Page 1

The Magazine For San Joaquin County

PASSIONATE ABOUT LITERACY

ELEVEN ADVOCATES FEATURED Page 19

COMMUNITY FESTIVALS FOOD, CULTURE & LITERACY Page 13

August/September 2012 ■ sanjoaquinlifestyles.com


L E T T E R

F R O M

T H E

E D I T O R

PULL UP A COMFY CHAIR AND READ A GOOD BOOK. PUBLISHER

Roger Coover

T

The Magazine For San Joaquin County

PUBLICATION DIRECTOR Deitra R. Kenoly

EDITOR

Carrie Sass

There are many amazing people in San Joaquin County. I consider myself so blessed and quite fortunate to meet these people on a daily basis. Not because I am anything special, but because I have the great opportunity to seek out interesting people, productive businesses, quirky talents and little hidden treasures. I am forever on the mission to bring our readers the people, places and things that make up our rich culture. Check out our Cultural Calendar (page 13), and Mark the Date, which has considerable events coming up in August and September. And people say they can’t find anything to do around here… I’m especially excited to remind you about the 15th Annual Record’s Literacy & Book Fair – Family Day at the Park being held on Saturday, September 15 (page 31). Not only does this fun and fabulous event draw upwards to 20,000 in a single day to celebrate literacy and learning, it offers entertainment by local musicians, a great used book sale, a slate of talented published authors, and it’s FREE! Yes, it’s free, thanks to our amazing sponsors! A full day of fabulous fun! Grandparents, you will score ‘grand’ points for bringing the kids out on this day! The

mascot parade kicks off the event at 9:30 a.m. (www.familydayatthepark.com) And while we’re on the theme of literacy, we are highlighting a broad range of folks that have a vested interest in literacy (page 19). Space does not permit us to name all of the people and organizations involved in literacy programs throughout the county (there are dozens), but Jennifer Torres has featured eleven people who have an ongoing, significant part in bringing educational programs, tutors, published authors, and other opportunities to our schoolchildren, as well as adults (okay, I know I’m in there, but I really, really do work hard on Family Day at the Park!). Jennifer has done an outstanding job drawing on the strengths of these individuals, while encouraging others to find their place in our community to help a child or adult learn to read. And to those of you who are already involved in literacy programs, thank you, thank you, thank you! So pull up a comfy chair, have a nice cup of tea and enjoy this issue of Lifestyles… possibly followed by another cup of tea and a good novel. And maybe a nice nap.

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Jason Ente Dan Loeffelbein

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sara Annotti Barbara Daly Charleen Earley Matt Davies Bobbie Wallinger Jennifer Torres

Lori Gilbert Jay Michael Rivera Laurie Eager Dani Hovatter John McClimans

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Amy Phipps Lindsay Ortez

Dani Hovatter Helen Ripken

— Carrie XOXO P.S. I need to apologize that the Wedding Venue story from the June 2012 issue listed an incorrect phone number for Eagal Lakes. Their contact information is (209) 640-4252 www.eagallakes.com And yes, it’s a beautiful venue for a beach wedding. I’ve been there and it’s pretty awesome!

Please continue to forward story ideas to: SASS! Public Relations 2972 W. Swain Road #228, Stockton 95219; or call: 209-957-7277; or email: cmsass@comcast.net Lifestyles is published six times a year by The Record, 530 E. Market Steet, Stockton, CA 95202. All information written for publication in Lifestyles is believed to be accurate. Readers must assume all responsibility for their own actions based on this information. Occasionally a product or company may be named in an article, but does not constitute an endorsement of said product. Lifestyles assumes no responsibility for claims made by advertisers. Photos and content become the sole property of Lifestyles and may be used, published or edited without limit or obligation to the author. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the permission of the publisher. For more information, go to sanjoaquinlifestyles.com.

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On the cover: Jennifer Torres PHOTO BY AMY PHIPPS


37

CONTENTS

LIVING WITH STYLE Eclectic style

7 ..........................................................................................

OUR CULTURE Community Festivals: Food, Culture, Literacy

13 ..........................................................................................

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT Read this! Advocates for literacy

19 ..........................................................................................

THE ARTS Rowland Cheney

34

60

..........................................................................................

WINE SPIRITS Beautiful vineyard setting for tasting wonderful wine.

37 ..........................................................................................

WINE CRITIC Wine to sip while reading a good book!

42

44

..........................................................................................

SAVOR The no-taco food truck

44 ..........................................................................................

LOCAL SPOTLIGHT

56

Clear vision for 50 years

47


LORI GILBERT SPORTING LIFE

52

Horseracing at the renewed San Joaquin County Fair

52 ..........................................................................................

ESCAPES Churchill Downs

54 ..........................................................................................

SPORTING LIFE Vroom, vroom, vroom. Speedway 99

56

7

..........................................................................................

WAG TALES Sugar. Ah, honey, honey.

57 ..........................................................................................

ELITE FLEET Row, row, row your boat. Canoes and kayaks

34

60 ..........................................................................................

MARK THE DATE

58 ..........................................................................................

SCENE AND BE SEEN Vaccarezza-Murdaca Family Foundation Festa Della Donna The Children's Home of Stockton Valley Garden Fair

31

32 Haggin Museum รก la Carte Child Abuse Prevention Council Auxilary 7th Golf Classic

SEPTEMBER 15, 2012

33 Mary Graham Children's Foundation Temple Israel 39th Annual Jewish Food Festival

50

19

St. Mary's Dining Room Evening of Appreciation United Way Power of One Luncheon

51 6

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L I V I N G

W I T H

F E A T U R E D

S T Y L E

H O M E

In

Perfect Harmony STORY BY LAURIE EAGER PHOTOS BY LINDSAY ORTEZ

lifestyles

7


L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E

D

ale Yeomans Casale is a woman

who knows what she likes. Her tastes, creativity, interests and passions are evident in every aesthetically pleasing inch of the Stockton home she shares with her husband Louis. From the moment you step foot inside the serene courtyard entrance, you are transported to another world. Together with her long-time decorator, James McCall, Dale has employed a myriad of textures including grass cloth, bamboo, slate, Venetian plaster, and hand-hewn wood in soft, natural shades to create an interior that is at the same time restful, yet exciting. Of special importance to Dale is the handcrafted kangi she hung on the dining room wall meaning “honor to the parents.� Dale’s father was half Japanese, and her mother was an incredibly organized hostess who loved to entertain. Dale honors the profound influence they both had on her life and her sense of style.

Dale has employed a myriad of textures including grass cloth, bamboo, slate, Venetian plaster, and handhewn wood in soft, natural shades. 8

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L I V I N G

W I T H

S T Y L E


L I V I N G

10

W I T H

S T Y L E

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A visit to the Casale home is a feast for the senses, and each room holds treasures to be discovered and enjoyed. The couple loves things that evoke culture memories. Their collection of artifacts harkens from Indonesia, Japan, China and Africa. Designer James McCall has masterfully repurposed objects that bear the scars of time, such as a centuries-old war club used as a towel bar, or the old fishing cages he fashioned into a dining room light fixture over a table handmade by Louis. The master bedroom headboard is an antique Japanese street sign hung from massive hooks on the wall. Organization is key to creating a calm atmosphere in this home. A neatly divided wall in the family room houses Dale’s unique collection of Ikebana containers (Ikebana is the art of Japanese flower arranging which Dale enjoys.). Her vast array of dishware and primitive serving pieces are beautifully displayed, and easily accessible in the open-shelved dish pantry. Dale’s private dressing room is fitted with custom cabinetry and even a Craftsman tool chest to efficiently organize everything from accessories to clothing. Dale, Louis and James have made the functional beautiful. Rainwater cascades down chains into splash rocks outside the home. Recessed square halogen light fixtures enhance the tranquil mood throughout the interior. In the master bedroom, custom-designed tansu chests line the wall to eliminate any visual clutter, and the master shower is open to the oriental side garden. The laundry room, almost too pretty to hide, is disguised behind doors reminiscent of Japanese shoji screens which roll open on barndoor rollers, and close when not in use. And at every turn, intriguing details complete the harmonious scheme.


