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PANHANDLE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE PLAN 2002 - 2022

Adopted by the PRPC Board August 29, 2002

This plan was funded through a solid waste management grant provided by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality through the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission. This funding does not necessarily indicate an endorsement of support of the plan findings and recommendations.


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

RESOLUTION 02-08-29-02 A RESOLUTION BY THE PANHANDLE REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION’S (PRPC) BOARD OF DIRECTORS FORMALLY ADOPTING THE 2002 PANHANDLE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN AMENDMENT AND AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TO SUBMIT THE AMENDMENT TO THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY FOR REVIEW AND FINAL APPROVAL THROUGH THE STATE OF TEXAS RULE-MAKING PROCESS. WHEREAS, Texas Senate Bill 1519 (SB 1519), enacted during the 71st Session of the Texas Legislature, called for the development of regional solid waste management plans and assigned the primary responsibility for the regional planning process to the states Councils of Governments (COGs), and WHEREAS, SB 1519 also required that the regional planning processes adhere to the guidelines established in Subchapter O of the Municipal Solid Waste Management Regulations and the Comprehensive Solid Waste Management, Resources, Recover, and Conservation Act (§363, Health & Safety Code) and that the regional plans be consistent with the State of Texas Solid Waste Management Plan, and WHEREAS, the PRPC Board of Directors did adopt such a plan on January 28, 1992, which subsequently was subsequently approved by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (now, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality or TCEQ) on October 11, 1995, and WHEREAS, the TCEQ is requiring that all the all the state’s COGs update and amend their plans in 2002 essentially following the same guidelines used to create the original regional solid waste management plans, and WHEREAS, the PRPC has amended its regional solid waste management plan in accordance with the TCEQ’s regional solid waste management planning requirements. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Directors of the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission: 1. That the 2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment has been developed in accordance with the Subchapter O Planning Guidelines and other applicable statutes as required by the TCEQ. 2. That to the extent economically and technologically feasible, the 2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Amendment does give preference to the state’s established hierarchy(ies) for the management of solid waste and municipal sludge. 3. That during the development of this amendment, due diligence has been given to ensure participation in the process by the public and other parties involved with or interested in the Panhandle’s solid waste management system.


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

4. That this amendment is intended to serve as a guidance document in assisting the region’s local governments in addressing their solid waste management needs during the next 20 years. 5. That the PRPC Board of Directors does hereby designate and adopt the attached plan as the Panhandle’s 2002 Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Amendment and authorizes the Executive Director to submit the amendment to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for review and final consideration of approval. CONSIDERED AND APPROVED THIS 29TH DAY OF AUGUST, 2002.

ATTEST:

Jack Hall, Secretary/Treasurer Panhandle Regional Planning Commission Board of Directors

Skip Huskey, Chairman Panhandle Regional Planning Commission Board of Directors


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table of Contents Plan Overview/Executive Summary

1

Regional Analysis Population and Growth Patterns

3 3 9

Economic Activity Waste Generation and Characterization Waste Generation Waste Characterization

11 11 24

Waste Management Systems Roles, Responsibilities and Institutional Arrangements Waste Disposal and Capacity Waste Transfer, Storage, Treatment, and Processing Waste Collection and Transportation Services Recycling Services Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Services Other Solid Waste Services Litter and Illegal Dumping Facility Siting Closed MSW Landfill Inventory Local Solid Waste Management Plans

26 26 27 31 35 37 46 47 47 48 50 51

Regional Goals, Objectives, and Action Plan Summary of Needs and Problems Goals and Objectives

51 51 53

Action Plan Short-Ranged Plan (2002-2006) Plan Conformance/Permit Review Grants Funding Plan Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Priorities Specific Projects Project Categories Allocation and Priorities Project Selection Process Local Solid Waste Management Plans Regional Coordination and Planning Local and Subregional Recommendations Recommended for State-Level Action Other Recommendations Medium-Ranged Plan (2007-2012) Long-Ranged Plan (2007-2012)

56 56 57 61 61 61 61 65 66 67 68 68 69 69 69 72

i


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

APPENDIXES Appendix 1: Status and Location of Permitted MSW Landfills Appendix 2: Inventory of Closed MSW Landfills Appendix 3: Other Data and Information Exhibit A: Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist List of Tables, Charts, and Maps TABLES Table 1. Population Trends and Projects: By City, County, Subregion and Region Table 2. Retail Sales 1990 – 2000 Texas Panhandle Region & Amarillo MSA

Page No. 4 9

Table 3. City of Amarillo Building Permits 1999 - 2000

10

Table 4. Landfill Disposal in the Texas Panhandle from 1998 – 2000

12

Table 5. Solid Waste Management Service Providers in the Panhandle Table 6. Estimate of the Region’s 2000 Landfill Disposal Activity by Landfill

13 16

Table 7. Estimated Regional Composition of Landfilled Waste

25

Table 8. Estimate of the Region’s 2000 Remaining Disposal Capacity by Subregion

27

Table 9. Panhandle’s Projected Landfill Consumption by 2010 Table 10. Municipal Solid Waste Tipping Fees: 1998 - 2002

29 30

Table 11. Registered Transfer Facilities Operating in the Panhandle in 2000

31

Table 12. Registered Storage & Treatment Facilities Operating in the Panhandle

31

Table 13. Panhandle’s Sludge Transporter Information

32

Table 14. Panhandle’s Private Solid Waste Haulers

35

Table 15. Panhandle’s Citizens’ Convenience Centers and Waste Drop-offs

36

Table 16. Panhandle’s Medical Waste Haulers

36

Table 17. TCEQ-Funded Waste Reduction Projects: 1996 – 2001 Table 18. Local Government Public Used Oil Collection Center Operators

37 39

Table 19. Recycling Markets Available to the Panhandle

40

Table 20. TCEQ’s Listed Recycling Markets for the Panhandle

41

CHARTS Regional Population Change 2000 – 2020

3

Panhandle Landfill Disposal Activity in 2000 by Subregion

11

Approximate Composition of Panhandle Wastestream

24

MAPS Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Subregional Planning Areas

2

Panhandle Regional Wastestream Flow Map Panhandle Region’s Local Government Recycling System

15 44

Location of Landfills and Transfer Stations in the Texas Panhandle

48

ii


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The PRPC acknowledges the efforts of the following groups who made the development of the 2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Amendment possible. The Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (RSWMAC) who gave voluntarily of their time to direct the development of this plan for the benefit of the Panhandle region. Chris Coffman, City Manager, City of Panhandle, who chaired the RSWMAC throughout the development of the 2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Amendment. All the local governments and private sector service providers in the region who contributed the data and information serving as the basis for this plan. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality which provided the funding to support the costs of developing the 2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Amendment.

iii


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

B. PLAN OVERVIEW/EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan was first developed in 1992 and then approved by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) {formerly, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC)} in 1995. Subsequently, the plan was updated in 1996 and then again, in 1998. Prior to this most current update process, the TCEQ required that the regional solid waste plans be updated every two years. From this point forward, the plan will now be updated or amended on a four-year cycle. Since its creation, and even during its initial development, the regional plan has been directed and overseen by the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (RSWMAC). An explanation of the composition of the RSWMAC and a description of the committee’s duties is shown as an attachment to this plan. For the purpose of planning regional and localized waste management initiatives, the Panhandle has been subdivided into 6 subregional planning areas. The map on the following page depicts these smaller unit planning divisions. Several significant changes to the original regional solid waste management plan are being made with this plan amendment. Firstly, as required by the TCEQ, an inventory of all closed MSW landfills in the Panhandle has been appended to this planning document. In the future, this inventory will be maintained on the PRPC’s public-access website and over time the information will be updated to reflect any new information found on one or more of the closed sites. Secondly, from this point forward, the RSWMAC’s involvement in the TCEQ’s MSW facility permitting process will be strengthened. This planning document details the enhanced role that the RSWMAC will fill in that process. Thirdly, the goals of this amended plan have been slightly modified from the way the appeared in the original solid waste management plan. This was done to reflect the changes that have occurred in this region since those goals were first authored. Finally, the life of the original regional plan ran through the year 2015. With this plan amendment, the life of the regional plan has now been extended to the year 2022. However, this particular plan amendment will only be in force until the year 2006 when it will again have to be updated in conformance with the TCEQ’s regional solid waste planning requirements. During the next four years, the region will concentrate on addressing two key solid waste management issues in the Panhandle. Those are the need to improve and enhance the region’s recycling and waste reduction efforts and the need to control and minimize illegal dumping and improper disposal practices in the Panhandle. The goals and strategies listed in the back of this document were designed to address the critical needs areas of the Panhandle’s solid waste management system. The goals and strategies have been categorized into three different groups to reflect the short-term, intermediate, and long-ranged goals of this plan. The overall purpose of this plan is help the region maintain a direction that will lead to an improved access to solid waste services in the region and ensure the continued protection of the Panhandle’s environmental resources.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Sub-Regional Planning Areas ●

Sub-Region 1

TEXHOMA

TEXLINE

Sub-Region 2

●BOOKER ● DARROUZETT FOLLETT ●

PERRYTON

HANSFORD

STRATFORD

GRUVER

DALLAM

LIPSCOMB

SHERMAN

OCHILTREE

SPEARMAN

LIPSCOMB

HIGGINS DALHART

SUNRAY

CACTUS

Sub-Region 3

● DUMAS

HARTLEY

● ● ● FRITCH

CHANNING

HEMPHILL

MIAMI

SKELLYTOWN

Sub-Region 4 CARSON

OLDHAM

ROBERTS

HUTCHINSON SANFORD BORGER

MOORE

ADRIAN

● CANADIAN

STINNETT

MOBEETIE

PAMPA

LEFORS

WHITE DEER

● WHEELER

POTTER

PANHANDLE

● VEGA

GROOM

AMARILLO

LAKE TANGLEWOOD PALISADES TIMBERCREEK

● ●

DEAF SMITH

CANYON

MCLEAN

HOWARDWICK

COLLINGSWORTH

DONLEY

CLARENDON

RANDALL

HEREFORD

● SHAMROCK

Sub-Region 5

CLAUDE

ARMSTRONG

WHEELER

GRAY

WELLINGTON

HEDLEY

FRIONA

Sub-Region 6

DIMMITT

HAPPY

PARMER

CASTRO

SWISHER

● MEMPHIS

BRISCOE HALL

SILVERTON

ESTELLINE

CHILDRESS CHILDRESS

HART FARWELL

TULIA

NAZARETH

BOVINA

LAKEVIEW

DODSON

HAPPY

KRESS

QUITAQUE

TURKEY

Page 2


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

C.

REGIONAL ANALYSIS

This portion of the plan is dedicated to describing the Panhandle region in terms of current and projected population, economic activity, waste generation, and waste composition. All of this information is important in not only forecasting future needs but also in identifying potential opportunities for furthering the goals and objectives of this plan. 1. Population and Growth Patterns The tables on the pages immediately following detail the population changes which have occurred and that are projected to occur in the Panhandle between the years 1990 – 2020. The population projections are based upon data developed by the Texas State Data Center at the conclusion of the 2000 Census. In accordance with the requirements affecting regional solid waste management plans, the data is provided at the city level, county level, subregional level and the regional level. Although this planning document runs through 2022, the population projects have been cut off at 2020 to maintain consistency with the way in which the State Data Center reports its projections. Overall, the Panhandle’s population is expected to grow by 17.8% by the year 2020. However, this growth is not expected to be consistent across the region. Subregions 1 and 4 are expected to experience the greatest growth during that period with each area’s population growing by approximately 23%. The populations of Subregions 2 and 6 will grow at a moderate pace with each area’s population increasing by roughly 12%. Subregions 3 and 5 will experience either a negligible or negative population growth. Graphically, the region’s 20-year population projections can be summarized as follows. Regional Population Change 2000 - 2020 500,000 450,000 400,000

Population

350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 Subregion 1

Subregion 2

Subregion 3 2000

Subregion 4 2010

Subregion 5

Subregion 6

Region

2020

Page 3


Table 1.

FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Population Trends and Projections: By City, County, Subregion and Region

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

1,048

1,224

1,191

1,254

1,300

16.8%

-2.7%

2.4%

6.2%

4,001

4,487

4,867

5,138

5,614

12.1%

8.5%

14.5%

25.1%

City of Texline

412

511

484

459

473

24.0%

-5.3%

-10.2%

-7.5%

Hartley County

1,127

2,431

2,493

2,541

2,594

115.7%

2.5%

4.5%

6.7%

262

356

376

399

421

35.9%

5.7%

12.0%

18.3%

2,245

2,750

2,745

2,757

2,874

22.5%

-0.2%

0.3%

4.5%

Moore County

1,736

1,886

1,917

2,167

2,354

8.6%

1.6%

14.9%

24.8%

City of Cactus

1,529

2,538

2,649

2,766

3,254

66.0%

4.4%

9.0%

28.2%

City of Dumas

12,871

13,747

14,947

16,019

18,237

6.8%

8.7%

16.5%

32.7%

City of Sunray

1,729

1,950

2,024

2,097

2,396

12.8%

3.8%

7.6%

22.9%

720

824

840

885

950

14.4%

2.0%

7.4%

15.3%

1,781

1,991

2,119

2,220

2,432

11.8%

6.5%

11.5%

22.1%

357

371

362

364

388

3.9%

-2.4%

-1.8%

4.7%

29,818

35,066

37,015

39,066

43,287

17.6%

5.6%

11.4%

23.4%

SUBREGION 2:

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

Hansford County

1,479

1,186

1,156

1,197

1,285

-19.8%

-2.5%

0.9%

8.3%

City of Gruver

1,172

1,162

1,235

1,282

1,389

-0.9%

6.2%

10.4%

19.6%

City of Spearman

3,197

3,021

3,103

3,220

3,474

-5.5%

2.7%

6.6%

15.0%

Hemphill County

1,300

1,118

1,079

1,119

1,113

-14.0%

-3.5%

0.1%

-0.4%

City of Canadian

2,420

2,233

2,326

2,377

2,398

-7.7%

4.1%

6.5%

7.4%

634

602

586

598

611

-5.0%

-2.7%

-0.6%

1.5%

SUBREGION 1: Dallam County City of Dalhart (pt.)

City of Channing City of Dalhart (pt.)

Sherman County City of Stratford City of Texhoma

SUBREGION 1 TOTALS

Lipscomb County

Page 4


Table 1.

FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Population Trends and Projections: By City, County, Subregion and Region

SUBREGION 2 (continued):

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

1,259

1,315

1,339

1,357

1,386

4.4%

1.9%

3.2%

5.4%

City of Darrouzett

370

303

292

293

299

-18.1%

-3.6%

-3.3%

-1.3%

City of Follett

429

412

408

413

422

-4.0%

-1.0%

0.3%

2.4%

City of Higgins

451

425

419

423

431

-5.8%

-1.5%

-0.6%

1.5%

Ochiltree County

1,521

1,232

1,215

1,266

1,349

-19.0%

-1.4%

2.7%

9.5%

City of Perryton

7,607

7,774

8,130

8,469

9,276

2.2%

4.6%

8.9%

19.3%

21,839

20,783

21,288

22,014

23,433

-4.8%

2.4%

5.9%

12.8%

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

Carson County

1,821

1,670

1,652

1,648

1,613

-8.3%

-1.1%

-1.3%

-3.4%

City of Groom

603

587

580

582

595

-2.7%

-1.2%

-0.8%

1.3%

City of Panhandle

2,353

2,589

2,617

2,643

2,743

10.0%

1.1%

2.1%

6.0%

City of Skellytown

674

610

587

582

549

-9.5%

-3.8%

-4.6%

-10.1%

City of White Deer

1,125

1,060

1,082

1,086

1,110

-5.8%

2.1%

2.4%

4.8%

2,503

3,468

3,356

3,324

3,283

38.6%

-3.2%

-4.1%

-5.3%

City of Lefors

647

559

537

532

517

-13.6%

-3.9%

-4.8%

-7.6%

City of McLean

858

830

828

820

820

-3.3%

-0.3%

-1.2%

-1.2%

19,959

17,887

17,655

17,487

17,368

-10.4%

-1.3%

-2.2%

-2.9%

5,293

5,181

5,125

5,350

5,375

-2.1%

-1.1%

3.3%

3.7%

City of Borger

15,675

14,302

14,319

14,324

14,527

-8.8%

0.1%

0.2%

1.6%

City of Fritch

2,335

2,235

2,354

2,383

2,441

-4.3%

5.3%

6.6%

9.2%

City of Sanford

220

203

193

195

192

-7.7%

-4.7%

-4.2%

-5.3%

City of Stinnett

2,166

1,936

2,030

2,067

2,120

-10.6%

4.8%

6.8%

9.5%

City of Booker

SUBREGION 2 TOTALS

SUBREGION 3:

Gray County

City of Pampa Hutchinson County

Page 5


Table 1.

FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Population Trends and Projections: By City, County, Subregion and Region

SUBREGION 3 (continued):

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

Roberts County

346

299

305

316

323

-13.6%

2.1%

5.8%

8.0%

City of Miami

679

588

593

614

632

-13.4%

0.8%

4.4%

7.5%

2,046

1,770

1,625

1,565

1,494

-13.5%

-8.2%

-11.6%

-15.6%

169

107

97

91

88

-36.7%

-9.0%

-15.1%

-18.0%

City of Shamrock

2,286

2,029

2,092

2,105

2,095

-11.2%

3.1%

3.7%

3.2%

City of Wheeler

1,378

1,378

1,313

1,287

1,252

0.0%

-4.8%

-6.6%

-9.1%

63,136

59,288

58,939

59,002

59,137

-6.1%

-0.6%

-0.5%

-0.3%

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

790

835

813

803

5.7%

-2.7%

-3.8%

-1.8%

1,231

1,313

1,343

1,368

820 1,420

6.7%

2.3%

4.2%

8.2%

Deaf Smith County

4,408

3,964

4,390

4,620

5,218

-10.1%

10.8%

16.5%

31.6%

City of Hereford

14,745

14,597

15,123

15,913

17,467

-1.0%

3.6%

9.0%

19.7%

Oldham County

1,203

1,090

1,131

1,182

1,227

-9.4%

3.8%

8.4%

12.6%

City of Adrian

248

159

166

172

179

-35.9%

4.3%

8.5%

12.5%

City of Vega

827

936

974

1,014

1,061

13.2%

4.1%

8.3%

13.3%

8,034

10,009

11,094

11,766

13,118

24.6%

10.8%

17.6%

31.1%

89,840

103,327

109,261

115,887

129,829

15.0%

5.7%

12.2%

25.6%

NA

210

229

243

274

NA

9.1%

15.7%

30.3%

9,619

19,554

20,849

21,951

23,858

103.3%

6.6%

12.3%

22.0%

City of Amarillo (pt.)

67,775

70,300

73,977

77,884

85,522

3.7%

5.2%

10.8%

21.7%

City of Canyon

11,365

12,875

13,789

14,518

16,125

13.3%

7.1%

12.8%

25.2%

637

825

871

918

1,008

29.5%

5.6%

11.2%

22.2%

Wheeler County City of Mobeetie

SUBREGION 3 TOTALS

SUBREGION 4: Armstrong County City of Claude

Potter County City of Amarillo (pt.) City of Bishop Hills Randall County

City of Lake Tanglewood

Page 6


Table 1.

FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Population Trends and Projections: By City, County, Subregion and Region

SUBREGION 4 (continued):

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

Village of Palisades

NA

352

397

418

456

NA

12.8%

18.8%

29.6%

Timbercreek Canyon

277

406

430

453

504

46.6%

6.0%

11.6%

24.0%

579

647

653

658

679

11.7%

0.9%

1.7%

4.9%

211,578

241,399

255,491

269,767

298,765

14.1%

5.8%

11.8%

23.8%

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

Swisher County City of Happy

SUBREGION 4 TOTALS

SUBREGION 5:

1990 Census

2000 Census

Childress County

907

900

844

793

803

-0.8%

-6.2%

-11.9%

-10.7%

City of Childress

5,046

6,788

6,902

7,054

7,174

34.5%

1.7%

3.9%

5.7%

1,026

816

776

767

767

-20.5%

-4.9%

-6.0%

-5.9%

129

115

109

110

108

-10.9%

-5.3%

-4.6%

-5.8%

2,418

2,275

2,270

2,255

2,263

-5.9%

-0.2%

-0.9%

-0.5%

1,033

1,038

1,025

1,016

996

0.5%

-1.2%

-2.1%

-4.0%

2,043

1,974

1,969

1,961

1,939

-3.4%

-0.2%

-0.7%

-1.8%

City of Hedley

415

379

372

365

353

-8.7%

-2.0%

-3.7%

-6.9%

City of Howardwick

205

437

425

422

406

113.2%

-2.8%

-3.5%

-7.0%

568

489

465

470

466

-13.9%

-5.0%

-3.8%

-4.8%

City of Estelline

177

168

154

150

146

-5.1%

-8.6%

-10.7%

-13.3%

City of Lakeview

195

152

144

143

140

-22.1%

-5.4%

-6.0%

-8.0%

City of Memphis

2,451

2,479

2,515

2,520

2,629

1.1%

1.4%

1.7%

6.0%

514

494

468

467

452

-3.9%

-5.2%

-5.5%

-8.5%

17,127

18,504

18,437

18,493

18,642

8.0%

-0.4%

-0.1%

0.7%

Collingsworth County City of Dodson City of Wellington Donley County City of Clarendon

Hall County

City of Turkey

SUBREGION 5 TOTALS

Page 7


Table 1.

FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Population Trends and Projections: By City, County, Subregion and Region

SUBREGION 6:

1990 Census

2000 Census

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

Briscoe County

671

587

571

587

611

-12.5%

-2.6%

-0.1%

4.2%

City of Quitaque

506

432

435

447

448

-14.6%

0.7%

3.4%

3.7%

City of Silverton

794

771

806

828

839

-2.9%

4.6%

7.4%

8.9%

Castro County

3,148

2,356

2,454

2,567

2,743

-25.2%

4.1%

8.9%

16.4%

City of Dimmitt

4,403

4,375

4,621

4,834

5,223

-0.6%

5.6%

10.5%

19.4%

City of Hart

1,221

1,198

1,214

1,270

1,367

-1.9%

1.3%

6.0%

14.1%

City of Nazareth

298

356

381

399

430

19.5%

7.2%

12.1%

20.7%

Parmer County

3,253

2,924

2,895

2,979

3,131

-10.1%

-1.0%

1.9%

7.1%

City of Bovina

1,549

1,874

1,899

2,022

2,147

21.0%

1.3%

7.9%

14.6%

City of Farwell

1,373

1,364

1,417

1,490

1,616

-0.7%

3.9%

9.2%

18.5%

City of Friona

3,688

3,854

4,055

4,150

4,408

4.5%

5.2%

7.7%

14.4%

Swisher County

2,102

1,788

1,748

1,662

1,460

-14.9%

-2.2%

-7.0%

-18.3%

753

826

846

855

865

9.7%

2.4%

3.5%

4.7%

4,699

5,117

5,299

5,597

6,099

8.9%

3.5%

9.4%

19.2%

28,458

27,822

28,641

29,687

31,387

-2.2%

2.9%

6.7%

12.8%

2005 Projection

2010 Projection

2020 Projection

% Change 90-00

% Change 00-05

% Change 00-10

% Change 00-20

419,811

438,029

474,651

8.3%

4.2%

8.7%

17.8%

City of Kress City of Tulia

SUBREGION 5 TOTALS

REGIONAL TOTALS

1990 Census 371,956

2000 Census 402,862

Source of Census Data: U.S. Census Bureau Source of Projections: Texas State Data Center, Dept of Rural Sociology Texas A&M University Based On: Table 1 - Race/Ethnicity by Migration Scenario for 2000-2040 in 5 year increments (SCENARIO 0.0)

Page 8


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

2. Economic Activity Despite recent signs of recession elsewhere in the state, the Panhandle economy remains fairly stable. Currently, the regional unemployment rate is hovering at about 3.5%. In simple terms, the region is basically divided into two primary economic zones; that within the Amarillo MSA (Subregion 4) and that which exists outside of the Amarillo MSA. To a certain extent both economies are intertwined and dependent upon one another and yet, have distinctly different characters. Nevertheless, the economy of the Amarillo MSA is the more dominant of the two. The economy of the Amarillo MSA is more retail and manufacturing based while outside the MSA, the economy is more reliant on agriculture. Albeit, much of the MSA’s retail activity can be attributed to Panhandle residents from outside the MSA who travel to Amarillo to make purchases. The table below describes the level of retail activity that took place in the Panhandle region between 1990 and 2000. As can be seen, the Amarillo MSA share of that activity has grown by 5% during that period and now commands nearly 70% of the region’s retail trade. During the report period, the amount of retail activity within the MSA grew by 62.87%. At the same time, the level of retail sales outside the MSA increased by 27.94%. Overall, the region’s retail trade grew by 50.2% during the past ten years. Table 2.

Retail Sales 1990 - 2000 Texas Panhandle Region & Amarillo MSA

Report Year 1

Total Panhandle Region

Amarillo MSA Only

Amarillo MSA %

1990

$ 2,797,574,030

$ 1,783,049,215

64%

1991

$ 2,934,299,988

$ 1,928,061,149

66%

1992

$ 3,063,931,634

$ 1,901,734,526

62%

1993 1994

$ 3,185,270,872 $ 3,443,278,420

$ 2,059,227,303 $ 2,277,316,851

65% 66%

1995

$ 3,555,911,041

$ 2,386,614,252

67%

1996

$ 3,692,203,484

$ 2,459,887,553

67%

1997

$ 3,761,284,459

$ 2,500,777,471

1998

$ 3,783,557,499

$ 2,560,790,842

66% 68%

1999

$ 3,957,583,910

$ 2,717,231,479

69%

2000

$ 4,201,980,281

$ 2,904,047,800

69%

Amarillo continues to aggressively pursue diverse economic growth and was recently designated as a Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ). The FTZ benefits local companies conducting business internationally and allows import/export activity more expediently and at a reduced expense. This should open the door for even more manufacture/production activity in the future.

1

Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

Page 9


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

The Amarillo construction market continues to be strong, fueled by population increases and hail storms that have struck the area in recent years. The table below indicates the amount of construction activity that took place in Amarillo alone during 1999 - 2000. Table 3. Report 2 Year

City of Amarillo Building Permits 1999 - 2000 Total Value of all # of Resident Total Value of # of NonPermits Permits Resident Permits Resident Permits

Total Value of NonResidential Permits

1999

$264,506,279

515

$69,771,199

62

$69,010,888

2000

$244,017,916

521

$69,320,155

126

$43,772,809

NOTE: The Total Value of all Permits column contains the total value of all building permits whether for new buildings, additions, remodeling, roofing or whatever. The other columns contain information on new buildings only and exclude all other permits.

Outside of Amarillo, since 1998 new construction starts have been somewhat of an infrequent event. However, wide portions of the region have recently been affected by damaging hail storms and tornadic activity. Dalhart and Spearman reported dramatic increases in their landfill disposal rates during 2000. In both instances, the cause was attributed to an influx of C&D material created by spring storms. Outside the MSA, the most visible area of economic growth has been in livestock production. Large dairy and swine operations are becoming more numerous in the region, particularly in the northern Panhandle counties. These new production facilities are creating new jobs and contributing to the local economies. The office of the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts is responsible for forecasting economic activity in Texas. Based on the agency’s new 13-region economic model of Texas, employment in the High Plains region (which covers a 41-county area including the Amarillo and Lubbock MSAs) is projected to grow at a 1.7 percent annual rate, up somewhat from the 1.2 percent rate seen from 1995 to 2000. Based on historical data maintained since 1970, the Comptroller projects improving economic growth for the region. The next five years should see growth in line with that seen during the early 1990s. 3 In the context of solid waste management, the region’s landfill operators can expect to see increases in the annual amounts of waste disposed of during the next five years. The landfills operated by Amarillo and BFI are two prime examples. Since the last regional plan update was completed, these two facilities have combined to accept 101,897 more tons of waste in 2000 than what they collectively accepted in 1998. If this trend continues, the life expectancies of some of the region’s landfills may be cut much shorter than currently expected. In some instances, it can take up to five years to permit and construct a new landfill facility. Local government officials would do well to monitor population and economic projections and changes, checking that information against their current year disposal rates to determine if and when a new facility is warranted and how that new facility, if needed, should be sized.

2 3

Source: City of Amarillo Source: Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts; Texas Regional Outlook

Page 10


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

3. Waste Generation and Characterization a.

WASTE GENERATION

This section begins by providing an overview of waste generation patterns in the Panhandle based upon (1) the landfill disposal rates reported by the region’s landfill operators to the TCEQ and (2) the sources of waste being accepted by those landfills. An attempt is also made to assign a per capital daily (PCD) disposal rate to each entity in the region The Panhandle’s waste management system is somewhat self-contained. There is only a minimal amount of waste importation and exportation occurring in the region. Generally speaking, the amount of waste being exported from the region is off-set by the amount of waste being imported into the region. As was done with the 2000 plan update, the region’s local governments were surveyed to determine where their wastes were being landfilled. A user population was identified for each landfill and then, a PCD rate was derived for each entity using the landfill. The PCD rate equation factored the total amount of waste disposed of at a facility versus the number of residents generating the wastes going into the landfill. Innate knowledge of the areas being served was used to refine the final PCD projections. One factor complicating a more accurate determination of the individual PCD rates is the fact that landfills such as BFI accept wastes from across the region. Also, in certain cases (e.g., Hereford and Shamrock) some communities use multiple landfills to meet their disposal needs. Because of that, it is difficult to accurately attribute volumes of wastes to the responsible generators. Some assumptions had to be made in order align all of the region’s waste generating entities for the sake of comparison and to begin developing observations regarding the impact of the region’s waste reduction efforts. These assumptions will be explained in further detail using the tables found on the following pages. The first step taken to define the Panhandle’s updated disposal rates was to quantify the total amounts of waste being deposited into each of the landfills in the region. This information was obtained through the regional survey and is listed on table shown on the following page. The chart below basically summarizes where the region’s waste was landfilled during 2000. Panhandle Landfill Disposal Activity in 2000 by Subregion Subregion 3 10% Subregion 2 2% Subregion 1 5% Subregion 6 3% Subregion 5 3%

Subregion 4 77%

Page 11 Subregion 3 10% Subregion 2


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 4.

Landfill Disposal in the Panhandle from 1998 - 2000

Entity Name 1. Dalhart 2. Dumas

Entity Type City of City of

3. Hartley County of 4. Boy’s Ranch Non-Profit 1

Permit No. 1038 211 787 791

Subregion 1 1 1 1

Landfill Type 1AE 1

1998 Tons 10,414 15,391

2000 Tons 15,881 13,340

Difference 5,467 -2,051

% Change 52.5% -13.3%

4AE 4AE

43 100

93 100

50 0

116.3% 0.0%

Booker Perryton Spearman McLean Pampa Pampa 10. Panhandle 11. Shamrock

City of City of City of City of City of City of City of City of

1943 876 338 570 589 2238 1164 244

2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3

1AE 1AE 1AE 1AE 1 1 1AE 4AE

1,943 5,895 3,323 849 0 53,928 2,353 1,899

1,709 5,765 5,104 849 390 48,388 2,353 250

-234 -130 1,781 0 390 -5,540 0 -1,649

-12.0% -2.2% 53.6% 0.0% NA -10.3% 0.0% -86.8%

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

City of County of BFI Landfill City of City of City of

73 414 1663 215 2263 2266 955 445 749 1009

4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6

1 4AE 1 4AE 1AE 1AE

208,848 150 100,418 5,599 4,686 4,290

239,991 150 171,172 5,023 5,445 4,810

31,143 0 70,754 -576 759 520

14.9% 0.0% 70.5% -10.3% 16.2% 12.1%

1AE 1AE 1AE 1AE

5,080 7,856 0 6,658

4,052 7,335 0 7,107

-1,028 -521 0 449

-20.2% -6.6% NA 6.7%

439,623

539,207

99,584

22.7%

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Amarillo Armstrong Southwest Hereford Childress Memphis

18. Wellington 19. Dimmitt 20. Tulia Tulia

City of City of City of City of

Two-Year Disposal Summary: 1

– The Cal Farley Boy’s Ranch landfill is shown here only to provide a complete listing of all permitted facilities in the region. However, since it is only used for limited disposal purposes, the facility is not recognized in this plan for generation/disposal purposes.

Page 12


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

The next step in the process was to determine where the waste being deposited into each landfill was coming from. Again, the recent regional solid waste survey was able to provide this information. The following table shows where each entity’s waste is being landfilled and identifies who is responsible for getting the waste to the landfill. Table 5.

Solid Waste Management Service Providers in the Panhandle Subregion

Collection Provider

Landfill Used BFI

Transfer Station Used

City of Cactus

1

BFI

City of Cactus

City of Channing

1

Tri-State Recycling Amarillo

Direct hauled

City of Dalhart

1

City of Dalhart

Dalhart

Direct hauled

City of Dumas

1

City of Dumas

Dumas

Direct hauled

City of Stratford

1

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Sunray

1

City of Sunray

Dumas

Direct hauled

City of Texhoma

1

Texhoma, OK

Guymon

Direct hauled

City of Texline

1

Tri-State Recycling Amarillo

Direct hauled

City of Booker

2

City of Booker

Booker

Direct hauled

City of Canadian

2

City of Canadian

Pampa

City of Canadian

City of Darrouzett

2

City of Darrouzett

Booker

Direct hauled

City of Follett

2

City of Follett

Booker

Canadian (occas.)

City of Gruver

2

City of Gruver

Spearman

Direct hauled

City of Higgins

2

City of Higgins

Pampa

Canadian (occas.)

City of Perryton

2

City of Perryton

Perryton

Direct hauled

City of Spearman

2

City of Spearman

Spearman

Direct hauled

City of Borger

3

City of Borger

Pampa

City of Borger

City of Fritch

3

BFI

Pampa

Direct hauled

City of Groom

3

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Lefors

3

City of Lefors

Pampa

Direct hauled

City of McLean

3

City of McLean

McLean

Direct hauled

City of Miami *

3

Self-hauled

BFI

Compact Station

City of Mobeetie

3

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Pampa

3

City of Pampa

Pampa

Direct hauled

City of Panhandle

3

City of Panhandle

Panhandle

Direct hauled

City of Sanford

3

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Shamrock

3

City of Shamrock

City

Direct hauled

City of Skellytown

3

City of Skellytown

Pampa

Direct hauled

City of Stinnett

3

City of Stinnett

Pampa

City of Borger

City of Wheeler

3

BFI

Pampa

Direct hauled

City of White Deer

3

City of White Deer

Pampa

Direct hauled

Page 13


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 5 (continued) Subregion

Collection Provider

Landfill Used

Transfer Station Used

City of Adrian

4

BFI

Amarillo

Direct hauled

City of Amarillo

4

City of Amarillo

Amarillo

City of Amarillo

City of Bishop Hills

4

Individual Contract

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Canyon

4

City of Canyon

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Claude

4

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Happy

4

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Hereford

4

City of Hereford

City/BFI

Direct hauled

Lake Tanglewood

4

Individual Contract

BFI

Direct hauled

Timbercreek Canyon

4

Individual Contract

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Vega

4

City of Vega

Amarillo

Direct hauled

City of Childress

5

City of Childress

Childress

Direct hauled

City of Clarendon

5

City of Clarendon

Memphis

Direct hauled

City of Dodson

5

City of Wellington

Wellington

Direct hauled

City of Estelline

5

Self-hauled

Wellington

Direct hauled

City of Hedley

5

City of Hedley

Wellington

Direct hauled

City of Howardwick

5

City of Clarendon

Pampa

Direct hauled

City of Lakeview

5

City of Memphis

Wellington

Direct hauled

City of Memphis

5

City of Memphis

Memphis

Direct hauled

City of Turkey

5

Superior Sanitation Tulia

Direct hauled

City of Wellington

5

City of Wellington

Wellington

Direct hauled

City of Bovina

6

Duncan Disposal

Clovis

Direct hauled

City of Dimmitt

6

City of Dimmitt

Dimmitt

Direct hauled

City of Farwell

6

Duncan Disposal

Clovis

Direct hauled

City of Friona

6

BFI

BFI

Direct hauled

City of Hart

6

City of Hart

Dimmitt

Direct hauled

City of Kress

6

Superior Sanitation Tulia

Direct hauled

City of Nazareth

6

City of Nazareth

Direct hauled

City of Quitaque

6

Superior Sanitation Tulia

Direct hauled

City of Silverton

6

City of Silverton

Tulia

Direct hauled

City of Tulia

6

City of Tulia

Tulia

Direct hauled

Dimmitt

* - The City of Miami operates a compactor leased from BFI. Residents self-haul to the station. The map on the following page depicts the Panhandle’s current wastestream flow and illustrates where each of the region’s local government’s solid waste is currently being landfilled. The next step in the process was to assign an appropriate share of each landfill’s waste back to the cities and counties that reportedly disposed of their waste in the facility. Page 14


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Panhandle Regional Wastestream Flow Map TO GOODWELL, OK

BFI

TO CLOVIS, NM

LEGEND:

TRANSFER STATION

LANDFILL

WASTE FLOW LINE

Page 15


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Some assumptions were made regarding the amount of waste being contributed by each entity to their respective landfill based on PRPC staff’s understanding of the area being served by each facility. These per city PCD rates may be somewhat imprecise. However, when the PCD rates for each entity are converted into annual disposal tons and totaled with the annual disposal tons from each other entity using the landfill, the total approximates the total annual landfilled tons reported by the landfill operator. Where county resident numbers are reported, only a percentage of the county’s residents are actually included in the count. It’s assumed that many county residents still burn their trash so this waste is not making it into the waste stream. In recent years however, more county residents are showing a greater inclination toward having their waste properly disposed of. In counties where a landfill is located, the percentage of residents accounted for in the PCD evaluation was greater than the percentage used for counties that do not have a landfill. Wherever possible, the numbers assigned to the individual entities was cross-referenced with information provided on the regional solid waste surveys. Table 6.

Estimate of the Region’s 2000 Landfill Disposal Activity by Landfill

CITY OF AMARILLO TYPE 1 LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Population

5

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

73 LBs/person/ day

1

City of Channing

356

356

325

5.0

1

City of Texline

511

511

465

5.0

1

Dallam County (pt)

1,224

408

410

5.5

1

Hartley County (pt)

2,431

608

550

5.0

3

Carson County (pt)

1,670

557

555

5.5

3

Hutchinson County (pt)

5,181

1,036

1,035

5.5

4

City of Amarillo

173,627

173,627

223,859

7.1

4

Clements Prison Unit4

3,589

3,589

3,930

6.0

1,344

1,344

1,472

6.0

5

4

Neal Prison Unit

4

Village of Bishop Hills

208

208

210

5.5

4

City of Vega

936

936

935

5.5

4

Armstrong County (pt)

835

835

755

5.0

4

Deaf Smith County (pt)

3,964

991

990

5.5

4

Oldham County (pt)

1,090

545

550

5.5

4

Potter County (pt)

10,009

2,002

2,000

5.5

4

Randall County (pt)

19,554

1,955

1,950

5.5

226,529

189,508

239,991

TOTALS 4

Permit No.

Source. Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Source. Ibid.

Page 16


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) BFI SOUTHWEST TYPE 1 LANDFILL SubUser Name region

Permit No.

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

1663 LBs/person/ day

1

City of Cactus

2,538

2,538

2700

5.8

1

City of Stratford

1,991

1,991

1,990

5.5

1

City of Sunray (pt)

1,950

1,950

450

1.3

1

Dallam County (pt)

1,224

408

410

5.5

1

Hartley County (pt)

2,431

1,580

1,450

5.0

1

Sherman County (pt)

824

412

415

5.5

1

Moore County (pt)

1,886

1,320

1,250

5.2

3

City of Sanford

203

203

205

5.5

3

Carson County (pt)

1,670

557

560

5.5

3

Hutchinson County (pt)

5,181

1,554

1,550

5.5

4

City of Adrian

159

159

160

5.5

4

City of Canyon

12,875

12,875

14,200

6.0

4

City of Claude

1,313

1,313

1,325

5.5

4

City of Hereford (pt)

14,597

14,597

11,880

4.5

4

City of Happy

647

647

650

5.5

4

Lake Tanglewood

825

825

830

5.5

4

Village of Palisades

352

352

355

5.5

4

Timbercreek Canyon

406

406

410

5.5

4

WTA&MU

6

3,375

3,375

3,700

6.0

4

Deaf Smith County (pt)

3,964

2,973

2,990

5.5

4

Oldham County (pt)

1,090

545

550

5.5

4

Potter County (pt)

10,009

8,007

8,100

5.5

4

Randall County (pt)

19,554

17,599

17,800

5.5

5

Donley County (pt)

1,038

519

525

5.5

6

City of Friona

3,854

3,854

3,900

5.5

6

Parmer County (pt)

2,924

2,047

2,050

5.5

NA

NA

5,000

NA

402,842

402,842

85,767

1.1

100,180

85,906

171,172

OR All

NM/OK Imports Regional Commercial/ Industrial Waste TOTALS

OR – Out-of-Region 6

Source. WEST TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY - 1999-2001 (Total Student Body: 6,750)

Page 17


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) CITY OF BOOKER TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

Permit No.

2000 Population

2

City of Booker

2

Estimated User Pop.

LBs/person/ day

1,315

1,315

1,126

4.7

City of Darrouzett

303

303

225

4.1

2

City of Follett

412

412

320

4.3

2

Lipscomb County (pt)

602

50

38

4.2

2,632

2,080

1,709

TOTALS

CITY OF CHILDRESS TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Population

5

City of Childress

5

Childress County (pt)

5

Roach Prison Unit

7

TOTALS

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

SubUser Name region

2000 Disp. Amount

2263 LBs/person/ day

6,788

6,788

3,500

2.8

900

90

75

4.6

1,708

1,708

1,870

6.0

9,396

8,586

5,445

CITY OF DIMMITT TYPE 1AE LANDFILL

Permit No.

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

445 LBs/person/ day

6

City of Dimmit

4,375

4,375

4,275

5.4

6

City of Hart

1,198

1,198

1,190

5.4

6

City of Nazareth

356

356

350

5.4

6

Castro County (pt)

2,336

1,635

1,520

5.1

8,265

7,564

7,335

TOTALS

CITY OF DUMAS TYPE 1 LANDFILL SubUser Name region

7

2000 Disp. Amount

1943

Permit No.

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

211 LBs/person/ day

1

City of Dumas

13,747

13,747

12,015

4.8

1

City of Sunray

1,950

1,950

1,200

3.4

Source. Ibid.

Page 18


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) CITY OF DUMAS TYPE 1 LANDFILL (continued) SubUser Name region 1

2000 Population

Moore County (pt) TOTALS

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

1,886

189

125

17,583

15,886

13,340

LBs/person/ day 3.6

CITY OF CLOVIS LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

LBs/person/ day

6

City of Bovina

1,874

1,874

1,725

5.0

6

City of Farwell

1,364

1,364

1,250

5.0

6

Parmer County (pt)

2,924

731

625

4.7

6,162

3,969

3,600

TOTALS

CITY OF DALHART TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

Permit No.

2000 Population

1

City of Dalhart

1

Dalhart Prison Unit 8

1

Dallam County (pt)

1

Hartley County (pt)

1

Sherman County (pt) TOTALS

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

1038 LBs/person/ day

7,237 1,332

7,237 1,332

13,461

10.2

1,450

6.0

1,224 2,431

408

375

5.0

243

220

5.0

824

412

375

5.0

13,048

9,632

15,881

CITY OF GOODWELL, OK LANDFILL SubUser Name region 1

2000 Population

City of Texhoma TOTALS

8

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

371

371

340

371

371

340

LBs/person/ day 5.0

Source. Ibid.

Page 19


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) CITY OF HEREFORD TYPE 4AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Population

4

City of Hereford

4

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

215 LBs/person/ day

14,597

14,597

4,550

1.7

Deaf Smith County (pt)

3,964

1,982

473

1.3

TOTALS

18,561

16,579

5,023

CITY OF McLEAN TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

Permit No.

