Issuu on Google+

WEDNESDAY April 6, 2011

Vol. 94 • No. 10

www.therambler.org

The Rambler The voice of Texas Wesleyan University students since 1917

Ram baseball wins third series game, 15-4, against Warriors.

Wesleyan hosts exploration of math and science careers. Campus, page 5

Sports, page 8

Shauna Banks

sbbanks@mail.txwes.edu

With less than a month left of classes, the Wesleyan community will soon elect a new student body president and other Student Government Association representatives and executives. “We’re governed by our constitution,” Heath Scott, current SGA president said. “Within our constitution, we have a section called the election code, so everything we do from the names that go on the ballot, to the way the ballot is produced—everything about this election is governed by that code.” Elections for executive SGA positions, including president and vice president, will take place April 19-20 in the Brown Lupton Student Center and Eunice and James L. West Library. Elections for representatives will take place April 27-28 in the same locations. Scott said anyone wanting to run for office should come by the SGA

offices on the second floor of O.C. Armstrong Hall and pick up a “petition for office” sheet. The petition requires 50 signatures for students running for an executive office, and 25 signatures for those running for representative positions. “Those signatures mean that you have some people who are at least interested in your petition for candidacy,” Scott said. Several constitutional amendments will also be included on the voting ballot during executive elections. Scott said one amendment pro-

time. Scott said that since the SGA is now handling citation appeals for students, he did not want the chief justice to have to campaign and make promises to students to get elected, with those same students expecting to receive preferential treatment if they later had to go through the hearing process. One of the biggest changes for the Wesleyan student body will be electing a new president after Scott’s twoyear presidency, which officially ends April 26. Blanche Giquinto, freshman biology major, said she is looking for

posed would reduce the amount of positions elected to 14, instead of the current 24, changing to five executives and nine representatives. Scott said most same-size schools nationally have 12-14 elected positions. Another amendment proposes that the SGA president appoint the chief justice in the future, instead of it being an elected position. If the amendment does not pass, elections for chief justice will take place at representative election

leadership skills in the next president elected. “[I’d like to see] someone that hears everyone out, listens to what they have to say and gives everyone equal opportunity to make organizations and everything they’re trying to do,” Giquinto said. Joel Herbel, junior theater major, said he wants to see someone elected who is charismatic and truthful and who also has the sense of morality and honor not typically found in politicians. Robyn Shelton, junior liberal studies major, said she would like to see a president that is passionate about making sure student voice is heard. “Confidence, intelligence and enthusiasm about holding the position of SGA president are also important,” Shelton said. “He or she must also possess honesty, dedication and the ability to communicate his or her vision for the school effectively.” For more information concerning the rules for candidate campaigning, visit the SGA offices,

Group offers experience Melissa Bates

mdbates@mail.txwes.edu

For people wanting to gain real-life law and paralegal experience, the Texas Wesleyan community now offers an outlet. In the works since last fall, the Student Paralegal Organization is reaching out to potential members after being approved by the Student Government Association earlier this semester. John West, junior paralegal studies major and president of the SPO, said the key focus of the organization is to set up networking for students and get involved in the community. “The goal is to set up networking within the legal community of Dallas-Fort Worth as well as all of the students on the campus,” West said. He said the organization belongs to the students and its success can only be based on student participation. “It can become very vital when it comes to

Rachel Peel | Rambler Staff Katreeva Phillips, senior vocal performance major and mezzo-soprano, sings “In Time of Silver Rain” and “Dream” at the President’s Honors Concert April 1 in Martin Hall, with Keith Kritcher, coach-accompanist and adjunct on the piano for her performance.

Honors concert showcases talent

$58,540

$60,000

$52,200

$50,000

$55,910

$50,050

$44,480

$40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000

M co an en mp ag te a em rp nie e ris s nt es an of d Em pl oy m en ts er vi ce s

er a Br l Ex an e ch cut iv e

Fe d

In su

ra n

ce

lS

er

vi

Ca rr

ce

s

ie rs

$0

ga

His first time attending a President’s Honors Concert, Frederick Slabach, president of Texas Wesleyan, said he was blown away by the hidden talent in the music department. The 15th annual President’s Honors Concert took place at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 4 in Martin Hall. The concert was hosted by Slabach and Wesleyan alumna and Board of Trustees member, Beverly Volkman-Powell and her husband, Charles. Heath Scott, president of the Student Government Association led the concert as master of ceremonies. “I knew we had talented faculty,” Slabach said. “I’m just amazed at the talent in our student body. But what I would really love to see is more students attending these wonderful programs we have.” Dr. John Fisher, professor of music and department chair, said the concert started in 1995 by Jake Schrum, university president at the time, and his wife, Jane. “Every single one rose to the occasion,”