The Casale home transitions seamlessly to the outdoors. A slate patio flows directly from the kitchen and borders Quail Lake. A stunning focal point outdoors is the limestone “scholar rock.” According to Chinese tradition, a limestone boulder is placed in a stream for one’s great-grandchildren to possess one day after nature’s forces have sculpted it for decades. Like all of the elements in the Casale home, it was chosen and placed to create harmony, and imbue the space with the distinctive style and spirit of its owners. ❑


O U R

C U L T U R E

D N U R O A AR CALEND 4TH OF JULY

OBON/BON ODORI

Diwali Festival

Jewish Food Fair

JUNETEENTH

Black History Month

Sikh Festival

Our Lady of Fatima Festival A Starlight Night

Cambodian New Year

Barrio Fiesta

Hmong New Year

BLACK FAMILY DAY

Chinese New Year

Community Powwow

Our Lady of Fatima Festival

Cinco de Mayo

INDEPENDENCE DAY

Greek Festival

COLOMBIAN

Hmong New Year

Olive Oil Festival

San Joaquin International Film Festival

THE

AROUND THE WORLD lifestyles

13


O U R

C U L T U R E

AROUND THE CALENDAR

AROUND THE WORLD

BY JENNIFER TORRES PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE RECORD

S

an Joaquin County residents claim

ancestry from more than 25 different countries, according to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. Throughout the year, they celebrate their heritage through fairs and festivals that add vibrancy to our community’s rich cultural life. Use this guide to begin exploring the world of cultures represented here in the Valley.

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JANUARY

San Joaquin International Film Festival
 Each year, the flagship festival of the San Joaquin Film Society presents a multicultural program, planned to appeal to a diverse audience. In previous years, the festival has served as the Northern California premiere of award-winning films from throughout the globe. More information: sjiff.org

FEBRUARY Black History Month Students, faculty and staff at University of the Pacific organize a series of events and activities aimed at honoring the heritage of African-Americans. Previous celebrations have included gospel concerts, financial aid workshops, guest lectures and celebrity performances. More information: pacific.edu/Campus-Life/Diversity-and-Inclusion/Multicultural-Affairs/ Black-History-Month.html

Chinese New Year


MARCH

Sometimes held in late February, Stockton’s

Lunar

New

Year

celebration features lion dancers, martial arts demonstrations, food and children’s activities. The festival has been ongoing for more than 30 years, and is held later than other Chinese New Year celebrations in the state in order to attract the most popular performing troupes. More information: stocktonchinese.org

APRIL

Cambodian New Year

Every April, thousands of people from throughout Northern California come together at Stockton’s Wat Dhammararam Buddhist Temple to celebrate and preserve Cambodian culture. The Temple, on Carpenter Road, houses a collection of massive Buddhist statuary, built by senior monk Kong Tith. The weekend event features traditional food, music and dance. More information: watdhammararambuddhist.org


O U R

C U L T U R E

APRIL Sikh Festival As many as 15,000 Sikh faithful parade through south Stockton in an event meant, in part, to foster strong relationships between the Sikh Temple and the surrounding community. Built in 1912, the Temple is one of the country’s oldest. More information: stocktongurdwarasahib.com

MAY

Cinco de Mayo
 The nonprofit El Concilio combines a festival featuring Mexican food, music and dance with a resource fair that encourages active Held on the St. Mary’s High School campus, the family event features

civic engagement. Each year, the event starts with a parade

olive oil tasting, bocce, children’s activities, a blessing of the olive

of colorfully decorated floats that winds through downtown

trees and entertainment. More information: saintmaryshighschool.org

Stockton. More information: http://estockton.com/cinco/

JUNE

Jewish Food Fair
 For nearly 40 years, Stockton’s Temple Israel has invited the community to sample treats such as blintzes and strudels, bagels and corned beef. Meanwhile, tours of the Temple sanctuary offer an engaging overview of Jewish belief, history and culture. More information: http://ca047.urj.net/

JUNETEENTH
 Commemorating the date in 1865 when the abolition of slavery was finally announced in Texas, Juneteenth aims to honor African-American achievement while also sharing resources that support education and economic development. In Stockton, Juneteenth is celebrated at Taft Community Center. A separate Juneteenth event is organized in Tracy. More information: taaa.net


O U R

C U L T U R E

4TH OF JULY

JULY OBON/BON ODORI Held a week apart, these Japanese festivals provide an opportunity to honor ancestors and share culture, especially traditional dance. For many among Northern California’s Japanese-American community,

INDEPEDENCE DAY

CELEBR ATION

they also serve as a homecoming, complete with dishes such as udon, tempura and teriyaki. Festivals are held in Stockton and Lodi. More information: stocktonbuddhisttemple.org or lodibuddhist.org

COLOMBIAN

INDEPENDENCE DAY The festival, originally the brainchild of Colombian priests within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Stockton, draws thousands to Weber Point for Colombian music, dance, soccer and culinary specialties such as arepas – grilled cornmeal patties.

AUGUST

Barrio Fiesta Downtown Stockton was once a major hub of Filipino-American life. Now, Filipino arts and culture is at the center of the annual Barrio Fiesta, which commemorates the building of Filipino Plaza on Main Street. The event features a fashion show, food, games and entertainment. More information: filipinoplaza.org

lifestyles

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O U R

C U L T U R E

Community Powwow American Indian drums and dancers are at the heart of the Labor Day Community Powwow.

SEPTEMBER

The event also features food and craft sales. More information: powwow-power.com/powwows

Greek Festival Organized by St. Basil Greek Orthodox Church for more than 50 years, the festival provides an introduction to Greek culture through food, music and tours of the church grounds. Especially popular are booths serving souvlaki and baklava. More information: gosaintbasil.org

Our Lady of Fatima Festival The tiny, north San Joaquin County

NOVEMBER OCTOBER

town of Thornton explodes with visitors who come for the annual festival

of

Portuguese

Catholic culture.

faith

and

Bloodless

bullfights are a centerpiece of events that also include a parade, nightly prayers and a candlelit procession. More information: fatimahall.com

DECEMBER

Diwali Festival The Indian Association of San Joaquin County promotes Indian

A Starlight Night

culture through an annual program of dance and musical

The holiday season is celebrated

performance. More information: iasjc.org

throughout Stockton with a daylong series of family activities that begins at

Hmong New Year

Lincoln Center, progresses through the the

Miracle Mile and ends downtown with

agricultural roots of San Joaquin County’s

a tree-lighting ceremony and lighted

Hmong Community, the event includes

boat parade. Events include choir

activities, such as pov pob, a traditional

and hand-bell performances as well

match-making game, as well as music

as appearances by Santa Claus. More

and dance. Every year it draws thousands

information: visitstockton.org

A

harvest

festival

that

recalls

of people to the San Joaquin Fairgrounds. More information: laofamilyofstockton.org.

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

JENNIFER TORRES COMMUNITY RELATIONS MANAGER, UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC

Passionate About Literacy STORY BY JENNIFER TORRES PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

O

n an afternoon this summer, I

brought my 2-year-old daughter, Alice, to the children’s section of the Chavez Central Library. She hurried to one of the bright, welcoming shelves, chose a picture book, held it up and said, “Mama, read it for me?” It was a powerful moment, in large part because of the promise it held for my child’s future. After all, the ability to read is not just a doorway to learning; it is also a component of good health, a requisite for active citizenship, a means of connecting with others and a pathway toward economic success – for individual children such as Alice, as well as for our community as a whole. As a parent, it is deeply reassuring to know that all around San Joaquin County, dedicated people and organizations are working to ensure that children and families have the support they need to become confident, capable readers. I recently had the privilege of speaking with ten of those literacy leaders. Read on to learn how reading shapes who they are and what they do.

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

“I was raised in Vietnam with not a lot of books. But my parents were educated, so they had books around the house. And I had a French education; the nuns always had books in the school.”

M

any educators agree that third grade marks a key

milestone in a child’s reading development: Until third grade, students

“Model by reading aloud to them with expression,” To-Cowell says. “Use your fingers to track the words, left to right.”

are learning to read. After third grade, they must read to learn. As

Don’t get too clinical – you want home reading fun – but ask some

a fourth-grade teacher and literacy specialist, Van Ha To-Cowell sees

questions as the story progresses. “Not just a little fact that they have

how weak readers, unable to keep up with the information presented

to recall,” she says. “Make them think a bit more. Ask about the why

to them in textbooks, can fall behind. With hard work and attention, it

and the how. That helps them make inferences, and by third grade

is possible for them to catch up, she says.

there’s a lot of inferences, a lot of higher-level thinking.”

But it’s better to prevent a learning lag by building literacy skills even before children start kindergarten.

An avid reader, To-Cowell used to devour as many as five or six novels a month. Now she only has time for one or two, she says. “But I do read a lot of education magazines.”

