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Since 1970 Aug. 9 - Aug. 16, 2018 QueensTribune.com

QUEENS transportation

ARTISTS ON THE RISE

City Caps For-Hire Vehicles By ARIEL HERNANDEZ Page 4

election 2018

PERALTA vs. RAMOS: Friends Fight In 13th Page 10

T H E R E A R E M A N Y up-and-coming artists you should know in the borough of Queens. We profile four of them this week, all expressing themselves through different media: filmmaker Christina Raia (upper left), band Blac Rabbit (upper right), painter Eileen Coyne (lower right) and author Bushra Rehman (lower left). Photography by Sasha Moslav Pages 11-14 14.0 in.

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The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

The Week In Tweets @EricFPhillips

@pessosices

“You’re a Red Sox fan. I almost didn’t vote for you because of that!”

Thrilled to throw the opening pitch at @citifield #PrideNight w @LGBTNetworkNY’s @DavidKilmnick & the NY @Mets! A great evening with @DocGooden16 @kimberleylocke @melindakatz @DannyODonnellNY @cpellegrino1221 @jackschnirman @bridgetmfleming & company. Let’s go Mets! Councilman Danny Dromm, a long-time LGBTQ activisit had the pleasure of throwing out the first pitch at Citi Field on Aug. 4 when the Mets hosted Pride Night. Rumor is that it was quite the heater.

On his way to the 102nd Precinct National Night Out in Forest Park, Mayor Bill de Blasio encountered a Yankee fan that had a hard time voting for him knowing that he rooted for the Red Sox. The loyalty torn constituent may have been nursing some fresh wounds after the Sox just beat the Yanks in a recent series.

@A_GiudiceReport

@assemblymanmike

The @NYPD112Pct #NationalNightOut got rained out but that hasn’t stopped the party! We just moved indoors! @112thpctcouncil

Rain or shine, we’re here at Forest Park Victory Field for the @NYPD102Pct #Nightoutagainstcrime

The 112th Precinct’s National Night Out in Forest Hills was drowned out a bit by the heavy rain and thunderstorms that took the area on Tuesday night, but it did not stop their celebratory spirits. They just took the party inside.

The 102nd Precinct National Night Out Festivities in Forest Park’s Victory Field was not dampened by the rain or thunder, they toughed it out, as evidenced by Assemblyman Mike Miller’s photos.

Who Won The Week

Osvaldo Nuñez Often it is a hyperbole to call law enforcement officials “heroes,” but Officer Osvaldo Nuñez’s actions on July 30 were truly heroic. The 22-year-old rookie member of the 115th Precinct didn’t hesitate to jump into action and perform chest compressions on 1-year-old Baby Leah as her mother, Rebecca Alarcon, watched, fearing the worst as any parent would in that situation. While the lifesaving quick actions of Officer Nuñez were not surprising—as each and every day the men and women of the NYPD and the FDNY go above and beyond to make the city safer and help those in need—they were heroic, and that is why he won the week.

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Top Stories

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Hunger Strike Held To Protest Ozone Park Shelter BY JON CRONIN

A battle to protest an onslaught of homeless shelters in Queens has led to a hunger strike and campout protest in Ozone Park. Sam Esposito, a retired police officer and motivating organizer behind the movement against the proposed shelter, has undertaken a hunger strike, while sleeping outside the site in a tent on the sidewalk. The shelter is planned for 85-15 101st Ave. in Ozone Park. Esposito said that his last meal was on Sunday, and he spent his first night on the street in his tent—sleeping on an air mattress—on Monday night. His purpose is to bring Mayor Bill de Blasio or other city officials to the table to negotiate a change in occupancy of the shelter. Residents and local politicians have spoken out against the plan for the shelter, which would house 113 single, mentally ill men at the site. “I got about four hours of sleep,” Esposito said of

would exceed the legal limit of the number of people that the city can house at the site. State Sen. Joe Addabbo (D-Howard Beach) reiterated that prior mayoral administrations have not implemented such policies without community input beforehand. He noted that he passed three schools on the way to the press conference. Still, he believes that if the mayor and city officials come to the table, “We can find common ground.” Assemblyman Michael Miller (D-Woodhaven) said that the city’s Department of Homeless Services (DHS) told the community that the shelter would close at 10 p.m., and if a person arrived later, he or she would have to sleep in the lobby of the shelter. Miller believes that if shelter residents were faced with that choice, they would instead choose to sleep on the streets and the stoops of the neighborhood. He added that previous mayoral administrations

“I don’t know how else to get attention. I could lose the weight anyway” his first night on the street. On Tuesday, Esposito hosted a press conference with E. Christopher Murray, Esq., an attorney representing the residents of Ozone Park in a lawsuit against de Blasio; the city’s Human Resources Administration; that agency’s commissioner, Steven Banks; the operator of the proposed shelter, Lantern Community Services Inc.; and 101 Realty Group LLC. Murray stated that the purpose of the lawsuit is to prove that the city did not follow due process in choosing the site. Chiefly, he believes that the city did not appropriately review the site through the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act. The lawsuit also states that site selection should be reviewed under the city’s Fair Share Criteria, and cannot function as a shelter for the mentally ill because it does not have proper licensing by the state’s Office of Mental Health. Murray also believes that housing 113 residents

provided better solutions for handling the mentally ill homeless, such as finding room for them at Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens Village. In the meantime, Esposito noted that he was “here for the duration.” He added that he spoke with the captain of the 102nd Precinct, and was told that he could sleep at the site as long as he didn’t interfere with a construction crew at the site. “The cops have been wonderful,” he said, adding that they drop by to check on him. He said that when he helped to organize the meeting with the DHS and the community, “it wasn’t enough. The mayor wasn’t hearing us.” “I don’t know how else to get attention. I could lose the weight anyway,” he concluded. Reach reporter Jon Cronin via email at jcronin@ queenstribune.com.

Sam Esposito's tent, where he will be sleeping during his hunger strike. Photo by Jon Cronin

City Council Passes Bill To Cap FHV Licenses BY ARIEL HERNANDEZ

Following a series of rallies by the New York Taxi Workers Alliance (NYTWA) and Uber and Lyft drivers, and the suicides of six taxi workers attributed to a decrease in ridership due to an increase in for-hire vehicles (FHV), the City Council passed a bill for a one-year cap on new vehicles, except for wheelchair-accessible cars. “We introduced Intro. 1078, in relation to creating an office of inclusion within the @nyctaxi,” Councilman Donovan Richards (D-Laurelton) tweeted following the ruling. “As we move to provide a lifeline to taxi drivers we must also address ride refusals. Thank you @ NYCSpeakerCoJo for acknowledging and addressing both issues today.” The bill to cap ride-sharing vehicles in New York City would limit the number of vehicles— which has increased from 63,000 to 100,000 since 2015. “Our city is directly confronting a crisis that is driving working New Yorkers into poverty and our streets into gridlock,” said Mayor Bill de Blasio. “The unchecked growth of app-based for-hire vehicle companies has demanded action—and now we have it. And this action will stop the influx of cars contributing to the congestion grinding our streets to a halt.” According to the Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC), fewer than 14,000 yellow cabs operate in the city. “Thousands of NYTWA members have marched and rallied, have stood together in the blazing sun, in rainstorms, joining us after sleepless nights and days behind the wheel,” said NYTWA Executive Director Bhairavi Desai. “Our activism created the momentum to regulate app-dispatch companies for the very first time. What happened today didn’t just set a precedent for New York City; it set a precedent for the entire world as app companies like Uber and Lyft use technological innovation to return us to a time of sweated labor, destroying lives and livelihoods across the planet.” When it was first announced that there would

be a cap on FHVs, a number of politicians from Queens and Brooklyn, as well as residents of those communities, shared concerns that yellow cabs would once again only target high-income communities, leaving low-income residents lacking in that area. Many supported Uber/Lyft because unlike yellow cabs and other professional car services operated by the TLC, the car services’ drivers did not discriminate against low-income communities. “These sweeping cuts to transportation will bring New Yorkers back to an era of struggling to get a ride, particularly for communities of color and in the outer boroughs,” said Lyft vice president of public policy Joseph Okpaku. “We will never stop working to ensure New Yorkers have access to reliable and affordable transportation in every borough.” In the event that certain geographic areas are in need of vehicles, the TLC will issue licenses, as long as there isn’t a substantial effect on congestion. During the hearing, Speaker Corey Johnson (D-Manhattan) shared the stories of Abdul Saleh, Yu Mein Kenny Chow, Nican Ochisor, Danilo Corporan Castillo, Alfredo Perez and Douglas Schifter, all of whom committed suicide this year due to Uber and Lyft’s takeover, which resulted in financial strain on the drivers. Earlier this week, the NYTWA and Uber, Lyft, Taxi, Black Car and Green Cab drivers rallied in Long Island City at the Uber and Lyft headquarters and at City Hall to support the FHV cap and prevent the city’s professional drivers from facing the prospect of poverty. “Today, a workforce of over 100,000 men and women, a workforce of immigrants and people of color, finally have a reason to hope for an end to this crisis,” said Desai. “Today, we took the first step. Tomorrow, we will continue to fight.” Reach Ariel Hernandez at (718) 357-7400 x 144, ahernandez@queenstribune.com or @reporter_ariel.

Woodside Rape Attempt BY NATHAN DUKE

NYTWA Executive Director Bhairavi Desai leads rally on Monday in Long Island City at headquarters of Lyft. Photo by Michael Gareth Johnson

A 34-year-old Florida man has been arrested after he allegedly attempted to rape a 21-year-old woman as she was attempting to gain entry into her Woodside residence on Aug. 3, police said. Around 3:50 a.m., the victim was attempting to enter her residence in the vicinity of 55th Street and Queens Boulevard, when Christopher Prusa—a resident of Port St. Lucie, Florida—allegedly approached her from behind, grabbed her by the arms and pulled her toward him. The victim was able to break free and run away, and her attacker f led on foot. On Aug. 4, police arrested Prusa around 6:15 p.m. after having released surveillance footage and a description of the suspect. He was charged with attempted rape, unlawful imprisonment, attempted assault, criminal possession of a controlled substance, sexual abuse, stalking, unlawful possession of marijuana and harassment, police said.


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The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

POLICE BLOTTER 102ND PRECINCT

PUBLIC LEWDNESS

Police said that they are searching for an individual who is wanted in connection with a public lewdness incident that took place on July 31 within the confi nes of the 102nd Precinct. Around 11:30 p.m., a 26-year-old woman was walking along 108th Street when the individual exposed his genitals to her and began to follow her while masturbating. He continued to follow her and waved to her. The suspect then fled the location in a light-colored sedan. The suspect is described as a five-footsix-inch Hispanic man who is believed to be 20 to 30 years old. He has a beard and was last seen wearing a white T-shirt and baseball cap.

106TH PRECINCT

ATTEMPTED BURGLARY

Police said that they are searching for an individual who is wanted in connection with an attempted burglary that took place on July 25 in Richmond Hill. Around 11:50 p.m., an individual attempted to gain entry through a window into a residence located at 108th

Street and 107th Avenue. The burglar was not successful in gaining entry and fled in an unknown direction. The suspect was described as a black man who is believed to be 20 to 25 years old. He has a black beard and a tattoo on his neck. The suspect was last seen wearing a baseball hat and hooded sweatshirt.

men with athletic builds. One of them had short black hair and a goatee, and was last seen wearing a white T-shirt and red shorts, while the second man had short, black braided hair and a goatee, and was last seen wearing a blue T-shirt with the word “witness” in white lettering on the front, grey sweatpants, white socks and black sandals.

111TH PRECINCT

COLLISION INVESTIGATION

A 33-year-old Hempstead woman was arrested in an Aug. 6 collision that killed a 36-year-old man on a motorcycle within the confi nes of the 111th Precinct. Around 12:19 a.m., police responded to a 911 call of a motor vehicle collision involving a motorcycle along the Cross Island Parkway near Northern Boulevard. Upon arrival, officers observed the motorcyclist—whose name has not been released—unconscious and unresponsive, lying on the roadway with severe trauma about the body. EMS pronounced the man dead at the scene. An investigation by the NYPD Highway District’s Collision Investigation Squad determined that the motorcyclist, who was operating a 2006 Honda motorcycle, was traveling northbound on the Cross Island Parkway at a high rate of speed and made contact with the center dividing wall, which caused him to be ejected from the motorcycle and enter the southbound lanes of traffic. At that time, Jevaughn Hodge, who lives on Highland Avenue in Hempstead, was driving a 2013 Bentley, which was traveling southbound on the Cross Island Parkway in the left lane of traffic and struck the motorcyclist. Hodge remained at the scene and was arrested and charged with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. The investigation remains ongoing.

114TH PRECINCT

ASSAULT

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in locating an individual who is wanted in connection with an assault that took place in Long Island City on Aug. 5. Around 1:15 a.m., the individual punched a 35-year-old man in the face following a confrontation in front of 41-10 29th St. The victim’s head hit the pavement when he fell back and he lost consciousness. The victim was removed to an area hospital in critical condition. The suspect fled the scene northbound on 29th Street inside of a white sport utility vehicle. The individual is described as a bald, dark-skinned man who was last seen wearing a light colored, long-sleeved shirt and jeans.

ASSAULT

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in locating two individuals who are wanted in connection with a shooting that took place in the rear of an Astoria housing development on July 29. Around 1:02 a.m., a 22-year-old man was shot in the left thigh behind a building located at 4-10 27th Ave. EMS transported the victim to Elmhurst Hospital Center, where he was treated and released. Two unidentified individuals were seen fleeing the scene after the victim was shot. Both suspects are described as black

114TH PRECINCT

ROBBERY

Police said that they are searching for three men who are wanted in connection with a robbery that took place on Aug. 2 in Astoria. Around 3 a.m., a 21-year-old woman opened the door of a commercial building on Steinway Street at 34th Avenue after three unidentified men knocked on it. Once inside, one of the men grabbed the victim by wrapping his arm around the back of her neck and placing his hand over her mouth. He then pushed her away from the door, grabbed her by the neck, made her take a seat and produced a knife. The second and third suspects searched the location unsuccessfully for cash. The men removed the victim’s purse and her three cell phones—a pink iPhone, green Samsung and black LG. The men restrained the victim with a bed sheet and fled. The victim, who was not in-

jured, free herself and went to another nearby commercial location, where she called the police. In surveillance photos from the scene, one of the men can be seen wearing a do-rag.

115TH PRECINCT

FORCIBLE TOUCHING

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in identifying an individual who is wanted for forcibly touching an underage girl in Corona. Around 10:20 p.m., the individual smacked a 16-year-old girl’s buttocks with his open hand in front of 99-22 Northern Blvd. and then fled the location in an unknown direction. The suspect is described as a five-footeight-inch Hispanic man with a light complexion who is believed to be 35 to 40 years old and weighs approximately 200 pounds. He has short black hair and a goatee and was last seen wearing a camouflage, sleeveless green shirt, black jeans and black boots.

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Around The Borough

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

QUEENS, NY

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ASTORIA

20K Pounds Of Mislabeled Greek Sausages Recalled 08

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has recalled 20,000 pounds of sausage products from Astoria’s Star Natural Meats LLC due to misbranding and undeclared allergens. The USDA announced that the products contain milk and soy, which were not on the sausage labels. The agency also stated that the sausage labels did not declare that the product contained “restricted ingredients,” such as sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate. The pork sausages—labeled as “Loukaniko Greek Brand–Made in the USA—are in packages of individual weights and were produced between Feb. 23, 2017, and Aug. 3, 2018. The USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service is

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concerned that some of the product could still be in home freezers, and urged consumers to throw the sausages away or return the product to the place of purchase. The USDA said that no one had been injured due to the mislabeling. The meat was shipped to retail outlets around Astoria. The issue was discovered on Aug. 3 when inspection personnel conducted a routine label check. Consumers with food-safety questions can contact AskKaren.gov or the tollfree USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 888-MPHotline (888-674-6854). -Jon Cronin

SUNNYSIDE

2-Year-Old Survives Three-Story Fall A 2-year-old boy survived after falling three stories from his fourth-floor Sunnyside apartment window on Aug. 4, police said. According to law enforcement officials, the boy was playing on the fire escape of the building, located on 49th Street, around 6 p.m. He climbed from the family’s fourthfloor apartment onto the third-floor fire escape before falling down to the building’s back courtyard. Sonia Ramirez, an elderly woman who lives in the building, witnessed the boy beginning to fall, broke his landing and, according to police, ultimately saved the boy’s life.

Ramirez and other neighbors saw the boy climbing onto the fire escape. She followed his every move and when he began to fall, she put her hands up and was able to catch him before he landed, preventing him from hitting the concrete. The boy’s mother, who was home during the time of the incident, didn’t know what had happened to her son until police arrived at the scene. The police are investigating how the boy got onto the fire escape. However, they said there are no expected charges. -Ariel Hernandez

04 MIDDLE VILLAGE

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Addabbo Hosts School Supply Drive As parents and children face the dog days of summer, schools are planning for the coming school year. State Sen. Joe Addabbo (D-Howard Beach) is partnering with the Girl Scouts of America Troop 4791 and Glendale’s Sacred Heart Food Pantry to collect supplies for local students and families who cannot afford them. Addabbo’s Middle Village office and the Girl Scouts will collect supplies and personal-hygiene products for the beginning of the school year. “With two children in the school system, I understand how difficult it can be for parents to purchase all of the necessary items on their school supply lists,” Addabbo said. “The growing number of supplies students need can become quite expensive, especially if a family has

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ASTORIA

Groundbreaking For Steinway Library Renovation Queens Library President Dennis Walcott joined western Queens leaders on Monday to break ground on a $3.9 million renovation of Astoria’s Steinway Library. The project, which is managed by the city’s Department of Design and Construction (DDC), will add an elevator and new entrance ramp for full accessibility, revamp the building’s second floor and cellar, and address external issues to ensure the building’s long-term structural integrity. The project will begin in August and be completed next summer. The library, located at 21-43 31st St., is expected to reopen in fall 2019. Walcott joined Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, Councilman Costa Constantinides (D-Astoria), Assemblywoman Aravel-

la Simotas (D-Astoria), state Sen. Jose Peralta (D-East Elmhurst) and DDC Commissioner Lorraine Grillo for Monday’s groundbreaking. “With these renovations, Queens Library’s Steinway branch will be more technologically efficient, eco-friendly and accessible to everyone,” Walcott said. “Our patrons deserve no less.” During construction, a new passenger elevator will be installed to serve all three levels of the building, while an ADA-accessible ramp will be added to the library’s main entrance on 31st Street. There will also be a new book-sorting area, while the second floor will be renovated and new offices will be added to the cellar.

A new external elevator tower will be constructed in the building’s rear courtyard with steel tube framing and an aluminum-framed curtain wall enclosure. Also, a new roof will be installed, masonry will be upgraded, and the watertightness will be addressed to eliminate leaks to the interior. Energy-efficient insulated glazing will be used at the new entrance. The library branch will be closed for approximately one week beginning on Aug. 13 for preliminary work related to the project. The branch is expected to close again this fall until the work is completed in fall 2019. Mobile library service will be provided in the interim. -Nathan Duke

more than one student attending school at the same time.” The school supply drive will end on Aug. 31. Representatives from Addabbo’s office will then deliver the collected goods to the Sacred Heart Food Pantry in Glendale, where they will be distributed to needy families. To donate, visit Addabbo’s Middle Village office at 66-85 73rd Place or call (718) 497-1630. The school supplies needed include pens and pencils, folders, loose-leaf paper, highlighters, crayons, notebooks and three-ring binders. Personal-hygiene products requested include bar soap, deodorant, shaving items, shampoo, facial tissues, toothpaste, toothbrushes, mouthwash, adhesive bandages, disposable diapers, feminine products and sunscreen. -Jon Cronin

JACKSON HEIGHTS

Hero Rookie Cop Receives State Citation A rookie 115th Precinct police officer who saved the life of a 1-year-old girl was presented with a state citation on Monday from state Sen. Jose Peralta (D-Elmhurst) for his heroism in saving the infant’s life. On July 30 at approximately 9 p.m., Osvaldo Nuñez, 22, was wrapping up his shift at the 115th Precinct in Jackson Heights when he was approached by a hysterical woman, Rebecca Alarcon, who was carrying a lifeless infant named Leah in her arms. Nuñez said that he grabbed Leah, rushed her into the precinct, laid her on a nearby stool and began performing chest compressions. After two rounds of compressions, Leah opened her eyes. The infant was rushed to Elmhurst Hospital,

where she was treated and released. “Office Nuñez is a true hero,” said Peralta. “He saved the life of baby Leah, who was having difficulties breathing and unresponsive. He is a hero to me, to Leah’s family, to the community and to the entire city. Thank you, Officer Nuñez.” Chief Terence Monahan, the NYPD’s chief of department, called Nuñez “a true hero in blue.” “As a dad, I can’t imagine the fear 20-monthold Leah’s mom felt as she rushed her into the 115th Precinct when she stopped breathing,” said Monahan. “Officer Osvaldo Nuñez didn’t skip a beat as he performed CPR and saved Leah’s life.” -Ariel Hernandez


Around The Borough

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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07 FAR ROCKAWAY

St. John’s Gets Maternity-Ward Funding Far Rockaway’s St. John’s Episcopal Hospital will receive more than $1 million from the City Council for a new Labor and Maternity Ward. Councilman Donovan Richards (D-Far Rockaway) announced on Aug. 3 that he had obtained $1.025 million in city funding dedicated to the project for the hospital, which serves a community with a high infant mortality rate. After the closure of Peninsula Hospital nearly a decade ago, St. John’s has served more than 110,000 residents.