2000 Population

3

City of McLean

3

Gray County TOTALS

Estimated User Pop. 830

750

5.0

3,468

347

99

1.6

4,298

1,177

849

Permit No.

2000 Population

5

City of Clarendon

5

LBs/person/ day

830

CITY OF MEMPHIS TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Disp. Amount

570

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

2266 LBs/person/ day

1,974

1,974

1,860

5.2

City of Howardwick

437

437

400

5.0

5

City of Lakeview

152

152

110

4.0

5

City of Memphis

2,479

2,479

2,335

5.2

5

Hall County (pt)

489

147

105

3.9

5,531

5,189

4,810

TOTALS

CITY OF PAMPA TYPE 1 LANDFILL SubUser Name region 2

City of Canadian

2

Permit No.

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

589 & 2238 LBs/person/ day

2,233

2,233

2,305

5.7

City of Darrouzett

303

303

178

3.2

2

City of Follett

412

412

412

5.5

2

City of Higgins

425

425

167

2.2

2

Hemphill County (pt)

1,118

559

450

4.4

2

Lipscomb County (pt)

602

50

25

2.7

Page 20


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) CITY OF PAMPA TYPE 1 LANDFILL (continued) SubUser Name region

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

LBs/person/ day

3

City of Borger

14,302

14,302

16,000

6.1

3

City of Fritch

2,235

2,235

2,200

5.4

3

City of Groom

587

587

505

4.7

3

City of Lefors

559

559

261

2.6

3

City of Miami

588

588

275

2.6

3

City of Mobeetie

107

107

75

3.8

3

City of Pampa

17,887

17,887

20,289

6.2

3

Jordan Prison Unit 9

994

994

1,088

6.0

3

City of Skellytown

610

610

646

5.8

3

City of Stinnett

1,936

1,936

1,325

3.8

3

City of Wheeler

1,378

1,378

1,250

5.0

3

City of White Deer

1,060

1,060

577

3.0

3

Gray County (pt)

3,468

347

250

4.0

3

Hutchinson Co. (pt)

5,181

518

250

2.6

3

Roberts County (pt)

299

150

90

3.3

3

Wheeler County (pt)

1,770

266

160

3.3

58,054

47,505

48,778

TOTALS

CITY OF PANHANDLE TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Population

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

1164 LBs/person/ day

3

City of Panhandle

2,589

2,589

2,260

4.8

3

Carson County (pt)

1,670

167

93

3.1

4,259

2,756

2,353

TOTALS

CITY OF PERRYTON TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region 2 9

2000 Disp. Amount

City of Perryton

2000 Population 7,774

Permit No. Estimated User Pop. 7,774

2000 Disp. Amount 5,675

876 LBs/person/ day 4.0

Source. Ibid.

Page 21


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) CITY OF PERRYTON TYPE 1AE LANDFILL (continued) SubUser Name region 2

2000 Population

Ochiltree County (pt) TOTALS

Estimated User Pop.

1,232

123

90

9,006

7,897

5,765

CITY OF SHAMROCK

Permit No.

SubUser Name region

2000 Population

3

City of Shamrock

2,029

3

Wheeler County

1,770 3799

Estimated User Pop.

SubUser Name region

2000 Population

LBs/person/ day 4.0

244

2000 Disp. Amount

LBs/person/ day

220

0.6

177

30

0.9

2206

250

2,029

CITY OF SPEARMAN TYPE 1AE LANDFILL

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

338 LBs/person/ day

2

City of Gruver

1,162

1,162

1,130

5.3

2

City of Spearman

3,021

3,021

3,090

5.6

2

Hansford County (pt)

1,186

890

960

5.9

5,369

5,073

5,180

TOTALS

CITY OF TULIA TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

10

2000 Disp. Amount

Permit No.

2000 Population

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

749 & 1009 LBs/person/ day

5

City of Turkey

494

494

265

2.9

6

City of Kress

826

826

430

2.9

6

City of Quitaque

432

432

225

2.9

6

City of Silverton

771

771

501

3.6

6

City of Tulia

5,117

5,117

4,736

5.1

513

513

562

6.0

10

6

Tulia Transfer Prison

6

Briscoe County (pt)

587

117

70

3.3

6

Swisher County (pt)

1,788

268

155

3.2

Source. Ibid.

Page 22


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 6 (continued) CITY OF TULIA TYPE 1AE LANDFILL (continued) SubUser Name region OR

2000 Population

Hale County (pt) TOTALS

Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

7,902

277

163

18,430

8,815

7,107

LBs/person/ day 3.2

OR – Out-of-Region

CITY OF WELLINGTON TYPE 1AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region

2000 Population

3

City of Shamrock

5

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

955 LBs/person/ day

2,029

2,029

1,652

4.5

City of Dodson

115

115

65

3.1

5

City of Estelline

168

168

100

3.3

5

City of Hedley

379

379

300

4.3

5

City of Wellington

2,275

2,275

1,695

4.1

5

Collingsworth Co. (pt)

816

408

240

3.2

5,782

5,374

4,052

TOTALS

ARMSTRONG COUNTY TYPE 4AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region 4

2000 Population

Armstrong County TOTALS

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

835

418

150

835

418

150

HARTLEY COUNTY TYPE 4AE LANDFILL SubUser Name region 1 1

2000 Population

City of Channing

2000 Disp. Amount

Permit No. Estimated User Pop.

2000 Disp. Amount

414 LBs/person/ day 2.0

787 LBs/person/ day

356

356

63

1.0

2,431

122

30

1.4

2,787

478

93

2000 REGIONAL TOTALS:

427,042

543,223

Hartley County (pt) TOTALS

7.0

Page 23


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Several other assumptions were made in deriving this regional breakdown. BFI and other private collection haulers pick up much of the commercial/industrial waste being generated across the region and a large percentage of the waste is eventually deposited into the BFI landfill. There is no way of accurately determining where this waste is coming from so it is assumed that the region is equally responsible for this material. Therefore, the 85,767 tons of Regional Commercial/ Industrial Waste associated with the BFI Southwest Landfill has, for the purpose of establishing an equitable region-wide PCD rate, been allocated back equally to the entire regional population. Also, the wards of the region’s state prison units and university are listed as separate populations to distinguish them from the Panhandle’s permanent residents. Fifty percent of the 2000 WTA&MU student body population is considered to be non-resident. b. WASTE CHARACTERIZATION Listed on the following page is an approximate break-down of the composition of the Panhandle’s wastestream. No actual waste composition studies have been conducted in the Panhandle as they are extremely costly and time consuming. This break-down represents a composite of various relevant waste composition analyses. It draws from actual waste studies conducted by the state of California, by Franklin Associates and R.W. Beck and Associates. Graphically, the region’s waste stream can be summarized as follows. APPROXIMATE COMPOSITION OF PANHANDLE WASTESTREAM

HHW Wastes 0.3%

Special Waste 4.1%

Mixed Residue 1.8%

C&D Wastes 13.4%

Paper 35.3%

Organics 27.4%

Glass 3.7% Plastic 8.4%

Metal 5.5% Page 24


Table 7.

FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Estimated Regional Composition of Landfilled Waste: Averaged Representation by Weight

Paper Uncoated Corrugated Cardboard Paper Bags Newspaper White Ledger Paper Colored Ledger Paper Computer Paper Other Office Paper Magazines and Catalogs Phone Books and Directories Other Miscellaneous Paper Other Paper

7.10% 0.70% 6.60% 2.30% 0.20% 0.40% 1.70% 1.90% 0.40% 4.40% 9.60% Total Paper Wastes

Other Organic Food Leaves & Grass Prunings & Trimmings Branches & Stumps Textiles Other Organics Total Other Organics

35.3%

Glass Clear Glass Bottles & Containers 1.40% Green Glass Bottles & Containers 0.40% Brown Glass Bottles & Containers 1.40% Other Colored Glass Bottles & Containers 0.05% Flat Glass 0.10% Mixed Glass 0.40% Total Glass Wastes

3.75%

Metal Tin/Steel Cans Major Appliances Other Ferrous Metal Aluminum Cans Other Non-Ferrous Metal Other Metals

Plastic HDPE Containers PETE Containers Miscellaneous Plastic Containers Film Plastic Durable Plastic Items Other Plastics

1.70% 0.10% 2.40% 0.70% 0.40% 0.20% Total Metal Wastes

0.80% 0.50% 0.70% 2.40% 1.80% 2.20% Total Plastic Wastes

5.50%

Construction & Demolition Concrete Asphalt Paving Asphalt Roofing Lumber Gypsum Board Rock, Soil & Fines Other Construction & Demolition

Household Hazardous Waste Paint Vehicle & Equipment Fluids Used Oil Batteries Other HHW

Special Waste Ash Sewage Solids Industrial Sludge Treated Medical Waste Bulky Items Tires Other Special Waste

Mixed Residue 8.40%

7.90% 8.70% 2.20% 0.20% 1.50% 6.90% 27.40%

1.20% 0.10% 2.40% 4.90% 1.10% 1.30% 2.40% Total C&D Wastes

13.40%

0.11% 0.01% 0.01% 0.10% 0.10% Total HHW Wastes

0.33%

0.10% 1.00% 0.01% 0.01% 1.80% 0.40% 0.80% Total Special Wastes

4.12%

1.80%

1.80%

COMPOSITION TOTALS

100.00%

Source. California 1999 Statewide Composition Study and 1993 R.W. Beck & Associate’ regional analysis of the Panhandle wastestream.

Page 25


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

4. Waste Management System Table 5 above supplies a summary of the various entities providing the region’s solid waste management services. The information on the table represents a vast improvement over the conditions that prevailed at the time the original regional solid waste management plan was developed. In 1993, seven Panhandle communities made no provisions for the collection of solid waste. Residents in very small rural communities and many in the counties relied on burn barrels as the chief means for eliminating their household wastes. Today, whether provided by a municipality or by a private hauler, each community in the Panhandle now has access to collection services on at least a once per week basis. a. ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS The management of solid waste in the region involves a cooperative effort among a variety of federal state, regional and local entities. At the Federal level, solid waste activities in the region are regulated by several different entities including:  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (federal MSW management policies, regulation,

potential grant funding)  Federal Aviation Administration (siting of solid waste activities in close proximity to

airports)  U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (construction of facilities in flood plains and wetlands)  Fish and Wildlife Service (habitats of threatened or endangered species)  Soil Conservation Service (rural solid waste management)

At the State level, agencies involved in regulating and tracking solid waste management activities in the Panhandle include:  Texas Department of Transportation (waste transportation)  Texas Historical Commission (activities impacting archeological resources)  Texas Railroad Commission (oil and gas waste management)  Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (MSW and industrial waste management)

At the Local level, solid waste management activities are regulated or coordinated by:  City and County governments (providing or contracting for solid waste services, enacting

and enforcing local solid waste regulations)  Panhandle Regional Planning Commission (regional solid waste planning, administration

of the regional solid waste grants program)

Page 26


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

b. WASTE DISPOSAL AND CAPACITY The following tables provide a view of the remaining capacity available in the region’s landfill benchmarked from the base year of 2000. The capacity information is presented by subregion. Table 8.

Estimate of the Region’s 2000 Remaining Disposal Capacity by Subregion Capacity Available

SUBREGION 1 LANDFILL FACILITIES 1

Tons

Hartley County (Type 4AE) City of Dalhart City of Dumas 2 City of Dumas Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch (Type 4AE) TOTALS: 1 2

1,210,136 tons

260.5 17.2 3.1 60.0 313.0

years years years years years

39.5 years

Capacity Available Tons

City of Booker City of Perryton City of Spearman TOTALS

Years

72,669 tons 85,141 tons 183,695 tons

42.5 years 14.8 years 36.0 years

341,505 tons

27.2 years

Capacity Available

SUBREGION 3 LANDFILL FACILITIES 1

Tons

City of McLean City of Pampa (#589) City of Pampa (#2238) City of Panhandle City of Shamrock (Type 4AE) 1 City of Shamrock 2

215,249 212,798 4,436,200 174,009 7,610 108,000 TOTALS

2

tons tons tons tons tons

- Total Years Available calculation only considers Type 1 or Type 1AE landfill capacity. - The City of Dumas recently received a permit to construct a new Type 1AE facility. Once built, the facility will have an estimated 60 years of capacity.

SUBREGION 2 LANDFILL FACILITIES

1

24,230 273,399 41,207 840,000 31,300

Years

tons tons tons tons tons tons

5,153,866 tons

Years 253.5 4.4 91.7 74.0 30.4 60.0

years years years years years years

95.9 years

- Total Years Available calculation only considers Type 1 or Type 1AE landfill capacity. - The City of Shamrock recently received a permit to construct a new Type 1AE facility. Once built, the facility will have an estimated 60 years of capacity.

Page 27


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 8 (continued) Capacity Available

SUBREGION 4 LANDFILL FACILITIES 1

Tons

City of Amarillo BFI Southwest Landfill Armstrong County (Type 4AE) City of Hereford (Type 4AE)

12,744,030 3,467,883 82,050 170,896

Years

tons tons tons tons

TOTALS: 16,464,859 tons 1

53.1 20.3 547.0 34.0

years years years years

39.4 years

- Total Years Available calculation only considers Type 1 or Type 1AE landfill capacity.

Capacity Available

SUBREGION 5 LANDFILL FACILITIES

Tons

City of Childress City of Memphis City of Wellington TOTALS

Years

1,040,592 tons 508,273 tons 263,082 tons

191.1 years 105.7 years 64.9 years

1,811,947 tons

126.6 years

Capacity Available

SUBREGION 6 LANDFILL FACILITIES

Tons

City of Dimmitt City of Tulia (#1009) City of Tulia (#749) TOTALS

Years

522,373 tons 800 tons 405,800 tons

71.2 years 0.1 years 57.1 years

928,973 tons

64.3 years

It should be noted that the remaining capacities for each listed facility is based upon the estimated tonnage space available in that landfill in 2000 divided by the number of tons reportedly placed into the facility that same year. Given the limitations on the types of waste that can be put in Type 4 landfills, the subregional totals only consider the space available in the subregion’s Type 1 or Type 1AE facilities. The subregional Total Years available was calculated by dividing the Type 1 or Type 1AE Tons Available by the total number of tons placed in those landfills in 2000. Listed on the following page is a projection of the amount of landfill space that will be consumed by each landfill by the year 2010. The projection assumes that each landfill will continue to be used by the same entities during the next decade but considers the population increases expected to occur during that timeframe. Some assumptions, based on current waste reductions efforts in each contributing entity, is made about the per capita waste generation rates that will be in affect in the year 2010.

Page 28


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 9.

Panhandle’s Projected Landfill Consumption by 2010

City of Amarillo BFI Southwest Landfill

Landfill Type

2,000 User Population

2,000 Disposal Amount

Estimated Lbs/Person Per Day

Current Years Remaining

Type 1 Type 1

189,508 85,906

Estimated 2010 User Population

2,010 Disposal Amount

239,991 171,172

6.9 10.9

Estimated Lbs/Person Per Day

2010 Years Remaining

Estimated 10-Year Reduction

53.0 20.0

210,658 91,300

266,775 173,288

6.9 10.4

37.3 9.0

15.7 11.0

City of Booker

Type 1AE

2,080

1,709

4.5

42.5

2,122

1,665

4.3

32.5

10.0

City of Childress

Type 1AE

8,586

5,445

3.5

191.1

8,923

5,700

3.5

171.8

19.3

City of Dimmitt

Type 1AE

7,564

7,335

5.3

71.2

8,300

7,876

5.2

55.7

15.5

City of Dumas City of Dalhart

Type 1 Type 1AE

15,886 9,632

13,340 15,881

4.6 9.0

63.0 17.2

18,333 10,839

15,390 16,418

4.6 8.3

51.1 6.2

11.9 11.0

City of Hereford

Type 4AE

16,579

5,023

1.7

34.0

18,223

5,986

1.8

18.4

15.7

City of McLean

Type 1AE

1,177

849

4.0

253.5

1,152

841

4.0

244.8

8.7

City of Pampa City of Panhandle

Type 1 Type 1AE

47,505 2,756

48,778 2,353

5.6 4.7

95.3 74.0

45,473 2,808

45,644 2,357

5.5 4.6

90.1 62.8

5.2 11.1

City of Perryton City of Shamrock City of Spearman

Type 1AE Type 1AE Type 1AE

7,897 2,206 5,073

5,765 1,788 5,180

4.0 4.4 5.6

14.8 60.0 36.0

8,627 2,250 5,400

6,298 1,807 4,852

4.0 4.4 4.9

2.9 47.9 26.5

11.8 12.1 9.5

City of Tulia City of Wellington Armstrong County

Type 1AE Type 1AE Type 4AE

8,815 5,374 418

7,107 4,052 150

4.4 4.1 2.0

57.1 64.9 547.0

9,267 3,264 402

7,441 2,442 147

4.4 4.1 2.0

43.8 95.3 547.0

13.3 -30.4 0.0

Hartley County

Type 4AE

478

93

1.1

260.5

527

133.4

1.4

170.8

89.7

NOTES: 1 - Assumes the City of Dumas will build its 60-year Type 1 facility, already permitted by the TCEQ, within the next three years. 2 - Assumes the combined capacity available between permitted facilities # 589 and #2238. 3 - Assumes the 60-year life span available with the Type 1 facility constructed in 2002. 4 - Assumes the combined capacity available between permitted facilities #1009 and #749. 5 - Assumes that the City of Shamrock will no longer be using Wellington's landfill beginning in 2002.

Page 29


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

As can be seen from the projection model above, some of the region’s landfill facilities (e.g., City of Amarillo) will begin to consume more landfill space, per annum, in the future as the user population of those facilities increases. In these cases, the life expectancy of the landfill may be cut shorter than what is currently being projected in 2000. Conversely, some of the region’s facilities (e.g., City of Pampa) may actually see a decline in the annual amounts of waste being landfilled. This will in affect increase the current life expectancy of those facilities. It should also be noted that there are two other permitted disposal facilities in the region; a waste incinerator and a waste-to-energy facility. The permit for the incinerator (Permit #790) is held by Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch. The permit for the waste-to-energy facility (Permit # 1678) is held by Baptist St. Anthony’s Hospital. At most, these two facilities negligibly impact the region’s disposal system and are mentioned here only as a means of providing a complete view of the existing disposal facilities in the region. The table below provides a listing of the tipping fee rates charged by the Panhandle’s landfill operators in 2002. Table 10.

Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Tipping Fees: 1998 - 2002

Landfill Operator

Permit #

1998 Tipping Fees

City of Amarillo

# 73

$ 19.00 a ton

$ 19.00 a ton

0.00%

BFI Southwest

# 1663

$ 19.00 a ton

$ 19.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Booker

# 1943

$ 40.00 a ton

$ 40.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Childress

# 2263

$

3.00 a cu. Yd.

$

0.00%

City of Dalhart

# 1038

$

3.00 a cu. yd.

$ 20.00 a ton

+ 11.0%

City of Dimmitt

# 445

$ 35.00 a ton

$ 35.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Dumas

# 211

$ 28.00 a ton

$ 28.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Hereford

# 215

$

1.54 a cu. yd.

$

7.00 a cu. yd.

+ 354.0%

City of McLean

# 570

$

4.50 a cu. yd.

$

4.50 a cu. yd.

0.00%

City of Memphis

# 2266

$

7.00 a cu. yd.

$

7.00 a cu. yd.

0.00%

City of Pampa

# 2238 & # 598

$ 22.50 a ton

$ 23.50 a ton

4.4%

City of Panhandle

# 1164

$ 10.00 minimum

$ 21.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Perryton

# 867

$ 16.85 a ton

$ 16.85 a ton

0.00%

City of Shamrock

# 244

$

$

City of Spearman

# 338

$ 25.00 a ton

$ 25.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Tulia

# 1009 & # 749

$ 25.00 a ton

$ 25.00 a ton

0.00%

City of Wellington

# 955

$ 25.00 a ton

$ 25.00 a ton

0.00%

$ 24.47 a ton

$ 24.90 a ton

+ 1.7%

Regional Averages

2.00 a cu. yd.

2002 Tipping Fees

3.00 a cu. yd.

5.00 a cu. yd.

% of Change

+ 150.0%

Page 30


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Assessment of Regional Waste Disposal Capacity: As it currently appears, the amount and distribution of the Panhandle’s landfill capacity is adequate to meet the needs of the region for at least the next 15 years. The one proviso being that BFI may have to consider starting the permitting process for a new landfill facility sometime within that timeframe. Regionally, with the few exceptions being some of the smaller Type 1AE facilities, landfill tipping fees remain reasonable and somewhat competitive. c. WASTE TRANSFER, STORAGE, TREATMENT AND PROCESSING Below is a table listing the registered solid waste transfer facilities that are located in the Panhandle in 2002. Table 11.

Registered Transfer Facilities Operating in the Panhandle

Owner City of Silverton

Permit # 40022

Type 5TS

Service/Service Area Solid waste transfer (currently inactive)

City of Canadian

40026

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving Hemphill Co.

City of Borger

40015

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving Hutchinson Co.

Raymond Weis

40037

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving the City of Higgins

City of Cactus

40031

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving the City of Cactus

City of Sunray Safety Kleen of Amarillo Golden Spread Pumping City of Stratford

40041

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving the City of Sunray

40120

5TL

Mobile liquid waste facility serving the region

61004

5GM

Mobile liquid waste processor serving the region

40109

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving the City of Stratford

City of Amarillo

76

5TS

Solid waste transfer serving the City of Amarillo

Assessment of Regional Waste Transfer Capacity: The transfer facilities in the Panhandle appear to be more than adequate to meet the current and projected future needs of the region. Most of the region’s waste generating entities are either directly hauling or contracting to have wastes directly hauled to a permitted disposal site. These arrangements seem to be financially satisfactory to these generators.

Table 12.

