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WEDNESDAY March 28, 2012

Vol. 95 • No. 9

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T�� R������ The voice of Texas Wesleyan University students since 1917

Movie adaptations for novels take focus and dedication.

Classic and modern novels make Tristian’s Top Ten list.

Opinion, page 2

Arts & Entertainment, page 6

New student leadership on its way Shauna Banks

sbbanks@txwes.edu

Elections for the future student leaders of Texas Wesleyan are just around the corner. Petitions to run for executive and representative positions in the Student Government Association are now available in the SGA and student life offices, said current SGA president Bradden Van Noy. Those interested in running for an executive position in the SGA must obtain 50 signatures for their petition before turning it in to the student life offices in the Brown-Lupton Student

Big Read brings all of Tarrant county together for literacy

Center or SGA offices in O.C. Armstrong Hall. Those running for a representative position must obtain 25 signatures for their petition, Van Noy said. With Van Noy graduating this May, Texas Wesleyan students and faculty will soon see someone new sworn in to continue Van Noy’s efforts for the students and bring in some fresh ideas of his or her own. “I would like to see a good leader—a strong voice and someone who’s going to carry on the traditions and the voice and the power and the leadership that we’re proud of in SGA—and some of the long-term goals in SGA,” Van Noy said.

Petitions to run for office are due by noon April 2 to the SGA or Student Life offices. Those running for executive positions can begin campaigning April 4, and those running for representative positions can begin campaigning April 11, Van Noy said. Voting for executive positions will be April 1819, and April 25-26 for representative positions. This year will mark the first year Wesleyan students vote in SGA office elections online, Van Noy said. VanNoy said polling stations will be available for students to vote at in the student center and Eunice and James G. Library, but students will

also be sent an email from the chief justice of the SGA, containing login information, links and a unique password to cast their ballots during all four election days. Similar to homecoming, which was the first time the SGA had implemented online voting at Wesleyan, students will also be able to view biographies and photos of those running for office, Van Noy said. He said 207 people voted for Homecoming king and queen in February through this online system, which is up from just 57 votes last year.

 ELECTIONS, page 3

Students attempt to walk on water at carnival

Rolandra West

rdwest@txwes.edu

The Big Read events continue to impact the Fort Worth community, as students and faculty at Texas Wesleyan proceed to act as key supporters and hosts with several events. Faculty at Texas Wesleyan and Tarrant County partners have been involved in several events over the past month, including the film screening of the 1940 The Grapes of Wrath, an adaption of the subject-themed book. Partners in the Big Read include Fort Worth Independent School District, Tarrant Area Food Bank, Friends of the Fort Worth Library, Texas Christian University, Tarrant County College, The Reading Connection and more. The screening was held at the Fort Worth Library March 11, followed by a Big Read reception hosted by the Fort Worth Library on March 22. Although Big Read events were held during spring break, many people supported the purpose of the events. According to the school website, the Big Read initiative supports the re-establishment of reading in American culture all over the United States, except this time in the Tarrant County community. Sandra Myers, grants and communications coordinator, said she enjoyed seeing the movie The Grapes of Wrath,which was nominated for several Academy Awards and won two for best actress and best director. “It was really cool to see how the film was different from the book, which it was in some ways,” Myers said. “Of course you can’t ever put everything from a book into a film.” Barnes and Noble hosted the first of several planned book discussions March 11. Trinity Terrace Retirement Community hosted another on March 14. Myers said the most anticipated Big Read event is the Rose Marine Theatre’s play adaption of The Grapes of Wrath called The Grapes of Wrath: A Scrapbook. Rose Marine Theatre will

 BIG READ, page 3

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Tyler Mendez, English and political science major, attempts to walk on water while trapped in a bubble during the Second Annual Residence Life Carnival March 25. See more photos on pages 4 and 5.

Drug testing policy for athletes given final approval Stephanie Randall

Slrandall@ txwes.edu

drugfree.org | courtesy Drug testing for athletes has been approved for Texas Wesleyan athletics. New policies will go into effect next fall for current and new athletes.

After two approvals March 13, Texas Wesleyan atheltics officials will start to implement a new drug testing program for athletes starting Fall 2012. On March 13, the policy was presented to the Student Life Committee and after they approved the policy, it was then presented to the Trustees at noon the same day. The Trustees also approved the policy and it will take effect in fall 2012. Steven Trachier, athletic director at Wesleyan, said the program is designed to educate student athletes about the harmful effects of drugs and alcohol by testing

student athletes. “Besides the fact that recreational or performance enhancing drugs are illegal, our primary concern is for the health and safety of our student-athletes,” Trachier said. Trachier said the program is also meant be a deterrent and to give students a reason to say no when pressured to experiment with illicit substances. “Additionally, it is a mechanism to identify individuals who need treatment and help with a problem,” Trachier said. “Most importantly we want to protect the integrity of the university and the athletic programs by taking a stand against illegal drugs.” On March 6, the Student Life

Committee and the Trustees Executive Committee came together to discuss the program’s approval. The new program is expected to cost around $5,000 dollars. Katherine Rosenbusch, sophomore athletic training major and volleyball player, said she thinks the new policy is pointless. “I think it is a waste of money,” Rosenbusch said. “I think that the people that are using drugs will find a way to pass the test anyway.” Rosenbusch said the money should be used to fund scholarships for athletes. Dillon Wilson, senior psychology major and baseball player, agrees with Rosenbusch. On the other hand, Angelica Arroyo, junior psychology major,

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said she thinks it is a good idea. “I don’t mind because I am not involved in that kind of stuff, and I trust that my team is not as well,” Arroyo said. Several non-athlete students have opinions about this new program as well. Daniela Torres, junior psychology major, said even though she is not an athlete, this program could possibly be a good idea. “I think that if the school feels that it’s necessary then they should do it,” Torres said. “If the team is not doing anything wrong then they have nothing to hide.” Tracier said the details about how many athletes will be tested and how often have not been decided yet.


