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GOOD NEWS FROM THE CHURCH AND COMMUNITY

Summer 2012

$2.95

www.thepositivecommunity.com

HARLEM SUMMER ISSUE

Harlem’s Kandake House

125th Street BID: Banners Are Back Khalil Gibran Muhammad Keeper of a Cultural Trust

Golden Krust CEO Lowell Hawthorne Talks about Faith, Family and Business


Believe that you can be happy, healthy and in control of your life.

AARP and you, continuing the journey. Nurturing the mind, body and soul is the greatest way to achieve the best life for our families. That’s why we proudly support the members and activities of churches and other religious institutions throughout the nation. We share your passion for strengthening both family and community and help celebrate their blessings by living a balanced life. We look forward to continuing to help every generation live life to the fullest. To discover all of the community efforts we support, visit aarp.org/blackcommunity.


Join us in building healthier, stronger communities. F o r mo reinfo rmatio n abo ut w o rk ing w ithusc all usat N J80 0 7 0 1 0 7 1 0T T Y80 0 7 0 1 0 7 2 0 / N Y86630 1 61 44,T T Y 7 1 1 ,8a. m.to8 p. m.M o ndayth ro ughF ridayo rv is it w w w . U H C C o mmunity P lan. c o m.

Not for distribution to retirees or beneficiaries. M R 12 _ D U 0 0 5_ 339 2 4 4 8


Summer 2012

CONTENTS Features 125th Street Bid Banners Are Back! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Harlem Week Kickoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Roundtable Wrap Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

31

Hooray for the Graduates . . . . . . . . . . 44

Lorna and Lowell Hawthorne

COVER STORY: LOWELL HAWTHORNE & GOLDEN KRUST

Countdown to Freedom: Summer Reading & Films. . . . . . . . . . 46

&also inside

Kahlil Gibran Muhammad’s Cultural Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

From the Publisher’s Desk . . . . . . . . . 10 Guest Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Spreading Gospel Music to Preserve Christian Tradition . . . . . . 66

My View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Gospel Train. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Harlem’s Musical Legacy . . . . . . . . . . 68

Fitness Doctor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Health Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84

The History of African American Music . . . . . . . . . . . 71

On Call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 The Way Ahead . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 The Last Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90

Kandake House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76


Financial Education Seminars ● Bank On It! ● Money Matters ● To Your Credit ● Financial Recovery For more information or sign-up for a seminar*, contact the branch nearest you! City National Bank • New Jersey Branches Southside Branch Linda Campbell-Aaron Branch Manager 1080 Bergen Street Newark, NJ 07112 973-923-2005

Main Office Tasha Lohman Branch Manager 900 Broad Street Newark, NJ 07102 973-624-0865 x637

Paterson Branch DeMetha Hukins Branch Manager 125 Broadway Paterson, NJ 07505 973-279-8700

Springfield Avenue Branch Vanessa Almeida Branch Manager 241 Springfield Avenue Newark, NJ 07103 973-624-4545

City National Bank • New York Branches Harlem Branch Sabrina Brice Branch Manager 382 W. 125th Street New York, NY 10027 212-865-4763

East New York Branch Francisco Castillo Branch Manager 2815 Atlantic Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11207 718-647-5300

*Seminars based on FDIC Money Smart Program

Roosevelt Branch Carey Davis Branch Manager 302 Nassau Road Roosevelt, NY 11575 516-623-7444

FDIC insured


GREAT

R C OLL

MAKE THE DIFFERENCE!