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Richards referenced a 2016 city Department of Health and Mental Hygiene report stating that New York City had an infant mortality rate of 4.3 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2016, a slight increase since 2014, which had 4.2 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. In 2016, the Rockaways’ infant mortality rate was 5.2. Borough-wide statistics showed that from 2013 to 2015, the maternal mortality rate was 22.0 per 100,000 births. Richards noted that maternal mortality rates

are higher in communities of color and low-income areas. He said that the city created a Severe Maternal Morbidity (SMM) surveillance system using measurement methods developed by the federal Centers for Disease Control. “To address these devastating disparities, the state and city must invest more in our local hospitals to improve the health and safety of mothers and infants, especially in communities of color,” Richards said. -Jon Cronin

CORONA

School Children Receive Backpacks For Back-To-School State Sen. Jose Peralta (D-East Elmhurst), community organizations and volunteers handed out approximately 3,000 backpacks filled with school supplies to children during an event on Saturday in Corona. The ninth annual backpack giveaway was held at the intersection of 98th Place and 57th Avenue. Each student received one backpack that contained notebooks, pencil kits, crayons and other learning tools. During the past nine years, more than 20,000 backpacks have been given to local schoolchildren. “Providing much-needed school supplies to the children in our community is essential—and, perhaps, will even inspire the next generation of architects, engineers and airline pilots,” said Grace Stevens, the community and external relations manager of LaGuardia Gateway Partners—the company operating and redeveloping LaGuardia Airport’s Terminal

B—which was among the organizations to take part in the event. This year, more than 20 local organizations partnered with Peralta to give away the backpacks. The event also included face-painting and a bounce house. Other companies and organizations to take part in the backpack giveaway included United’s LaGuardia Operations, Mark Medical Care, Con Edison, Queens Library, Delta Air Lines, Local 338 RWDSU/UFCW, Queens Center Mall, LeFrak City, Affinity and White Castle. “Education is fundamental for a child’s future, and providing the appropriate learning tools is vital to ensure schoolchildren are confident to face the new academic year,” Peralta said. “Unfortunately, many hard-working families struggle to make ends meet and cannot afford to buy the basic school supplies for their children.” -Nathan Duke

08 COLLEGE POINT

Tornado Touches Down In College Point A tornado touched down in College Point last week during a thunderstorm, leaving several homes damaged and wires and trees down. The National Weather Service confirmed that at approximately 10:20 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 2, a tornado landed at 124th Street and 15th Avenue near St. Fidelis Church. The National Weather Service sent out a team to check on the damage on Friday morning. The tornado’s Enhanced Fujita scale was 0, which is the weakest strength on the scale for

tornadoes, according to the National Weather Service. “The tornado strengthened as it moved toward Powell’s Cove Park, where at least 50 trees were downed in a narrow, convergent pattern highly indicative of a tornado,” the National Weather Service said. “The tornado briefly moved along the southernmost shoreline of Powell’s Cove and then dissipated over the far eastern end of the park just before reaching 138th Street. Additional straightline wind damage occurred from that point

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Transportation

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

MOVING THROUGH QUEENS

A look at transportation issues around the borough

SERVICE CHANGES On Friday and Saturday, Hunters Point Avenue and Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue ❼ trains will board at the Flushing-bound platform from 12:40 a.m. to 5 a.m. Also, due to track replacement, Flushing-bound ❼ trains will skip 82nd, 90th, 103rd and 111th streets in Queens from 3:45 a.m. on Saturday to 10 p.m. on Sunday.

WOODHAVEN BOULEVARD TO GET MORE SBS UPDATES

There will be no A trains running to Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue this weekend and no S Rockaway Park Shuttle service at Broad Channel. Due to signal modernization, World Trade Center-bound E trains will skip Briarwood and 75th Avenue from 9:45 p.m. on Friday to 5 a.m. on Monday. Also, World Trade Center-bound E trains will run express from 71st Avenue to Queens Plaza from 11 p.m. on Friday to 5 a.m. on Monday. Coney Island-bound F trains will skip Sutphin Boulevard, Briarwood and 75th Avenue from 9:45 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Monday due to signal modernization. To allow for structural improvements, there will be no J trains between Crescent Street in Brooklyn and Jamaica Center from 3:45 a.m. on Saturday to 10 p.m. on Sunday.

BY JON CRONIN The city’s Department of Transportation (DOT) announced last week that it is implementing more changes as part of the Select Bus Service (SBS) and Vision Zero enhancements to Cross Bay and Woodhaven boulevards. The DOT explained that the bus and safe-

ty improvements will be between 81st Road in Glendale and Rockaway Boulevard in Ozone Park, and are part of the Q 52/Q 53 Select Bus Service route. The project will include: - Lengthening the southbound left-turn bay at Myrtle Avenue - Installing new slip lanes between Jamaica and 89th avenues

- Constructing pedestrian refuge islands at 81st Road and Myrtle Avenue - Installing mid-block signalized crosswalk at 88th Avenue - Continuing SBS treatments The changes have already begun at Jamaica Avenue and Woodhaven Boulevard at the crosswalks. “These changes were a part of the original

Woodhaven SBS implementation project that were pushed to the 2018 implementation season due to the need to focus on more critical elements for the launch of Q 52/Q 53 Select Bus Service,” the DOT spokesman said. “The DOT is committing to completing all of the safety and traffic improvements that have been proposed to the community.”

Due to station enhancements, the Broadway and 39th Avenue N and W stations are closed. There will be no N trains between Ditmars Boulevard and Queensboro Plaza from 3:45 a.m. on Saturday to 10 p.m. on Sunday to allow for track maintenance. Free shuttle buses will provide alternate service. To allow for signal modernization, Manhattan-bound R trains will run express from 71st Avenue to Queens Plaza on Saturday and Sunday.

MOST-DANGEROUS INTERSECTIONS IN QUEENS NE QUEENS LEADERS TALK HELICOPTER NOISE PLANS BY NATHAN DUKE

Northeast Queens leaders recently held a meeting to discuss plans to combat helicopter noise that has been plaguing several communities. U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Little Neck) recently met with state Sen. Tony Avella (D-Bayside), Councilman Paul Vallone (D-Bayside) and representatives from the Queens borough president’s office, TRACON, the city’s Economic Development Corporation, We Love Whitestone and other neighborhood organizations to come up with plans to mitigate helicopter noise in Northeast Queens. “I became co-chair of the Quiet Skies Caucus because my constituents in Northeast Queens have been forced to endure constant and intrusive noise due to low-flying helicopters at all hours of the night,” Suozzi said. On July 30, Suozzi met with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) officials and community groups to come up with “realistic solutions” to the quality-of-life issue. Avella said that

various strategies—including alternate flight paths, minimum altitude standards and safety procedures—have been discussed with the FAA to prevent the “relentless onslaught” of helicopter noise in Northeast Queens. Aircraft noise has long been an issue in Northeast Queens. For the past five years, residents have complained of nonstop airplane noise at all hours over their communities following the introduction of a new flight pattern known as the Tennis Climb at LaGuardia Airport. In April, a bill by U.S. Rep. Grace Meng (D-Flushing) and members of New York’s Quiet Skies Caucus was passed that would direct the FAA to continue evaluating metrics to the Day-Night Average Sound Level (DNL) 65, which is the current national standard at which the agency determines acceptable levels of aircraft noise. Then, in May, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that included measures to help curb the noise—including an initiative in which the FAA would partner with private in-

dustry to develop aircraft and engine technology that reduces noise, and a requirement for the FAA to complete an evaluation of its methods of measuring aircraft noise within a year. Previous complaints of helicopter noise over Long Island resulted in a route change for helicopters, but the new route did not alleviate noise for Queens. Following a helicopter crash in the East River in March, Vallone called on the city to change how helicopter noise and safety are monitored. The councilman said that the recent meeting to discuss helicopter noise was a necessary step in tackling the problem. “As a result of this meeting, an understanding is in place for all parties to develop plans and strategies to develop alternate flight paths and routes, minimum altitude standards and maximum speed requirements, overall safety procedures and the collection of necessary data,” Vallone said. Reach editor-in-chief Nathan Duke via email at queenstribune@gmail.com.

With streets crowded with cars and buses, it should not be surprising that some of the deadliest and most-dangerous intersections in New York City are found in the borough of Queens. Localize.city—a website that provides information on any address in the five boroughs—analyzed thousands of datasets to figure out the places across New York City where pedestrians and cyclists were in the most danger. The study found five places in Queens where people should pay attention. Intersections in Corona, Jamaica, Jackson Heights, Ridgewood and Flushing were among the city’s worst. The study found that the intersections had a three-times– higher rate of injury or death for pedestrians and cyclists than other intersections across the city. Additionally, it was discovered that crashes occurred most often near elevated tracks or bridges and their approaches. "This may give you a truer sense of how safe it is to cross a given street than just using raw numbers alone,” said Localize. city urban planner Andrew Lassiter. The most-dangerous intersections from Jan. 1, 2013, to Jan. 1, 2018, were the following:

CORONA:

General boundaries between 35th and Roosevelt avenues, from 94th to 108th streets Cyclists injured: 332 Pedestrians injured: 455 Killed: 9

JACKSON HEIGHTS:

General boundaries between 37th Avenue and Broadway, from 76th Street to 84th Street/Whitney Avenue Cyclists injured: 240

Pedestrians injured: 499 Killed: 9

FLUSHING:

General boundaries between College Point Avenue and Parsons Boulevard, from 37th to Franklin avenues Cyclists injured: 91 Pedestrians injured: 571 Killed: 12

RIDGEWOOD:

General boundaries between Woodward and Myrtle avenues, from Grove Street to Forest Avenue Cyclists injured: 98 Pedestrians injured: 237 Killed: 3

JAMAICA:

General boundaries between 89th and 90th avenues, from 164th Street to 168th Place Cyclists injured: 46 Pedestrians injured: 351 Killed: 4 The study also ranked three sites in Brooklyn, one in the Bronx, one in Manhattan and two in Staten Island. “We know how to prevent death and serious injury on our streets, and with this study, we also have a better understanding of where the city should target investments in safer street redesigns,” said Paul Steely White, the executive director of Transportation Alternatives. “Traffic deaths are falling in New York thanks to the city’s data-driven approach to street safety. Thanks to this critical research, we can further reduce the threat to pedestrians and bicyclists at the intersections where help is needed most.”


Development

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF QUEENS A look at development and its impact on the borough

By NATHAN DUKE Sunnyside residents and community leaders protested against the implementation of the Vision Zero protected bike lane at Skillman and 43rd avenues last week. Next to the Sunnyside arch and under the 7 train stop, several of the rally’s speakers stated that they are bikers and support cyclists, but not the city Department of Transportation’s (DOT) plan to take away 113 parking spots along the two avenues. Trisha Dorfman, the executive director of the new Queens Streets for All, said that the purpose of the rally was to get the attention of Mayor Bill de Blasio and persuade him to agree to a meeting with the community and change his Vision Zero plan for the streets. Dorfman believes that the protected bike plans will be inherently unsafe, as cyclists do not pay attention to pedestrians or to the rules of the road. “They will run us over,” she said. “We live the nightmare every day. Why are we not looking at Northern Boulevard? We have children dy-

ing there all the time.” Rev. Neil Margetson, the pastor of Sunnyside Reformed Church, said that Manhattanville was once a quiet “pocket community” like Sunnyside. He fears that the bike lane would change the demographics of the neighborhood. He sees Sunnyside as “a city under siege,” and pointed out that it takes 20 minutes now for his parishioners to find parking near the church. Mindy Bichler-Greene, the PTA president at PS 11 on Skillman Avenue, believes that children could be in danger when crossing the bike lane as they come and go from school. Gary O’Neill, the owner of Aubergine Cafe on Skillman Avenue, is an avid cyclist and a member of Transportation Alternatives, but does not agree with his fellow cyclists about the plan. “Even though [the DOT] said they are going to put in a protected bike lane in August, it doesn’t mean the fight is over,” he said. “Because if we let them think it’s over, they would run over every community in Queens, not just ours.”

FAMILIES UPSET BY HILLSIDE MANOR’S SHUFFLING RESIDENTS corecredit

By TRONE DOWD

In an effort to install a new diversity initiative, Jamaica Estates retirement home Hillside Manor has been shuffling its residents, upsetting family members who say that the change is abrupt and unnecessary. Family members were notified of the change in late July through a letter sent in the mail. The Queens Tribune obtained the letter from the daughter of one of the residents who lives at the nursing home. “The purpose of this letter is to inform you of a newly developed and soon to be implemented resident cultural/ethnic program at Hillside Manor Rehabilitation and Extended Care Center that will affect your current living arrangement,” the letter reads. According to the letter, the cultural program

is aimed at Indian, Guyanese and Bengali residents. “Our surrounding communities in Queens are very ethnically diverse,” the letter continues. “Administration has determined that we currently are not fully meeting the cultural [and] ethnic needs of these communities after residents of these ethnic backgrounds are admitted to our facility.” To adhere to the new standard, the facility’s 11th floor is being completely overhauled to accommodate the new plans, displacing nearly 30 residents across 23 rooms by as early as September. Hillside Manor’s administration made it clear that they want to ensure that the comfort of their residents is considered during the move.

In literature distributed at the rally, Queens Streets For All contended that the DOT misled the community and mayor regarding the need for bike lanes. The group wrote that when the DOT counted how many cyclists use the route, it did so on Bike to Work Day. They also believe that the DOT and Transportation Alternatives exploited the widow of Gelasio Reyes for their cause. Reyes was killed on April 1, 2017, by a drunk driver after the driver ran a red light while crossing 43rd Avenue and 39th Street at 2:53 a.m. The group also criticized the DOT for not providing information on who was at fault in incidents of car and bicycle crashes in the area. Queens Streets for All is asking the city to keep the current bike lanes as they are but paint them green, change lights to lead pedestrians and cyclists ahead of cars, and add rumble strips at dangerous intersections to let bike riders know they are coming to an area that requires heightened awareness.

“We understand change of this nature can be difficult, but we will do everything possible to ease the process,” the letter read. But families and residents are saying that the way the nursing home handled the move is unacceptable. Some residents have gone as far as to refuse relocation. Candace Prince-Modeste, whose father has resided at Hillside Manor for more than six years, told the Queens Tribune that her main issue with the move is the lack of communication up until the very last minute. “They changed the rules midstream,” PrinceModeste said. “If we had come into the facility knowing that it wasn’t set up in a particular way, then that’s one thing. It’s hard to fight or disagree with that. But the way it’s currently set up, residents are organized according to their medical needs.” Prince-Modeste said that the 11th-floor residents are able to be more independent than some of the others who stay there. The nurses who work with residents are distributed according to their skill and whom they need to work with. She also pointed out that the idea of adding the program strikes her as redundant, considering that Hillside Manor has always been effective at ensuring that the cultural traditions and other needs of all residents were met without any residential reshuffling. “If you’re a Jewish person, they have folks from synongauges come in to do Jewish service,” she said. “If you’re a Methodist, they have Methodists come in. If you want to play with cats and dogs, they bring in folks from local animal shelters or animal entities come in with pets. If you want to do knitting, there’s a knitting program. They bring everything in there and it’s open and available to everyone. If you want to take advantage of it you can—if you don’t, then you don’t. What that has to do with where you are housed in the building, it doesn’t make sense.” Prince-Modeste is currently Councilman I. Daneek Miller’s (D-St. Albans) chief of staff. She told the Queens Tribune that while she is fortunate enough to voice her father’s dissatisfaction on the matter, she knows that many other residents are not as lucky. “This issue isn’t about my father as an individual,” she said. “Where he is now is an option that we chose to make in terms of his care. I could take him out tomorrow if I wanted to. But there are folks there who probably don’t have that choice, and they probably don’t have the same access to resources that could help them fight this new policy the way I do. This is about righting a wrong, and whatever comes of this, I hope that everyone can benefit from it.” She mentioned that she reached out to both Councilman Rory Lancman (D-Hillcrest) and state Sen. Leroy Comrie (D-St. Albans). Comrie’s office said that it was following up with Hillside Manor to get further details on the situation. The Queens Tribune reached out to Hillside Manor’s administration several times throughout the week and did not receive a response.

BOOKINGS OPEN FOR TWA HOTEL AHEAD OF 2019 LAUNCH By JON CRONIN

TWA Hotel (photo byMax Touhey

THREE QUEENS LEGISLATORS GET PERFECT ENVIRONMENTAL SCORE

The TWA Hotel has started to accept bookings for its debut in spring 2019 at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The hotel’s developer—MCR and MORSE Development—also recently unveiled the designs for the hotel’s Starstream Ballroom, Flight Center Ballroom and several other event rooms. Reservations for guest rooms will open in December. The hotel will feature 50,000 square feet of event space, an additional 20,000 square feet of space in the former TWA terminal for outdoor terraces and an observation deck, 45 event rooms, 512 guest rooms, 44 suites, five hospitality suites, a kosher kitchen, 10,000-squarefoot fitness facility, six restaurants and eight bars, audiovisual and teleconferencing equipment, valet parking, 4,000 parking spaces in adjacent garages and 100 on-site parking spaces. “The reaction and anticipation among event and meeting planners has been overwhelm-

ing,” said Tyler Morse, the CEO of MCR and MORSE Development, of the new hotel. “There is something quite special about hosting events at the TWA Hotel. We are restoring one of the most important buildings in America—the TWA Flight Center—and event attendees will be greeted by the vibrant spirit of 1962, the year the Flight Center opened, along with modern amenities that make this destination unique.” Since its groundbreaking ceremony two years ago, the hotel has been considered one of the city’s largest construction projects. It is estimated to create more than 3,700 permanent jobs and, during the course of its creation, 300 construction union jobs. The hotel will also include a Jet Age museum that will chronicle the mid-century modern design era. It will exhibit mid-century furniture, TWA uniforms, David Klein destination posters, inflight amenities and other TWA memorabilia.

SENIOR HOUSING COMING TO GLENDALE By JON CRONIN After being proposed as a site for a homeless shelter, Community Board 5 recently found out that a long-abandoned Cypress Avenue housing project will become supportive housing for senior citizens. WellLife Network, a company with four decades of experience creating supportive housing for mentally ill and physically disabled adults, have owned the site at 80-97 Cypress Ave. since 2003. After a previous false start, the company has begun to develop it. According to the city Department of Buildings’ website, an application was filed on Aug. 3 for a six-story building with a basement and 66 units. Willie Scott, the vice president of public affairs for WellLife Network, said that the company is currently attempting to get a variance for the height and square footage to develop a multi-family apartment building, which could take six to eight months to get approved. Scott added that Well-Life Network is also researching the amount of funding it can receive from the state. “Hopefully, within a few weeks we can give specifics,” Scott said. He added that the project is being built as of right, which means that it does not have to be approved by the community board or City Council. He said that the developer is hoping to begin “as soon as possible.” However, due to the process of obtaining the variance, he doesn’t know when they will be able to start.