Yearly salaries for paralegal jobs

Le

mdbates@mail.txwes.edu

Fisher said. The audience truly enjoyed it.” Becca Mitchell, sophomore vocal performance major, performed in last year’s concert. Mitchell said she was one of two freshmen chosen to perform. “I thought it was really cool last year, as a freshman, to be a part of that, because it’s normally an upperclassman thing,” Mitchell said. “I just enjoyed singing with my peers, my favorite people.” Mitchell also said she enjoyed this year’s concert. Wiley Lindsey, sophomore vocal performance major, had not performed in the President’s Honors Concert before. Lindsey said he was honored to perform. “All these voices and musicians are fabulous ,and it is just an honor to get to sing with them and be a part of the program,” Lindsey said. Lindsey also said the President’s Honors Concert was his first big performance. “I was fine for most of the song but got really nervous and started shaking towards the end,” Lindsey said. “I really enjoyed it. I was into the song.”

  PARALEGAL, page 3

Yearly salaries for paralegal careers

Salaries

Melissa Bates

job seeking and networking, if you show participation in a group that benefits the community,” West said. “That’s definitely a plus to help further your career.” West said by serving the community and also being a part of national paralegal organizations, members will get first-hand experience in what really happens out in the real world versus the content offered in textbooks for classes. West said he was also the president of the Student Paralegal Organization at Tarrant County College Northeast. Amanda Hazel, junior paralegal studies major, said she served as the vice president then president of the Student Paralegal Organization at TCC Northeast prior to West taking office. Hazel is now the vice president of the Wesleyan Student Paralegal Organization.


2

|

April 6, 2011

Opinion

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Rams can make difference in disaster zone

than 40 fires were started because of the tsunami as well. Emma Fradette A nuclear plant in the path Sports writer of the waves was severely damekfradette@mail.txwes.edu aged, and contaminated everything around it including people. Those people who have been affected by the radiation On March 11, Japan was hit by are left in confinement separated one of the biggest earthquakes from the outside word in fear of in history, and shortly after the further contamination. quake followed a tsunami devasMany universities and organizatating parts of the island. tions are doing what they can to According to ABC News, waves give aid to the Japan tsunami suras high as 10 meters in some areas vivors, and I believe Texas Wesreached as far as five kilometers leyan should be one of them. inland. More than 18,000 people have Thousands of farms, houses and been presumed dead or missing, people were swept away from the and police officials say that numunexpected natural disaster. More ber will only grow larger.

Those who have survived the disaster have been left with little to nothing. Thousands are without electricity, clean water, food, shelter and families. According to The Guardian more than 452,000 people are located in packed shelters until further assistance can be available. Texas Christian University, our neighbor school, is throwing a block party to benefit the relief effort in Japan. Students have joined together to throw a benefit called the West Berry Block Party where local bands and businesses join together in an effort to raise money for aid to Japan. The event begins on April 16, and the majority of the funds go

to Disaster Relief International. General admission for anyone is $20 in advance and $25 the day of the event, according to the TCU Daily Skiff. I think Texas Wesleyan should participate in the relief efforts as well. Students and faculty have a tremendous opportunity to do something important for others around the world. Athletes make up a large part of the student body at Wesleyan. I believe if all the athletic programs got on board, they could come up with a type of game where students and faculty could come out and watch to raise money for the relief efforts. Concessions could be sold and

a general admission into the game could be set as well. Another option is students can collect non-perishable food items such as canned foods, rice and other boxed items to donate. As a university, Wesleyan could send the items over to be used by the survivors. We could send old clothes, shoes, blankets and toys as well. A university meeting could be held to discuss these and further options for students to participate in. Wesleyan’s community should not turn away from this devastating event for Japan because it has and will continue to affect the rest of the world as well. Our college community can find a way to help.

Legalized gambling brings games but no real winners I wonder if he or any who support the notion of legalizing Barry Grubbs gambling remember the promOpinion editor ises made about the state lottery. bgrubbs@mail.txwes.edu On Aug. 26, 1991 the state government signed bill 54 to instate the Texas lottery, I recall predictions that this would virtually solve the education funding As students, we may not consider crisis. After being fed that promise, the issue of legalized gambling worth Texas voters had no problem voting worrying about. After all, who has it through. any cash left over to bet with after You probably realize by now that books, tuition and fees? it didn’t exactly work out the way it However, the issue is gaining mo- was planned. mentum in our state whether we like By the way, Rodríguez also supit or not. Texans do gamble, just not ports using the $9.2 billion in Texas’ in Texas. rainy day fund to help balance the It is estimated by Texas legislators budget. that Texans spend between $4 - 6 bilHere’s an idea: let’s try that first lion every year on gaming in neigh- before making the same lame lottoboring New Mexico, Oklahoma and style promises to taxpayers about Louisiana. That money eventually gaming dollars solving our fiscal pays for roads, and educational pro- problems. grams among other things—but not Texas senators and representatives in Texas. have already filed casino gambling Yes, I agree that letting that kind of bills and bills that would allow slot money cross our state lines on a one- machines at racetracks in the Texas way trip is sickening. House and Senate. I do not however believe legalized Whether you are a college student gambling will solve Texas’ budget or limping along on social security, crisis. this irresponsible behavior by lawTexas lawmakers do not all share makers will affect you. my view. House Joint Resolution 112 would District 29 Senator Jose Rodriguez call for an election on a constitutionsays, “Given our current fiscal crisis, al amendment that would allow the it would be irresponsible to not con- creation of a five-person Texas Gamsider the expansion of gambling.” ing Commission.