ALL

TO PROGRESS

he clergy organizations, churches, community businesses and institutions listed below have committed to the purchase of at least 50 magazines per month at $1.00 each (one-third of the cover price) or support this publication through the purchase of advertising. Find out more by calling 973-233-9200 or email rollcall@thepositivecommunity.com

T

Abyssinian B.C., Harlem, NY Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts III, Pastor

Fellowship Missionary B.C., Newark, NJ Rev. Kippie C. Brown, Pastor

Abundant Life Fellowship COGIC, Newark, NJ Supt. Edward Bohannon, Jr, Pastor

First AME Zion Church, Brooklyn, NY Dr. Darran H. Mitchell, Pastor

Antioch Baptist Church., Brooklyn, NY Rev. Robert M. Waterman, Pastor Archdiocese of New York Brother Tyrone Davis, Office of Black Ministry Berean B.C., Brooklyn, NY Rev. Arlee Griffin Jr., Pastor Bethany B.C., Brooklyn, NY Rev. Dr. David Hampton, Pastor Bethany B.C., Newark, NJ. Rev. Dr. M. William Howard, Pastor Beulah Bible Cathedral Church, Newark, NJ Gerald Lydell Dickson, Senior Pastor Black Ministers Council of NJ Rev. Reginald T. Jackson, Exec. Director Calvary Baptist Church, Garfield, NJ Rev. Calvin McKinney, Pastor

First B.C. of Lincoln Gardens, Somerset NJ Rev. Dr. DeForest (Buster) Soaries, Pastor First Baptist B.C. of Teaneck, NJ Rev. Marilyn Monroe Harris, Pastor First Bethel Baptist Church, Newark, NJ H. Grady James III, Pastor First Park Baptist Church, Plainfield, NJ Rev. Rufus McClendon, Jr., Pastor Friendship Baptist Church, Harlem, NY Rev. James A. Kilgore, Pastor General Baptist Convention, NJ Rev. Dr. Guy Campbell, President Grace B. C., Mt. Vernon, NY Rev. Dr. Franklyn W. Richardson, Pastor Greater Abyssinian BC, Newark, NJ Rev. Allen Potts, Senior Pastor

Canaan B. C. of Christ, Harlem, NY Rev. Thomas D. Johnson, Pastor

Greater Faith Baptist Church, Philadelphia, PA Rev. Larry L. Marcus

Canaan B.C., Paterson, NJ Rev. Dr. Gadson L. Graham

Greater Friendship Baptist Church, Newark, NJ Rev. John Teabout, Pastor

Cathedral International., Perth Amboy, NJ Bishop Donald Hilliard, Pastor

Mount Olive Baptist Church, Hackensack, NJ Rev. Gregory J. Jackson, Pastor Mount Zion B.C., S. Hackensack, NJ Rev. Dr. Robert L. Curry, Pastor Mt. Olivet B.C, Newark, NJ Rev. André W. Milteer, Pastor Mt. Zion AME Church, Trenton, NJ Rev. J. Stanley Justice, Pastor New Brunswick Theological Seminary, New Brunswick, NJ New Hope Baptist Church, Metuchen, NJ Rev. Dr. Ronald L. Owens, Pastor New Hope Baptist Church of Hackensack, Hackensack, NJ Rev. Dr. Frances Mannin-Fontaine, Pastor New Life Cathedral, Mt. Holly, NJ Rev. Eric Wallace, Pastor New Zion B.C., Elizabeth, NJ Rev. Kevin James White, Pastor Paradise B. C., Newark, NJ Rev. Jethro James, Pastor Ruth Fellowship Ministries, Plainfield, NJ Rev. Tracy Brown, Pastor Shiloh B.C., Plainfield, NJ Rev. Dr. Gerald Lamont Thomas, Pastor

Greater New Hope Missionary B.C., NYC Rev. Joan J. Brightharp, Pastor

St. Anthony Baptist Church, Brooklyn, NY Rev. Dr. Duane E. Cooper

Childs Memorial COGIC, Harlem, NY Bishop Norman N. Quick, Pastor

Greater Zion Hill B.C., Harlem, NY Rev. Dr. Frank J. Blackshear, Pastor

Christian Cultural Center, Brooklyn, NY Rev. A.R. Barnard, Pastor

Harlem Congregations for Community Improvement (HCCI) Drek E. Broomes, President & CEO