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March 28, 2012

Opinion

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Early inventions shape lives over decades for the mere fact that you can virtually do everything on a Joshua Dunk cell phone. Staff Writer There are many major milejkdunk@txwes.edu stones in the history of computers, starting with 1936, when Konrad Zuse built the first freely programmable computer. Through the years It’s a Friday night, school is out and computers have gotten technological no homework—which means no advances and can now be held in the worries. But there is a twist—it’s 1769, palm of our hands. there is no Facebook, car, Twitter, cell In 1884, Paul Nipkow sent images phone or TV. What would you do? over wires using a rotating metal disk. Many would seemingly die over Television then evolved along two the thought of not getting on Twit- paths: mechanical—based on Nipter, let alone not having a cell phone kow’s rotating disks, and electronic— to text. I am addicted to social media based on the cathode ray tube. Paul and staying in the know with celeb- Nipkow is the reason we have our rity gossip. So, not having a computer guilty pleasure TV shows such as Jerto access that information would be sey Shore, Teen Mom and American heartbreaking. Idol. Over the years, these inventions In 1885, Karl Benz designed and have shaped our lives and our daily built the world’s first practical autoroutines so much, that without them mobile to be powered by an interwe can’t do even the simple tasks like nal-combustion engine. Today the turning the channel on a TV. automobile is an essential aspect to In 1875, Alexander Graham Bell a person’s life—especially one who built the first telephone that electri- wants a social one. Most of these incally transmitted the human voice. ventions would not be made possible Since then it has evolved into one of without the biggest invention of all the greatest necessities known to man time, electricity.

www.misscollier.com | courtesy

In our modern society all aspects of our lives are almost totally dependent upon electricity, from the telephone to water and sewage treatment plants, from our transportation systems to refineries, factories, food processing plants and high rise buildings.

These inventions have made the idea of being lazy a reward to technological advances. So the next time you have to clean up a bit of dust or blow out candles for your birthday, and you happen to have an iPhone, there is an app called Blower that will do it for you. Don’t feel bad. You’re

not lazy. You’re just living in the 21st century. So the next time you update your status on Facebook from your computer or Twitpic from your phone, remember it took someone several years ago to come up with the technology for you to do so.

Novel to big screen adaptations must tread lightly Tristian Evans Staff Writer

tevans@txwes.edu

www.blogspot.com | courtesy

The art of adaptation is a tricky one. When people decide to make a movie or television series based on a novel, comic book or even stage play, they must walk a fine line between staying true to the book so that they do not upset fans, and also creating something that will translate well to the screen. Sometimes this means excluding things from the source material. Last August, I discovered the Hunger Games trilogy of books. I was amazed by these books, which

manage to include both social commentary and strange science fiction elements. Last week, I went to the midnight opening of the Hunger Games movie. And, while the true message of the book was in the film, I still found myself a little disappointed with the things that hadn’t made it from the book to the screen. Some scenes felt rushed, and others failed to reveal character motivation. Because of this, it made some of the characters’ actions unbelievable. Be that as it may, I have to admit this was the best book to film I have seen in a long time. Movies like The Lighting Thief and Eragon, which were both based on bestselling novels, completely abandoned the elements readers loved from the books when they were

translated to the screen. Heck, if one has read the Harry Potter book series in its entirety and watched the films, you’ll notice that there was plenty left out of the movies, and sometimes those things left big gaping plot holes. I know the art of adapting a book into a film is a complicated process and not everything from the page can make it to the screen. But I believe that if things will be left out, something that equally makes sense should be added in to avoid making certain aspects of the story flat out stupid. At this point, I’m sure the Hunger Games has made millions and the next two books will definitely be adapted into movies. I can only hope that in the future, the filmmakers will be more careful of things they choose to leave out of the film.

Spinoff reality shows leave much to be desired in most cases renowned contemporary dance Shauna Banks instructors, VicOpinion Editor/Columnist tor Smalley and sbbanks@txwes.edu Angel Armas are front and center to teach and mold the young dancers brought There isn’t a single thing to them by a group of moms funnier than a middle-aged who will surely take gossip to dance instructor riling up a a whole other level. group of other middle-aged The very trailers for this moms to the point of lawsuits. show have put the moms in Except, perhaps there soon the original Dance Moms to will be. shame. Really. Who doesn’t Lifetime is jumping on the get an ironic laugh out of a spinoff reality show band- grown woman who thinks wagon with its new show the world hates her and her Dance Moms: Miami (a spin- daughter because they’re just off of Dance Moms, currently too beautiful? in its second season). Pure reality show gold. Premiering at 9:30 p.m. I can’t say the same for othApril 3, the show is based in er spinoff reality shows of the a Miami dance studio, Stars past. Does anyone remember Dance Studio. Owners and the original Laguna Beach on

The Rambler Shauna Banks, news/opinion editor Stephanie Randall, sports editor Meisa Keivani Najafabadi, photo editor Erica Estrada, cartoonist/photographer Tristian Evans, staff writer Rolandra West, staff writer Joshua Dunk, staff writer Katherine Williams, staff writer Wendy Moore, faculty adviser Dr. Kay Colley, faculty liaison Frederick Slabach, publisher

MTV? You know, the show chocked full of silly teenage fights and so much drama that even on your worst day, you knew your life couldn’t be this messed up? That show had me hooked from the getgo. I mean, in that it’s-so-badyou-have-to-watch kind of way And then there was the Hillary Duff theme song— of which was permanently etched in my brain after just a few episodes. However, after three seasons, it went into the black hole where all reality shows go to die when their characters have become boring or too old to continue in the show. Then we were subjected to the so-bad-you-can-hardlywatch spin-off show, The Hills. Revealed to be an almost completely scripted

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“reality” show in the series finale, The Hills was Laguna Beach hyped on Pixie Stix. If I never hear the infamous couple’s name “Spidey” again, it’ll be too soon. To further drive the stake in the heart of spinoff shows, do I really even need to describe the shows that have sprung forth from the original Keeping up with the Kardashians? Oy vey. Words could never truly capture the level of stupidity and uselessness that has materialized in all of its spinoff shows. Who knew someone could become so famous without actually being that interesting? But I digress. Dance Moms: Miami is going to fill the void that will be left when the original series ends its current season, also on April 3.

