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WEDNESDAY Sept. 16, 2015 Vol. 99 • No. 9

www.therambler.org

OPINION

Fort Worth has taco fever Brianna Kessler

bnkessler@txwes.edu

Wesleyan should have given more warning to International students Editorial on the “deregistration” policy for international students.

NEWS

Three potential stores coming to Wesleyan As part of the 2020 Vision, Wesleyan plans to fill the vacant storefronts to enhance the student experience.

CAMPUS 4 |Wednesday | Septemeber 16, 2015

CAMPUS

TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

Mental health of college students Signs of depression •

Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions

Fatigue and decreased energy

Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness

Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism

Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping

Irritability, restlessness

Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable

Overeating or appetite loss

Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment

Excessive sadness or moodiness

Hopelessness

Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts Making comments about being hopless, helpless, or worthless

Putting affairs in order, tying up loose ends

Saying things like “It would be better if I wasn’t here”

Where to get help

Warning signs of suicide •

Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” feelings

• •

The Community Counseling Center

Sleep problems.

Free personal councling to Wesleyan stu-

Sudden calmness

dents, faculty and staff.

Info graphic of college students’ mental health •

Withdrawal

Changes in personality and/or appearance

Dangerous or self-harmful behavior

3106 E. Rosedale Ave. 817-531-4859

Recent trauma or life crisis

Making preparations: This might include visiting friends and family members, giving away personal possessions, making a will, and

cleaning up his or her room or home. Some people will write a note before committing suicide. Some will buy a firearm or other means

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7 help for anyone

like poison.

1 (800) 273-8255

Threatening suicide: From 50% to 75% of those considering suicide

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

will give someone -- a friend or relative -- a warning sign. However, not everyone who is considering suicide will say so, and not every-

one who threatens suicide will follow through with it. Every threat of suicide should be taken seriously.

Don't miss the action this weekend!

FRIDAY Soccer - Sept. 18th hosts St. Thomas 6&8pm Volleyball - Sept. 18th hosts Southwestern Christian 7pm

Statistics about depression, stress and suicide, and how to get help. SATURDAY

Soccer - Sept. 19th hosts University of the Southwest 2&4pm Volleyball - Sept. 19th hosts St. Gregory's 2pm

Texas officially loves tacos more than any other state, and Fort Worth is second only to Arlington in cities that love tacos the most, according to a 2014 survey. Cowtown native Joshua Matthews, a senior science in athletic training major, is not surprised by these results at all. “I believe people love tacos in Fort Worth because of all of the heritage and diversity in the city,” Matthews said. “I love tacos.” Matthews, who eats tacos about twice a week, recommends Fuzzy’s Taco Shop, Torchy’s Tacos and Jack in the Box. “I mostly go to Jack in the Box for tacos because they’re two for a dollar,” he said. “And I love Fuzzy’s breakfast tacos. But I think Torchy’s Tacos is the best place for tacos in town.” Estately, an online blog, conducted the 2014 survey, “Most Taco-Crazed Cities in America” to find out which of the largest 50 U.S. cities had the most taco enthusiasm, according to NBCDFW.com Fort Worth ranked number two for highest level of taco enthusiasm out of the largest 50 U.S. cities, right behind Arlington and topping Austin, which came in third. Dallas and San Antonio were fourth and fifth. Philadelphia, Boston and New York brought up the rear at 48, 49 and 50. The survey measured the percent-

Graphic by Brianna Kessler These are the top four places to get tacos in Fort Worth, according to students surveyed for this article.

age of each city’s restaurants serving tacos via Yelp, the percentage of Facebook users in each city expressing interest in tacos via Facebook, and the level of internet searches related to tacos via Google Trends, ac-

cording to blog.estately.com. Taco enthusiasm is even spreading to out of state Wesleyan students, said Adrian Perez, a senior biology major from Miami. “I have started eating tacos so

much more living in Fort Worth than I did back home,” he said. Perez, who eats tacos once every two weeks, loves going to Chipo-

 TACOS, page 3

Wesleyan hopes to fill storefronts

A&E

A Walk in the Woods is “excellent” Hilarious moments make this movie worth seeing. Photos by Jessica Liptak Weslyan plans to fill vacant retail spaces with student-oriented businesses after construction is completed on Rosedale Street later this semester.