St. John Baptist Church Camden, NJ Rev. Dr. Silas M. Townsend, Pastor

Christian Love B.C., Irvington, NJ Rev. Ron Christian, Pastor Community B.C., Englewood, NJ Rev. Dr. Lester Taylor, Pastor Community Church of God, Plainfield, NJ Rev. Dr. Shirley B. Cathie., Pastor Emeritus Concord B.C., Brooklyn, NY Rev. Dr. Gary V. Simpson, Pastor Convent Avenue Baptist Church, New York, NY Rev. Dr. Jesse T. Willams, Pastor

It Is Well Living Ministries, Clark, NJ Rev. Kahlil Carmichael, Pastor Jesus Christ Family Church, Brooklyn, NY Rev. Jason Sumner, Senior Pastor Messiah Baptist Church, East Orange, NJ Rev. Dana Owens, Pastor Metropolitan B.C., Newark, NJ Rev. Dr. David Jefferson, Pastor Mother A.M.E. Zion Church, Harlem Rev. Dr. Gregory Robeson Smith, Pastor

Empire Missionary B.C., Convention NY Rev. Dr. Ronald Grant, President

Mt. Calvary United Methodist Church, Harlem, NY Rev. Ebenezer Aduku Mt. Neboh Baptist Church, Harlem, NY Rev. Dr. Johnnie Green Jr., Pastor

Evening Star B.C., Brooklyn, NY Rev. Washington Lundy, Pastor

Mt. Pisgah B.C., Brooklyn, NY Rev. Dr. Johnny Ray Youngblood, Pastor

Ebenezer B.C., Englewood, NJ Rev. Jovan Troy Davis, M.Div.

St. Luke Baptist Church of Harlem, New York, NY Rev. Dr. Johnnie McCann, Pastor St Luke B.C., Paterson, NJ Rev. Kenneth D.R. Clayton, Pastor St. Albans, NY COGIC Rev. Ben Monroe St. James AME Church, Newark, NJ Rev. Ronald L. Slaughter, Pastor St. Matthew AME Church, Orange, NJ Rev. Reginald T. Jackson, Pastor St. Paul Community B.C., Brooklyn, NY Rev. David K. Brawley, Pastor The New Hope B.C., Newark, NJ Rev. Joe Carter, Senior Pastor Thessalonia Worship Center, Bronx, NY Rev. Dr. Shellie Sampson, Pastor Union Baptist Temple,, Bridgeton, NJ Rev. Albert L. Morgan, Pastor

Walker Memorial B.C. Bronx, NY Rev. Dr. J. Albert Bush Sr., Pastor White Rock B.C, Edison, NJ Jason D. Greer, Pastor World Gospel Music Assoc., Newark, NJ Dr. Albert Lewis, Founder Zion Hill B.C, Newark, NJ Rev. Douglass L. Williams, III, Pastor

Businesses & Organizations 125th St. BID African American Heritage Parade American Diabetes Association American Heart Association, Northern, NJ Brown Executive Realty LLC, Morristown, NJ City National Bank Essex County College, NJ Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce Medgar Evers College Mildred Crump, Newark City Council NAACP New Jersey* NAACP, NY State Conference* New Jersey Performing Arts Center New York Theological Seminary New York Urban League Newark School of Theology Razac Products Co., Newark, NJ Schomburg Center The College of New Rochelle The United Way of Essex and West Hudson WBGO-88.3FM WKMB-1070AM

THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT!!!

“The Positive Community magazine does outstanding work in promoting the good works of the Black Church. All churches and businesses should subscribe to and advertise in The Positive Community. Please support this magazine, the only one that features good news about the black community.”—Rev. Buster Soaries, General Baptist Revival, May 20, 2010


