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WEDNESDAY March 30, 2011

Vol. 93 • No. 9

www.therambler.org

Dr. John Fisher performs at Celebrating World of Piano.

The Rambler

Arts & Entertainment, page 5

The voice of Texas Wesleyan University students since 1917

War veterans offered post-war relaxation at retreat. Community, page 6

SGA revokes organization approval Shauna Banks

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Alpha Tau Kappa, one of three prospective organizations approved at the Feb. 16 Student Government Association meeting, had its approval officially revoked March 23. Heath Scott, president of SGA,

Runnin Rams join race for breast cancer

said in a formal letter to Ashlie Sivley, president of ATK, that due to significant credibility issues with ATK’s list of interested students originally submitted for approval, the SGA has formally withdrawn its recognition of ATK as a student organization. Scott said immediately follow-

ing ATK’s approval in February, about 15 concerned individuals approached him. “Everyone was highly upset because they were concerned with how these young ladies sometimes conducted themselves,” Scott said. “Their grades were also a concern.” Scott said two women originally

on the interest list for ATK when they submitted their application for approval in January, approached him, saying that they did not know they were on the list. “These two girls came to me, and I told them, ‘look, you have to put something in writing,’ because I can’t just take your word,’” Scott said.

Rams slide into series win

Scott said the women both brought back handwritten statements saying they did not know they had been on the list. Both women did not want to be interviewed for this article at the time of press.

  REVOKED, page 3

Library takes trial run with extended hours

Rachel Peel

Melissa Bates

The Runnin Rams are lacing up their running shoes once again. The Runnin Rams team will represent the Texas Wesleyan community by participating in the Greater Fort Worth 2011 Race for the Cure on April 9 at Ridgmar Mall. “I knew I wanted to do it, and this time last year no one really had talked about forming a team,” Sarah Smith, admissions counselor, said. “I had been a team captain for another race, The Jingle Bell Run, so I said, ‘I can do it, I can make a team online.’ ” Smith decided to participate in the Race for the Cure about three years ago when she lived in Amarillo, just because she wanted to participate in 5Ks. Smith said the Race for the Cure just came along at the right time and when she moved here, she decided to participate in the Fort Worth run. “Last year, was pretty simple as far as making the team and anyone who wanted to sign up could just sign up—we didn’t do a lot of advertising,” Smith said. Smith said this year the Susan G. Komen foundation really reached out to team captains from last year as early as January, asking if they were going to be team captains again this year. Then they offered to help with advertising. “Race for the Cure is unlike any other race that I have ever done, there is such a feeling of comradery amongst everyone that is there,” Smith said. “You go there and it’s just a sea of pink.” Smith said the team members can wear pink hats or bows, but the etiquette is that only survivors can wear pink shirts. “Those survivors out there, doing the race is just such a cool thing,” Smith said. Smith said right now there are seven team members but she is still looking for participants. Elizabeth Henson, assistant librarian, is one of the seven team members and said she usually does the Komen with her mom’s workplace, but joined the Runnin Rams this

With projects, research papers and tests piling up, students now have an extra two hours of library time to get it all done. For four weeks, from April 18 to May 12, the Eunice and James L. West Library is running a trial for late-night hours, extending closing time to midnight. Since fall 2008, the West Library has extended their late night hours to midnight for the week of final exams. Sheri Parker, coordinator of library operations, said every year the library receives requests from students for extended hours. Parker said the library staff is happy to stay open for students but the numbers of students present at those hours aren’t enough to warrant the expense all year. “We’re going to try it for three weeks and see how the numbers go and see whether we should try to do it longer,” Parker said. “After finals, we’ll review and decide if we want to stay open longer.” Parker said she could not guess the number of students administration would require for approval to make midnight hours permanent. Safety regulations require two staff members and one student worker to work during midnight hours. During these late hours, students will have the same access to the library and all its resources as during daylight hours.

rlpeel@mail.txwes.edu

  RUNNIN, page 7

mdbates@mail.txwes.edu

  MORE TIME, page 7

West Library extended hours

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Marissa Rangel, junior outfielder, slides home safe, past Bacone College’s catcher Jessica Harper, to put the Lady Rams up 5-0 in game one of their Lady Warrior series. The Lady Rams won game one of the series 9-3, game two 8-0 and suffered a 5-3 loss in game three, finishing the series with a 2-1 Red River Athletic Conference win at Sycamore Park March 25-26. Their next game is against Langston University April 3-4.

April 18-20 – 7:30 a.m. - midnight April 21-24 - closed for Easter April 25-28 – 7:30 a.m. - midnight April 29 – 7:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. April 30 – 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. May 1 – 1 p.m. - midnight May 2-6 – 7:30 a.m. - midnight May 7 – 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. May 8 – noon - midnight May 9-10 – 7:30 a.m. - midnight May 11 – 7:30 - 10 p.m. May 12-13 – 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. May 14 – start summer hours

Graduation ceremony split evokes mixed feelings Stephanie Mejia

smejia@mail.txwes.edu

As the spring semester draws to an end, Wesleyan seniors prepare for graduation. On May 13, students graduating will make the traditional walk across the stage to celebrate the completion of their academic careers, with some changes implemented this semester. Graduation will now take place in the Fort Worth Convention Center and the ceremony will be split by school.

Dr. Allen Henderson, provost and senior vice president, said issues with the Will Rogers venue were key factors in the decision to find a new location for graduation. “Will Rogers discontinued their guarantee not to bump us to Saturday or another date even though we had reserved the facility,” Henderson said. Henderson said students’ demands for more tickets and parking problems in the past few years were considered in the decision. “The spring 2011 graduating class is the largest one we have had in re-

cent years and maybe ever,” Henderson said. “We would prefer not to split graduation into two ceremonies, but the Convention Center is not big enough to hold all school graduates and guests at one time.” These changes have created mixed feelings amongst some graduating seniors. Ashly Spencer, senior education major, said she believes students should have been asked whether they agreed with these changes. “I don’t like that half my professors won’t see me graduate after five years

of hard work,” Spencer said. “I hate that I need a ticket to see my friends graduate and vice versa.” Spencer said the splitting of ceremonies takes away from the experience and meaning of graduation. Rose Boots, senior marketing major, agrees that the separation of the class ruins the graduation experience. “I feel that I won’t graduate with a bonding experience,” Boots said. Tara Cates, senior psychology major said that there are some positive aspects to the split in ceremonies. “What a lot of students probably

don’t realize is that this 2011 Graduating class is the largest one Wesleyan has had in recent years ,” Cates said. “As much as I’m looking forward to graduating and basking in my success, I don’t want to wait four hours for that to happen.” The school of arts and letters and natural and social sciences will have its graduation ceremony at 4:30 p.m. The graduation ceremony for the schools of education and business and all graduate students will follow at 8 p.m. “Regardless of the time we graduate, we are all still Rams,” Cates said.