SPORTS

Wesleyan golfer looking to go pro Alexis Belton works to accomplish her dream of going pro, despite slim chances.

ONLINE

Watch out for these 2015 NFL storylines Michael Acosta gives five bold predictions for the 2015 season.

WILLSON LECTURESHIP EST. 1946

Brianna Kessler bnkessler@txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan University’s Rosedale Renaissance Project is coming to an end, and the university is now considering food vendors and franchise retailers for three vacant storefronts on campus to further the 2020 Vision. This is an opportunity for Wes-

leyan to provide additional space for retail and the school’s programs, said President Fred Slabach. “We would love to have a retail place that is appealing to students,” Slabach said. “A place where students can hang out, study and eat would be ideal.” Neighborhood revitalization, economic development and campus enhancement are strategic parts of the 2020 Vision, said John Veilleux, vice

president of marketing & communications. “We are highly motivated to get retailers into the storefronts,” he said. “And we are very interested in eatery type places for our new retail spaces to enhance the community.” There are a lot of people on campus with certain diet restrictions and cannot eat at Dora’s or Subway, said Kelsey Manuel, senior theatre major. “We need something like Spiral

Diner,” she said. “I would love to have somewhere we can all eat together.” There are not many food options on campus so a new place to eat would be great, said Daniella Shackelford, sophomore psychology major. “I would like to see something healthy and cheaper go in as far as

solved,” Spence said. Spence spoke highly of the new

The reorganization helps Wesleyan hold people accountable instead of

This has eliminated the complaints for the turn around on job completions, said Spence. Spence said that the change has made her job easier with the help of the four student workers and the three analysts also working for the Service Desk. “The student workers really help to free up the technicians for the major things, and the students can handle the smaller things,” Spence said. Sallie Trotter, Wesleyan’s Service

 STOREFRONTS, page 3

Service Desk streamlines requests Gracie Weger gjweger@txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan’s Help Desk is now the Service Desk. The difference is not just a name change. The reorganization means that “the Service Desk is now like a secretary for Facilities,” said Maria Dominique Brown-Spence, a Wesleyan graduate and Service Desk employee. “We send the tickets out and it gives Facilities a schedule with an estimated time to have requests

MANDELA & TUTU MONDAY, SEPT. 28 7 P.M., MARTIN HALL DOORS OPEN AT 6:30 P.M.

“The Facilities adoption of the Service Desk tool has truly been a game changer for the department.” -Michael J. Poole approach to organizing the school’s maintenance requests.

running simply on a word of mouth request for help or services, she said.

FEATURING HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS NDABA MANDELA, GRANDSON OF NELSON MANDELA & NAOMI TUTU, DAUGHTER OF ARCHBISHOP DESMOND TUTU PRESENTING CONTINUING TO STRIVE FOR TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION

 SERVICE DESK, page 3

PRESENTED BY


2 | Wednesday | Septemeber 16, 2015

Opinion

TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

New “deregistration” policy is unfair EDITORIAL

International students should not have been removed from Texas Wesleyan this semester. The university implemented a strict payment policy for international students over the summer. Several emails were sent to the students warning them that they had to be on a payment plan or pay in full by the 12th day of class, or face deregistration. This was not a smart thing to do. It wasn’t dumb that the policy changed to include deregistration, but it is ridiculous to think that sending out four emails over the summer would suffice in communication. The emails were sent out on July 13, Aug. 4, 13 and 19. First, some international students have problems getting to their email during the summer. Plus, many students do not check their email over the summer. School is not in session, and many students put school in the back of their minds. This is especially true for returning students who aren’t expecting any policy changes. Second, international students spend tons of money to even get to America. The cost of flying here, getting a phone, paying visa fees and living on campus can be several thousand dollars. If they had not checked their email, then they just spent thousands of dollars and wasted a great amount of time to get kicked out of school. The university should have made sure the students had replied and understood the change well before the start of the semester. Changing a policy over the summer and sending out emails does not ensure that students will understand the change. If the university wanted to make this change, it should have delayed another semester, or even a year, so that international students could have more time to adjust and effectively com-

Illustration by Rebekah D. Ruiz

municate with Wesleyan. These students often have language barriers and allowing them to ask questions in person could have saved them from getting deregistered. Furthermore, the university should be more willing to open up about this subject, let people know what is going on, and do its best to help these students find a way home or transfer to another school. This situation, in other words, should have

been more carefully considered. Several students, domestic and international, are upset about what has happened. If Wesleyan had been losing money from students not paying tuition, they are really going to lose money now because students may not want to come to this campus. We know of students who have paid tuition who are considering transferring to another university because of this situation.