That sounds like more government to me. I do not think they will work for free. There is no get rich scheme to bail us out of this mess. And please do not be fooled when supporters explain how gambling receipts will save our economy. They are the same legislators, responsible for a budget that will see an estimated 8,000 jobs lost in edu-

Choosing war solves nothing help us win. Let’s think really hard, and ask ourselves Regina Crossley why we really Photographer fight. Instead of rlcrossley@mail.txwes.edu taking the time to fight, we can take the time to talk and get an underWhat do we actually fight standing of one another. No for? Yes, we have one mil- one would have to die. The lion reasons to fight in a population would even be war. But why do we fight bigger. when everything is for evThis land and this world eryone. belongs to all of us We weren’t put on earth to Yes I’m proud of the solfight for our land, our food diers who defend my counor our independence. We try. They are really strong, have always had what was and they sacrifice their ours. lives, which is a really big It’s just that people want deal. to take away from others But doing this is avoidwhat we all share. able. Instead of fighting, Sharing isn’t so hard. Why we can make promises that can’t we all just get along? one country won’t hurt the We think we have reasons other. to kill each other, but does When there are problems it really make sense? to solve, we can talk about What does killing each it. Everyone disagrees, but other mean in the end? It sometimes you just have means some win and some to agree to disagree, move lose, but what is really won? forward and follow through We don’t stop fighting once with that. we’ve won the war. Just because we are differWe pray to our God to ent, and we live in different

The Rambler

Shauna Banks, editor-in-chief Barry Grubbs, opinion editor Eliana Mijangos, sports editor Meisa Keivani Najafabadi, photo editor Stephanie Mejia arts & entertainment editor Jonathan Resendez, multimedia editor Erica Estrada, graphic designer/cartoonist Wendy Moore, faculty adviser Dr. Kay Colley, faculty liaison

places does not mean we should fight one another. Love the differences, cherish and explore why people are different. We can love one another and just stop the violence. It is a choice. There is not really anything that can help us while we are crying about wars we put ourselves into. When are we going to wake up, and realize we are all one? I guess it would be asking too much for us not to go to war. It would also be asking too much for us to love one another. Going to war while loving one another is the wrong thing to do. So let’s fight, let’s go to war. Let’s fight against the people that are different from us. Don’t help the people that may need us on the other side of the world. We don’t need them, right? I am saying that all of our wars were pointless. There are reasons we have fought, but do any of them justify killing each other? I guess it would be really crazy if what I’m suggesting were to happen.

“We are not afraid to follow the truth ... wherever it may lead.” — Thomas Jefferson

Address all correspondence to: Texas Wesleyan University

The Rambler

1201 Wesleyan St. Fort Worth, TX 76105 twurambler@yahoo.com (817) 531-7552 Advertising Inquiries: (817) 531-6525

cation, mostly teachers. There is always some quick fix for our economic problems but our lawmakers don’t seem to follow through. A recent poll of registered voters conducted by the University of Texas at Austin and the Texas Tribune indicates 74 percent support casinos in Texas, and fewer than 20 percent oppose the expansion of gambling. Whether or not these numbers

accurately represent Texan’s beliefs, there is no way to keep government from re-appropriating any funds the state receives from legalized gambling. Maybe they will legalize gambling eventually. Maybe some of the money will be used responsibly to rescue our state from its grave economic situation. All I’m saying is—don’t bet on it.

What do you think about legalized gambling in Texas? “I guess it’s okay if we have it, but I’m really indifferent about gambling” - Cristina Brewis, junior, Spanish “I think if it’s controlled then it’s fine. It shouldn’t be that big of an issue.” - Skyler Gentry, freshman, Psychology “I understand if that’s what people want to do, but gambling your kids college fund away isn’t smart.” - Paige Jennings, freshman, mass communication “I think legalizing gambling could bring money to the Metroplex.” - Gina Kautai, junior, finance “I think gambling could be bad, but it could be fun until it gets out of hand.” - Ashley Bringol, junior, business marketing “I say it’s fine if it’s allowed in Las Vegas.” - Eiji Davis, freshman, undecided

Member of the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association, Associated Collegiate Press, Student Press Law Center, College Media Advisers and College Newspaper Business and Advertising Managers. Opinions expressed in The Rambler are those of the individual authors only and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Texas Wesleyan community as a whole.