VAN HA TO-COWELL

TRUSTEE, LINCOLN UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FOURTH-GRADE TEACHER, LODI UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

San Joaquin Reads Week September 15-23, 2012

“Success by 3rd Grade” Saturday, September 15 The Record’s Literacy & Book FairFamily Literacy Day in the Park A free community event focused on literacy and learning. www.familydayatthepark.com 9:30am to 3:30pm

Sunday, September 16 Sunday Sundae A free event for children and familiesmeet the author and make a sundae! 2:00pm to 4:00pm at Pacific’s Benerd School of Education

SUE DE POLO

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SAN JOAQUIN A+

“People need to realize that everybody has an obligation to make sure that the

A

nation’s kids know how to read.” s a child, Sue de Polo climbed into her father’s lap every night when he got

home from work. He would then open The Stockton Evening Record to the children’s stories that used to be printed there. “It was always Thornton Burgess, ‘Old Mother West Wind,’ and every night, while my mom was cooking dinner, he read to me,” de Polo recalls. Her passion for literacy endures, and as Executive Director of San Joaquin A+, de Polo now works to ensure that all children grow up with the same fondness for reading that she had. Founded in 1997, San Joaquin A+ aims to enhance education in San Joaquin County, developing programs – such as tutoring for elementary students and take-home book bags for kindergartners – that promote literacy skills. Through San Joaquin Reads Week, the nonprofit organization leads a community-wide celebration of reading, culminating in a gala that honors local individuals for extraordinary support of literacy. But one of the organization’s most significant accomplishments has been helping businesses and public schools forge strong relationships, de Polo says. “We have brought business and education together,” she says. “The trust that has been built between the school districts and the business community has been wonderful.” lifestyles

Monday, September 17 Beyond the Gates Community discussion featuring Ralph Smith University of the Pacific 10:00am to 12 noon

Monday evening, September 17 Spirit of Literacy Gala Dinner Gala Dinner to honor literacy advocates Wine & Roses Lodi 5:30pm

Tuesday, September 18 Progressive Book Kick-Off and School & Government Days Wednesday, September 19 Read at Home Night All families in the county are encouraged to stay at home and read.

Thursday, September 20 Health Literacy Day Friday, September 21 Early Literacy Day Celebrate reading with San Joaquin County preschool-age children.

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, September 21-23 Faithful Readers Local faith organizations focus on the value of literacy during services by allowing youth to participate. For more specific information on each scheduled event, as well as a listing of event sponsors, please call San Joaquin A+ at 209-462-6113 or email at SJAREAD@aol.com 21


L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

DAVID HURST VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING, HEALTH PLAN OF SAN JOAQUIN

“I was lucky – I had a lot of exposure to reading as a child. I got books as gifts. I always had some sort of library going.”

T

he connection between health care and literacy is little noticed, but critically important, says David

Hurst, Vice President of Marketing for Health Plan of San Joaquin. “We come in contact with so many members who have low literacy skills,” he explains, “who might not be able to read the instructions on the prescription bottle. It all fundamentally comes down to literacy.” An original supporter of Reach Out and Read San Joaquin – the program sends volunteer readers to medical waiting rooms, and gives books to doctors to distribute during well-baby and well-child visits – Health Plan of San Joaquin continues to support literacy initiatives as part of its broader health mission, Hurst says. The health plan works with community-based organizations to ensure that the health-related materials they offer parents and families are understandable to the community at large. Health Plan of San Joaquin also is a longtime supporter of The Record’s Literacy and Book Fair –­­ Family Day at the Park, sponsoring the Healthy Highway and Golden Gateway activity areas. Golden Gateway focuses on ways seniors can stay active and keep healthy and was launched, Hurst says, in recognition that grandparents in our community often play a key role in family life. “So many seniors and grandparents are taking care of their grandkids,” he says. “We want to show seniors how important it is to share literature with their grandkids.”

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

“I actually remember reading the sports section of the Los

Angeles Times with my grandfather – learning to read the newspaper so my grandfather could keep up with the Rams.”

W

hat Tama Brisbane began in

2006 – with workshops and after-school programs focused on slam poetry – has grown into the nationally acclaimed youth poetry collective, With Our Words, an endeavor that empowers young leaders through literacy and the performing arts. “We make the kids own every word that comes out of their mouths,” says Brisbane. “They have to own the opportunity, and they have to own the impact. Through workshops, they learn how to arm themselves with different words. They’ve got a lot of dark stories… and they need to start releasing that. We give them a platform.” About a year and a half ago, Brisbane seized an opportunity to expand the reach of With Our Words, creating the “Hip-Hop, You Don’t Stop Reading!” program in collaboration with Hip Hop Congress and Fat City Books. As part of the program, hip hop artists visit local schools to perform pieces that promote literacy. After the performance, donated books are made available for children to select and take home. “The idea was to start or enhance the kids’ own personal libraries,” Brisbane explains. So far, roughly 2,000 books have been given away. “The numbers would have you believe

TAMA BRISBANE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WITH OUR WORDS

that kids are disinterested. They’re not. They’re thirsty.”

lifestyles

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

JANN BUENO

MANAGER, FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK STORE

“The best part of my job is getting to meet all of

A

the people who come in to look at books.” s the daughter of a librarian, Jann Bueno grew up with a

deep appreciation for books – especially Nancy Drew books. Bueno still prefers mysteries – and she’s still surrounded by literature as manager of Stockton’s Friends of the Library Used Bookstore. “There are lots of different people who come in, a lot of kids,” Bueno says of the Hammer Lane shop. “Some kids are so excited to find a magazine for 10 cents.”

volunteers keeps the operation running smoothly. Bueno says teachers account for many of her regular customers. That means that the bookstore’s children’s section is particularly wellstocked and well curated. “Especially at the end of the year, when teachers are cleaning out their classrooms, we get a lot of donations,” Bueno says. “We get a lot

Proceeds from the store – open Monday and Tuesday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

24

– help pay for library programming and materials. A team of dedicated

of nice books. We try and keep the prices reasonable. The whole idea is just to get the books out there.”

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L O C A L

“The children who start coming to the library for story time come back for years and years because this is a place they enjoyed, a place where

A

S P O T L I G H T

legend among thousands of local children who come to the rousing story hours

and puppet shows she leads at the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library, Suzy Daveluy introduces reading as lively, interactive pursuit. “When I read a book or I give a book talk, and the children ask to take that book home and then come back to tell me how much they loved it, that’s when I feel like I have really succeeded,” says Daveluy, who has been with the library for nearly 20 years. While watching children develop a passion for reading is exhilarating, Daveluy says there is a quieter sort of joy to be found in another aspect of her work. Daveluy oversees the public library program that offers free, one-on-one tutoring for adults who don’t know how to read. “You have an adult who tells you they need help,” she says. “You tell them about the

they accomplished

resources available, and they start to cry. ‘You mean, you will do this for me?’ Every door has

something and a

been shut to them, and then there’s this opportunity. It’s a huge thing. It changes their lives.”

place where they

because they want to be able to share books with children and grandchildren, Daveluy says.

were welcomed.”

Many of the adults who come to the library for help learning to read finally seek assistance “They want to be contributing members of our society.”

SUZY DAVELUY

YOUTH SERVICES & LITERACY, OUTREACH AND PROGRAMMING COORDINATOR, STOCKTONSAN JOAQUIN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

lifestyles

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

W

hen Pamela Eibeck became

University of the Pacific’s President in 2009,

PAMELA EIBECK PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC

she brought to the campus a renewed commitment to community engagement. “Stockton’s successes help the university,” Eibeck says. “And Pacific’s strengths benefit the community.” Seeking ongoing insight to help guide Pacific’s community-engagement endeavors, Eibeck convened the Beyond Our Gates Community Council, a group of leaders representing the education, business, law, government, nonprofit, arts, faith and media fields. Recognizing the critical importance of education, Community Council members – with Pacific support – are working to rally county residents around early literacy, or “Reading by Third.” Research shows that reading ability at the end of third grade is a powerful predictor of future academic success. Troublingly, though, most local third-graders cannot read at grade level. But Eibeck finds promise in the pursuit of a common mission. By coming together in support of early literacy, she says, the community can ensure that all children are able to read and ready to learn. With Community Council guidance, the university plans to publish an annual report on early literacy in the county, and in September,

“By working in alliance and holding ourselves collectively accountable for progress, we can secure a promising future for our children.”

26

will host nationally-recognized education advocate Ralph Smith at the Beyond Our Gates Dialogue, a free public event. “By focusing our efforts around a single set of goals,” Eibeck says, “we can see real change.”

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

“If you can get a child to love books from an early age, you can’t stop them from becoming a reader.”