Wesleyan has been working hard to build up the university’s reputation and promote itself in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. This new deregistration policy is not going to help. International students should have to pay for tuition; that is fair. What is not fair is kicking them out without making sure that they understood the policy well before the first day of school.

College is a time to learn life lessons Jessica Liptak Multimedia Editor jliptak@txwes.edu

If you learn anything in college, it should be about you. Freshman year of college is full of new beginnings, new friends, new freedoms, new home new challenges, and the list goes on and on. But what happens when you aren’t true to yourself during this time? After six semesters in college, I have seen several people try to make themselves into someone that they aren’t. This can take many different forms. For some people, it may be pursuing a career that they are pressured into, often by family. Other people may try to fit into friend groups that do not encourage them as an individual or help This is a time in your life filled with decisions to make. Most of these decisions affect the path we take for the rest of our lives. It is very tempting to make decisions based on the expectations of others, what is popular in society, what will help us earn the most money, or what will make us appear successful in the eyes of others. Each of those things are not necessarily bad, but people often forget to pursue things they love. If you spend your entire college career forcing yourself to be someone

you aren’t, what makes you think you will find happiness and satisfaction in your career after graduation? I think it’s important for you to be honest with yourself and evaluate what areas you are gifted in, what you are passionate about, and what you want to achieve in your life. No one should ever be ashamed of his or her passions and interests. Each of us have unique talents to help benefit others and society, what a shame it would be to hide it! Obviously this is all easier said than done. How exactly can you practically learn to be yourself? It won’t be an easy process and will definitely require hard work and honesty with yourself. I encourage others to take advantage of being at a small university like Texas Wesleyan. Your professors will begin to know you personally and can help you recognize your strengths and weaknesses. I’ve had professors do this for me and they pushed me to pursue the things that I really enjoy. It was a huge encouragement to use my passions in my career. Professors want you to be the best you can be and want to help direct you. Listen and be open to advice, in some areas they just might know you better than you know yourself. It isn’t just about academics, but also the relationships you are in with others. In order to meet true, lasting friends, you must be true to yourself. College is a unique time in life where you will be surrounded by an incredibly diverse group of people, and you are bound to

Illustration by Jessica Liptak

find people like yourself. Being honest about who you are will attract similar people. Find people who push you and encourage your dreams and goals. As busy as this time in life may seem, it actually is one of the best times to pursue the things you are passionate about. Life will only get busier and you will have more and more commitments as the years go on. There isn’t a better time than now to give those talents a chance and incorporate them into your career. It would be a shame to give up on your dreams before you even get the chance to start pursuing them.

“We are not afraid to follow the truth... wherever it may lead.” — Thomas Jefferson Print/Web Content Producers:

Michael Acosta, Ricardo Cortez, Sachiko Jayaratne, Brianna Kessler, Jared Rabye, Gracie Weger

Editor-In-Chief: Valerie Spears IMG Director: Rebekah Ruiz Rambler TV Director: Victoria P. Garcia

Adviser: Dr. David Ferman Faculty Liaison: Dr. Kay Colley Publisher: Frederick Slabach Editorial Staff: Michael Acosta, Victoria Garcia, Jessica Liptak, Rebekah Ruiz, Valerie Spears

Digital Media Editor: Jessica Liptak Letters to the editor: T he R ambler , a biweekly publication, welcomes all letters. All submissions must have a full printed name, phone number and signature. While every consideration is made to publish letters, publication is limited by time and space. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions for space, grammar, clarity

and style. Letters to the editor may be subject to response from editors and students on the opinion page. Member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press, Student Press Law Center, College Media Advisers and College Newspaper Business and Advertising Managers. Opinions expressed in T he R ambler are

Address all correspondence to: Texas Wesleyan University T he R ambler 1201 Wesleyan St. • Fort Worth, TX 76105 twurambler@yahoo.com (817) 531-7552 Advertising Inquiries: (817) 531-6525 those of the individual authors only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Texas Wesleyan community as a whole. Rambler Contribution Please send all news briefs to twurambler@yahoo.com. Submissions due by noon Friday to see brief in the following week’s issue.

