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WEDNESDAY

September 15, 2010

Vol. 93 • No. 16

www.therambler.org

The Rambler The voice of Texas Wesleyan University students since 1917

Grab something to eat near campus.

Lady Rams dominate rivals SAGU. Sports, page 5

A&E, page 4

Anita Perry speaks at TWU law school

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff First Lady Anita Perry speaks to about 40 Wesleyan Law students and faculty about being a successful leader in today’s society. Shauna Banks

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Texas’ First Lady Anita Perry greeted everyone from the dean to the students as they filed into the Amon G. Carter auditorium Sept. 13. Perry, Gov. Rick Perry’s wife, visited the Texas Wesleyan School of Law and spoke to the students and faculty about the importance of leadership and community service. “No community is worth living in

without good leadership,” Perry said. “I heard once that people are most afraid of failure. I think we are more afraid of success.” Martin Garcia, a board member of the Texas Wesleyan Law Republicans, said the speech was organized by fellow member and third-year law student Carol Longoria. He said with midterms coming up and elections not far away, it was a good time to have Perry on campus. Perry spoke of past leaders during

her address, including Nolan Ryan and New York mayor Rudy Giuliani, revealing the biggest key to success is leadership. To become successful leaders, she said people must first define who they are to themselves so they can make tough decisions when they arise. “The people in your community should be your top priority, because you will have the chance to make a difference for them,” Perry said.

Perry ended her speech after 15 minutes by thanking law students for coming and wishing them well in their future endeavors. “For us, it’s been a privilege to have the First Lady of Texas coming to our school, and I think we’ve all learned a lot about the legal profession and helping our community,” said Mahrosh Nawaz, third-year law student. “I was actually hoping that it would be longer because she spoke very well.”

Scuba certification open to Wesleyan students Shauna Banks

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Only three students so far can say they’ve donned scuba gear for graduation at Texas Wesleyan after completing a minor in recreational dive management. Starting the open-water, scuba diving activities course in 1992, scuba and swimming instructor Bill Rucker has headed a one-of-akind program at the university for more than a decade now. “The course is basically to provide a recreational dive management for a student that wants to have a secondary employment opportunity,” Rucker said. Rucker said the course takes about three years, or 20 credit hours, to complete and it certifies the students to teach others to dive and to possibly manage a diving business. A lifeguard at the university pool, junior kinesiology major Jonathan Ayala, has already completed his first semester of open-water diving. “[I will] probably end up coaching down the line,” he said. “But I’m also taking scuba, so there’s probably a lot of things I can do with that.” Students coming into the minor program with previous experience and certification can

New blog sheds light on school’s community Rachel Peel

rlpeel@mail.txwes.edu

The Signature Experience Leadership Team is going digital to promote communication within the Wesleyan community. Earlier this year, SELT ventured into the virtual world by creating a blog where students, faculty and staff at the school can share stories about what they think makes Wesleyan special. “[The blog] was my idea, because we needed a communication tool to keep the campus updated with what’s happening and what’s new,” said Amy Collier, director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. The Signature Experience Blog allows students to upload stories about their experiences at Texas Wesleyan as well as what they think separates Wesleyan from other universities. For now, the SELT team is only inviting certain people to upload their stories. Financial aid secretary Tara Cates is among those who have already posted. “I’m very proud of Wesleyan and what it has done for my family. They gave me a home at the Village when I had lost my own,” she said. Chuck Burton, assistant vice president for marketing and communications, said the department is doing its best to satisfy students and using the blog as an informational tool. “We use it to provide news updates, project updates, any kind of information related to the Signature Experience,” Burton said. In the future, SELT will open the blog to the entire Wesleyan community, but for now they are trying to get the information to the faculty and

  BLOG, page 3

“When you watch him

underwater with students, he is like this eagle eye that sees everything.” Pamela Rast

Kinesiology Department Chair

also gain credit towards the minor and start with the higher-level courses. “I encourage the students that want to do this to go ahead and take the two one-hour classes just to get started,” said Dr. Pamela Rast, kinesiology department chair and professor. All scuba students have the opportunity to go on a trip once a year as part of the program. Previous trips have been to Cozumel and the Bay Islands of Honduras, where the world’s second largest barrier reef rests, she said. “There is nothing like what you see underwater,” Rast said. The minor itself is a combination of open water diving, advanced diving, master dive and instructional assistant courses before students

Jonathan Resendez | Rambler Staff First Restoration Inc. technician Jose Prieto pumps water out of the library’s basement after thunderstorms left it sitting in 6 inches of water. The services cost an estimated $20,000.

Floods damage buildings Jonathan Resendez

jlresendez@mail.txwes.edu

The Sept. 8 thunderstorms didn’t spare Wesleyan as segments of multiple buildings were shut down due to flooding.   SCUBA, page 3 About 6 inches of water closed the library

basement and first floor of the administration building. First Restoration Inc. vacuumed and dried the buildings for multiple days, which will cost about $20,000, owner James Farley said.

  FLOOD, page 3


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September 15, 2010

Opinion

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Discrimination has no place at Wesleyan

other legally-protected status.” Most people know what discrimination looks like when they see it, Melissa Bates even if they don’t read the handStaff writer book. When I came to Wesleyan mdbates@mail.xwes.edu I was afraid I might experience discrimination because of my agnosticism, bisexuality and previous homeless status. I have not experienced many Wesleyan has a very concise, but acts of personal discrimination in perhaps not so clear, policy against my lifetime. I have however, experidiscrimination on its campuses. enced discrimination against others Even if you’re no good at decipher- on issues of sexual orientation and ing legal speak, the policy should be religious affiliation. easy enough to comprehend. I guess I was naive when I came to I’m starting to wonder how many Wesleyan. I expected this school to of us actually read and understand be different from others. the student handbook. One might think that discriminaWesleyan defines discrimination tion on a Methodist campus would as “any act or conduct that is preju- be difficult to find, but I was apdicial toward another person’s race, palled last spring when I found the color, national origin, ethnicity, opposite is true. gender, age, religion, disability or A friend of mine, who happens to

Shauna Banks Staff writer

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Gun shots. Screaming. Chaos. Things no student, staff or faculty member ever wants to encounter within the classroom at any university. Yet, are institutions of higher education across the country really doing their students and faculty any favors by banning licensed students and staff from carrying on campus? The 2010-2011 Student Handbook for Texas Wesleyan spells out strict rules and policies concerning any weapons on campus, including concealed handguns. It goes so far as to specify that even those licensed to carry any such weapons not be permitted to carry, or have them in any parked vehicle on campus. Maybe it’s just me, but I know I’d be a little less panicked in a shooter situation, knowing that at least a few of my classmates were armed. Maybe those who possess concealed handgun licenses and were carrying could put up some sort of defense, potentially saving many lives. Currently the university uses the Wesleyan Emergency Management System. This system is intended to rapidly send messages to students and faculty who are registered for the service, in the event of a weather emergency or violent crisis situation. While this is all fine and good, by the time any student received such a message during a violent shooter situation, the scene could already be very grim. Nearly three and a half years after the Vir-

be Jewish, confided in me that some Wesleyan students had called him derisive names. I could not believe something like that would happen at my school, and I was outraged. Later that week, I encountered discrimination again on campus while in a humanities class discussing two workshops that had been presented at University College Day. The workshops focused on the topic of transgender issues. During the discussion, two of my classmates made it very clear they did not like the topic and that they didn’t want to continue the discussion. They tried to make the comments under their breaths, but I heard them loud and clear, and it made me irate. I nearly let my temper get the best of me, but because I am older, I kept my mouth shut and let their immature rants continue.

Concealed carry makes safety personal

ginia Tech shootings, I am still convinced that allowing students and faculty with concealed handgun licenses to carry on campus would offer some sort of hope. Obviously a similar situation could arise at another college campus. I would hate to think that my only defense would be hiding behind a desk or praying that I played dead convincingly enough. Because after all is said and done, the fact still remains that a person who has gone off the deep end, enough to open up fire on a college campus, has no regard for the laws in place. A simple policy stating it’s now allowed, under stiff penalties, just does not deter such an individual. However, knowing the classroom he or she was walking into could contain five or more concealed handgun carriers would give room for pause. Students for Concealed Carry on Campus is an organization of students and faculty all over the country that advocate for students’ rights to carry on campus, as given to us by the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Texas is still behind the curve in allowing its students who are licensed to carry on campus, but came closer in February 2009, when a bill was introduced during the 81st legislative session, calling for campuses to allow concealed handgun carry. SCCC said that Senator Jeff Wentworth (R-San

Antonio) introduced bill 1164 on Feb. 26, 2009.  The bill left the State Affairs Committee and passed the Senate by a vote of 2011.  The bill was then sent back to the House Calendars Committee but ultimately died due to the lengthy Democratic filibuster in the Texas House over the Voter ID bill. Despite this setback, debates are still going on today at many campuses, even progressing to “empty holster protests,” originally coined by the SCCC, in which students wear empty gun holsters in protest of the concealed handgun ban. Currently, Utah is the only state allowing licensed handgun owners to carry on campus at its nine public universities. With any luck, Texas will eventually follow suit—allowing students and faculty to equally defend themselves in a crisis situation and put their lives back in their own hands.