O

ne of the earliest and most enthusiastic

champions of San Joaquin County’s Reach Out and Read literacy program, Kaiser Permanente pediatrician Felipe Dominguez still keeps a shelf full

FELIPE DOMINGUEZ PEDIATRICIAN, KAISER PERMANENTE

of picture books to dispense to patients during wellchild visits. “The program is about using the authority of the doctor to encourage parents to read with their children,” Dominguez says. “It’s a part of what I do now.” Reach Out and Read was launched in San Joaquin County in 1998, and Dominguez, then Chief of Pediatrics for the county’s health care services division, was the first local physician trained to implement the program. Through Reach Out and Read, children receive a new picture book at each regular checkup, starting with their 6-month visit. “I think of it as an immunization,” Dominguez says – one that reinforces the parent’s role as his or her child’s first teacher, and one that strengthens a family’s love of books. As a child, Dominguez recalls, he struggled with reading. “Then I started reading comic books. Comic books led to science fiction books. Then, when you read science fiction books, you have to go read some astronomy, some physics. That takes you to math, to philosophy, to history. Once you find your entry point, new areas open up. I don’t care what children start reading, just that they read.”

lifestyles

27


F

or 15 years Carrie Sass, owner of SASS! Public

Relations, Inc., and editor of Lifestyles magazine, has organized The Record’s Literacy & Book Fair – Family Day at the Park, one of Northern California’s largest literacy-themed events. Originally held in Victory Park, the festival quickly outgrew its venue. It now draws as many as 20,000 people to University Park in central Stockton for author readings, a used book sale, information booths, entertainment and other activities.

CARRIE SASS

“It was small to begin with, but we could just tell

OWNER, SASS! PUBLIC RELATIONS, INC.

it was going to develop into a grand event”, Sass says. “It’s a happy educational festival that children love, and parents enjoy bringing their kids to.” Over the years, Family Day at the Park has earned the respect and appreciation of a wide range of community agencies that are now represented across the festival grounds. Sass says she hopes the families who attend walk away empowered – both with a renewed enthusiasm for reading and a better sense of the support and services available to their families. “I want them to come away feeling good about our community and knowing that there are resources for their children at every level,” Sass says. “You can’t help but go away happy.”

“I belong to a weekly book club that’s faith-based, and thoroughly enjoy it. Janet, Cyndi and I have been meeting every Wednesday for more than 10 years — it’s the highlight of my week.” 28

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L O C A L

S P O T L I G H T

ROGER COOVER

PUBLISHER, THE RECORD/SAN JOAQUIN MEDIA GROUP

F

ifteen years ago, The Record newspaper launched what would become its signature

community-engagement event, Family Day at the Park. “We wanted to create something that the whole community could come to,” explains Record Publisher Roger Coover. “The key was that it had to be free, open to the community and fun for

“We have

children. What we really wanted was to educate the parents.”

to have an

Though the annual literacy and book fair has grown significantly since its early years, it remains true to its original purpose, featuring booths with activities for children to enjoy while their parents

educated public if our

learn about valuable community resources. Education and literacy, Coover says, are connected to a newspaper’s traditional role of informing the public. “We have learned that the way to really have an impact is start in early childhood.”

community is to thrive.”

Last year, The Record worked with Port of Stockton and First Book, a Washington D.C.-based nonprofit organization, to coordinate the distribution of 150,000 books to needy children. About 5,000 of those books were given away at Family Day at the Park. “For many of us, it is surprising that there could be a household with no books in it,” Coover says. “But often, when we give a book, we find that this is the first book the child has ever owned.”

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L O C A L

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UNITED BY READING

E

very year, San Joaquin County’s diverse residents come together with a shared passion

for reading and education through Family Day at the Park, The Record’s signature communityoutreach literacy & book fair. The free family festival kicks off with a parade of local mascots, led by Clifford, the Big Red Dog, and continues with live musical performances and a used book sale. More than seventy interactive areas feature booths offering activities for children and valuable information – on health, safety, education, development and community resources – for their parents. Throughout the day, children’s authors and illustrators present a slate of readings and performances. This year, The Record’s Literacy & Book Fair – Family Day at the Park will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. September 15 at University Park, home of the CSU Stanislaus-Stockton Center. For more information, visit familydayatthepark.com Can’t wait that long? Get your family in the reading spirit with a picture book celebrating one of the many cultures represented in San Joaquin County. All are available through the Stockton-San Joaquin County Public Library System.

I, Too, Am America

By Langston Hughes, with illustrations by Bryan Collie r Hughes’ poem on African-American identity is re-inte rpreted through striking illustration.

Celebrating the Thanking the Moon:Fe stival Mid-Autumn Moon

By Grace Lin e works together to prepar A Chinese-American family l, tiva fes on mo n mid-autum a nighttime picnic for the s. ake onc mo eet sw g blin pouring cups of tea and nib

The Caged Birds of Phnom Penh

By Frederick Lipp A poor Cambodian girl longs to buy a bird and set it free; according to tradition, the bird will carry her wishes to the sky so they can be fulfilled.

Mi Carrito/My Little Car

By Gar y Soto Teresa’s grandfather When she’s too old for a tricycle, r pedal car. She shows gives her a bright green, lowride stops taking care of it. it off with pride, but eventually

Grandfather’s Stor y Cl

oth By Linda Gerdner Chersheng is devastat ed by his grandfathe r’s failing memory, but wi th the help of a Hmon g story cloth, his grandfat her is able to recall the events of his past.

When the Chickens Went on Strike: a Rosh Hashanah Tale

By Erica Silverman ing a chicken Resentful of Kapores, the New Year custom of swing misdeeds erase lically symbo over one’s head and reciting a prayer to strike. on go village small of the past, the chickens in a

30

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The Beckoning Cat: Based on a Japanese Folktale

By Koko Nishizuka A poor boy shares his dinner with a cat he finds on his doorstep. Late r, when the boy needs help, the cat rem embers his generosity.

Hot, Hot Roti for Dada-ji

By Farhana Zia e to visit When Aneel’s grandparents com tall tale a tells her from India, his grandfat greathis by on t ugh bro s of superpower grandmother’s hot, hot roti.

Brave Donatella and the Jasmine Thief

By Caroline McAlister When gardener Antonio steals a sprig of jasmine from Duke Cosimo de Medici’s treasured plant, he is sent to prison. Brave Donatella must save him.

Cora Cooks Pancit

re By Dorina K. Lazo Gilmo s in the kitchen, job s’ kid ing do of ed Tir lp her mother he to ts Cora finally ge pino dish. prepare a traditional Fili

My Grandm Singing Yayaother is a

By Karen Scourb y D’Arc Lulu loves to hear her Gree k grandmother sin g in private – bu t in public, it mak es her cringe.


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Vaccarezza-Murdaca Family Foundation

Festa Della Donna PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Held at the River Bend Vineyard Estate on May 16 this popular event was hosted by the Vaccarezza Murdaca Family Foundation and Watts Equipment Company – benefitting the Lodi House and Hope Harbor.

Heidi Sowers-Hill and Christy Brown

A Jovanna Ferrari and Lisa Crete

A

B

B

Peggi Beckman, Eileen Tiede and Jeannie Lewis

C

Dolores DeCarli, Judy Yecies and Ann Kolber

D Raetta Schatz, Elisa Parises

and Deanna DeLu E

C

D

Kathy Facha, Margie Wood and Wendy Reynolds

E

The Children’s Home of Stockton

Valley Garden Fair

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

The Children’s Home Auxiliary presented the 41st Annual Valley Garden Fair Under the Trees on May 9. The luncheon, fashion show and garden market was held at the beautiful estate of Marie and Joe Barkett. Proceeds from the event benefit the lives of children through the Children’s Home of Stockton.

Janelle Nelson, Anna Sass and Mari Tripp

A Fred Lee and Neil Gluskin B

Cyril Seligman, Madelyn Kolber, Emily Ripken and Ann Kolber

C

Dixie Mulrooney, Letha Patmon and Barbara Bennett

A

B

D Nancy Mott and Bert Brown E

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Melissa Goodman and Karry Lindenberg

C

D

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รก la Carte

Haggin Museum PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

The 24th Annual Haggin รก la Carte was held May 12 at the Haggin Museum. The event featured local restaurants and wineries that sampled their signature dishes and drinks. Attendees enjoyed the two exhibitions, Memories of World War II and Fine Feathered Friends, that were on display.

Kylee Denning, Janie Reddish and Susan Obert

A Dwaine Risenhoover and Carolyn Steinmetz B

Fran Meredith and John Irish

C

Presley Schuler, Brigadier General Sandy Sanderson and Buzz Fornaciari

A

B

D Mike, Allison Gadeke

and Bill Wagner E

Hunter Hayes, Grace Hayes and Leslie Gerard C

D

E

Child Abuse Prevention Council Auxiliary

Golf Classic

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

The 7th Golf Classic was held on May 14. Dan Chapman and Brian Martucci were the chairs of the event. Proceeds from the day helped the Child Abuse Prevention Council to continue to prevent child abuse through outcome driven programs.