R ambler Contribution

Please send all news briefs to twurambler@yahoo.com. Submissions due by noon Friday to see brief in the following week’s issue. Letters to the editor: The Rambler, a weekly publication, welcomes all letters. All submissions must have a full printed name, phone number and signature. While every consider-

ation is made to publish letters, publication is limited by time and space. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions for space, grammar, clarity and style. Letters to the editor may be subject to response from editors and students on the opinion page.


The Rambler | www.therambler.org

News

April 6, 2011

|

3

Passion for music shines in annual concert

Photos by Rachel Peel | Rambler Staff Left: Mary Banks, sophomore music education major, sings at the President’s Honors Concert April 1 in Martin Hall. Banks performed “O Mio Babbino Caro (O My Dear Daddy)” by Giacomo Puccini. Above: Becca Mitchel, sophomore vocal performance major, also performs at the concert, singing “Give Me to Jesus,” arranged by Moses Hogan.

Student experience receives attention Melissa Bates

mdbates@mail.txwes.edu

TIPA 2011 The Rambler staff was awarded first place in Division 3 Overall Excellence for college newspapers at the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association conference March 31 - April 2.

Administration, faculty and staff at Texas Wesleyan are taking new strides to make the college experience more enjoyable for all classifications and types of students. From 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. March 29 in the Baker Building, more than 50 members of the Wesleyan faculty and staff attended the Signature Student Experience Projects KickOff meeting to discuss how to improve student experience. The Signature Student Experience is an initiative started in Fall 2009 by Wesleyan’s administration, with the intent to improve the experience students receive from their education. In the meeting, Marcus Kerr, chief information officer, said the first few years of the Signature Student Experience consisted of finding out what worked before and what did not work. “Through the process we learned Texas Wesleyan University is extraordinary and the things other institutions seem to struggle with come naturally to us,” Kerr said.

Kerr said Wesleyan and its students are unique in their cultures, beliefs and values. “The Signature Experience is really about identifying what it is that makes us unique and then aligning the key elements to emphasize the positive aspects of the university and neutralize the negatives,” Kerr said. In the meeting, Pati Alexander, vice president for enrollment and student services and steward of the Enhancing Transfer Student Engagement Project, said some transfer students have said they feel like they are being ignored by Wesleyan. Alexander said Wesleyan recruits 500 transfer students every year, 350 in fall and 150 in spring. “This project will look at the entire process for transfer students; from the time we enroll them here all the way to the time they graduate and become alum,” Alexander said. Alexander said one step of this transfer enhancement program is to find out what other universities in the area are doing for their transfer students. Alexander said she be-

PARALEGAL (from left to right) Dr. Kay Colley, Rachel Peel, Melissa Bates, Jonathan Resendez, Shauna Banks, Barry Grubbs, Wendy Moore, Meisa Keivani Najafabadi.

On-site competition awards:

Honorable Mention - Print Advertising Design - Shauna Banks Honorable Mention - Video News - Jonathan Resendez

Mail-in competition awards:

Honorable Mention - News Story - Eliana Mijangos Honorable Mention - News Feature Story - Jonathan Resendez Second - Sports Column - Eliana Mijangos Honorable Mention - News Photo - Meisa Keivani Najafabadi Third - Advertising Design - Josh Grace Third - Illustration - Erica Estrada Third - Information graphic - Angie Ruiz

“We try to provide a format and a place for students to come to learn about the different things they can do with their paralegal degree,” Hazel said. Hazel said the books and professors help provide the foundation paralegal studies majors need, but books and lectures do not show what real world experience is like.

continued from page 1 “You usually use your books as a reference guide, but you actually learn how it’s really done once you get out in the real world,” Hazel said. “The teachers do a great job preparing us as best they can, but there’s nothing that beats that real world experience.” Mara Garrison, senior paralegal studies major, said she

lieves the current Wesleyan transfer student orientation process is good but there is room for improvement. Also in the meeting, Allen Henderson, provost and senior vice president and steward of the Organizing to Deliver on the Career Promise Committee said his project is to identify the strengths and weaknesses in the career services offered and point out room for improvement. The other committees are the Making Our Spaces Count committee headed by Bill Bleibdrey, senior vice president finance and administration and the Enhancing Campus Communications committee headed by Joan Canty, interim vice president of university advancement. After each administratror presented their projects, the faculty and staff in attendance chose which project they wanted to be involved in, then broke into groups to discuss how to improve the student experience via their project. The results of the Signature Student Experience Projects will not be released until fall 2011. became a paralegal to help others and sees the SPO as one avenue toward her goal of being an attorney. “I’m actually honored to be a part of the creation of the foundation,” Garrison said. “I just want other paralegals to partake in the amazing challenges and successes that will occur within this society.” Kesley Bryant, junior paralegal studies major, said the SPO gives paralegal studies majors the ability to meet people currently in the industry. For more information, students should contact John West at jcwest@mail.txwes.edu. The SPO meets biweekly at 6 p.m. on Thursdays in Polytechnic United Methodist Church room 124, where anyone interested in becoming a member can attend.