Founded in 1917 as The Handout Publisher: Lamar Smith

Jonathan Resendez, editor-in-chief Barry Grubbs, opinion editor Eliana Mijangos, sports editor Chuck Fain, arts & entertainment editor Dwight Conerway, college life editor Meisa Keivani Najafabadi, photo editor Erica Estrada, graphic designer/cartoonist Wendy Moore, faculty adviser Dr. Kay Colley, faculty liaison

Letters to the editor: The Rambler, a weekly publication, welcomes all letters. All submissions must have a full printed name, phone number and signature. While every consideration is made to publish letters, publication is limited by time and space. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions for space, grammar, clarity and style. Letters to the editor may be subject to response from editors and students on the opinion page.

Member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press, Student Press Law Center, College Media Advisers and College Newspaper Business and Advertising Managers.

“We are not afraid to follow the truth ... wherever it may lead.” — Thomas Jefferson

R ambler Contribution

Please send all news briefs to twurambler@ yahoo.com. Submissions due by noon Friday to see brief in the following week’s issue.

Barry Grubbs Opinion editor

bgrubbs@mail.txwes.edu

The idea of students, faculty and staff members carrying concealed handguns on Wesleyan’s campus does not sit right with me for a variety of reasons. There are obviously two sides to this issue but each of us has the right to decide which makes us feel safer. The students and faculty on any campus should strictly focus on academic pursuits. Security teams hired by the college should likewise focus on the constant protection of those students and faculty. We all have a role in the big picture. Asking us to take responsibility for our own security and safety by allowing concealed carry is counter to the rationale for hiring the security force in the first place. It isn’t logical to deploy a security force on a college campus whose mission is to provide a safe environment only to minimize their ability by disarming them. There are college campuses of various sizes all across the country that have profes-

Photo Illustration by Barry Grubbs

The Rambler

Opinions expressed in The Rambler are those of the individual authors only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Texas Wesleyan community as a whole.

These two incidences of discrimination have caused me to look at Wesleyan in a slightly different way. I don’t want to believe that there could be discrimination of any kind on my campus or in my church, but I now realize that discrimination may be everywhere and will not go away. I am still having trouble comprehending such intolerance and discrimination from a group of people whom I expected to adhere to a doctrine of love for their fellow man. Americans have overcome some insurmountable hurdles in the past 234 years, but some form of discrimination still exists in many of us. In recent months, we’ve seen discrimination against Hispanics in Arizona and against Muslims all across the nation.

This discrimination is just despicable. When we stereotype people, all we’re doing is making it difficult for the next generation to overcome the curse of discrimination. I do my best to avoid discrimination, but like most people, I have stereotypical thoughts that slip into my mind. Those thoughts might come from the clothes people wear, the cars they drive or the way they look. Is that guy with his pants slung low really a gang-banger, or is he just trying to fit in with the crowd? Is the old man who just got off the bus wearing a pagri (head scarf) likely to be a terrorist? It’s ridiculous to make those assumptions. I understand that discrimination and stereotypes will not go away any time soon, but it would be nice to keep it off the Texas Wesleyan campus and out of Poly Church.

More guns do not make campus safer

sionally-trained and properly armed officers on their security teams. Weatherford College, for example, is roughly the size of Wesleyan, and employs a security force comprised of professionally-trained peace officers who are armed and on duty 24 hours a day. This is the most effective way to provide security to a campus regardless of its size. The Students for Concealed Carry on Campus is a grassroots organization that supports concealed carry. Their website lists a number of “common arguments” for allowing licensed adults to carry on campus. They attempt to answer each argument with a very rational explanation. It really is just rationalization. That’s what I mean when I say there are two sides to the issue. Regardless of any rationalization by the SCCC, allowing more guns on campus will logically result in a higher probability that a gun will be used against the campus population. More guns–more opportunity. A gun that does not exist can’t be fired accidentally or on purpose. According to SCCC data, about 10 percent of adults are licensed and carry concealed guns nationwide. If I knew one out of every 10 people on campus was packing heat, I would be distracted—period. It’s one thing for someone to take the state’s course to become licensed. It is something else entirely to predict how a student with four hours of safety training will react under fire.

Students and faculty carrying concealed guns would be no less vulnerable to the crazy, armed madman who comes on campus bent on destruction than they are now. There would just be more guns involved, more bullets flying and a greater probability that someone is unintentionally injured or killed. Honestly, no one would expect a 22-year-old accounting major to suddenly transform into a commando and make all the right decisions in a “kill or be killed” situation that could easily be over in less than a minute. I can’t buy the concept that someone with no experience of defending himself against violent crime can suddenly protect himself and others, just because he is the one with the concealed gun. I don’t want that pressure on me, and I don’t want to put it on my friends and professors. I honestly don’t believe Wesleyan’s administration believes there is any reason for the students and staff of this university to fear gun violence on campus. If they change their minds on that, I hope the resolution will be to develop an armed campus police force to enhance our security. There are plenty of places where I believe concealed carry is a good idea, and I am a big fan of the U.S. Constitution. There is not a more civilized place to be than on a college campus. That said—I like to think we have a better chance of remaining civilized and safe, if we don’t get used to the “wild west” approach to campus security.

What do you think about students carrying concealed guns on campus?

Sofia Maldonado, junior exercise science

Doss Whetstone, senior mass communication

Patrick Fraser, senior biology

“That would probably make “There’s too much testosterone “With the right regulation, it me pretty uncomfortable.” on a college campus to allow should be no different than guns to be carried.” walking through Wal-Mart.”

Address all correspondence to: Texas Wesleyan University

The Rambler

1201 Wesleyan St. Fort Worth, TX 76105 twurambler@yahoo.com To contact T he R ambler (817) 531-7552 Advertising Inquiries: (817) 532-7582

Kristi Roberts, freshman athletic training

“This is not the best neighborhood in the world. I think it would be all right.”

Oscar Campos, junior business

“I have a concealed handgun license, and it’s a deterent to potential things that can happen.”


Campus

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

FLOOD

continued from page 1

“The drains got overwhelmed,” said John Sinclair, emergency response coordinator for First Restoration Inc. “They’re full of leaves and couldn’t handle it. They’re stuffed.” Sinclair said the damage could have been worse considering the dock held more than a foot and a half of water at its peak. Security notified maintenance workers about the flooded offices in the administration building at about 7 a.m. that morning. “In the past, security has caught it early, today we didn’t get the call until 7 a.m.,” said James Ayala, facilities maintenance technician. “There were some ponds in here. As long as it keeps raining we’ll be sucking it up.” Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff The mailroom sustained wa- More than a foot and a half of water covered the library’s ter damage, but the employees loading dock, disabling deliveries for the day. However, only managed to work around it. 6 inches penetrated the building. “We’re a mess,” said mail/ copy center manager Joy Students, prepared for rain class on time. Burge. “Hasn’t happened like but not high water, maneu“I messed up my perfect this before. This is the first vered through puddles and shoes,” said Jennifer Brewer, time it’s this bad.” fast-moving currents to get to freshman music education major. “Honestly, I didn’t think it was going to get that bad. I didn’t think that it was going to flood like that.” Religious Life at Texas Wesleyan -Staff writer Rachel Peel contributed to this article.

University Chapel:

September 15, 2010

continued from page 1

have earned their instructional diving certification. Rucker currently teaches all scuba courses with occasional assistance from Rast, who is a certified dive master herself. “I feel very fortunate that we have him [Rucker] here teaching for us, because of how he cares for students,” Rast said. “When you watch him underwater with students, he is like this eagle eye that sees everything.” Students are provided with major scuba diving equipment like oxygen tanks, and only have to purchase their personal equipment, which includes a snorkel, boots, mask and fins. When students complete the program, they get to go through an underwater graduation ceremony and are given red and white cords to wear at the traditional robing ceremony. “The underwater graduation is usually right after the robing ceremony, or the day before, and our students actually turn their tassel over as they come up out of the water,” Rast said. The university also offers a four-week, open-water div-

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Wesleyan students train for their scuba certification in the pool located in the SUB. An underwater graduation ceremony is offered to students who complete the program.

ing course in the evenings for continuing education students, or others related to students and faculty. Those interested do not have to be registered students to participate in this evening

CareerLink Wesleyan’s On-line job board!

Free lunch and discussion/dialogue PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312

Major/Career Guidance

Computerized Job Searches Job/ Intern Seeker’s Database

• “Faith seeking understanding” – ALL are welcome! For info: http://www.txwes.edu/religiouslife/index.htm

Located in Brown Lupton North Wing Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm 817.531.6512 smata@txwes.edu rfisk@txwes.edu

class. The next four-week course begins Sept. 21, Rucker said. “We continue to teach Wesleyan’s family in those courses, and it’s very enjoyable,” Rucker said.

BLOG

continued from page 1

Services Available:

Common Meal:

Mocking Interview

Resume Writing & Critiquing

Resume Posting

Employer’s Database

http://www.txwes.edu/careerservices/index.htm

staff so everyone can be on the same page, Burton said. “People don’t often check their e-mail, so we wanted to make sure there are different ways of getting information out,” Collier said. Sophomore kinesiology major Deserae Davis said the blog could produce positive results. “People got something good to say all the time,” she said. “You never know what it may be. It could change the world.”