Dan Keyser, Debbie Armstrong, Cathy Ghan and Chris Conklin

A Babe Titus and Gary Long A

B

B

Ken Pesarento and Mike Pasqualicchio

C

Pauline Sanguinetti and Paul Vander Veen

D Curt Maloney and Chad Sublet E

C

D

Joyce Drew and Judy Green

E

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T H E

A R T S

Meet San Joaquin Artist

Rowland B Cheney

WRITTEN BY SARAH ANNOTTI PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

orn August 8th 1943 in Salt Lake City, Utah, artist Rowland

Cheney came to the San Joaquin Valley in 1971 to take a teaching job at San Joaquin Delta College, where he taught until 2006. Cheney’s educational background spans from Chico State to UC Berkeley. Predominantly known for his incredible talent and ability as an artist and art professor, Cheney is also a KMLA spokesman, advocate and horse breeder. Cheney lives near Lodi, where he and wife Cheryl raised their four children. Cheney has been described as a “complete artist” due to his extraordinary ability to work with multiple facets of supplies to create his aesthetically pleasing and meaningful pieces. Bronze, oil, watercolor and prints are just a few mediums Cheney is skilled in using to create his art. Cheney’s pieces are multidimensional, each piece telling a story that exudes a wide range of feelings and emotions easily felt by those who view his work.

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T H E

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Many of his paintings, sculptures and etchings are inspired by his passion for wildlife – specifically wildlife in its natural and wild habitat. Having the eye and perspective uniquely possessed by an artist, Cheney is able to create pieces that truly capture the essence of these beautiful creatures and their homes. When you view his pieces, you are not just seeing, but also feeling. Along with his ability to beautifully capture and create the essence of wildlife and nature, Cheney has also incorporated specific aspects of San Joaquin Valley life into his work. Several of Cheney’s sculptures’ poignantly emanate the pride and passion that drives our San Joaquin Valley. An incredible example of his representation of San Joaquin Valley living is in his black granite and bronze sculpture, “Celebrate Harvest.” This piece resides on the corner of School and Oak in downtown Lodi. With this piece Cheney has single-handedly captured the ambiance and pride of Lodi and its thriving grape and wine industry. As a fellow Lodian, I have found myself on many occasions stopping to take in this sculpture and appreciating its beautiful representation of a town I love so much. His work can also be seen at the Micke Grove Zoo, where Cheney’s life-size bronze sculpture of Mr. and Mrs. Micke, who donated the land that now encompasses the Zoo, theme park, water park and Japanese gardens, resides. Appropriately placed at the Lodi Amtrak station is the incredible, “Leaving and Coming Home,” piece depicting two

Rowland Cheney’s work can be seen throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Dublin and beyond. Those interested

larger-than-life Sandhill Cranes taking flight in

in learning more about Cheney and his

different directions. This symbolic piece is said

work can do so by visiting his website

to represent the comings and goings of our

at www.rowlandcheney.com

lives, and I have to say it does so beautifully. ❑


G R A P E V I N E

P

WRITTEN BY SARAH ANNOTTI PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

ristinely located amongst the picturesque

vineyards of the Lodi wine country is family-owned-andrun St. Jorge Winery. Built and maintained by the Vierra family, St. Jorge is a vision realized generations after it was conceived. In homage to the Portuguese island from which Vern Vierra’s great grandfather came, St. Jorge was named. With a passion and love for the process and result of wine making handed down from many generations before him, Vern and wife Jenice created a place that provides visitors much more than an average winetasting experience. Drawing inspiration from their travels through Spain, Italy and Portugal, the Vierras designed and built the St. Jorge buildings and courtyard with European piazzas in mind. Their goal was to create an ambiance and environment that is warm, friendly and festive. In essence,

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G R A P E V I N E

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they wanted St. Jorge visitors to experience what they themselves enjoyed and loved about their time abroad. When entering the St. Jorge grounds it is clear that great thought, time and precision where put into every detail of the beautiful St. Jorge buildings and dÊcor. The warm rich colors of Tuscany and Venice adorn the buildings from ceiling to floor inside and out. Bold and rustic doors, mirrors and furniture inside the tasting room, bridal suite and courtyard allow guests to be transported to another place. The large and exquisitely hand-painted art that adorns the walls of St. Jorge is done by the winery’s very own wine club and event manager, Jackie Vierra. Well-received by the media and wine coinsurers alike, several of St. Jorge’s wines have received great accolade and awards. Dedicated in staying true to his Portuguese heritage, Vern Vierra has created a wine menu that is 80% Portuguese. Portuguese wines are unique in that they are made from fruits not common in most other wines. A combination of berry, plum and cherry influences come together to create the full, rich, palate-pleasing

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G R A P E V I N E

flavors indigenous to Portuguese varietals. Aged between 18 and 20 months in oak barrels prior to being bottled, these wines are like nothing you’ve ever had before. While their Tempranillo and Zinfandels are a favorite of many, the White Verdello has continued to be a successful surprise, as it continues to sell out every year. Still new to the Lodi wine scene, Vern began bottling in 2007, producing just 1,200 cases. Today St. Jorge produces 5,000 cases, and expects to continue growing year after year, introducing new varietals and even more of what is available today! There is no better time of year to come and enjoy the outdoor space and view offered at St. Jorge. Open daily from 12:00-5:00 visitors are warmly welcomed by the Vierra family. So come on over and experience the beautiful views, inviting ambiance and one-of-kind tastes only found at Lodi’s very own St. Jorge Winery! ❑


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G R A P E V I N E

Chardonnay is Alive

M

ark Twain once stated, “The

report of my death was an exaggeration.” This was after a reporter was sent to investigate news that Twain had died. More recently a famous New York sommelier proclaimed that the summer of Riesling would be followed by the fall of Chardonnay. Let me be the first to say that the demise of Chardonnay is also highly exaggerated. Chardonnay remains the country’s favorite white grape. You can plow through Nielsen statistics to verify this, or you can simply walk into a Safeway and see for yourself. Despite the growing interest in Riesling, Chardonnay commands a far stronger presence. In the supermarket I visited, there were over 200 Chardonnays and a mere 12 Rieslings. Still, there are good reasons why some sommeliers and wine drinkers seek anything but Chardonnay. Because of its massive popularity, Chardonnay is planted virtually everywhere – even in very warm wine regions. Chardonnay from warm climates is usually a very simple wine. It is fat without a lot of character. Even with some of the best Chardonnays,

42

flavor comes from oak aging; the toastiness,

to lactic acid. The character of the grape itself

from barrel-fermentation. And that buttery

sometimes remains a mystery.

the character comes from winemaking rather

character,

fermentation

Some wineries are peeling back the make-

than the grape itself. That vanilla aroma and

whereby the malic apple-like acid is converted

up to reveal Chardonnay's true nature. Iron

from

malolactic

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Horse is one such winery making an unoaked Chardonnay without malolactic fermentation. Instead of oak and butter, you find melon, mandarin, orange and lime characteristics. The wine is crisp and refreshing. Expect to pay about $26.00 for this wine. Perhaps the truest expression of Chardonnay comes from Chablis, France. Yes, Chablis is a place, not a gallon jug of white wine in your grandmother’s pantry. In Chablis, the grape yields are frighteningly low and the vineyards are predominantly planted in Kimmeridgian soil – a mixture of clay, chalk and fossilized oyster shells. Domaine Laroche makes a basic Chablis called Saint Martin, which is crisp and mineraldriven. The green apple aromas and vibrant acidity dominate the wine’s flavor. It is the perfect pairing with oysters. Chablis Saint Martin sells for about $40.00. One of the very best Chardonnays in California is made by Kistler in Sonoma County. Back in the 1970s, Steve Kistler and Mark Bixler began tasting Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from California, and comparing those to reference standards produced in Burgundy. Using the Burgundian model, they identified sites ideal for Chardonnay in Sonoma Valley and the Sonoma Coast regions. They keep the yields at around 3 tons per acre, which is quite low by California standards. Kistler’s crop level is comparable to Grand Cru white Burgundy, which usually sells for at least $150. Most Kistler Chardonnay is only available at the winery, but a few top wine shops have Sonoma Mountain Chardonnay at about $65.00. You are more likely to find a top restaurant with the Kistler “Les Noisetiers” Chardonnay on the wine list, at about $120. Both of these wines have a rich texture and distinctive golden apple and hazelnut aromas. There is a core of acidity and minerality in Kistler wines which is distinctive and markedly different than most California Chardonnays. So rest assured, Chardonnay is alive and well. If you already have a taste for this popular wine, seek out the more distinctive examples. You will not be disappointed when you try some of the best bottlings. ❑

Sommelier Matt Davies is the owner of Le Bistro Restaurant in Stockton.