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Opinion

March 30, 2010

Career fair leaves students hanging Angie Ruiz Photographer

ayruiz@mail.txwes.edu

With graduation approaching, job searching has become stressful. Career Services’ Career Fair was set up just in time to relieve some of that stress. Unfortunately it was a lot less beneficial to me and my career goals than I thought it would be. Career Services did their best, and called on all agencies willing to participate. This event’s organizers drowned me with email invitations and reminders, but the fair itself failed to meet my expectations. There was a lack of big name corporations and most of the businesses that were involved were outside of my career path. The traffic was light coming in and out of the Sid Richardson building, and a lot of the people walking through were not Wesleyan students. I think it’s great that others were able to take advantage of the oppor-

tunity, but I expected more Wesleyan students to be involved. These opportunities are created for us to participate in so we can make professional connections. I was disappointed in the lack of student involvement. After dressing up, perfecting a resume and showing up to the career fair, I have to say I was disappointed in the fact that none of the businesses I was interested in were taking resumes. I’m confused. What is the point of a career fair if I’m just going to be referred back to company websites? Yes, I walked out with a bag full of business cards and pamphlets, but for the little information I received I could have easily saved myself the two hours of walking around trying to find something within my interest. It didn’t seem like the companies were recruiting as much as they were marketing. They just wanted to pass out their stuff and keep the line moving. I didn’t receive a single handshake from any of the companies, and it seems that they weren’t too interested in convincing me that they wanted me

to be interested in them. There appeared to be a lack of interest from students as well as from the businesses present that day. The event reeled in only 200 students; surely more than 200 students graduating in May are looking for jobs. There were multiple tables for certain professions. Three tables were set up for police departments; even from as far away as Austin. We live in Fort Worth. I understand we have a pretty large criminal justice program, but is there such a high demand to be an officer? There were many careers that were not represented at all, such as technology, education and medical. Since most companies just referred students to their websites, the whole concept of the career fair seemed depersonalized. That is what we’ve been doing on our own already. I do not think Career Services is at fault for my lack of a positive experience. I feel the whole experience would have been much better if there was more participation present from the students, as well as from the participating companies.

Fake degrees no substitute for hard work me, and I couldn’t believe it was real. Melissa Bates I went back to Campus editor the site and read mdbates@mail.txwes.edu the introduction. After reading the information, examining A few weeks ago, I was everything on the site and perusing my Facebook feed viewing examples, I nearly reading the multitude of ar- broke down in tears. ticles from the 60 plus news This website, which is stations and newspapers I self-proclaimed as the web’s like when I saw a post about leading diploma company, a website called Phonydi- provides fake high school ploma.com. and college diplomas, fake My first reaction to this transcripts, fake certifiwebsite selling fake high cates and even fake report school and college diplo- cards. mas was to repost it with a The reason this upset me joke about how I’ve wasted so much is because I have the past three years of my worked very hard and very life working toward a de- long to get to where I am. gree. To be honest, I really I was shocked to think thought this website was a someone could pass off one joke. of these fake diplomas or A few weeks later, the im- certificates as equal to my pact of a site like this hit real high school and college

diplomas or the real certificates I’ve received. The website touts many reasons for purchasing a counterfeit degree, such as boosting self-esteem, replacing lost originals, building a social media profile and impressing friends at reunions. I’m not much of a show off and I don’t know anyone who would bring his college diploma or certificate of achievement to a reunion. I’ve got enough self esteem boosters in my life; I don’t need some forgery to provide the lift. If I wanted to add a diploma or certificate to my social media profile, I would do what is required to achieve that diploma or certificate. I consider purchasing such a document unethical, to say the least.

Library schedule must expand to serve needs of all students to get things done. It’s just a Erika Ferrell habit I haven’t Staff writer been able to erferrell@mail.txwes.edu shake. Not having access to the library after Pulling an all-nighter study- 10 p.m. really puts a wrench ing for an exam or final? in the works. Maybe you’re even writing The library’s hours don’t a big research paper that is only affect me, they affect a worth close to half of your lot of college students’ acafinal grade. demic successes. Well wouldn’t the library Some students don’t have be the perfect place to do their own computers. If a that? There is only one little student doesn’t have one problem — the Library clos- or access to someone else’s, es before midnight. how are they going to finish The Eunice & James L. a paper or assignment? West Library opens at 7:30 I am a college athlete. a.m. and closes at 10 p.m. Having games, both in and As a college student, I out of town, and practices know procrastination is one that end late, make it difof my biggest problems. I will ficult to get a good meal wait until the last minute in; forget trying to cram in Page 1

rushing to the library to finish up a paper before it closes at 10 p.m. Knowing that I only have a little time before I am forced out of the library is a real problem for me. Even if I get there with an hour to spare, I am looking at the clock like a countdown to lift off. It’s distracting and hard to concentrate on the task at hand — whatever assignment I have due tomorrow. Although some may not consider the library closing so early a big deal, I think it would really help those who don’t have access to personal computers or who just don’t have traditional hours available for study and homework. It would be an advantage for the students if the library’s hours were extended.

Library staff have heard the students’ voice their concerns and are trying a trial run of extended library hours. See more in the story on Page 1.

The Rambler

Shauna Banks, editor-in-chief Barry Grubbs, opinion editor Eliana Mijangos, sports editor Meisa Keivani Najafabadi, photo editor Stephanie Mejia arts & entertainment editor Jonathan Resendez, multimedia editor Rachel Peel, community editor Melissa Bates, campus editor Erica Estrada, graphic designer/cartoonist Wendy Moore, faculty adviser Dr. Kay Colley, faculty liaison

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During my research on this topic, I discovered this website is not the only one. On this particular phony diploma website, there is a list of more than 50 other websites of the same type. I am sure there are hundreds more out there. I’ve been at Wesleyan since fall 2009 and I graduated from Tarrant County College with my associates in spring 2010. I’ve worked very hard, now to find out there are some people who don’t want to go through the same amount of work but they want the prize. It angers me to no end. I am sure every student graduating in May will agree with me. There is no way a document from a diploma mill such as this one can be as significant as mine.

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Staff Editorial

Students should take advantage of campus services Students often complain about the high cost and rising rates for tuition, books and fees. But when it is all said and done, they may not be getting the most for their money because they ignore some of the vital programs and services that fees help to pay for. Career Services may be the most important and most overlooked resource students have. As we approach spring graduation, some students may have become more aware of Wesleyan’s Career Services department than at any time in their college experiences. Sadly, some students will graduate unprepared for the next step. If you are a senior and you aren’t thinking about the looming job search and your career after college, you might be playing catch-up. Career Services, located in the north wing of the Brown-Lupton Student Center, has a small staff and a big job, but the likely reason they don’t make more of a difference in the lives of our students is the fact that some just do not know they exist. Obviously they are introduced to all freshmen and transfer students and they are making an effort to advertise their services, but the average student may not realize the important ways they can benefit until they are ordering their graduation invitations. By then they have wasted some valuable time that

should have been spent preparing for their careers. Career fairs, interviewing techniques, resume assistance and help with on and off-campus employment are just a few of the resources offered to Wesleyan students and the best part is, they have already been paid for—by students. In spite of that fact, we are not taking full advantage of these services. According to the center’s director, Sherri Mata, statistical reports show that only about 200 students attended the last career fair. That is a very small number considering the record size of the spring graduating class.  The staff is much smaller than that of the Texas Wesleyan School of Law and serves many more students, but they make an effort to assist all students willing to seek them out. Those students who take advantage of the resume counseling, internship programs and job search assistance offered by Career Services are more likely to have success after graduation. It may be too late for some seniors to realize the full value of their tuition dollars. Some of the services offered are likely as valuable as the work done in the classroom during our time in college. Those students not graduating in May still have time to prepare themselves if they are willing to take advantage of something valuable right under their noses.