Registered Storage & Treatment Facilities Operating in the Panhandle

Operator/Address

EPA ID

Permit #

Type of Operation

Thomas Disposal Company P.O. Box 952 Perryton, TX 79070

DW311

WDW311

Class 1 Waste - Injection Well

Safety Kleen Corp. 3811 I-40 East Amarillo, TX 79104

61018

50252

Hazardous Waste - Solvent Recycling, Storage and Transfer

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Assessment of the Region’s Registered Storage and Transfer Capacities: Table 12 above lists the various registered storage and treatment facilities that are operating in the Panhandle in 2000. Based on the lack of survey comments to the contrary and the lack of any reported illegal disposal activity, it appears as if the availability of storage and treatment facilities in the Panhandle is adequate to meet the current and future needs of the region. Table 13 below provides a list of the known registered haulers of wastewater sludge, grease and grit trap waste, and septic wastes operating in the Panhandle region in 2002.

Table 13.

Panhandle’s Sludge Transporter Information 11

OPERATOR NAME

TNRCC ID #

SITE ADDRESS

WASTE TYPE(S)

Golden Spread Septic Tank & Pumping

20172

106 Rendezvous Amarillo, TX 79108

Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste

TCB Enterprises

20272

711 Moody St Borger, TX 79007

Septic Tank Waste

Allens Tri State Mechanical Inc

20289

404 S Hayden Amarillo, TX 79101

Hereford Septic Tank Service

20331

334 Avenue J Hereford, TX 79045

B&B Septic Systems

20338

9001 S Osage St. Amarillo, TX 79118

Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste OT Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

Jess Pumping Service Inc.

20619

530 Lisa Lane Canyon, TX 79105

Pete Watts Septic Service

20691

1219 E Francis Pampa, TX 79065

Jack's Car Wash

20747

Greasetrap Services of Amarillo

20902

1815 Apache Dr Dalhart, TX 79022 16800 FM 2186 Amarillo, TX 79119

Water Supply Treat. Plant Sludge Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste

Panhandle Portable, Inc.

21331

719 Main St Stinnett, TX 79083

Septic Tank Waste Chemical Toilet Waste

11

Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste

Source. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality; current as of November 7, 2001.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 13 (continued) OPERATOR NAME

TNRCC ID #

SITE ADDRESS

WASTE TYPE(S)

Boyd's Backhoe Service

21369

8711 State Hwy 136 Amarillo, TX 79108

Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste

T&J Pumping

21374

228 Cheyenne Canadian, TX 79014

Septic Tank Waste

Williams, C. E.

21482

Septic Tank Waste

Boyd, Daniel

21532

821 N 9th Canadian, TX 79014 403 Airport Rd Spearman, TX 79081

A-1 Rocket Industries, Inc.

22032

2214 S. Buchanan St. Amarillo, TX 79109

Chemical Toilet Waste

City of Amarillo

22079

3700 SE Loop 335 Amarillo, TX 79118

Grit Trap Waste Water Supply Treat. Plant Sludge Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

Murrell and Sons Pumping Service

22193

Rd. X N. Hwy 87 Kress, TX 79052

Septic Tank Waste

Red River Authority of Texas Champion Enterprises

22236

412 7th St NE Childress, TX 79201 3101 Amarillo Blvd E Amarillo, TX 79107

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste

Blackie's Pump Service

22311

212 North James Spearman, TX 79081

Septic Tank Waste

Godfrey, Patrick C.

22327

1609 W Noel St Memphis, TX 79245

Septic Tank Waste

Borger, City of

22461

600 N. Main Borger, TX 79007

Dalhart, City of

22473

Perryton, City of

22478

200 Olive Avenue Dalhart, TX 79022 2 Nth Amherst Perryton, TX 79070

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge Water Supply Treat Plant Sludge Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

Waste Wranglers, Inc.

22519

22276

500 McCafe Lane Amarillo, TX 79118

Septic Tank Waste

Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste Chem. Toilet Waste Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge Water Supply Treat Plant Sludge

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 13 (continued) OPERATOR NAME

TNRCC ID #

SITE ADDRESS

WASTE TYPE(S)

B & J Pumping Service

22597

1301 S Barrett Pampa, TX 79065

Septic Tank Waste

City of Wheeler

22640

505 S Alan Bean Blvd Wheeler, TX 79096

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

City of Panhandle

22642

C'S Portable Services

22698

201 Euchlid Panhandle, TX 79068 600 Phillips Dr Dumas, TX 79029

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge Chemical Toilet Waste

Canadian, City of

22701

6 Main Street Canadian, TX 79014

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

NPS - Lake Meredith Rec Area City of Hereford

22733

Bryer's Septic Tank Service

22792

419 E Broadway Fritch, TX 79036 15th St & Progressive Hereford, TX 79045 Hwy 136 & Matador Fritch, TX 79036

Chemical Toilet Waste Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge Septic Tank Waste

Odom Cess Pool

22878

15683 FM 1062 Canyon, TX 79015

Septic Tank Waste

City of Darrouzett

23006

111 West Texas Ave Darrouzett, TX 79024

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

Dumas Pumping Service

23012

306 Bruce Dumas, TX 79029

Septic Tank Waste Grease Trap Waste Grit Trap Waste

City of Higgins

23024

201 North Main Street Higgins, TX 79046

Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

Llano-Permian Environmental

23067

4104 West 33rd Ave Amarillo, TX 79109

Precision Pumping

23078

13301 S Osage St. Amarillo, TX 79118

Septic Tank Waste

Pam Tex Portables

23138

City of Booker

23192

513 W Wilks Pampa, TX 79065 214 S Main Booker, TX 79005

Septic Tank Waste Chem. Toilet Waste Wastewater Treat. Plant Sludge

22756

Assessment of the Region’s Sludge, Grease/Grit Trap Waste, and Septic Waste Disposal Capacities: Based on the comments received through the recent regional survey, it appears that the region’s capacity to manage these wastes is sufficient for the present and for the nearterm future. All of the region’s local governments that operate wastewater treatment plants have arrangements in place to dispose of their plant waste. In fact, many of those plants use a facultative system and in those instances, there is no need for sludge disposal.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Most Panhandle local governments however do not make provisions for the disposal of grease and grit trap waste and septic waste. Those services are for the most part being provided by the private sector. It is the responsibility of the business owner or homeowner to make the provisions necessary to ensure their wastes are being properly disposed of. The collected septic waste is either dumped, at a fee, into any number of the region’s municipally-operated wastewater treatment plants or some other registered processing facility outside the region. Much of the collected grease and grit trap waste is taken to the BFI landfill, solidified and then landfilled. There have been no reports of the illegal dumping of these materials anywhere in the region. Based on the availability of registered haulers and the lack of any confirmed illegal dumping reports, it is assumed that the region’s need for these services is being adequately met by the private sector. It is anticipated that if the need for these services were to increase in the future, the private sector will in turn increase its collection/management capacities. d. WASTE COLLECTION AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES Again, as can be seen by reviewing Table 5, for the most part, the region’s municipal solid waste is being collected and managed by municipalities. There are however, a number of private haulers that do provide this service in addition to, providing much of the collection services required by the region’s commercial and industrial waste generators. Table 14.

Panhandle’s Private Solid Waste Haulers 12

Service Provider

Office Location

Contact Number

BFI - Waste Services Sales & Service, Recycling Services

4831 East 25th Avenue Amarillo, TX 79103

(806) 376-5755

Duncan Disposal

2006 South Soncy Road Amarillo, TX 79124

(806) 358-7739

Panhandle Disposal & Recycling

617 North Buchanan St. Amarillo, TX 79107

(806) 342-4855

Waste Wranglers

2025 Hope Road Amarillo, TX 79124

(806) 354-2300

Starkeys Trash Service

Rockwell Place Canyon, TX 79015

(806) 655-1584

Superior Sanitation Service Inc

3012 Dimmitt Road, Plainview, TX 79072

(806) 293-9934

Wasteco Inc

North Highway 70 Pampa, TX 79065

(806) 665-7766

Tri State Recycling

P.O. Box 421 Texline, TX 79087

(806) 362-4828

Rural Waste Management Inc

RR 1 Box 38B Hooker, OK 73945

(580) 652-2577

12

Source. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

To facilitate the collection process or to ensure that collection services can be affordably provided in the very rural areas of the region, some of the region’s local governments have established citizens’ convenience stations. These facilities basically serve as a staging area for household wastes. Residents will drop their wastes off at these facilities and the waste is then collected and hauled off to a landfill for disposal. The table below lists the various convenience centers and waste drop-off facilities that are operating in the Panhandle region in 2002. Table 15.

Panhandle’s Citizens’ Convenience Centers and Waste Drop-offs

Operator

Facility Description

Materials Accepted

Residents Served

City of Clarendon

Convenience Center

Large bulky items

Clarendon residents

City of Friona

Convenience Center

Metal/Wood Wastes

Friona Residents

City of Fritch

Collection Station

Metal/Wood Wastes

Fritch & Surrounding Residents

City of Happy City of Higgins

Convenience Center Collection Station

Metal/Wood Wastes Household Wastes

Happy Residents Higgins Residents

City of Howardwick

Convenience Center

Metal/Wood Wastes

Howardwick Residents

City of Miami City of Panhandle

Collection Station Convenience Center

Household Wastes Metal/Wood Wastes

Rural Residents Panhandle Residents

City of Skellytown

Collection Station

Metal/Wood Wastes

Skellytown Residents

City of Stinnett

Convenience Center

Metal/Wood Wastes

Stinnett Residents

City of Sunray

Convenience Center

Large bulky items

Sunray Residents

City of Texline

Collection Station

Household Wastes

Texline Residents

Collingsworth Co.

Satellite Dumpsters

Household Wastes

Rural County Residents

Donley County

Compactor Station

Household Wastes

Rural County Residents

Parmer County

Convenience Center

Household Wastes

Rural County Residents

Table 14 provides a listing of the private solid waste haulers known to be operating in the Panhandle in 2002. In addition, there are private haulers in the area specifically permitted to provide medical waste hauling services. That list includes the following. Table 16.

Panhandle’s Medical Waste Haulers 13

Service Provider

Office Location

Contact Number

Stericycle, Inc.

6443 S. Western Amarillo, TX 79110

(806) 744-3449

MedClean Systems, Inc.

P. O. Box 7248 Amarillo, TX 79114-7248

(806) 352-5335

13

Source. Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Overall Assessment of the Region’s Waste Collection and Transportation Services: In summary, the Panhandle is currently being well serviced by the collection facilities and services available in the region. The recent local government survey detected no unusual deficiencies or inadequacies. However, in an effort to improve access to disposal services in the very rural stretches of the region, some unserved Panhandle counties may want to consider the establishment of citizens’ convenience centers for their residents. There is still a good deal of trash burning taking place in rural counties. The provision of additional convenience centers may help to reduce the level of burning that is occurring and improve waste management in those areas. e. RECYCLING SERVICES During the past five years, the Panhandle region has, as a whole, become more actively engaged in recycling and waste reduction. This increased involvement is being prompted by four major factors. Those are: 1. The availability of state grant funds to establish local recycling and waste reduction projects. 2. The availability of intermediate- and/or end-market buyers willing to accept and pay for the region’s recyclable materials. 3. Improved transportation access to intermediate- and/or end-markets. 4. An improved efficiency in program operation which makes alternative waste management options comparable in cost to landfilling. The table below identifies the region’s local governments which have established recycling or waste reduction projects between 1996 and 2001 as a result of the TCEQ solid waste grant program. Table 17.

TCEQ-Funded Waste Reduction Projects: 1996 – 2001 RECYLING PROJECTS:

Year Est.

Project Operator

Project Description

1997 1999

City of Amarillo City of Amarillo

Commercial Waste Reduction Improvement to Recycling Program

1997

City of Canadian

Baling Program

1999

City of Canadian

Improvement to Baling Operation

1996

City of Childress

Community Recycling

1998

City of Childress

Baling Operation

2001

City of Childress

Baling Operation Enhancement

1999 2000

City of Clarendon City of Dalhart

Improvement to Baling Operation Baling Operation

1998

City of Dimmitt

Commercial Waste Reduction

1999

City of Dumas

Improvement to Baling Operation

1999 2001

City of Friona City of Friona

Metals/Wood Waste Reduction Metals/Wood Waste Program Enhancement

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 17 (continued) Year Est.

RECYLING PROJECTS:

Project Operator

Project Description

1996

City of Fritch

Baling Operation

1997

City of Fritch

Recycling Program Improvements

2001 1998

City of Fritch City of Fritch

Baling Operation Enhancement Baling Operation

1996

City of Gruver

Baling Operation

1999

City of Gruver

Improvement to Baling Operation

2000 1996

City of Gruver City of Hedley

Improvement to Baling Operation Metals Recycling

1999

City of Howardwick

Metals/Wood Waste Reduction

1999

City of Panhandle

Baling Operation

2001 1997

City of Panhandle City of Perryton

In-School Recycling Program Baling/Collection Program

1999

City of Perryton

Regional Recycling Coordination

2001

City of Perryton

Baling/Collection Program Enhancement

1996 1998

PRPC PRPC

Regional Commercial Waste Recyle Recycling Market Development

1999

PRPC

Regional Transportation Program

2000 2001

PRPC City of Quitaque

Regional Transportation Program Metals/Wood Waste Reduction

2001

Sanford-Fritch ISD

In-School Recycling Program

1996

City of Shamrock

Baling Operation

2001 1997

City of Shamrock City of Spearman

Baling Operation Enhancement/Metals Program Baling Program

1999

City of Spearman

Improvement to Baling Operation

2000

City of Spearman

Improvement to Baling Operation

1998

City of Stratford

Baling Operation

2001

City of Stratford

Community Recycling/Yard Waste Reduction

1996

City of Sunray

Community Recycling

2001

City of White Deer

Community Recycling

WOOD WASTE REDUCTION/COMPOSTING PROJECTS: Year Est.

Project Operator

Project Description

1996

City of Amarillo

Backyard Composting Program

2000

City of Borger

Regional Wood Waste Program

2001 2000

City of Booker City of Canyon

Wood Chipping Program Wood Chipping Program

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 17 (continued) Year Est.

WOOD WASTE REDUCTION/COMPOSTING PROJECTS:

Project Operator

Project Description

1996

City of Dalhart

Yard Waste Reduction Program

2001

City of Dimmitt

Wood Chipping Program

1997 1998

City of Happy City of Hereford

Wood Chipping Program Wood Chipping Program

1999

City of McLean

Wood Chipping Program

2001

City of Memphis

Wood Chipping Program

1999 1999

City of Pampa City of Stratford

Alley Limb/Brush Program Wood/Yard Waste Reduction

1998

City of Wellington

Wood Chipping Program

1997

City of Wheeler

Wood Chipping Program

1996

City of White Deer

Wood Chipping Program

All of these programs are still in operation and contributing to local and regional waste reduction goals as of 2002. In 1993, the PRPC implemented a regional used oil recycling program which resulted in the establishment of 75 local government public used oil collection centers. Most of these centers are still in operation in 2002. Public used oil collection centers can be found in the following locations. Table 18.

Local Government Public Used Oil Collection Center Operators

Operator City of Cactus

Subregion 1

Operator City of Spearman

Subregion 2

City of Dalhart

1

Hemphill County

2

City of Dumas

1

City of Borger

3

City of Sunray City of Texline

1 1

City of Fritch City of Groom

3 3

Dallam County

1

City of Lefors

3

Hartley County

1

City of McLean

3

Moore County

1

City of Miami

3

Sherman County

1

City of Pampa

3

City of Booker

2

City of Panhandle

3

City of Canadian

2

City of Shamrock

3

City of Darrouzett

2

City of Skellytown

3

City of Follett

2

City of Stinnett

3

City of Gruver

2

City of Wheeler

3

City of Higgins City of Perryton

2 2

City of White Deer Carson County

3 3

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 18 (continued) Operator City of Adrian

Subregion 4

Operator Childress County

Subregion 5

City of Amarillo

4

Collingsworth County

5

City of Claude

4

Donley County

5

City of Happy

4

Hall County

5

City of Hereford

4

City of Dimmitt

6

City of Vega

4

City of Farwell

6

Deaf Smith County

4

City of Friona

6

Oldham County

4

City of Hart

6

City of Childress

5

City of Kress

6

City of Clarendon

5

City of Nazareth

6

City of Hedley

5

City of Quitaque

6

City of Howardwick

5

City of Silverton

6

City of Memphis City of Turkey

5 5

City of Tulia Swisher County

6 6

City of Wellington

5

In addition to used motor oil, most of these center operators also collect used automotive oil filters. E & E Environmental out of Brownfield, Texas, services most of the region’s local government used oil centers. The oil is picked up at no charge. However, the center operators must pay $30 per 50-gallon drum to have their uncrushed oil filters recycled. E & E also operates a permitted oil filter incinerator in Childress, Texas. The collected used oil is blended and used for heating oil. The filters are incinerated. The heat destroys the paper filament and residual oil. The remaining metal cartridges are then recycled as scrap metal. The table below identifies the various recycling markets currently available directly to the Panhandle region. Table 19.

Recycling Markets Available to the Panhandle

Industry Name Amarillo Metals Co.

Type of Materials Aluminum, scrap metals

Address 415 N. Grand Amarillo, TX 79102

Amarillo Recycling Co., Inc.

Scrap metals

725 N. Grand Amarillo, TX 79102

Bell Group

OCC

BFI Recyclery

CPO, white ledger, ONP #8, OCC, SOW, PET, HDPE

P. O. Box 2604 Wichita Falls, TX 76307 803 S. Garfield Amarillo, TX 79102

Budco Recycling Center

Aluminum

100 South Philadelphia Street, Amarillo, TX 79104

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 19 (continued) Industry Name Champion Recycling

Type of Materials ONP #8

Address Through CTRA contract: Located in Houston, TX

Commercial Metals

Steel cans, aerosol cans, paint cans, white gods, and scrap metal

Through CTRA contract: Located in Jacinto City, TX

Hereford Iron & Metal CO

Scrap metals

North Progressive Road, Hereford, TX 79045

Image Industries, Inc.

Clear and green PET containers

Route 1 Box 193-B Summerville, GA 30747

Ranco Recycling

Scrap metals

2700 South Lincoln Street, Amarillo, TX 79109

Scrap Processing

Aluminum, clear and brown glass, tin/steel cans, white goods, scrap metals, old appliances

95 Browning Street Amarillo, TX 79104

Strategic Materials

Glass: clear, amber, brown, green, mixed

Through CTRA contract: Located in Jacinto City, TX

TASCON, Inc.

ONP #6, junk mail, magazines, telephone books

Through CTRA contract: Located in Dallas, TX

Tri-State Metals

Scrap metals

Vista Fibers

Aluminum, CPO, white ledger, ONP #6, ONP #8, OCC, SOW, PET, HDPE

4110 E. Amarillo Blvd. Amarillo, TX 79104 Through CTRA contract: Located in Lubbock, TX

Western Fibers

ONP #8, CPO, SOW, OCC

Hollis, OK

E & E Enterprises

Used oil, used oil filters, antifreeze

F M Road 164 Childress, TX 79201

The TCEQ’s Recycle Texas Online Database indicates that the following companies are also willing to accept recyclable materials from the Panhandle region. Table 20.

TCEQ’s Listed Recycling Markets for the Panhandle

Company Name

Materials Accepted

Company Location

Butts Recycling Inc.

Newspapers, magazines, OCC, 615 W 11th St computer paper, mixed office paper, San Angelo, TX 76903-5271 white ledger, HDPE-natural bottles

Rock Tenn Recycling

card stock, directories

Halbert Mill Company

Kraft paper

Pioneer Paper Stock Of Mixed paper Texas, Inc

phone

books

& 1100 NE 23rd Fort Worth, TX 76106 FM 347 S Jacksonville, TX 75766 5000 Singleton Blvd. Dallas, TX 75212

Page 41


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Table 20 (continued) Company Name

Materials Accepted

Company Location

Vista Fibers

Other ledger grades, phone books & 2828 Nagle St. directories Dallas, TX 75220

Smurfit-Stone Recycling

Phone books & directories

Heat Treatment Services

Mixed plastics, polystyrene (PS, #6), 4460 Singleton Blvd fluorescent bulbs Dallas, TX 75212

Recycle America Non-Fiber Marketing

Mixed plastics, polystyrene (PS, #6)

Civiera & Silver International

HDPE-natural bottles, LDPE-bottles, 99 Reservoir St. polyprolylene (PP, #5), polystyrene Holden, MA 01520 (PS, #6)

Poly Resource Recycling, Inc

HDPE-natural bottles, LDPE-bottles, 6406 Burleson Rd. 160 polyprolylene (PP, #5) Austin, TX 78744

Envirosol, Onsite Service

Light bulbs & light fixtures without 212 S Mesquite Ste 1D PCBs, fluorescent bulbs Arlington, TX 76010

14950 Heathrow Forest Pkwy Ste 130 Houston, TX 77032

6565 N MacArthur Ste 210 Irving, TX 75039

Used tire management is a problem for the region’s local governments. Many of the region’s landfill operators cite tires as being one of their key waste management issues. In 2002, there is one registered scrap tire processor located in the region. That company is: THOSHANOWASTI

Registration #79544

315 W Farmers Avenue Amarillo, TX 79118

The other registered tire handlers listed for the Panhandle region include: Tejas Tire Company

Registration #26841

4602 S. Hughes Amarillo, TX 79110

Texas Tire & Tube, Inc.