Scott said that the previous contractor used porous materials that caused the site to flood whenever it rained. “The problem was the material used was not quality material,” he said, adding that the old structure will need to be torn down before the new one can begin. “Right now, we’re really just gearing up.” On its website, the developer wrote of its history, “In its early years, WellLife Network operated and maintained community residential facilities for people with developmental disabilities and mental illness, and to provide programs of care, service, habilitation, rehabilitation, social and recreational activities, in a homelike environment.” Scott added that the company has moved into creating senior housing and senior supportive services in the past 15 years. Vinnie Arcuri, the chairman of Community Board 5, said that the property was abandoned by WellLife Network five years ago and the board had been trying to get in touch with them ever since. The site has long been a graffiti-filled eyesore on Cypress Avenue. “We had no problem with the usage—we just asked them to add more senior apartments,” Arcuri said of the board’s previous communications with the developer. The most recent complaint on file on the DOB’s website regarding the property was from 2003. The complainant stated that the site was not properly boarded and there were squatters on the premises.


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Election 2018

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Former Friends Fight For Votes In 13th Senate District

Challenger Jessica Ramos told the Queens Tribune she feels betrayed by Peralta’s decision to join the IDC.

Incumbent state Senator Jose Peralta rallies at LeFrak City with members of the Black Leadership Action Coalition.

BY ARIEL HERNANDEZ

record. “He should not have missed that vote to fully fund the schools,” said Ramos. “He should have been there. I don’t know about anyone else, but I need my state senator to show up for my kids.” Peralta said that in government, it’s difficult to please everyone—but when constituents walk into his office needing attorneys or he’s walking down the street and people thank him for helping them, that’s all the motivation he needs to stay in office. He added that he knows he is getting the job done and that he has a proven track record backing him. Both candidates visited the district’s senior community as the Queens Tribune covered them. Ramos spent Friday afternoon knocking on approximately 150 doors of East Elmhurst’s senior residents to greet them, share her campaign platform, and listen to their issues and concerns. “We do it because that really is the most genuine way to get out our message to voters,” said Ramos. “I believe in doing my due diligence and making sure that people actually meet me. If I’m going to represent them in the state Senate or anywhere, for that matter, they should meet me and get to know me; and it’s important for me to get to know them and to understand what issues are important to them, whether they agree with me or not.” Among the issues that the seniors brought to Ramos’ attention were traffic safety and quality-of-life issues, such as stop signs, parking or street lighting. Peralta began Monday with a press conference at LeFrak City, where tenants called for an end to major capital improvement rent increases, an end to violence on 57th Avenue, and better services for seniors, who currently have to travel

W

ITH THE DEMOCRATIC state Senate primaries just weeks away, the Queens Tribune spent time this week with former friends turned competitors incumbent state Sen. Jose Peralta (D-Elmhurst) and challenger Jessica Ramos, both of whom said they were betrayed by the other. Ramos’ decision to resign from her position as director of ethnic media in the mayor’s office and run for state Senate was made in light of Peralta’s move to the Independent Democratic Conference (IDC), a breakaway group of Democrats who worked closely with Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Senate Republicans to pass bills in the closely divided legislative body. The partnership deteriorated this past year, and the IDC members reached a pact to rejoin the larger Democratic Party fold. “I believed in Peralta just like everyone else did,” said Ramos. “My parents even helped him get elected back when he first ran. When he announced that he was joining the IDC, I was baffled.” Ramos said that she attended Peralta’s “infamous town hall” following his IDC announcement, and that she couldn’t stop shaking her head the entire time. “I couldn’t believe it,” said Ramos. “I was stunned. I mean, how could you betray your people like that?” Peralta said when he first heard rumors that Ramos was running against him, he called her. Considering that the two of them were friends, he couldn’t believe it. “She confirmed that she was running, and I asked why, when she knows that I’m bringing resources to the community—and she said people are telling her that I’m not, so I was like, ‘OK,’” said Peralta.

Ramos said that when she meets people and tells them why she is running and whom she is running against, she doesn’t use the initials “IDC.” “I say I’m running against the current state senator, who voted for the Republican majority for the past two years,” said Ramos. Ramos said that her mother, a Colombian immigrant, crossed the border, flew to Mexico and crossed the Mexican border on foot. When she heard that Peralta had joined the IDC, she felt betrayed. “Her heart sank,” said Ramos. “He didn’t even have a conversation without talking to other elected officials. For months at the New Visions Democratic Club, we heard him say the IDC was so bad—and then he went and joined them.” Peralta said that although there are still people who are upset with his decision to join the IDC, they understand when he explains to them why he made that decision. He said that people’s not trusting him is just a narrative. “People have seen what I’ve been able to deliver. They have seen my track record and they know I made that decision for them,” said Peralta. “I’m proud of bringing resources back to my district, even if it was by being in the IDC. I’ve always been true to my Democratic values.” Ramos, on the other hand, said that she doesn’t believe Peralta’s explanation that he joined the IDC so he could have a seat at the table. “He gave my kids’ school—PS 69—a check for $100,000,” said Ramos. “What good is $100,000 when he skips out on a vote to fully fund the school and get it the $2 million that it’s owed? It’s a photo-op, a political gimmick. You can’t do that.” Ramos said that the IDC didn’t show up in Albany for the vote to fully fund schools because it didn’t want a “no” vote on its

Ramos knocked on roughly 150 doors when the Queens Tribune shadowed her for an afternoon.

from LeFrak City to St. Marks AME Church in Flushing, where seniors are currently renting the church’s basement for a senior center. Following the press conference, where Peralta stated that he would continue to fight for the residents of LeFrak City and was endorsed by the Black Leadership Action Coalition (BLAC), he visited three of the district’s senior centers: Elmcor Senior Center, the LeFrak senior center at St. Mark AME Church and the IPRHE Corona Senior Center. “I always visit seniors and I always want to ensure that they are not forgotten because they have given so much to the city and state and, too often, they get kind of pushed to the side, so I always make it a point to visit senior centers and I do this on a weekly basis,” said Peralta. “Ever since I’ve gotten elected from Assembly on, I’ve always visited senior centers. This is not just about visiting seniors when it is convenient from time to time. You’ve got to be consistent, every week, every month.” Peralta said that when he gets re-elected, of which he is confident, his main priority is the DREAM (Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors) Act, a bill that would grant legal status to certain undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children and attended school there. “We currently have 27 co-sponsors and we need 32,” said Peralta. “Once the state Senate gets into the majority, I want to make sure that the DREAM Act passes, because if everyone has been telling the world we need a majority to pass, I don’t want any excuses.” Ramos, who is also confident that she will win, said that her first priority is to make the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) an agency. “The MTA should be a state agency that

Peralta greets voters at a campaign stop.

we can regulate and hold accountable to people,” said Ramos. “Money is being thrown around in the MTA, and there’s no way of knowing exactly where it’s going and how much.” She said she’d also like to get more rapid bus transit in western Queens. “For me, it’s very outrageous that there seems to be $1 billion to build an Airtrain for tourists to get to LaGuardia Airport, while folks here have been fighting for equity in public transportation for such a long time,” said Ramos. “I think it’s insulting.” Peralta said he believed that the race comes down to who has a proven track record. “It’s about who has been there, who has existing relationships with the Senate, Assembly, the governor’s office, and who can navigate the system,” said Peralta. “I have served for eight years. I’ve got the relationships that will help push back against the Trump administration.” But Ramos believes that the district needs a new representative. “Traditionally, we seek to elect people for whom the system has worked and then we were frustrated because they can’t figure out how to fix it,” said Ramos. “We can’t keep sending people who have been able to thrive. We have to send people for whom the system has not worked because they understand what it will take to fix it. For a long time, [women] felt like we could trust certain men to have our backs, but then after eight years, they haven’t been able to step up to the plate to protect us. At some point, as a woman, you have to say, ‘I can do it myself, thank you.’” Reach Ariel Hernandez at (718) 357-7400 x144, ahernandez@queenstribune.com or @ reporter_ariel.


11

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

ARTISTS ON THE RISE:

Queens has long been known as a hotbed for aspiring artists. From Martin Scorsese (who was born in Corona) and Jack Kerouac (who lived in Ozone Park) to Nas (who was among the many hip-hop stars who grew up in Queensbridge Houses) and Paul Simon (who attended Forest Hills High School), the borough was the birthplace of a number of iconic figures across every artistic medium imaginable. In this section, you’ll find four aspiring artists to keep on your radar in the years to come. FILMMAKER

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REBELLIOUS ACT HAS turned into the realization of a lifelong dream for a young, film-obsessed Queens woman. “My mom moved to Fresh Meadows when she was only 14 years old from Trinidad,” said Christina Raia, 29. “My mother worked multiple part-time jobs because she was a single mom, so I would have a lot of babysitters who would watch things I wasn’t allowed to. I fell in love with watching those movies and how they could transport you to another world— the way you can walk into someone else’s shoes and live a life that isn’t yours.” At age 10, after realizing her daughter’s love for horror and comedy, Raia’s mother would tell people that her daughter was going to make movies. “I didn’t really know what that meant,” said Raia. “All I knew was that I loved movies.” As Raia got older, her love for the art form increased. By high school, she knew that she wanted to pursue filmmaking, despite people’s telling her not to do so. “People told me I shouldn’t go into this business because it isn’t practical; because I didn’t know what this industry was or how to break into the industry,” said Raia. “But I was passionate about storytelling and images and how they could affect people, so I decided to study film in college.” Raia attended Hunter College and majored in film. Although she completed her college degree, she didn’t feel that the courses she was taking were relevant to who she was or what she was hoping to accomplish. “I found while in school that I was learning a traditional Hollywood model about how to be a filmmaker and it didn’t really exist anymore and it was very much about championing a very specific type of person who was largely white and male and of privilege, which was not me in a variety of ways. And I felt like this system wasn’t designed for me, so I started using social media to identify people who cared about the kinds of stories I wanted to tell and I started building an audience,” she said. Raia’s first feature film was titled Summit. It follows the story of five friends who are going on a ski trip and end up at the wrong location. “It’s a generic slasher setup, but the film was actually made to dissect gender and race tropes in horror and how those are reflections of issues in the real world, and how people can objectify each other,” said Raia. All of Raia’s works are comedies, horror films or a combination of the two. She said that horror movies allow the filmmaker to address social issues from a “safely removed place,” and comedy films act as a bridge, bringing people together through laughter. “For me, filmmaking and art are really about addressing social issues and trying to make people understand experiences that are or aren’t their own,” said Raia. “So, I like sort of blending those two genres to get conversations going and to get people to think outside themselves.” In 2013, Raia created a web series titled Kelsey, which provides a more “realistic” take on the popular hit series Friends. Kelsey tells the story of a group of friends living in New York City. The main character is a lesbian and the remainder of the group of friends are all from different ethnicities, religions and backgrounds, which Raia said is “actually a reflection of New York City’s diversity and not just a group of white people in New York.” That web series was listed on IndieWire’s Best of 2013 list. After Kelsey, Raia wrote About a Donkey, a comedy about a family that is struggling in various ways. “It’s like a catalyst for change,” said Raia. “It’s quirky, it’s sweet and it has a mission to

CHRISTINA RAIA By ARIEL HERNANDEZ

kind of spread empathy and awareness and bridge gaps—and it’s LGBTQ inclusive.” Raia said that she will screen the film in “Bible Belt areas throughout the country,” and hopes to increase empathy in the process. About a Donkey premiered at the Georgia Film Festival, and has screened at the North Carolina Gay & Lesbian Film Festival and Austin Revolution Film Festival. It is expected to screen at the Adirondack Film Festival and Buffalo International Film Festival. Considering that her films take place in Queens or feature scenes in the borough, Raia intends to submit her film to the Queens World Film Festival, hoping to close down her festival tour for About a Donkey at home.

“I shot the film in Queens, so I want to close out our festival run there,” said Raia. Raia said that Queens’ diversity—both in its people and its landscapes—is the element that makes the borough her go-to locale when filming. “You can get that urban city look, but if you go deeper into Queens, you can also get that suburban look, so I usually always stick to home because it’s convenient,” said Raia. Raia, who lives in Woodside, said that her most frequent spots to film are Doughboy Park and on the 7 train. Although her preferred genres are comedy and horror, Raia said that the events of 2016 motivated her to tell the stories of those who

are underrepresented, and to address injustice. Amid the rise of original series, Raia said that she hopes to eventually create her own. “With every platform doing its own originals, it’s the perfect opportunity for me to get in there,” said Raia. Raia’s goal is to make filmmaking a lifelong career, and she has even set her sights on television. “Film is changing constantly—the way that we make films, the way we shoot them, how we watch them, and so it’s hard to really think about my entire lifetime,” said Raia. “I’m trying to have a sustainable career, so that filmmaking can always be what I do for

a living, my passion and what pays the bills. I’d also love to try out TV because it reaches people in a way that movies can’t because they actually go into people’s homes.” Raia also runs a monthly film-screening series known as IndieWorks at The Local, a bar and café in Long Island City. The event showcases the work of local filmmakers and is operated via Raia’s production company, CongestedCat Productions. Raia said that she’d also love to eventually obtain funding for local women filmmakers.


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AUTHOR

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

BUSHRA REHMAN By THOMAS MOODY

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N THE FINAL CHAPTER OF Corona, Bushra Rehman’s debut novel, a bread truck breaks down on a cold Queens winter night on the street the neighborhood has unofficially reserved for abandoned cars. What seems like the whole of Corona looks on from their houses, waiting to see if the driver will return. “The old Italian ladies were the first to disappear from their windows,” Razia, the young Pakistani-American speaker of the novel, recalls. “They showed up again, on the snow, like black crows on ice.” The father of Razia’s friend Julio crowbars the truck’s gate open and, moments later, Razia watches as Julio runs home with his arms filled with loaves of bread. Slowly a line forms, and Julio’s father begins to dole out the spoils of the neighborhood’s good luck: the old Italian ladies at the head, “but behind them was the Korean grandmother, the young Dominican mothers, and other kids from my school.” Razia looks up at her strict, conservative mother, waiting for her to admonish their neighbors. Instead, she tells her daughter to

put on her coat and go out into the street to get some bread. The scene is an illustration of what permeates Bushra Rehman’s work: a deep affection for Corona and the borough of Queens. “The seed of Corona was a series of prose poems I wrote to remember the beauty of Corona,” Rehman tells me, “a place others might just see as a rundown, impoverished neighborhood.” It is hardly a romanticized version of her upbringing that she chronicles in her poetry and fiction. But out of its fallibilities, including those imperfections of her home borough, wonderful and unique characters grow. Bushra Rehman was born into a first-generation Pakistani American family in Queens, and grew up here in the 1980s. It was a time when her family’s culture, religion and skin tone were new and unfamiliar to a borough that had already seen many waves of immigration. As Razia puts it in Corona to her Italian American friend Tony from another part of New York, “There were the Italians, the Dominicans, the Puerto Ricans, the Ecuadorians, the Colombians, the Cubans, the Koreans….But Pakistanis were on the bottom of the chain.” Much of Reham’s work is centered around what it is like to be the daughter of immigrants. “I’m a Pakistani from Queens,” Rehman

white picket fence, no, try chain link my father so afraid of the world he erected it, Pakistani style-ghetto style 12-foot-high fence, metal, jail around our house

explains, “which is a specific cultural identity, very different than being a Pakistani from anywhere else, including Pakistan.” Reham’s work deals with the push and pull of these two cultures. Her speakers never seem to feel entirely comfortable in either one, but fluctuate between the two in another, third, space. “I grew up in a tight-knit Muslim community where I prayed five times a day, read Quran and went to extra religious service on the weekends. Then when I went to school, I wore skin-tight acid-wash jeans, feathered my hair, belted out Whitney Houston and fell for boys breakdancing in the schoolyard. It was complicated.” In her early 20s, Rehman traveled around America with “nothing more than a Greyhound ticket and a bag of poems.” The wide spaces and open roads provided a stark contrast to the religious and cultural confinements of her upbringing. Some of these experiences are alluded to in Corona in the guise of Razia Mirza, a young Pakistani woman who acts as Rehman’s fictional proxy. Rehman sees the novel, published in 2013, as a work of “autobiographical fiction” that is “definitely not a memoir. Many of my experiences overlap with the character’s, but I’ve taken enormous liberties. The process is much like cutting up my memories and creating collages from the scraps.” The result is, in the case of Corona, a wildly funny and moving portrait of life as a first-generation American. Rehman wants to make it clear, however, that her story, although in ways similar to all immigrant experiences, is decidedly unique in others. “For the record: Razia’s life doesn’t represent the lives of all Muslim women,” Rehman said. “Not all Muslim women run away from home and get jobs at re-created 17th-century villages so they can dress up in costumes from the 1600s.” Autofiction is a genre that Rehman loves. She views it as a way for writers of color to reclaim their stories and “work against the forces of dehumanization directed towards us.” Corona was noted among Poets & Writers’ “Best Debut Fiction” and featured in the Los Angeles Review of Books among a new wave of South Asian American Literature, and Rehman uses her extensive talents as a writer to help others aspiring to tell their own stories. She currently teaches a workshop at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop in writing autobiographical fiction, brilliantly titled “Two Truths and a Lie.” “It is such an essential part of my life” she insists. “It’s my way of community building and sharing with other writers what I’ve learned about turning life stories into fiction.” This May saw the publication of Rehman’s first book of poetry, Marianna’s Beauty Salon. The poems share with her fiction a dark humor and brilliant, nuanced and often distressing insights into what it is like to exist in and between two cultures. In the poem “White Picket Fence, No,” Rehman writes: white picket fence, no, try chain link my father so afraid of the world he erected it, Pakistani style-ghetto style 12-foot-high fence, metal, jail around our house It is as if the speaker’s father is attempting to keep the old world—Pakistan—in and the new world—America, Queens—out. Other poems seem quintessentially American in their references: “Sometimes I wonder what it was / if it was all those Long Island Iced Teas we drank”; while in poems such as “Your Lock,” Rehman writes with a beautiful sensuality about love and longing: “It is the missing clasp of your body / that shudders me awake / and before I fall asleep / I replay all the tightly / wound metal / of our kisses.” Rehman currently lives in Brooklyn with her husband, the musician Ben Perowsky; and their 5-year-old daughter. But her home borough of Queens is still the major preoccupation of her work. She has recently finished the sequel to Corona (what she jokingly calls a “midquel”), covering Razia’s teenage years and her friendship with another Pakistani girl in their immigrant community. It is a young-adult novel, forthcoming from Tor/Macmillan. Rehman is also wrapping up the updated edition of Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism, a book of essays she co-edited with friend Daisy Hernandez that has become a seminal work in American feminism. Bushra Rehman’s career as a writer, editor and teacher is going from strength to strength, and she is also quick to pay tribute to the influence that Queens has had on all of her pursuits. “Something I’ve been thinking a lot about is how lucky I was as a writer to be immersed in languages from all over the world,” she explains, “some of which I understood, many of which I didn’t. I could listen to the music of how people spoke, and then, of course, I was listening to music from all over the world on the streets and in the parks. There were hundreds of cultural bubbles, each community making its own world. Then they threw us in public school where all those bubbles hit up against each other and burst. I went to under-resourced public schools in Queens and the teachers I had were amazing. They nurtured my love for books and reading. Now that I’ve been on the other side of the desk, I understand more the conditions they were working in and have even more admiration.”