Arts & Entertainment Ram Jam jives with international week

4

|

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

April 6, 2011

Daniel McGary

dcmcary@mail.txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan continues its annual Ram Jam tradition. This year’s Ram Jam will be combined with Wesleyan’s International Fair. Attendees will be treated to booths set up by the university’s International Programs Office. The event is open to all students, faculty and staff and will feature free food and entertainment. Aramark Dining Services will cater free fajitas. Tu-Tones, a local blues rock band, and Indie Rock artist Shwa will perform from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Each booth will represent one of the countries,� Marie Boisvert, director of international programs said. “At each booth, students from that country will be serving food and handing out information pamphlets about the country.� At the event, a group of henna tattoo artists from Irving will offer attendees Middle Eastern body art. Henna tattoos are not permanently dyed into the skin like real tattoos. The image is dyed on the top

layer of skin, usually lasting about two weeks. Student Life will be give away 200 free T-shirts. Printing equipment furnished by a college novelty company will be on hand to customize each student’s shirt. “We can take the person’s picture, then place the face into a photo-shopped scene,� said Michael Chaney, coordinator of student life. “We have one design where the student’s face is photo-shopped onto a giant muscle man, as well as several other scenes.� Chaney said a little bit of a line may form at the Tshirt printing exhibit, but it will most likely move quickly. “It doesn’t take very long for a student to select a shirt and photo-shop scene then have their picture taken,� Chaney said. “I don’t expect a long line backed up.� A laser tag game will also be held. Chris Windsor, associ- Texas Wesleyan’s annual Ram Jam event will take place April 7 in the mall area in front of the Eunice and James L. West Library. The ate dean of students, said event will be combined with international week and will offer free fajitas and entertainment to Wesleyan students, faculty and staff. 10 laser tag guns will be available as well. from a nearby high school,� obstacles for the laser tag booths will hold a passport Ram Jam will take place “We borrowed some Windsor said. “Those players.� contest game. The winner April 7 in the mall in front football tackling dummies dummies will provide some The international student willl receive a USB drive. of the library at 11 a.m.

Theatre Wesleyan presents annual musical Jordan Twine

jetwine@mail.txwes.edu

In a comedic play where knowing how to spell guarantees victory and the woes of teenage puberty run rampant, Theatre Wesleyan will debut its annual musical.

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee is a musical about six students who participate in a spelling bee, while also exploring their personal lives. “We hope the audience will find it funny,� said Connie Whitman, director



5

and

The Department of Music present

6

The Virtuoso String Quartet and Wesleyan Faculty Soloists April 7 at 7:30 p.m. Martin Hall

1 9 4 7

Š Puzzles provided by sudokusolver.com

4 1 5 8 9 2 7 2 8 5 6 9 5

said. “He’s kind of the outsider and not that smart.� Baker said this is his first time as a lead in one of Wesleyan’s musicals, and that it is definitely going to be a great time. The set designers are working to convey a spelling bee setting. Bradley Gray, freshman assistant set designer, helped come up with a plan to make the audience feel as if they are in the real gym where the spelling bee takes place. “We’re building bleachers that you will find in an auditorium that will be

actual seating for the audience,� Gray said. The musical is set in modern times and designers want to make sure it has a campy feel to go along with the humor of the play. “The colors and everything involved is going to show there’s humor,� Gray said. “It’s meant to be a good time.� The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee will premiere April 14 at 7:30 p.m. in Thad Smotherman Theatre. Repeat performances will run April 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. and April 17 at 2 p.m.

25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee April 14-16 7:30 p.m. April 17 2 p.m.

Ticket Prices $12 general admission $8 Wesleyan faculty and staff $6 students with valid ID

Texas Wesleyan University

Greater Fort Worth Community Band Henry Schraub, director April 10 at 3:00 p.m. Martin Hall

Wind Ensemble Concert Christine Beason, director April 12 at 7:30 p.m. Martin Hall

For more information, visit http://www.txwes.edu/music/music/index.htm or call 817-531-4992

Le R t’s A M G S! O !!

5 2 3 9 8 4 3 9 7 2 3 7 6 7

of the musical. “There are also some touching moments because some of the children who are there as spellers have some rather poignant stories.� Whitman said members of the audience should be prepared for anything, and that the musical is unique because the actors participate with the audience during the production. Spencer Baker, freshman theatre major, plays Leaf Coney Bear, one of the children in the spelling bee. “Leaf Coney Bear is the only kid there who is homeschooled,� Baker

RRAC Baseball TWU vs. Northwood Fri. at NU 3:00 p.m. Sat. at LaGrave 1:00 p.m. Sun. at LaGrave 1:00 p.m. Support your Rams against the rival Knights.

