Dream Gala celebrates raising $1.4 million in support of programs and services dedicated to serving abused and neglected children in Arizona. î‚ťank you Generous Sponsors.

- To learn more about Childhelp, please visit www.childhelp.org -


calendar

MAR

MAR

3

10 Celebrity Fight Night

Beach Ball

MARCH 3 Beach Ball Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. phoenixchildrensfoundation.org BluePrints & Blue Jeans Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona D.C. Ranch, 6 p.m. habitatcaz.org AAHA! An Auction of Heirlooms & Art Hospice of the Valley Arizona Biltmore, 6 p.m. hov.org MARCH 7 Celebration Dinner Teach for America Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 6 p.m. phoenix.teachforamerica.org MARCH 8 10th Annual Ryan House Community Breakfast Ryan House Arizona Biltmore, 7 a.m. ryanhouse.org/events MARCH 10 Celebrity Fight Night Celebrity Fight Night Foundation JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 5 p.m. celebrityfightnight.org

Children’s Museum of Phoenix Gala Children’s Museum of Phoenix, 6 p.m. childrensmuseumgala.org Fresh Start Gala Fresh Start Women’s Foundation The Phoenician, 6 p.m. freshstartwomen.org MARCH 11 Xavier Scholarship Fashion Show Xavier College Preparatory JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 10:30 a.m. xcpmg.org Plated & Staged … A Herberger Theater Experience Herberger Theater Center, 5 p.m. herbergertheater.org MARCH 17 Arizona Opera Gala Luncheon Arizona Opera Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 11 a.m. azopera.org

The Honor Ball HonorHealth Foundation The Phoenician, 6:30 p.m. honorhealth.com MARCH 22 Teaming Up for Girls Luncheon Florence Crittenton JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 10 a.m. flocrit.org Governor’s Arts Awards Arizona Citizens for the Arts Arizona Biltmore, 5 p.m. azcitizensforthearts.org MARCH 23 Wish Ball Make-A-Wish Arizona JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. arizona.wish.org

Today’s Kids, Tomorrow’s Stars Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Phoenix The Westin Kierland Resort and Spa, 5 p.m. bgcmpstars.org Evening to Paws Arizona Animal Welfare League Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 5 p.m. aawl.org

MAR

11 Xavier Scholarship Fashion Show

For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar March 2018 / 63



calendar

MAR

24 Evening on the Diamond MARCH 24 Evening on the Diamond Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation Chase Field, 5:30 p.m. mlb.com/dbacks/community Super Ball Arizona Assistance in Healthcare Mountain Shadows Resort, 6 p.m. goodyear.aih.org MARCH 25 Compassion with Fashion Arizona Humane Society JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 11 a.m. azhumane.org MARCH 26 Awards Luncheon Arizona Foundation for Women Arizona Biltmore, 10:30 a.m. azfw.org MARCH 27 Stand With Planned Parenthood Luncheon Planned Parenthood Arizona Arizona Biltmore, Noon ppaction.org

APRIL 7 First Press Fine Wine Dinner & Auction Friends of Public Radio Arizona Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 6 p.m. firstpressarizona.com APRIL 8 Wings Fashion Show Luncheon Childhelp JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 10 a.m. childhelp.org APRIL 13 Swirl, Sip & Savor Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center Royal Palms Resort & Spa, 5:30 p.m. autismcenter.org Vino con Stelle Gateway for Cancer Research Wrigley Mansion, 6 p.m. gatewaycr.org

APRIL 7 Charity Ball The Board of Visitors JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. boardofvisitors.org Art from the Heart Art Auction Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona Saks Fifth Avenue, 4:30 p.m. freeartsaz.org

MAR

25 Compassion with Fashion

For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar March 2018 / 65


calendar

benefitting

APR

14 Children Helping Children Spaces is an incubator farm, community garden and farmers market.

Enjoy an exclusive performance by Las Cafeteras from Los Angeles. Their music fuses spoken word and folk with traditional Son Jarocho, Afro-Mexican music and Zapateado dancing. Tickets at

dbg.org/fundthefarm

APRIL 14 Celebration of Caring Assistance League of Phoenix Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 5:30 p.m. alphxaz.org Children Helping Children Fashion Show and Luncheon PANDA – Steele Children’s Research Center JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 10:30 a.m. azpanda.org Crozier Gala Catholic Community Foundation Arizona Biltmore, 5:30 p.m. ccfphx.org APRIL 21 Silver & Turquoise Ball Phoenix Indian Center Scottsdale Resort at McCormick Ranch, 5:30 p.m. phxindcenter.com Porch Party Cancer Support Community Arizona, 5:30 p.m. cscaz.org The Original Taste Executive Council Charities Scottsdale Waterfront, 7 p.m. ec70phx.com Unleash the Love Breakfast Gabriel’s Angels JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 7 a.m. gabrielsangels.org