Where would you want to go to study abroad and why? “I would choose Italy, because I like the food and I think the language is pretty fascinating.” -Amber Smith, freshman, undecided “I would study abroad in Austrailia, but they have really big bugs though so that would not be good.” - Catherine Bryant, senior, education “I’ve been to Spain before and it’s a nice country with a lot of history.” - Jonathan Blake, senior, graphic design “I’d either go to England or anywhere in Europe. Italy would be awesome.” - Rachel Daniel, senior, kinesiology “I’d like to go to Italy because it is a beautiful country and has a lot of history.” - Victoria Browning, freshman, English “I would like to study abroad in Austrailia because it would be amazing, and I think the accent is awesome.” - Zuhair Inayat, junior, exercise science

Member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press, Student Press Law Center, College Media Advisers and College Newspaper Business and Advertising Managers. Opinions expressed in The Rambler are those of the individual authors only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Texas Wesleyan community as a whole.

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Please send all news briefs to twurambler@yahoo.com. Submissions due by noon Friday to see brief in the following week’s issue. Letters to the editor: The Rambler, a weekly publication, welcomes all letters. All submissions must have a full printed name, phone number and signature. While every consider-

ation is made to publish letters, publication is limited by time and space. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions for space, grammar, clarity and style. Letters to the editor may be subject to response from editors and students on the opinion page.


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News

March 30, 2010

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Lincoln makes stop at West Library

Melissa Bates

mdbates@mail.txwes.edu

From April 13 to May 8, the West Library is showcasing the Abraham Lincoln: A Man of His Time, A Man of All Times exhibit from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History. The exhibit was offered to Texas Wesleyan last summer because Dr. Elizabeth Alexander, associate professor of history, was a participant in a seminar at Yale University sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute. Wesleyan will be the only Texas showing the exhibit will make. “I’m thrilled, of course, as a historian,” Alexander said.

“Abraham Lincoln was president during probably the most difficult time this country has experienced. This exhibition, I think, will give people an understanding of how difficult that time period was.” Alexander said the month of April was chosen as the exhibit period because the Civil War started April 14, 1861 and Lincoln was assassinated April 14, 1865. “April is a big month as far as Lincoln history is concerned,” Alexander said. The exhibit contains several large panels featuring pictures and text information about Lincoln. “The exhibit is large panels set up in kind of a zigzag type of thing

and I think they are about 72 feet in length,” Alexander said. Alexander said she hopes the Wesleyan community comes to the exhibit. “I hope they will take the time to read through the panels and look at the exhibit very carefully and think about how fortunate we are,” Alexander said. The exhibit will be on the second floor of the library. The Gilder Lehrman Institute is paying all expenses of the exhibit. Shelley Almgren, periodical and systems librarian, is in the process of becoming familiar with the exhibit. “My understanding, though I’m not positive about it, is that it’s a national exhibit so not a lot of libraries have

Mark the date ...

March 31 - Senior voice recital for Katreeva Phillips @ 7:30 p.m. in Martin Hall April 1 - President’s Honors Concert @ 7:30 p.m. in Martin Hall April 5 - Study Abroad Fair @ 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. in BLC lobby April 4 & 5 - University College Day on entire campus @ 5-6:45 p.m. (4th)/ 9 a.m.-8 p.m. (5th) April 7 - Ram Jam @ 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. in the Mall (outside library) April 10 - Greater Fort Worth Community Band Concert @ 3 p.m. in Martin Hall April 14 - 57th Annual Musical @ 7:30 p.m. in Law Sone Fine Arts Building April 26 - Awards Day @ 12:15 p.m. in Martin Hall

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been able to display it,” Almgren said. Almgren said her responsibility has been to clear the area on the second floor to ensure enough space for the exhibit is available. “It’s kind of nice to have something here for a change that’s from a national exhibit,” Almgren said. Almgren said a film accompanies the exhibit which will include a seating area. Louis Sherwood, university archivist, said he is looking forward to seeing the exhibit and he hopes the students learn from it. “I think it will be an opportunity for students to learn something about him and gain more of an appreciation of his contributions to American

REVOKED

history,” Sherwood said. Sherwood said he thinks this exhibit may lead to a student becoming more interested in Lincoln’s legacy and history, in general. “Maybe it will inspire them to learn more about American history,” Sherwood said. “History can be an interesting and exciting thing.” Wesleyan is one of 33 locations in the nation and the only location in Texas to feature this exhibit. “I think it’s a great thing for the school, I really do,” Sherwood said. “I think that we got on the calendar to host it is really quite a wonderful thing. It will certainly be an opportunity for anyone in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, who’s interested, to come and see it.”

continued from page 1

Scott said since rules for becoming an organization include that a group must have at least six individuals interested to apply for recognition, these two being removed from the list reduced the list to five—putting the group under the minimum limit. Scott said other problems were also noted with parts of the application packet submitted. There were discrepancies in the constitution and some women on the interested members list not meeting the 2.5 GPA requirement set forth by the prospective organization’s constitution and bylaws. Sivley said since this was just an interested members list, and not the final members list, that all the girls did not have to meet the GPA requirement. Sivley said she believes ATK’s approval being revoked is completely personal. Scott said the decision to withdraw ATK’s organization approval was not personal, but simply procedural. Michael Chaney, coordinator of student activities, volunteerism and organization, sent

Sivley a formal letter March 9. The letter said that she had until March 31 to bring forth evidence dismissing the inaccuracies posed by the two women coming forward. “We talked to Michael Chaney, and he said that they have to come forward and say that ‘yes I did know my name was on that list’ and if that happens, then you guys are good ,and it gets fixed as long as it’s done by the 31st,” Sivley said. Sivley said one of the two came forward again to Chaney and said she knew her name was on the list. Chaney then ripped up the original statement submitted. The letter sent to Sivley from Scott on March 23 stated that all previous interactions concerning this matter from any office should be considered voided, meaning the letter from Chaney was no longer valid. “I’m going to fight the fact that I signed basically a contract saying I had until the 31st and then they took it away, because they can’t do that,” Sivley said. Amanda Moten, junior history

major, is a student currently interested in being a part of ATK, but was not on the original list when the application was submitted in January. “Any of the student group meetings that I’ve gone to—at every single one of them, someone has said that Greek Life needs to improve and that students need more options.” Moten said. “Here they are trying to do that and everyone is kind of pushing them away.” Scott said the group can reapply as early as next semester. With SGA elections coming up, the agenda has been filled until the end of the semester. “We initially were trying to get these girls through, because we wanted to really see them,” Scott said. “I think Greek Life needs to be large. There should be a lot of selections for anyone looking to pledge.” Scott said this is the first time in his 2-year presidency that an organization’s approval has been withdrawn. Sivley said she will continue to go up the chain of command until she findssomeone that can help her fight this decision handed down by SGA.