Member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press, Student Press Law Center, College Media Advisers and College Newspaper Business and Advertising Managers. Opinions expressed in The Rambler are those of the individual authors only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Texas Wesleyan community as a whole.

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Bring on the sassy pants moms and kids who don’t realize they’re actually

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News

March 28, 2012

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Wesleyan drug policies re-examined after TCU bust Tristian Evans

Tkevans1098@txwes.edu

Last month, more than 20 TCU students were arrested on drug charges. It all started back in October 2011, when the Fort Worth Police department received complaints about drug activity according to the after-action Report released by the police department. The report said that over the following four months, two officers went undercover and made purchases from both current and former TCU students, and also people who did not attend the university at all. On Feb. 20, the Texas Wesleyan administration sent out a mass email to its students regarding the TCU incident. Like all universities, the possession and distribution of all illegal

BIG READ

continued from page 1

present the play at 7:30 p.m. March 28, 29 and 30 all three nights at the Rose Marine Theater on 1440 North Main Street in Fort Worth,Texas. General admission is $15 and General Admission for students and seniors is $10. At 12:30 March 29, the play will be performed at The Thad Smotherman Theatre located in the Law Sone Fine Arts building. Ticket prices are $8 for general admission for $6 faculty and staff and $4 for students. The play consists of readings by characters that existed in the 1930s,

ELECTIONS

drugs on and off the Texas Wesleyan campus will lead to disciplinary action from the university. Carla Tennison, senior political science major, said she was shocked by the TCU drug bust. “That is really scary,” she said. “If that can happen there, that can happen anywhere.” Felisa Barnes, security manager,said what happened at TCU could happen anywhere. “If Fort Worth PD came onto our campus and arrested some of our students [who had] drugs, we would turn that over to the [Fort Worth Police Department],” Barnes said. “And then the school would take action on the disciplinary end.” Barnes said she met with others such as the dean of students and

the era in which The Grapes of Wrath was set. Jeremy Jackson, senior theatre major at Wesleyan, said he is acting in the play along with Kristin Spires, adjunct voice faculty in the Theatre Department at Wesleyan. “The play is a bilingual reading. Adam Adolfo, the director, read the book and knows a lot about the era and has put together these readings, I am really excited about it,” Myers said. “It is brand new.” Jackson said every member in the cast is playing at least five different characters.

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Van Noy said he hopes to also see more people vote in SGA elections this year with the new system. Some of the issues Van Noy said he hopes the future president will continue to make efforts in implementing improvements including the installation of security cameras on campus. “It’s not something that with the expense, we can do right now,” Van Noy

said. “We’ve made a lot of headway; we’ve got a plan in place and it’s ready to go.” Van Noy also hopes the future SGA executives and representatives will push forward with the issue of who is permitted to robe undergraduates at their robing ceremony before graduation. Currently only faculty are permitted to robe students. At a Faculty Council

the athletic director to discuss what procedures Wesleyan had in place to prevent something like this from ever happening. “We wanted to meet and discuss what [we are] doing to protect our [students],” Barnes said. Barnes said she feels the university has taken a good stand and is providing an anonymous hotline for students to report suspected illegal activity. The hotline number is 866943-5787. “I want to encourage the students to use the hotline,” Barnes said. “Therefore, security will be able to act on what’s reported. If no one reports it, and we don’t visibly see it ourself, then [the illegal activity] will continue.” Also according to an email sent out to students, Wesleyan administra-

tion offers help to anyone who has a problem with drug abuse. The email said if help was needed or requested, the university would offer its support, and the person would not have to fear punishment. Cary Poole, dean of students, said he thought it was very important to make students aware of this “amnesty clause.” “The university has taken the initiative to create a policy which encourages students to come forward,” Poole said in an email. “The amnesty policy encourages friends, roommates or other colleagues to assist students who may have alcohol or a drug overdose to call for assistance and ensure the student gets the necessary help needed and not worry about sanctions from

the university. This does not mean the university will issue a “free pass,” but the students may be required to go through alcohol [or] drug intervention courses.” Poole said if a student were to be caught with drugs or alcohol, they could choose to have their disciplinary case reviewed by either the dean of students board or the student hearing board. “Both boards have the ability to determine innocence or guilt and if found guilty, what appropriate sanctions will be applied,” Poole said in an email. Poole also said the university is looking into creating a drug and alcohol education program that all freshmen, residential students and athletes would participate in.

“Everyone in the cast are playing what we are referring to as migratory workers, which is pretty much just an ensemble,” Jackson said. “The play is more so a narrative as opposed to scenes.” Jackson said a few of the characters he will play are Reverend Casey, a character in the novel, Tom Steinbeck, who is John Steinbeck’s son, and a three other minor characters. The actors involved have been encouraged to write blogs while they are in the process of preparing for the performances. According to Rose Marine Theater’s public relations website Artes De la Rosa’s contribution to The Big

Read in Fort Worth is a bilingual performance of The Grapes of Wrath novel called The Grapes of Wrath: A Living Scrapbook, directed and written by Adam Adolfo. According to the website, “This World Premiere production for Artes de la Rosa innovatively tells the epic journey of The Grapes of Wrath in 80 minutes with only 10 actors. The final experience is a multimedia, multi disciplinary stage celebration of the literary work of John Steinbeck.” Annette Lance, senior public relations advertising major, said she looks forward to seeing how the high school students will connect to the story in this setting. Lance said there should

be around 200 students attending. “I meet Adam at one of the Big Read partner meetings where he discussed the process of creating this performance. It was interesting to see how he adapted a book like The Grapes of Wrath and is turning it into an interesting interpretation for the stage,” Lance said. For more information on the events visit www.txwes.edu. For more information about the play and tickets visit www.rosemarinetheater.com, and for a look at the online blogs from the Artes de la Rosa cast visit http://rosemarinetheater.blogspot.com/ under 2012 The Grapes of Wrath.