Registration #26973

3001 S. Fillmore St. Amarillo, TX 79105

Assessment of the Panhandle region’s recycling facilities and services: SOLID WASTE RECYCLING EFFORTS In 2002, the state of the region’s recycling infrastructure is considerably better than it was in 1993 when the development of that network began. The local governments of the region have taken large strides in making recycling a viable element of the region’s waste management program. There are currently 13 municipally-run recyclable materials baling programs operating in the Panhandle and 1 (BFI Recyclery in Amarillo) privately run operation. The PRPC operates a Regional Transportation Program, funded through the TCEQ, which is responsible for moving baled materials from the municipally-run centers to various end-market buyers. This regional program has helped to overcome the distance problems that once plagued the Panhandle’s recycling efforts. Page 42


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Currently, most of the local projects concentrate on capturing and recycling materials that have the highest redemption value including cardboard, newsprint, office paper, aluminum, and scrap metals. For most local project operators, plastic recycling has been somewhat problematic because it takes so much plastic to produce a bale. Nevertheless, some communities are beginning to make the effort to add Type 1 and Type 2 plastics to their recycling stream. The main problem in assessing the overall impact of recycling on the region is the lack of reliable information regarding private sector recycling efforts. Many of the region’s chain retail stores are recycling their cardboard. Much of the Panhandle’s scrap metal is already being captured through private recycling efforts. Many offices, particularly in the Amarillo area, are recycling their office waste paper. Unfortunately, there currently is no way of documenting how much waste is being recycled outside of the efforts of the region’s local governments. Based solely on local government efforts, it’s estimated that the Panhandle region is now diverting between 5 and 10 percent of its waste through recycling. This is an extremely conservative estimate given that an even larger volume of waste is most likely being diverted through commercial sector efforts. Regardless, recycling is making a valuable contribution to the region’s waste reduction efforts and in the future, it’s expected that more local governments will become involved in operating their own recycling program. The map on the following page depicts the various local government recycling programs in existence in the Panhandle in 2000. Most of the region’s local governments are currently marketing their baled materials through a regional contract between the PRPC and the Central Texas Recycling Association (CTRA). In most cases, the CTRA guarantees floor prices for the materials being recycled. In other words, regardless of market conditions elsewhere in the state, at no time will the redemption value of those guaranteed materials drop below the given floor price. This CTRA contract option is available to all local governments in the region. The BFI Recyclery in Amarillo also pays for most paper commodities, based on a daily market value. Although this option provides for a less predictable revenue stream, it at least gives the region’s local governments another alternative for selling their recyclable commodities. There is certainly sufficient capacity available to expand the region’s recycling efforts. The region’s 14 baling operations and the confirmed availability of recycling markets provide the framework for this growth.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Panhandle Region’s Local Government Recycling System

    

TO PLAINVIEW

Used Oil Recycling Center

Recycling & Baling Facility

Participating in baling program

Scrap Metals Program Page 44


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

WOOD AND YARD WASTE REDUCTION EFFORTS It is estimated that the region’s wood and yard waste reduction efforts are helping to reduce the load on Panhandle landfills by 10 – 15 percent. In 2002, two communities, Dalhart and Pampa, are operating citywide yard waste reduction programs. Others, such as Stratford are in the process on implementing citywide programs. Most of the Panhandle’s municipalities operate a wood waste reduction program, whether funded by a TCEQ grant or funded locally. In 2000, the City of Borger received grant funds to purchase a large tub grinder. The intent behind this project was that the City would make the equipment available to other communities across the Panhandle. In the future, it is anticipated that this grinder will make an impact on reducing the wood and construction/demolition (C&D) waste currently being landfilled in the region. The C&D waste will be diverted for use as daily cover material at some of the region’s landfills. AUTOMOTIVE WASTE REDUCTION EFFORTS Most of the region’s local governments operate used oil collection programs. To date, the collected oil has been recycled with relative ease. Few local governments operate used antifreeze programs, relying instead on local repair shops to management that component of the region’s automotive waste stream. Given that it costs local government to have antifreeze recycled, this will probably continue to be the case in the future unless market conditions change. As noted earlier, there is a need for more access to affordable tire recycling services in the Panhandle. Residents who are unwilling to or can not afford the cost of properly disposing of their tires simply place them covertly into dumpsters. When they arrive at the landfill, they then become a disposal problem for the local government. Consequently, the local government has to pay to have the tires properly disposed of. The tire problem is much bigger than the Panhandle and its solution will likely require action on the part of the state. Tires can be disposed of in landfills if they are first quartered or shredded. However, the equipment needed to process the tires is expensive and costly to maintain. The region will continue to look for ways to cope with the issue until a longer term solution can be found. Overall, the region’s recycling and waste reduction efforts are currently achieving an approximate 20 – 25 percent reduction in the Panhandle’s wastestream. The current goal is to reach and maintain a level of 40 percent waste reduction. Even though the region has made vast improvements in recent years with its waste reduction efforts, there is still much room for improvement. Listed below is a description of the various different ways in which the region’s waste reduction efforts can be elevated. Paper Recycling: Paper constitutes approximately 35% of the region’s wastestream. Newsprint, OCC, ledger, computer, magazines and office paper together represent 20.2% of the waste going into the region’s landfill. Converted to tons, approximately 108,919 tons of this material went into the region’s landfills in 2000. Currently, there are markets available for each one of these material types. Increased efforts to capture and recycle these materials will benefit the Panhandle’s waste reduction efforts.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Metal Recycling: Although by weight, scrap metal only represents approximately 5.5% of the region’s wastestream; scrap metal recycling does warrant greater attention in the Panhandle. There are several reasons why stepped up efforts will benefit the region. Firstly, metal is bulky and generally does not compact well. Therefore, it takes up more space in the landfill. Secondly, when it is landfilled, metal is generally the cause for much of the damage done to landfilling equipment. Thirdly, it can be captured fairly easily. Currently, and increasing number of the region’s local governments are showing an inclination toward starting their own metal recycling program. As the number of programs grows, the benefits to the region will increase. Yard Waste Composting: Leaves and grass makes up approximately 8.7% of the region’s wastestream. Though the region is considered to be arid in climate, during the summer months, grass clippings can take up about 40% of the space inside the region’s trash dumpsters. A number of the region’s local governments have instituted large-scale yard waste composting programs. It is recommended that other local governments consider this as an option for their solid waste management programs. Additional residential yard waste reduction efforts will help the region in achieving its 40% waste reduction goal. Wood Waste Reduction: Many of the region’s local governments currently operate wood waste reduction programs. Like metal, it is a bulky waste that can be damaging to landfilling equipment. So, there are several different benefits to be gained by stepping up efforts to reduce the region’s landfilled wood waste. With the Borger tub grinder now being available regionwide, hopefully this will provide an avenue for achieving further reductions in this area. Regional Compliance with Statutory Recycling Requirements: As a result of Senate Bill 1340, local governments, school districts and universities are obliged to institute and maintain in-house recycling programs. A very small percentage of these covered entities are currently complying with these requirements in the Panhandle. Increased efforts in this regard are necessary not only to ensure compliance with the requirements but to assist the region in achieving its overall waste reduction goals. Studies show that students on the average generate about a pound of paper per day. Most of the waste being generated in city halls and county courthouses is also paper. There is a ready market for these materials and in school and office settings, it can be easily captured. More of the Panhandle’s local governments, school districts, colleges and the university need to implement in-house recycling programs. In so doing, not only will they be abiding by statutory requirements, they will also be making a valuable contribution toward the region’s recycling and waste reduction goals. f.

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE (HHW) SERVICES

Currently, there is only one established household hazardous waste (HHW) program operating in the region; the City of Pampa’s annual HHW collection event. Although HHW represents less than 1% of the Panhandle’s wastestream, it can, in concentrations, pose a risk to the region’s ground and surface water supplies. Therefore, greater efforts need to be made to reduce the amount of HHW being improperly disposed of in the region. Given the cost of conducting periodic or permanent collection programs, most of the region’s local governments have elected to avoid direct involvement in such programs. There is however an alternative. That is, to reduce the HHW waste at its source.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

In the future, efforts will be made at the regional level to educate the public on the risks associated with HHW. The objective will be to encourage residents to buy and consume their HHW products with more forethought. If that objective is achieved, the amount of landfilled HHW in the region will decline through natural attrition. g. OTHER SOLD WASTE SERVICES The BFI Southwest Landfill is permitting a new landfill cell for the purpose of accepting Class 1 Non-Hazardous Wastes. Much of Class 1 waste generated in the region is currently being disposed of outside of the Panhandle. With this permitted facility being located in the Panhandle, most of region’s Class 1 Non-Hazardous Waste will likely be disposed of in-region. The BFI Landfill is also the only landfill in the region authorized by the TCEQ to accept liquid wastes for solidification. There is one additional MSW landfill facility in the region which heretofore has not been mentioned. This is the Type 4AE landfill located at Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch (Subregion 4). Since it is only intended for the use of the residents at the Boys Ranch, it has not been included in any of the regional analyses covered in this plan. h. LITTER AND ILLEGAL DUMPING The results of the recent local government survey indicate that while it is currently a negligible problem, illegal dumping is on the rise in the Panhandle. Several years ago, the PRPC implemented a training program to instruct local law enforcement officials on how to reduce illegal dumping within their jurisdictions. Some have taken this training to heart, others have not. The problem is becoming more pronounced in the Panhandle’s larger counties, particularly in Potter and Randall counties. Randall County will soon begin the implementation of local litter enforcement officer program. Potter County hopes to follow suit in the not too distant future. The urbanized counties of the region would benefit by following through with the establishment of local enforcement programs. Ideally, these enforcement programs should be coupled with other waste management programs (i.e., recycling, citizen convenience centers) to provide the public with a wider array of meaningful alternatives to illegal dumping. In a number of smaller counties, the issue of illegal dumping is most visibly seen in what has become a traditional ranching practice. Dead cattle are routinely hauled by ranchers to drop points located adjacent to their property and generally along a county road. From there, the carcasses are theoretically picked up by a rendering company and hauled back to a plant for processing. However, too frequently, the dead cattle are simply left along the roadside until they rot completely or are consumed by scavenging coyotes or vultures. While some counties may agree that this practice is problematic, because of the political implications involved, they are hesitant to take any action that might adversely impact the largest tax-paying group in their jurisdiction. These smaller counties would benefit from the implementation of a program that would facilitate the safe and timely disposal of dead cattle. To ameliorate political concerns, the program(s) should be developed in consultation with the ranching community.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Overall, the region needs to give greater attention to this issue now before the problem gets out of hand. Options for addressing the problem can include efforts from the regional and local levels. At the regional level, programs for educating the public on the social costs of illegal dumping and littering should be considered. At the local level, more local governments may also have to consider the development of litter abatement officer programs. i.

FACILITY SITING

Appendix 1 provides complete current listing of all the permitted MSW landfill facilities in the Texas Panhandle. The map on the following page shows the location of these facilities. At least through the intermediate term (2002 – 2010) of this plan, the region has a sufficient supply of disposal capacity to meet its projected needs. It appears that the Type 1 landfills of Subregion 4 will bear the brunt of any waste load increases resulting from the population growth expected to occur in the region by 2010. In 2010, over 50% of the Panhandle’s population is projected to reside within this subregion. If the current landfill space consumption model holds true, these Type 1 operators may experience an accelerated life reduction in their landfills. Whether new MSW facilities are needed in Subregion 4 or for that matter, in any part of the region, during the life of this plan, the permit applicant will have to design that facility in conformance with the plan. This is a requirement of the state. To the extent possible, future permit applicants should consider the region’s waste reduction goals when designing their new facility. Future MSW facilities are encouraged to take an integrated approach to waste management; using recycling or composting alternatives whenever those alternatives are economically feasible. Future MSW facilities should also be designed and operated in a manner sensitive to their existing surroundings. The facility design and operating plan should consider the impact on the residents in close proximity to the facility at the time it is built and take appropriate measures to minimize that impact. Further guidance regarding regional plan conformance can be found in Part D, Section 3(a) of this document.

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PANHANDLE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM LOCATION OF LANDFILLS TRANSFER STATIONS LOCATION OF LANDFILLS AND TRANSFERAND STATIONS IN THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

FY02 Panhandle Regional Solid WastePanhandle Plan Amendment FY2002 Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

BOYS RANCH BOYS RANCH

4 AE

Page 49 LEGEND: I Landfill 1AE - Type AE Landfill 4AE - Type Landfill (Brush/C&D) Station)Station) LEGEND:1 - Type 1 - Type I Landfill 1AE -I Type I AE Landfill 4AE IV - Type IV Landfill (Brush/C&D)5 - Type 5V-(Transfer Type V (Transfer


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

j.

CLOSED MSW LANDFILL INVENTORY

Section 363.064(a)(10), of the Texas Health and Safety Code, as amended in 1999 by Senate Bill 1447, requires that the state’s regional solid waste management plans include an inventory of all closed municipal solid waste landfill units. This inventory must include all suspect, unauthorized landfill units (of a quarter acre in size or larger) and known permitted landfill units. Per the statutory requirements of Senate Bill 1447, the inventory must include either the exact boundaries of the landfill units or, if the exact boundaries are not known, the best approximation of those boundaries. For those sites where the exact boundaries are not known, a map showing the approximate boundaries must be included in the inventory. Where exact boundaries have been identified, the PRPC is obliged to contact the county clerk in the county where the site has been identified. The clerk will also be notified that the unit boundary information needs to be deed recorded on the property where the unit is situated. The basic purpose of this inventory process is to make the public aware of where these units are located to prevent the possibility of someone unknowingly developing the property for habitation. Appended to this plan is an inventory of all such landfill units in the Panhandle. The listing has been completed to the extent that the relevant information can presently be verified. There may be information gaps in the inventory and in the coming years, PRPC staff will work toward locating the data needed to refine the accuracy of the inventory. As of this writing, all of the sites for which exact boundaries have been confirmed are former municipal/county sites and the sites are still under the control of the jurisdiction that originally operated the landfills. These sites are well-documented and have been recorded on the appropriate deed records. Most of the unverified sites are purportedly less than 1 acre in size and can generally be found in remote, sparsely populated areas of the region. A handful of these smaller, unverified sites can be found in and around the Amarillo area. Based on the historical documents used to develop the region’s closed landfill inventory, it would appear that in general, the closed facilities do not pose a significant risk to the public. Publicizing the approximate location of the facilities will help to deter future development over these sites and further minimize the public safety/health risk potential. Beginning in FY04, contingent upon the availability of resources to do so, PRPC will post the entire inventory on its website to make this information even more accessible to the public. However, based on the reported locations of these unverified sites and on the historical records documenting the types of materials supposedly deposited into these facilities it appears that the risk to the public is relatively insignificant. Future developers should be wary when building over and around these sites. If buried waste is encountered during future construction activities; construction should stop and the regional TCEQ office contacted immediately. Unless future events dictate otherwise, it appears that no further assessments are needed of the risk posed by the closed landfills in the region. The development and completion of the inventory is being done with the assistance and in coordination with the TCEQ.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

k. LOCAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS This section does not apply to the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. There are no formal subregional/local plans currently in existence. In years past, particularly those immediately following the adoption of the original regional plan, several of the Panhandle’s subregional planning areas set about the task of establishing subregional solid waste management plans. In each instance, after meeting on several occasions, the local planning committees decided to drop the planning effort. Reason being, the committees felt that the types of issues that could be addressed in the subregional plans would be better served if addressed on a regional basis. In subsequent years, outside of planning for local logistical operations, the region has relied on the Panhandle-wide approach to solid waste planning. However that said, this statement does not preclude the possibility that at some point, some of the more populous areas of the region (i.e., City of Amarillo) would not benefit from more intensive, localized planning. Should areas such as the City of Amarillo deem it appropriate to develop a Subchapter O-conforming plan, then programs such as that would certainly be considered for support under the regional solid waste grants program. At this writing, neither the City of Amarillo nor any other local government(s) in the region has indicated a need for the development of a local solid waste management plan. D. REGIONAL GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND ACTION PLAN 1.

Summary of Needs and Problems

The following is a summary of the key needs and problems identified during the 2002 plan amendment process. a. Waste Minimization: The region is currently not achieving the 40% waste reduction goal set in Senate Bill 1340 (SB 1340). The Panhandle’s local governments and private sector waste generators should, whenever economically feasible, should consider increasing their efforts to minimize waste through recycling, composting and source reduction. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

The region should continue to support local and shared programs designed to reduce waste through recycling or composting.

The region should use an educational approach to encourage local governments and residents to employ source reduction options.

The region should attempt to achieve and maintain a 40% waste reduction rate, using a 7 pounds per day rate as the benchmark rate, by the year 2015. The target per capita generation rate would then be 4.2 pounds per day per person.

b. SB 1340 Recycling Programs: Currently, many of the Panhandle’s local units of government (counties, cities, schools, and universities) required by SB 1340 to maintain inhouse recycling programs are not doing so. Moreover, as also required by SB 1340, many of these covered governmental units are not presently giving preference to products made of recycled materials when making routine purchases.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

More efforts should be made to encourage and facilitate the region’s local government’s active participation with in-house recycling programs and preference purchasing as required by SB 1340. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

The region should encourage more of the governmental units covered by SB 1340 to implement in-house recycling programs.

The region should consider the possibility of implementing a cooperative purchasing program as a means of promoting the purchase of recycled content products.

c. Marketing and Transportation of Recyclables: Continued consolidation and marketing of recyclables will help to overcome the distance barriers in the region and increase the feasibility of recycling in the Panhandle. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

The region should maintain the Regional Marketing & Transportation currently being used to market and transport the recyclable commodities being generated by the region’s local governments.

The region should continue to encourage local governments to work together to support shared recycling endeavors.

d. Scrap Tire Management: Illegal disposal of tires is increasing in the region because many landfill operators refuse to accept whole tires for cost, operations, and safety reasons. Recycling opportunities and cost-effective and safe opportunities to shred, split or quarter tires, as well as educational initiatives, are needed to increase the proper disposal, or ideally, recycling of scrap tires. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

The region should increase its efforts to educate the public on the illegality of improperly disposing of scrap tires.

If allowed by the TCEQ, the region should consider undertaking a shared program that will facilitate the proper disposal of scrap tires.

The region should encourage the TCEQ and its legislators to introduce state-level programs that will make it easier to recycle and/or dispose of used tires at the local level.

e. Waste Handling: Local governments need to ensure there is reasonable access to collection services within their jurisdictions (either publicly or privately provided) as a means of controlling unauthorized burning and improper disposal. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

Local governments should encourage their residents to take advantage of private sector collection services when those services are not being provided by the local government.

Local governments should consider the use of citizens’ convenience centers as a means of making waste collection more accessible to their residents.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

f.

Illegal dumping and littering: Though the problem is not yet pronounced in the region, illegal dumping and littering are on the rise. Efforts need to be made to control the problem before it gets out of hand.

Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

Public education should be used to make residents aware of the social and environmental consequences associated with illegal dumping and littering.

Where the problem is becoming persistent, local governments should consider undertaking law enforcement measures to control illegal dumping and littering within their jurisdictions.

g. HHW Management: Currently, there are nearly no programs or facilities in place to ensure the proper disposal of the household hazardous wastes being generated in the region. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

The region should educate the public on the proper personal management of HHW so that the waste can be reduced at its source.

When economically feasible, local governments should consider the possibility of working together to cooperatively implement periodic or permanent programs for the proper management of HHW Wastes.

When economically feasible, individual local governments should consider the possibility of implementing a periodic or permanent program for the proper management of HHW wastes.

h. Disposal: Continued long-term disposal capacity needs to be ensured for all waste generators in the region. Priorities for addressing this problem or need: 

Landfill operators in the region should monitor their annual disposal rates to determine when the state permitting process should be initiated.

To the extent possible, landfill operators in the region should use an integrated waste management system to extend the life of their facility.

Landfill operators in the region should consider the possibility of using Alternative Daily Cover materials as a means of extending the life of their facility.

2.

Goals and Objectives

The goals and strategies outlined in this portion of the plan were identified as a means of addressing the needs of the region’s waste management system and for meeting the state’s waste reduction targets. The following goals are listed in priority order to reflect their importance to achieving the critical objectives of the regional plan. This priority ordering of the goals will also be considered in the distribution of the Panhandle’s regional solid waste grant funds. GOAL 1:

Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs with the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting.) Page 53


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Region-Level Strategies: 1A.

1B.

1C.

1D. 1E. 1F.

1G. 1H.

Implement subregional and local source reduction, waste minimization, reuse, and recycling strategies to meet the goals of the Regional Plan and any subsequent plan amendments. Develop education/information programs and technical assistance programs at the regional level to encourage source reduction, waste minimization, reuse, and recycling in the Panhandle. Coordinate with state efforts and develop programs as necessary at the regional level to monitor the success of source reduction, waste minimization, reuse, and recycling efforts in the Panhandle Region. Suggest minimum levels of recyclables and yard waste collection services to be provided in incorporated and unincorporated areas of the Panhandle Region. Develop programs at the regional level to facilitate cooperative and standardized approaches to recycling in the Panhandle Region. Maintain recyclables market development programs at the regional level that focus on ensuring "high quality and consistent volumes of recyclables", economic development; assisting subregions, local governments, businesses, and institutions in obtaining markets for their recyclables, and encouraging state-level market development actions. Develop programs at the regional level to support private and non-profit recycling programs in the Region. Regionally, achieve and maintain at least a 40% regional solid waste reduction level by the year 2015.

Role of Other Entities: 1I. 1J. 1K. 1L.

1M.

1N.

Local Governments in the region should work toward establishing or enhancing locallyoperated recycling and wood/yard waste reduction programs. Cities, counties, school districts, colleges, universities and the COG should all maintain active in-house recycling programs in accordance with statutory requirements. Cities, counties, school districts, colleges, universities and the COG should all work toward routinely purchasing recycled content products. For the near term, Local Governments recycling and waste reduction efforts should at least target the key components of waste disposal outlined in this plan including paper, metal, wood and yard waste. Local Government recycling and waste reduction program operators should work toward improving their ability to document and report the amounts of waste being diverted by their program. The TCEQ and other applicable state agencies should work cooperatively with the region in order to improve the Panhandle’s recycling markets particularly, for waste tires and automotive wastes.

GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

Region-Level Strategies: 2A.

Develop programs at the regional, subregional and local levels to facilitate effective communication among local government officials and private and non-profit entities involved in MSW management.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

2B. 2C.

2D.

Develop programs at the regional level to facilitate effective communication between the Panhandle Region and state officials on MSW management issues. Develop programs at the regional level to help local governments as well as private and non-profit entities pursue state and federal funding sources for MSW management programs. Develop education/awareness campaign at the regional level to increase awareness of integrated MSW management practices and associated costs.

Role of Other Entities: 2E. 2F.

Local Governments, the TCEQ, and private sector service providers should work toward improving the cost effectiveness waste tire management in the Panhandle. MSW facility permit or registration applicants should consider an integrated waste management approach when designing their facilities to support the environmental suitability of the region’s waste management system.

GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices.

Region-Level Strategies: 3A. 3B. 3C.

3D. 3E.