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Last but not least, don’t be afraid to get out there. Join clubs and organizations that you are drawn to. This is another way to meet others with similar interest. If you have an interest in something, shadow someone who works in that field or look for internships that fit along with your passions. Make your time in college about more than maintaining a 4.0 and getting a diploma. Make your time about learning and discovering what you are meant to do. College is an awesome time to begin the rest of your life. And I hope that you can start it by being you and pursuing what you love.

Rams up Thumbs up to cooler weather and the end of the summer. Thumbs up to new sidewalks popping up on campus. Thumbs up to the Central Market food truck coming to campus. Thumbs up to North Texas Giving Day.

Rams down Thumbs down to needing to get a flu shot. Thumbs down to the Sub being closed during night. classes. Thumbs down to the unreliable vending machines in the library basement Thumbs down to living on a college budget.


Wednesday | September 16, 2015|3

News

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TACOS

continued from page 1 tle for tacos and has heard good things about Fuzzy’s. The love for tacos can even be found among many international students on campus as well, said Thang Le, senior graduate finance major. “I eat tacos about once a week,” he said. “I love tacos. My taco enthusiasm can be measured at about 80 percent.” There seem to be more places serving authentic Mexican food and more and more taco-serving food trucks popping up in the area serving tacos, said Molly Woodruff, a senior history major and Fort Worth native. “The results from the survey do not surprise me at all,” she said. “The food trucks and chain restaurants like Fuzzy’s and Torchy’s seem to be the places for tacos. Both of which are very good.” Woodruff eats tacos probably two or three

times every two weeks, she said. “I tend to eat them in spurts,” she said. She added that Salsa Limon is one of her favorite taco spots. “I highly recommend Salsa Limon and Tina Cocina, off Magnolia Street,” she said. “I used to love Taco Bell but stopped going when I started eating healthier. Plus fresh ingredients make all the difference.” There are so many wonderful Mexican food restaurants with great tacos in Fort Worth, said Texas native Dr. Pamela Rast, professor of exercise & sports studies. “I recommend going to Taco Tuesdays at Rosa’s Café,” she said. “I also enjoy Torchy’s and Fuzzy’s.” Rast can easily eat tacos two or three times a week, she said. “I’ll eat anything in a tortilla,” she said.

Graphic by Brianna Kessler Here are the top 10 cities with the most taco love, according to the blog estately.com.

STOREFRONTS continued from page 1

Photo by Jessica Liptak The storefronts need to be black box ready.

food,” she said. There have been several inquiries about the spaces from mom-and-pop vendors to wellknown big name vendors, Veilleux said. But first the school needs to identify funding to get the spaces black box ready, which means

they need to access the structural identity of the spaces outside, he said. “All plans for the property are currently taking shape,” Veilleux said. “We want to be able to control and enhance the campus experience. We are very concerned about the long term success of the businesses so we need to make sure we get the right business for this part of town.” Wesleyan purchased the storefronts and several other units on the west and east side of Wesleyan Street last August to benefit the facility enhancement goals outlined in the 2020 Vision, said Brian K. Franks, executive director of facilities. The acquisition of this property was recommended in the University’s Master Strategic Plan, he said. The university has updated several of the units such as the bookstore, Subway, the Coun-

seling Graduate Programs faculty offices and the Counseling Programs Clinic, Franks said. The newly renovated space allows the Counseling Programs Clinic, which moved into 6,000 square feet of the newly renovated spaces this summer, to expand into Family Therapy, he said. Also, Wesleyan is planning to start renovating the 1,975 square-foot space located at 3114 Wesleyan Street for the Business Accelerator, Franks said. The faculty and students from the School of Business will staff the Business Accelerator, which will assist with the startup and acceleration of small businesses in the community, Franks wrote in an email. Alongside this project, Wesleyan is also working on the renovation of multiple vacant spaces on the 3000 block of Wesleyan Street, where the three storefronts are located, Franks