The African American chamber of commerce

presents The African American chamber commerce The African American chamber ofof commerce The African American chamber of commerce The African American chamber of commerce The African American chamber of commerce The African American chamber of commerce 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner The The African African American American chamber chamber of of commerce commerce The African American chamber of commerce The African American chamber of commerce presents presents The The African African American American chamber chamber of of commerce commerce The African American chamber of commerce The The African African American American chamber chamber of of commerce commerce presents presents presents presents presents presents presents presents 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner presents presents presents 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner presents presents “Passing the Torch” 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner 2012 2012 HUMANITARIAN HUMANITARIAN Awards Awards Dinner Dinner 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner 2012 2012 HUMANITARIAN HUMANITARIAN Awards Awards Dinner Dinner 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner 2012 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinner frican American chamber of comm 2012 2012 HUMANITARIAN HUMANITARIAN Awards Awards Dinner Dinner September 15, 2012 “Passing the Torch” the Torch” “Passing the Torch” “Passing “Passing the the Torch” Torch” “Passing Torch” the New“Passing Jersey Performing Arts Center “Passing the Torch” September 15, 2012 “Passing Torch” “Passing “Passing the the Torch” Torch” “Passing the Torch” “Passing “Passing the the Torch” Torch” “Passing the Torch” presents “Passing the Torch” September 15, 2012 September September 15, 15, 2012 2012 September 15, 2012 September 15, 2012 September 15, 2012 One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 New Jersey Performing Arts Center September 15, 2012 September September 15, 15,2012 2012 September 15,Arts 2012 September 15, 2012 New Jersey Performing Arts Center New New Jersey Jersey Performing Performing Arts Center Center New Jersey Performing Arts Center New Jersey Performing Arts Center One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 September 15, 2012 Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. New Jersey Performing Arts Center New Jersey Performing Arts Center New New Jersey Jersey Performing Performing Arts Arts Center Center New New Jersey Jersey Performing Performing Arts Arts Center Center New Jersey Performing Arts Center New Jersey Performing Arts Center One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 One One Center Center Street, Street, Newark, Newark, NJ NJ 07102 07102 One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 One One Center Center Street, Street, Newark, Newark, NJ NJ 07102 07102 New Jersey Performing Arts Center One One Center Center Street, Street, Newark, Newark, NJ NJ 07102 07102 One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. Registration Registration and and Cocktail Cocktail Reception Reception Begin Begin at 6:00 at 6:00 P.M. P.M. One Center Street, Newark,Begin NJ 07102 Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. Registration Registration and and Cocktail Cocktail Reception Reception Begin at 6:00 6:00 P.M. P.M. Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. Keynote Speaker Honoree Registration Registration and and Cocktail Cocktail Reception Reception Begin Begin at at 6:00 6:00 P.M. P.M.P.M. One Center Street, Newark, NJ at 07102 Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin 6:00 P.M. Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 Registration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:00 P.M. Keynote Speaker Honoree The Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg Keynote Speaker Honoree Keynote Keynote Speaker Speaker Honoree The Honorable David n. Dinkins Reception GustavHonoree “Gus” Heningburg Registration and Cocktail Begin at 6:00 P.M. Keynote Speaker Honoree Keynote Speaker Honoree Keynote Keynote Speaker Speaker Honoree Honoree Mayor, New York City Business Advocate Former Keynote Speaker Honoree Keynote Keynote Speaker Speaker Honoree Honoree The Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg The The Honorable Honorable David David n.n.Dinkins n. Dinkins Gustav Gustav “Gus” “Gus” Heningburg Heningburg Keynote Speaker Honoree Mayor, New York City Business Advocate Former The Honorable David Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg The The Honorable Honorable David David n.n. Dinkins Dinkins Gustav Gustav “Gus” “Gus” Heningburg Heningburg The Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg Keynote Speaker Honoree Keynote Speaker Honoree The Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg The The Honorable Honorable David David n. Dinkins n. Dinkins Gustav Gustav “Gus” “Gus” Heningburg Heningburg Mayor, New York City Business Advocate Former Mayor, Mayor, New New York York City City Business Business Advocate Advocate Former Former The Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus”Advocate Heningburg Mayor, New York City Business Advocate Former Mayor, Mayor, New New York York City City Business Business Advocate Former Former Mayor, New York City Business Advocate Former Mayor, New York City Business Advocate Former Former Former Mayor, Mayor, New New York York City Business Business Advocate Advocate Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg TheThe Honorable David Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg Keynote Speaker Honoree Mayor, Newn. York City Business Advocate Former Mayor, NewYork York City Business Advocate Former Mayor, New City Business Advocate Former The Honorable David n. Dinkins Gustav “Gus” Heningburg September September 15,15, 2012 2012