meeting last fall, Van Noy and current SGA members presented a proposal that would allow staff with higher education degrees to also robe graduating students. However, the proposal was not approved, only missing approval by two votes with a 52-54 vote. Van Noy also said he hopes future SGA members will continue the fight to get the alcohol policy at Wesleyan changed. Garry Jones, current SGA secretary, said the SGA has made a lot of head-

way this year with getting the alcohol policy changed. “Our plan that we submitted to President Slabach was similar to TCU’s,” Jones said. “You can’t be in your room with anyone under 21 years old. You can’t have a wet bar or more than a 12pack of beer or bottle of wine.” Also with continuing those policy efforts, some students and alumni hope to see their future SGA president bring in some fresh ideas to implement. Jan Pettigrew Wilde, Texas Wes-

leyan alumna, said she remembers grassroots efforts made while she was at Wesleyan—including students who slept in the grass under a tree behind the library when it was set for demolition. “I recall the SGA being made up of those among my peers who I truly regarded as leaders,” Pettigrew Wilde said. “I feel that the SGA president needs to be prepared to work with the diverse student population that exists on the Wesleyan campus—all ages, religious backgrounds.”


Campus Students treated to free Louisiana cui 4

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The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 28, 2012

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1. Gamma Phi Beta sorority members, Amanda Moten, Reagan Mathis, Ashlie Sivley, Courtney Briley, Niamn Kelly, Allie Gomez, sing karaoke March 25 at the Second Annual Residence Life Carnival. Events were sponsored by residence life and all students were invited. 2. Martika Cook, sophomore criminal justice major, loses her footing in an attempt to roll on water in what participants had deemed “Bubble” at the carnival. 3. Selena Stewart, senior music major, falls flat inside “Bubble,” the giant ball filled with air after participants stepped inside. 4. Lamba Lamba Kappa members, junior Alyssa Cavitt and freshman Germaine Holt Jr., sell popcorn, pickles and nachos to hungry carnival goers. 5. Kristi Taylor, junior theatre major, sings karaoke for a small crowd at the residence life carnival March 25.

T E X A S W E S L E YA N U N I V E R S I T Y ’ S

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Research Stacking Up? Learn how to CITE and FORMAT your APA style paper. March 6 (Tuesday) March 25 (Sunday) April 2 (Monday) April 15 (Sunday)

Saturday, April 14, 2012 12 noon—2p.m. BAKER BUILDING 1201 WESLEYAN ST. FORT WORTH , TX 76105

Earn your Master’s degree! Concentrations available: Administration, Reading, Reading Specialist, Science Education, Math Education, Gifted and Talented, Second Language and Culture. Enjoy a free light lunch, beverages and dessert!

For additional information: Graduate Admissions Office

Speak with Admissions Counselors and Financial Aid

Learn about the graduate experience from faculty members and current students

Apply for free! Attend our open house and have your application fee waived.

817-531-4930 To register for this event please e-mail graduateadmission@txwes.edu or call 817-531-4930. Registration is not required to attend but is highly encouraged. txwes.edu/grad

4:00pm, 5:30pm 2:00pm 4:00pm, 5:30pm 2:00pm All workshops in the West Library Orientation Room. One-on-one help is also available. Email kvandertulip@txwes.edu, or come by the West Library.


5 Campus isine at annual residence life carnival The Rambler | www.therambler.org

March 28, 2012

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Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff

7. 6. Gramma Phi Beta member

Ashlie Sivley, sophomore religion major, tries her hand at balloon darts with booth host and Kappa Alpha fraternity member Baron Yarborough, senior business management major. 7. Wesleyan volunteers Stacy Jennings and father Tex Jennings, cook and serve crawfish to students and faculty attending the residence life carnival. 8. Senior Delvin Hill, grills free hamburgers for carnival attendees looking for a little more traditional Texas backyard cuisine. Residence life staff gave out free event T-shirts to residents and other door prizes throughout the day to all who attended on the bright Sunday.

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Faculty, Staff, Alumni MFC Members Only

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Attend10Group FitnessClassesinthe monthofApril

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Pick up applications outside the Rambler office in O.C. Armstrong Hall next door to Dora’s. Email wmoore@txwes.edu with any questions.


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March 28, 2012

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tristian’s top ten Top 10 novels of all time This week in Tristian’s Top Ten, I will rank the Top Ten novels of all time — in my opinion of course. Tristian Evans

tkevans1098@txwes.edu

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The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007) — This novel, written by Junot Diaz, chronicles the life of an overweight and awkward Jersey kid named Oscar de Leon. Oscar has grown up with a fascination for the fantasy and science fiction genre. The beginning chapters of the novel tell of his years as an awkward teenager dealing with unrequited love and a curse that has apparently plagued his family for generations. Although the novel follows other members of his family at times, Oscar’s story is the most fascinating. Diaz is a writer whose stories are both engaging and tragic. It is easy to see why this book won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It’s definitely a must read for fans of coming of age stories.

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American Gods (2001) — Written by master scribe Neil Gaiman, this novel follows excon Shadow, who is released from jail and recruited to be the chauffer of the mysterious Mr. Wednesday. Eventually, Shadow discovers that Wednesday is an incarnate of the Norse god Odin. Mr. Wednesday is recruiting the old gods of mythology to fight in a war against the newer American Gods such as the Internet and the Media. The novel explores what happens when people bring their beliefs over from different countries and then abandon them as time goes on. The pagan gods in the novel were brought to American in the minds of their followers, but as their followers stopped worshipping them, they

are left in America without any power. This book is half-road trip novel, half-fantasy adventure and completely awesome. The Hunger Games (2008) — This novel is the Lord of the Flies, for the Facebook generation. This amazing science fiction novel manages to include deep social commentary about our modern society’s obsession with reality TV. Set in the futuristic North America where children are forced to battle to the death on national television, the Hunger Games protagonist, Katniss Everdeen, will go down in pop culture and literature history as a character both men and women will aspire to be like. She’s independent, brave and devoted to the wellbeing of the people she loves.