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PAINTER

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

EILEEN COYNE By JON CRONIN

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ONG ISLAND CITY ARTIST EILEEN Coyne—a former dancer who is now a painter—looks for the empathy in each of her subject’s eyes. Whether her painting is of Russian President Vladimir Putin, a self-portrait of tortured frustration or a man wearing nothing but a gun belt, Coyne said that it’s all in the eyes. “I always find that if I can conquer the eyes as truthfully as possible, then I have a pretty good shot at making the rest of the painting work,” Coyne said. Coyne said that she has endless empathy for humanity and her heart has always been touched by the working poor. Coyne grew up outside Pittsburgh in Homestead, Pennsylvania, a steel town that was affected by the shutdown of the local plant. “I like to paint people and their stories,” she said. Coyne grew up in a working-class, sin-

gle-mother household. Her family came from Ireland to work in Andrew Carnegie’s steel industry in the late 1800s. They were later involved in the Homestead Steel strike in 1892, an epic story of loss for a working class that tried to rise up against intolerable work conditions. Her grandfather was the mayor of Homestead and her family was filled with progressive Democrats whom, she said, were at the time considered conservative Democrats. “It was a good working-class Irish family,” Coyne said. Tales of the proletariat uprising and her family legacy are factors that stir the sense of social activism in her own work. “I feel like my work is my activism. I’m using it as a voice,” she said. She points to that painting of a man wearing nothing but a holster with the gun covering his genitalia. His arms are crossed stubbornly and he looks disgruntled. “That says it all, right?” Coyne asked. Growing up in western Pennsylvania, she said that she knew a number of people who owned guns. “Not any of my family,” she added. The man depicted in the painting is based on her husband, a former actor and now producer who modeled for the painting. The couple

lives in Long Island City, a couple of blocks away from the waterfront-based Long Island City Artists’ Plaxall Gallery, where she is a resident artist. Coyne said that her husband was fortunate enough to purchase a building there long before the development boom. After being a single mom for 10 years, she remarried. She and her husband raised Coyne’s daughter, who is now 21, attending college and an aspiring artist. Coyne spent her 20s dancing in musical theater productions. She later studied massage therapy to pay the bills. It was a trade that she credits with her deep understanding of the human musculature. She noted that the profession made her brush movements much more instinctual. Her daughter suffers from Crohn’s disease, although it is now under control. But the frustrating marathon of hours that Coyne spent in the hospital with her daughter while her daughter was receiving IV treatment is reflected in her self-referential work. In one self-portrait, she stares out of the canvas with bright-blue eyes while sitting in a waiting room, her slight-framed young daughter sleeping beside her with an IV bag in her arm. “Every line that she draws seems to carry

some level of emotion, and then when you meet her and get to know her, she is an exceptionally intuitive and sensitive person,” said Edjo Wheeler, the artistic director at Long Island City Artists, of Coyne’s emotive work. He called her a prolific painter with the talent to back it up. While discussing her oeuvre, Coyne cannot help but talk about her portrait of Bull Harris, a doorman she met while on vacation in New Orleans. She said that they immediately hit it off and, in between exploring the city with her husband, she enjoyed her chats with Harris. She said that before she took her solo jaunts through the city in the mornings, she talked with him. During the first talk, she offered to buy him coffee. “Yes, I will take 14 sugars,” he told Coyne, who added that there was something about him that was “beautiful, kind and playful. Some people just touch you.” Coyne said that eight years ago she began to find time for herself to spend on her artwork. “I became very disciplined and focused,” she said, adding that she had possessed the talent since childhood, but had not had time to invest in it. “You need to give yourself permission to be wrong. You don’t realize how freeing it is in other areas of your life.”

During that time, she met Polina Osnachuk, an artistic mentor who changed her life. Coyne said that since that time, she has adopted Osnachuk’s immigrant Ukrainian family. “Her voice is in my head all the time,” she said. “After meeting Polina, everything just took off. It was like we spoke the same language. She did help expedite things for me. It took some of the guesswork out of figuring out drawing.” Coyne’s career is beginning to take off. She still works with clients as a massage therapist, but also takes commissions as a portrait artist. She paints both people and animals, which are another of her passions. Wheeler noted that an observer can easily see the empathy in Coyne’s work. Regarding her burgeoning success and prolific pace, she said, “It’s such a surreal time. I don’t seem to allow myself to think beyond the ‘now.’” ”The headlines enrage and yet inspire me artistically,” she said. “I will continue on this path. As I’ve said, my art is a huge part of my activism. I hope to continue doing creative work that enlightens a broader audience; creates a sense of solidarity; provides comfort and empathy for those who may feel forgotten or marginalized.”


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BAND

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

BLAC RABBIT By TRONE DOWD

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S THE SUN BEGAN to set and the ocean breeze blew softly past the small Far Rockaway boardwalk bar known as Low Tide, more than 100 locals waited patiently for their hometown band to begin their set. A mix of tracks from artists—including Tame Impala, MGMT, Toro Y Moi and others influenced by the funky, psychedelic sounds of the past—crashed against the sounds of rustling mic screeches of repetitive sound checks. As anticipation grew, the group—collectively known as Blac Rabbit—improvised over a few tracks to ensure everything was tuned just right. The band members later told the Queens Tribune that this playlist of select artists has preceded nearly all of their shows since hitting the road earlier this year, acting as an opener and giving the audience a taste of what to expect later in their performance. As the band continued their busy work, fans and friends approached them with the same kind of warm hospitality one sees at a home baseball game. There were high fives, cheers, compliments and more. Blac Rabbit seemed appreciative of the reception, occasionally chatting up those who approached them or replying with smiles and brief conversations. Finally, against the dimly lit fluorescent-red backdrop, the makeshift stage suddenly sprang to life. The bandmates took their places as the audience scrambled to follow suit.

In a seemingly unbothered, almost tranquil voice, lead singer Rahiem Taylor greeted the diverse crowd of millennials and baby boomers alike. “How are you doing tonight, Far Rockaway?” Taylor asked the boisterous and excited crowd. “You always gotta remember your roots.” And with a strum of his electric guitar, his bandmates jumped right into the first track of the night. For Blac Rabbit, the group’s Aug. 3 show at Low Tide was a homecoming. After two short but well-attended tours on both coasts of the United States and a number of international shows, the band said that it was refreshing to play a venue that was just two blocks from their manager’s home. On the whole, 2018 has been a hallmark year for identical twins, guitarists and lead singers Amiri and Rahiem Taylor, drummer Patrick “Sticks” Jones and bassist Josh Lugo. Founded just three years ago, Blac Rabbit had their big break after the Taylors went viral covering classic Beatles tracks on the New York City subway. The effort, which began as a way to make some extra cash in order to visit their grandmother in Puerto Rico, became a national sensation practically overnight due to the group’s spot-on impressions of Beatles frontmen John Lennon and Paul McCartney. The duo has since made media appearances nationwide, including on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and ABC and NBC news. It has also been featured in such top publications as Complex and The New York Times. Blac Rabbit told the Queens Tribune that adjusting to life post internet fame has been less of a chore and more of a blessing. “The biggest change has been getting booked,” Amiri said. “And we’re making more money,” Jones laughed. “I wouldn’t say that,” Amiri quipped and smiled. “We’re finally living off our music. Let’s say that.” “Our skill set has been getting better too,”

Jones said. “We’ve become tighter as a band after all of this. We’ve been practicing nonstop. We noticed that us as individual musicians has grown too.” During their beachside performance, the band announced that they were working on new music and aiming to release a substantial 12-track follow-up to their 2017 self-titled EP. They gave attendees a preview of one of their new tracks, titled “Windy Cities,” which seemed to stop folks walking along the boardwalk in their tracks. Their sound is best described as psychedelic rock, but through an optimistic and modern lens. Fans of Tame Impala would likely feel right at home instrumentally, with Jones’ melodic and excitable drum-fills and Lugo’s funky basslines accompanying the soft, laidback harmonies of the Taylors to create a combination unlike most rock music heard today. Jones admitted that, on paper, the musical tastes of the group members seem like they would clash. “I grew up on gospel music,” he said. “And when I started playing, I was totally into metal.” “For me it was classic rock,” said Lugo, who occasionally plays lead guitar for the group’s original songs—and whenever the band covers the Beatles, he appears to take inspiration from virtuosos such as Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Slash. The Taylors, on the other hand, said that they have always had a love for two musical eras. “It was all our parents’ and grandparents’,” Rahiem said. “Our love for the 1980s comes from our mom, and then our love for the 1960s comes from our grandparents.” When the Taylors and Jones initially met at a Sam Ash Open Mic, they traded off on their music interests. Later on, when Lugo joined the group, they continued to learn about new sounds, finding common ground somewhere in the middle. “Josh with his crazy guitar solos, me with my crazy drumming, and Amiri and Rahiem

with their classic throwback stuff—it just fits,” Jones said. While all four members are originally from Brooklyn, they have lived in Queens for some time now. The Taylors said that they’ve lived in Queens for more than a decade. “I love the Rockaways,” Rahiem said. While Lugo and Amiri seemed to agree, Jones noted that the warmer months are definitely a standout time for the peninsula. “The winter time, I don’t know, man,” he said to a chorus of jeers from his bandmates. “Just write, ‘Blac Rabbit loves the Rockaways,’” Amiri said as the rest of the group and their friends laughed. During the show, the group played an hour of their original songs for the audience. The younger crowd seemed familiar with much of the group’s catalogue, with a handful of them even singing along. The older folks in the crowd appeared less familiar with the music, yet enthralled by the sound. “These guys are so good!” said one grayhaired woman to an elderly man. “What’s the name of this group?” asked an older woman, who walked up to a table full of high-school–aged youths from the boardwalk. “Blac Rabbit!” one of the boys exclaimed as he continued to nod his head to one of the group’s earliest songs, “All Good.” After the initial hour, Blac Rabbit made a tangible transition in demeanor, and shuffled their instruments around before settling in once more. “Do you guys want to hear some Beatles?” Raheim asked the audience to deafening approval. In a dead ringer of Lennon’s voice, Raheim counted down to the twangy opening guitar of the Beatles’ 1965 hit “Day Tripper.” Almost immediately, the crowd began to move. People young and old made their way closer to the band and began dancing under the few remaining streetlights of an otherwise dark section of the Far Rockaway

boardwalk. The infectious mood continued for another half hour as the band turned out renditions of such classics as “Eight Days a Week” and “Come Together.” The band tried once to close out the show, but were called back by an audience that wanted an encore. They acquiesced, playing “I Saw Her Standing There” to a beaming crowd. “It was such an integrated crowd tonight,” Rahiem said. “So much diversity, especially with age groups. There were little kids here. I like performing at less-formal venues because it’s cool to see little kids dancing around, riding their bikes and scooters back and forth. It was like an amusement park.” As much as they loved being back home, the band members said they would soon be on the road. “We were invited to play Beatles Fest in Guatemala,” Jones said. “That’s set for this Friday.” “Then we’re off to the West Coast for a show in Los Angeles and a couple of shows in San Diego,” Amiri chimed in. When asked about their favorite city to play, they struggled to narrow down their list, but ultimately decided on Chicago; Toronto; San Francisco, Washington, D.C.; and, of course, New York City. “Do you want to do a top-18 favorite cities we played in?” Amiri joked. Members of Far Rockaway’s Blac Rabbit appear happy to commit themselves to their craft. And if the reception they received playing their hometown is any indication, this year is clearly a sign of bigger and better things to come. Blac Rabbit told the Queens Tribune that the band is on all social media platforms, but Instagram is the best way to follow the group for updates on upcoming projects and shows. The Band @blacrabbitband Rahiem @taylorrah Amiri @the_extraordinary_wonderchild Patrick @tb_music9 Josh @mon_amee


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The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Queens World Film Festival Ranked By Filmmakers Among World’s Best

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Celebrating its ninth year in 2019, the Queens World Film Festival has much to celebrate: More than 100 filmmakers from across the globe have already submitted their work to be considered for the festival, which will be held in March, and the festival was recently the only New York City outer-borough festival to be included in a ranking of the 100 best-reviewed festivals by filmmakers from around the world. Katha Cato—who is the festival’s executive director, while her husband, Don Cato, acts as its artistic director—said she was proud that Queens World was listed on the FilmFreeway submission platform among the world’s top100 film festivals that burgeoning filmmakers ranked based on user-friendliness. “It means that we’ve really done our jobs well because we need to serve those filmmakers,” Katha Cato said. “They need to get something out of our festival. It’s a festival’s job to find the right audience for specific films.” The Catos said that they are well into the planning stage for the ninth annual Queens World Film Festival, which will run from March 21 to 31 at various western Queens locales, including Kaufman Astoria Studios’ Zukor Theatre and the Museum of the Moving Image. Last year, the festival screened 189 films of varying styles—from features and shorts to documentaries and animation—from the United States, India, Vietnam, Canada, Switzerland, Italy, the UK, the Philippines, Ireland, Germany, Spain, Mexico, Portugal, Argentina, Japan and Kosovo. Katha Cato said she expects this year’s edition to feature approximately the same number of films, and that the types of films and countries of origin will once again be varied. “We already have 125 submitted films,” she said. “The screening committee is already hard at work. We’ll continue to keep the focus on connecting filmmakers to industry professionals. We’re talking to SAG [the Screen Actors Guild], Backstage and other industry organizations that will bring value to the filmmakers and distributors. At our festival, the films are the stars.” The Queens World Film Festival launched in 2011, two years after the borough’s previous film festival, the Queens International Film Festival (QIFF), ended in catastrophe. In 2009, various institutions and individuals involved in film screenings and distribution accused Marie Castaldo, a French national who operated QIFF, of bilking them out of thousands of dollars by not paying them for

their services. In 2010, she was arrested on animal-cruelty charges for keeping 48 emaciated pit bulls upstate, and was later deported. Katha Cato said that Queens World, which is not affiliated with the previous festival, was created in the wake of QIFF’s dissolution after the borough was left without a credible film festival. “We grew out of the vacuum created by a previous disaster, and we used that previous entity as a roadmap of what not to do,” she said. “Our mission statement is the films. We learned early on that filmmakers want perfect screenings—red carpets are great, parties are flashy and wonderful, but where we really put our emphasis is on union projectionists at great venues, and making sure that the sound is good and the films look the way the filmmakers want them to.” In recent years, Katha Cato said, the festival has drawn new audiences and filmmakers— for example, a continually increasing number of LGBTQ movies that screen at the festival, and more participation by women filmmakers. But the one element that has been a primary focus of the festival is the emphasis on the word “world” in its title. “By the third and fourth year, we saw that filmmakers from out of town wanted to come to the festival,” Katha Cato said. “Last year, we had 36 nations represented. We’ve screened 1,035 films from 68 nations. Word spreads quickly in places like Finland or Portugal when a filmmaker has a good experience at a festival. No matter where you’re from, we have an audience for your film here and we know how to get them. There are 10,000 festivals worldwide from which filmmakers can choose, so they put their precious pennies into coming to a festival that gives them access to press, great venues and curation around evocative themes. Every block of our films has a host and Q&A, so it’s worth the price for them to get here.” She added that Queens’ status as the “World’s Borough”—due to the large number of ethnicities and languages that can be found in the borough—makes it a unique place to hold the festival. “You can see a film from Vietnam and then go have dinner at a Vietnamese restaurant in Queens,” she said. “We’ve created an incredible home for international cinema, and some of that cinema comes from people here in Queens. I think the festival is a beacon. Not

only will your screening be flawless and your film will look the best it’s ever looked, but you’ll also have an audience that’s interested in your work.” Films screened at the festival include everything from indie dramas to experimental works and, this coming year, some new categories will be featured. “For the first time, we’re doing a separate category for music videos,” Katha Cato said. “We are also cultivating family-friendly films, which is kind of hard to do with indie films because they’re edgier.” Each year, the festival receives more than 600 entries, of which a little under one third are selected. Last year, a staff of 87 people, as well as interns, worked on the festival— assisting with workshops and viewing submissions anywhere from six months to year round. The Catos said that providing a space for filmmakers who have overcome great challenges to find their cinematic voices has been one of their proudest moments. “For many of these filmmakers, their families don’t believe in them or they are working a full-time job,” Katha Cato said. “In some cases they are working in countries where there are sanctions on films or the government limits what you can say. To be part of a system that legitimizes their films is an amazing thing.” Don Cato said it is also gratifying that many of the filmmakers who participate in Queens World often do so more than once. “When filmmakers come from overseas or a long travel, it’s wonderful to make them feel at home and, ultimately, their reaction has been extraordinarily favorable,” he said. “Many of them are repeat visitors who submit again because they were happy to be there.” In 2020, the festival will celebrate its 10th anniversary. While the Catos said that they do not yet have any special plans for the 10th annual festival, they want to ensure that the festival continues to be well received and word gets out to filmmakers and moviegoers who want to attend. “I’d like to put together a coalition of folks who see the incredible potential and recognize the well-earned world reputation we have now,” Katha Cato said. “This borough saw the birth of the industry. We have hundreds of filmmakers, artists, grips, screenwriters and actors who live here in Queens. It’s something that the entire borough can be proud of.”

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Don and Katha Cato, the founders and operators of the Queens World Film Festival. Photo by Sasha Maslov

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DOWN 1 La Jolla school 2 Cat’s scratcher 3 All there 4 8 bits 5 Second degree 6 World supporter 7 Barbecue fuel 8 Fourth in a series 9 Dos Passos trilogy 10 Body fats 11 Loftily remote 12 Eastern money 13 Chicago’s ----- Expressway 18 Less inept 22 Honoree’s spot 24 Gambling inits. 25 Limit 26 The First Lady of American Cinema 27 Golden rule preposition 28 Decorator’s essential 29 Determine 32 Genetic transmitter 33 Age 34 Pa. airport north of PIT 36 Carbamide 37 Vex, with “at” 40 Movie enhancers 42 Bandy words 43 Dash 44 RR stop 45 Impetuosity 47 A whole lot 49 Green Shield company 50 Fill with joy 51 Elizabeth I was the last one 52 Bullying, e.g. 53 Keys 57 Viva voce 58 Count (on) 59 Every family has one 60 Keys to get you out of trouble 62 Security system giant 63 Typescripts

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Legal Notices

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Getting around Queens is easier than ever, thanks to Uber.

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rom Jackson Heights to Jamaica, Uber helps us move around in our communities and in every corner of the five boroughs.

That’s why the majority of Uber rides are now outside of Manhattan, in areas like Queens. And, in the past year, trips in our borough have nearly doubled. Uber is helping to fill the gaps in transit service, ensuring that no matter where we live in NYC, we can get an affordable, reliable ride within minutes. After all, the City isn’t just midtown Manhattan.

No matter when. No matter where. Uber is there. Learn more at UberConnectsNYC.com Paid for by Uber Technologies, Inc


Back2School

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Back 2 School

Queens public school students head back to the classroom on Sept. 5, which leaves a little less than a month for parents and kids to prepare for the big day. So what do you need to know? All month, the Queens Tribune will be taking a look at the education trends, recent changes by the New York City Department of Education, and anything else you need to know before your children head back to school. We start this week with a look at what teachers want parents to know ahead of the new year, what NYC schools are doing about their bullying policies, and some fun facts.

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Back 2 School

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Back-To-School Supplies For Students And Teachers By JON CRONIN

School supply lists change from generation to generation. The time has passed for merely purchasing protractors and spiral notebooks, and parents now have to aid their children’s digital needs for school. In elementary schools, teacher ask for various types of supplies, depending on the school and grade and—often with individualized lesson plans—supplies that are specific to the student. For example, teachers at Glendale’s PS 113 are asking for one-gallon Ziploc bags that are used for organizing reading materials borrowed from the school. They also ask for headphones for individualized lesson plans on a student’s school computer. The complete cost of the list could range from $75 to $100, depending on the grade of the student. “The growing number of supplies students need can become quite expensive, especially if a family has more than one student attending school at the same time,” said state Sen. Joseph Addabbo (D-Howard Beach), who recently held a back-to-school drive for students in his district. Local state and city politicians are holding similar supply drives throughout the month. One elementary school parent said that some teachers ask for them to purchase a ream of printer paper. “That’s ballsy,” she said. She noted that supplies often requested for parents of younger elementary school students include tissues, baby wipes and hand sanitizer. Teachers recommend that parents send their kids—especially smaller children—to school

with the supplies gradually. Such items as papers towels, tissues, and baby wipes are shared by the whole class and can be brought in at a later date. Teachers recommend that children bring in the smaller items that they need on the first day of school for their desks. Pencils, notebooks and folders are the top three items. Teachers also recommend that children come to school without a bookbag on the first day because parents could wait for them to go on sale. But Miranda Barbot, a spokeswoman for the city’s Department of Education, said that city schools are prepared to provide the necessary items for children whose parents cannot afford to purchase them. “Our schools ensure that every student has the supplies and materials they need to be successful, regardless of whether their families are able to purchase suggested supplies,” she said. If parents cannot afford all of the items on the varied supply lists, Barbot confirmed that each school will make sure that students have all the supplies they need to succeed. Frequently, teachers often reach into their own pockets to buy tools to effectively help them teach their students. Harriet Taub—the executive director of the Materials for the Arts, which is a program with the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs— said that the program has more than two million pounds of school supplies available for New York City teachers in its Long Island City warehouse on Northern Boulevard. “It’s back to school for us every day of the year,” Taub said. At the end of August, Materials for the Arts

put together “goody bags” for teachers with supplies that the program has collected over the course of the past year. “It’s a large bag that they can later fill up in our warehouse,” she said. “If you are a New York City public school teacher, before you start digging into your pockets, plan a visit to Materials for the Arts. Everything is free.” However, the program currently does not provide supplies for pre-K teachers. Taub said that teachers are required to make an appointment to visit through their respective schools. If teachers are not sure whether their school is registered, they can email Materials for the Arts through a school email and get signed up. She noted that if teachers cannot get to the warehouse before school starts, they can visit at any point during the school year. “Email us at education@mfta.nyc.gov, use your school email, tell us your school name and your principal—and we will add you to list,” she said. Once teachers are added to the school’s account, they can receive a password and become a member. She noted that technology has taken over the education system, and now parents might be asked to buy an iPad, so that students can email teachers. “Some parents used to go to the dollar store, now you’re being asked to buy a piece of equipment. It’s more expensive, but probably more sustainable,” Taub said. Taub pointed out that the Materials for the Arts warehouse has more than 50,000 binders and a number of file cabinets as well as markers, crayons, art supplies, glue sticks and paint brushes.