Religious Life at Texas Wesleyan University Chapel: Live music with brief time of worship Tuesdays at 12:15 in PUMC Chapel Free lunch after on PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312

Common Meal:

Free lunch and discussion/dialogue Thursdays at 12:15 in PUMC Chapel PUMC 3rd Floor – Room 312 “Faith seeking understanding� – ALL are welcome! For info: http://www.txwes.edu/religiouslife/index.htm


Campus

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

April 6, 2011

|

5

Conference encourages girls to excel in math 1

2

3

4

Rachel Peel

rlpeel@mail.txwes.edu

On April 2, Wesleyan opened its doors to middle school girls interested in pursuing a math or science degree at the 23rd annual Expanding Your Horizons Conference. Dr. Jane Moore, professor of mathematics, said more than 400 seventh and eighthgrade girls from Tarrant area schools registered for the conference. “It’s important because it tells young women what they can be,” Moore said. “I suppose it started out a little bit of women’s lib, but I hope we have moved past that now.” EYH began in 1989 when Moore heard about the conference out of the University of California Berkley and joined with LouAnn Mahaney, a then graduate student at the University of Texas at Arlington. They decided to start the program at Texas Wesleyan. According to the EYH web site, the goal of the conference is to encourage young women to pursue science, technology engineering and mathematics careers. “The big thing is to go to college and have a career,” Moore said. “If they want to be a lawyer, that’s fine; if they want to be an engineer, they can be an engineer.” Moore said not all middle school girls are interested in pursuing a career in math and science, so now EYH includes women with expertise

in fields such as surgery, veterinary medicine, astronomy, law and piloting. “I have had a wonderful life teaching, but I think if I had known back then, and the opportunities had been there, I probably would have been an engineer,” Moore said. Sarah, seventh-grader at Venus Middle School, said the workshop helped by letting her know what type of careers are out there and what she has to do to pursue them in the future. “I want to be an astronomer,” Sarah said. “It told me how many years it would take me to graduate and the classes I would have to take.” Krista Wallen, Venus seventh-grade math and honors teacher, said EYH helps students by showing them different career opportunities. “It broadened their horizons in knowing that there are a lot of different opportunities out there for them,” Wallen said. The girls were divided into 24 groups with two leaders each and rotated throughout classrooms to various activities and workshops focused on different areas. Activities included teaching the girls how to sew wounds, do a routine pet check-up, test toothpaste in the lab, and how pilots know which direction a plane is going. “I think it gave them more of a path, or paths, that they can choose from in order to meet their goals in science and mathematics,” Wallen said.

Photos by Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff 1: A middle school student decorates her airplane. 2: Maria Salgueiro, senior math major, mixes materials to make clay fossils. 3: A middle school student performs surgery on a banana. 4: A middle school student assembles her airplane.


Community Budget cuts cash out pre-K assistants

6

|

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

April 6, 2011

Rachel Peel

rlpeel@mail.txwes.edu

Wesleyan educationa students are having second thoughts about their majors after Fort Worth Independent School District trustees voted to cut pre-K teacher assistants. On Wednesday, March 22, trustees voted 8-1 to cut 207 pre-kindergarten teacher assistants throughout the district. According to Clinton Bond, external communications coordinator for Fort Worth ISD, this information is true but not entirely. “The superintendant also recommended that principals use campus level funds to rehire those teacher’s assistants,” said Bond. Dr. Patsy Robles-Goodwin, assistant professor and director of ESL/bilingual education does not think these cuts will have a positive impact. “I think the decision to cut the pre-k assistants really hits the most vulnerable population that we have in our schools,” Robles-Goodwin said. Robles-Goodwin said if pre-K programs begin to get cut the long-term effects haven not been looked at. “I challenge any lawmaker to spend a day in a pre-K classroom and see what these assistants do,” Robles-Goodwin said. “When it hits home and when it’s personal that’s

when people see these issues from a different point-ofview.” Robles-Goodwin also said most of the children who will be affected by the cut of pre-k programs come from minority groups. “You need to educate the majority population of the state, and if you don’t do that, what does that say about our state as being competitive globally for our educational systems,” Robles-Goodwin said. “Why can’t we cut somewhere else? Why can’t we get funds somewhere else? It seems like we take many steps forward and one big leap backwards.” Dr. Carlos Martinez, dean of education, said there is no doubt in his mind the statewide cuts are going to be long lasting and could have an impact on how children are educated in the future. Martinez said some school districts are proposing to cut half-day pre-K and curriculum materials, increase the size of classrooms, eliminate conference periods and reduce the amount of staff development. “To me, pre-K and K are the most difficult, the most complex classrooms out there; you have 20 little people that are not designed to be sitting down,” Martinez said. “You can have all different levels of kids. You can have readers, non-readers, children who know the language, and children who don’t.”