said. “There has been some activity here,” he said. “We anticipate the interest in this area to increase now that improvements to Rosedale Street are coming to a close.” The spaces are currently being offered through a triple net lease, not an outright sale, Franks said. It is unknown what the storefronts will be or when they will open. The storefronts will only open upon the completion of the finish and lease agreement of the future tenants, Franks said. In addition, Wesleyan would also like to explore adding additional parking to this portion of the campus, he said. “I am a strong supporter of the gains this university is making in the revitalization of this part of Fort Worth,” Franks said. “It truly is a wonderful time to be at Texas Wesleyan.”

ple know they are still out there. “We are using the same system, but using it more regularly,” Trotter said. The Service Desk is also working on a mobile component that will raise awarness that it is more than just an IT Desk, she said. “One of our key strengths is our student workers and their involvement with other stu-

dents,” Trotter said. “We have a diverse department to service our diverse community.” Trotter also said that this change has not necessarily made her job easier, but it is better for the university. “The Facilities adoption of the Service Desk tool has truly been a game changer for the department,” Michael J. Poole, director of Facili-

ties, wrote in an e-mail. “We are now able to track and prioritize our work orders and ensure we complete them in a timely manner.” Poole said that the partnership with the Service Desk has also helped out Facilities by handling the first call and guaranteeing that campus emergencies are pushed straight through to the department.

SERVICE DESK

continued from page 1

Desk director, said everyone is using the new system. Students are the biggest users, she said, then faculty and staff. “There is not so much a transition, but more of a rebranding,” Trotter said, “to say we will try and help with anything.” Trotter said that the Service Desk is still doing business as usual, but they want to let peo-

Join us at TheSUB!

Onyesonam Nolisa finishes a practice session with optimism for the season. Photo by Paula Justice

Located in the Brown-Lupton Campus Center. TheSUB offers fresh and fantastic options from grab-and-go snacks to Coca-Cola and Pepsi products! Breakfast Sandwiches and options offered from 7 am – 10 am Monday through Friday Freshly Grilled Burgers, Philly Steaks, Chicken Sandwiches, and Fries!! We also feature authentic custom made Street Tacos with your choice of Carne Asada, Chicken, or Carnitas with a variety of toppings and our freshly made Salsas. All of this and more! Stop by and check it out!

HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday - Thursday: 7 am - 7 pm Friday: 7 am -2 pm * Saturday & Sunday: Closed

www.txwes.campusdish.com


4 |Wednesday | Septemeber 16, 2015

Campus

TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

Mental health of college students Signs of depression • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions • Fatigue and decreased energy • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness • Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping • Irritability, restlessness • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable • Overeating or appetite loss • Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment • Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” feelings • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts • Making comments about being hopless, helpless, or worthless • Putting affairs in order, tying up loose ends • Saying things like “It would be better if I wasn’t here”

Warning signs of suicide

Where to get help

• Excessive sadness or moodiness • Hopelessness

The Community Counseling Center

• Sleep problems

Free personal counseling to Wesleyan

• Sudden calmness

students, faculty and staff.

• Withdrawal • Changes in personality and/or appearance • Dangerous or self-harmful behavior

3106 E. Rosedale Ave. 817-531-4859

• Recent trauma or life crisis • Making preparations: This might include visiting friends and family members, giving away personal possessions, making a will, and cleaning up his or her room or home. Some people will write a note before committing suicide. Some will buy a firearm or other means

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 24/7 help for anyone 1 (800) 273-8255

like poison. • Threatening suicide: From 50 percent to 75 percent of those considering suicide will give a friend or relative a warning sign. However, not everyone who is considering suicide will say so, and not everyone who threatens suicide will follow through with it. Every threat of suicide should be taken seriously.