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Back 2 School

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Help Students Get Organized For A Strong Start To The School Year

School-related stress is common among multi-tasking students. But smart organization can make it easier to dash from class to study hall to after-school activities. It all starts with the right supplies. Gear up for a successful, low-stress school year with these handy tips.

Consult the List Give your students the tools they’ll need to hit the ground running, and alleviate their stress of being unprepared by referencing the supply list the school sends home. Then, spend some time before the first day of school doing something fun together that’s also educational, such as visiting a museum or reading books. This will get brains active and alert before the first bell rings, ensuring a smooth transition to classroom learning.

Work Smarter A lot of information is thrown at students during a lesson, but even the quickest notetaker can run into trouble sorting it all out when it comes time to study. The right school supplies will allow students to learn in a meaningful way. New alternatives to traditional note-taking can make finding relevant information a cinch during study sessions. For example, the Five Star College Ruled Interactive Notebook includes a table of contents with a spot for the date, topic descriptions and page numbers to help students quickly find specific information. Side margins and page number blocks allow for page customization and organization, while the grid ruled quick reference guide is a handy tool for periodic tables, multiplication tables and a glossary of terms. Students can stress less with organizational tools such as these. Likewise, the Five Star Flex Hybrid NoteBinder, which acts like a notebook and works like a binder, is adaptable to meet the needs of all types of learners. On the inside, pocket dividers provide built-in organization and paper

storage to which students can add paper and dividers as needed.

Reduce Your Haul It’s practical to maintain two sets of certain school supplies—one for a student’s home workstation and the other in his or her locker. Pens, pencils, erasers, highlighters, extra paper, sticky notes and rulers are great examples of supplies to store in both places. Doing so will save students the stress of remembering everything before leaving for school or home and can also reduce some weight in heavy backpacks.

Seek Durability Stuffed into backpacks, stored at the bottom of lockers and shuttled between school and home, school supplies take a beating. This can mean ripping and even losing important papers. Seek out items durable enough to store materials for multiple classrooms and functional enough to withstand multiple locker visits, such as the Five Star 3-Inch Binder with Removable Padded Case. It comes with an expanding file for quick access to papers and a padded pouch for storing tech gear. Double the strength of competition, Five Star College Ruled Reinforced Filler Paper is a must-have for schoolwork and pairs well with binders. Five Star aims to be an ally and champion for students looking for creative and expressive ways to manage the stress of their daily routines. More tips to reduce school-related stress can be found at strengthenotstress. com or join the conversation using #StrengthNotStress. “Stress is a common challenge for students,” says Jessica Hodges, the vice president of marketing at ACCO Brands, which builds school supplies based on evolving student needs. “Knowing you can channel stress into something more positive is empowering.” Content provided by Statepoint

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Back 2 School

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

New York City Schools Agree to Bullying Reforms in Wake of Lawsuit By CHRISTINA VEIGA From Chalkbeat

A student accused of stabbing and killing a classmate in 2017 at Urban Assembly for Wildlife Conservation in the Bronx said he was the victim of bullying. The school, which has since been closed, shared a building with PS 67.

A legal settlement calling on the Department of Education to do more to address bullying in schools was approved this week by a judge, despite objections from advocates. The settlement was announced in March, but the Legal Aid Society challenged the agreement. Lawyers for the public interest firm argued that the settlement called on the education department to implement reforms that were already required by law or under the city’s own rules, and that the agreement did not address “the underlying causes of bullying, including trauma and mental health issues.” The city had already moved forward with many of the requirements of the settlement, such as allowing bullying victims to transfer schools and creating an online system to report bullying complaints, after a fatal stabbing at a school in the Bronx in 2017.

Shortly after the stabbing, Chalkbeat reported the city would implement a suite of programs to address bullying: The $8 million package of programs includes a new online tool for families to reporting bullying incidents, anti-bullying training for students and school staff members, and funding for student-support clubs such as those for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. In addition, the department will begin allowing bullying victims to request school transfers, will require schools to come up with individual plans for dealing with students who bully others, and will provide extra training and support to the 300 schools with the highest bullying rates. The class action suit was originally filed in April 2016 by a group of 23 families who alleged that the education department was not addressing bullying concerns. The set-

tlement was approved on Monday. “This settlement finally brings relief to children and parents suffering the dangerous consequences of school bullying, and mandates meaningful reform,” Jim Walden, an attorney representing the parents, said in an emailed statement. In an email, education department spokesman Miranda Barbot said the city is focused on improving school climate and that every bullying allegation is treated seriously. “We recognize the impact that bullying can have on the wellbeing of young people, and are committed to fostering school environments that are safe and supportive for all students,” she wrote. Chalkbeat NY is a nonprofit news organization committed to covering education and schools. www.chalkbeatny.org/ny

Movers & Shakers DOE NAMES DEPUTY CHANCELLOR FOR COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT Hydra Mendoza has been appointed the deputy chancellor for community empowerment, partnerships and communications at the city’s Department of Education, Schools Chancellor Richard Carranaza announced on Monday. Mendoza had previously served as the deputy chief of staff for education and equity to Gavin Newson, the mayor of San Francisco. In that position, she was responsible for community empowerment and engagement, public affairs, maintaining relationships between the city and key stakeholders, developing public-private partnerships and advising the mayor and city elected officials on education policy matters. In her new role, Mendoza will oversee the divisions of family and community empowerment, communications, external affairs, intergovernmental affairs and translation and interpretation services. “Hydra is one of the staunchest allies for public school families that you’ll ever find,” Carranza said. “I saw Hydra’s innate ability to connect with students and parents firsthand during my time in San Francisco as she galvanized neighborhoods and communities to strive towards equity for

all students.” Mendoza was a founding member and former executive director of Parents for Public Schools of San Francisco, an organization focused on engaging parents and community members around top issues in public education. She also served as a preschool teacher, acting director and parent president of the Miraloma Cooperative Nursery School in San Francisco. “The focus must be on equity, but that cannot be achieved without building close partnerships with our students, families and communities,” Mendoza said of her new position. “I’m looking forward to diving right into the work and partnering with school communities across New York City to ensure every child is receiving the education they deserve.”

STUDENTS GRADUATE FROM BUFFALO STATE

SUNY Buffalo State announced that a number of Queens students earned their baccalaureate degrees during the spring semester. Students who graduated include Hollis’ Oluwaseun Fagbamigbe (BA in biology); Springfield Gardens’ Idris Lawal (BS in business administration) and Deja Lloyd (BA in communication studies); Jamaica’s Raymond Morrison (BS in business administration), Stephanie Selby (BA in public communication), Kassidy Sandy-Bourne (BA in psychology), Raheem Nugent (BS in criminal justice), Renee

Smikle (BS in individualized studies), Tatiyana Washington-Bellamy (BS in business administration) and Isaiah Springer (BS in business administration); Far Rockaway’s Chyna Sourzes (BS in business administration) and Nicholas Hamilton (BS in computer information systems); Queens Village’s Nafesah Mohamad (BS in childhood education), Vanessa Campbell (BA in psychology) and Karen Gutierrez Serna (BA in history); Long Island City’s Katherine Jimenez (BA in communication studies); St. Albans’ Jamal Greenidge (BS in computer information systems), Jaynie Doe (BA in political science), Janell Marshall (BA in psychology), Kaylia Greenland (BS in individualized studies) and Kelsey Samuels (BS in economics); Fresh Meadows’ Raymond Lin (BS in computer information systems); Rosedale’s Osahon Odigie (BS in computer information systems), Erin Thompson (BS in fashion and textile technology), Craig Henry (BS in health and wellness) and Skye Hicks (BS in fashion and textile technology); Bayside’s Jordan Chateau (BS in criminal justice); College Point’s Mariah Rosario (BS in criminal justice); Ozone Park’s Nikita Singh (BA in journalism) and Kasandra Flynn (BA in media production); East Elmhurst’s Kashief Lewis (BS in mechanical engineering technology) and Rochelle Spires (BA in public communication); Flushing’s Gyooheon Lee (BA in media production) and Khadijah McCaw (BS in social work); Laurelton’s Berthlyne Francois (BA in psychology); Rockaway Park’s Mariah White (BA in psychology); Bellerose’s Deborah Witthauer (BS in speech-language pathology); Astoria’s Stephanie Bernard (BA in sociology); and Arverne’s Denisha Williams (BA in psychology).


The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

Precincts around the city celebrated the 35th annual National Night Out on Crime on Tuesday. Each precinct offered free food and activities for children as well as information on crime prevention to local residents. The anti-crime initiative was originally founded as a means of creating police-community partnerships to make communities safer. “More than three decades ago, violent crime ran rampant throughout New York City and National Night Out Against Crime was established as a way for law-abiding citizens to symbolically reclaim their streets,” Queens District Attorney Richard Brown said. “In the intervening years, that symbolism has become a reality as the crime rate has fallen to record lows and people can once more enjoy all that this great city has to offer without fear.” Check out these photos from the 102nd Precinct’s National Night Out event at Victory Field in Forest Park in Woodhaven. Photos by Robert Stridiron

Night Out

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Fifty Plus

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

50 +

Every month in our 50 Plus section, the Queens Tribune explores issues—from health and exercise to finances and trends—that people over the age of 50 are facing. This month’s stories focus on senior fashion trends and how exercise can do more than just keep you in good physical shape. The section features a story on current fashion trends for senior men and senior women. One of our reporters braved the malls of Queens to find out what the hottest fashion trends are for people over the age of 50. And this month’s column from Joanne Barry Colon, a certified personal trainer, focuses on how weight-bearing exercises can lead to better brain health. According to a study by the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, obese people experienced significantly greater self-esteem building and perceived strength after several weeks of resistance training—or weight lifting—as opposed to aerobic exercise. In fact, researchers have long contended that weight-bearing exercises can improve cognitive thinking and ward off such conditions as dementia, Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. So, dive into this month’s 50 Plus section and check out our selection of stories on fashion and getting fit.

Weight-Bearing Training Equals Brain Health By JOANNE BARRY COLON

Did you know that such weight-bearing exercises, especially for the lower body, as weight training, jumping and jogging produces healthy neural cells for the brain? When weight-training exercises are decreased, it is challenging for the brain to produce new cells, therefore, a person would have a difficult time handling stressful situations. As a certified personal trainer and brain and balance training specialist, I encourage clients to engage in weight bearing exercises for their lower body two days per week, incorporating functional training and strength training exercises into their program. There are many benefits for weight bearing training--for example, it improves balance, coordination, focus, core strength and helps decrease loss of bone mass, injuries and pain. What is functional training? Functional training means performing exercises that

mirror daily activities such as: • Squats resemble sitting and using the toilet • Travel lunge resembles stepping into the tub or stepping onto the bus • Deadlifts resemble picking up a laundry basket and things off the floor What is strength training? Strength training means performing exercises that include weight loading (resistance) to build strength and size of muscles. Below are sample strength training exercises: • Leg Press • Lying Leg Curl (Seated, Standing) • Barbell Squats • Deadlifts All functional exercises can be performed as a strength training exercise just by adding re-

sistance. Below is a sample weight bearing routine: • Leg Press • Travel Lunges • Lying Leg Curls • Deadlifts • Abductors (lying on floor, use resistance band or ankle weights) • Ball Adductor (resistance ball) • Seated Calf Raise Perform two to three sets for each exercise, starting with a weight that challenges you to get eight to 12 repetitions. Depending on your personal goals, weight and repetitions may vary. To help improve strength, increase weight every four to six weeks. Before starting this program consult with a physician, and for best results work one on one with a certified personal trainer. Redeem this article to receive a complimentary workout. Email questions to healingwithin34@aol.com.


Fifty Plus

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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50 Plus Fashion

Two Words: “Comfort” and “Sales”

BY ARIEL HERNANDEZ

50 plus were out and about taking advantage of the back-to-school sales.

Lidia Lopez

There has long been talk of whether dressing a certain way is “age appropriate.” The Queens Tribune spoke to Queens residents over the age of 50 about their fashion choices for the season—and they all cited two elements as the most important: comfort and saving money. Carol Williams, 59, who was sporting a fitted striped maxi dress and flip flops on Friday at the Queens Center Mall, said that she doesn’t believe in age appropriateness, and instead focuses on weather conditions, comfort and price. “It’s too hot for me to worry about what anyone thinks about me. I know everything is not in its place,” said Williams, referring to the size of her body. “But as long as I am happy with me, that’s all that I care about.” Williams said that when she shops, she makes sure that the items she buys are worth every penny. “I’ve been around for a few decades, so I know how this economy and society works,” said Williams. “I remember buying $2 graphic T-shirts. Now, those things

Best friends, Betty and Lucy say goodbye after a Sunday afternoon of shopping.

are over $20, depending on the manufacturer. It’s a scam. I just make sure that if I’m paying over $20 for a T-shirt, it’s going to be comfortable and universal.” Abe Walker, 77, walks along Jamaica Avenue every Sunday by himself and occasionally shops on the strip. “I mostly look around, but if I see something—and it has to be real nice—I’ll get it,” said Walker. Walker said that he rarely buys clothing, because “what’s being sold nowadays is for the young cats.” “You see these young boys out here in those skinny pants? I can’t wear no skinny pants,” said Walker. On a recent 85-degree day, Walker was wearing brown slacks, black slides and a white polo shirt. “I get hot just like everybody else, but if I’m not comfortable, I’m not comfortable,” he said. Walker said that slacks are always his goto, and he’ll alternate his shoes depending on the weather. Betty, 82, and her best friend, Lucy, 85,

spoke to the Queens Tribune after exiting an Access-A-Ride, which dropped them off at Jamaica Center after Sunday mass. “We usually alternate on whose house we’re going to go to for lunch after church, but the back-to-school sales are out and there’s a dress I’ve been eyeing for some time,” said Lucy. Both women were still in their church gear. Betty said that her church clothes are not vastly different from what she wears on a regular basis. “We just wear the expensive stuff to church,” said Betty. Betty is a firm believer in age-appropriate clothing, while Lucy had another take on it. “If you look good and you feel good, do what you want,” said Lucy. “But if you have rolls and cellulite and everything is falling apart, leave that stuff to the young girls. We’ve been there and now it’s time for the new generations to live their lives.” Lidia Lopez, 70, also believes in age-appropriate clothing. She said that when she was younger, she would often wear shorts and tight T-shirts, but now she opts for pants and will only wear shorts if she’s going to the beach. “It depends on where I’m going,” said Lopez. “If I’m wearing dressy pants, I like them loose fitted, but if I’m wearing athletic gear, I prefer tight pants.” Lopez said that her two fashion favorites are her shoes and accessories. “I love accessories, but not too much or exaggerated,” said Lopez. As for her shoes, Lopez said that she could never have enough. Although Raul, 68, was wearing clashing plaid shorts and a T-shirt, he said that he takes his style seriously.

“I’m just here taking my grandson school-shopping for my daughter,” said Raul. “Usually, I’m looking neat with my fedora on, but shopping with a teenage boy is too stressful and it’s too hot out.” Raul said that during the summer, he loves wearing linen shorts and pants, open-toe shoes—such as slippers or sandals—and loose and lightly fitted shirts. “I’m too big for Jamaica Center, so I shop mostly on Long Island or a bit more north at Big and Tall because I’m big and tall,” said Raul. Raul said that he rarely wears jeans and sweatpants in the winter, because jeans in Big and Tall sections of clothing stores are expensive as they have more material than the average men’s pair of jeans. Claudette, 71, said that she loves florals, plaids, stripes and all sorts of prints. “I love overlapping the patterns and playing around with the color,” said Claudette. “Color is so important because it shows life and happiness.” Claudette said that she only shops in the sales racks because “clothing evolves.” Merle, 55, said that her go-to clothing store is her closet. “I’ve accumulated over 35 years of great classics, which have always come full circle, reinventing effortlessly,” said Merle. Merle said that when she is in the mood to splurge, she shops at Zara, Aritzia or Anthropology. “They have minimalist and trendy styles that keep me looking young and fun,” said Merle. Reach Ariel Hernandez at (718) 357-7400, ext. 144, ahernandez@queenstribune.com or @reporter_ariel.


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The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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Queens Today

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

SPOTLIGHT OF THE WEEK

Dance Company. Free. 2 p.m. Fort Totten, Totten Avenue and 15th Road, Bayside. ------------------------------------------------

Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival

A family-friendly Brooklyn vs. Queens field day with sack races, trivia knockout, a pieeating contest and dance off, culminating in an epic tug-of-war. The winning borough takes home the coveted Arbitration Rock Trophy. $5 suggested donation. Noon. Onderdonk House, 1820 Flushing Ave., Ridgewood. ------------------------------------------------

Thousands are expected to run this oneloop course that starts and ends near the Unisphere. The course is open for various gender, age and talent divisions. 8:30 a.m. Meet at the Unisphere, Flushing Meadows Corona Park. ------------------------------------------------

Comedy Under The Stars

Alessio “The Sicilian Guy” Terrana headlines a night of laughter at Resorts World Casino. 8 p.m. Resorts World Casino New York City, 110-00 Rockaway Blvd., Jamaica. ------------------------------------------------

This 28th annual event celebrates the Year of the Dog with boat races—and more than 200 teams—as well as entertainment, folk art and a food court. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Aug. 11 and 12. Free. Meadow Lake, Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Norte Maar’s Dance

Artists in residence offer a sixth annual performance on a main stage by the East River waterfront at Socrates Sculpture Park. Free. 5:30 p.m. Socrates Sculpture Park, 32-01 Vernon Blvd., Long Island City. ------------------------------------------------

SUNDAY 8/12

“The Princess and the Frog”

This modern version of the Grimm fairy tale features the first-ever African American Disney princess. $15. Daily at 11 a.m. The film will screen through Aug. 12. Museum of the Moving Image, 36-01 35th Ave., Astoria’s Kaufman Arts District. ------------------------------------------------

Jazz In The Park

Joey “Hot Lips” Morant electrifies audiences with his dazzling trumpet technique, skillful scat singing and humorous asides. Free. 6:30 p.m. Socrates Sculpture Park, 3201 Vernon Blvd., Long Island City. ------------------------------------------------

Afro-Cuban Jazz With Román Filiú

This New York-based saxophonist, bandleader and composer was born and raised in Santiago de Cuba. Free. 6 p.m. Queens Central Library, 89-11 Merrick Blvd., Jamaica.

“42nd Street”

This classic musical stars talented young people from local Queens communities. The show will be performed at 7 p.m. on Aug. 9, 8 p.m. on Aug. 10, 8 p.m. on Aug. 11 and 3 p.m. on Aug. 12. Admission is $12 or $10 for seniors and children under age 12. HCJ Msgr. Murray Auditorium, 111-02 86th Ave., Richmond Hill. ------------------------------------------------

FRIDAY 8/10

Mad Science Presents: Spin! Pop! Boom!