66 / TRBM

1201 N. Galvin Parkway Phoenix, AZ 85008 480 941.1225 | dbg.org

For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar


A NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOL ARSHIP

HELP GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY PROVIDE SCHOLARSHIP PACKAGES TO QUALIFIED HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS COVERING FULL TUITION AND FEES!

STUDENTS INSPIRING STUDENTS SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS: • Must be a high school senior admissible to GCU* • Attending a GCU participant school • Complete 100 hours of study time at the GCU Learning Lounge • 3.5 GPA or above, weighted or unweighted • Demonstrate a financial need† • Submit a personal narrative

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO DONATE, VISIT: gcuscholarshipfoundation.org

*Admissibility Requirements: 3.0 unweighted GPA, 19 ACT, or 920 SAT (includes math and reading scores only) †Financial need is determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Students must apply for the FAFSA. If eligible, PELL Grant, along with all other gift aid, including federal and state grants and loans, as well as private scholarships, are subtracted from student’s tuition and fees unless they are being used for costs not covered in the scholarship program such as housing and meal plans. The remaining cost of tuition and fees up to a maximum of $18,000 will be covered by this scholarship package. 17GCU0089


calendar

APR

28 Picnic Under the Stars APRIL 21 Community Breakfast Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center Arizona Biltmore, 7:30 a.m. autismcenter.org APRIL 28 Dinner on the Desert Desert Botanical Garden, 6 p.m. dbg.org Picnic Under the Stars American Cancer Society Scottsdale Resort at McCormick Ranch, 6 p.m. cancer.org MAY 1 Success Starts With Hope Breakfast Boys Hope Girls Hope of Arizona Arizona Biltmore, 7 a.m. bhgh.com MAY 19 Arizona Awards Dinner Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation Arizona Campaign JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. gatewaycr.org Thrive Gala Celebration and Awards Dinner Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence The Camby, 6 p.m. azcadv.org For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar


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Funded clinical trials include robust patientcentered outcomes

Trials would not have proceeded without Gateway support

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of every dollar received directly funds research for cancers of all types

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48TH SCOTTSDALE ARTS FESTIVAL The three-day celebration showcases 175 jury-selected artists from throughout the United States and abroad who work in painting, sculpture, glass, ceramics, jewelry, photography and other media. March 9 – 11, 2018 Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts and Scottsdale Civic Center Mall

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Karen Grobman, PC 480.688.0688

www.ArizonasHotProperties.com

Necklace by Yumi Ueno

30TH ARIZONA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL The festival celebrates its 30th season with eight weekends of revelry in a 30-acre medieval theme park. The outdoor event combines entertainment and wares reminiscent of what may have been found in a 16th century European village. Through April 1, 2018 Saturdays and Sundays Festival Village, Gold Canyon

40TH SCOTTSDALE CULINARY FESTIVAL The festival provides the opportunity to taste food from 40 local restaurants and refreshments from 30 craft breweries. Other highlights include live music, a teen cooking challenge, chef demos and a wine garden. April 14 – 15, 2018 Scottsdale Civic Center Mall

CREDITS, FROM TOP, THIS PAGE: SCOTTSDALE ARTS; ARIZONA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL; SCOTTSDALE CULINARY FESTIVAL

Old-time spring festivals stay fresh, showcasing art, history and delectables


CREDITS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, THIS PAGE: CLAUDIO DICOCHEA AND LISA SETTE GALLERY; THE HENAN MUSEUM; WILDE MEYER GALLERY; PHOENIX ART MUSEUM, PHOTO BY BART OOMES, NO 6 STUDIOS

culture Claudio Dicochea. de la Chavela y la Residente Permanente, la Multi, 2017. Acrylic, graphite, charcoal and transfer on wood

TRAVEL THROUGH 9,000 YEARS OF CHINESE MUSIC AND HISTORY “Ancient Musical Treasures from Central China” presents unique musical and archaeological treasures spanning 9,000 years of Chinese music and history. The show explores the harmony between music, people, heaven and earth through more than 60 extremely rare instruments and artworks on display for the first time in the United States. “Ancient Musical Treasures from Central China: Harmony of the Ancients from the Henan Museum” Through May 6, 2018 Musical Instrument Museum