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Arts & Entertainment Theater opens doors to college students 4

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The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 30, 2010

Daniel McGary

dmcgary@mail.txwes.edu

New theatrical productions of modern classics, belly dancers, Shakespeare in Spanish and postmodern art exhibits—there’s something for everyone at the Rose Marine Theater, and at a low cost. This relatively unknown theater in Fort Worth’s north side offers discounted tickets for college students with a school issued ID card, in addition to presenting many free events. Wesleyan students on a limited budget can experience various aspects of culture while being entertained. The historic theater, traditionally a major venue for aspiring Latino artists and actors, presents most of its performances in English with Spanish captioning. Jeanne Everton, associate professor of theatre, said students can learn a lot from a visit to the historic venue.

“It really is a great place to go to experience good theater, as well as art exhibits,” Everton said. Everton is also looking forward to seeing two Wesleyan students performing at the Rose Marine later this month. Two theatre arts majors will be among the cast of the musical version of Kiss of the Spiderwoman, which will run from March 31 to April 9. “It is our policy that Wesleyan theatre arts majors can audition for parts at off-campus venues such as the Rose Marine Theater,” Everton said. “So, fairly often, students participate in shows there.” Connie Whitt-Lambert, Wesleyan theatre professor, knows firsthand how students can get valuable career experience at the theater. “We’ve had theatre arts majors’ work there as set designers, and even as management interns,” Whitt-Lambert said. Whitt-Lambert has also had

her own work performed at the Rose Marine Theater. In 2005, her play, A Modern Adaptation of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, was staged there. Maria Solano, Rose Marine Theater’s managing director, has seen students from Wesleyan and other local universities benefit professionally from their association with the nonprofit theater. “We have had college students do internships with us,” Solano said. “It’s really a great thing for college students. Doing an internship with a non-profit like our theater has proven to be a very valuable experience for those students.” Opportunities to improve a person’s education are not limited to college students. At risk young people in lowincome neighborhoods can enroll in free art education programs at the Rose Marine Theater as part of an outreach program. The program oper-

ates in conjunction with the Fort Worth ISD. Young people are given classes in subjects such as acting, singing and film-making. The Rose Marine Theater, located at 1440 North Main St., originally opened in the 1920s as Fort Worth’s only Spanish language movie house. Since then, it has lived up to its mission of providing a venue for aspiring Latino artists, comedians and actors. During the 1950s and 60s, actors Cantinflas and Pedro Infante performed there to promote upcoming movies. Today, the Rose Marine Theater is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. While the venue has undergone renovations over the years, one part has remained the same: the old-style neon sign with the large red rose on top. The Rose Marine Theater is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Fort Worth museum takes flight into history Daniel McGary

dmcgary@mail.txwes.edu

Anyone interested in aviation history, World War II history, or flying in general, can experience it firsthand at Fort Worth’s Vintage Flying Museum. The museum, located at Meacham Field Airport, has a collection of more than 20 aircraft from the WWII and Korean War eras. Open seven days a week, the museum offers educational programs for elementary through college aged students. Museum president Charlyn “Chuckie” Hospers said many of the educational programs are

done with the local office of the Federal Aviation Administration, as well as with American Airlines. Hospers and her late husband, Dr. William Hospers, founded the museum in 1990. Hospers said high school and college students can benefit from serving as volunteers. “Anyone can become a member of the Vintage Flying Museum,” Hospers said. “Members volunteer to give tours of historic aircraft, maintain the aircraft in good condition and help coordinate some of our other activities.” Other activities include an annual “Hanger Dance,” which

features big band style music. The museum also shares some of its facilities at Meacham Field with another, similar historic aircraft organization, the Commemorative Air Force. According to CAF member Colonel Charlie Wood, the relationship is expected to continue. “We’re starting up a new Commemorative Air Force branch at Meacham Field,” Wood said. “We already have one of our World War II planes in the Vintage Flying Museum.” Sharing facilities such as aircraft hangers is often a necessity when dealing with museum pieces as big and expensive as vintage airplanes.

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Hospers said it costed more than $1,000 an hour in airplane fuel alone when she and her husband flew their restored B17 bomber, a huge WWII plane built by Boeing. While most of the museum’s aircraft collection are from WWII, planes from the Korean War are also on display. Wood pointed out the difference between WWII and Korean War airplanes. “The interesting thing about Korean War airplanes is that, historically, the Korean War was the first war in which jet aircraft were used,” Wood said. “Jets didn’t really come along until the Korean War.”

Wood said he believes the Vintage Flying Museum provides an opportunity to get an up close, hands-on history lesson that cannot be taught in schools. “People can come here and go inside the historic aircraft, even take rides—learn what it was really like,” Wood said. “That’s especially important when educating young people about what older generations experienced in keeping our country free during those wars.” In addition to learning about aviation history, Tarrant County College Northwest Campus students can earn credit hours by volunteering

their time at the museum. The Northwest campus offers an associate degree in aircraft maintenance. Students earn credit toward their degrees by helping mechanics at the museum repair and restore the vintage war birds. Wesleyan history professor Tim Grammer said the museum also has a lot to offer Wesleyan students who visit it. “It’s a great idea, because it represents history that the students can touch and see; it becomes real to them,” Grammer said. “I think it is very important for students to learn and experience as much about World War II history as they can.”


5 Arts & Entertainment Wesleyan showcases artistic talents The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 30, 2010

Stacia Dunn Neeley | Courtesy Photo

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Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff

Rachel Peel | Rambler Staff

Stacia Dunn Neeley | Courtesy Photo Top Left: Jasmun Askew, a senior pre-med major, entertains people with her miming at Subway during Open Mic Night Wednesday, March 23. Top Right: Dennis Eambovornchai performs Sanucci’s Viva Pancho for the Youth Duo-Piano Competition Saturday, March 26. Above: Stephen Netsch plays the saxophone at Open Mic Night. Middle: Dr. John Fisher, professor and chairman of the music department, with the assistance of Dr. Ilka Araujo, performs at the Celebrating the World of Duo-Piano recital Thursday, March 24. Bottom Left: Rodney Greenwood shares his poetic work at Open Mic Night. Bottom Right: Tien Tang performs Meir’s Carousel Waltz at the Youth Duo- Piano Competition.

Stacia Dunn Neeley | Courtesy Photo

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff

Texas Wesleyan University and

The Department of Music present

West Library Showcase Preview Concert Keith Critcher, piano March 31 at 12:15 - 12 45 p.m. The Eunice & James L. West Library



2 4

Katreeva Phillips, soprano March 31 at 7:30 p.m. Martin Hall

7

3 1 8 9 3 5 4 4 3 6 7 2 9 3 5 6 5 8 1 9 2 6 4

15th Annual President’s Honors Concert Apri1 1 at 7:30 p.m.. Martin Hall

University Chapel: Live music with brief time of worship Tuesdays at 12:15 in PUMC Chapel Free lunch after on PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312

Common Meal:

Free lunch and discussion/dialogue Thursdays at 12:15 in PUMC Chapel PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312 “Faith seeking understanding” – ALL are welcome! For info: http://www.txwes.edu/religiouslife/index.htm

For more information, visit http://www.txwes.edu/music/music/index.htm or call 817-531-4992 © Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

4 9

Senior Recital

Religious Life at Texas Wesleyan

Like to take photos? THE RAMBLER needs photographers. Great opportunity to learn how to use state-of-the art equipment, learn more about photography and meet new people. Call (817) 531-7552 for more information.