NEVER GO HUNGRY Always have a plan Best Values for Commuter Students Meal Plans:

Best Values for Faculty and Staff Meal Plans:

The Block 30 is the

best value if you would like to eat 1-2 meals in a week in our residential restaurant.

The Block 40 is

the best value if you dine at our residential restaurants 2-3 times a week.

Plan #1

Plan #2

The Block 50 is not the best value for your dollar but great for those patrons who would like to join us 3-4 times a week.

Plan #3

Block 30 • 30 all-you-care to-eat meals/ semester • $186.73/ semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $200 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $20 • $6.22 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

Block 40

• 40 all-you-care to-eat meals/ semester • $238.50/semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $200 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $20 • $5.96 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

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SCUBA

Career Services

Live music with brief time of worship Tuesdays at 12:15 in PUMC Chapel Free lunch after on PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312

|

The Bronze is the best

value if you are really price conscious -all-you-care-to-eat meals are a little more than $4 versus paying at the door is $6.50; plus you get $25 in free DBD just for signing up!

Plan #1

Sample The Ram is the best value if you would like to eat on campus once a day during the week. Plan #2

Willie Wallet is great for students who

have a crazy schedule that need a little bit more in their meal plan membership.

Block 50

• 50 all-you-care to-eat meals/ semester • $284.16/ semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $200 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $20 • $5.68 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

Add $ to your meal plan when you get your refund check

Plan #3

Ram Sample • 5 all-you-care to-eat meals/ week • $100 Declining Balancing Dollars • $585.46/ semester (includes tax) • Super Value Stretcher- Add $100 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $25 • $6.07 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

Willie Wallet • 300 Declining Balance Dollars • $300/ semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $100 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $25

Bronze • 30 all-you-care to-eat meals/semester • $150 Declining Balancing Dollars • $324.75/ semester (includes tax) • Super Value Stretcher- Purchase this membership and we will give you $25 in free Declining Balance Dollars! • $5.82 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!


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Arts & Entertainment

September 15, 2010

Feeding the urge:

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Finding food around Wesleyan Chuck Fain

cmfain@mail.txwes.edu

Beach St.

4224 East Lancaster Avenue

180 E. LANCASTER 2657 East Vickery Blvd.

3012 E. Rosedale St.

Wesleyan St.

Vickery Blvd. 5012 East Rosedale Street

E. Rosedale St.

Dwight Conerway | Staff Photographer See history come to life at the Museum of Science and History in Fort Worth.

Experience the past today

1417 Vaughn Boulevard

N 2400 Vaughn Blvd.

Vaughn Blvd.

Dwight Conerway

dconerway@mail.txwes.edu

Angie Ruiz | Rambler Staff

sity, and they always remember you when you go in,” said alumnus Robert Carroll. If you want more soul food, travel about five minutes or so east on Rosedale. There you will find Drew’s, a neighborhood legend. Drew’s has been around for as long as anyone who talks about it can remember. Their selection of soul and comfort food can’t be beat, and their generous portions leave you feeling full all day. Tres Coronas is an authentic Mexican food place just behind the campus on Vickery Bulvard It too looks like it could use a fresh coat of paint,

Texas Wesleyan Presents p.m. ony t 1:15 ion Cerem a 8 r at be Dedic ptem brary • Se rary Piano L. West Li Lib es West & Jam e c i n u The E • Se p Facult tember 9 at 7:3 y Recit 0 p.m Music a . for Flu l: te, Pic Marti colo a n Hal nd Pia l no . m . p t 7:30 r 14 a e list b m Meda pte eries e S ld S o t r G e • c n rn Con petitio *Clibu liburn Com C 2009 all Bass H

For more information, visit The Music Department at http://www.txwes.edu/music/ music/index.htm or call 817.531.4992

but what it lacks in presentation, it makes up for in taste. What most gringos know as “street tacos” are served up hot and fresh in handmade corn tortillas, along with a full menu of authentic appetizers. Try the “La Lengua” taco if you’re looking for a truly authentic treat. Also on the Mexican food front is Campesinos Cafe. South of the campus, straight up Vaughn, is where you’ll find it. With excellent enchiladas, tasty tacos and cold cerveza, Campesinos is a great place to have a meeting or just to enjoy lunch. Holding its own alongside

Fort Worth’s cultural district houses the Museum of Science and History, which boasts new exhibits. One exhibit is the TXO 4-D theater where visitors can take a tour of the gas drilling industry. The brief movie also provides a simulated experience that leaves visitors holding on to their seats. Starting with an introduction of how gas is discovered, visitors take a 4-D tour that goes from inside the earth to the earth’s surface. Afterward, visitors can take a walk through the museum area where actual equipment and videos give an in-depth view of the Barnett Shale and explain what this is. The exhibit is an experience for all who want to learn more about the origin and the business of gas drilling. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Another sight is the Extreme Building exhibit where visitors can use materials to invent, draw and design electronic, visual and movement type models. In another sec-

more popular chain burger joints like McDonalds and Whataburger is Griff ’s. Big burgers overflowing with fixings are what you can expect from this Poly staple. They are reasonably priced and serve ice cream and sweet tea. Get yourself a greasesoaked bag of burgers from here soon. There are many other places to eat around Wesleyan that are unique to the Poly neighborhood. I suggest you seek out and try as many of these places as you can, and to keep the old adage in mind —don’t judge a book by its cover.



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tion visitors can view replicas of Leonardo de Vinci’s artwork and inventions. A walk through the Noble Planetarium provides information on local sites where many historic discoveries have been made in Texas during the past 100 years. One example is the world’s largest hand-dug well. A brief video allows visitors to experience night fall and actually see constellations formed and where they may be located using the naked eye as well as a common pair of binoculars. Although there are no special rates for college students, a $14 admission gets visitors in until closing time. Another attraction is the Omni Theater, which shows documentary films for $7 and full-length features for $10. Combo pricing is also available if desired, where visitors may view all exhibits plus an Omni film for $19, or all exhibits and the planetarium for $17. Tickets can be purchased by calling 817-255-9540, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday or online up to one hour before show time for the Omni. All major credit cards are accepted, and there are no refunds or exchanges.

© Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

Wesleyan offers many opportunities to its students – unfortunately, a wide variety of food isn’t one of them. As far as on-campus eateries go, our selection is slim – especially when compared to other colleges in the area. There’s Dora’s, which is expensive if you don’t have a meal plan and is every bit as spectacular as you would expect a cafeteria to be. The Coffee X Spot offers lighter fare such as salads and wraps, and perhaps the most popular choice, The Sub, which serves hamburgers and sandwiches. “I like The Sub. They always know how to make my chicken cheese steak,” said freshman liberal studies major Robert Tutt. But what if none of these on-campus options appeals to you? There’s the Subway across the street from Wesleyan on Rosedale, and other chain restaurants such as McDonalds, Whataburger and Jack in the Box are found just north of the school on Lancaster. However, Poly has so much more to offer your stomach than the same old deep-fried flavors. The Poly Grill, just across the street from Wesleyan on Vaughn, is a soul food place serving up rib-sticking home cooking. The small, unassuming building looks a bit rough, but inside are some of the friendliest folks and the finest food. Their menu includes everything from chicken fried steak to waffles —you can even get a glass of Kool-Aid to wash it down. “Poly Grill is a place to go for good food at a good price. They are supportive of the community and the univer-

90 Years of Leadership 1920 Applications available online www.studentlife.txwes.edu contact:

Michael Chaney 817-531-4870 or mchaney@txwes.edu contact: contact: Michael MichaelChaney Chaney817-531-4870 817-531-4870 or mchaney@txwes.edu or mchaney@txwes.edu

2010 Contact Us at

Phone: 817-531-7550 Email: stugov@txwes.edu

Visit us at

OC Hall 202 and 204


Sports

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Ram volleyball spikes the “swagger” off SAGU Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

The Texas Wesleyan Lady Rams’ volleyball team defeated school rivals Southwestern Assemblies of God University 3-1. “This is a team that always comes out with a lot of swag,” said sophomore middle blocker Christina Danile. The Lady Rams came out slow in the first set getting down quickly to a 6-2 deficit. Head Coach Christi Clawson called a time out where she said, “We need to regroup and refocus. Ready and relax.” Turning the game around, freshman outside hitter Haelee Horne and freshman middle blocker Katherine Rosenbush came out of the time out with three blocks. Senior outside hitter Kristen Venhuizen topped off their work and finished the first set with four kills giving them a 25-23 win over SAGU. “Going into the match it was very apparent that SAGU knew our tendencies, but I think we did a good job adjusting,” said senior setter Evoni Darling. Wesleyan came out strong in the second set with an 18-9 lead. SAGU picked it up and cut the score to 24-23. Rosenbush kept a steady pace leading the set in kills.

Horne took the win with a kill assisted by Darling. The Lady Rams pulled out with a 25-23 lead. The third set was a constant exchange of points between the Lions and Lady Rams. With SAGU up by one point, Horne lost a tip and Wesleyan lost 25-23. Rosenbush led the team with five kills in the fourth set. Christina Daniel, sophomore middle blocker, and Hannah Horton, freshman outside hitter, came in with a block and a kill each. Rosenbush, once again, sealed the win with a kill assisted from Darling. “The great thing about our team is that we aren’t dependent on one person. We have many hitters who can put the ball away which contributed to our win,” Darling said. Darling led the Lady Rams with 53 assists, 16 digs and two aces. She was accompanied by Venhuizen with 14 kills, 16 digs and two aces. Horne had 12 kills and 10 digs, and Rosenbush had 18 kills. “It was a great start to conference. We did a great job of working together and playing to our strengths,” Rosenbush said. The Lady Rams are now 6-2. They will face St. Thomas University Sept. 14 at home.