Develop education/awareness programs at the regional level to discourage open-burning, illegal dumping and other improper disposal practices. Support subregional and local strategies that intend to minimize open-burning, illegal dumping and other improper disposal practices. Develop education/awareness programs and technical assistance programs at the regional level to encourage proper management practices for special and problem wastes (particularly tires, bulky wastes, municipal sludge, household hazardous waste, and small quantity generator hazardous wastes). Identify preferred regional, subregional, and local strategies for managing special and problem wastes such as waste tires. Identify preferred regional, subregion, and local strategies for managing household hazardous wastes.

Role of Other Entities: 3F.

3G.

3H. 3I.

More Local Governments should consider the establishment of citizens’ convenience centers as a means of improving solid waste management service in the rural areas of the Panhandle. Local Governments that have not already done so should consider the passage of a litter control ordinance as of means of controlling litter and illegal dumping within their jurisdiction. Local Governments should consider the institution of local or multi-jurisdictional litter enforcement officer programs as a means of controlling illegal dumping in the Panhandle. The TCEQ and other applicable state agencies should work with the region in an effort to resolve the region’s waste tire management issues.

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GOAL 4:

Maintain administrative structures that will ensure at least some measure of local control over future systems operations and provide an element of control over siting of future landfills in the Region.

Region-Level Strategies: 4A.

4B.

Maintain the RSWMAC’s Conformance Review process to ensure that all future MSW facilities located in the Panhandle are compatible with the goals and objectives of the regional solid waste management plan. Work with the TCEQ to ensure the RSWMAC’s role in the MSW facility permitting process is clearly defined and understood by all concerned parties.

Role of Other Entities: 4C.

4D. 4E.

MSW facility registration and/or permit applicants should work toward designing their facility to achieve the greatest possible conformance with the regional solid waste management plan. The RSWMAC should maintain an active role in ensuring that future MSW facilities sited in the Panhandle conform to the regional solid waste management plan. The TCEQ should actively heed the recommendations of the RSWMAC regarding the conformance of proposed MSW facilities to the regional solid waste management plan.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

Region-Level Strategies: 5A.

5B.

Where it is not currently provided or easily accessible, to encourage local governments to make MSW collection services more available in the incorporated and unincorporated areas of the Panhandle Region. Develop programs at the regional level to facilitate cooperative and standardized approaches to providing MSW collection and transportation services in rural areas of the Panhandle.

Role of Other Entities: 5E. 5F. 5G. 5H.

3.

Local Government and private landfill operators in the region should work toward achieving maximum feasible compaction of waste so as to extend the life of their landfill. Local Government and private landfill operators should consider extending the life of their MSW facility by implementing new integrated waste management alternatives. Local Government landfill operators should consider initiating the permitting process for a new facility when the expected life of their current landfill drops below 10 years. Local Governments should work toward encouraging their unserved residents to access the available waste collection services in the region, be they private or public services, to improve waste management in the rural areas of the Panhandle. Action Plan: ACTION PLAN - SHORT-RANGED PLAN (2002 – 2006)

The following briefly outlines the actions that will be taken during the life of the current plan amendment (2002 – 2006) to address the region’s identified solid waste management needs and to help in achieving the goals described above. Page 56


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

a. PLAN CONFORMANCE/PERMIT REVIEW All MSW facilities proposed for siting in the Panhandle must conform to the regional solid waste management plan. This is a condition of the TCEQ’s MSW facility permitting requirements and other applicable state statutes (§363.066, Texas Health and Safety Code and §330.566 Subchapter O). As such, one of the primary functions of the RSWMAC is to review permit and registration applications being filed from this region to assess their conformance to the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. The findings of the RSWMAC are then presented to the TCEQ Commission. The RSWMAC’s comments or recommendations will be considered by the Commission when it decides whether or not to grant the permit or registration request. In the Panhandle region, the following procedures will be followed by the RSWMAC when asked to review a permit or registration application for regional plan conformance. Timing of a Review Request: Applicants may only request a conformance review of their registration or permit application after Part 1 and Part 2 of the filing forms have been fully completed. These documents will be submitted to the PRPC as part of the review process. Additional Required Filing Information: In addition to submitting Part 1 and Part 2 of the permit application, applicants will also be required to submit a completed Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist (shown as Exhibit A to this planning document). Subchapter E of the TCEQ’s permitting procedures (§ 330.51 (10)) states that it is the responsibility of the applicant to demonstrate conformance with the regional solid waste plan. This then is the purpose of the regional plan checklist. The applicant will complete the form to the best of his or her ability to indicate how the proposed facility will help in promoting the goals and objectives of the regional plan. The chief administrative officer of the applicant organization must sign the form to attest to the accuracy and truthfulness of the information presented. Requesting a Registration or Application Review: When requesting a review, applicants will submit the following documents to the PRPC: 1. Two (2) full copies of Part 1 and Part 2 of the application form 2. One (1) originally signed copy of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist 3. One (1) copy of any other information which the applicant may view as helping to facilitate the RSWMAC review process This information must be submitted under a cover letter which lists the following information. 1. The chief contact person for the application 2. The contact information for that individual 3. The name of the engineer representing the applicant 4. The contact information for the applicant’s engineer 5. The contact information for the TCEQ staff person to whom all review-related correspondence should be sent

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The submission documents and cover letter must be addressed and delivered to the PRPC’s Regional Solid Waste Management Coordinator at the following address: Mailed Requests:

Hand-Delivered Request:

PRPC Attn: SW Program Coordinator P.O. Box 9257 Amarillo, TX 79105

PRPC Attn: SW Program Coordinator 415 West Eighth Avenue Amarillo, TX 79101

No RSWMAC review requests will be considered until all the required information has been submitted in its completed form. Once it has been determined that the information has been properly filed, the PRPC Regional Solid Waste Coordinator, will confirm its receipt in writing to the applicant and schedule a meeting of the RSWMAC to review the application at the earliest possible date. Applicants will be notified in writing of the application review date and are strongly encouraged to attend that RSWMAC meeting in order to present their application to the committee. RSWMAC’s Conformance Review Considerations: The RSWMAC will consider the following factors when determining how a proposed facility will or will not conform to the regional solid waste plan. 1. The information provided on the applicant’s Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist and 2. The general compatibility of the proposed facility to existing surrounding land use. The second of these two factors is not intended to supercede or take the place of the land use compatibility determination that will ultimately be made by the TCEQ. The TCEQ requires that the RSWMAC make some judgment, outside that which will be made by the Commissioners, as to the appropriateness of the proposed facility in relation to the existing surrounding land use. The types of information that will be considered with regard to general land use compatibility will include but may not be limited to: For landfills: The proposed fill height of the facility and how it will eventually impact the existing appearance of the surrounding area. For landfills: If the proposed facility is within an area covered by a set of local zoning requirements, applicant must demonstrate that the proposed facility will be conformance with those zoning standards. For landfills: How the proposed facility will impact existing traffic patterns in and adjacent to the proposed facility. For transfer facilities: The measures that will be taken, if necessary, to blend the appearance and operation of the proposed facility in with its surroundings. For transfer facilities: If the proposed facility is within an area covered by a set of local zoning requirements, applicant must demonstrate that the proposed facility will be conformance with those zoning standards. Page 58


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

For transfer facilities:

How the proposed facility will impact existing traffic patterns in and adjacent to the proposed facility.

For other MSW Facilities: The measures that will be taken, if necessary, to blend the appearance and operation of the proposed facility in with its surroundings. For other MSW Facilities: If the proposed facility is within an area covered by a set of local zoning requirements, applicant must demonstrate that the proposed facility will be conformance with those zoning standards. For other MSW Facilities:

How the proposed facility will impact existing traffic patterns in and adjacent to the proposed facility.

Unless the property adjacent to the proposed facility site has been purchased, zoned and/or platted for future development at the time the permit/registration application is submitted for review, the RSWMAC will generally not consider future growth patterns as a factor of the conformance review. As a pre-existing facility, the RSWMAC would consider the rights of the MSW facility to hold precedence over the rights of the individual or entity that might elect to develop that adjacent property in the future. The RSWMAC reserves the right to solicit letters of comment from individuals and organizations located within the proposed facility’s impact area when considering the general land use compatibility factor. RSWMAC’s Conformance Review Findings: There are four responses the RSWMAC may consider when determining the conformance of a proposed facility to the regional solid waste management plan. Those are: 1. A finding that additional information will be required before a final recommendation can be rendered. 2. A finding of conformance with the plan prompting a recommendation to the TCEQ that the application be approved as presented. 3. A finding of non-support of the regional plan, prompting a recommendation letter from the RSWMAC to the applicant citing suggestions as to how the facility could be better aligned with the regional planning goals. 4. A finding of incompatibility with existing surrounding land use, prompting a recommendation to the TCEQ that a land use compatibility hearing be held before the granting of the permit or registration is considered. It should be noted that this review is not an application approval or disapproval process. It is merely a means by which the RSWMAC can voice its qualified opinion of how the proposed facility conforms to the regional solid waste management plan to the body that will eventually approve or disapprove the application. Communicating the RSWMAC’s Conformance Review Findings: The PRPC’s Regional Solid Waste Program Coordinator will be responsible for communicating the RSWMAC’s findings in writing to all affected parties. Those findings will be communicated as follows.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

An original copy of the RSWMAC’s recommendation letter, signed by the current year RSWMAC chairperson, will be sent to the individual identified in the applicant’s cover letter as being the appropriate TCEQ contact person. The letter will be mailed seven days following the meeting during which the RSWMAC recommendation was made allowing the applicant time, if necessary, to appeal the recommendation of the RSWMAC. In keeping with the desires of the TCEQ Commissioners, only that checklist information which pertains to Land Use Compatibility will be included in with the RSWMAC’s recommendation letter. A copy of the letter will be sent to the person identified in the applicant’s cover letter as being the chief contact person for the application. The letter will be mailed immediately following the meeting during which the RSWMAC recommendation was made. A copy of the letter will be sent to the person identified in the applicant’s cover letter as being the engineer representing the applicant. The letter will be mailed immediately following the meeting during which the RSWMAC recommendation was made. Appeals Process: The RSWMAC is an Advisory Committee to the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission’s Board of Directors. The PRPC Board has vested the responsibility for MSW facility application review with the RSWMAC. In general, the recommendations of the RSMAC will be final. An applicant may appeal the disposition of its application only if the application review is not processed and treated in accordance with the procedures set forth in this section. All appeals, including the specific alleged procedural violation(s), must be submitted to the PRPC Executive Director in writing. The Executive Director may then take one of the following actions: 1. Investigate the allegation and determine that the appeal is not valid. In such case, the applicant will receive in writing the basis for the decision to reject the applicant’s appeal. In such case, the decision of the Executive Director is final. 2. If there is some validity to the appeal, the Executive Director will place the appeal on the agenda of the PRPC Board of Directors. The protesting applicant will be notified of the time and date of the meeting during which the Board of Directors will consider the appeal. The applicant will be given the opportunity to present his/her case directly to the PRPC Board of Directors. The Board of Directors will then render a decision on the appeal of the protesting applicant. All decisions made by the PRPC Board of Directors will be final. An appeal can be filed at any time during the seven calendar-day period following the date on which the RSWMAC developed its recommendation. The appeal must be received by the PRPC during that timeframe. Any appeals received after that date will not be considered and the RSWMAC recommendation letter will be immediately forwarded to the TCEQ. Voluntary Pre-Application Review: A potential permit or registration applicant may, at their discretion, ask to meet with the PRPC Regional Solid Waste Program Coordinator to discuss their impending application. The PRPC Solid Waste Program Coordinator will provide the potential applicant with his/her observations of the proposed facility in relation to the regional solid waste management plan. In so doing, this may help to ensure the ultimate conformance of the proposed facility with the regional plan.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

b. GRANTS FUNDING PLAN Each year, the TCEQ provides the Panhandle region with funding to implement projects designed to address the priority needs identified in the regional solid waste management plan. Described below is the plan that will be followed to utilize these grant funds so as to fulfill this purpose. It should be noted that the PRPC’s Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (RSWMAC) will be responsible for implementing this funding plan and for determining how the region’s annual allocations of TCEQ funding can best be used to meet the goals of the regional solid waste management plan. (1) Regional Solid Waste Management Plan Priorities The goals of the regional solid waste management plan have been prioritized by the RSWMAC in the following order. To the extent practicable, the RSWMAC will consider these prioritized goals when determining how the annual allocation of TCEQ grant funds should be utilized. GOAL 1:

Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs with the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting.)

GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

GOAL 3: GOAL 4:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices. Maintain administrative structures that will ensure at least some measure of local control over future systems operations and provide an element of control over siting of future landfills in the Region.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

(2) Specific Projects Because of the contribution it makes to sustaining and developing the region’s recycling efforts, the Regional Marketing & Transportation Program administered by the PRPC will be an annual priority in the award of TCEQ grant funding. To avoid limiting the potential for large-scale creative projects in the future, the Regional Marketing & Transportation Program is the only standing project being identified in the region’s funding plan. (3) Project Categories The types of projects that will be considered under the region’s funding plan will include the following. Listed below the project type is the planning goal(s) the project should be helping to promote.

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Recycling and Waste Reduction Projects: Funds may be used for projects that provide a direct and measurable affect on reducing the amount of waste going into landfills, by diverting various materials from the municipal solid waste stream for beneficial reuse or recycling, or reducing waste generation at the source. GOAL 1:

Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs with the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting.)

GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: new community recycling programs or expansions to existing community recycling programs, in-school recycling programs or in-school programs carried out in cooperation with community recycling programs, scrap metal recycling programs, programs that target the reduction or beneficial reuse of construction/demolition debris, programs that promote source reduction, projects that encourage the purchase of recycled-content products or materials and/or educational programs to promote all of the above. Composting and Yard Waste Reduction Projects: Funds may be used for projects that provide a direct and measurable affect on reducing the amount of waste going into landfills, by diverting various organic materials from the municipal solid waste stream for beneficial reuse, composting, mulching, or reducing waste generation at the source. GOAL 1:

Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs with the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting.)

GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: wood/brush diversion/composting projects, yard waste diversion/composting projects, source reduction projects such as the “Don’t Bag It” program and the Master Composting program, promotion and/or demonstration of xeriscaping techniques, and/or educational programs to promote all of the above. HHW Projects: Funds may be used for projects which provide a means for the collection, recycling or reuse, and/or proper disposal of household hazardous waste, including household chemicals, used oil and oil filters, antifreeze, lead-acid batteries, and other materials. GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: projects carried out in support of the TCEQ’s Texas Country Clean-up Program, local/regional HHW collection events, electronic waste diversion/recycling programs, and/or educational programs to promote all of the above. Law Enforcement Projects: Funds may be used for projects that contribute to the prevention of illegal dumping of municipal solid waste, including liquid wastes. Funding recipients may investigate illegal dumping problems; enforce laws and regulations pertaining to the illegal dumping of municipal solid waste, including liquid waste; establish a program to monitor the collection and transport of municipal liquid wastes, through administration of a manifesting system; and educate the public on illegal dumping laws and regulations. GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: the implementation of local/subregional/regional Environmental Officer programs, assisting with the development of local codes and ordinances to strengthen local attempts to inhibit illegal dumping, the purchase and distribution of training materials to better instruct local elected and law enforcement officials on the legal resources currently available to inhibit illegal dumping, and/or educational programs to promote all of the above. Litter and Illegal Dumping Cleanup Projects: Funds may be used for ongoing and periodic activities to clean up litter and illegal dumping of municipal solid waste, excluding cleanup of scrap tire dumping sites. Projects may include support for Lake and River Cleanup events, conducted in conjunction with the TCEQ’s and Keep Texas Beautiful’s Lake and River Cleanup Program. GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: support of city/county litter clean-up events, highway litter clean-up events, litter prevention programs and/or educational programs to promote all of the above. Rural Waste Management Projects: Funds may be used for projects to construct and equip citizens’ collection stations, as these facilities are defined under 30 TAC §330.2, TNRCC Rules. Municipal Solid Waste Transfer Stations that qualify for registration under § 330.4(d)(1) – (3) or § 330.4(r) of the TCEQ’s Rules may also be funded. Projects funded for these types of facilities shall include consideration of an integrated approach to solid waste management to include providing recycling services at the site, if appropriate to the management system in place. Funds may also be used for periodic community collection events, held not more frequently than four times per year, to provide for collection of residential waste materials for which there is not a readily-available collection alternative, such as large and bulky items that are not picked up under the regular collection system.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category are cited in the project caption above and may also include educational programs to promote any or all of the described activities. Other Waste Management Projects: Funds may be used to support Education Only projects, projects for the Formation of Partnerships for the Utilization of Shared Solid Waste Services and other solid waste projects focusing primarily on waste reduction/recycling which because of the project’s unique character, is not easily categorized under any other project category heading. Being a catch-all project category, projects funded under the category heading could potentially address any or all of the following. GOAL 1:

Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs with the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting)

GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices. (NOTE: If permitted by the TCEQ, this goal under Other Waste Management Projects may be achieved with programs that target the proper recycling/disposal of waste tires)

GOAL 4:

Develop recommendations for administrative structures that will ensure at least some measure of local control over future systems operations and provide an element of control over siting of future landfills in the Region.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: stand alone public education projects on recycling/waste management issues, local/subregional/regional waste tire recycling/disposal projects, and developing administrative arrangements for the shared use of waste management systems. Technical Studies and Local Sold Waste Management Plans: Funds may be used for projects that include the collection of pertinent data, analysis of issues and needs, evaluation of alternative solutions, public input, and recommended actions, to assist in making solid waste management decisions at the local level. Any project funded under this category heading must conform to the TCEQ’s requirements for technical studies and local plans. Also, in any given year, the funds available for projects in this category will be limited to no more than ten (10) percent of the total grant budget available.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Again, because this is a rather broad project category, projects funded under this category heading could potentially address any or all of the following. GOAL 1:

Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs with the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting.)

GOAL 2:

Develop regional cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-suitable solid waste management systems.

GOAL 3:

Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices.

GOAL 4:

Develop recommendations for administrative structures that will ensure at least some measure of local control over future systems operations and provide an element of control over siting of future landfills in the Region.

GOAL 5:

Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability.

Examples of projects that could be considered within this project category include: the development of local/subregional solid waste management plans and the development of local/ subregional feasibility studies for recycling/composting/waste reduction initiatives. Engineering designs for the development of new disposal facilities are specifically prohibited from consideration by the TCEQ program rules governing the regional solid waste grants program. (4) Allocation and Priorities During the life of this amendment, the RSWMAC will not place any priority or caps on any of these categories. Each year’s grant program will allow for an open competition for all available funds. In that same regard, the RSWMAC will not allocate blocks of funds to any of the Panhandle’s subregions, establish category funding limits or artificial award funding caps. Rather, each year’s grant program will allow for an open competition for all available funds. (5) Project Selection Process The RSWMAC will be primarily responsible for recommending the Implementation Projects that will be selected for funding during any Regional Solid Waste Grant Program Year. In accordance with the provisions of this funding plan, the RSWMAC may recommend projects for funding on a competitive basis, non-competitive basis, or a combination thereof. All applications will be reviewed and prioritized by the RSWMAC with a final review for program conformance being conducted by the TCEQ. However, the decisions made by the RSWMAC will, if approved by the PRPC Board of Directors, for the most part be final. The TCEQ's role will be one of ensuring project eligibility and will only intervene on specific cases where the eligibility of a particular project is called into question. Therefore, the responsibility of determining the use of the Panhandle's Regional Solid Waste Grant funds will remain at the local level. Page 65


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

The RSWMAC will consider the following criteria when reviewing and prioritizing the region’s Solid Waste Grants applications. A. PROJECT DESCRIPTION (0-20 Points)

Is the purpose of the project clearly defined?

Are the goals and outcomes of the project clearly and realistically defined?

Are the project's target groups clearly defined.

Are the implementation steps and procedures clearly defined?

Does the project meet one or more of the goals and objectives of the Regional Solid Waste Management Plan?

B. IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM (0-20 Points)

Are all program costs accurately defined and documented.

Is the project's implementation timetable realistic?

Is the person(s) responsible for ensuring the implementation of the project identified?

Is that person(s) role in the project clearly defined?

Are there adequate accountability controls to ensure the project is completed as proposed?

Are program costs justifiable?

C. PROJECT IMPACT (0-30 Points)

Does the project involve the cooperative efforts of multiple entities or organizations?

Does the project involve effective public/private participation and if so, to what extent will the private participation benefit the program.

How do the estimated per capita program costs compare to the estimated savings the project is anticipated to achieve.

Will project income(s), if there are any generated, be used to further the applicant's solid waste management efforts.

How will progress measures be made and reported.

D. LEVEL OF COMMITMENT (0-30 Points)

Are any resources, other than the Solid Waste Grant funds, being committed toward the completion of this project?

Who is committing these additional resources and have those commitments been documented.

Who will be responsible for operating the program once the term of the project is complete?

What are the estimated on-going maintenance costs for sustaining the project beyond the term of the project period?

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

How will the on-going maintenance costs be funded?

If the project involves waste reduction/recycling/diversion, will the applicant be able to continue generating and providing annual waste diversion reports to the PRPC.

The RSWMAC will use an averaged rank-based scoring system for determining the prioritization of the projects. The maximum number of points that any project can receive is 100. The numeric point values shown for each criterion being used by the RSWMAC will be used to score the applications. Then, each RSWMAC member’s point scores for the proposals will be converted to an individualized ranking of how each member ranked the projects on his or her ballot. The individualized rankings of all the reviewing RSWMAC members will then be totaled and averaged based on the number of members evaluating each proposal, to create a prioritized listing of all the projects. c. LOCAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS To date, none of the region’s local governments have shown a compelling interest in developing a local solid waste management plan. Many rely instead on the regional plan for local guidance. One key reason why this is so is because most of the local governments in the region are too small to support a plan. In those cases, a local plan would not be of great benefit. However, that is not to say that at some point in the future, one or more of the region’s local governments will see a need to develop a local plan. In such event, if the project is supported by Regional Solid Waste Grant funding, then the plan will have to follow the solid waste planning requirements as established by the TCEQ. Briefly, the local plan will have to be written in conformance with this regional plan and with the state’s solid waste management plan. Further, as directed by the TCEQ, local plan development in this region must be guided by the PRPC. In other words, the plan must be crafted with input from the RSWMAC to ensure the plan, when completed, is in conformance with the regional solid waste management plan. d. REGIONAL COORDINATION AND PLANNING The PRPC’s Solid Waste division is responsible for carrying out regional solid waste coordination and planning activities in the Panhandle. The various duties of the Solid Waste division staff include but will not be limited to the following. 