Don't miss the action this weekend! FRIDAY Soccer - Sept. 18th hosts St. Thomas 6&8pm Volleyball - Sept. 18th hosts Southwestern Christian 7pm

SATURDAY Soccer - Sept. 19th hosts University of the Southwest 2&4pm Volleyball - Sept. 19th hosts St. Gregory's 2pm

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org


Wednesday | September 16, 2015

|5

Campus

TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

College depression and stress statistics

One out of every four college stu-

Forty-four percent of

Seventy-five percent of college

dents suffers from some form of

American college students report

students do not seek help for mental

mental

having symptoms of depression

health problems

Sixty-four percent of young adults who

More than 80 percent of college

More than 40 percent of college stu-

are no longer in college are not attend-

students felt overwhelmed the amount

dents have felt more than an average

ing college because of a mental health

of work they had to do in the past year

amount of stress within the past 12

related reason

months

College suicide statistics

Suicide is the third leading cause of

Young people diagnosed with

Four out of every five college

death among college students

depression are five times more likely

students who either contemplated

to attempt suicide than adults

or attempted suicide showed clear warning signs

Information from healthline.com, the National Alliance on Mental Health and WebMD Graphics by Valerie Spears

WILLSON LECTURESHIP EST. 1946

MANDELA & TUTU MONDAY, SEPT. 28 7 P.M., MARTIN HALL DOORS OPEN AT 6:30 P.M.

FEATURING HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS NDABA MANDELA, GRANDSON OF NELSON MANDELA & NAOMI TUTU, DAUGHTER OF ARCHBISHOP DESMOND TUTU SEE THEM TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY, PRESENTING CONTINUING TO STRIVE FOR TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION FOLLOWED BY AN AUDIENCE Q&A SESSION PRESENTED BY TEXAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY

1920

2015


6 |Wednesday | September 16, 2015

Arts&Entertainment

TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

Redford, Nolte impress in Woods

Photos coutesy of Vanity An adaptation of Bill Bryson’s non-fiction book of the same name, the new A Walk in the Woods, directed by Ken Kwapis, stars Robert Redford and Nick Nolte as old friends who reconnect during an eventful walk on the Appalachian Trail. The film also includes performances by Emma Thompson, as Bryson’s wife, and Mary Steenburgen as a hotel owner interested in Bryson.

Ricardo Cortez rbcortez@txwes.edu

A Walk in the Woods is a feel-good film that triumphs where most most film adaptations fail in bringing a book to life on the big screen. Directed by Ken Kwapis, Woods is the story of author Bill Bryson (Robert Redford)

who decides to hike the Appalachian Trail from Georgia to Maine with one of his oldest friends, Stephen Katz (Nick Nolte). The movie shows every triumph and failure of their journey. It is a clever tale of old age and chasing that ever-so-elusive feeling of youth. The film is adapted from Bryson’s book of the same name. Redford and Nolte fit together perfectly. Both actors portray their roles to the fullest, pushing on the “opposites attract” stereotype. The movie has both characters moving through some hilarious predicaments. From

escaping a big-mouthed hiker to running from an angry husband, Woods is full of clean adult comedy that has you laughing almost the entire movie. Redford does an excellent job of portraying a man struggling to find himself. As he moves through the trail, his state of mind shifts from wanting to achieve his last hurrah to understanding that time stops for no one and one can only accept it. And along the way Bryson finds what he has been truly looking for: himself. Nolte also gives a shining performance as

Stephen Katz. He gives the role innocence, portraying Katz as a man who means well but often finds distractions that ultimately lead the duo into some of their harshest moments. Woods (104 minutes, rated R) does excellent of blending coming-of-age comedy with a modern twist, replacing teenagers with a couple of deviant seniors. While the film maybe not be Oscar-worthy, it is a splendid treat at a time of the year when there aren’t usually many good movies released.

Metamorphoses revives Ovid’s myths Samantha Rodriguez srodriguez3@txwes.edu

To kick off the 2015-2016 season, Theatre Wesleyan will be producing Metamorphoses. Directed by Theatre Department Chair Bryan Stevenson, Metamorphoses is an adaptation of Ovid’s myths, according to a department press release. It’s also staged in a three-foot-deep swimming pool. “This is one of the hardest things we’ve ever had to build,” junior theater major Eric Nunez said. Stage manager Tyler Guse said the PG-rated show brings back a little “throwback Thursday Greek” feeling to this season’s roster. “It brings a contemporary Greek twist so younger audiences and college students can understand more in depth about the show,” Guse said. The cast includes seniors Cameron Byerly and Crystal Salazar; junior Giselle Saucedo; sophomores Michelle Phillips, Clarissa Murillo, and Logan Rodgers; and freshmen Katie Collard, Gabe Crowley, Kevin Dawson, and Tobin Griffin. Mary Zimmerman wrote and directed an