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Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Haelee Horne, freshman outside hitter, gets a tip, turning the tempo of the first set and leading the Lady Rams to a 25-23 win.

TWU soccer teams fall short on victory Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan women’s soccer team lost to the Lubbock Christian Chaparrals 1-0 in Saturday’s game. This is their first loss of the season bringing their record to 4-1. The one goal of the game was scored with very little effort from the Chaparrals. Katy Houchin, junior goal keeper, actually ran into another defender, giving Lubbock the perfect opportunity for an open shot at the goal. The goal came with a lot of disappointment after the Lady Rams had held the score to 0-0 for the first half of the game. “I feel like we took LCU a little lightly,” said head coach Josh Gibbs. “They never came out and played us, and that was frustrating. They did what they needed to win, so hats off to them. We will refocus and look to get a win Friday versus Houston Victoria.” Houchin finished the game with four saves to Lubbock’s four saves. The Rams outshot the Chaparrals 16-10 and led in corner kicks 7-2. The Wesleyan men’s team took a hard-fought loss to the Chaps in a double overtime game 3-2. Down by a quick two goals at half time, the Rams worked hard the second half to tie the game. Ivan Kovacevic, freshman mid-fielder, scored the first goal unassisted. He was followed by sophomore defender Ryan Johnson who was assisted by Tyler Mendez, freshman defensive midfielder. “We showed a lot of heart. Even though we were down by two, we didn’t stop playing,” said senior forward Marcus Harris.

5 Martin Field improvements in progress, more to come

September 15, 2010

A multiphase improvement plan for Wesleyan soccer field is currently in the works. Phase one is already complete. Copper lights were actually stolen last year and have now been replaced with more energy-efficient bulbs. The second commitment includes fixing and maintaining the playing turf by adding more natural fertilizers. “We are really excited about the improvements that they are making to the field,” said Katy Houchin, junior goal keeper. “They were definitely needed.” A parking lot with about 60 spots will be added to a lot of of Collard Street with the goal of alleviating traffic along Binge Street. However, Binge will still have parking allotted for players and coaches. “We are looking to improve the overall fan experience,” said Kevin Millikan, athletic director. “They will be adding stadium-style seating in order to gain perspective onto the field as well as permanent bathrooms to replace the Porta Potties.” For the players, locker rooms and athletic training stations will be a vital addition to the field. “The improvements are amazing. It makes our school look great, and it lets us know that they care. We are driven to pay back our school and athletic program by winning a conference championship,” said Ricardo Aguilera, junior forward. The improvements will cost approximately $30,000. Millikan said the plans will be completed by kick off of next year.

Red River Players of the Week • Men’s soccer, Chase Richeson, junior midfielder, was nominated for offensive player of the week. • Women’s soccer, Kayla Mason, junior defender, was nominated for defensive player of the week. Meisa Keivanai Najafabadi | Rambler Staff • Women’s soccer, JesRandal McClanahan, sophomore forward, hustles to turn the ball around and get a score before the half sica Watton, sophomore against Lubbock Christian. forward, was nominated

Dominick Guitierrez, sophomore goal keeper, had a couple of huge saves on goal and some plays off penalty kicks. However, in the 107th minute of overtime, Dustin Jones of the Chaps had a breakaway shot and won it for Lubbock Christian. “Even though we lost, the way we fought showed a positive change in character and a step in the right direction,” said Miguel Arreguin, junior forward.

for offensive player of the Guitierrez finished with 11 saves to Lubbock’s 12 week. to end the game. The Chaparrals led in shots 26-23 and corner kicks 7-6. • Volleyball, Katherine This game left the Wesleyan soccer team winless, Rosenbush, freshman with an 0-6 record. middle blocker, is volleyThe next game for both men and women is set ball player of the week for for Sept. 21 against Schreiner University in Ker- the second consecutive ville. week.

TWU Athletics At Texas Wesleyan, our team members are truly

Yeah. We’re everywhere. But start here: www.therambler.org

student-athletes. They bring in a cumulative GPA of 2.84 and 35 2009-10 NCTTA National Champions: Table Tenis

percent have higher than a 3.0. With academic and athletic success, these students are winners in the classroom as

The Rambler

The Voice of Texas Wesleyan University Students Since 1917

well as on the field or the court. 2009-10 Red River Conference Champions: Men’s Basketball, Baseball, Softball and Golf


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September 15, 2010

College Life

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

TWU network technician moonlights as grillmaster Jonathan Resendez

jlresendez@mail.txwes.edu

The smells in Tommy Chandler’s smoker linger long after his bouts are over. Aromatic ghosts of briskets, ribs and chicken haunt the massive $5,000 pit he constructed himself over the course of two years. While the aromas would simply elicit mouth watering from most people, to Chandler, they mean victory. A competitive cooker for almost two decades, Chandler has traveled the nation winning hundreds of awards in competitions such as the American Royal BBQ Cook Off and the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbeque. “Ask anybody in the cooking world about ‘Smok’n Joe’ and they know who that is,” Chandler said. “That’s me.” Chandler, whose middle name is Joe, modeled his moniker after boxing legend Joe Frazier. He goes by his real name at Wesleyan, where he’s a project manager in charge of installing network cabling and fiber optics. “He’s one of those guys that plans his work and works his plan,” said Richard Webb, senior network engineer. “He’s very proactive.” Although they work together, Webb is no stranger to Chandler’s cooking. “I almost enjoy Tommy as much as I enjoy his barbeque,” Webb said. “You just have to try it to know. It’s the best recipe I’ve ever had.”

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff (Above) Tommy Chandler pieced together his custom smoker with a 75-year-old friend over the course of two years. (Bottom left) Chandler keeps his first cooking award, for 8th place in brisket out of 110, in a special sleeve to preserve it. (Bottom right) The competitive cooker has won hundreds of awards, including 2nd overall at the American Royal and and 11th overall at the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbeque.

Chandler keeps a recipe journal that he travels with, making notes as he tweaks the flavor for different locations. “Each judge has his own taste buds,” he said. “You have one chance to impress the judge. One bite.” Chandler began competitive cooking in 1995, won his first award a year later, and has been “hooked ever since.” He honed his craft by listening, asking questions and experimenting. “It’s a very expensive hobby, like golf,” Chandler said. “It’s addicting.”

Competitive cooker Steve Graham has known Chandler for five years. They meet with other cooks, usually couples, and travel to various competitions around the country. “We’re friends Friday night,” Graham said. “But come Saturday morning, we’re there to cook—to compete.” Chandler’s wife cooked against and alongside him until two years ago, when she died of a heart attack. Using a simple grill, she’d win more often than the cooks with expensive set-

ups, he said. “For two years, she kicked everyone’s butt,” he said. Chandler said he’s always receiving calls from friends and family, asking for cooking advice. He said he doesn’t mind helping people and is pleased that the proceeds from the competitions go toward helping charities. He catered for the IT department last year, but plans on feeding 300 students, faculty and staff Sept. 15 for the Signature Student Experience BBQ luncheon. “I’ll have to get up a whole lot earlier,” he said.

Wesleyan community remembers Sept. 11, supports Islamic religion (Above) Associate psychology professor Dr. Marilyn Pugh reads from the Quran, the Islamic holy book, on Sept. 11. A crowd of 21 gathered to show their support of religious freedom. (Below) The Never Forget Project set up 3,000 flags on the mall. Each flag represents a victim of the 9-11 attacks.

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff .


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September 15, 2010

College Life

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

TWU network technician moonlights as grillmaster Jonathan Resendez

jlresendez@mail.txwes.edu

The smells in Tommy Chandler’s smoker linger long after his bouts are over. Aromatic ghosts of briskets, ribs and chicken haunt the massive $5,000 pit he constructed himself over the course of two years. While the aromas would simply elicit mouth watering from most people, to Chandler, they mean victory. A competitive cooker for almost two decades, Chandler has traveled the nation winning hundreds of awards in competitions such as the American Royal BBQ Cook Off and the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbeque. “Ask anybody in the cooking world about ‘Smok’n Joe’ and they know who that is,” Chandler said. “That’s me.” Chandler, whose middle name is Joe, modeled his moniker after boxing legend Joe Frazier. He goes by his real name at Wesleyan, where he’s a project manager in charge of installing network cabling and fiber optics. “He’s one of those guys that plans his work and works his plan,” said Richard Webb, senior network engineer. “He’s very proactive.” Although they work together, Webb is no stranger to Chandler’s cooking. “I almost enjoy Tommy as much as I enjoy his barbeque,” Webb said. “You just have to try it to know. It’s the best recipe I’ve ever had.”

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff (Above) Tommy Chandler pieced together his custom smoker with a 75-year-old friend over the course of two years. (Bottom left) Chandler keeps his first cooking award, for 8th place in brisket out of 110, in a special sleeve to preserve it. (Bottom right) The competitive cooker has won hundreds of awards, including grand champion for chicken and ranked within the top 10 at the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbeque.