12 HUMANITARIAN Awards Dinne 012 “Passing the Torch”

September 15, 2012 New Jersey Performing Arts Center Business Advocate Former Mayor, New York City One Center Street, Newark, NJ 07102 ration and Cocktail Reception Begin at 6:0

ynote Speaker Honoree The AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH

The AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH The AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH The The AACCNJ AACCNJ and and its its guests guests will will SPEND SPEND AN AN EVENING EVENING WITH WITH Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg The AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH The The AACCNJ AACCNJ and and its its guests guests will will SPEND SPEND AN AN EVENING EVENING WITH WITH TheThe AACCNJ AACCNJ and and its its guests guests will will SPEND SPEND ANAN EVENING EVENING WITH WITH Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg Mr. Mr. Gustav Gustav “Gus”Heningburg “Gus”Heningburg The AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH and him with aGustav Humanitarian Award for his leadership, Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg Thepresent AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH Mr. Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg “Gus”Heningburg Mr. Mr. Gustav Gustav “Gus”Heningburg “Gus”Heningburg The AACCNJ and its guests will strategies SPEND AN EVENING WITH courage and wisdom in that strengthen and present him with Humanitarian Award for his leadership, and and present present him him with with aa Humanitarian aexecuting Humanitarian Award Award for for his his leadership, leadership, and present him with Humanitarian Award for his leadership, Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg and present him with a Humanitarian Award for his leadership, Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg and and present present him him with with a a Humanitarian Humanitarian Award Award for for his his leadership, leadership, courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen courage courage and and wisdom wisdom executing in executing strategies strategies that that strengthen strengthen and and present present him him with with a Humanitarian a Humanitarian Award Award for for his his leadership, leadership, courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen African American businesses and communities. Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg courage and wisdom inHumanitarian executing strategies that strengthen courage courage and and wisdom wisdom in inexecuting executing executing strategies strategies that that strengthen strengthen and present him with a Award for his leadership, courage courage and and wisdom wisdom in executing strategies strategies that that strengthen strengthen and present him with ain Humanitarian Award for his leadership, African American businesses and communities. The AACCNJ and its guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH African African American American businesses businesses and and communities. communities. African American businesses and communities. and present him with a Humanitarian Award for his leadership, African American businesses and communities. courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen African African American American businesses businesses and and communities. communities. courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen African African American American businesses businesses and and communities. communities. Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen Mr. “Gus”Heningburg The AACCNJ and itsGustav guests will SPEND AN EVENING WITH African American businesses and communities. African American businesses and communities. Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. Sponsorship Sponsorship opportunities opportunities are are available, available, visit visit www.aaccnj.com www.aaccnj.com for for details. details. REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. African American businesses and communities. Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. Sponsorship Sponsorship opportunities opportunities are are available, available, visit visit www.aaccnj.com www.aaccnj.com for for details. details. and present him with aare Humanitarian Award for his leadership, Sponsorship Sponsorship opportunities opportunities are available, available, visitvisit www.aaccnj.com www.aaccnj.com forfor details. details. Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED REGISTER REGISTER BY BY AUGUST AUGUST 17, 17, 2012—SEATING 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED IS LIMITED REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING ISIS LIMITED courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. REGISTER REGISTER BY BY AUGUST AUGUST 17, 17, 2012—SEATING 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED LIMITED REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. The AACCNJ and its guests SPEND AN WITH REGISTER REGISTER BY BY AUGUST AUGUST 17,will 17, 2012—SEATING 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED ISEVENING LIMITED and present him with a Humanitarian Award leadership, Sponsorship opportunities are visit www.aaccnj.com for details. The African-American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey Inc.available, a non-profit corporation founded in 2007. A member of for the Nationalhis Black Chamber of Commerce African American businesses and communities. REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED courage and wisdom in executing strategies that strengthen Federation, aNew 501(c) 3aorganization incorporation accordance withfounded the Internal The African-American Chamber Commerce New Jersey Inc. aInc. non-profit founded 2007. ARevenue member of National Black Chamber Commerce Mr. Gustav “Gus”Heningburg The African-American The African-American Chamber Chamber of of Commerce of Commerce of of New of Jersey Inc. Jersey non-profit a non-profit corporation corporation founded in in 2007. inA2007. member A member ofCode thethe National of the National Black Chamber Black Chamber of of Commerce of Commerce REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED The African-American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey Inc. a non-profit corporation founded in 2007. A member of the National Black Chamber of Commerce TheThe African-American African-American Chamber Chamber of Commerce of Commerce of New of New Jersey Jersey Inc. Inc. a non-profit a non-profit corporation corporation founded founded in 2007. in 2007. A member A member of the of the National National Black Black Chamber Chamber of Commerce of Commerce Federation, a 501(c) 3 organization in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code Federation, Federation, aJersey 501(c) aInc. 3501(c) organization 3Inc. organization in in accordance in corporation accordance with thefounded with Internal the Internal Revenue Revenue Code The African-American The African-American Chamber of Commerce of Commerce of New of Jersey New Inc. Jersey anon-profit non-profit a non-profit corporation founded in Internal 2007. in A2007. member A Code member of the National of theNational National Black Chamber Black Chamber of Commerce ofofCommerce The African-American Chamber ofChamber Commerce of New aorganization corporation founded in 2007. A member of the Black Chamber Commerce Federation, a 501(c) 3 accordance with the Revenue Code African American businesses and communities. Federation, Federation, a 501(c) a 501(c) 3 organization 3 organization in accordance in accordance with with thethe Internal Internal Revenue Revenue Code Code and present him with Humanitarian Award for his leadership, Federation, Federation, aJersey 501(c) a3Inc. 501(c) 3organization organization 3 organization in accordance in accordance with the with Internal the Internal Revenue Revenue Code Code Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. Federation, aa 501(c) incorporation accordance with the Internal Revenue Code The African-American Chamber of Commerce of New a non-profit founded in 2007. A member of the National Black Chamber of Commerce The African-American Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey Inc. a non-profit corporation founded in 2007. A member of the National Black Chamber of Commerce courage and wisdom executing strategies that strengthen The African-American Chamber of Commerce of Newin a non-profitin corporation founded 2007. ARevenue member Code of the National Black Chamber of Commerce Federation, a 501(c) 3 accordance with Federation, aJersey 501(c)Inc. 3 organization organization in accordance with the theinInternal Internal Revenue Code REGISTER BY AUGUST 17, 2012—SEATING IS LIMITED Federation, a 501(c) 3 organization in accordance with the Internal Revenue Code Sponsorship opportunities are available, visit www.aaccnj.com for details. African American businesses and communities.