Photo Illustration by Rachel Peel | Rambler Staff

Martinez said lots of prek classrooms are center driven, meaning teachers organize their classrooms around centers for instruction and do rotations. Pre-k classrooms have six to seven rotations and usually one or two people are manning centers. “Making sure that students are doing what they are sup-

posed to be doing in those centers is going to be the greatest challenge,” Martinez said. Tasmin Turner, junior education major, said she has had second thoughts about being just an education major. “I was one of those kids, first grade,” Turner said. “I’m going to be a teacher, and people said you never are

what you are when you’re that little, but here I am, going to be a teacher,” she said. Turner also said she is looking into adding a minor just in case education falls through. “The school system isn’t going to magically fix itself in that short amount of time,” Turner said. There’s not going to magically be all these jobs opened.”

Not all students are concerned about the recent budget cuts in the education world. Andrea Waggoner, senior english major, said that the budget cuts do not affect her decision to go into the teaching field. “I know I am supposed to be a teacher and the layoffs will not affect my pursuit,” she said.

In the spotlight...

Everyone needs a friend! Be ours on Facebook! Download any MobileTag app and use your smartphone to navigate to our profile!

Lena Pope Home Inc. History: Founded in 1930, by Lena Pope at Broadway Baptist. Mission: Once an orphanage when they first opened, they now assist children and their families through counseling and family intervention. Services Offered: Chapel Hill Academy Charter School, is a public free charter school that offers parents a choice to enroll their child in their home school or CHA. Behavioral improvement class, Tarrant County juvenile justice AEP, Family mat ters counseling and family preservation services.

90 Years of Leadership

3131 Sanguinet Street Fort Worth, TX 76107 817-255-2606

This is the first in a series of spotlights for local non-profit organizations.

2010

1920 Contact Us at Phone: 817-531-7550 Email: stugov@txwes.edu

Visit us at

OC Hall 202 and 204

Need a clue on where to look?

E

E FR •

FR

Services Available: CareerLink

EE

Wesleyan’s On-line job board!

Major/Career Guidance

Computerized Job Searches

Job/ Intern Seeker’s Database

Career Services

FR

EE

FREE

Located in Brown Lupton North Wing Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm 817.531.6512 smata@txwes.edu rfisk@txwes.edu

Employer’s Database

FR

EE

EE

FR

FRE

E

EE

FR

Mock Interview

FREE Resume Writing & Critiquing Resume Posting

FRE FREE E E E R F http://www.txwes.edu/careerservices/index.htm

Study with Day or Night

Get help researching your paper at the West Library’s Reference Desk.

Eunice and James L. West Library

Texas Wesleyan University

Services Available: Monday-Thursday 8 am - 8 pm Friday & Saturday 8:30 am - 5 pm Sunday 1 pm - 8 pm or e-mail: reference@txwes.edu

Open:

Monday thru Friday 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Special Offers Valid Only in 3012 East Rosedale Fort Worth, TX, 76105 and 4225 East Lancaster Fort Worth, TX, 76103

$5.00 Footlongs Meatball B.L.T. Spicy Italian Cold Cut Combo Black Forest Ham Oven Roasted Chicken and Veggie Delight


The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Sports

April 6, 2011

|

7

Gough pursues dreams in Mexico Emma Fradette

ekfradette@mail.txwes.edu

Texas Wesleyan men’s basketball graduates six seniors this year, some of who to continue their basketball careers overseas. One player on the men’s basketball team who has embraced his opportunity is senior center Ty Gough who has the chance to play basketball in Mexico. “I’m graduating in May and wanting to settle down before I start my career,” Gough said. “I think it will look good on my resume as I plan to be a personal trainer with my degree.” According to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics website, Gough is ranked 11th in Division 1 for total rebounds for the season with 296. He averages about eight rebounds per game to go with his average nine points per game. “We have several players this season that agents and teams have inquired about,”head coach Terry Waldrop said. “Our staff will do whatever we can in order to help them get an opportunity to pursue a professional career.” Waldrop talks to professional scouts more

than once a month and said these scouts are very aware of the raw talent some the players have on the Wesleyan basketball team. “Over the last 10 years we have had players go through this process,” Waldrop said. “It is a regular occurrence for our program, and something we enjoy almost on a yearly basis.” Jonathan Blake, senior guard, said Gough has a great jump shot, which is rare for a player his size. “I am very proud of Ty, and I consider him as a brother of mine that has a lot of great things ahead of him,” Blake said. Gough said he does not plan on playing more than a year or two. “Just want to try it out and make a little cash until I get my career wiring in the fitness corporation,” he said. Waldrop said he is very excited for Gough along with other players and looks forward to keeping up with them as their careers take off. “We are thankful for the time they have spent with us and the impact they made both on and off the court at Texas Wesleyan,” Waldrop said.

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Ty Gough, senior post, goes up for a tear drop against Wiley College after getting a rebound in a game at the Sid Richardson Center. Gough is headed to Mexico to play basketball after he graduates from Wesleyan in May.