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The Fault in Our Stars (2012) — Teen protagonist Hazel Lancaster is dying from cancer. After she joins a support group for people with cancer, she meets and falls in love with Augustus Walters, who also is a cancer patient. Eventually, the two begin to fall in love with each other. Although this novel had the potential to be some long, drawn out, Rome and Julietlike tragic story, it isn’t. The fact that they might die at any moment forces both characters to grow up and live their lives to the fullest. Both characters are full of wit and make this an interesting and thoughtprovoking read.

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Fight Club (1996) — This cult classic novel chronicles the life of a narrator, who is never given a name. He suffers from insomnia and joins a testicular can-

cer support group because of the emotional release it provides him. He soon meets the charming and enigmatic Tyler Durden. Together, they create an underground fight club that quickly becomes popular. Eventually things get out of hand when Tyler starts a dangerous cult with the goal of bringing down modern civilization. The most disturbing twist in the novel is revealed when the Narrator realizes that Tyler isn’t a separate person, but a separate personality that has manifested within him. While the premise of the novel may be a turn off to some, it does manage to be an engaging and interesting read.

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Letters to a Young Poet (1945) — This novel is actually a series of letters exchanged between Rainer Marie Rilke and Franz Kappus, a young poet. Franz is disheartened by the thought of life in the army and begins to send his poetry to Rainer and ask for feedback on his work and advice on his situation. The responses by Rainer are some of the most thought-proving and moving anyone can ask for, as he often gives Franz advice on things such as loneliness and career choices. This short book is one that all should read at some point in their lives. Even if you’re not a writer, the messages found in the letters are universal and can be applied to anything in life. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007) — Of course, by putting this on the list, I’m saying you should definitely read the other six novels in the Harry Potter series. But this one in particular stands out as the well-written book

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in the Harry Potter franchise. This novel brought to a close a story fans had been waiting for years to see concluded. This novel is part-mystery, part-road trip, part-war story. While it was quite sad at times, as fan favorite characters perished in the war that was taking place in the magical world, it gave a satisfactory conclusion to the series. And, it even left room for follow ups at some point in the far future. This Boy’s Life (1989) — This memoir chronicles the adolescence of writer, Tobias Wolff, as he struggles to overcome his abusive stepfather. Dwight abuses, critiques and berates Tobias, then known as Jack, and his mother at every turn. Jack longs to escape and imagines a different and better life for himself. He writes various false letters to private schools hoping he will get accepted to one of them and escape his current situation, and eventually he manages to do so. Although a lot more happens in this novel, the sections I have mentioned are the ones that spoke to me. The message throughout this memoir is that anyone and everyone has the power to change his/her life.

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Jonothan Strange and Mr. Norrell (2004) — This novel is set in an alternate 19th century England, where magic has returned to the world. Gilbert Norrell and Jonathan Strange, two men who cause magic to reemerge in the world, eventually go their separate ways and both develop groups of followers who are constantly at war. What the novel does really well is that although it is a fantasy, it manages to make the

mundane parts of the story equally fascinating. The heart of the novel is about two men, who become like brothers, but are eventually torn apart by their differing views on the nature of magic. The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (2000) — This novel, set in the late 1930s and early 1940s, tells the story of the lives of two Jewish cousins, Sam Clay and Joe Kavalier, as they use their talents to break into the comic book industry after the success of the Superman characters. While attempting to follow their dreams, both deal with their personal struggles. Joe tries desperately to help his family escape from Prague, which is heavily occupied by Nazis, while Sam battles his depression over his lackluster literary career, and confusion over his own sexuality. One of the fascinating things about this novel is that a lot of the events that take place within it directly resemble the lives of comic book legends such as Stan Lee, Joe Simon, Joe Shuster and many others. It shows the isolation they felt as grown men who wrote and drew funny books for children and the turmoil of their personal lives as a result of that, among other things. This novel manages to be a history, coming of age, and mystery novel all in one.

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In the next installment of Tristian’s Top Ten a.k.a Triple T, I will list the top 10 TV shows of all time. Including a dysfunctional family that runs a funeral home, a group of people trying to survive the zombie apocalypse and a suburban dad who likes to kill people in his downtime.

Find out what one of our staffer’s has to say about The Hunger Games movie on the TheRambler.org. *Scan the code on the left with the QR code scanner on your mobile device to go directly to the link. 

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The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Sports

March 28, 2012

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Golf takes 4th at Hawks Creek Rams secure three wins against Wiley Wildcats over weekend and kept the other team’s hitters off balance,” Wilson said. Alex Padilla, junior catcher, said the first game started off well. “We started off well, then we kind of fell asleep but picked it up and found a way to win,” Padilla said. “Then in the second game, we picked up where we left off from the first game.” The next two games were played March 24. The first game began early for the Rams. In the second inning Brian White, junior catcher, hit a home run giving the Rams a 2-0 lead. The Rams kept up their defense and scored two more runs in the fifth, putting the score up 4-0, with the help of Barnes and Stephen Niedwiecki, senior first baseman. Wiley scored two runs in the fifth as well but never got the lead. The Rams won 4-2. Derek Vaughn, junior pitcher, said the team has started to play together. “We have been playing as one complete entity and playing more balanced in all aspects of the game,” Vaughn