DEBATE SOCIAL MATTERS THROUGH INTRIGUING ART This is the first major survey exhibition of Mexican-American painter Claudio Dicochea, whose work investigates how genealogy, sexual desire and poverty affect the structure of social identity. This exhibition is designed to facilitate a dialogue about race and belonging in the national debate about the border and immigration. “Claudio Dicochea: Acid Baroque” Through May 10, 2018 Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art

Chinese instrument stand in the form of a divine beast

Things Noted Tour a world of culture with avant-garde European fashion, contemporary Western art, ancient Chinese instruments and flamboyant Mexican paintings PUSH THE BOUNDARIES OF FASHION DESIGN “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” surveys 15 collections of the dynamic, innovative work of the Dutch designer. Van Herpen, widely regarded as one of fashion’s most forward-thinking creators, continually pushes the boundaries of fashion design and is often hailed as a pioneer in utilizing 3-D printing as a garment construction technique. “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” Through May 13, 2018 Phoenix Art Museum

Iris van Herpen, Biopiracy, dress, March 2014. 3-D-printed thermoplastic polyurethane 92A-1 with silicon coating

DISCOVER WESTERN ART WITH A CONTEMPORARY TWIST Presented in partnership with the Scottsdale Gallery Association, this exhibition features a selection of emerging artists of the greater western region who are pushing the boundaries of contemporary art. “Western Edge: Humor and Playfulness in Contemporary Western Art” Through May 27, 2018 Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s Museum of the West

Andrea Peterson, Whisper, oil on canvas March 2018 / 71


PHOTO BY TINA CELLE

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Amy Lau at Phoenix Art Museum in front of The Last Scattering Surface by Josiah McElheny, purchased with funds provided by Jan and Howard Hendler

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DESERT INSPIRATION aking exception to Thomas Wolfe, “You can go home again,” Amy Lau, founder and principal of New York-based Amy Lau Design, told a welcoming sold-out crowd of 600 at Phoenix Art Museum’s Independent Woman Luncheon on Jan. 30. The internationally acclaimed designer, born and raised in Paradise Valley, was the keynote speaker for the event that annually has featured exclusive designers since its inception in 2011. She credits her interest in art and design to two influences: nature and her family. Lau recalls riding through the desert on her horse and marveling at the colors and shapes she saw, whether in a Saguaro cactus or the dramatic pattern on a Gila monster’s back.

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Her family’s home was her first gallery, she says. Her grandmother was a mineralogist and accomplished artist, and her parents, Patti and Fred Lau, filled their home with paintings, curated furnishings and her father’s collection of prehistoric jewelry. This visually rich background led to a degree in art history at The University of Arizona, a Master of Arts degree in fine and decorative art from Sotheby’s Institute of Art and an honorary doctorate from New York School of Interior Design. The sophisticated homes around the world for which she has designed interiors have been featured in numerous publications and garnered her many of the most coveted awards in the design world.


CANDELARIA inspiring living

www.candelariadesign.com 602-604-2001

Watch us on The Design Network

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Walt Danley Christie’s International Real Estate

4BR | 4.5BA | 4,282 SQ FT $1,295,000 | MLS# 5709623

8BR | 11BA | 14,231 SQ FT $9,500,000 | MLS# 5702877

3041 East Ocotillo Road Phoenix, Arizona Karen Pratte | 602.228.4377

27341 North 102nd Street Scottsdale, Arizona Julie Rohr | 602.317.5667 Wa l t D a n l e y | 4 8 0 . 9 9 1 . 2 0 5 0

5BR | 5.5BA | 7,767 SQ FT $3,250,000 | MLS# 5706953

5BR | 6.5BA | 7,178 SQ FT $3,850,000 | MLS# 5704412

7120 North 46th Street P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Karen Ganz | 602.469.6709

4601 East Ocotillo Road P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Christy Dean | 602.327.0697

6 B R | 7. 5 B A | 9 , 2 4 7 S Q F T $4,000,000 | MLS# 5714847

5BR | 6BA | 7,010 SQ FT $4,500,000 | MLS# 5715012

8602 North 58th Place P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Catherine Jacobson | 602.790.1992

4 5 0 2 E a s t M o o n l i g h t Wa y P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Libby Cohen | 602.291.1446

For More Photos and Information on These and Other Fine Properties, Visit WaltDanley.com


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