Also featuring at Dora’s: • Tuesday: Fiesta Tuesday • Thursday: $3 Thursday for faculty only. • Friday: Wings and Fish Friday night: Hot dogs, hot links, and hamburgers. Visit our website: http://www.campusdish.com/en-US/ CSSW/TexasWesleyan/

**All specials include a small fry or salad and a small drink.


Sports Rams fight Warriors, lose series 2-1

8

| April 6, 2011

The Rambler | www.therambler.org

Eliana Mijangos

emmijangos@mail.txwes.edu

Ram baseball went 2-1 in a Red River Athletic Conference series match up against Bacone College April 3-4 at Sycamore Park. Game one started out slow as the Rams gave away three runs in two innings off of three walks and an error. Taylor Jockers, junior outfielder, tried to turn around the momentum with an RBI single in the third, while Derek Vaughn, sophomore pitcher, held the Warriors off the score board until the seventh inning. Vaughn allowed six runs, one earned on five hits and four walks in the six innings he pitched. The Rams finished game one with a 6-1 loss. In game two, the Warriors once again took a 3-0 lead in just three innings. Christian Soberanes, junior short stop, tried to save the Rams going 2 for 4 in the game, but the Rams couldn’t pull it out and the Warriors took the 4-0 win. Colton Farrar, junior pitcher, tossed six scoreless innings before allowing three hits and five walks. In game three, the Rams blew out the

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Eric Epperson, senior outfielder, hits a single to left field for the Rams in a Red River Athletic Conference game against Wiley College March 25 at Sycamore Park. The Rams took on Bacone College April 3 where they suffered two losses, game one 6-1 and game two 4-0. However, the Rams came out on top in game three 15-4 April 4.

Ba-

Rams 15 (26-15,16-8 RRAC)

cone Warriors 15-4. “Game three was a wake up call for us,” Eric

Bacone 4 (9-26,6-15 RRAC)

Player

ab

rr

h

rbi

Player

ab

rr

h

rbi

Jockers, Taylor cf

3

2

1

1

Jackson, Brandon p/dh

4

0

1

1

Lassiter, Joseph lf

4

2

2

1

Gonzalez, Lester 2b

4

1

2

0

Melton, Patrick dh

5

0

2

1

Consuegra, David rf

2

1

1

0

Niedwiecki, Stephen 1b

5

2

3

2

Miller, Mike 3b

2

1

0

0

Snider, Justin 3b

4

1

0

0

Smith, Steven 1b

3

0

1

1

Soberanes, Christian ss

4

2

2

2

Hamilton, John c

3

0

1

1

Epperson, Eric rf

5

3

4

3

Norton, Garland pr/ph

1

0

1

0

Holmes, Jason 2b

2

1

1

3

Seabold, Anthony cf

2

0

0

0

Taylor, Matt c

3

0

1

0

Lima, Rolando ss

3

0

0

0

McFadden, Garrett pr

0

2

0

0

Simms, Will lf

3

1

1

0

Sewell, Trent c

0

0

0

0

Aguillard, Eric p

0

0

0

0

Cavender, Drew p

0

0

0

0

Wearing, Brian p

0

0

0

0

Totals

35

15 16 13

Totals

27

4

8

3

We’re Everywhere! Now Accepting Applications for

Editor in Chief Applications are available at O. C. Hall 107 For a Complete Job Description, Visit www.therambler.org

The Rambler For More Information, ContactDr. Kay L. Colley at kcolley@txwes.edu

Epperson, senior outfielder said. “We really turned it on both offensively and defensively,

and I think it made us realize out potential.” Ram offense turned on in the second and third innings as Soberanes hit a double followed by Epperson with a single to left field. Jason Holmes, first and third base, brought in both Soberanes and Epperson with a double hit to left field, while Matt Taylor, senior outfield, finished the four straight hits with a bunt. This episode gave the Rams a 4-3 lead, the largest in the series. Epperson hit a homer to bring the Rams to a 10-3 lead in the fourth inning. Epperson finished the game with three RBIs and three runs scored. Stephen Niedwicki, junior first base, got three hits in his five trips to the plate in the Ram win Soberanes finished with a power house two RBIs, two runs and two doubles for the day. “The first two games were embarrassing. There was no intensity, and we didn’t hit the ball,” Christian Mendoza, sophomore pitcher said. “Sunday was the opposite and was the game that’s going to turn our season around.” The Rams will hit La Grave field once again at 1 p.m. April 9 where they will take on school rivals Northwood University. “Sunday, we finally got stuff to go our way,” Jacob Lyons, sophomore pitcher, said. “I really think we will be able to keep up this streak as we face our rivals.”

The Voice of Texas Wesleyan University Students Since 1917

Meisa Keivani Najafabadi | Rambler Staff Colton Farrar, junior pitcher, throws a no hit inning against Wiley College March 26 at Sycamore Park as the Rams took a 2-1 series win. The Rams will be back in action April 9 at 1 p.m. as they take on Northwood University at La Grave Field.


The Rambler Vol. 94 No. 10