Chandler keeps a recipe journal that he travels with, making notes as he tweaks the flavor for different locations. “Each judge has his own taste buds,” he said. “You have one chance to impress the judge. One bite.” Chandler began competitive cooking in 1995, won his first award a year later, and has been “hooked ever since.” He honed his craft by listening, asking questions and experimenting. “It’s a very expensive hobby, like golf,” Chandler said. “It’s addicting.”

Competitive cooker Steve Graham has known Chandler for five years. They meet with other cooks, usually couples, and travel to various competitions around the country. “We’re friends Friday night,” Graham said. “But come Saturday morning, we’re there to cook—to compete.” Chandler’s wife cooked against and alongside him until two years ago, when she died of a heart attack. Using a simple grill, she’d win more often than the cooks with expensive set-

ups, he said. “For two years, she kicked everyone’s butt,” he said. Chandler said he’s always receiving calls from friends and family, asking for cooking advice. He said he doesn’t mind helping people and is pleased that the proceeds from the competitions go toward helping charities. He catered for the IT department last year, but plans on feeding 300 students, faculty and staff Sept. 15 for the Signature Student Experience BBQ luncheon. “I’ll have to get up a whole lot earlier,” he said.

Wesleyan community remembers Sept. 11, supports Islamic religion (Above) Associate psychology professor Dr. Marilyn Pugh reads from the Quran, the Islamic holy book, on Sept. 11. A crowd of 21 gathered to show their support of religious freedom. (Below) The Never Forget Project set up 3,000 flags on the mall. Each flag represents a victim of the 9-11 attacks.

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff .


WEDNESDAY

September 15, 2010

Vol. 93 • No. 16

www.therambler.org

The Rambler The voice of Texas Wesleyan University students since 1917

Grab something to eat near campus.

Lady Rams dominate rivals SAGU. Sports, page 5

A&E, page 4

Anita Perry speaks at TWU law school

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff First Lady Anita Perry speaks to about 40 Wesleyan Law students and faculty about being a successful leader in today’s society. Shauna Banks

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Texas’ First Lady Anita Perry greeted everyone from the dean to the students as they filed into the Amon G. Carter auditorium Sept. 13. Perry, Gov. Rick Perry’s wife, visited the Texas Wesleyan School of Law and spoke to the students and faculty about the importance of leadership and community service. “No community is worth living in

without good leadership,” Perry said. “I heard once that people are most afraid of failure. I think we are more afraid of success.” Martin Garcia, a board member of the Texas Wesleyan Law Republicans, said the speech was organized by fellow member and third-year law student Carol Longoria. He said with midterms coming up and elections not far away, it was a good time to have Perry on campus. Perry spoke of past leaders during

her address, including Nolan Ryan and New York mayor Rudy Giuliani, revealing the biggest key to success is leadership. To become successful leaders, she said people must first define who they are to themselves so they can make tough decisions when they arise. “The people in your community should be your top priority, because you will have the chance to make a difference for them,” Perry said.

Perry ended her speech after 15 minutes by thanking law students for coming and wishing them well in their future endeavors. “For us, it’s been a privilege to have the First Lady of Texas coming to our school, and I think we’ve all learned a lot about the legal profession and helping our community,” said Mahrosh Nawaz, third-year law student. “I was actually hoping that it would be longer because she spoke very well.”

Scuba certification open to Wesleyan students Shauna Banks

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Only three students so far can say they’ve donned scuba gear for graduation at Texas Wesleyan after completing a minor in recreational dive management. Starting the open-water, scuba diving activities course in 1992, scuba and swimming instructor Bill Rucker has headed a one-of-akind program at the university for more than a decade now. “The course is basically to provide a recreational dive management for a student that wants to have a secondary employment opportunity,” Rucker said. Rucker said the course takes about three years, or 20 credit hours, to complete and it certifies the students to teach others to dive and to possibly manage a diving business. A lifeguard at the university pool, junior kinesiology major Jonathan Ayala, has already completed his first semester of open-water diving. “[I will] probably end up coaching down the line,” he said. “But I’m also taking scuba, so there’s probably a lot of things I can do with that.” Students coming into the minor program with previous experience and certification can

New blog sheds light on school’s community Rachel Peel

rlpeel@mail.txwes.edu

The Signature Experience Leadership Team is going digital to promote communication within the Wesleyan community. Earlier this year, SELT ventured into the virtual world by creating a blog where students, faculty and staff at the school can share stories about what they think makes Wesleyan special. “[The blog] was my idea, because we needed a communication tool to keep the campus updated with what’s happening and what’s new,” said Amy Collier, director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. The Signature Experience Blog allows students to upload stories about their experiences at Texas Wesleyan as well as what they think separates Wesleyan from other universities. For now, the SELT team is only inviting certain people to upload their stories. Financial aid secretary Tara Cates is among those who have already posted. “I’m very proud of Wesleyan and what it has done for my family. They gave me a home at the Village when I had lost my own,” she said. Chuck Burton, assistant vice president for marketing and communications, said the department is doing its best to satisfy students and using the blog as an informational tool. “We use it to provide news updates, project updates, any kind of information related to the Signature Experience,” Burton said. In the future, SELT will open the blog to the entire Wesleyan community, but for now they are trying to get the information to the faculty and

  BLOG, page 3

“When you watch him

underwater with students, he is like this eagle eye that sees everything.” Pamela Rast

Kinesiology Department Chair

also gain credit towards the minor and start with the higher-level courses. “I encourage the students that want to do this to go ahead and take the two one-hour classes just to get started,” said Dr. Pamela Rast, kinesiology department chair and professor. All scuba students have the opportunity to go on a trip once a year as part of the program. Previous trips have been to Cozumel and the Bay Islands of Honduras, where the world’s second largest barrier reef rests, she said. “There is nothing like what you see underwater,” Rast said. The minor itself is a combination of open water diving, advanced diving, master dive and instructional assistant courses before students

Jonathan Resendez | Rambler Staff First Restoration Inc. technician Jose Prieto pumps water out of the library’s basement after thunderstorms left it sitting in 6 inches of water. The services cost an estimated $20,000.

Floods damage buildings Jonathan Resendez

jlresendez@mail.txwes.edu

The Sept. 8 thunderstorms didn’t spare Wesleyan as segments of multiple buildings were shut down due to flooding.   SCUBA, page 3 About 6 inches of water closed the library

basement and first floor of the administration building. First Restoration Inc. vacuumed and dried the buildings for multiple days, which will cost about $20,000, owner James Farley said.

  FLOOD, page 3


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September 15, 2010

Opinion

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Discrimination has no place at Wesleyan

other legally-protected status.” Most people know what discrimination looks like when they see it, Melissa Bates even if they don’t read the handStaff writer book. When I came to Wesleyan mdbates@mail.xwes.edu I was afraid I might experience discrimination because of my agnosticism, bisexuality and previous homeless status. I have not experienced many Wesleyan has a very concise, but acts of personal discrimination in perhaps not so clear, policy against my lifetime. I have however, experidiscrimination on its campuses. enced discrimination against others Even if you’re no good at decipher- on issues of sexual orientation and ing legal speak, the policy should be religious affiliation. easy enough to comprehend. I guess I was naive when I came to I’m starting to wonder how many Wesleyan. I expected this school to of us actually read and understand be different from others. the student handbook. One might think that discriminaWesleyan defines discrimination tion on a Methodist campus would as “any act or conduct that is preju- be difficult to find, but I was apdicial toward another person’s race, palled last spring when I found the color, national origin, ethnicity, opposite is true. gender, age, religion, disability or A friend of mine, who happens to

Shauna Banks Staff writer

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

Gun shots. Screaming. Chaos. Things no student, staff or faculty member ever wants to encounter within the classroom at any university. Yet, are institutions of higher education across the country really doing their students and faculty any favors by banning licensed students and staff from carrying on campus? The 2010-2011 Student Handbook for Texas Wesleyan spells out strict rules and policies concerning any weapons on campus, including concealed handguns. It goes so far as to specify that even those licensed to carry any such weapons not be permitted to carry, or have them in any parked vehicle on campus. Maybe it’s just me, but I know I’d be a little less panicked in a shooter situation, knowing that at least a few of my classmates were armed. Maybe those who possess concealed handgun licenses and were carrying could put up some sort of defense, potentially saving many lives. Currently the university uses the Wesleyan Emergency Management System. This system is intended to rapidly send messages to students and faculty who are registered for the service, in the event of a weather emergency or violent crisis situation. While this is all fine and good, by the time any student received such a message during a violent shooter situation, the scene could already be very grim. Nearly three and a half years after the Vir-

be Jewish, confided in me that some Wesleyan students had called him derisive names. I could not believe something like that would happen at my school, and I was outraged. Later that week, I encountered discrimination again on campus while in a humanities class discussing two workshops that had been presented at University College Day. The workshops focused on the topic of transgender issues. During the discussion, two of my classmates made it very clear they did not like the topic and that they didn’t want to continue the discussion. They tried to make the comments under their breaths, but I heard them loud and clear, and it made me irate. I nearly let my temper get the best of me, but because I am older, I kept my mouth shut and let their immature rants continue.