Emma Fradette

ekfradette@txwes.edu

The Texas Wesleyan baseball team competed on March 23 and 24 against Wiley College in Marshall, Texas. The Rams swept the Wildcats in a three-game series 5-1, 4-2 and 4-3. The Rams started behind in the first game on Friday. The first inning ended with the Wildcats ahead 1-0. Wesleyan remained scoreless until the fourth inning when the Rams took a 2-1 lead. The Rams took off in the eighth inning. Joseph Lassiter, senior second baseman and outfielder, hit a single to give the Rams a 3-1 lead. Justin Barnes, senior first baseman and outfielder, also contributed a single hit along with Joel Horton, freshman shortstop, securing the win for the Rams 5-1. Dillon Wilson, senior pitcher, was pleased with the team’s performance. “We played like a team and did the small things right when we needed to score runs, and the pitchers threw strikes

Rams vs. Wiley College - Game 1

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Joel Thelen, senior finance major, sinks a put at the the UST Mimaya Texas Intercollegiate at Hawks Creek Golf Course, March 12. The Texas Wesleyan men’s golf team finished fourth. The Rams shot a team score of 286 the first day and 289 the second day for a total of 575, eight strokes behind the leaders. The Rams will play in the Dallas Baptist University Patriot Invitational at the Golf Club of Dallas in Oak Cliff, Texas April 9-10.

said. The last game of the weekend started with Padilla hitting a single giving Wesleyan a 1-0 lead. Wiley came with three runs in the third inning taking the lead 3-2, but Christina Soberanes, senior shortstop, tied the game for the Rams in the fifth inning 3-3. The Rams continued to battle with the Wildcats until the eighth inning when Lassiter hit a single to give the Rams a 4-3 lead that finished the game. Padilla said the team can continue to improve. “We just need to be more consistent in hitting and can’t take innings off,” Padilla said. Wilson said the team chemistry is coming along great as well. “We all get along and back each other up and try to help each other out if someone struggles; we are a family,” Wilson said. The Rams will play again at 2 p.m. March 30 and at noon March 31 against Bacone College in Muskogee, Okla.

Rams vs. Wiley College - Game 3

Player

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h

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Player

ab

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Jockers, Taylor cf

5

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3

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Jockers, Taylor cf

3

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Soberanes, Christian ss

5

1

1

0

Soberanes, Christian ss

3

1

1

0

Barnes, Justin dh

3

2

1

0

Barnes, Justin dh

4

1

3

1

Padilla, Alex 1b

4

2

0

0

Padilla, Alex 1b

2

0

1

0

Niedwiecki, Stephen dh

4

0

0

0

Niedwiecki, Stephen dh

1

0

1

1

Lassiter, Joseph 2b

4

0

1

1

Lassiter, Joseph 2b

3

0

1

0

Horton, Joel 3b

3

0

1

3

Horton, Joel 3b

4

0

0

0

Howeth, Jake cf

3

0

0

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Howeth, Jake cf

2

0

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Barbee, Nolan p

0

0

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White, Brian c

3

1

1

2

Vaughn, Derek p

0

0

0

0

Winter, Vincent pr/dh

1

0

1

1

Fuller, Jordan lf

3

0

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3

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34

5

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27

4

9

4

Runnin’ Rams compete with NCAA runners at UTA meet Emma Fradette

Ekfradette@txwes.edu

The Texas Wesleyan men’s and women’s track team ran in the Bobby Lane Invitational at the University of Texas at Arlington March 24. Jessica Davis, junior distance runner, said the team ran with teams in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. “We ran pretty well,” Davis said. “We kept up with the big boys.” Davis placed 7th in the 5000 meter run with a time of 18:32.14 while placing 22nd in the 1000m with a time of 4:50.02. Asia Wilson, sophomore sprinter, ran the 200m dash in 26.40, and Raven Alexander, junior sprinter, ran

the 200m in 27.70. Maria Aguayo, freshman distance runner, finished the 5000m run in 19:44.52, and Lauri Gutierrez,junior mid-distance runner finished it in 20:20.39. J’lesa Hutchinson, sophomore sprinter, ran the 400m in 1:02.19 and Ana Segovia, freshman distance runner, ran the 1000m in 5:11.92. Alexander said the girls ran well against the teams they were up against. “Some people set personal records in their events due to the stiff competition,” Alexander said. The men’s team competed in the Bobby Lane Invitational as well. Bobby Hawes, sophomore mid distance runner, ran for Wesleyan this past weekend. “We did OK but I believe

we all could have done better and could do better,” Hawes said. Hawes ran the 1500m placing 6th with a time of 4:02.78. While Ramiro Garcia, sophomore distance runner, ran the 1500m in 4:15.48. Christopher Smith, senior sprinter, ran the 400m in 52.92 The 5000m run was completed by Manny Belay, freshman runner, and Edwin Ngeno, junior distance runner. Belay finished in 16:55.16 and Ngeno finished with a time of 16:55.19. Hawes said the men had a strong field of great runners. “The Runnin’ Rams can improve by running smarter, faster, stronger and

harder,” Hawes said. As nationals get closer for both men and women, Davis said it is looking good. “I feel like nationals is a reach away, and we are working hard to keep getting closer but all that means is we have to put more work in because we are not giving up,” Davis said. “We deserve to be there.” Alexander said the hard work is paying off for everyone. “The hard work is giving us a mindset that nothing is going to come easy, and it is making us want to work harder for that conference title,” Alexander said. Erica Estrada | Rambler Staff The Rams’ next meet will be April 6 at the University Nancy Lozano (left), freshman long distance runner, Anagabriel of North Texas in Denton, Segovia, freshman long distance runner, and Lauri Guiterrez, junior mid-distance runner, prepare for their meet on March 24. Texas.