Community Veterans seek post-war rehabilitation

6

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The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 30, 2010

Rachel Peel

rlpeel@mail.txwes.edu

Owned by Anne Skipper, an alumna of Texas Wesleyan, Wildcatter Ranch Resort and Spa in Graham, Texas was shut down this past February for a week-long retreat called Project Odyssey. Female veterans traveled from all over the United States to participate in the week-long retreat. “There’s a lot of walking wounded around that we don’t know about, who are still suffering from just being in the war,” Skipper said. Skipper has been working alongside the Wounded Warriors Project for four years now by providing her ranch. According to the website, the Wounded Warriors Project is a non-profit organization that helps to heal veterans’ spirits, and overcome combat stress through outdoor, rehabilitative retreats that encourage a connection with nature, peers, the Odyssey staff and Vet Center counselors. Skipper said she was first approached in 2007 by a United Service Organization representative about opening up Wildcatter to the organization for

Above:Jay Brewer,trail guide at Wildcatter Ranch prepares to lead a group on a horseback riding trail through the ranch. Bottom Left: The entrance to Wildcatter Ranch welcomes visitors as they come off of U.S. Highway 16 just a few miles east of Graham, Texas. Bottom Right: A skull of a longhorn is used to decorate the front fence of one of three cabins that can be used as lodging while visitors stay at the ranch. Wildcatter offers a wide variety of lodging including hotel suites, cabins suites and the O.T. Cabin for larger groups.

retreats. After crunching the numbers, she decided to accept. A representative came down to visit the ranch and explain to Skipper the organization would provide all the funds to fly the veterans to the ranch, but that she would be responsible for finding volunteers and workers to assist on site. Skipper sought assistance at a local high school, asking for volunteers who would be willing to work during the scheduled retreat. She had several honors students volunteer. Skipper said she mentioned the event to a friend, who then decided to get her fourth and fifth-grade students involved as well. “The fourth and fifth graders made placemats and then laminated them for the veterans,” Skipper said. While on the Odyssey retreat, veterans work on team building techniques to help them return to life off the battlefield. “On Monday, we go down to the barn and the head wrangler shows them [the participants] how to gentle a horse, and how you treat a horse is really the way you are supposed to treat the world off of the battlefield,”

Skipper said. Skipper said the veterans are still learning how to trust again, to find out that they are no longer isolated. Activities included: campfire activities, adventure races, skeet shooting, team cattle penning, canoeing, archery and a blindfold maze. “All of this gives them back the feeling of being in the unit, like they were in Afghanistan or Iraq,” Skipper said. “They were functioning as a unit, and when they come home they don’t quite know what to do with themselves.” Jeremy Allen, activities coordinator at Wildcatter Ranch, and a native to Graham said Project Odyssey was great. “It’s fun to see people come together from all over the country who come in distancing themselves, and then they start to warm up to the faculty and staff,” Allen said. Andrew Thurman, front desk clerk at Wildcatter Ranch and fellow veteran, was among the staff members who worked the Odyssey retreat. “It was very hard to control the emotions, because you don’t really know what they are thinking of or what they are feeling,” Thurman said.

Also featuring at the SUB: • Tuesday: Fiesta Tuesday • Thursday: $3 Thursday for faculty only. • Friday: Wings and Fish Friday night: Hot dogs, hot links, and hamburgers. Visit our website: http://www.campusdish.com/en-US/ CSSW/TexasWesleyan/

**All specials include a small fry or salad and a small drink.


campus

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 30, 2010

|

7

Wesleyan Greeks host week-long competition Stephanie Mejia

smejia@mail.txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan’s Greek fraternities and sororities spring to life for their annual Greek Week competition. The week of events begins April 11 and ends with an awards banquet the night of April 16. Greek Week is planned and organized by the United Greek Council. Michael Chaney, coordinator of student activities and volunteerism, helps UGC by making sure ideas are thought out and all necessary equipment is available. “Greek Week is a friendly competition between Wesleyan’s Greeks to determine who has the best team and who works together best,” Chaney said. Each fraternity and sorority is responsible for choosing and hosting an event. Events take place every night and during Tuesday and Thursday free periods. Last year’s competition included a trivia game, tug of war, volleyball, 3-on-3 basketball and a threelegged race. “It’s really about trying to bring the Greeks together and giving them something to rally around,” Chaney said.

Greek Week will count on the participation of nine Greek fraternities and sororities. The fraternities competing against each other are Lambda Kappa Kappa, Lambda Theta Phi, Kappa Alpha Order and Phi Beta Sigma. The competing sororities are Gamma Phi Beta, Alpha Xi Delta, Lambda Theta Alpha, Zeta Phi Beta and Gamma Sigma Sigma, a coed sorority. Melinda Pospichal, junior marketing major and member of Gamma Phi Beta, said she likes the friendly competition that takes place during Greek Week and the camaraderie it develops. “My favorite part about Greek Week is how it strengthens the bonds of sisterhood and brotherhood in each organization,” Pospichal said. Lisa Puente, junior English major and member of AXiD, was part of last year’s Greek Week. “I mostly did the events during free period because I’m a commuter,” Puente said. “I did the tricycle relay and fell, but other than that it was really fun.” Puente also said she believes Greek Week helps bring attention to Greek life and she looks forward to participating again.

“I think the events during free period bring more attention to Greeks because people are walking around campus and they see us in our shirts,” Puente said. Chaney also believes Greek Week

helps spur interest in Wesleyan’s Greek life. “If carried out successfully and the Greeks really get behind it and participate, it absolutely shines good light and helps them potentially re-

cruit new members,” Chaney said. “It shows people that our Greek organizations do fun stuff on campus.” The banquet recognizes Greek Week winners and new UGC officers are presented at the banquet.

Tri-Beta honor society offers research opportunities Emma Fradette

ekfradette@mail.txwes.edu

Beta Beta Beta, the national biological honor society at Texas Wesleyan, is putting students’ ideas and studies to the test. Giving student’s opportunities to meet with professionals and speakers throughout the school year, president of BBB, Tuan Nguyen said students in the organization learn about their science field of choice.

“BBB is dedicated to improving the understanding and appreciation of biological study and extending boundaries of human knowledge through scientific research,” said Diana Gerrard, vice president. According to the university website, BBB was founded in 1922 in Oklahoma City by Dr. Frank G. Brooks. By 1925, the organization had spread and gone national. The honor society is divided into groups and regions, and every year

there is a convention where student’s present research papers they have worked on and awards are granted to those who have shown the best work. According to BBB’s web page, in order to participate in these conventions and be a member of BBB at Wesleyan, a student must be an undergraduate with a major in biological sciences. There are different types of membership offered. The regular mem-

bership is $30 per year and a student must have taken at least three biology classes and maintained a B in them as well. An associates’ membership is available for $20 per year for students who have not completed three biology classes but would still like to join BBB. There is also a membership for $30 per year for faculty and students who have completed graduate school. “Our chapter sold me on becom-

ing a member when they explained what Tri Beta is all about—community service, outreaching to others, spreading the word about biology, getting field experience, and putting on interest shows that demonstrate the importance of biology,” said Sarah Golob, member of BBB. Golob said not only does BBB benefit the community but it also teaches the members how to increase their chances of getting into medical and dental school.