The provision of support staffing to the Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (RSWMAC)

The provision of Technical Assistance to eligible applicants in the development of applications for Regional Solid Waste Grant funding

The provision of Technical Assistance to Regional Solid Waste Grant grantees in the implementation of their projects

The provision of Technical Assistance to any party interested or involved in the region’s solid waste management system on matters pertaining to municipal solid waste in the region  The conduct of regional outreach, education and training activities as requested and directed by the TCEQ 

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment 

The maintenance of a regional information resource center on information related to MSW management

Facilitating the RSWMAC Conformance Review and Comment on MSW Facility Permit applications originating from within the Texas Panhandle

Providing Pre-Application Review consultation to potential applicants for MSW Facility Permits or Registrations from within the Texas Panhandle

Performing data collection and analysis activities as needed or as requested and directed by the TCEQ

Maintaining and updating the Panhandle region’s Closed Landfill Inventory and responding to public requests for information regarding the Inventory on an as-needed basis  Maintaining the Regional Marketing & Transportation Program to facilitate the marketing and transportation of recyclable materials being processed by the region’s local governments 

Any other duties as may be assigned by the RSWMAC, the PRPC Board of Directors or the TCEQ in the future. e. LOCAL AND SUBREGIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS

The following factors should be taken into consideration by local governments within the subregional areas described below. Subregions 4 and 6: Currently, there is a relatively small amount of recycling and waste reduction taking place within these two subregional areas. Yet, the bulk of the region’s population resides within these two planning subdivisions. If the region ever intends to hit a 40% waste reduction goal then the local governments within these two subregions will have to make a sizable contribution toward that effort. If they have not already done so, the local governments within Subregion 4 and 6 should consider the possibility of starting their own recycling and/or waste reduction initiative. If they already have a program in place, they should consider the possibility of expanding upon that program(s). Subregions 1, 3, 4, and 6: In the 2002 Local Government Survey response pool, some of the more serious comments regarding the illegal dumping issue came from local governments located within these three planning subdivisions. Local governments in these areas should consider the implementation of programs that either facilitate proper disposal and/or control illegal disposal in order to contain the problem in the future. Subregions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6: All the local governments, school districts, colleges and universities located within these subregional areas should consider the possibility of implementing in-house recycling programs in accordance with the requirements of Senate Bill 1340. f.

RECOMMENATIONS FOR STATE-LEVEL ACTION

The management of scrap tires continues to be a problem in the Texas Panhandle. Since the state’s tire program was sunset several years ago, the problem has only worsened.

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As it currently appears, at least for the near-term, the solution to this problem will not be marketdriven. That assumption was made at the time tire program was rescinded and that outcome has yet to materialize. The TCEQ and other applicable state agencies should consider measures that will make the management of scrap tires more effective across the state including, the Texas Panhandle. g. OTHER There are no further recommendations to be made at this time. Nevertheless, in the future as other solid waste needs are clarified or possible solutions to management issues are identified, recommendations for responsive actions will be made to the appropriate parties or agencies. ACTION PLAN - MEDIUM-RANGED PLANNING PERIOD (2007 – 2012) As the planning period extends outward, the specific recommendations become more generalized to account for accomplishments or regulation/legislative changes that might occur during preceding planning period. For the purpose of the Panhandle’s medium-ranged plan, future initiatives will continue to focus primarily on supporting environmentally-safe, costeffective waste reduction initiatives. This was the main purpose behind original creation of the Regional Solid Waste Management Program and remains central to goals of the region’s local governments. The medium-ranged planning objectives are set out as follows: Assigned to: REGIONAL MSW COORDINATOR On-Going Actions:  Continue to arrange and facilitate quarterly RSWMAC meetings. On-Going Actions: (continued)  Continue to maintain the coordination of MSW management-related activities at the Regional level.  Monitor implementation of regional plan.  Continue to maintain regional resource center for MSW education/awareness programs.  Continue to serve as a clearinghouse for laws, policies, and regulations affecting the Region’s MSW system.  Provide input to state officials on MSW management issues important to the Region.  Maintain the Regional recyclables collection, transportation, processing and marketing program.  On an annual basis, estimate the volumes of MSW being diverted through the Region’s waste reduction and recycling programs and provide that data to the TCEQ.  Continue to assist local governments in the planning, development, and implementation of local, TCEQ grant-funded programs and projects.  Monitor need for additional disposal capacity in the Region. Page 69


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Medium-Range Specific Actions:  Administer the FY07 amendment to the Regional Plan.  Develop additional education/awareness programs at regional level to support MSW management programs in the region and encourage proper management practices.  As needed, assist in the development of more formal administrative structures for MSW management programs. Assigned to: REGIONAL MSW COORDINATOR IN COOPERATION WITH STATE OFFICIALS On-Going Actions:  Educate local government officials, facility/service operators, and generators about changes in state MSW laws, regulations and policies.  Identify and assist in development of recyclables/ compost markets and coordinate development efforts with other economic development efforts in Region.  Provide MSW technical assistance to local governments, businesses, and institutions.

Assigned to: THE REGIONAL SOLID W ASTE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE On-Going Actions:

 Meet at least quarterly. On-Going Actions: (continued)  Oversee, review, and provide input during the development of the regional plan amendment.  Share information on local MSW plans and programs.  Explore approaches to cooperatively providing MSW management services.  Facilitate siting of MSW facilities in the Region.

As-Needed Actions:  Communicate with State officials on MSW management matters important to the Region.  Develop updates/modifications to the RSWMAC Operating Procedures/Bylaws.  Provide Conformance Review Comments/Recommendations to the TCEQ regarding applications for new MSW facilities in the Region.  Nominate new members to the RSWMAC.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Recommended For: LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (CITY AND COUNTY) On-Going Actions:  Ensure that long-term disposal capacity, including disposal capacity for special wastes, is available for their jurisdiction.  Ensure convenient collection service is provided in their jurisdiction at least weekly.  Continue to support the maintenance and expansion of the region’s waste reduction initiatives.

Medium-Range Specific Actions:  Adopt internal source reduction, reuse, recycling, and recycled content procurement policies and programs.  Establish waste reduction and recycling programs in areas which currently have none.  Implement more aggressive programs as needed to meet the region’s waste reduction goals to the extent technically and economically feasible.  Implement programs to control and/or prevent illegal dumping and disposal.

Recommended For: SOLID W ASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY OPERATORS On-Going Actions:  Monitor the need for additional disposal capacity. On-Going Actions: (continued)  Implement techniques/procedures to effectively and safely extend the life of the MSW facility.  Operate in strict conformance with TCEQ rules and requirements.  Support the regional plan amendment process by providing disposal data to the PRPC MSW Coordinator on an as-needed basis.

Medium-Range Specific Actions:  Assess options for increasing convenience and cost-effectiveness of MSW management services.  Support regional initiatives to manage problem wastes such as waste tires.

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Assigned to: THE PRPC BOARD OF DIRECTORS On-Going Actions:  Consider and act upon Regional Solid Waste Grant Program applications and RSWMAC funding recommendations.  Appoint new members to RSWMAC.  Approve regional plan amendments. ACTION PLAN - LONG-RANGED PLANNING PERIOD (2013 – 2022) Assigned to: REGIONAL MSW COORDINATOR On-Going Actions: Same as those listed under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period. Long-Range Specific Actions:  Complete or maintain those activities describe under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period.  Develop programs at the regional level to facilitate standardized, cooperative approaches to managing problem and specials wastes.  Establish a regional “dumpstoppers” hotline.

Assigned to: REGIONAL MSW COORDINATOR IN COOPERATION WITH STATE OFFICIALS On-Going Actions: Same as those listed under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period. Assigned to: THE REGIONAL SOLID W ASTE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE On-Going Actions: Same as those listed under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period. Recommended For: LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (CITY AND COUNTY) On-Going Actions: Same as those listed under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period. Long-Range Specific Actions:  Provide HHW waste collection.  Implement more aggressive waste reduction programs to the extent technically and economically feasible.  Implement more aggressive enforcement programs to the extent needed to control and deter illegal dumping and disposal. Page 72


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Recommended For: SOLID W ASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY OPERATORS On-Going Actions: Same as those listed under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period. Long-Range Specific Actions:  Implement more aggressive waste reduction programs to the extent technically and economically feasible.  Minimize, reuse, or recycle special and problem wastes to the extent technically and economically feasible.

Assigned to: THE PRPC BOARD OF DIRECTORS On-Going Actions: Same as those listed under the Medium-Ranged Planning Period.

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FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

APPENDIX 1. STATUS AND LOCATION OF PERMITTED MSW LANDFILLS

Appendix 1


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

2000 Status Report of the Panhandle Region’s Permitted MSW Landfills

Table 21. PERMITEE

SUB

PERMIT #

TYPE

2000 TONS

REMYDS

RATE

REMTONS

City of County of City of Boys City of City of City of City of City of City of City of City of City of City of County of BFI City of City of City of City of City of City of

1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 22

211 787 1038 791 338 876 1943 244 570 589 1164 2238 73 215 414 1663 955 2263 2266 445 1009 749

1 4AE 1AE 4AE 1AE 1AE 1AE 4AE 1AE 1 1AE 1 1 4AE 4AE 1 1AE 1AE 1AE 1AE 1AE 1 (inact.)

13,340 93 15,881 100 5,104 5,765 1,709 250 849 390 2,353 48,388 239,991 5,023 150 171,172 4,052 5,445 4,810 7,335 7,101 0.00 539,301.00

123,745 69,228 780,853 156,500 384,702 227,044 484,458 30,440 573,999 500,700 870,044 8,872,400 31,083,000 427,241 328,200 7,300,805 657,704 2,601,480 1,195,937 1,392,994 1,778 900,000 58,963,252

666 700 700 400 955 750 300 500 750 850 400 1,000 820 800 500 950 800 800 850 750 100 900

41,207 24,230 273,299 31,300 183,695 85,142 72,669 7,610 215,250 212,798 174,009 4,436,200 12,744,030 170,896 82,050 3,467,882 263,082 1,040,592 508,273 522,373 89 405,000 24,961,674

Dumas Hartley Dalhart Ranch Spearman Perryton Booker Shamrock McLean Pampa Panhandle Pampa Amarillo Hereford Armstrong Southwest Wellington Childress Memphis Dimmitt Tulia Tulia TOTALS

REMYRS 3.1 260.5 17.2 313.0 36.0 14.8 42.5 30.4 253.5 545.6 74.0 91.7 53.1 34.0 547.0 20.3 64.9 191.1 105.7 71.2 0.01 57.0 46.3 1

1 - Remaining Years based on Total Tons Landfilled in 2000 versus Remaining Landfill Capacity in Equivalent Tons

2000TONS - Total Tons Landfilled in 2000 REMYDS - Remaining Landfill Capacity in Cubic Yards RATE - In-Landfill Comaction Rate in Pounds per Cubic Yard REMTONS - Remaining Landfill Capacity in Equivalent Tons (based on in-landfill compaction rate) REMYRS - Remaining Landfill Capacity in Equivalent Years (assumming 2000 population and disposal amount remain constant) Appendix 1


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

APPENDIX 2. INVENTORY OF CLOSED MSW LANDFILLS

Appendix 2


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

APPENDIX 3. OTHER DATA AND INFORMATION Appendix Page(s) 1. PRPC ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATION 31: DUTIES OF THE RSWMAC 2. CURRENT RSWMAC MEMBERSHIP 3. SUMMARIES OF THE SUBREGIONAL WASTE SYSEMS 4. CURRENT LISTING OF THE REGION’S RESIDENTIAL SOLID WASTE FEES

1 - 2 3 4 - 15 16 - 17

Appendix 3


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

PANHANDLE REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION Administrative Regulation Number 31

Adopted: July 26, 1990 Amended: December 13, 1990 October 24, 1991 October, 27, 1994

PANHANDLE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE PROCEDURES AND POLICIES I.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this administrative regulation is to formally establish a Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee and to establish procedures necessary for its operation. II. REGIONAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE A. Establishment and Scope of Authority 1. The Board of Directors of the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission hereby establishes the Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee to provide general guidance and policy direction in regard to solid waste management in the Texas Panhandle. The Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee's specific responsibilities shall include but not be limited to the following: a. The establishment of working rules and procedures for the Advisory Committee.1 b. The development, review and approval of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. c. The development, review and approval of updates and amendments to the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. d. The coordination and promotion of the implementation of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. e. The provision of solid waste management information to the local governments and general population of the Texas Panhandle. f.

The provision of general direction to the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission staff regarding solid waste management issues in the Texas Panhandle.

g. The provision of oversight and direction to foster the growth and development of the Panhandle Environmental Partnership. 1

– The authority to establish working rules extends to developing protocols for complying with the SWAC’s obligations under the TCEQ’s Regional Solid Waste Program contract. Appendix 3 – Page 1


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

2. The responsibilities of the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission's Board of Directors and the Planning Commission's Executive Director shall include but not be limited to the following: a. Contracting matters; b. Budgeting; c. Financial reporting; and d. Personnel matters. B. Membership 1. The Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee shall be composed as follows: a. Twenty-two (22) Panhandle area local government representatives (local government elected officials or local government professional staff). b. Four (4) Panhandle area private solid waste management service providers. c. Two (2) Panhandle area citizens representing solid waste management or environmental interest groups. 2. Members of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee shall be appointed by the Panhandle Regional Planning Commission's Board of Directors for staggered three-year terms beginning each August. Onethird of the Advisory Committee members shall be reappointed or replaced each year, members may not serve more than two consecutive three-year terms. 3. A Chairperson and Vice Chairperson of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee shall be elected by vote of the Advisory Committee. The Chairperson and Vice Chairperson shall serve one-year terms beginning each August. 4. A representative of the state agency in Texas charged with municipal solid waste management oversight authority shall serve as a member of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee. C. Meetings 1. Meetings of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee shall be held no less frequently than one meeting per quarter. 2. All Advisory Committee meetings shall be open to the public. Meetings shall be recorded on audio tape and minutes prepared. 3. A simple majority of those Advisory Committee members present and voting at any meeting is sufficient to approve any motion. ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯

Appendix 3 – Page 2


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Members of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (Aug. 1, 2001) Term Beginning August 1, 1999 - Expires July 31, 2002 Lynard Schafer Arbie Taylor Billy Jack Land Gilbert Bailey Paula Wilson David Moore Jeremy Briant Greg Duggan Hoyt Manning

(1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1)  (2) (1)

Hemphill County Commissioner Director of Public Works, City of Perryton Alderman, City of Clarendon Sanitation Director, City of Childress City Manager, City of Friona President, Compost Performance Systems Manager, BFI Recycling City Manager, City of Dalhart Sanitation Director, City of Canadian

Term Beginning August 1, 2000 - Expires July 31, 2003 Jon Sessions Linda Weller Michael Rice Randy Criswell Jerry Patton Darcy Long Greg Dankworth James Stroud Michael Kitten

(2)  (2) (1) (1) (1) (2) (2) (2)

City Manager, City of Wellington City Manager, City of Gruver FY02 Vice Chairman Asst. Director of Public Works, City of Amarillo City Manager, City of Canyon City Administrator, City of Silverton City Manager, City of Booker Owner, Scrap Processing City Manager, City of Stinnett Environmental Coordinator, AzTx Cattle Company

Term Beginning August 1, 2001 - Expires July 31, 2004 Matt Wood Robert Patrick Don Sheffey Ken Fortham Ernie Johnston Richard Morris Johnny Rhodes Chris Coffman Dusty McGuire Ric Walton

(2) (2) (2) (1) (1) (2) (1) (2) (1) (2)

TNRCC Field Representative:

District Manager, BFI Solid Waste Systems City Manager, City of Spearman City Manager, City of Dimmitt Director of Public Works, City of Stratford Donley County Commissioner City Engineer, City of Pampa City Manager, City of Shamrock City Manager, City of Panhandle – FY02 Chairman Citizen Concerned with the Environment City Administrator, City of Fritch

Doug White

 - Serving a partial term, still eligible for 2 additional 3-year term(s). (1) - Serving first full three-year term. (2) - Serving second consecutive three-year term.

Appendix 3 – Page 3


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

SUBREGION 1 SUMMARY

POPULATION OVERVIEW 2000 Census Population

2020 Population Projection

Net Anticipated 20-Year Change

20-Year Change as a %

35,066

43,287

+ 8,221

+ 23.4%

CURRENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICE PROVIDERS Entity

Collection Services Provider

Landfill(s) Used (Type) - {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Dalhart

City of Dalhart

Dalhart (1AE) –

{1}

Direct hauled

City of Texline

Tri-State Recycling

Amarillo (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Dallam County

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Dalhart (1AE) – BFI (1) –

{1} {4}

Direct hauled

City of Stratford

BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

City of Texhoma

City of Texhoma, OK

Guymon, Landfill {OK}

Direct hauled

Sherman County

BFI (pt)

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

City of Channing

Tri-State Recycling

Amarillo (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Hartley County

BFI (pt) Tri-State Recycling (pt) Waste Wranglers (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

BFI (1) – {4} Amarillo (1) – {4} Hartley Co (4AE) – {1}

Direct hauled

City of Cactus

BFI

BFI (1) –

Direct hauled

{4}

Appendix 3 – Page 4


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Collection Services Provider

Entity

Landfill(s) Used (Type) - {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Dumas

City of Dumas

Dumas (1) –

{1}

Direct hauled

City of Sunray

City of Sunray

Dumas (1) –

{1}

Direct hauled

Moore County

BFI (pt) City of Sunray Residents self-haul (pt)

BFI (1) – Dumas (1) –

{4} {1}

Direct hauled

ESTIMATE OF WASTE GENERATION IN 2000 BY COUNTY Direct to Landfill(s) Dallam County

Regional Comm./Industrial

Estimated Tons Generated

16,571

1,353

17,924

Sherman County

3,120

693

3,813

Hartley County

2,638

1,204

3,842

Moore County

19,730

4,377

24,107

TOTAL ESTIMATED WASTE GENERATED IN 2000:

49,686

ESTIMATED REMAINING LANDFILL CAPACITY Subregional Landfill Facilities

Capacity Available Tons

Hartley County (Type 4AE) 1 City of Dalhart City of Dumas City of Dumas 2 TOTALS

24,230 273,399 41,207 840,000 1,178,836

Years tons tons tons tons tons

260.0 17.2 3.0 60.0 39.5

years years years years years

NOTE: The Total Remaining Years Capacity is based upon the estimated remaining Tons Capacity divided by the amount of waste deposited into the landfills during 2000. 1

- Total Years Available calculation only considers Type 1 or Type 1AE landfill capacity.

2

– The City of Dumas recently received a permit to construct a new Type 1AE facility. Once built, the facility will have an estimated 60 years of capacity. The City is currently working on permitting a new Type 4AE facility.

Appendix 3 – Page 5


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

SUBREGION 2 SUMMARY

POPULATION OVERVIEW 2000 Census Population

2020 Population Projection

Net Anticipated 20-Year Change

20-Year Change as a %

20,783

23,433

+ 2,650

+ 12.8%

CURRENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICE PROVIDERS Entity

Collection Services Provider

Landfill(s) Used (Type) - {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Gruver

City of Gruver

Spearman (1AE) – {2}

Direct hauled

City of Spearman Hansford County

City of Spearman City of Gruver (pt) Rural Waste Mgmt. (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Spearman (1AE) – {2} Spearman (1AE) – {2}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

City of Perryton

City of Perryton

Perryton (1AE) –

{2}

Direct hauled

Ochiltree County

Residents self-haul

Perryton (1AE) –

{2}

Direct hauled

City of Booker

City of Booker

Booker (1AE) –

{2}

Direct hauled

City of Darrouzett

City of Darrouzett

Booker (1AE) –

{2}

Direct hauled

City of Follett

City of Follett

Booker (1AE) –

{2}

Direct hauled

City of Higgins Lipscomb County

City of Higgins City of Higgins (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Booker (1AE) – Booker (1AE) – Pampa (1) –

{2} {2} {3}

Direct hauled Direct hauled (pt) Canadian TS (pt)

Appendix 3 – Page 6


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

NOTE: For a brief period during 2001-2002, the City of Booker had to temporarily suspend its landfill operations until the facility was brought back into compliance with TCEQ regulations. In the interim, the cities that normally brought their wastes to the Booker landfill had to make temporary, alternate arrangements.

ESTIMATE OF WASTE GENERATION IN 2000 BY COUNTY Direct to Landfill(s)

Regional Comm./Industrial

Estimated Tons Generated

Hansford County

5,180

1,167

6,347

Ochiltree County

5,765

1,959

7,724

Lipscomb County

2,491

655

3,146

Hemphill County

2,755

729

3,484

TOTAL ESTIMATED WASTE GENERATED IN 2000:

20,701

ESTIMATED REMAINING LANDFILL CAPACITY Subregional Landfill Facilities

Capacity Available Tons

City of Booker City of Perryton City of Spearman TOTALS

72,669 85,141 183,695 341,505

Years tons tons tons tons

42.5 14.8 36.0 27.15

years years years years

NOTE: Remaining Years Capacity is based upon the estimated remaining Tons Capacity divided by the amount of waste deposited into the landfills during 2000.