rable David n. Dinkins ayor, New York City

Gustav “Gus” Heningb Business Advoca


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ADRIAN COUNCIL FROM THE PUBLISHER’S DESK

. . . Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery; none but ourselves can free our mind. Have no fear for atomic energy for none of them can stop the time… “Redemption Song”—Lyrics: Bob Marley

Summer 2012 elcome to The Positive Community’s annual Harlem Summer Issue, celebrating the world’s most famous black community featuring its crown jewel for shopping, dining and entertainment, 125th Street! The annual HARLEM WEEK festival’s theme for 2012 is “Harlem: Where the World Meets the World.” It’s a celebration that recognizes the many cultures that have had a positive impact on this fabled community. This year, Jamaica celebrates 50 years of independence from Great Britain. From Marcus Garvey to Bob Marley, General Colin Powell and countless others, Jamaica’s contributions to the enrichment of black life, America and world popular culture are immeasurable. Jamaican-born Lowell Hawthorne, founder and CEO of Golden Krust Caribbean Bakeries (page 31), owner of 120 franchised restaurants and employer of nearly 2,000 people, graces our cover. Also in this issue, meet Kahlil Gibran Muhammad, the director of the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem (page 53).

W

Paris.” Nicki Minaj, winner for Best Female Hip-Hop Artist, had much of her performance and even parts of her acceptance speech censored due to offensive language. This was all done to thunderous applause of approval from the audience. Here, the Seven Deadly Sins are embraced as trendy and fashionable. At present, a black man is running for re-election to this country's highest office his African American wife and their two daughters are living in the White House along with his mother-in-law. How then could an entire people, indeed a nation, just look the other way while the souls of our children, the very hope for America's future, are recklessly led astray?

Violence, Health and Public Safety Far too much of today’s music celebrates the denigration of our women, violence, the threat of violence and selfhatred. Many of us wonder how seventeen year-olds can roam the streets armed with guns, shooting at each other, killing babies and innocent bystanders in the crossfire. Just a generation ago, who would have ever imagined such an oppressive, negative cultural environA Crisis in Spirituality and Culture ment with an ominous decline in values, morals and Today, African Americans must grapple with the realities ethics? Not only are we challenged by a crisis in spiritualof their own ethnic identity and its impact on society, ity and culture, but by a crisis in health through physical, especially as America approaches the 150th anniversary verbal (bullying) and domestic violence and abuse. of Great Emancipation. The recent BET (Black Enter On Saturday August 25th, the Greater Harlem tainment Television) Awards Show was a well-produced Chamber of Commerce (GHCC) and the NY Road program that gave a Lifetime Achievement Award to the Runners (NYRR) are partnering to host the Percy Sutton R&B legends, Frankie Beverly & Maze, and delivered a Harlem 5K Run and the NY City Family Health Walk. touching tribute to Whitney Houston. Rev. Al Sharpton This year’s Health Walk will focus on the issue of violence, guns and bullying, under the theme “Peace in was also honored as Humanitarian of the Year. However, the presentation of some of the Hip-Hop Our Communities.” I invite your church, business, entertainers was troublesome. The performances were school or community group to join them. Call the crude, anti-social, superficial, and sometimes even men- Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce at 212-862-7200 acing. The stage sets brought to mind a vision of Dante’s to register your walk team. Inferno or Main Street in Hell—plumes of fire, smoke, A Positive Personality red lights and flashing strobes. Many of the lyrics were From a layman’s perspective, I believe that Jesus of censored due to the abundance of obscenities. Nazareth was the most incredibly positive personality to Jay-Z and Kanye West won the Video of the Year award continued on next page for the track “The Throne,” also known as “Niggas in

10

The Positive Community Summer 2012

www.thepositivecommunity.com


PUBLISHER’S DESK continued from previous page

have ever walked this earth. He boldly and courageously answered life’s negative circumstances with a positive response, leading up to, and including a humiliating, ignominious death on the cross. Once and for all, His life —from incarnation, birth, death and resurrection is a revelation of God to humanity that the universe is inherently positive. I imagine His watch words for encouragement in these times: “Fear not,” “let not your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid” (John 14:27). I also believe that The Positive Community’s Great Countdown to Freedom’s “cultural narrative” (see inside back cover) can affect positive, lasting change. In Classic Black Finally, as we mourn the recent passing of Sylvia Woods, founder of Harlem’s iconic Sylvia’s Restaurant, The Positive Community, WBLS/WLIB and the volunteers of

www.thepositivecommunity.com

African Americans for Health Awareness, a health advocacy group, will join together to celebrate the life of another great legend, Hal Jackson across the river in Newark, NJ. On Friday, September 28th, all roads lead to Newark Symphony Hall’s Terrace Ballroom for the Hal Jackson Memorial Dance Party: In Classic Black. Songs of freedom, unity, love, peace, goodwill and wholesome fun will be the order of the day! Broadcasting pioneer Hal Jackson lived his life in loving service to others. Let’s dance to the music and memory of greatness- the harmonies, melodies and rhythms of progress! Let us come together to have a real good time! Proceeds from this event will benefit Hal Jackson’s Talented Teens International – Youth Development Foundation, awarding scholarships to young ladies seeking careers in the arts. See you there and look your best—in Classic Black.