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Imagine-Create-Connect april 11, 2012

“Network on Purpose. Campus Think Tank” Michael Chaney

2:30-2:50 STC 114

“Solving a Two-Dimensional Heat Equation Using Java” Shannon Myers Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Yukong Zhang (Computer Science, UG)

“Escaping Welfare of Entrapment, Part I” Fahad Alghussein, Hafidh Alghussein Faculty sponsors: Ms. Dorian Johnson and Ms. Lisa Scott (English/Math; UG)

STC 116

STC 116

“Pecha Kucha Wesleyan: ‘Just Get to the Point!’” Erin Bethany, Trent Sandles Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carol Johnson-Gerendas (Communication; UG)

“Bilingual Education Student Organization: TABE Conference 2011 Report” Rocio Franco Reyes, Lisa Garcia, Mary Valdez, Jazmin Mendoza, Italia Perez, Sandy Ramirez Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Annette Torres-Elias (Education, UG)

STC 118

STC 118

“Building Android Apps - Expense Tracker” Kyle Bannerman Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Yukong Zhang (Computer science; UG)

“Polytechnic Heights: Looking at a Community through Multimedia Journalism” Eliana Mijangos, Brian McDaniel, Jonathan Resendez Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Kay Colley (Communication, UG)

Library Orientation Room

Library Orientation Room

“Philosophy for Children: Best Practices for Promoting Learning” Education Honors: Jennifer Batchelor, D’Yanhira Cabañas, Crystal Davis, Martina Padezanin, Sara Shipman, Selena Stewart Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education; UG)

“Poetry as Performance and Multimedia Remix” Conner Slosek, Katie Blount, Arnold Martinez, Devin Salako, Lupe Sanchez Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Carol Johnson-Gerendas and Dr. Stacia Dunn Neeley (Communication/ English, UG)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Study Abroad: Global Opportunities for Students” Panel moderated by Dr. Mark Hanshaw and Andy Harris, Director of International Programs

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Experiences of Academic Publishing in the Social Sciences” Dr. Sara Horsfall, Dr. Elizabeth Alexander, Dr. Tanni Chaudhuri, Dr. Timothy Grammer, Dr. Ibrahim Salih, Ms. Barbara Kirby, Ms. Michelle Payne (Faculty)

3:00-3:20 STC 114

“Fun and Creative Advertising” Alejandra Garcia; Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tom Smith (Business, UG)

STC 116

“Escaping Welfare of Entrapment, Part II” Anagabriel Segovia, Luis Soto Faculty Sponsors: Ms. Dorian Johnson and Ms. Lisa Scott (English/Math; UG)

“Our Experience at TCTELA” Aida Mehanovic, Lisa Garcia, Erica Delgadio, Claribel Carranza Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elsa Anderson (Education, UG)

STC 118

STC 116

“Classical Rhetoric in Contemporary Law” Tiffany Stone Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Stacia Neeley (English; UG)

“The Enigma That Lies Within Brahms’ Cello Sonata in E Minor” Adam Pratt Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Ilka Araujo (Music, UG)

Library Orientation Room

STC 118

“Holy Crap! The Portrayal of God in Primetime Cartoons and the Nature of Modern American Christianity” Justin Mikulencak Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Whitney Myers (English; UG)

“Honoring Francophone Contributions: Competition for the Hall of Fame” Anna Cabanski, Brittani Evans, Chantel Jepson, Maegan McCarthy, Audra Morton, Randee Powell Sponsor: Ms. Laurel Mayo (French, UG)

Library Orientation Room

“The Wesleyan Silver Screen: Collaborative Student Films; Learning Community and Student-Produced Films” Faculty Sponsors: Dr. Stacia Neeley, Dr. Mark Hanshaw (English/Religion)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Study Abroad: Global Opportunities for Students” Panel moderated by Dr. Mark Hanshaw and Andy Harris, Director of International Programs

3:30-3:50 STC 114

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Contemporary Issues in World Religions” Samantha Max, Emily Dzenowski, Audrey Snowden, Beverly Vallance Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Lili Zhang (Religion, UG)

STC 116

“Identifying the Expectations Gap: What Skills Employers Want and What Skills Students Learn” DuJuanna Douglas Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Trisha Anderson (Business, GR)

STC 118

“Future Trends in Education” Bryan Michler, D’Yanhira Cabanas, Wendi Earnheart, Martina Padezanin, Amanda Wright Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Jacqueline Gaffner (Education, UG)

Library Orientation Room

“Carousel Quintet” Austin Ray Snow, Christine Beason, Adrian Bumgarner, Dr. Greg Dewhurst, Denise French-Lamb Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Ilka Araujo (Music, UG) “Convicting the Innocent: The Wesleyan Justice Project” Melissa Gibson, Rachel Hunter, Charlien Trotter, Rachel Hackworth Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Michelle Payne (Political Science, UG)

9:30-9:50 STC 114

10:00-10:20 STC 114

“Escaping Welfare Entrapment, Part III” Alexandria Bozzoli, Travis Nelon, Chelsea Fletcher Faculty sponsors: Ms. Dorian Johnson and Ms. Lisa Scott (English/Math, UG)

STC 116

“Retrospective Analysis of Admission Criteria for a Nurse Anesthesia Program” Ms. Lisa Milhoan, Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesia (Nurse Anesthesia, GR)

STC 118

“Do SmartBoards Really make Students Smarter?” Dr. Kalpana Pai (Faculty, School of Business)

Library Orientation Room

“Redefining the Reach of Public School Discipline in the Internet Age” Jesse Snyder, School of Law Faculty Sponsor: Mr. H. Brian Holland (Law, GR)

Brown Lupton International Programs

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Asian Religions and Culture” Emily Dzenowski, Crystal Ogwurike, Betty Taylor, Audra Morton Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Lili Zhang (Religion, GR)

4:00-4:20 STC 114

10:30-10:50 Library, Main Floor / Poster Session STC 114 “Escaping Welfare Entrapment, Part IV” Lawrence Jacob Pope Faculty sponsors: Ms. Dorian Johnson and Ms. Lisa Scott (English/Math, UG) STC116

“Tweet Success: How to Write Across Media (and Social Media) Effectively” Dr. Kay Colley (Faculty, Communication)

STC118

“Building iPhone/iPad iOS Apps” Joaquin Feliciano, Robert Vera Faculty Sponsor: Dr.Yukong Zhang (Computer Science, UG)