S A V O R

A Moveable Feast. Eating on The Go BY CHARLEEN EARLEY PHOTOS BY AMY PHIPPS

Y

ou can’t miss it – the lime-green kitchen

on wheels at the corner of Sacramento Street

and Lodi Avenue in Lodi – it looks just like a taco truck, but it’s not. “We don’t serve tacos, and we’re not a truck, but everyone calls us ‘that taco truck!” said David Seed, co-owner with his dad, Doug Seed, of A Moveable Feast. The stand-out color is David’s wife’s favorite, and they’ve been serving up New American-style cuisine in their outfitted trailer since January this year. Sandwiches (no tacos) on the menu include steak, chicken Caesar or steak Caesar, “Crabby” crabcake and Cajun shrimp. Just add regular or garlic fries, one of five tasty dipping sauces, and a soda or water to complete your meal. Of course the last thing you’ll find at a mobile eatery is health food, but for Doug and David, good calories are not compromised. “We serve a vegetarian black bean burger loaded with fresh tomatoes, cucumber and sprouts, and all of our sandwiches are available as a salad or in a Lavash wrap, an Armenian flatbread,” said David, who won Best Food Booth at the Lodi Spring Wine Show in March. The father-son duo humbly began two years ago as a catering business to homes while working out of a community kitchen in south Stockton. It escalated to corporate gigs, one of them a cherry packing plant. The business sprouted from there. “We just blew up! We’re doing really great,” said David, 28, who pays rent for their parking lot locale to Lodi Payless – a discount cigarette and cigar store.

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S A V O R

While waiting for your meal, you can read scriptures and famous quotes painted on their trailer. One quote and photo in particular feeds into their business name – it’s of author Ernest Hemingway regarding A Moveable

Feast, a set of memoirs about Hemingway’s years in Paris. With plans to open another eatery in a couple of years, the Seeds strive to meet the needs of their current drive-up customers. “One lady said that if we didn’t get an umbrella for our table, she would drive by and not stop anymore,” recalled David. “So we got the umbrella for her!” Sandwiches are $5.50 to $6.50, and fries range from $1.50 to $5 for “epic” size. Hours are Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday until 3 p.m. (because they work the Lodi Farmers Market from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.), and Friday and Sat urday until 7 p.m.; closed on Sundays. For David, this full time job feeds his soul. “Our food makes people happy,” said David, whose father is also a minister. “And it’s a good day when someone tells you your food is great!” ❑


L O C A L

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BRINGING LIFE INTO FOCUS Zeiter Eye Celebrates 50 Years in the Central Valley

DOCTORS JOHN, HENRY AND JOSEPH ZEITER

“Eyes are the mirror of the soul,”

N

STORY BY BARBARA DALY PHOTOS COURTESY OF ZEITER EYE

o doubt sight is one of our most valued and treasured assets.

The Zeiter Eye clinic has been serving the ocular needs of Central Valley

residents for 50 years now. Few area businesses have touched as many lives. It was 1962 when 28-year-old Henry J. Zeiter, MD and his wife Carol packed up their one-year-old son John in the family station wagon, and

“Seeing is believing,”

headed west from their home in Detroit, MI. The destination was Stockton, where many of Dr. Zeiter’s relatives had immigrated from Lebanon. When Dr. Zeiter opened the doors to his ophthalmology practice in

“A picture’s worth a thousand words.”

downtown Stockton, his goal was simple. “I wanted to practice the specialty I loved, and to make a decent living,” says Dr. Zeiter. He’s been able to do that and so much more. Continually introducing new surgical procedures to the area, the business quickly grew in size and reputation. Nephew Joseph Zeiter, MD soon joined the practice and eventually son John, that one-year-old boy who made the trek in his parents’

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station wagon so many years prior, became an ophthalmologist and joined the Zeiter Eye team. Now, two businesses – Zeiter Eye Medical Group, Inc. and Zeiter Eye Surgical Center, Inc. – specialize in diagnosing and treating medical and surgical diseases of the eye including cataract surgery, LASIK surgery, glaucoma treatment, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. Zeiter Eye also provides oculofacial plastic surgery (eyelid surgery), skin care and laser rejuvenation of the face, and routine eye exams and glasses. With the extensive areas of expertise, Zeiter Eye now includes ophthalmologists John Canzano, Richard Wong, Harold Hand and Kimberly Cockerham. This summer, Dr. Joe’s son Joseph Zeiter, Jr. completes his residency in ophthalmology and he, too, joins the practice. Through the years the Zeiter Eye group has made a of point of giving back to the community. With more than one hundred employees, they are often seen around the community, involved in vision screenings at schools or senior centers, and with their Gift of Sight Program, providing free cataract surgery for uninsured patients. With offices in Stockton, Lodi, Manteca, Tracy and Sonora, the business Henry J. Zeiter, MD started 50 years ago has exceeded his expectations. But the simple pleasures of the work is what it’s all about, says Dr. Zeiter. “When sight is restored with cataract surgery, we are able to share in that celebration with our patients, and there are not many things more gratifying than that.” Zeiter Eye has just added a new piece of cutting-edge technology for their patients. The LensX Femtosecond Laser increases the precision of cataract surgery. Currently it is only the second such laser being used in Northern California. ❑

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Mary Graham Children’s Foundation

Kids Art Auction

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

The 4th Annual Kids Art Auction was held on May 15 at the Stockton Golf and Country Club. The evening featured winetasting, hors d’oeuvres, dessert, a raffle and live auction. Student scholars spoke at the event, and all proceeds benefit foster youth in the Mary Graham Kids Art Program and the College and Trade School Scholarship Program.

Amber Saunders, Janet Kavanaugh and Francesca Vera

A Carmen Steele-Abundez and

Karen Sanchez A

B

B

Carol Burke, Sandy Guidi, Francie Gillies and Pat DeBock

C

Shani Richards and Lani Schiff-Ross

D Don Devold and Claudia Pruitt E C

D

E

39th Annual Jewish Food Festival

Cecelia Delatorre, Karen Moran, and Linda Schwager

Temple Israel

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

Held on June 3 at Temple Israel, the Jewish Food Festival, as always, served up delicious food, festive dancing, and family fun.

Lisa Cooperman, Nancy Freedman and Stacy Sims

A Nina, Gianna, Shelly

and Zach Guebara B

Scott Greeley, Sylvia Jones, Valerie Jones and Matthew Adler

C

Shirley Corren, Brian Closs, Donna Stein, Emily Ripken and Leslie Corren

A

B

D Mark Barber, Dave Schmitt

and Steve Stein E

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Norma Schultz, Rabbi Jason Gwasdoff and Zelda Schule

C

D

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St. Mary’s Dining Room

Evening of Appreciation PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

The 2012 Evening of Appreciation Fundraising Event for St. Mary’s Dining Room was held on June 23 at the River Bend Vineyard Estate. The evening honored medical professional volunteers who have been actively involved at the Dining Room by assisting those in need.

Saira Malik, Terry Morse and Dr. Parveen Malik

A KR Hovatter, Kim and David Ehlert,

Shelley and Rick Toy B

Mark Ketcherside, Linda Sanguinetti, Nick and Jennifer Salvetti

C

Rob and Debbie Wayne, Kelley and Gary Kruse

A

B

D Reed and Audrey Peters E

Lynne Davis and Natalie Pettis C

D

E

Power of One Luncheon UNITED WAY

PHOTOS BY HELEN RIPKEN

The United Way held the 10th Annual Power of One – Women Making A Difference Luncheon on May 22. The keynote speaker at the luncheon was Pamela Eibeck, the first woman president of University of the Pacific. The Community Star Award was given to St. Joseph’s Medical Center volunteer Joy Clem. Proceeds from the luncheon will benefit United Way programs.

Debbie Grooms, Suzanne Mangum and Marla Scott

A

A Martha Moore, Connie Henderson,

B

Amy Travaille, Joyce Grubbs and Irene Castillo B

Terasa Dannecker, Terri Redwood and Elizabeth Lynch

C

Bob Kavanaugh and John Rauch

D Linda Philipp and Teresa Mandela C

D

E

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Gail Drzewiecki and Julie Whitehouse

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L I F E

“Call to the Post” STORY BY LORI GILBERT PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE RECORD

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F

or some folks, it takes the prospect of a Triple Crown winner, or a

For 80 years the San Joaquin Fair has managed to entertain locals

photo finish in the Belmont to make up for the absence of a potential

who don’t know the difference between a thoroughbred and the horses

Triple Crown winner, to make a horse race enjoyable.

that guide them onto the track (hint: the thoroughbreds are the high -

With all due respect to “I’ll Have Another,” who charmed his way

strung beauties with the colored numbers hanging down their sides).

into the public consciousness with his thrilling wins in Kentucky and

Still, the races have lured hundreds of thousands of visitors over the

Baltimore, and heartbreaking withdrawal from the Belmont, there’s

years who are happy to plunk down a $2 bet or two with visions of

more to horse racing than big steaks and purses.

striking it rich.

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L I F E

A day of horse racing, which this year runs at the San Joaquin Fairgrounds Sept. 20-30, though, is greater than the sum of a ticket payoff. It’s:

the rail, the expectations and thrill for anyone with a bet on them, and the beautiful sight that is horses running stride for stride toward the finish line.