This event focuses on experimentation and will feature amazing feats of chemistry. It will include demonstrations and chemical reactions. 10:30 a.m. Buz O’Rourke Playground in Crocheron Park, 33rd Road and 214th Place, Bayside. ------------------------------------------------

Tie Dye Your Clothes

Kids in Motion will lead this tie dye event. Participants should bring an article of clothing to be tie dyed. All other supplies will be provided. 11 a.m. Free. Playground for All Children in Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

de los Santos in a celebration of music from Latin America and East Asia. Sing and dance to folk and children’s songs in English, Spanish, Korean, Mandarin, Japanese, Tibetan and Taiwanese. 1 p.m. Admission is $14 or $8 for children. Flushing Town Hall, 137-35 Northern Blvd. ------------------------------------------------

Arbitration Rock: Battle Of The Boroughs Music In The Garden: Women’s Raga Massive Corona Mile

SATURDAY 8/11

THURSDAY 8/9

Sundays On Movie Night: “Black Panther” The Lawn: Ani Cordero The popular Marvel Comics blockbuster will screen at Rockaway Beach. In the film, T’Challa returns home to the African nation of Wakanda to take his rightful place as king after his father dies, but he is challenged by a powerful enemy. Free. 8 p.m. Beach 59th Street and Boardwalk in Rockaway Beach. ------------------------------------------------

SATURDAY 8/11

Hot Jazz/Cool Garden: Bria Skonberg

The Louis Armstrong House Museum will host this highly acclaimed and versatile singer, trumpeter and songwriter. $20 with red beans and rice dish and sweet tea. 2 p.m. Louis Armstrong House Museum, 3456 107th St., Corona. ------------------------------------------------

Cooking with Granny

This outdoor program presents internationally renowned bands and musicians after free art-making classes and lawn games. Cordero is a singer, songwriter, drummer, guitarist and Latin American music researcher. 1:30 p.m. Queens Museum, NYC Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park. ------------------------------------------------

“The Monkey King”

This new work by Common Man Musicals tackles an ancient Chinese legend with a modern American point of view. What happens when a new king is born, but he turns out to be a she? Free. 2 p.m. Queens Museum 14 United Nations Ave. S., Flushing Meadows Corona Park. ------------------------------------------------

Global Mashup For Kids

A fun-filled afternoon featuring Park and

This event at the Queens Botanical Garden will feature improvised pieces, original works and raga-inspired tributes to female heroes. 4 p.m. Queens Botanical Garden, 43-50 Main St., Flushing. ------------------------------------------------

“Kabarett Weimar”

This play takes the audience to the divine decadence of a Weimar-era German cabaret, Kit Kat Club. A devious master of ceremonies, desperate dancers, stirring chanteuses and bawdy bumps and grinds lurk at every turn. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Let Love Inn, 27-20 23rd Ave., Astoria. ------------------------------------------------

Free Corn Roast

Those who drop by the Cunningham Park Farmers Market will receive a free ear of corn roasted over a coal fire. 10 a.m. Cunningham Park Farmers Market, northeast corner of parking lot, vicinity of Union Turnpike, Fresh Meadows. ------------------------------------------------

MONDAY 8/13

“Crazy Rich Asians”

The film, which is based on the 2013 novel by Kevin Kwan, will have a red carpet premiere at the College Point Multiplex. Star Henry Golding will be in attendance. The film follows the story of a young Asian American woman who finds out that her boyfriend’s family is one of the richest in Singapore. 6 p.m. College Point Multiplex, 28-55 Ulmer St., Whitestone. ------------------------------------------------

TUESDAY 8/14

The Bartlett Band With The Next Generation Sound

Such varied musical styles as Bebop and hip hop will be performed as part of the two-month Live at the Gantries series. Free. 7 p.m. Gantry Plaza State Park, Center Boulevard and 48th Avenue, Long Island City.

Greek octopus stew is on the menu for this live cooking and storytelling session with Granny Barbara and Caroline Shin. So are tales of Greek immigration and Astoria. 2 p.m. COFFEED, 37-18 Northern Blvd., Long Island City. ------------------------------------------------

Victorian Walking Tour

Board member Jo-Anne Raskin leads a trek through the Victorian section of Maple Grove Cemetery. Visit gravesites of notable permanent residents and learn about Victorian funerary symbols and styles. $15. 2 p.m. Meet inside the gate at Kew Gardens Road and Lefferts Boulevard, Kew Gardens. ------------------------------------------------

Queensboro Dance Project

Norte Maar’s Dance will perform at Socrates Sculpture Park this weekend.

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This event will feature performances by NY Hung Sing Kwoon Lion Dance, Dugal Dance Projects, Rogue Dancers, Sector Dance, Vissi Dance Theater and The Kingdom

Bria Skonberg will perform at the Louis Armstrong House Museum.


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Legal Notices

James Scott Yoh, Esq., SUBSTITUTE REFEREE!!! Lawrence Gressner, Esq., Referee Queens Tribune SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF QUEENS HOWARD AVENUE LAND CORP., Plaintiff against CARLYLE PREUDHOMME AND DONNA PREDUHOMME A/K/A DONNA CHILDS INDIVIDUALLY AND AS CO-EXECUTORS OF THE ESTATE OF ARTHUR PREDUHOMME, SR., DEBORAH PREDUHOMME AND DENISE PREUDHOMME A/K/A DENISE CHAMBERLAIN, Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Partition and Sale entered on March 22, 2018. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Queens County Supreme Courthouse, 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Court Room # 25, Jamaica, N.Y. on the 31day of August, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Said premises known as 167-32 118th Avenue, Jamaica, N.Y. (Block: 12368, Lot: 16). Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 702262/2016. James Scott Yoh, Esq., Referee. Howard M. Lefkowitz, Esq. Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 32 Flag Hill Road Chappaqua, N.Y. 10514 (914) 769-7668 Title searches should be performed in advance of the auction. There is no representation that insurable title will be transferred. The closing title will be “time of the essence,” as is stated in the Terms of Sale. Terms of Sale and the Judgment of Partition and Sale are available in advance of the auction date - - call (914) 769-7668. The property is being sold “as is” in all respects (physical condition and from title perspective), except to extent stated in Judgment. INDEX NO. 713668/2016 Plaintiff designates QUEENS as the place of trial situs of the real property S U P P L E M E N T A L SUMMONS Mortgaged Premises: 221-26 113 AVENUE QUEENS VILLAGE, NY 11429 District: Section: Block: 11220 Lot: 122 & 124 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS ________________________ REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC., Plaintiff, vs. GEORGE HERIVAUX, JR., AS ADMINISTRATOR AND AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF GEORGE HERIVAUX; UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF GEORGE HERIVAUX; any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; ‘’JOHN DOE #1’’ through ‘’JOHN DOE #12,’’ the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, Defendants. ________________________ To the above named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your

answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $420,000.00 and interest, recorded on March 22, 2013, at Instrument number 2013000119344, of the Public Records of QUEENS County, New York, covering premises known as 221-26 113 AVENUE QUEENS VILLAGE, NY 11429. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. QUEENS County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: March 6, 2018 RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: DANIEL GREENBAUM, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516-280-7675 S U P P L E M E N T A L SUMMONS Index No. 706767/2014 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF QUEENS FEDERAL NATIONAL M O R T G A G E ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, -vsTHE HEIRS AT LARGE OF GLORIA COLON, deceased, and all persons who are husbands, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be dead, and their husbands and wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest of all of whom and whose names and places are unknown to Plaintiff; ALECIA MITCHELL-FR ANCOIS; SANDRA BROWN; ORVILLE BROWN; JOSEPH STALIN BOGLE; WILLIAM BOGLE; LILIETH BOGLE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU PAYMENT AND ADJUDICATION CENTER OF QUEENS; NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD; NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAI; “JOHN DOE” AND “JANE DOE” said names being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, Defendants. Mortgaged Premises: 147-18 FERNDALE AVENUE, JAMAICA NY 11435 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018 entitled action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days of the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service of the same is complete where service is made in any manner other than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. Your failure to appear or answer will result in a judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. In the event that a deficiency balance remains from the sale proceeds, a judgment may be entered against you, unless the Defendant obtained a bankruptcy discharge and such other or further relief as may be just and equitable. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer to the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. These pleadings are being amended to include ALECIA MITCHELL-FR ANCOIS, SANDRA BROWN, ORVILLE BROWN, JOSEPH STALIN BOGLE, WILLIAM BOGLE and LILIETH BOGLE, as possible heirs to the Estate of Gloria Colon, deceased. These pleadings are also being amended to include UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE PARKING VIOLATIONS BUREAU PAYMENT AND A D J U D I C A T I O N CENTEROF QUEENS, NEW YORK CITY ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL BOARD and NEW YORK CITY TRANSIT ADJUDICATION BUREAU are party defendants to the foreclosure action filed under Index No. 706767/2014. These pleadings are also being amended to include FEDERAL NATIONAL M O R T G A G E ASSOCIATION, as Plaintiff in the action pursuant to the Assignment of Mortgage recorded in CRFN 2015000434421. QUEENS County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: AUGUST 4, 2017 Mark K. Broyles, Esq. FEIN SUCH & CRANE, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and P.O. Address 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone No. (585) 232-7400 Block: 11949 Lot: 307 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage held by the Plaintiff recorded in the County of QUEENS, State of New York as more particularly described in the Complaint herein. TO THE DEFENDANT, the plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named defendants: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of HON. FREDERICK D.R. SAMPSON, Justice of the SUPREME Court of the State of New York, dated July 12, 2018 and filed along with the supporting papers in the QUEENS County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a Mortgage. ALL that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Borough and County of Queens, City and State of New York, bounded and descried as follows: BEGINNING at a point on

the Southerly side of Ferndale Avenue, distant 180 feet Easterly from the corner formed by the intersection of the Southerly side of Ferndale Avenue and Easterly side of Liverpool Street; THENCE Southerly parallel with Liverpool Street, 100 feet; THENCE Easterly parallel with Ferndale Avenue, 30 feet; THENCE Northerly parallel with Liverpool Street, 100 feet to the Southerly side of Ferndale Avenue; THENCE Westerly along the said Southerly side of Ferndale Avenue, 30 feet to the point or place of BEGINNING. Mortgaged Premises: 147-18 FERNDALE AVENUE, JAMAICA NY 11435 Tax Map/Parcel ID No.: Block: 11949 Lot: 307 of the BOROUGH of QUEENS, NY 11435 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS S U P P L E M E N T A L SUMMONS AND NOTICE Index No. 713332/2017 Date Filed: 4/13/2018 U.S. Bank N.A, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Trust 2006-WMC4 Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-WMC4, Plaintiff, -againstAlison Espeut, if she be living or dead, her spouse, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; Mortgage Electronic Registration System, Inc., as nominee for WMC Mortgage Corp.; City of New York Environmental Control Board; City of New York Parking Violations Bureau; City of New York Transit Adjudication Bureau; State of New York; and “JOHN DOE”, said name being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, and any parties, corporations or entities, if any, having or claiming an interest or lien upon the mortgaged premises, Defendants. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 118-87 Riverton Street, St. Albans, NY 11412 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or a notice of appearance on the attorneys for the Plaintiff within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Timothy J. Dufficy, a Justice of the Supreme Court, Queens County, entered July 23, 2018 and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Queens County Clerk’s Office. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Consolidation and/or Modified Mortgage (hereinafter “the Mortgage”) to secure $753,003.89 and interest, and loan modification agreement covering premises known as 118-87 Riverton Street, St Albans, NY 11412 a/k/a Block 12450, Lot 10. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. Plaintiff designates Queens County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT

JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: March 26, 2018 Frank M. Cassara, Esq. Senior Associate Attorney SHAPIRO, DICARO & BARAK, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 175 Mile Crossing Boulevard Rochester, New York 14624 (585) 247-9000 Fax: (585) 247-7380 Our File No. 17-063652 #95381 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF QUEENS SUMMONS Foreclosure of: Borough: Queens Block: 2747 Lot: 12 Index No.: 18686/2013 Date of filing: 10/08/13 Plaintiffs designate Queens the place of trial. Venue is based upon the county in which the Premises are situated. NYCTL 2012-A TRUST, and THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON, as Paying Agent and Collateral Agent and Custodian for the NYCTL 2012-A TRUST, Plaintiffs, - against - SHANK REALTY CORP., MEYER CHEVROLET, INC., NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, and “JOHN DOE No. 1” through “JOHN DOE No. 100” inclusive, Defendants. TO THE A B O V E - N A M E D DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action within twenty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty days after service is completed if the summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT The object of the above-entitled action is to foreclose the Tax Lien listed in The City of New York Tax Lien Certificate No. 4A, dated as of August 8, 2012, recorded August 20, 2012, as CRFN 2012000329364, covering premises described as follows: COUNTY: Queens ADDRESS: 60th Lane Maspeth, NY 11378 BLOCK: 2747 LOT: 12 The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the tax lien described above. This action does not involve “subprime” or “high costs” loans that were consummated between January 1, 2003 and September 1, 2009. To the above named Defendants, the foregoing summons is served upon you pursuant to an order of the Hon. Robert J. McDonald J.S.C dated June 18,2018 and entered July 10, 2018. SEYFARTH SHAW LLP Attorneys for Plaintiffs 620 Eighth Avenue New York, New York 10018 (212) 218-5500 DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING Docket No. SU18D1327DR Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Suffolk Probate & Family Court Dorothy Davis vs. Brett Davis Suffolk Probate & Family Court 24 New Chardon Street Boston, MA 02114 To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant a divorce for Irretrievable Breakdown The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Joan M Altamore, Esq.

Joan M. Altamore, Esquire 39 Glendower Rd Roslindale, MA 02131 your answer, if any, on or before 08/30/2018. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, Hon. Brian J. Dunn, First Justice of this Court Date: July 3, 2018 Register of Probate DIVORCE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION AND MAILING Docket No. HD18D0484DR Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Trial Court Probate and Family Court Christine Diaz vs Nelson A. Diaz Hampdent Probate and Family Court 50 State Street Springfield, MA 01103 To the Defendant: The Plaintiff has filed a Complaint for Divorce requesting that the Court grant divorce for Irretrievable Breakdown. The Complaint is on file at the Court. An Automatic Restraining Order has been entered in this matter preventing you from taking any action which would negatively impact the current financial status of either party. SEE Supplemental Probate Court Rule 411. You are hereby summoned and required to serve upon: Christine Diaz 122 Washburn Street Springfield, MA 01107 your answer, if any, on or before 10/24/2018. If you fail to do so, the court will proceed to the hearing and adjudication of this action. You are also required to file a copy of your answer, if any, in the office of the Register of this Court. WITNESS, Hon. Barbara M Hyland, First Justice of this Court. Date July 17 2018 Suzanne O. Seguin Register of Probate CITATION SURROGATE’S COURT, QUEENS COUNTY SUBJECT: ESTATE OF LANE REED BLOCKFILE NUMBER 2017-5388 TO all unknown persons whose names are unknown, and places or residence are unknown and their relation to the deceased, LANE REED BLOCK, is unknown. If any of the said unknown persons are distributees of the deceased and they are alive, or if they are dead, you are all served by publication of this CITATION. NOTICE TO UNKNOWN DISTRIBUTEES: A Petition in Probate in the ESTATE OF LANE REED BLOCK was filed under file number 2017-5388 with the Surrogate’s Court of Queens County New York by HILLIARD SCHLESINGER, who is domiciled at 79-16 209th Street, Hollis Hills, New York 11364, United States of America. ALL SUCH UNKNOWN DISTRIBUTEES OF LANE REED BLOCK, DECEASED, ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court of Queens County New York located at 88-11 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York 11435 on Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 9:30 o’clock in the fore noon of that day, why Letters Testamentary should not be granted and issued to HILLIARD SCHLESINGER. Further relief sought: Granting to the Petitioner, Hilliard Schlesinger, such other, further, and different relief as the Court deems just and proper in the premises. Dated, Attested, and Sealed, July 30, 2018 Honorable Peter J. Kelly, Surrogate James Lim Becker, Chief Clerk Submitted by: Alan Brian Jones, Esquire Attorney for Hilliard Schlesinger 275 South Broadway While Plains, New York 10601 Telephone number: (914)-770-7759 NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by Law. If you fail to appear, it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested in this CITATION. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you, and you, or your attorney, may request a copy of Hilliard Schlesinger’s Petition in Probate from petitioner’s attorney. PROBATE CITATION File No. 2018-1581 SURROGATE’S COURT, QUEENS COUNTY CITATIONTHE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK,

By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: The heirs at law, next of kin and distributees of Elaine Rosenfeld deceased, if living, and if any of them be dead to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligience. A petition having been duly filed by Michael Scarano and Donna Scarano who are domiciled at 26 Ray Street, Staten Island, New York 10312 and 26 Ray Street, Staten Island, New York 10312. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Queens County, at 88-11 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York on August 30, 2018, at 9:30 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Elaine Rosenfeld lately domiciled at 152-34 Jewel Avenue, Apt. 97A, Flushing, New York 11367, United States admitting to probate a Will dated July 6, 2016 as the Will of Elaine Rosenfeld deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that Letters Testamentary issue to: Michael Scarano and Donna Scarano. Dated, Attested and Sealed, June 27, 2018 HON. PETER J. KELLY, Surrogate, James Lim Becker, Chief Clerk, Anthony G. Capozzi, Attorney for Petitioners (718)-745-3300, 9201 4th Avenue, 7th floor, Brooklyn, NY 11209 (Note: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you.)

Jam Jam LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 7/16/2018. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 24-57 47th St., Astoria, NY 11103. General Purpose.

Notice of formation of 117-45 FARMERS LLC. Articles of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/05/2018. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: 117-45 FARMERS LLC 117-45 FARMERS BLVD JAMAICA, NY 11412. Purpose: Any lawful activity or purpose.

Formation of PAPER RIVER, LLC filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/20/18. Office loc.: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address SSNY shall mail process to Susan Z. Rogers, 10848 70th Rd., Apt. 10-E, Forest Hills, NY 11375. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Reenbow Media L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 06/18/08. Office: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Dahiya & Associates, 325 Broadway, Suite 304, New York, NY 10007, USA. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

31-31 Astoria Realty LLC, Arts of Org filed with SSNY on 07/02/18. Off. Loc.: Queens County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 645 Water St, #17D, New York, NY 10002. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act.

Notice of formation of IOVES USA LLC. Articles of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/10/2018. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: MATTIA COSTAN 3537 36TH STREET ASTORIA, NY 11106. Purpose: Any lawful activity or purpose.

Top King Realty LLC, Arts of Org filed with SSNY on 05/09/18. Off. Loc.: Queens County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 64-86 Wetherole St, #1A, Rego Park, NY 11374. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. 5712 Granger St LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 5/11/2018. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Mike Guanghang Liu, 4271 79th St., Elmhurst, NY 11373. General Purpose. F & M Taxi LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/30/2018. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 63-29 Ellwell Crescent, Rego Park, NY 11374. General Purpose. 43-43 KISSENA, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 07/19/18. Office: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Community Realty Corp., 42-08 Bell Boulevard, Bayside, NY 11361. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. 18-41 21st Road Realty LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 5/11/2018. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Law Offices Of Michael P. Giampilis, P.C., 94 Willis Ave., Mineola, NY 11501. General Purpose. Notice of formation of Doroni Holdings, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/19/2018. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: OR RAUCHER 94-11 65TH ROAD, SUITE 3C REGO PARK, NY 11374. Purpose: Any lawful activity or purpose. Notice of Formation of Best Sushi Island LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/4/2018. Office location:Queens County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 87-18 Queens Blvd., Elmhurst, NY 11373. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of formation of 505 ROGERS LLC. Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/10/18. Office location: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: 45-42 Oceania St., 1st Fl., Bayside, NY 11361. Purpose: any lawful act. SOLUTION TAXI LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 07/03/2018. Office loc: Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Ioanna D. Giovanis, 33-21 21 Street, Astoria, NY 11106. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Notice of formation of LIXING 41 LLC. Articles of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/27/2018. Office located in Queens County. SSNY has been designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of any process served against the LLC to: FU ZHENG 59-04 MAIN STREET FLUSHING, NY 11355. Purpose: Any lawful activity or purpose. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: S & P REALTY II, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/27/18, office location Queens County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of the process to the LLC, 14-72 161st Street, Whitestone, New York, 11357. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.