Library Orientation Room

“Re-Imagining the Sacred Through Graphic Stories” Dr. Gladys Childs, Lisa Mullins Denis Ushakov (Religion, UG)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Nuts, Sluts, and Perverts, Part IV: Who Was Jack the Ripper?” Brenton Flowers, Bailey Clark, Shirley Wood, Ashia Mayes, Nick Maryol, Barbie Diaz Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Greg Gullion (Criminal Justice, UG)

11:00-11:20 Library, Main Floor / Poster Session STC 114 “Educating Future Teachers” Lisa Garcia, Mary Valdez; Sandy Ramirez; Italia Perez; Jazmin Mendoza Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Annnette Torres-Elias (Education, UG)

“Quiet Misogyny: Chaucer’s Depiction of Women in The Canterbury Tales” Lisa Puente Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elizabeth Battles (English, UG)

“The Benefits of Attending Professional Conferences Prior to Graduation” Tambre Ruggerio Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Elsa Anderson (Education, UG)

STC 116

“Tsunesaburo Makiguchi - Value Education to Teach Authentic Happiness” Heather Hughes Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

STC 118

“Artful Curriculum Evaluation and Instruction: Lessons Learned from Rudolf Steiner’s Spirituality-Based Waldorf Education” Morgan Valsin Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

Library Orientation Room

“Elephant in the Room” Kristi Taylor, Allen Dean, Rachel Starkey, Kalani Smith, Jacob Sanchez Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Connie Whitt-Lambert (Theater, UG)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Family Sexual Violence: Protection, Prevention, and Education” Ray A. Cox, Amy Suffield Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tanni Chaudhuri (Sociology, UG)

4:30-4:50 STC 114

“Reading and Technology Preferences of Gifted and Talented Students in 4th, 5th, 6th Grades” James Segrest Dr. Twyla Miranda, (Education, GR)

STC 116

“Rabindranath Tagore’s Holistic Approach to Learning” Erin Vader, Marco Walder Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

STC 116

“How Mission Impacts Everything: A Review of College Student Media Mission Statements and Student Media Success” Dr. Kay Colley (Faculty, Communication)

STC 118

STC 118

“Identity in America: An Exercise in Visual Sociology” Payton Carter, Kriti Sharma, Felicia Hernandez, Kim Tuyindi Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tanni Chaudhuri ( Sociology, UG)

“Xingzhi and the Emergence of Public Education in China” Julie Ledford Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

Library Orientation Room

Library Orientation Room

“Re-Analyzing the Story of Adam and Eve” Maria Rojas Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Kendra Weddle Irons (Religion, UG)

“True Value of Professional Certifications” Joshua Stone, MBA Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carol Sullivan (Business, GR)

Brown Lupton

“DIY: Students Renovate A Fine Arts Class” Justine Wallace, Jan L. Birks, Tyler Lackey, Martika Cook Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Kit Hall ( Art, UG)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Victims of Violence in Relationships: Academic and One Safe Place” Michelle Morgan, Dr. Tanni Chaudhuri, Beth Hollingsworth, Chasiti Dixon, Katy Parkley, Kim Tooke Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Sandra Hart (Business, GR)

11:30-11:50 Library, Main Floor / Poster Session STC 116 “Jazz: The American Music” Austin Snow Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Ilka Araujo (Music, UG)

5:00-5:20 STC 114

“Strategies Used to Improve ELL Literacy Skills” La Verne Ross Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

STC 116

STC 118

“Memory Guards the Heart” Ryan Grounds, Sophia Ingram Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Linda Carroll (English, UG)

“Maria Montessori: Peace and Education” Katarina Schultz Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

STC 118

Library Orientation Room

“Mommy Dearest: The Casey Anthony Case Study” Timothy Reece, Nicholas Maryol, Felicia Hernandez, Cesar Linares, Delvin Hill Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Tanni Chaudhuri ( Sociology, UG)

“The Psychological Aspects of Athletic Injury” Kori J. Bell Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Misti Sparks (Counseling, GR)

Library Orientation Room

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Employing Integrated Marketing Communications Techniques Every Day to Create a Positive Image” Chelsey Lewis, Annette Lance, Dana Mertz, Rhyan Lynch Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Kay Colley (Communications, UG)

“The Fraud Practicum and Texas Wesleyan University: An Opportunity to be an “Asset” to the School” Joshua Stone Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carol Sullivan (Business, GR)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Creating Possibilities through Alternative Policy Perspectives” Jackie Gaffner, Katrina Schultz Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Julia Ballenger (Education, GR)

12:00-2:00 Lou’s Place 2:00-2:20 STC 114

SGA Luncheon and Panel: Success after Wesleyan by invitation only, due to limited seating “DFW National Cemetery: It’s Here for our Veterans” Brandy Hendon, Priscilla Torres, Maggie O’Flinn, Carl Howell Faculty Sponsor: Ms. DeeAnn Day (English, UG)

STC 116

“A Better Way to Use Cloud Storage” Kendall Baker; Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Yukong Zhang (Computer Science, UG)

STC 118

“Does Empowerment of Women Help or Hinder Global Progress?” Tonya Henderson, Laura Alexander, Brandy Hendon, Rachel Hunter Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Ibrahim Salih (Political Science, UG)

Library Orientation Room

“Imagine Yourself as a Leader: Creating Possibilities to Connect with the World Around You” Michael Chaney, JoAnna Duncan, Monica Maldonado, Brenton Flowers, Eva Lopez, Brandon Flowers Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Bruce McDonald (Religion, UG)

Brown Lupton International Programs

“Study Abroad: Global Opportunities for Students” Panel moderated by Dr. Mark Hanshaw and Andy Harris, Director of International Programs

5:30-5:50 STC 114

“Garden Gift (A Sorrow Song for W.E.B. DuBois)” Jeff Herr Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

STC 116

“John Dewey: His Ethical Vision of Education Practice” Solomon Cross Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

Library Orientation Room

“Paulo Freire: Educating the Educator” Jacqueline Gaffner Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Twyla Miranda (Education, GR)

6:30-7:15

Nicholas Martin Hall / Keynote Address: Fort Worth City Councilman, Joel Burns

7:30

On the Mall / University Cookout


March 28, 2012