“Call to the Post,“ the music played on the bugle before each race, whether it’s run at Churchill Downs or at Airport Way and Martin Luther King Boulevard in Stockton.

The explanations you hear from betters who explain their wagering strategies. I had one guy, with Daily Racing Form in hand, draw me a diagram with squares and numbers that was more confusing than solving for x in high school algebra. Others go for numbers or colors or names, or the tried-and-true, “any mount with Russell Baze aboard” method. Still, my favorite story came from two guys who won big, and were celebrating on the lower concourse. The secret to their success: “We came downstairs.” Yes, they’d been sitting in the stands and betting at the booths on the upper level. When they moved downstairs, the money poured in.

A chance to see Stockton in all its diverse glory, with fans of all ages, size, shapes, colors, national origins and preferred religion gathered in one place. The amazing athleticism of 115-pound men and women, who manage to keep those skittish racehorses under control as they urge them to gallop with all their might in a tight pack of thundering creatures. The dexterity of the guys who load those horses into the starting gate, jumping out of the way of disinclined horses, and positioning themselves tightly against the gate’s bars until the door flies open and the announcer cries, “And, they’re off!” An event that ignites your senses with the sound of the hooves as they pound the freshly turned and watered dirt in unison, the breeze you feel as they race by if you’re standing on

Stockton being able to attract the aforementioned Baze, one of the greatest athletes in his field, in his prime, to compete here. The sheer poetry in motion that is a horse running. Animal lovers and advocates can debate the merits and cruelty to horses, and I

lifestyles

won’t try to talk them down. As Jerry Seinfeld says, horses would be stepping a lot more carefully if they knew the hazards of charging down a track as they do. All that aside, though, horses are animals that are meant to run, and watching them do so, even in a race on a track, is to see absolute beauty. A sport you don’t have to understand to enjoy. Okay, the betting thing is complicated, and it’s sometimes hard to find a pari-mutuel window clerk nice enough to walk you through the process, but just to watch the race is simple. There are no innings, outs, first downs, free throws or any other unique rule you need to learn to understand the game. It’s a horse, with men and women on top of them, trying to get to the finish line first. Exciting to watch with or without a bet on the line. To see a long shot come in first, or have two or three animals nose-to-nose until the end is absolutely dramatic and thrilling. An opportunity to buy one of the best corn dogs you’ll ever taste in your life.

The King of Sports, so named because of its appeal to royalty and the upper classes, and if that traditional designation no longer applies, it is, in Stockton, a sport of rich tradition and history, which gives it a value all its own.

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SOUTHERN

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COMFORT, SPORT OF KINGS, A PERFECT EXACTA! H

STORY BY BOBBIE WALLINGER

aving been fortunate to have traveled to more than fifteen countries

outside of the United States, I decided there was far too much of the United States I needed to explore. So April and most of May was spent making a ninethousand mile car trip across America’s southland. The Carolinas were divine, Texas and Oklahoma were both a “hoot,” and the beauty of Arkansas, Tennessee and Virginia was breathtaking. Everything is so “green.” One highlight of this trip was an opportunity to attend the races at Churchill Downs, pride of Kentucky, and rightfully so. Nothing was more thrilling than driving through Louisville, passing a neighborhood of private homes – some large, most modest – and suddenly to my left was the most famous racetrack in the United States, and home of the Kentucky Derby. Arriving on Mother’s Day, the Sunday after “Derby Weekend” resulted in a smaller crowd, but no less enthusiastic on the part of the hordes of folk, hurrying to the paddock to check out the horses for the first race. The gorgeous animals, coats shiny from the grooming they received that morning, paraded by one at a time, ridden by such famous jockeys as Jesus L. Castanon, Fabio A. Arguello and Shaun Bridgmohan, all decked out in colorful silks and escorted by pony girls and boys and trainers. A light rain peppered the scene, and the tote board described the track as “muddy,” but nothing could dampen the spirits of those ready to place their money on “Charlie in Charge,” “Favorite Flavor,” or “Golden Causeway.” Imbibing a genuine Mint Julep certainly added to the flavor of the day, and while ladies with fancy Derby chapeaux were not in abundance, there were plenty of us with brightly-colored umbrellas as the trumpeter sounded his call to the gate, and the announcer called to us, “…And they’re off!” The thrill of having placed my bet at the track established in 1895, the roar of the crowd, the smells of horseflesh, feed, and freshly cut grass on the manicured grounds that surround the newly painted stands provided me a memory of the excitement and gentility of the home of the Kentucky Derby I shall never forget. ❑

55


S P O R T I N G

L I F E

Vroom, Vroom S

pectators, start your engines and prepare for an evening of

free family section as well as low-cost admission. Kids ten and under

whizzing cars, rumbling seats, and the excitement of short track

get in for free, and ticket prices for adults range from $15 for most

racing. Whether you’re new to the sport or a loyal fan, the Stockton 99

events to $35 for the Pro Series events. With tickets and snacks at the

Speedway is sure to get your heart racing.

concessions, a family of four can enjoy a unique evening out for $50-

The tricky, quarter-mile high-banked oval track located on Wilson

$60, making it a great (and less expensive) alternative to a movie.

Way hosts a variety of races including Late Model cars, which closely

The Stockton 99 Speedway has a rich history of entertaining fans.

resemble the ones you’ll see during NASCAR races on TV. If you feel like

It opened in 1947 and joined NASCAR in 1955, becoming the longest-

expanding your racing repertoire, you can also watch Modifieds, Super

running NASCAR-sanctioned track in the West until it closed in 2006.

Stocks and Bombers, to name a few.

After a three-year hiatus and more than $1 million in repairs and

The cars breathe life into the track, and shake the grandstands as

renovations, the speedway was reopened in 2009 by Tony and Carol

they race past. “They’re sometimes so close and loud that you feel like

Noceti. Renamed “The New Stockton 99 Speedway,” it's been well-

you’re on the track itself,” says Kelly Collins, assistant at the speedway.

received by both fans and drivers. It has been recognized in the top 10

And although the noise of the engines only adds to the excitement, if

NASCAR short tracks each year since it reopened, and hosts the K&N

it’s too much to handle, you’re welcome to bring earplugs or purchase

Pro Series, which features some of NASCAR’s future stars.

them at the track.

The speedway has races most Saturdays through October. The

“People always have such a good time when they’re out here,” says Collins. “This is a place where you can bring the whole family.” The family-friendly speedway offers a special smoke- and alcohol-

56

STORY BY JOHN McCLIMANS PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE RECORD

grandstands open at 4 p.m. and the green flag drops at 6 p.m. Races usually finish around 10 p.m. For more information visit www.stockton99.com ❑

a u g u st /sep temb er 2 0 1 2


Wag Tales Joaquin Dogs

Sugar I am a: Golden Retriever Where I’m from: Stockton Favorite place to hang out: The couch. Most amazing trick: I can catch a fly ball – a real fly ball! Most recent accomplishment: I can carry 4 tennis balls in my mouth. Favorite dogpark or place to play/ roam/walk: Walks in my neighborhood. Guilty pleasure: Chasing our cat, Sprinkles, around the house. Naughtiest deed: Putting my chin on the dinner table. Favorite Treat: Pupperoni Obsession: Playing fetch. Where I go to get beautiful: (groomers) Rain N Cats N Dogs in Parkwoods Shopping Center. Any other interesting info about me: I’m a big-boned girl. I exercise every day and still weigh 102 pounds. I feel your pain, ladies! Human parents: Todd & Kris Rice

lifestyles

57


Mark the date

8 BOB HOPE THEATRE Keep an eye on the Bob Hope

August

17

Lincoln Center will be hosting the annual Classic Car Show at Friday Night LIVE! which benefits Lincoln High School programs on Friday, August 17. The evening will feature over 200 cars and live music by RBX! Don’t miss this fun event from 6:009:00p.m. For more information call 209-477-4868 or visit www.lincolncentershops.com

18

TASTE OF SAN JOAQUIN & THE WAY OUT WEST BBQ CHAMPIONSHIP

The Annual Taste of San Joaquin and Way Out West BBQ Championship will take place August 18 from 11:30 – 6:30 p.m. at Weber Point. There will be BBQ teams, local restaurants, music and activities for kids throughout the day. For more information visit www.downtownstockton.org.

21

58

STOCKTON BEER WEEK

Theatre line-up! Great performances scheduled throughout the year. Martina McBride will be performing on Wednesday, August 8, followed by Gavin Degraw & Colbie Caillat on August 15. For more information visit www.ticketmaster.com or www.stocktonarena.com.

LIVE! AT LINCOLN CENTER

23

The first Stockton Beer Week will be held August 23-26 throughout Stockton. The purpose of this new, innovative event is to support the craft beer industry while increasing traffic and building excitement in Stockton bars and restaurants. For more information visit www.stocktonbeerweek.com.