Concealed carry makes safety personal

ginia Tech shootings, I am still convinced that allowing students and faculty with concealed handgun licenses to carry on campus would offer some sort of hope. Obviously a similar situation could arise at another college campus. I would hate to think that my only defense would be hiding behind a desk or praying that I played dead convincingly enough. Because after all is said and done, the fact still remains that a person who has gone off the deep end, enough to open up fire on a college campus, has no regard for the laws in place. A simple policy stating it’s now allowed, under stiff penalties, just does not deter such an individual. However, knowing the classroom he or she was walking into could contain five or more concealed handgun carriers would give room for pause. Students for Concealed Carry on Campus is an organization of students and faculty all over the country that advocate for students’ rights to carry on campus, as given to us by the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Texas is still behind the curve in allowing its students who are licensed to carry on campus, but came closer in February 2009, when a bill was introduced during the 81st legislative session, calling for campuses to allow concealed handgun carry. SCCC said that Senator Jeff Wentworth (R-San

Antonio) introduced bill 1164 on Feb. 26, 2009.  The bill left the State Affairs Committee and passed the Senate by a vote of 2011.  The bill was then sent back to the House Calendars Committee but ultimately died due to the lengthy Democratic filibuster in the Texas House over the Voter ID bill. Despite this setback, debates are still going on today at many campuses, even progressing to “empty holster protests,” originally coined by the SCCC, in which students wear empty gun holsters in protest of the concealed handgun ban. Currently, Utah is the only state allowing licensed handgun owners to carry on campus at its nine public universities. With any luck, Texas will eventually follow suit—allowing students and faculty to equally defend themselves in a crisis situation and put their lives back in their own hands.

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Jonathan Resendez, editor-in-chief Barry Grubbs, opinion editor Eliana Mijangos, sports editor Chuck Fain, arts & entertainment editor Dwight Conerway, college life editor Meisa Keivani Najafabadi, photo editor Erica Estrada, graphic designer/cartoonist Wendy Moore, faculty adviser Dr. Kay Colley, faculty liaison

Letters to the editor: The Rambler, a weekly publication, welcomes all letters. All submissions must have a full printed name, phone number and signature. While every consideration is made to publish letters, publication is limited by time and space. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions for space, grammar, clarity and style. Letters to the editor may be subject to response from editors and students on the opinion page.

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R ambler Contribution

Please send all news briefs to twurambler@ yahoo.com. Submissions due by noon Friday to see brief in the following week’s issue.

Barry Grubbs Opinion editor

bgrubbs@mail.txwes.edu

The idea of students, faculty and staff members carrying concealed handguns on Wesleyan’s campus does not sit right with me for a variety of reasons. There are obviously two sides to this issue but each of us has the right to decide which makes us feel safer. The students and faculty on any campus should strictly focus on academic pursuits. Security teams hired by the college should likewise focus on the constant protection of those students and faculty. We all have a role in the big picture. Asking us to take responsibility for our own security and safety by allowing concealed carry is counter to the rationale for hiring the security force in the first place. It isn’t logical to deploy a security force on a college campus whose mission is to provide a safe environment only to minimize their ability by disarming them. There are college campuses of various sizes all across the country that have profes-

Photo Illustration by Barry Grubbs

The Rambler

Opinions expressed in The Rambler are those of the individual authors only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Texas Wesleyan community as a whole.

These two incidences of discrimination have caused me to look at Wesleyan in a slightly different way. I don’t want to believe that there could be discrimination of any kind on my campus or in my church, but I now realize that discrimination may be everywhere and will not go away. I am still having trouble comprehending such intolerance and discrimination from a group of people whom I expected to adhere to a doctrine of love for their fellow man. Americans have overcome some insurmountable hurdles in the past 234 years, but some form of discrimination still exists in many of us. In recent months, we’ve seen discrimination against Hispanics in Arizona and against Muslims all across the nation.

This discrimination is just despicable. When we stereotype people, all we’re doing is making it difficult for the next generation to overcome the curse of discrimination. I do my best to avoid discrimination, but like most people, I have stereotypical thoughts that slip into my mind. Those thoughts might come from the clothes people wear, the cars they drive or the way they look. Is that guy with his pants slung low really a gang-banger, or is he just trying to fit in with the crowd? Is the old man who just got off the bus wearing a pagri (head scarf) likely to be a terrorist? It’s ridiculous to make those assumptions. I understand that discrimination and stereotypes will not go away any time soon, but it would be nice to keep it off the Texas Wesleyan campus and out of Poly Church.

More guns do not make campus safer

sionally-trained and properly armed officers on their security teams. Weatherford College, for example, is roughly the size of Wesleyan, and employs a security force comprised of professionally-trained peace officers who are armed and on duty 24 hours a day. This is the most effective way to provide security to a campus regardless of its size. The Students for Concealed Carry on Campus is a grassroots organization that supports concealed carry. Their website lists a number of “common arguments” for allowing licensed adults to carry on campus. They attempt to answer each argument with a very rational explanation. It really is just rationalization. That’s what I mean when I say there are two sides to the issue. Regardless of any rationalization by the SCCC, allowing more guns on campus will logically result in a higher probability that a gun will be used against the campus population. More guns–more opportunity. A gun that does not exist can’t be fired accidentally or on purpose. According to SCCC data, about 10 percent of adults are licensed and carry concealed guns nationwide. If I knew one out of every 10 people on campus was packing heat, I would be distracted—period. It’s one thing for someone to take the state’s course to become licensed. It is something else entirely to predict how a student with four hours of safety training will react under fire.

Students and faculty carrying concealed guns would be no less vulnerable to the crazy, armed madman who comes on campus bent on destruction than they are now. There would just be more guns involved, more bullets flying and a greater probability that someone is unintentionally injured or killed. Honestly, no one would expect a 22-year-old accounting major to suddenly transform into a commando and make all the right decisions in a “kill or be killed” situation that could easily be over in less than a minute. I can’t buy the concept that someone with no experience of defending himself against violent crime can suddenly protect himself and others, just because he is the one with the concealed gun. I don’t want that pressure on me, and I don’t want to put it on my friends and professors. I honestly don’t believe Wesleyan’s administration believes there is any reason for the students and staff of this university to fear gun violence on campus. If they change their minds on that, I hope the resolution will be to develop an armed campus police force to enhance our security. There are plenty of places where I believe concealed carry is a good idea, and I am a big fan of the U.S. Constitution. There is not a more civilized place to be than on a college campus. That said—I like to think we have a better chance of remaining civilized and safe, if we don’t get used to the “wild west” approach to campus security.

What do you think about students carrying concealed guns on campus?

Sofia Maldonado, junior exercise science

Doss Whetstone, senior mass communication

Patrick Fraser, senior biology

“That would probably make “There’s too much testosterone “With the right regulation, it me pretty uncomfortable.” on a college campus to allow should be no different than guns to be carried.” walking through Wal-Mart.”

Address all correspondence to: Texas Wesleyan University

The Rambler

1201 Wesleyan St. Fort Worth, TX 76105 twurambler@yahoo.com To contact T he R ambler (817) 531-7552 Advertising Inquiries: (817) 532-7582

Kristi Roberts, freshman athletic training

“This is not the best neighborhood in the world. I think it would be all right.”

Oscar Campos, junior business

“I have a concealed handgun license, and it’s a deterent to potential things that can happen.”


Campus

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

FLOOD

continued from page 1

“The drains got overwhelmed,” said John Sinclair, emergency response coordinator for First Restoration Inc. “They’re full of leaves and couldn’t handle it. They’re stuffed.” Sinclair said the damage could have been worse considering the dock held more than a foot and a half of water at its peak. Security notified maintenance workers about the flooded offices in the administration building at about 7 a.m. that morning. “In the past, security has caught it early, today we didn’t get the call until 7 a.m.,” said James Ayala, facilities maintenance technician. “There were some ponds in here. As long as it keeps raining we’ll be sucking it up.” Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff The mailroom sustained wa- More than a foot and a half of water covered the library’s ter damage, but the employees loading dock, disabling deliveries for the day. However, only managed to work around it. 6 inches penetrated the building. “We’re a mess,” said mail/ copy center manager Joy Students, prepared for rain class on time. Burge. “Hasn’t happened like but not high water, maneu“I messed up my perfect this before. This is the first vered through puddles and shoes,” said Jennifer Brewer, time it’s this bad.” fast-moving currents to get to freshman music education major. “Honestly, I didn’t think it was going to get that bad. I didn’t think that it was going to flood like that.” Religious Life at Texas Wesleyan -Staff writer Rachel Peel contributed to this article.

University Chapel:

September 15, 2010

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have earned their instructional diving certification. Rucker currently teaches all scuba courses with occasional assistance from Rast, who is a certified dive master herself. “I feel very fortunate that we have him [Rucker] here teaching for us, because of how he cares for students,” Rast said. “When you watch him underwater with students, he is like this eagle eye that sees everything.” Students are provided with major scuba diving equipment like oxygen tanks, and only have to purchase their personal equipment, which includes a snorkel, boots, mask and fins. When students complete the program, they get to go through an underwater graduation ceremony and are given red and white cords to wear at the traditional robing ceremony. “The underwater graduation is usually right after the robing ceremony, or the day before, and our students actually turn their tassel over as they come up out of the water,” Rast said. The university also offers a four-week, open-water div-

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Wesleyan students train for their scuba certification in the pool located in the SUB. An underwater graduation ceremony is offered to students who complete the program.

ing course in the evenings for continuing education students, or others related to students and faculty. Those interested do not have to be registered students to participate in this evening

CareerLink Wesleyan’s On-line job board!