Spanish Language & Culture of Latin America: Costa Rica Overall course dates: July 2 - July 30 Travel Dates: July 9 - July 23 This program will focus on Spanish language and Latin American civilization & culture using Costa Rica as the point of reference. Special emphasis is placed on the history and development of Costa Rica and on specific cultural aspects belonging to Costa Rica. Activities and excursions will include museums, cooking classes, and excursions which highlight experientially what is taught in the class.

Last day to apply: April 1

Courses:

(students must pick one language class and one culture class): • SPN 1341 Elementary Spanish I • SPN 1342 Elementary Spanish II • SPN 2313 Intermediate Spanish I • SPN 2314 Intermediate Spanish II • SPN 3370 Latin-American Civilization and Literature • SPN 3371 Special Topics: Costa Rica: País de Maravillas

Apply online or drop application off at International Programs office

Program Fees: Travel Program Fee: $700* (payable to Texas Wesleyan) * $300 non-refundable deposit due with enrollment packet * $400 balance due with Summer Extended tuition Tuition & Course Fees: (6 UG course hours) Per Texas Wesleyan billing schedule for Summer extended semester. (financial aid can be used)

MORE TIME

continued from page 1

“This is brand new and I got approval to try it,” Cindy Potter, director of West Library, said. “We’ll have to see how it plays out. We want to support the students.” Potter said she does not want library hours to be a roadblock to people pursuing their education. “Anything that helps people or encourages people in pursuing their education dreams is beneficial,” Potter said. “This is the student’s library. I’m very interested to see how this goes.” Some students are not sure the extended hours would benefit everyone in the Wesleyan community. “If they extend the hours it would be beneficial for those who are on campus but the commuters would not take advantage of it because that’s added pressure to go

home, take care of family, then come back,” said Berta Frank, junior academic counseling major. Some students said even though they are commuter students they would still take advantage of the extended hours. “I think it’s a good idea, especially for around finals because we have a lot of classes we need to work on,” Shuntel Johnson, senior education major, said. “I’m here all the time so it doesn’t bother me.” Some students see extended hours as a chance for students to have more privacy while studying. “I think it’s good because there are a lot of people trying to study different things, they can just go to their own study room and close themselves in or just go to the third floor,” Martha Flores, freshman psychology major, said.

Download any Mobile Tag app and use your smartphone to scan this barcode and get more information about this study abroad opportunity

RUNNIN

continued from page 1

year because she really loves Wesleyan. “The atmosphere is electrifying, it’s very energizing, it’s the largest race in the Metroplex, and with so many people there, it is a fun place to be,” Henson said. This will be Henson’s fourth year to participate in the event. Henson said she is very thankful she doesn’t have a personal connection with breast cancer. Unlike Henson, team member Mayra Ramon, grants assistant, joined because of her personal connection to breast cancer.

“I had two co-workers, from my previous job that went through breast cancer,” Ramon said. Ramon’s ex-boss went through breast cancer treatment and is now in remission. “It was devastating just to see her go through chemo, having to lose all her hair,” Ramon said. “But also, just everything she went through, and the struggles, she still overcame it, still went to work, and still succeeded.” Ramon said her boss showed her even though she had this illness, she still overcame it, and

Be our friend on Facebook, and visit www. therambler.org to read the most up-to-date coverage for Texas Wesleyan University.

made Ramon realize anything she put her mind to, she could accomplish it. According to www. Komengreaterfortworth.org over 1.3 million people are diagnosed with breast cancer annually. Last year over 14,000 participants participated in the Greater Fort Worth Komen for the Cure and raised over $1.5 million dollars. 100 percent of all the proceeds go to breast cancer research and 75percent stay in the Fort Worth area. For more information about making a donation or participating in the event please go to www.komentarrant.com.


8

Sports

| March 30, 2010

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Rams sweep Wildcat series 2-1 Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

Ram baseball snagged a 6-3 win in a Red River Athletic Conference game against Wiley College March 25. The Wildcats took a one-run lead in the first inning with a leadoff single that the Rams answered with a RBI hit-and-run single from Justin Snider, junior catcher and third base. Eric Epperson, senior outfielder, gave the Rams a 3-1 lead with a two-run single. Derek Vaughn, sophomore pitcher, threw three scoreless innings giving the Rams the lead for the eighth inning. Nolan Barbee, sophomore pitcher, picked up Vaughn’s run and closed out the eighth on top. Matt Taylor, senior outfield, also gave the Rams some cushion as he closed out the eighth inning with a pinch-hit tworun-homer. Jason Holmes, first and third base, led all Rams from the plate going 3 for 4 with a double and home run. Saturday, the Rams again faced Wiley in a double header. Wiley took game one

7-2, and the Rams took game two 7-6 after coming from behind.

Wiley 6 (16-12,11-10 RRAC)

Texas Wesleayn 7(24-13,15-6 )

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Taylor Jockers, junior outfield, puts his team back in the game with a sac fly hit in the bottom of the third inning of game two against the Wiley Wildcats March 26. The Rams took the 7-6 win this game closing the series with a 2-1 Red River Athletic Conference victory.

Player

ab

rr

h

rbi

Player

ab

rr

h

rbi

Liendo, Rosnay rf

4

0

0

0

Lassiter, Joseph 3b

5

1

1

0

Sorilla, Danny ss

5

2

2

1

Jockers, Taylor cf

2

1

0

2

Sanchez, Rafael lf

5

1

2

1

Snider, Justin c

2

0

1

1

Fernandez, Eduardo 1b

3

1

0

0

Mcfadden, Garrett pr

0

1

0

0

Roberts, Lionel dh

3

1

1

1

Padron, Justin 1b

3

0

0

0

Murphy, James 3b

3

1

3

1

Melton, Patrick ph/lf

1

0

0

1

Bridges, Luther pr/rf

1

0

1

0

Niedwiecki, Stephen lf/1b

3

1

1

0

Munoz, David 2b

3

0

0

0

Winter, Vincent lf

0

0

0

0

Lebron, Rafael 2b

1

0

0

0

Robinson, Hunter dh

4

0

1

2

Rivera, Brian p

3

0

0

0

Epperson, Eric rf

3

0

1

1

Hicks, Brian p

0

0

0

0

Holmes, Jason 2b

4

1

2

0

Dowdell, Christopher p

0

0

0

0

Soberanes, Christian ss

4

2

3

0

Totals

34

6

10 6

Totals

31

7

10 7

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”We lost one game that we shouldn’t have, but overall I thought we had a pretty

good weekend,” Drew Cavender senior pitcher said. In game one, the Wildcats took the 4-0 lead with a two-run triple. Colton Farrar, junior pitcher, allowed five runs on six hits while striking out three batters in five innings. Joseph Lassiter had two of the Rams’ three hits in game one. To start off game two, Wiley had a RBI triple followed by a home run giving the Wildcats a 2-0 lead. The Rams bounced back in the third inning with a sac fly from Taylor Jockers, junior outfield. Justin Snider, junior center field and Melton continued the Ram roll with a sac fly each in the fifth inning. Patrick Stanley, sophomore pitcher seal two scoreless innings while Jacob Lions, sophomore pitcher, finished the game with two hitless innings, to seal the 7-6 win. ”This was an important series for us to win,” Christian Soberenas, junior short stop said. ”We have to keep getting better as we get closer to the end of the season.” The Rams next home game will be at 12p.m. April 2 at La Grave Field.