25

ORANGE AND BLACK BALL

The 13th Annual Orange and Black Ball, sponsored by the Pacific Athletic Foundation will be held August 25 in the Janssen-Lagorio Gymnasium. Enjoy a silent auction, hors d’oeuvres, dinner, live auction and dancing. Proceeds benefit the Pacific Athletic Foundation to provide scholarship opportunities for Pacific Athletes. For more information call 209-946-2387.

September MANA’OLANA (HOPE) LUAU

7

Defying Muscular Dystrophy will be hosting its 2nd Annual Mana’olana (Hope) Luau on Friday, September 7 at the Stockton Ballroom. The evening will feature entertainment, a silent auction, raffle and delicious authentic island cuisine prepared by The Breadfruit Tree. The organization is raising money for Vector Treatment clinical trials. For more information call 209-598-0471 or email cgusmandmd@ymail.com.

7-9

SUMMER SING

Enjoy two evenings of music and fun on August 21 and 28 at 7:00 p.m. at St. John’s Anglican Church in Stockton. The Stockton Chorale will hold a “Summer Sing” where the evening will feature great music to sing along to. The cost is $15 for both evenings, or $10 for one. For more information call 209-951-6494 or visit www.stocktonchorale.org.

KINGDON DRAGS

“The Return to Kingdon” is the 7th annual drag race event held on DeVries Road in Lodi from September 7–9. The event draws 8,000-10,000 people and is three full days of fun! The proceeds from the event benefit “The Welcome Home Hero’s” and the “Retired Sheriff’s Air Patrol”. For more information call 209-992-0171.

RESTORE THE DELTA

8 a u g u st /sep temb er 2 0 1 2

The Grand Food and Wine Classique for Restore the Delta will be held September 8 from 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m., at Grand Island Mansion in Walnut Grove. The event will feature local wines, cuisine, art, music and a silent auction. For more information call 209-475-9550 or email Jessica@restorethedelta.org.


8

Mark the date

RED RHINO PROJECT

Red Rhino Orphanage Project will be hosting their annual fundraiser at the home of Dr. John & Lynette Zeiter. The event will be held on September 8, at 5:30 p.m. Highlights include wine tasting, gourmet foods, and a silent and live auction. For more information visit www.rrop.org.

13

8-29

THE KNOWLTON GALLERY

The opening reception for California Gems, featuring beautiful landscape paintings of Yosemite and Tahoe, will be held September 8 with the exhibit running through September 29. For more information call 209-368-5123 or visit www.knowltongallery.com

FAMILY DAY AT THE PARK

15

15

The Lodi Grape Festival will take place September 13-16 at the Grape Festival grounds in Lodi. There will be a carnival, food, exhibits and music celebrating the agriculture in San Joaquin County! For more information visit www.grapefestival.com.

SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY FAIR

20-30

Don’t miss the annual San Joaquin County Fair from September 20-30. There will be music, a carnival, agriculture, livestock, food and live entertainment and exhibits. Bring your family and friends out to the Stockton Fairgrounds to celebrate the fun in San Joaquin County. For more information call 209-466-5041 or visit www.sanjoaquinfair.com.

Bring the kids, bring the grandkids to The 15th Annual Record’s Literacy & Book Fair – Family Day at the Park! This action-packed day of fun will be held September 15 at University Park in Stockton. Beginning at 9:30 with a mascot parade, the fun-filled day of family activities concludes at 3:30. For more information call 209-957-7277 or visit www.familydayatthepark.com

STOCKTON SYMPHONY

LODI GRAPE FESTIVAL

The Stockton Symphony will present its August Pops Concert: Cirque de la Symphonie on September 15 at 6:00 p.m. and September 16 at 2:30 p.m. Veterans from cirque programs throughout the world perform as their moves are paired with a classical masterpiece performed by the Symphony. For more information call 209-951-0196 or visit www.stocktonsymphony.org.

October

5

EL CONCILIO PRESENTS GALA DINNER

The Friends of El Concilio will be holding the Stockton Gala Dinner on Friday, October 5th at 5:30 p.m. at Hutchins Street Square in Lodi. For more information please call 209-644-2627 or email asan@elconcilio.org.

5

MORE IMPRESSIVE TALENT COMING TO THE STOCKTON ARENA

Lynard Skynyrd will be performing with the Doobie Brothers on October 5 at the Stockton Arena. For more information call (800) 745-3000 or visit www.ticketmaster.com

lifestyles

59


E L I T E

F L E E T

Meet me at the lake

STORY BY J. MICHAEL RIVERA PHOTO COURTESY OF THE RECORD

T

he warm days of late summer are the

perfect time to leave the confines of a stuffy

For only $20, staff at The Headwaters

home and glide along one of the Central

Kayak Shop in Lodi leads beginning kayakers

Valley’s many waterways in a kayak.

on a 2.5-hour trip around Lodi Lake. Gear is

Buying or renting a kayak, paddles, life

included. The class is held each Tuesday.

enthusiasts, the group meets monthly at freshwater lakes and rivers throughout Central California. For more adventurous types who want to go it alone, Headwaters rents kayaks for

jackets, and then figuring out where to go

Members of the Lodi Paddle Club regularly

half-days, full days or weekends. For $150,

and how to schlep everything safely there and

turn out to welcome and help new paddlers.

customers can try any rental kayak to help

back can prove daunting for newcomers to the

“It’s an incredibly popular class and resource,”

decide which model to purchase. The $150

sport.

said Dan Arbuckle, owner of Headwaters.

rental fee is applied to the purchase of a

“It helps new people meet and greet new

regularly priced kayak.

A number of San Joaquin region sporting goods retailers have tossed out a lifeline

60

enthusiasts eager to lend a hand.

kayakers while learning the sport.”

“The most important thing is to try different

for beginning kayakers, offering equipment

Formed in 2006 and comprised of mostly

ones before you go out and buy the cheapest

rentals, lessons and a community of paddling

Lodi- and Stockton-area kayak and canoe

kayak,” said Arbuckle, who has kayaked for

a u g u st /sep temb er 2 0 1 2


Boating, Rather than Baking at Lodi Lake STORY AND PHOTO BY DANI HOVATTER

Pie in the sky is often hard to find once the summer sun hits the horizon. The dry heat seeps into valley, baking us every day. Sometimes it seems like there’s no escape, but you may not realize just how close one is. Lodi Lake is the ideal place to be when the overbearing temperature starts doubling. The list of activities at Lodi Lake is extensive, and if boating is your bread and butter, then this is your picnic. Roam about the lake in a pedal boat, or take a kayak or canoe along the serpentine river. Rent a boat for only $5, bring your own raft or motorboat, or join a Group Paddle down the Mokelumne River on select days for $20. The Chartered Boat Tours bring you along 5 miles of the river’s scenic beauty, and is also a fun way to spend a couple hours. If you’re looking for amusement, walk to the river at the back of the lake. Aside from all the other watercraft meandering by, jet skiers will glue your eyes to the water. Families and friends are always grouped along the river’s edge with tents and trailers to watch as The Headwaters

they zoom by, pull tricks and turns, or possibly take a few spills and splashes. It’s always

847 N. Cluff Avenue, Suite A-6

fun to watch these skiers play off each others’ waves. Perhaps simply watching is not

Lodi, CA 95240 224-8367

enough? Load up your jet ski and truck it to the water. Apart from the boating hoopla that’s found, there are plenty of other activities in the

headwaterskayak.com

park. Whether you bring your bike, your kid’s trike, or simply take a hike in the Nature Area

www.rei.com/outdoorschool

trail, you can enjoy the park’s beauty. If it’s more of a lazy day, the Swimming Beach area is family-friendly and the perfect place to lounge. Or, take your fishing poles and try your luck at catching catfish or bass in the lake and river. On those more animated days, gather up some friends near the playground, barbecue up some hamburgers and have a picnic. No matter what fun and games you’re searching for, all-day enjoyment is as easy as

more than 20 years. “Not every kayak works for

pie, and just around the corner. Arrange a visit or come at the spur of the moment, and

every person.”

you’re sure to leave with a smile. So bring some friends, some pie, and join the activities

There are plenty of great spots for kayaking in San Joaquin County. The placid waters of the Mokelumne River winds its way through the region, and is a mere half-mile from Headwaters on North Cluff Avenue in Lodi. The Consumnes River Preserve in Galt and Delta Rivers Meadow Park near Locke are less than an hour away. While further afield, outdoor retailer REI offers beginning kayaking classes near Auburn and Folsom Lake. ❑

at Lodi Lake. ❑


San Joaquin Lifestyles Aug 2012  

The August 2012 issue of San Joaquin Lifestyles from the Stockton Record.

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