42-07-20 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 06/13/18. Office: Queens County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Sanco Mechanical Inc., 19-10 Hazen Street, E. Elmhurst, NY 11370. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Why Dough Productions LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 6/15/2018. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to David Anthony Anerella, 37-28 63rd St., Apt. 2F, Woodside, NY 11377. General Purpose. Keit LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 7/5/2017. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Helen Keit, 253-43 Leith Rd., Little Neck, NY 11362. General Purpose. Cactus 1041 Prospect LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 11/15/2017. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 47-05 Metropolitan Ave., Ridgewood, NY 11385. General Purpose. Cactus 814 Jamaica LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 11/15/2017. Cty: Queens. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 47-05 Metropolitan Ave., Ridgewood, NY 11385. General Purpose. Notice is hereby given that an on-premise license, # TBA has been applied for by El Tecolote Corp d/b/a El Tecolote to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 80-09 Roosevelt Avenue Jackson Heights NY 11372. Notice is hereby given that a license, number 1310749 for a “Restaurant Wine License” has been applied for by the undersigned to serve Beer / Wine at retail in the restaurant under the Alcohol Beverage Control Law at Jungo Sushi Inc., located at 48-11 43rd Avenue, Sunnyside, NY 11104 for on premises consumption: Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Civil Court, Queens County on June 12, 2018, bearing Index Number NC-000489-18/QU, a copy of which may be examined at the Office of the Clerk, located at 89-17 Sutphin Boulevard, Jamaica, New York, 11435, grants me the right to: Assume the name of (First) KRYSTLE (Middle) LEIGH (Last) CAUTHEN. My present name is (First) CRYSTAL (Middle) LEE (Last) CAUTHEN AKA KRYSTLE L. CAUTHEN, AKA KRYSTLE CAUTHEN. The city and state of my present address are Long Island City, NY. My place of birth is MANHATTAN, NY. The month and year of my birth are December 1984. Missing Person MPS #17/7401 CIRC #17/039 (10/28) Name: Ghulam Muhammad Description: Male, Other, 77 years of age, 5’ 09”, 170 lbs., thin build, medium complexion, gray hair, dark eyes. Clothing & Jewelry: Male Pakistani with gray hair and beard. He has not been seen by family since approx. January 01 , 2015. Last seen: At 0900 hours on 01/01/2015 in the vicinity of Edgerton Blvd. and GCP in Queens within the confines of the 107th. ANY INFORMATION: Contact nearest Police Officer or Missing Person Squad at: Tel: 212-694-7781 / 7782/7783 Det. McDonough


27

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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Scharome Cares Licensed Home Care Agency 89-44 162nd St, Queens 1729 E. 12 St., off Kings Hwy, Bklyn Call Today! Hiring Now!

Union Benefits for steady positions including Medical and Pension

Job Requirement:

DOE certified a plus but company will sponsor

** Must be at least 21 years of age. ** Must hold a current New York State driver's license. ** Must possess a commercial driver's license (CDLA, B, C) w/ CDL "S" (school bus) endorsement and "P" (passenger) endorsement. ** Able to pass a DOT physical, drug screen and background qualification process.

SCHOOL VAN HELP WANTED DRIVERS

SCHOOL BUS/VAN DRIVERS

UP TO

Best Pay Package in the Industry! Start at $23.62* Bus, $20.61* Van Equal Opportunity Employer Free CDL Training 25 hrs. a week minimum extra work available Full Benefit Package

$20.75TO START.

Health Insurance, Life Insurance, 401k, Paid Holidays, Attendance Incentives, 12 Month Employment. CDL-C PS License or Will Train. Hempstead Village & Port Washington locations. With attendance bonus.

HUNTINGTON COACH

MACHINIST, F/T

Working Days: Monday-Friday Time Schedule: 11am-1pm

Experienced on conventional lathes, milling machines, & bridgeports. College Point Location

john2819@outlook.com

or Fax Resume 718-886-5132

$600 Weekly

LOOKING FOR SHEETROCK TAPER LABOR WORKERS AND PLASTERER

FOR MAIL WAREHOUSE

WITH EXPEREINCE IN MANHATTTAN

AM and PM shifts available

Call Jack

APPLY AT: 860 Long Island Ave. Deer Park, N.Y., 11729

516.538.5200 516.883.6711

631-271-8931

*Attendance Bonus Included

CLEANERS WANTED

Quit 7 Smoking Smoking 1 8 - 4 3 4 -Quit 090 9

631.586.4699

$200 Daily

Must know all aspects of roofing.

646.879.5537

RESEARCH

PODIATRIST

Sexually Transmitted Diseases Dermatology

Dr. John Libertella, DPM “Foot Care / Podiatry In Your Own Home”

Vascular Studies • X-rays • Bloodwork HOUSE CALL SERVICE BY APPT. Serving Queens,Nassau & Suffolk

Rapid, Effective, Treatment, Confidential HIV Test. Dr. D. Park, MD, Specialist

718-429-3800

40-44 82 St. Elmhurst, Queens

Most Insurance Plans & CCs Accepted

917-715-9081

(1 blck frm Roosevelt Ave #7 Train) Accept Major Insurance, Credit Cards

KK SPA

MASSAGE THERAPY

T4M PROFESSIONAL MASSEUSE/MASSEUR Private Office Woodhaven and Jamaica Avenue.

516.900.4343

HEALTH

MASSAGE THERAPY

ELDER CARE SERVICES

CAROL WONDERFUL BODY WORK You will feel great 7 Days · 10am - 8pm Astoria, Queens Location

347.948.1567 SUMMER SPECIAL! Treat Yourself to Simply Divine Swedish, Shiatsu, Reflexology & Reiki Healing You won’t Be Disappointed

ROXANNE

(718) 225-3107

7 Days 8am-9pm Off Northern & Bell

Aroma Therapy MASSAGE

SUNDAY SPECIAL 122-15 25th Road

516-806-7171 FARM LIQUIDATION! 42 ACRES– ABUTS STATE LAND- $69,900 3 hrs NY City. Big views, woods, pond, meadows! Twn rd, utils. Owner terms. 888-701-1864 NewYorkLandandLakes.com

MEDICAID PROFESSIONALS

FREE Consultation Jack Lippmann

Dream Spa Heavenly Massage & Relaxation

10am-11pm • Flushing Area

347-348-9590

EVICTIONS/HOUSE FOR SALE

· Foot Reflexology · Beauty · Hair Cut · Waxing

LICENSED MASSAGE THERAPIST

I solve problems you don't know you have—in ways you cannot understand—

For your convenience all around.

FULL SERVICE MASSAGE

20% OFF w/10 Massages

14-21 College Point Boulevard, Flushing N.Y. 11356 · ASIAN OWNED

646.251.8828

I got your back! Neck, Shoulders, Arms and Legs.

Lisa: 646.523.8139

REAL ESTATE

(718) 575-5700

108-18 Queens Boulevard Suite 801, Forest Hills, NY 11375

LABORERS/MASONS WANTED We are looking to hire construction laborers and masons. Pay level with experience. Call

(718) 210-3365 EXT. 402

Leave a detailed message with your name and number

HOME HEALTH CARE AIDE Irish trained woman with 10 years experience and excellent checkable references available. Honest and reliable. Licensed driver with own transportation.

718-357-7400 EXT. 131

516.383.7150

APARTMENT LOTTERY

NEW APARTMENT LOTTERY FOR U.S. VETERANS Studio -1 Beds $1028+ Astoria Request app P.O.Box 1094, NY 10116 Or print @ www.marineterracevets.com Postmark Deadline 8/26/18

HOUSE FOR SALE

ELMHURST LUCKY SPA $ Massage Therapy

$ $ $ 24/7 929-290-3301 $ BIG SAVINGS $ $$$ $ $ Full Service… Pay Only 3% Commission of your property $ $ on the sale with this ad. $ $ $ 917-771-1736 $ $ or 718-454-9000 $ $$$ SAVE BIG…

HOUSES WANTED

STUNNING SENSATIONAL SOUTH BEACH HOUSE

HOUSES BOUGHT

OPEN HOUSE

ESTATE SPECIALIST

51 Crestwater Court, Staten Island, NY 10305

on Weekends 1-3pm 3 Floors - 4 BR, 2.5 Bths, 2 Balconies, Garage, Newly Renovated, Mint Condition. Ideal For Beach Lovers. Near All Shopping & Trans. Perfect Starter Home - Asking $579K

VITO CONENNA NYS LICENSED R.E. BROKER

O: 718.874.8300 C: 646.785.7516

HOUSE FOR SALE

MARGARITA

ALL CASH ANY CONDITION

718-217-2000 I BUY HOUSES

ANY CONDITION, ANY LOCATION

$$ CASH $$ Quick Sale, Fair Price Offer Guaranteed

347-642-3880

WE BUY PROPERTIES

Man Franchise L.I. 2 Territories. Established Business. Great 2nd Income. Nassau $54,995. Suffolk $49,995

ALL TYPES – FAST $$$ FREE OFFER 24 HRS

516.671.3910

646-625-9565

REAL ESTATE AGENT

ADIRONDACKS

(B'klyn/Queens)

thg.vcardinfo.com

VACATION RENTALS

For More Details Call Ms. Gittens:

Let me be your Representative & do the Negotiating for you! Denise 516-457-0617

GITTENS QUICK SALE REALTY, INC.

@ Keller Williams Realty 400 Garden City Plaza, Garden City, NY 11530

518-866-1570

Call for a FREE HOME EVALUATION

PA CONTEMPORARY

• Over 18 years experience filing Medicaid Home Care & Nursing Home applications • Protect your income, home, life savings • Apply for Medicaid, medical assistance

www.eldercareservicesny.com

(347) 462-2610 (347) 565-6200

ROOFING MECHANIC REAL ESTATE

Call 718-886-5470

HEALTH

Jack: 917.807.6898

If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed

Little Egg Harbor, Ocean County, NJ's newest 43-unit townhome community! Affordable taxes, low association fees & low insurance! Phase II construction now started; be in your shore home to enjoy summer 2018!

www.harborviewestates.com Contact Us Today. Judith Boulware

609.290.5906 • Spring Hollow Realty

100% FREE No Pressure No Hassles

Call Joseph Vicari

718-300-0660

Sleeps 12, pool, lake, lots of extras. $200 Off Summer Special Book Now!

$235,000

8+ acres, no community, lake rights to Twin Lakes. The potential is astounding; whether a main residence, second/vacation home or looking to Air BNB or long term rental. MLS #18-3416.

CHANT REALTORS Call Barbara

800-372-4268


28

Classifieds

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

REAL ESTATE

HOME SERVICES

HOUSE FOR SALE

REALTOR

POWER WASHING

14-19 116th St, College Point, NY 11356 • $1,390,000 Huge Price Reduction!!! Owner Wants To Hear All Offers!!! New Construction, Diamond Condition Minutes From #7 Train To Manhattan. Quiet Block, Bring The Whole Family. Park, Shopping, Houses Of Worship In Walking Distance. 3 Zone Heat & Central-Air, Large Full Finished Basement With High Ceilings & Separate Entrance. High Performing School District 25, Short Drive To Airports, 4 Car Driveway Houses All Your Vehicles.

“BIG or SMALL, we wash them ALL” "WE DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME CHRIS CAPUANO chrisjamescapuano@gmail.com

516.305.0490

14-15 116th St, College Point, NY 11356 • $1,490,000 Huge Price Reduction!!! Owner Wants To Hear All Offers!! Minutes From #7 Train To Manhattan. Quiet Block. Bring The Whole FamilyDiamond Condition, 5 Car Driveway. Walking Distance To Shopping, Schools, Library & Park. Close To Laguardia. High-Performing School District 25. 3 Zone Heat & CentralAir, Bay Windows, Large Attic, Full Finished Basement With High Ceilings.

Call or Text for a

FREE ESTIMATE $99 Value

CONSTRUCTION

For Sale - Not Rent • Mike Fink

*Terms and conditions apply, call for details. Offer Expires 08/31/18

ROCCO'S GENERAL CONTRACTING

917.747.3227

• Complete • Finished • Cement • Sheetrock • Taping &

Kitchen & Bath Renovations Basements All Work Work Guaranteed Work Compound + Painting LIC#1039268

ONE YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL LABOR

ONE YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL LABOR

Laffey Fine Homes International 516-647-3737 • mfink@laffeyintl.com 191 Hillside Ave, Williston Park NY

construction

NUNEZ

CONSTRUCTION & PAINTING EXPERT ON STOOPS

· Crack Repair · Brick Work · Kitchen Remodeling · Lic. & Ins.

MORTGAGES

BROKERAGE

718.219.1257

HOUSE FOR SALE

TO PLACE YOUR AD PLEASE CONTACT THE QUEENS TRIBUNE SALES DEPARTMENT AT 718-357-7400 EXT. 131

nunezforu.com · member of angies list A rating

PROPERTIES FOR SALE

CALLING ALL LANDLORDS & HOMEOWNERS

Are you PAYING TOO MUCH for Rental Properties or Homes?

98-13 Astoria Blvd. 2nd Fl, East Elmhurst, NY 11369

WE HAVE SEVERAL INSURANCE COMPANIES FOR YOUR HOME & MIXED-USE PROPERTIES �Claims OK � Poor Credit OK � Affordable Rates � Financing CALL US TO Options Available SAVE TOD

AY!

718-658-5300

FULL CIRCLE BROKERAGE

Auto, Home, Life, Motorcycle & Business Insurance 172-02 JAMAICA AVE., JAMAICA, NY 11432 Fax: 718-658-8107 • Email: fullcirclebkg@hotmail.com

AVELLINO

CONSTRUCTION CORP

Orange County Open Houses Every Weekend!

Little Egg Harbor, Ocean County, NJ's newest 43-unit townhome community! Affordable taxes, low association fees & low insurance! Phase II construction now started; be in your shore home to enjoy summer 2018!

www.harborviewestates.com Contact Us Today. Judith Boulware

609.290.5906 • Spring Hollow Realty

LAND FOR SALE

Homes Starting at $439,900 A charming community of farm house colonials located near quick access to Route 17 and the NYS Thruway. Choose from a variety of floor plans with endless options. Come Visit Our Model Home Today! Directions: Route 17 to Route 94, see signs across Johnson Road. GPS Address: 3423 State Route 94 Chester, NY Call office for info: 845-381-5777

• • • • •

General Contractor

Kitchens Painting Bathrooms Concrete Sidewalks

• • • • •

Waterproofing • Extensions • Stoops Doors • Pointing Basements • Windows Roofing Licensed & Insured Carpentry

FREE ESTIMATES

917-804-0531

No payment required until completion of work

FREE ESTIMATES

www.ChesterdaleEstates.com

Se Habla Espanol VISIT OUR NEW OFFICE LOCATION: 98-13 Astoria Blvd., 2nd Floor East Elmhurst, NY 11369

Quality Is Our Priority!

LAND 56 ACRES OWN YOUR OWN MOUNTAIN

Quik Fund, Inc. is a Licensed Mortgage Banker in NY, NJ, PA, CT, DE. NMLS ID#: 1733

JUST OFF ROUTE 80 NR LK HARMONY & CAMEL BACK. MIN: TO JIM THORPE VILLAGE

.0% INT ,$500 DN , $200 MONTH ,BALANCE $7,500. DEAL WITH OWNER DIRECT

973-222-1803

sub divided/infrastructure low taxes, near lakes, ski resort

$199K

https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=Q20UI3hWqsY& feature=share

518-866-1570

LAND FOR SALE

DELAWARE COUNTY, NY 200 Acres-woods, quarries, stream: 117 Acres-cabin, woods, stream: 40 Acres-mountain views, bldg site: 70 Acres-bgd site, woods, stream:

$340,000 $240,000 $112,900 $100,000

D. Todd Ogden Broker D.T. Ogden Real Estate dtodd79@yahoo.com

607-865-7000

Ogdenrealestate.org for other listings

HOME SERVICES JUNK REMOVAL

B&B JUNK REMOVAL

• Commercial & Residential Cleanouts • Hoarders, Bsmt, Construction Debris • Same Day Service bbjunkremoval.com

FREE ESTIMATES · 10% OFF

347-229-0305

CARPENTRY, ROOFING, PAINTING, CONCRETE WATERPROOFING, DRAINAGE, BASEMENTS

10% OFF 20% OFF with this ad

cannot be combined with any other offer

seniors special discount

cannot be combined with any other offer

929.312.2642

www.allboroconstructionny.com


Classifieds

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

HOME SERVICES CHIMNEY SERVICES

CHIMNEY KING ENT, INC. Done By Fighters That Care!

FLOOR/ROOFING SERVICES

PAINTING/HANDYMAN SERVICES

29

CLEANING SERVICES

Since 1982

FREE ESTIMATES

STAINLESS STEEL LINERS CLEANING & REPAIR SPECIALISTS

Fireplaces • Gas/Oil Chimneys • Damper Repairs Animals Humanely Removed • Draft Problems Corrected Stainless Steel Liners Installed • Waterproofing Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Caps Installed Chimneys Repaired, Rebuilt & Tuckpointing MASONRY SPECIALIST

516.766.1666 • 631.225.2600

www.chimneyking.net • Fully Licensed & Insured

NYC Lic# 2061397-DCA, Nassau County Lic# H0708010000, Suffolk County Lic# 41048-H

ROOFING/GUTTERS

BIG JOHN'S ROOFING & GUTTERS WE SHOW UP!

SENIOR DISCOUNT

25 YEARS EXPERIENCE

WESTBROOK PAINTING CORP

All Types of Roofing $ Flattops Leak Repairs GUTTER w/warranty CLEANING Flashing / Coatings

75

Specializing In Interior Painting, Plastering, Wall/ Ceiling Repair, Skim Coating, Drywall, Light Handyman Services.

646-242-6093

Licensed, Insured, Bonded

FREE E ESTIMAT

ROOFING/WINDOWS

FREE ROOF SIDING WINDOW INSPECTION CHIMNEYS GUTTERS CLEANED CLEANED

$75

$48

& UP

SAME DAY SERVICE 7 DAYS A WEEK Free Estimates • All Work Guaranteed

V&G

MAINTENANCE

Residential • Commercial • Roofing • Shingles • Flat Roofs • Slate Roofs • Siding • Gutters • Windows 45-26 220th St. • Bayside, NY 11361

(718) 423-3640

www.A-OneRoofing.com

$400 OFF

A COMPLETE ROOF (Min. 1000 sq. ft.)

718-300-4572

10% OFF

ANY ROOF REPAIR

Thomas James

ROOFING & WATERPROOFING

CONSTRUCTION 4 Generations Since 1919

• Roofing • Waterproofing • New Roofs • Roof Repairs • Flat Roof Specialist • Coatings CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE

COMPLETE HOME REMODELING

NEW

WINDOWS $99 ROOF $199

per month - no interest for 60 months - no money down

Free $50 Gift Card

w/FREE in-home estimate. No Obligation. Call for details.

800-504-5001

Licensed & Insured, Bonded, NYC Lic 0673685 Nassau Lic 3308190000 Suffolk Lic 31415-H Westchester Lic WC-18838-HOC Rockland Lic H-10639-07-38-00 Connecticut Lic HIC.0620437

AHMED

SHIVA

CONTRACTING LLC FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED

All Interior & Exterior Work • Brick Pointing • Steam Cleaning • Kitchens & Baths • Vinyl & Wood Floors • Cement & Brick Work • Sheetrock • Carpentry • Waterproofing • Roofing • Painting & Paint Stripping • Finish Basment • Ceramic

OFFICE: 917-582-8068 POWAR: 347-312-3421

shivallc@gmail.com

CONSTRUCTION CO.

Brickwork, Sidewalks, Painting, Waterproofing, Roofing, Pointing Silicone Coating, Steam Cleaning, Sheetrock T: 718.740.2532 C: 917.862.1632 Free Estimates Lic# 1001349

VISHAL: 645-595-7710

MOVING SERVICES

AFFORDABLE MOVING EXPERTS RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

Expert Packing & Crating Courteous & Always Professional Last Minute Moving Anytime & Any Place World Wide On Time, Always Dependable

718-788-5500 DOT # 36242

SUPERIOR MOVING PROFESSIONAL, RELIABLE & COURTEOUS • Big & Small Jobs • Office Relocations • Commercial & Long Distance

718-339-8888 ICC LIC#470654/US DOT 117151

718-416-5255

10% Discount for Seniors and Military

CC's · M/C · Amex · Visa · Discover

Lic & Ins • Lic #2045162-DCA • tj.roofingandwaterproofing@yahoo.com

J&S FLOOR SERVICE

• Scraping • Polyurethane • Staining • Bleaching White Floors • Waxing & Stripping • Repairs & Installation We also do Painting, Wallpaper Removal, Tiling & Dry Wall Reasonable Prices • Free Estimates

917-459-2421 718-464-4535 24/7

7 Days/wk

FREE ESTIMATES & BOX DELIVERY

TOMMY'S FLOORWORKS

Complete Hardwood Floor Service

INSTALL NEW FLOORS Sand • Stain & Refinish Old Floors OFFICE 718-830-7197 TOMMY 917-714-8825 tommysfloorworks.com tommysfloorworks@yahoo.com Licensed & Insured

PAVEMENT

OLD H.P.