early version of the play, Six Myths, in 1996 at Northwestern University, where she teaches, according to a 2013 article in The Washington Post. In 1998 it was produced at the Lookingglass Theatre in Chicago, and in 2002 it went to Broadway. “Everything that was written in the original play is what’s being produced,” Guse said. Metamorphoses was nominated for several Tony Awards in 2002, including Best Play and Best Scenic Design for a play or musical. Zimmerman won the 2002 Tony for Best Direction (Play), according to tonyawards.com. Guse said that the show is very contemporary and imaginative. “The show is really tech heavy so I’m excited to see how the technical side of things brings the show to life,” he said. “The lights and pool are going to be really cool.” Metamorphoses runs Sept. 24-26 and Oct. 1-3 at 7:30 p.m. There is also a 2 p.m. matinee on Oct. 4. Tickets are $5 for students with ID, faculty, staff and senior citizens. General admission tickets are $10. Tickets can be reserved by call (817) 531-4211. All performances are at the Thad Smotherman Theatre, which is on the campus at the corner of Avenue E and Binkley Street.

Etiquette Dinner 6 course meal will be served Limited number of spots so hurry!

Tuesday, September 29, 2015 Organized by Career Services RSVP to Career Services at 817-531-6512 or careerservices@txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan Religious Life

Common Meal

Free lunch & Discussion Every Tuesday at 12:15 PUMC Room 312

Wind

Ensemble Directed By:

Christine Beeson

University Chapel

Free lunch and live worship Every Thursday at 12:15 PUMC Room 117 Polytechnic United Methodist Church

1310 S Collard St Fort Worth, TX

Thursday October 15th

at 7:30 in Martin Hall

Art courtesy of Theatre Wesleyan


Wednesday | September 16, 2015

|7

Sports

TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

Coaches look for more than just talent

Illustration by Jessica Liptak

Jared Rabye jdrabye@txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan head baseball coach Mike Jeffcoat says that when he recruits players, he’s looking for gamers. “I look for guys that are going to find a way to win,” Jeffcoat said. “We try to find the best hitters and place them into positions we feel that suits them, and as for our pitchers we don’t necessarily look for speed, we look for location.” Jeffcoat is one of four coaches interviewed about recruiting and what he looks for in athletes. He, head track and cross country coach Natnael Amare, women’s golf coach Kevin Millikan, and head softball coach Shannon Gower all agree that hard work and dedica-

tion, along with being coachable, are traits all college athletes should have. There are no set guidelines for what coaches should value when they are recruiting. According to an article on Recruiting-101.com, there are five attributes that coaches look for: ability, character, work ethic, size, and grades, in that order. On the other hand, a 2013 article on varsityedge.com says the top attributes are, “1) – Good athletes, 2) – Good athletes at their particular sport, 3) – Good academic students, 4) – Interested in their college, and last but not least, 5) – A good person.” “Skill level, academic qualifications, and in general just a good college student with a great personality is what I look for most,” Millikan said. In contrast, Gower said she looks for “play-

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ers that will come in and make an impact, that show attitude and work ethic.” Gower said she also recruits or tries to recruit players who display personality, chemistry with other teammates, and composure. Similarly, Amare said he looks for athletes who show dedication, determination and desire. “I love giving athletes that have the three Ds the opportunity to be successful and to push themselves, if they want to,” Amare said. Wesleyan athletes have a variety of reasons why they decided to play sports here. Several of them, including senior cross country runner Becky Lavarn and junior softball player Shelby Reddington, like the small school atmosphere. “I wasn’t ready for a big school so Wesleyan fit the bill for me,” Lavarn said.