Appendix 3 – Page 7


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

SUBREGION 3 SUMMARY

POPULATION OVERVIEW 2000 Census Population

2020 Population Projection

Net Anticipated 20-Year Change

20-Year Change as a %

59,288

59,137

- 151

- 0.3%

CURRENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICE PROVIDERS Entity

Collection Services Provider

Landfill(s) Used (Type) {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Borger

City of Borger

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Borger TS

City of Fritch

BFI

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Direct hauled

City of Stinnett

City of Stinnett

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Borger TS

Hutchinson County

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Direct hauled Borger TS (pt)

City of Miami

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Direct hauled

City of Groom

BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

City of Panhandle City of Skellytown

City of Panhandle City of Skellytown

Panhandle (1AE) – {3} Pampa (1) – {3}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

City of White Deer Carson County

City of White Deer BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Pampa (1) – {3} Pampa (1) – {3} Panhandle (1AE) – {3}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

Appendix 3 – Page 8


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Collection Services Provider

Entity

Landfill(s) Used (Type) {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Lefors

City of Lefors

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Direct hauled

City of McLean

City of McLean

McLean (1AE) –

{3}

Direct hauled

City of Pampa Gray County

Pampa (1) – Pampa (1) – McLean (1AE) – Pampa (1) –

{3} {3} {3} {3}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

City of Mobeetie

City of Pampa BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt) BFI

City of Shamrock

City of Shamrock

Wellington (1AE) – {5}

Direct hauled

City of Wheeler

BFI

Pampa (1) –

{3}

Direct hauled

Wheeler County

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Pampa (1) – {3} Shamrock (4AE) – {3}

Direct hauled

Direct hauled

ESTIMATE OF WASTE GENERATION IN 2000 BY COUNTY Direct to Landfill(s) Hutchinson County

Regional Comm./Industrial

Estimated Tons Generated

22,565

5,190

27,755

Roberts County

425

193

618

Carson County

5,196

1,417

6,613

22,737

4,948

27,685

1,457

1,149

2,606

Gray County Wheeler County

TOTAL ESTIMATED WASTE GENERATED IN 2000:

65,277

ESTIMATED REMAINING LANDFILL CAPACITY Subregional Landfill Facilities

Capacity Available Tons

City of McLean City of Pampa (#589) City of Pampa (#2238) City of Panhandle City of Shamrock (Type 4AE) 1 City of Shamrock 2 TOTALS

215,249 212,798 4,436,200 174,009 7,610 108,000 5,153,866

Years tons tons tons tons tons tons tons

253.5 40.9 91.7 74.0 30.4 60.0 95.57

years years years years years years years

NOTE: Remaining Years Capacity is based upon the estimated remaining Tons Capacity divided by the amount of waste deposited into the landfills during 2000. 1

- Total Years Available calculation only considers Type 1 or Type 1AE landfill capacity.

2

– The City of Shamrock recently received a permit to construct a new Type 1AE facility. Opened in 2002, the facility will have an estimated 60 years of capacity. Appendix 3 – Page 9


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

SUBREGION 4 SUMMARY

BOYS RANCH

4 AE

HAPPY

POPULATION OVERVIEW 2000 Census Population

2020 Population Projection

Net Anticipated 20-Year Change

20-Year Change as a %

241,399

298,765

+ 57,366

+ 23.8%

CURRENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICE PROVIDERS Entity

Collection Services Provider

Landfill(s) Used (Type) {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Adrian

BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

City of Vega Oldham County

City of Vega City of Vega (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Amarillo (1) – Amarillo (1) – BFI (1) –

{4} {4} {4}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

City of Amarillo

City of Amarillo

Amarillo (1) –

{4}

Amarillo TS (pt) Direct hauled (pt)

City of Bishop Hills Potter County

Ind. contracts w/ BFI BFI (pt) Waste Wranglers (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Amarillo (1) – Amarillo (1) – BFI (1) –

{4} {4} {4}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

City of Hereford

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt) BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

BFI (1) – Hereford (4AE) – BFI (1) – Hereford (4AE) –

{4} {4} {4} {4}

Direct hauled

Deaf Smith County

Direct hauled

Appendix 3 – Page 10


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Collection Services Provider

Entity

Landfill(s) Used (Type) – {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Canyon

BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

City of Happy

BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Lake Tanglewood

Ind. contracts w/ BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Village of Palisades

Ind. contracts w/ BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Timbercreek

Ind. contracts w/ BFI

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Randall County

BFI (pt) Waste Wranglers (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

BFI (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

City of Claude

BFI

Amarillo (1) –

{4}

Direct hauled

Armstrong County

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

Amarillo (1) – {4} Armstrong Co. (4AE) – {4}

Direct hauled

ESTIMATE OF WASTE GENERATION IN 2000 BY COUNTY Direct to Landfill(s) Oldham County Potter County Deaf Smith County Randall County Armstrong County

Regional Comm./Industrial

Estimated Tons Generated

2,195

475

2,670

148,933

24,701

173,634

20,883

4,038

24,921

132,983

22,692

155,675

2,230

467

2,697

650

141

791

Swisher County

TOTAL ESTIMATED WASTE GENERATED IN 2000:

360,388

ESTIMATED REMAINING LANDFILL CAPACITY Subregional Landfill Facilities

Capacity Available Tons

City of Amarillo 12,744,030 tons 1 BFI Southwest Landfill 3,467,883 tons 2 Armstrong County (Type 4AE) 82,050 tons 2 City of Hereford (Type 4AE) 170,896 tons TOTALS 16,464,859 tons

Years 53.0 20.0 547.0 34.0 31.2

years years years years years

NOTE: Remaining Years Capacity is based upon the estimated remaining Tons Capacity divided by the amount of waste deposited into the landfills during 2000. 1

– BFI Southwest Landfill recently permitted a new cell to accept Class 1 NonHazardous Industrial Waste. 2 - Total Years Available calculation only considers Type 1 or Type 1AE landfill capacity. 3 – The Boy’s Ranch Type 4AE is not listed because it only serves ranch residents. Appendix 3 – Page 11


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

SUBREGION 5 SUMMARY

POPULATION OVERVIEW 2000 Census Population

2020 Population Projection

Net Anticipated 20-Year Change

20-Year Change as a %

18,504

18,642

+ 138

+ 0.7%

CURRENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICE PROVIDERS Entity

Collection Services Provider

Landfill(s) Used (Type) {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Clarendon

City of Clarendon

Memphis (1AE) –

{5}

Direct hauled

City of Hedley

City of Hedley

Wellington (1AE) – {5}

Direct hauled

City of Howardwick

City of Clarendon

Memphis (1AE) –

{5}

Direct hauled

Donley County

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

BFI (1) – {4} Memphis (1AE) –

{5}

City of Dodson

City of Wellington

Wellington (1AE) – {5}

Direct hauled

City of Wellington

City of Wellington

Wellington (1AE) – {5}

Direct hauled

Collingsworth County

City of Wellington Residents self-haul (pt) Residents self-haul

Wellington (1AE) – {5}

Direct hauled

Wellington (1AE) – {5}

Direct hauled

City of Estelline

Direct hauled

Appendix 3 – Page 12


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Collection Services Provider

Entity

Landfill(s) Used (Type) {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Lakeview

City of Memphis

Memphis (1AE) –

{5}

Direct hauled

City of Memphis City of Turkey

City of Memphis Superior Sanitation

Memphis (1AE) – Tulia (1AE) –

{5} {6}

Direct hauled Direct hauled

Hall County

Residents self-haul

Memphis (1AE) –

{5}

Direct hauled

City of Childress

City of Childress

Childress (1AE) –

{5}

Direct hauled

Childress County

Residents self-haul

Childress (1AE) –

{5}

Direct hauled

ESTIMATE OF WASTE GENERATION IN 2000 BY COUNTY Direct to Landfill(s)

Regional Comm./Industrial

Estimated Tons Generated

Donley County

3,085

833

3,918

Collingsworth County

2,000

697

2,697

Hall County

2,815

823

3,638

Childress

5,445

1,672

7,117

TOTAL ESTIMATED WASTE GENERATED IN 2000:

17,370

ESTIMATED REMAINING LANDFILL CAPACITY Subregional Landfill Facilities

Capacity Available Tons

City of Childress City of Memphis City of Wellington TOTALS

1,040,592 508,273 263,082 1,811,947

Years tons tons tons tons

191.1 106.0 65.0 126.65

years years years years

NOTE: Remaining Years Capacity is based upon the estimated remaining Tons Capacity divided by the amount of waste deposited into the landfills during 2000. NOTE: In 2002, the City of Clarendon is in the process of obtaining a Transfer Station registration.

Appendix 3 – Page 13


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

SUBREGION 6 SUMMARY

POPULATION OVERVIEW 2000 Census Population

2020 Population Projection

Net Anticipated 20-Year Change

20-Year Change as a %

27,802

31,387

+ 3,585

+ 12.8%

Entity

Collection Services Provider

Landfill(s) Used (Type) {Subregion Location}

Transfer Station Used

City of Bovina

Duncan Disposal

Clovis, NM

Direct Hauled

City of Farwell

City of Farwell

Dimmitt (1AE) –

{6}

Direct Hauled

City of Friona Parmer County

BFI BFI

BFI (1) – BFI (1) –

{4} {4}

Direct Hauled Direct Hauled Parmer Co. CS

City of Dimmitt

City of Dimmitt

Dimmitt (1AE) –

{6}

Direct Hauled

City of Hart

City of Hart

Dimmitt (1AE) –

{6}

Direct Hauled

City of Nazareth Castro County

Dimmitt (1AE) – BFI (1) – Dimmitt (1AE) – Tulia (1AE) –

{6} {4} {6} {6}

Direct Hauled Direct Hauled

City of Kress

City of Nazareth BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt) Superior Sanitation

City of Tulia

City of Tulia

Tulia (1AE) –

{6}

Direct Hauled

Swisher County

BFI (pt) Residents self-haul (pt)

BFI (1) – Tulia (1AE) –

{4} {6}

Direct Hauled

City of Quitaque

Superior Sanitation

Tulia (1AE) –

{6}

Direct Hauled

City of Silverton

City of Silverton

Tulia (1AE) ���

{6}

Direct Hauled

Briscoe County

Superior Sanitation Residents self-haul (pt)

Tulia (1AE) –

{6}

Direct Hauled

Direct Hauled

Appendix 3 – Page 14


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

ESTIMATE OF WASTE GENERATION IN 2000 BY COUNTY Direct to Landfill(s)

Regional Comm./Industrial

Estimated Tons Generated

Parmer County

9,548

2,179

11,727

Castro County

7,335

1,802

9,137

Swisher County

5,883

1,823

7,706

Briscoe County

796

390

1,186

TOTAL ESTIMATED WASTE GENERATED IN 2000:

29,756

ESTIMATED REMAINING LANDFILL CAPACITY Subregional Landfill Facilities

Capacity Available Tons

City of Dimmitt City of Tulia (#1009) City of Tulia (#749) TOTALS

522,373 800 405,800 928,973

Years tons tons tons tons

71.2 0.1 58.1 64.27

years years years years

NOTE: Remaining Years Capacity is based upon the estimated remaining Tons Capacity divided by the amount of waste deposited into the landfills during 2000. NOTE: The City of Tulia’s remaining capacity information reports the Capacity Available in both of its permitted facilities (#1009 and #749).

Appendix 3 – Page 15


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Monthly Residential Solid Waste Fees: 1998 – 2001 SUBREGION 1 City of Cactus City of Channing City of Dalhart City of Dumas City of Stratford City of Sunray City of Texhoma Subregional Averages

SUBREGION 2 City of Booker City of Canadian Town of Darrouzett City of Follett City of Gruver City of Higgins City of Perryton City of Spearman Subregional Averages

SUBREGION 3 City of Borger City of Fritch City of Groom City of Lefors City of McLean City of Miami City of Mobeetie City of Pampa City of Panhandle City of Sanford City of Shamrock City of Skellytown City of Stinnett City of Wheeler City of White Deer Subregional Averages

Monthly 1998 Fees $ 10.00 $ 7.50 $ 10.00 $ 12.00 $ 12.50 $ 16.60 $ 10.00 $ 11.23

Monthly 2001 Fees $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Monthly 1998 Fees $ 10.50 $ 13.00 $ 8.50 $ 13.50 $ 10.50 $ 10.00 $ 9.00 $ 14.75 $ 11.22

Monthly 2001 Fees $ 10.50 $ 13.00 $ 11.00 $ 17.00 $ 12.50 $ 10.00 $ 11.50 $ 14.75 $ 12.53

Monthly 1998 Fees $ 12.50 $ 10.50 $ 10.82 $ 12.00 $ 16.50 $ 10.00 $ 11.50 $ 12.50 $ 10.50 $ 16.09 $ 10.00 $ 13.50 $ 15.00 $ 13.02 $ 8.00 $ 12.16

Monthly 2001 Fees $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

15.00 9.00 12.00 12.00 12.50 16.60 10.00 12.44

12.50 10.50 10.89 12.00 16.00 10.00 11.50 12.50 10.50 15.00 10.00 14.50 15.00 11.16 8.50 12.04

% Increase 50.00% 20.00% 20.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% + 10.77%

% Increase 0.00% 0.00% 29.41% 25.93% 19.05% 0.00% 27.78% 0.00% + 11.67%

% Increase 0.00% 0.00% 0.65% 0.00% -3.03% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -6.77% 0.00% 7.41% 0.00% -14.29% 6.25% - 0.98%

Appendix 3 – Page 16


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

Monthly Residential Solid Waste Fees: 1998 – 2001 Monthly 1998 Fees $ 9.24 $ 12.50 $ 10.85 $ 10.75 $ 13.30 $ 13.83 $ 11.75

Monthly 2001 Fees $ 9.54 $ 12.50 $ 11.25 $ 11.61 $ 15.30 $ 13.83 $ 12.34

Monthly 1998 Fees $ 15.00 $ 10.40 $ 12.00 $ 5.00 $ 11.00 $ 10.00 $ 11.00 $ 15.00 $ 9.00 $ 12.00 $ 11.04

Monthly 2001 Fees $ 14.00 $ 10.40 $ 12.00 $ 5.00 $ 12.00 $ 10.00 $ 11.00 $ 15.00 $ 9.00 $ 12.00 $ 11.04

City of Bovina City of Dimmitt City of Farwell City of Friona City of Hart City of Kress City of Nazareth City of Quitaque City of Silverton City of Tulia Subregional Averages

Monthly 1998 Fees $ 13.00 $ 9.00 $ 15.90 $ 12.50 $ 18.50 $ 11.00 $ 9.18 $ 11.50 $ 11.00 $ 8.25 $ 11.98

Monthly 2001 Fees $ 13.00 $ 9.00 $ 15.90 $ 10.00 $ 18.50 $ 11.00 $ 8.48 $ 12.25 $ 11.00 $ 8.25 $ 11.74

REGIONAL AVERAGES

$

$

SUBREGION 4 City of Amarillo City of Canyon City of Claude City of Happy City of Hereford City of Vega Subregional Averages

SUBREGION 5 City of Childress City of Clarendon City of Dodson City of Estelline City of Hedley City of Howardwick City of Lakeview City of Memphis City of Turkey City of Wellington Subregional Averages

SUBREGION 5

11.56

12.02

% Increase 0.00% 0.00% 3.69% 8.00% 15.04% 0.00% + 5.02%

% Increase -6.67% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 9.09% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.00%

% Increase 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% -20.00% 0.00% 0.00% -7.63% 6.52% 0.00% 0.00% -2.02% + 3.98%

Appendix 3 – Page 17


FY2002 Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan Amendment

EXHIBIT A. PANHANDLE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE PLAN CONFORMANCE CHECKLIST

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

PANHANDLE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE PLAN CONFORMANCE CHECKLIST This checklist is designed to assist the MSW facility permit or registration applicant in meeting the TCEQ’s application requirements. Subchapter E (§ 330.51 (10)) of the Texas Administrative Code states that it is the applicant’s responsibility to demonstrate conformance with the regional solid waste management plan.

The TCEQ requires that the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (RSWMAC) review your application to determine if the proposed facility will conform to the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. The questions below pertain to the goals and objectives of that plan. Your response to these questions will provide the RSWMAC with a perspective on how your proposed facility will support the plan’s goals. All questions must be answered. A response of “Not Applicable” or “N/A” will not be acceptable. This checklist must be fully completed and submitted to the PRPC, along with Parts 1 and 2 of your facility application, before the local conformance review process can be initiated. The certification box must be signed by the chief administrative officer of the applicant entity indicating that the information provided herein is accurate and true. At the request of the TCEQ, only that checklist information relating to Land Use Compatibility (Regional Planning Goal #4) will be submitted to the agency when the RSWMAC submits its comments. The other checklist information requested will be used solely by the RSWMAC in determining the conformity of the application/registration to the regional plan.

Section 1:

General Applicant Information

1.1.

Applicant’s Name

1.2.

Is this a permit or a registration application? (please check the appropriate box and provide the application number.)

1.3.

 

Permit

No.____________

Registration

No.____________

What type of MSW facility is being registered or permitted? (please check the appropriate box)

  

Type I Landfill Type I AE Landfill Type IV Landfill

  

Type IV AE Landfill Type V Facility Other (please describe)

Describe “Other” below:

1.4.

What types of waste(s) will be accepted at your facility? Please specify any special wastes.

Page 1 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

1.5.

What entity(ies) in the Panhandle region is this facility intended to serve?

1.6.

Do you plan to accept out-of-state waste at your facility? If Yes, what percent of your projected wastestream will be from out-of-state? _______%

Section 2:

 

Yes No

Regional Planning Goal Conformance

Please provide information as to how your proposed facility will help to support or conform with the goals and/or objectives of the Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Plan

Regional Planning Goal #1 Develop programs to facilitate the development and maintenance of local source reduction, waste minimization, recycling, and composting programs within the region, thus, conserving disposal capacity and resources to the extent technically and economically feasible. (NOTE: Recycling includes yard waste composting) 2.2.1. Will your facility divert for recycling or beneficial reuse any of the following items? (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet titled “Planning Goal #2.1.1” in the upper right-hand corner of the page)

  

White Goods Scrap Metal Tree limbs or brush

  

Yard Waste Construction/Demolition Debris Other (please describe)

Describe “Other” below:

2.2.2. Do you believe your facility will support this regional planning goal? If so, please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.1.2”)

Page 2 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

Regional Planning Goal #2 Develop regional cost-effective, management systems.

efficient

and

environmentally-suitable

solid

waste

2.2.1. Per your operating plan, describe how you will achieve environmentally-suitable cost effectiveness and efficiency with your facility? (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.2.1.”)

2.2.2. How will your facility customer base benefit from any efficiencies or cost effectiveness? (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.2.2.”)

2.2.3. Do you believe your facility will support this regional planning goal? If so, please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.2.3.”)

Page 3 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

Regional Planning Goal #3 Develop programs to assist regional and local entities in controlling and stemming illegal and improper disposal practices. 2.3.1. What measures will you take to make your services conveniently accessible to the public? (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.3.1.”)

2.3.2. As part of your operating plan, would you be willing to accept waste from locallysponsored litter and illegal dumping clean-up projects at no cost or at significantly reduced costs? Please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.3.2.”)

2.3.3. Do you believe your facility will support this regional planning goal? If so, please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.3.3.”)

Page 4 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

Regional Planning Goal #4 (Land Use Compatability) Maintain administrative structures that will ensure at least some measure of local control over future systems operations and provide an element of control over siting of future landfills in the region. (PLEASE NOTE: The information you provide in this section of the checklist will be presented to the TCEQ along with the RSMWAC’s Conformance Review letter.) 2.4.1. Is the site of your proposed facility in an area that has been zoned by one of the region’s local governments?

 

Yes No

2.4.2. If Yes, which local government zoning standards will this facility have to comply with? Also, attached documentation from the zoning entity indicating that the proposed facility is in compliance with the standards.

2.4.3. Describe the current land use within ½ mile of the proposed facility site? To the North: To the South: To the East: To the West: 2.4.4. If the proposed facility is a landfill, what will be the maximum fill height of the facility? _______ Feet above grade 2.4.5. When the maximum fill height is reached, how will the facility to compare to surrounding elevation features (surrounding meaning, “within a two-mile circumference of the facility”)? Will this be the most prominent elevation feature within a 2-mile radius? Please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.4.5.”)

Page 5 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

2.4.6. If the proposed facility is a transfer station or some “Other” type of MSW facility, how will it be built and operated to correspond with the way the property adjacent to the proposed facility site is currently being used? (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.4.6.”)

2.4.7. Will vehicular traffic into and out of the proposed facility disrupt or impact the area’s existing traffic patterns? Please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.4.7.”)

2.4.8. To the best of your knowledge, is there any pre-existing, planned development of the property adjacent to the proposed facility site? If Yes, please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and

 

Yes No

provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.4.8.”)

Page 6 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

2.4.9. Do you believe your proposed facility is compatible with the current land uses surrounding the proposed site? Please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #4.8�)

Regional Planning Goal #5 Regionally, ensure continued, adequate disposal capability 2.5.1. If the proposed facility is other than a landfill, where will the stored or processed wastes be taken for disposal?

2.5.2. If the proposed facility is other than a landfill, what, if any, type of measures will be taken to minimize, reduce, or recycle the waste before it is hauled off for disposal?

2.5.3. If the proposed facility is a landfill, what type of measures will be taken to compact the landfilled waste? What is your projected compaction ratio? ____ pounds per cubic yard. What type of equipment will you use to achieve this compaction ratio?

Page 7 of 8

Exhibit A


Regional Solid Waste Plan Conformance Checklist

2.5.4. Do you plan on using Alternative Daily Cover materials or other space-savings measures that might extend the useful life of your landfill? If Yes, please explain.

2.5.5. Do you believe that your proposed facility will contribute toward this regional goal? If so, please explain. (if additional space is needed, attached an additional sheet and provide the information under a heading titled “Planning Goal #2.5.5.”)

Section 3:

Certifications

I hereby certify that the information contained herein is, to the best of my knowledge complete and accurate and that the information in fact represents the MSW facility for which this entity is requesting a TCEQ registration or permit. Name of Applicant’ Chief Administrative Officer: Title of Chief Administrative Officer:

Signature of Chief Administrative Officer

Date

NOTE: PLEASE COMPLETE THIS FORM AS FULLY AND AS ACCURATELY AS POSSIBLE. YOUR COMPLETED CHECKLIST WILL BE SUBMITTED TO THE PERMITS SECTION OF THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ALONG WITH THE REGIONAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY’S COMMITTEE’S CONFORMANCE REVIEW ASSESSMENT.

Page 8 of 8

Exhibit A


Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Plan