WATERPROOFING & ROOFING

• Steam Cleaning & Brick Pointing • Cement & Brickwork • Stucco • Windows & Shingling • Flat Roofs • Gutters & Leaders • Painting • Scaffold Work

Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Fully Insured/Lic. #883368

(718) 969-6752 MY WAY CONSTRUCTION

FREE ESTIMATES

Call owner Eric at 917-554-3111

Lic./Bonded/ Ins. Lic# 1474297

Licensed & Insured #0906289

Windows & Doors • Siding & Roofing • Kitchen & Bath Dedicated In-House Project Managers • On-site Foreman • Products To Fit Every Budget • Full-Time Service Department • 97 Years Says It All!

Serving Queens For 16 Years Honest, Reliable & Responsible Lots Of References Available

Family Owned and Operated Since 1990

WE WILL NOT be UNDERSOLD

Roofing • Siding • Windows • Cement Work • Violations Removed • Basements & Bathrooms

PAVING THE WAY, INC.

PAINTING / PAPER HANGING Interior & Exterior Painting

Plastering • Oil Wood ReFinish Taping • Staining • Sheetrock Skim Coating • Hanging Wallpaper Removal Paint Removal • Power Washing Wood Replacement Lic & Insured #80422100000

John: Office:

516-901-9398 516-483-3669

Anthony’s 1st Class Painting & Handyman

$50

ar 28 ye nce Per Room rie w/ your own paint Expe

718-852-3481 347-457-0147

No job too big or too small. Free Estimate. Senior Citizen Discount. Work area cleaned daily. Polite, professional service.

718-352-2181 Your Friendly

HANDYMAN Painting, Wallpapering, Tiling, Clogged Tubs, Carpentry, Roofing No Job is too small for us!

William 718-793-3531

COST RITE CONTRACTING Free Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Kitchens • Bathrooms • Tile Work • Sheetrock • Painting • Wood • Doors Floors • Windows • Carpentry

718-945-6612 917-676-0021 Ken LIC# 1210212

TREE SERVICES

SEWER AND DRAIN

SEWER AND DRAIN SPECIALIST

ON ANY CLOG LINES.

Includes: Tubs, Sinks, Toilets, Kitchen Sinks, Backyard and Garage Drainage. Shower and Faucet Leaks.

ANY KIND OF LEAKS.

EMERGENCY SERVICE 24 Hours, 7 Days

718.717.9976 � 347.236.7763

BLACKTOP & CONCRETE Masonry • Roofing Sidewalks • Waterproofing Driveways • Stoops

• Fast Reliable Service • Free Estimates • Free Firewood Cut & Delivered • Expert Tree Care • Yard Cleanup • 10% Discount For Veterans & Senior Citizens

718-352-5142 • 646-934-2749

• Tree Removal • Stumps • Fertilization

Finished Basements

Luke - Boss

• Planting • Land Clearing • Topping

FREE ESTIMATES

718-809-0368

Lic./Ins.

FRANCISCO’S TREE SERVICE Office: 516-546-4971 Cell: 516-852-5415

WIRE SERVICES

LONG ISLAND BEST TREE SERVICE

TERMITE CONTROL

FILLMORE

SPECIALIZING IN:

TERMITE PEST CONTROL INC.

Land Clearing Cutback Stump Grinding

Commercial • Residential 10% Off With This Ad

718-307-9818

OWNER OPERATED OVER 40 Yrs Exp.

TREE SERVICE

LIC & INS · In Business 32 Yrs Free Estimate · Senior Citizen Disc.

Lic. # 1244131

www.fillmorepest.com

TREE REMOVAL PRUNING TOPPING & STUMP GRINDING

BATHROOMS

718-598-9754

Lic. and Insured

JIM'S TREE SERVICE

516-433-9473(WIRE) 631-667-9473(WIRE) 718-489-3926

Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866-951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.

Donate your car to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call (917) 336-1254

Elevation Trimming Taping

Tree Removal Pruning Storm Damage

Reasonable Rates • FREE ESTIMATES No Job too Big or Small

516-903-0730 • 516-505-2216 Lic/Ins

Res/Com

longislandtreeservices.com


30

Classifieds

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

HOME SERVICES

GENERAL

WANTED TO BUY

ROOFING/CONSTRUCTION

WANTED TO BUY

ABE BUYS OLD STUFF

Great Prices Paid. Silver, Paintings, Rugs, All Furniture till 1960. Estates & all contents from homes! Looking for antiques & Modern Designer Names also, Lucite & Chrome, Iron Garden furniture.

PATRICK BUYS

Tools, Toys, Trains, Fountain Pens, All Kinds of Art, Costume Jewelry, Coins, Sterling, Clocks, Watches (working or not), Photos, Snapshots, Paper Items, Military Items. All Collectibles Cleanouts Arranged - will consider items taken as part of the price

Expert Appraisals, Naval Veteran, Queens Resident • You've Seen Me on TV!!!

In Business 54 Years. Call Me 1st!

718-332-9709

MARTY PAYS TOP CASH

American & Foreign Coins Costume Jewelry and Jewelry Baseball & Basketball Items Comic Books - Stamps - Paintings Sterling Silver - Records

G. STEWART

LICENSED & BONDED, RETIRED POLICE OFFICER

ROOFING & PAINTING CONTRACTOR

• All

Types Of New Roofs • Brick Sealing • Chimney Caps • Leaf Guards

• Pest

Guards • Seamless Gutters • Gutter Cleaning • Masonry Repairs • Waterproofing

Repairs • Driveway Coating • Roof Repairs • Roof Sealing

Mr. Schiff 718-962-4593

• Siding

ATTORNEY

FREE ESTIMATES 67-43 Myrtle Ave #119 Glendale, N.Y., 11385 Statewide Service Licensed & Insured

HIC LIC#2034648

DIONISOS CONSTRUCTION CORP. GENERAL CONTRACTOR DIONISOSCONSTRUCTION@hotmail.com

Green Cards Via Marriage, Fiancé Visas, Family-Based Green Cards, Abused Spouse Waivers, Green Card Waivers for Entries Without Inspection, Citizenship, Green Card Waivers for Removal of 2 yrs via Marriage, Green Card Waivers for U.S.C. Adult Children, Visa Tourist Extensions, Embassy Processing, International Adoptions.Uncontested Divorce, Wills, Incorporations, Real Estate Closings, Leases.

90-25 161st Street, Suite 501, Jamaica, NY 11432

718-262-8032

Payment Plans . Low Fees

. Saturday Appt. Available

UNITED BUSINESS SERVICE FOR THIS MONTH ONLY

(917)476-8296 COMPLETE INTERIOR REMODELING

347-256-7981

Old Records 33 - 45 - 78

• Doo-Wop • Rockabilly • Rock & Roll • Heavy Metal • Punk • Disco • Latin • Soul • Jazz • Blues • Gospel • Reggae/Calypso • Ethnic Music • Classical • Soundtracks • No Pop Music Charlie

DIVORCE $299

ANTIQUE & ESTATE BUYERS We Pay $$CASH$$ For

• Paintings • Clocks • Watches • Estate Jewelry • Coins • Stamps • Antique Furniture • Hummels/LLadros • Records • Sterling Silver

3618 Church Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y., 11203 no spouse signature required � no court appearance required.

Immigration Tax ID $180 and up.

*the individual providing assistance to you is not an attorney licensed to practice law or accredited by the board of immigration appeals to provide representation to you before the bureau of citizenship and immigration authorities and may not give legal advice or accept fees for legal advice.

Fully Insured

IRONWORKS

CLASSICAL IRON WORKS INC.

TUTORING

Home Tutoring Experienced Teachers Reasonable Rates, Elementary Thru College, All Subjects & Exams

HIGH GRADE TUTORING SERVICE

718.740.5460 AUTO SCHOOL

ALL SEASONS AUTO SCHOOL 41-02 Bell Blvd. Suite L1 Bayside, NY 11361 5 Hour Class DDC - Course

718-225-8438

516-974-6528

ASK FOR CHRISTOPHER

1029 West Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown, L.I.

SERVING QUEENS & ENTIRE TRI-STATE AREA

We buy anything old. One Piece or house full FUNERAL HOME

REGO PARK Garage Sale

Saturday 8.25 - Sunday 8.26 10 am - 6 pm 63-105 Alderton Street

Exclusive High-End New Items, Some In Original Unopened Box. Too much to mention. Something for everyone. Will go Fast.

Rain Date: Following Weekend

FIRE DETECTOR

SAVE YOUR LIFE TODAY

Want to find an Asian woman for serious dating

Call today Install a smoke/ Fire Detector Carbon Monoxide Detector or Fire Extinguisher

Don't wait! Love is in the air. Call us to meet her now!

Ray: 929.454.1243

217-04 Northern Blvd. Bayside, 11361

212-518-7267 • 718-200-3228 Email:Startingpointdating@gmail.com webchat: findme5921 www.WeDateUSA.com

WANTED TI BUY

Diabetics OK Call for more info 516.938.2990 ext. 24 800.938.3439 ext. 24

GARAGE SALE

PERSONALS

FREE ESTIMATE

Just a few questions.

Local dog groomer w/ 32 yrs. exp. will pamper your pet in my home or yours. Fenced in yd, Daily walks, Unlimited Hugs & Kisses, References Available Lisa 917-478-5493

TOP $ PAID FOR JUDAICA COLLECTIBLES

718.941.5100 � nysdivorcehelp.com

Purchase to AGE 85

PET SITTER AVAILABLE

MILITARY COLLECTIONS:

FREE ESTIMATES!

LIFE INSURANCE NO MEDICALS

PET SITTER

Swords • Knives • Helmets

+ court fee

KITCHEN � BATHROOMS � APARTMENT RENOVATIONS WOOD FLOORING � EXTERIOR REMODELING EXCAVATION � FOUNDATION � SIDEWALK � CONCRETE ACRYLIC STUCCO � ALL TYPES OF MASONRY DOT PERMIT � VIOLATION REMOVAL

516-612-2009

House Calls & Same Day Service Available

IMMIGRATION

800-590-1309 � 718-489-4044

LIFE INSURANCE

65 Year Old MALE 5’11, 300 LBS. Looking For Open Minded Women

ATTRACTIVE YOUNG WOMAN SEEKS MATURE, WELL ESTABLISHED GENTLEMAN. (OVER 40+)

718-217-9788

Lisa: 646.523.8139

If interested call or text

FIDELIS CARE

WANTED TO BUY

ITEMS FOR SALE

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Commentary

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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Troubling Changes Coming to OCFS By EDDIE BORGES There’s a spotlight on the state Department of Corrections and Community Supervision as the October deadline nears for implementation of New York’s Raise the Age law, which will for the first time recognize some 16and 17-year-olds in the criminal justice system as minors, separating the teens from adult populations. Yet little attention has been paid to the Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS)—or to troubling changes at the agency. The woman who managed the juvenile jails when Human Rights Watch called it “the most hostile system” it had ever encountered in the world is again in charge of the system—and a co-leader on implementation of Raise the Age. Acting Deputy Commissioner for Juvenile Justice Inés Nieves, who repeatedly swore she would roll back the

Campaigns Are Missing Some Green This past week, we saw environmental issues once again pop into the news headlines, most notably, the Trump administration’s move to roll back Obamaera emission standards for cars and other vehicles. The move was condemned by pretty much all Democrats, with Gov. Andrew Cuomo crafting a scathing op-ed for the Daily News. The outrage and subsequent headlines about the perils of climate change dissipated quickly as the media, and politicians, moved on to the next enraging thing. With all the political noise going on, it is easy to forget that the most pressing and life-threatening issue of our time may very well be global warming and its impact on our society. As damaging as the Trump administration’s rhetoric has been in regard to race relations, immigration and foreign policy, his administration’s rollback of environmental protections may be the most harmful thing he has done since taking the oath of office. Democratic candidates seeking office

are often eager to talk about how horrible Trump’s presidency has been for working families, but this talk often sticks to tax breaks for the rich and declining healthcare options. While both topics are important, the candidates should add environmental degradation to their stump speeches. And, if you are running in a primary against a fellow Dem who likely has similar views on the environment, why not try to set yourself apart from your opponent by proposing bold initiatives and then hammering that home as part of your campaign? Gov. Cuomo is a great example. He has a record of proposing some of the most environmentally progressive policies in the country, including a call to make 40 percent of energy come from renewable sources by 2030. Yet, this doesn’t appear in his television campaign ads, and he hardly talks about this in his heavily orchestrated campaign stops. Sometimes leadership means cutting through the noise and talking about the really important things, even if they aren’t in the headlines.

It’s Dumb Politics, But Cuomo Should Debate Nixon This week, NY1 send out an open letter detailing its ongoing plans to try to set up a Democratic primary debate between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his challenger, Cynthia Nixon, to take place at Queens College on August 22. Four years ago, Cuomo chose not to debate Zephyr Teachout. He ended up winning easily, though the margin was a lot closer than the poll numbers had predicted. This year, he is facing a challenger with much higher name recognition, yet he still holds a commanding lead in recent polls. Traditional politic wisdom dictates that he shouldn’t debate. There is little for him to gain, considering he has spent the past eight years developing alliances and partnerships; and amassing a huge campaign warchest that allows him to plaster the airwaves with 30-second ads touting his legislative record. Getting on the stage with an accomplished actor with nothing to lose is like walking through a minefield, where success would be avoiding major gaffes. The problem is this traditional view of politics hasn’t been working well for the Democratic Party in recent years. The run-out-the-clock method didn’t work for Hillary Clinton in her presidential bid. Rep. Joe Crowley was blindsided by an influx of “unlikely” voters on whom pollsters didn’t pick up because those voters were engaged

for the first time. We don’t doubt that a number of really smart people working on the Cuomo campaign are looking at data and crunching numbers right now, and coming to the conclusion that not debating is the best way to ensure he gets 51 percent of the vote. In the end, they are probably right. But if Gov. Cuomo wants to be president (as some speculate), or if he wants to govern effectively for the final four years of his term in office, then we think he should aspire to more than a narrow victory aided by low turnout. If Gov. Cuomo thinks he is the best person to run the state of New York for four more years, then he should stand on a stage and articulate why. Sure, he will get barraged with questions about his administration’s ethical failings, but he should explain what happened and what he has done to prevent it from happening in the future. Of course he will be attacked relentlessly by Cynthia Nixon, but he should respond with appropriate gravitas and show voters he has the intelligence and temperament necessary to manage one of the biggest and most complex governments in the United States. The time for safe and calculating politics is over. Now is a time to be bold and unafraid. The bold and unafraid move is to debate.

New York’s juvenile jails. Three months later, two of Nieves’ workers sat on a rambunctious child until he stopped breathing. The following month, the New York State inspector general and the Tompkins County district attorney released the findings of a 10-month investigation that described a “near-total breakdown” in the Office of the Ombudsman intended to provide independent oversight and “serious deficiencies in mental health resources and substance abuse treatment.” Upon taking office, Carrión limited the use of restraints on children to instances in which the children might cause harm to themselves or to someone else. She also created an agency-wide restraint and incident database to track the use of violence against children. She further created a robust and model

between December 2007 and June 2010, I witnessed first hand when Nieves, then an associate commissioner, would tell those of us on Carrión’s senior leadership team that as soon as we were gone, “everything will go back to the way it always was.” The “way it was” under Nieves’ previous tenure was that children were regularly abused, their constitutional rights were violated, and 95 percent were likely to become involved in the criminal justice system again. Nieves was so fixed on the old model of juvenile justice that she could not understand why I refused to approve reprints of a Resident’s Manual that contained language indicating that children would get demerits for “rolling their eyes” or “gritting their teeth.” When Carrión was named OCFS commissioner, she conducted a nationwide search for a deputy for juvenile

Nieves could not accept the basic premise of the need to transform New York’s juvenile justice system. She spent her entire career building and managing the state’s juvenile jails—where a whole generation of children was lost. policies at the heart of the transformation of juvenile justice in New York, has moved to fulfill that pledge. According to her calendar, obtained by the Queens Tribune under the state Freedom of Information Law, Nieves has been holding meetings to review agency restraint and confinement policies, including handcuffing children. She also had a meeting to review what is a “reportable incident.” These reforms were instituted as a direct response to conditions in the juvenile jails when Gov. Eliot Spitzer named reform-minded attorney Gladys Carrión commissioner at OCFS in January 2007. Several months earlier, in September 2006, Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union published a joint report denouncing conditions in

Ombudsman’s office and a working Independent Review Board (IRB) that met in person on a regular basis. Rolling back these reforms would return New York to the dark ages of juvenile justice. OCFS refuses to release the minutes of the juvenile justice division’s Independent Review Board meetings, which might shed light on why Nieves is reviewing these policies. OCFS even refuses to release the names of the members of the IRB. Nieves objected to the transformation of juvenile justice from a “custody and control” model to a “trauma informed” model because she spent her career building and managing the old system— where a whole generation of children was lost. As the OCFS director of communications

justice. She hired a professional who had implemented reforms in Washington, D.C.; and Pennsylvania—and even for the U.S. Dept. of Justice. When she retired, Carrión promoted an associate commissioner who is a nationally recognized psychologist in the field of juvenile justice. Nieves is someone who, 10 years ago, Human Rights Watch, the state inspector general, a local district attorney and the U.S. Dept. of Justice agreed was not fit to run the system. Gov. Andrew Cuomo promoted her acting deputy commissioner for juvenile justice in January 2014. New York deserves better.

of diversity, age, and viewpoints. My Board is changing naturally, with long time members gradually leaving the Board and those positions being replaced by new people every year. There is no need to remove from the Board knowledgeable unpaid volunteers who have served with distinction and integrity over the course of several years to better their communities. I believe that this is the case for many of the Boards across the City. Term limiting will result in weaker Boards, in my opinion, because of the loss of experienced members. Every Board member must renew their membership every two years. The local City Council Member and the Borough President decide whether to re-appoint the Board member or not. If there are issues with a Board member, that member may not be reappointed. So serving on a local Board is not a lifetime appointment. It is important that all community voices are heard on our community boards. Even though Boards are only advisory in nature, all sectors of the community merit representation on those Boards. I would urge all community members who are interested, to consider joining their local Boards. Applications (they are online at queensbp.org) are filed in January, with appointments announced in March.

Editorial Board Response

Eddie Borges is a veteran political reporter and former communications director at the Office of Children and Family Services.

LETTERS To The Editor: The NYC Charter Revision Commission is currently considering various changes to the city charter that would amend various governmental practices in our city. Public hearings have been held giving the people a chance to give their opinions on governmental matters that need to be changed or improved. The Commission will then issue a report that will discuss findings and recommendations to change the city charter. These changes will be brought before the voters for their approval or disapproval in the general election. With regards to community boards, there have been proposals that community board members should be term limited. I disagree with that stance. I have served on my local community board for several years and have seen first hand the importance of experience on my Board. The institutional knowledge that our seasoned Board members possess assist with decision making with frequent regularity. Many of the experienced people on my Board have lived in their communities for long periods of time and understand the needs and workings of those communities. This year, six new members joined my Board. Last year, six other new members joined as well. We still have six vacancies on my Board. I believe that we have an excellent mix in terms

Henry Euler, Bayside

Mr. Euler, Your editorial touches on a recurring debate over the value of term limits versus the drawbacks. There is no question that term limits are a limit on the choice of voters and communities. If the people want to send the same person back to office year in and year out, they should have that right. If that right is taken away, there should first be a very compelling case to do so. In modern politics, we have seen how the lack of term limits has allowed some individuals to manipulate the system and obtain more power than many voters and constituents feel they should have. It’s the Queens Tribune editorial board’s belief that the cause of this abuse has not been a lack of term limits, but instead other flaws in the system that limit voters’ power. We think elected officials and the charter commission should probably focus on some of these other limitations on voting power first before tackling the issue of term limits.


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Classifieds

The Queens Tribune, Thursday, August 9, 2018

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