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Bradley Stone, sophomore pitcher, winds up for a strike in a close game against Wiley College March 25 at Sycamore Park. This was game one of a double header that the Rams lost 7-2.

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9 Sports Lady Rams softball slides safe to 2-1 series victory against Lady Warriors The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 30, 2010

Emma Fradette

ekfradette@mail.txwes.edu

The Lady Rams softball team took on the Lady Warriors of Bacone University March 25-26 at Sycamoore Park and left with a 2-1 series victory. In game one, the Lady Rams took the win with a score of 9-3. Junior outfielder Makelle Akin scored the first run to give Wesleyan a 1-0 head start in the first inning. The second inning was huge for the Lady Rams, scoring four runs alone. Sophomore pitcher Ashley Hudson hit a high ball home Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff run. Ashley Hudson, sophoTaylor Hodge, junior pitcher and first base, more utility player, followed winds up to pitch one of three consecutive with a single, while Raven outs that allowed the Lady Rams to take a Moreno, sophomore utility 9-3 victory March 25 against the Lady War- player, hit the ball to the left riors. Hodge improved 5-7 on the year with side of the field allowing two the win. more runs for the Lady Rams.

Bacone 0 (16-12,11-10 RRAC)

The fourth run in the second inning came from Akin as the Lady Warrior’s pitcher walked her with all bases loaded. This early two inning run gave the Lady Rams a score of 5-0. Bacone tried to come back in the third and fourth innings, but holding the Lady Warriors to only two runs, the Lady Rams remained in the lead 5-2. The Lady Rams did not score again until the sixth inning when Moreno hit a homerun over the left fence. Hudson then stepped up and slammed one out of the park with two other players on base giving Wesleyan a 9-3 lead. Game two took place March 26 at Sycamore Park. The Lady Rams took a quick win going only five innings. The first run came from Hudson with a centerfield ball hit allowing Moreno, who was on third, to score the run. In the second inning, junior outfielder Courtney Orebaugh scored a run to put the Lady Rams up 2-0.

Junior second base Ashleigh Jiminez hit two RBI singles and three more hits were added by the Lady Rams in the third inning giving them a 5-0 lead. Haley Butler, senior catcher, hit a home run with two players on base adding three more runs in the fourth inning. The Lady Rams took an 8-0 victory. “Everything we do, whether good or bad, is preparing us mentally and physically for our long-term goals,” head coach Shannon Gower said. The Lady Rams’ defense allowed the Lady Warriors no runs the whole game finishing in the fifth inning. “We have girls in new positions ,and we never let that phase us on defense or offense,” Hodge said.“We continue to trust in each other to get the job done, and with that, I know we will go far.” Wesleyan got a slow start in the last game of the series with the Lady Warriors scoring two runs early in the first. The Lady Warriors also picked up three more runs by the

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third inning putting the Lady Rams down 5-0. The Lady Rams went scoreless until the fifth inning when Hudson hit a double, giving Wesleyan two runs, followed by Lindsay Cline, freshman third and first base, hitting a single to close the gap 5-3. The Lady Rams were never able to gain a lead against the Lady Warriors, losing game three 5-3, but taking the series 2-1. “For the most part, I am very pleased with the weekend performance,” Gower said.“We are slowly starting to gel and play like the team we are. The Lady Rams are continuing to work hard as the conference tournament gets closer.” Caitlin Bradley, junior utility player said, “I think we did well we’ve started to make a turn around which was very much needed.” The Lady Rams will hit the field next when they take on Langston University April 3-4 in Langston, Okla.

Lady Rams 8 (16-12,11-10 RRAC)

Player

ab rr

h

rbi

Player

ab rr

h

rbi

Fredman, Alex ss

2

0

0

0

Akin, Makelle cf

3

2

2

0

furra, Stevie lf

2

0

1

0

Moreno, Raven 2b

2

2

1

0

Williams, Courtney p

2

0

0

0

Hudson, Ashley dp

2

1

1

1

Watson, Karina 2b

1

0

0

0

Butler, Haley c

3

2

2

3

Covington, Ashley cf

2

0

0

0

Cline, Lindsay 1b

3

0

1

1

Whitmire, Lauren 3b

2

0

0

0

Jester, Kali ss

1

1

0

0

Forehand, Paige c

2

0

0

0

Siebel, Ashley 3b

1

0

0

0

Ferguson, Samantha 1b

2

0

1

0

Jiminez, Ashleigh rf

2

0

1

2

Scott Ashton rf

2

0

0

0

Orebaugh, Courtney lf

2

0

1

1

Totals

17 0

2

0

Totals

19 8

9

8

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Kali Jester, freshman utility player, hustles to get a Lady Wildcat runner out at third base. Jester aided the Rams in their 8-0 victory March 26 at Sycamore Park, as they held Bacone College to five scoreless innings.

The Rambler Now Accepting Applications For forSpring fall Editor-in-Chief Applications are available at O. C. Hall 107 For a Complete Job Description, Visit www.therambler.org

Congratulations Brian Wanamaker! For making 1st-team All-American.

90 Years of Leadership

We’re Everywhere! For More Information, ContactDr. Kay L. Colley at kcolley@txwes.edu

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10

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Campus

March 30, 2010

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

University College Day 2011 Connecting the Community and the World All Monday events held in the Schollmaier Science and Technology Center (STC)

Monday, April 4, 2011 5:00-5:20 STC 114

5:50-6:00 STC, lobby

Study Abroad: Ways of Learning in Diverse World Jessica Martinez, Christina Stanley Sponsors: Dr. Linda Metcalf, Dr. Edita Ruzgyte

STC 118

Teaching with Purpose Elvivia C. Acosta, Fedra M. Castaneda Lara, Vanessa C. Justice, Flor A. Portillo Sponsor: Dr. Mary Landers

STC 121

Fraud Recognition and Deterrence Practices: A Research Study D.J. Nail, Alison Smith Sponsor: Dr. Carol Sullivan

5:25-5:45 STC 114

Classroom Management Veronica Robles, Iris Valenzuela Sponsor: Dr. Annette Torres-Elias

STC 118

Imprinted on the Hearts; The Unwritten Laws in John Ford’s The Man who Shot Liberty Valance Jim Mathew Sponsor: Dr. Susan Ayres

STC 121

How does accountable talk used in modern classrooms connect to Socrates’ philosophy on education? Elena Cazares Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda

6:00 – 6:20 STC 118 STC 121 6:25-6:45 STC 118

STC 121

Graduate Reception An International Comparative Approach: Responding to the Global Problem of Neonaticide Sarah Peerwani, Melissa Griffith Sponsor: Dr. Susan Ayres Counselor’s Introduction to Psychogenic Seizures Karen McKibben Sponsor: Dr. Edita Ruzgyte The Philosophy behind Bilingual Education Itzel Pozos, Flor Saldivar Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda How Important is a Blank Slate when Referring Success to a Child? Benjamin Swanson Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda

Tuesday, April 5, 2011 9:00-9:20 STC 116

Villains: We’re Not So Different You and I Dayton Tanner Sponsor: Dr. Timothy Grammer

Carter Conference Rm The Power of Networking Associations in Modern Business Communications Lori De La Cruz, Laura Hanna, Tim Tune, Julie Loeffelholz, Cheryl Hart, Betsy Deck Sponsor: Dr. Kay Colley Library Orientation Rm Behind the Scenes: Bringing the Historical Novel ‘Killed by Indians 1871’ into Publication Lisa Puente, Erin M. Tucker, Jeffrey DeLotto, Twyla Miranda Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda 9:30-9:50 STC 116 Sore Thumbs and Texted Out: The Call for Community (9:20 – 10:20) Dr. Gladys Childs, Dr. Kendra Irons Baker Building

Christopher Tye and Thomas Tallis: The Exceptional Position of Musicians in the Tudor Court Katherine Altham Sponsor: Dr. Ilka Araujo

Carter Conference Rm Domestic Violence: A Community Response Ray A. Cox Sponsor: Dr. Tanni Chaudhuri Library Orientation Rm A Community of Killers: The American Mob and the Roman World-View Dr. Timothy Grammer, Dr. Greg Gullion 10:00-10:20 STC 116 Sore Thumbs and Texted Out: The Call for Community (continues from 9:30) Dr. Gladys Childs, Dr. Kendra Irons Baker Building

Writing Creative Nonfiction: Connecting Self and Community, Present and Past Allison Kane, Kaylee Perry, Suhasini Yeeda Sponsor: Dr. Jeffrey DeLotto

Carter Conference Rm The Whole Five Yards: The Journey of the Sari Derrick Brewer, Dawn Green, Crystal Ogwurike, Mayrion Washington, Ms. Tanni Chaudhuri Sponsor: Ms. Tanni Chaudhuri Library Orientation Rm Terrorism on the Home Front: Los Zetas and Mexican Drug Cartels Stephanie Mejia Sponsor: Dr. Kay Colley 10:30-10:50 STC 116 From Conflict to Confidence Tara Cates Sponsor: Dr. Jay Brown 10:30-10:50 Baker Building

From Walden to the Ganges and the Potomac: Freedom Flows Through Righteous Resisters Sasha Banks, Brandon Bowers, Susannah Phillips, Lisa Puente Sponsor: Dr. Linda Carroll

Carter Conference Rm Double-Binds in the Novels of Edith Wharton Allison Kane Sponsor: Dr. Elizabeth Battles Library Orientation Rm Nuts, Sluts, and Perverts (Part 3): Underworld of the Jamaican Posse Brenton Flowers, Tina Roberts, Jessica Oliver, Greg Gullion Sponsor: Dr. Greg Gullion 11:00-11:20 STC 116 Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Podcasts, Blogs and Wikis, Oh My! Convergent Education at Texas Wesleyan Dr. Kay L. Colley Carter Conference Rm From Ikhernofret to Ibsen: A Brief History of Acting Suzanne Fordering, Jeremy Jackson, Scott Hargrove Sponsor: Ms. Connie Whitt-Lambert Library Orientation Rm Honoring Francophone Contributions: Competition for the Hall of Fame Maria Arreola, Rachel Benham, Brandon Bowers, Joshua Branum, Parker Fitzgerald, Chantil Rubio, Michael Rudd Sponsor: Ms. Laurel Mayo 11:30-1:00 Lou’s Place Student Government Association Luncheon Special Guest: Mr. Arun Gandhi

2:00-2:20 STC 116

STC 118

Software Engineering - Dance Application Joaquin Feliciano Sponsor: Dr. Yukong Zhang Twenty-two Pennies Rachel Horton Sponsor: Dr. Stacia Neeley

Carter Conference Rm Darfur Now: The Connection to Global Issues in Community Involvement Rebecca Moore, Monica Salas, Christina Zimmerman Sponsor: Dr. Greg Gullion Library Orientation Rm Analysis of the Automotive Industry Thomas Bosco Sponsor: Dr. Trisha Anderson 2:30-3:20 Baker Building Wesleyan Justice Project: Justice for the Wrongfully Convicted Nina Frolov, Rachel Hackworth, Tonya Henderson, Mary Hughes, Jeanne Lamb, Tonya Love, Jeremy Newton, Ida Nickerson, Michelle Payne, Natalie Roetzel, Philip Robinson, Cory Sessions Sponsor: Dr. Michelle Payne 2:30-2:50 STC 116 Making My Way in the World Melissa Bates Sponsor: Dr. Marilyn Pugh STC 118

Glamorizing Drugs: Mexican Drug Cartels in an Age of New Media Miguel Arreguin Sponsor: Dr. Kay Colley

Carter Conference Rm Into the World of Wesleyan Leaders Brandon Flowers, Brenton Flowers, Gary Jones, Cathy Nguyen, Selena Stewart, Melissa McDuffy Sponsor: Dr. Carol Johnson-Gerendas Library Orientation Rm The Ritual of Life in India Micah Brooks, Carlos Careaga, Melondy Doddy, Kevin Keathley, Oscar Lazarky, Timothy Reece, Betty Taylor, Mark Hanshaw Sponsor: Dr. Mark Hanshaw 3:00-3:20 Carter Conference Rm Diversity Empowering our Community Daniel Martinez-Torres, Trevor Judge, Nicholas Demetre, Nathan Horsfall Sponsor: Ms. Melody Bell Fowler Library Orientation Rm The Music in the Mind of Wozzeck: More than What the Naked Ear Perceives Katreeva Phillips Sponsor: Dr. Ilka Araujo 3:30-3:50 Carter Conference Rm Educating the Leaders of Our Future Mayra Vital, Mayra Olivas, Lisa Garcia, Jessica Lopez, Michelle Barajas Sponsor: Dr. Annette Torres-Elias Library Orientation Rm The Artist’s Transformation: A Guide into the Horrors that Bring Art to the World and Art Community Jovan Rodriguez, Gloria Mendoza Sponsor: Ms. Connie Whitt-Lambert 4:00-4:20 Carter Conference Rm The Praxis of Educational Leadership: How Teachers Become Leaders Michelle Sullivan, Alice Wade, Amanda Deboer, Ashly Spencer, Jennifer Helstern, Cheryl Kile, Bryan Michler, Jessica Walls, Selena Stewart Sponsors: Dr. Twyla Miranda and Dr. Carlos Martinez Library Orientation Rm Your Path to Legal Excellence! Chris Green, Nicholas Demetre, Danielle Bateni Sponsor: Dr. Michelle Payne 4:30-4:50 Library Orientation Rm Public Discourse in America: Civility or Censorship? Amanda Hazel, Karen Self, Narvis Medlock, Ray A. Cox, Sherry Johnson, Jessica Arreguin Sponsor: Dr. Barbara Kirby 7:00 Martin Hall Auditorium Lessons Learned from My Grandfather Keynote speaker: Mr. Arun Gandhi

For information about the poster presentations, go to http://www.txwes.edu/provost/ucdScheduleFY2011.htm


The Rambler Vol. 94 No. 9  

The Rambler Vol. 94 No. 9 Published March 30, 2011

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