Sophomore women’s golfer Alex Schies, from Mansfield, said she was actively recruited by Millikan, and liked the fact that she didn’t have to go far from home to play collegiate golf. Also, Schies loves that Wesleyan plays in tournaments in different parts of the country. “We get to go to cool places like Georgia and Florida as well as Puerto Rico, and it expands our skills because we aren’t just playing the same courses all the time,” Schies said. Senior baseball player Jake Davis, who grew up in Weatherford, also wanted to stay close to home. He also likes how small Wesleyan is so he can interact with his professors. “I’ve never experienced not knowing my teachers well, like high school it’s nice to be able to talk face to face to my professors so I can know what to improve on,” he said.


8 | Wednesday | September 16, 2015 TheRambler.org | For news throughout the day.

Belton swinging for LPGA in 2016 Ricardo Cortez rbcortez@txwes.edu

Alexis Belton is taking the journey so many athletes dream of: going pro. Belton has played for the Lady Rams golf team and now, with help of her former coach Kevin Millikan, as well as friends and family, she is attempting to continue her golf career. “This is something I’ve always desired to do, but this summer has been a turnaround to me knowing I can do it,” Belton said. “I think those are two different things to know about yourself: Is this something that I just want or is it something that you really think you can do?” Belton, who is graduating in December, played three seasons for Wesleyan and is now an assistant coach. In those three seasons, she broke eight school records, including a career scoring average (80.28), according to ramsports.net. “I think it just comes down to work ethic and believing that you can do it,” Belton said. “Of course a little talent helps, but hard work beats talent every day.” Belton, 22, said she has to thank her parents, Alana and John Belton, as well as Millikan and her former high school coach at West Monroe High School in Monroe, La., Tony Osborne, for believing in her and continuously pushing her to do better. “Just playing here at Texas Wesleyan and in Texas sets you up for every situation,” she said. “Coach Millikan is an awesome coach so his guidance has help definitely paved the way for me to believe that I can do this.” Belton’s chances of becoming a professional golfer are slim. Less than two percent of college athletes make it to the pros, according to NCAA.org. Millikan wrote in an email that he’s seen great players never make it beyond college athletics due to low work ethic or poor financial resources. “There are just so many great players, so it is very difficult to make it to the major tours with the PGA or LPGA,” Millikan wrote. Belton said she understands how hard it is to go pro, and because of this, she has always had a backup plan. “Golf is a great sport to be in contact with people as far as jobs go,” Belton said. “So hopefully I’ll have a job on the Golf Channel. Photo by C.J. Prater Whether golf does work out and I hang up Senior Alexis Belton practices her swing. Belton, an assistant coach, is looking to become part of my shoes later or it doesn’t, I still want to end the less than 2 percent of college athletes to play professionally. up there.”

Belton said that her success in college all leads back to Millikan for giving her the shot to walk onto a team that was already full. “I’m surprised they even had enough uniforms for me,” she said. “He has really helped me grow in the game and really helped paved the way for me.” Millikan said going pro was certainly part of the plan for Belton. “You never know if the plan will work out and you really become what you think you can be,” he said. “I’m really excited about what we’ve done and what we still have yet to accomplish. “But it doesn’t surprise me, I know we’ve had quality players and they’ve worked hard both on the classroom and on the court. This just proves their hard work is paying off.” Millikan said he believes Belton has a chance to go pro due to certain attributes he calls “unteachable.” “She hits the ball a mile away, she has a great work ethic,” he said. “Those are things that are just innate. “The fact that she got those things going for her makes me think she can accomplish this goal.” Belton’s former teammate, Alex Schies, said Belton has been a good friend for several years. “I met Alexis when I first came to visit the team and since then we have become very close,” Schies said. “She’s done nothing but help me with my game and I try to help with hers.” Schies said she thinks Belton has a good shot at going pro due to the performances she has seen from her. “I know she can do it. I caddied for her in one tournament and she played very well and I know she has a chance,” she said. “It’s like coach said, she can hit the ball a lot further than most people can and that can really give you an advantage on some holes. “She’s really good at thinking things out before it happens and you need that.” Belton is currently practicing both with the team and on her own and has entered several amateur tournaments. She will start her professional career in January 2016. “To be the number one player in the world is definitely the dream,” she said. “It’s a far goal and it takes a lot of work to do that, but anyone can do it, look at (Jordan) Spieth holding on (to the No. 1 ranking) for a week or two and then Rory (McIlroy) getting it.”

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