Free lunch and discussion/dialogue PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312

Major/Career Guidance

Computerized Job Searches Job/ Intern Seeker’s Database

• “Faith seeking understanding” – ALL are welcome! For info: http://www.txwes.edu/religiouslife/index.htm

Located in Brown Lupton North Wing Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm 817.531.6512 smata@txwes.edu rfisk@txwes.edu

class. The next four-week course begins Sept. 21, Rucker said. “We continue to teach Wesleyan’s family in those courses, and it’s very enjoyable,” Rucker said.

BLOG

continued from page 1

Services Available:

Common Meal:

Mocking Interview

Resume Writing & Critiquing

Resume Posting

Employer’s Database

http://www.txwes.edu/careerservices/index.htm

staff so everyone can be on the same page, Burton said. “People don’t often check their e-mail, so we wanted to make sure there are different ways of getting information out,” Collier said. Sophomore kinesiology major Deserae Davis said the blog could produce positive results. “People got something good to say all the time,” she said. “You never know what it may be. It could change the world.”

NEVER GO HUNGRY Always have a plan Best Values for Commuter Students Meal Plans:

Best Values for Faculty and Staff Meal Plans:

The Block 30 is the

best value if you would like to eat 1-2 meals in a week in our residential restaurant.

The Block 40 is

the best value if you dine at our residential restaurants 2-3 times a week.

Plan #1

Plan #2

The Block 50 is not the best value for your dollar but great for those patrons who would like to join us 3-4 times a week.

Plan #3

Block 30 • 30 all-you-care to-eat meals/ semester • $186.73/ semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $200 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $20 • $6.22 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

Block 40

• 40 all-you-care to-eat meals/ semester • $238.50/semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $200 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $20 • $5.96 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

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SCUBA

Career Services

Live music with brief time of worship Tuesdays at 12:15 in PUMC Chapel Free lunch after on PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312

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The Bronze is the best

value if you are really price conscious -all-you-care-to-eat meals are a little more than $4 versus paying at the door is $6.50; plus you get $25 in free DBD just for signing up!

Plan #1

Sample The Ram is the best value if you would like to eat on campus once a day during the week. Plan #2

Willie Wallet is great for students who

have a crazy schedule that need a little bit more in their meal plan membership.

Block 50

• 50 all-you-care to-eat meals/ semester • $284.16/ semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $200 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $20 • $5.68 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

Add $ to your meal plan when you get your refund check

Plan #3

Ram Sample • 5 all-you-care to-eat meals/ week • $100 Declining Balancing Dollars • $585.46/ semester (includes tax) • Super Value Stretcher- Add $100 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $25 • $6.07 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!

Willie Wallet • 300 Declining Balance Dollars • $300/ semester • Super Value Stretcher- Add $100 DBDs to your plan and we’ll credit your account with an extra $25

Bronze • 30 all-you-care to-eat meals/semester • $150 Declining Balancing Dollars • $324.75/ semester (includes tax) • Super Value Stretcher- Purchase this membership and we will give you $25 in free Declining Balance Dollars! • $5.82 per meal -save versus paying cash at the door!


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Arts & Entertainment

September 15, 2010

Feeding the urge:

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Finding food around Wesleyan Chuck Fain

cmfain@mail.txwes.edu

Beach St.

4224 East Lancaster Avenue

180 E. LANCASTER 2657 East Vickery Blvd.

3012 E. Rosedale St.

Wesleyan St.

Vickery Blvd. 5012 East Rosedale Street

E. Rosedale St.

Dwight Conerway | Staff Photographer See history come to life at the Museum of Science and History in Fort Worth.

Experience the past today

1417 Vaughn Boulevard

N 2400 Vaughn Blvd.

Vaughn Blvd.

Dwight Conerway

dconerway@mail.txwes.edu

Angie Ruiz | Rambler Staff

sity, and they always remember you when you go in,” said alumnus Robert Carroll. If you want more soul food, travel about five minutes or so east on Rosedale. There you will find Drew’s, a neighborhood legend. Drew’s has been around for as long as anyone who talks about it can remember. Their selection of soul and comfort food can’t be beat, and their generous portions leave you feeling full all day. Tres Coronas is an authentic Mexican food place just behind the campus on Vickery Bulvard It too looks like it could use a fresh coat of paint,

Texas Wesleyan Presents p.m. ony t 1:15 ion Cerem a 8 r at be Dedic ptem brary • Se rary Piano L. West Li Lib es West & Jam e c i n u The E • Se p Facult tember 9 at 7:3 y Recit 0 p.m Music a . for Flu l: te, Pic Marti colo a n Hal nd Pia l no . m . p t 7:30 r 14 a e list b m Meda pte eries e S ld S o t r G e • c n rn Con petitio *Clibu liburn Com C 2009 all Bass H

For more information, visit The Music Department at http://www.txwes.edu/music/ music/index.htm or call 817.531.4992

but what it lacks in presentation, it makes up for in taste. What most gringos know as “street tacos” are served up hot and fresh in handmade corn tortillas, along with a full menu of authentic appetizers. Try the “La Lengua” taco if you’re looking for a truly authentic treat. Also on the Mexican food front is Campesinos Cafe. South of the campus, straight up Vaughn, is where you’ll find it. With excellent enchiladas, tasty tacos and cold cerveza, Campesinos is a great place to have a meeting or just to enjoy lunch. Holding its own alongside

Fort Worth’s cultural district houses the Museum of Science and History, which boasts new exhibits. One exhibit is the TXO 4-D theater where visitors can take a tour of the gas drilling industry. The brief movie also provides a simulated experience that leaves visitors holding on to their seats. Starting with an introduction of how gas is discovered, visitors take a 4-D tour that goes from inside the earth to the earth’s surface. Afterward, visitors can take a walk through the museum area where actual equipment and videos give an in-depth view of the Barnett Shale and explain what this is. The exhibit is an experience for all who want to learn more about the origin and the business of gas drilling. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Another sight is the Extreme Building exhibit where visitors can use materials to invent, draw and design electronic, visual and movement type models. In another sec-

more popular chain burger joints like McDonalds and Whataburger is Griff ’s. Big burgers overflowing with fixings are what you can expect from this Poly staple. They are reasonably priced and serve ice cream and sweet tea. Get yourself a greasesoaked bag of burgers from here soon. There are many other places to eat around Wesleyan that are unique to the Poly neighborhood. I suggest you seek out and try as many of these places as you can, and to keep the old adage in mind —don’t judge a book by its cover.



3 9 1 2 8 3

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tion visitors can view replicas of Leonardo de Vinci’s artwork and inventions. A walk through the Noble Planetarium provides information on local sites where many historic discoveries have been made in Texas during the past 100 years. One example is the world’s largest hand-dug well. A brief video allows visitors to experience night fall and actually see constellations formed and where they may be located using the naked eye as well as a common pair of binoculars. Although there are no special rates for college students, a $14 admission gets visitors in until closing time. Another attraction is the Omni Theater, which shows documentary films for $7 and full-length features for $10. Combo pricing is also available if desired, where visitors may view all exhibits plus an Omni film for $19, or all exhibits and the planetarium for $17. Tickets can be purchased by calling 817-255-9540, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday or online up to one hour before show time for the Omni. All major credit cards are accepted, and there are no refunds or exchanges.

© Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

Wesleyan offers many opportunities to its students – unfortunately, a wide variety of food isn’t one of them. As far as on-campus eateries go, our selection is slim – especially when compared to other colleges in the area. There’s Dora’s, which is expensive if you don’t have a meal plan and is every bit as spectacular as you would expect a cafeteria to be. The Coffee X Spot offers lighter fare such as salads and wraps, and perhaps the most popular choice, The Sub, which serves hamburgers and sandwiches. “I like The Sub. They always know how to make my chicken cheese steak,” said freshman liberal studies major Robert Tutt. But what if none of these on-campus options appeals to you? There’s the Subway across the street from Wesleyan on Rosedale, and other chain restaurants such as McDonalds, Whataburger and Jack in the Box are found just north of the school on Lancaster. However, Poly has so much more to offer your stomach than the same old deep-fried flavors. The Poly Grill, just across the street from Wesleyan on Vaughn, is a soul food place serving up rib-sticking home cooking. The small, unassuming building looks a bit rough, but inside are some of the friendliest folks and the finest food. Their menu includes everything from chicken fried steak to waffles —you can even get a glass of Kool-Aid to wash it down. “Poly Grill is a place to go for good food at a good price. They are supportive of the community and the univer-

90 Years of Leadership 1920 Applications available online www.studentlife.txwes.edu contact:

Michael Chaney 817-531-4870 or mchaney@txwes.edu contact: contact: Michael MichaelChaney Chaney817-531-4870 817-531-4870 or mchaney@txwes.edu or mchaney@txwes.edu

2010 Contact Us at

Phone: 817-531-7550 Email: stugov@txwes.edu

Visit us at

OC Hall 202 and 204


Sports

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Ram volleyball spikes the “swagger” off SAGU Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

The Texas Wesleyan Lady Rams’ volleyball team defeated school rivals Southwestern Assemblies of God University 3-1. “This is a team that always comes out with a lot of swag,” said sophomore middle blocker Christina Danile. The Lady Rams came out slow in the first set getting down quickly to a 6-2 deficit. Head Coach Christi Clawson called a time out where she said, “We need to regroup and refocus. Ready and relax.” Turning the game around, freshman outside hitter Haelee Horne and freshman middle blocker Katherine Rosenbush came out of the time out with three blocks. Senior outside hitter Kristen Venhuizen topped off their work and finished the first set with four kills giving them a 25-23 win over SAGU. “Going into the match it was very apparent that SAGU knew our tendencies, but I think we did a good job adjusting,” said senior setter Evoni Darling. Wesleyan came out strong in the second set with an 18-9 lead. SAGU picked it up and cut the score to 24-23. Rosenbush kept a steady pace leading the set in kills.

Horne took the win with a kill assisted by Darling. The Lady Rams pulled out with a 25-23 lead. The third set was a constant exchange of points between the Lions and Lady Rams. With SAGU up by one point, Horne lost a tip and Wesleyan lost 25-23. Rosenbush led the team with five kills in the fourth set. Christina Daniel, sophomore middle blocker, and Hannah Horton, freshman outside hitter, came in with a block and a kill each. Rosenbush, once again, sealed the win with a kill assisted from Darling. “The great thing about our team is that we aren’t dependent on one person. We have many hitters who can put the ball away which contributed to our win,” Darling said. Darling led the Lady Rams with 53 assists, 16 digs and two aces. She was accompanied by Venhuizen with 14 kills, 16 digs and two aces. Horne had 12 kills and 10 digs, and Rosenbush had 18 kills. “It was a great start to conference. We did a great job of working together and playing to our strengths,” Rosenbush said. The Lady Rams are now 6-2. They will face St. Thomas University Sept. 14 at home.

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Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Haelee Horne, freshman outside hitter, gets a tip, turning the tempo of the first set and leading the Lady Rams to a 25-23 win.

TWU soccer teams fall short on victory Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan women’s soccer team lost to the Lubbock Christian Chaparrals 1-0 in Saturday’s game. This is their first loss of the season bringing their record to 4-1. The one goal of the game was scored with very little effort from the Chaparrals. Katy Houchin, junior goal keeper, actually ran into another defender, giving Lubbock the perfect opportunity for an open shot at the goal. The goal came with a lot of disappointment after the Lady Rams had held the score to 0-0 for the first half of the game. “I feel like we took LCU a little lightly,” said head coach Josh Gibbs. “They never came out and played us, and that was frustrating. They did what they needed to win, so hats off to them. We will refocus and look to get a win Friday versus Houston Victoria.” Houchin finished the game with four saves to Lubbock’s four saves. The Rams outshot the Chaparrals 16-10 and led in corner kicks 7-2. The Wesleyan men’s team took a hard-fought loss to the Chaps in a double overtime game 3-2. Down by a quick two goals at half time, the Rams worked hard the second half to tie the game. Ivan Kovacevic, freshman mid-fielder, scored the first goal unassisted. He was followed by sophomore defender Ryan Johnson who was assisted by Tyler Mendez, freshman defensive midfielder. “We showed a lot of heart. Even though we were down by two, we didn’t stop playing,” said senior forward Marcus Harris.

5 Martin Field improvements in progress, more to come

September 15, 2010

A multiphase improvement plan for Wesleyan soccer field is currently in the works. Phase one is already complete. Copper lights were actually stolen last year and have now been replaced with more energy-efficient bulbs. The second commitment includes fixing and maintaining the playing turf by adding more natural fertilizers. “We are really excited about the improvements that they are making to the field,” said Katy Houchin, junior goal keeper. “They were definitely needed.” A parking lot with about 60 spots will be added to a lot of of Collard Street with the goal of alleviating traffic along Binge Street. However, Binge will still have parking allotted for players and coaches. “We are looking to improve the overall fan experience,” said Kevin Millikan, athletic director. “They will be adding stadium-style seating in order to gain perspective onto the field as well as permanent bathrooms to replace the Porta Potties.” For the players, locker rooms and athletic training stations will be a vital addition to the field. “The improvements are amazing. It makes our school look great, and it lets us know that they care. We are driven to pay back our school and athletic program by winning a conference championship,” said Ricardo Aguilera, junior forward. The improvements will cost approximately $30,000. Millikan said the plans will be completed by kick off of next year.

Red River Players of the Week • Men’s soccer, Chase Richeson, junior midfielder, was nominated for offensive player of the week. • Women’s soccer, Kayla Mason, junior defender, was nominated for defensive player of the week. Meisa Keivanai Najafabadi | Rambler Staff • Women’s soccer, JesRandal McClanahan, sophomore forward, hustles to turn the ball around and get a score before the half sica Watton, sophomore against Lubbock Christian. forward, was nominated

Dominick Guitierrez, sophomore goal keeper, had a couple of huge saves on goal and some plays off penalty kicks. However, in the 107th minute of overtime, Dustin Jones of the Chaps had a breakaway shot and won it for Lubbock Christian. “Even though we lost, the way we fought showed a positive change in character and a step in the right direction,” said Miguel Arreguin, junior forward.

for offensive player of the Guitierrez finished with 11 saves to Lubbock’s 12 week. to end the game. The Chaparrals led in shots 26-23 and corner kicks 7-6. • Volleyball, Katherine This game left the Wesleyan soccer team winless, Rosenbush, freshman with an 0-6 record. middle blocker, is volleyThe next game for both men and women is set ball player of the week for for Sept. 21 against Schreiner University in Ker- the second consecutive ville. week.

TWU Athletics At Texas Wesleyan, our team members are truly

Yeah. We’re everywhere. But start here: www.therambler.org

student-athletes. They bring in a cumulative GPA of 2.84 and 35 2009-10 NCTTA National Champions: Table Tenis

percent have higher than a 3.0. With academic and athletic success, these students are winners in the classroom as

The Rambler

The Voice of Texas Wesleyan University Students Since 1917

well as on the field or the court. 2009-10 Red River Conference Champions: Men’s Basketball, Baseball, Softball and Golf


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September 15, 2010

College Life

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

TWU network technician moonlights as grillmaster Jonathan Resendez

jlresendez@mail.txwes.edu

The smells in Tommy Chandler’s smoker linger long after his bouts are over. Aromatic ghosts of briskets, ribs and chicken haunt the massive $5,000 pit he constructed himself over the course of two years. While the aromas would simply elicit mouth watering from most people, to Chandler, they mean victory. A competitive cooker for almost two decades, Chandler has traveled the nation winning hundreds of awards in competitions such as the American Royal BBQ Cook Off and the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbeque. “Ask anybody in the cooking world about ‘Smok’n Joe’ and they know who that is,” Chandler said. “That’s me.” Chandler, whose middle name is Joe, modeled his moniker after boxing legend Joe Frazier. He goes by his real name at Wesleyan, where he’s a project manager in charge of installing network cabling and fiber optics. “He’s one of those guys that plans his work and works his plan,” said Richard Webb, senior network engineer. “He’s very proactive.” Although they work together, Webb is no stranger to Chandler’s cooking. “I almost enjoy Tommy as much as I enjoy his barbeque,” Webb said. “You just have to try it to know. It’s the best recipe I’ve ever had.”

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff (Above) Tommy Chandler pieced together his custom smoker with a 75-year-old friend over the course of two years. (Bottom left) Chandler keeps his first cooking award, for 8th place in brisket out of 110, in a special sleeve to preserve it. (Bottom right) The competitive cooker has won hundreds of awards, including 2nd overall at the American Royal and and 11th overall at the Jack Daniel’s World Championship Invitational Barbeque.

Chandler keeps a recipe journal that he travels with, making notes as he tweaks the flavor for different locations. “Each judge has his own taste buds,” he said. “You have one chance to impress the judge. One bite.” Chandler began competitive cooking in 1995, won his first award a year later, and has been “hooked ever since.” He honed his craft by listening, asking questions and experimenting. “It’s a very expensive hobby, like golf,” Chandler said. “It’s addicting.”

Competitive cooker Steve Graham has known Chandler for five years. They meet with other cooks, usually couples, and travel to various competitions around the country. “We’re friends Friday night,” Graham said. “But come Saturday morning, we’re there to cook—to compete.” Chandler’s wife cooked against and alongside him until two years ago, when she died of a heart attack. Using a simple grill, she’d win more often than the cooks with expensive set-

ups, he said. “For two years, she kicked everyone’s butt,” he said. Chandler said he’s always receiving calls from friends and family, asking for cooking advice. He said he doesn’t mind helping people and is pleased that the proceeds from the competitions go toward helping charities. He catered for the IT department last year, but plans on feeding 300 students, faculty and staff Sept. 15 for the Signature Student Experience BBQ luncheon. “I’ll have to get up a whole lot earlier,” he said.

Wesleyan community remembers Sept. 11, supports Islamic religion (Above) Associate psychology professor Dr. Marilyn Pugh reads from the Quran, the Islamic holy book, on Sept. 11. A crowd of 21 gathered to show their support of religious freedom. (Below) The Never Forget Project set up 3,000 flags on the mall. Each flag represents a victim of the 9-11 attacks.

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff .


The Rambler Vol. 93 No. 16