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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INEZ DICKENS GUEST EDITORIAL

Inez Dicken is a Councilmember, District 9 in New York City

My Harlem arlem born; Harlem bred. I have been a Harlemite all of my life and I have told all who asked or cared to listen, “I will never leave my beloved Harlem. No, not natural or man-made disaster, Harlem is my home and I will never leave.” My Harlem has always been a welcoming port-of-call to all. The business of living is about change and Harlem has gone through its share of changes. Currently, our Village of Harlem is in transition; but I believe that my beloved community will always be grounded in black American tradition and culture. The blood, sweat and tears of black people, people of color and disenfranchised populations who stayed in Harlem through good and bad times, who fought for inclusion and equality for all people regardless of race, color, creed, or sexual preference, comprise the strong and brilliant mosaic of what makes our Village of Harlem one of the most coveted destinations in the world. Many years ago, when black folks migrated to Harlem from near and far—southern and western United States, Canada, the West Indies and Africa—they did not find streets paved with gold and they faced many challenges. As W.E.B Dubois stated, the major challenge many Harlem settlers faced was crippling discrimination because of the color of their skin. This challenge proved to be an ironclad, unifying force to which Harlem settlers rallied. This challenge to obtain equal rights, equity and opportunity cemented the foundation of Harlem and built a fortress of African American culture and tradition that I believe will last until time itself is no more. I was taught at my father's knee that politics was important. Voting is power. The political clubs that rose up in Harlem commanded attention to issues critical to the well-being of black people, communities of color and disenfranchised populations. Out of this initial grassroots movement came what we in Harlem affectionately call “The Gang of Four.” This extraordinary group of individuals: Congressman Charles B. Rangel, Mayor David N. Dinkins, Hon. Percy Sutton and the Hon. Basil Paterson, became our centurions. They battled for economic and social justice for all and scored countless vic-

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tories for Harlem and disenfranchised communities across our nation. They fought against the common practice of red-lining and won the right for Striver’s Row black people to rent Harlem, USA and/or own their homes. Further, they fought for people of color to open their own business enterprises. They were of one mind and one body when it came to civil rights and economic justice. Congressman Rangel, Mayor David Dinkins, and the Hon. Basil Paterson remain on the front lines today as outspoken voices on injustice and exclusion of any kind. These giants of humanity cast an incredible footprint that we must follow especially as we face right wing extremists who threaten to strip us of all that we have gained as a people and a nation. My Lord, we have come far but we still have miles to go. We have a black President of the United States, Barack Obama, and our national icon, Congressman Charles B. Rangel. I truly believe that the history of Harlem charts a blueprint for empowerment. It is my hope that our neighbors who have recently moved uptown will work with the indigenous Harlem community to make Harlem stronger for our children, for our aspiring entrepreneurs and for our treasured, multi-cultural experiences. In my Harlem, my home, we stand side by side as elected officials, community leaders and concerned citizens to fight for common goals of inclusion, justice and a better life for future generations. However, only a united Harlem maintaining a strong political voting block can stand together to build a future of empowerment for all. So I am appealing to you for your support for my Harlem because it is your Harlem too! If you are not registered, please register to vote today. We need everyone to come out to vote on primary day, September 13th and for the General Election on November 6th and re-elect President Barack Obama.

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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REV. THERESA NANCE MY VIEW

Rev. Nance is pastor of The Church by the Side of the Road in Passaic, NJ. She is also a radio talk show host and documentary filmmaker.

LISTEN TO THE POSITIVE COMMUNITY HOUR ON WKMB 1070 AM HARVEST RADIO, MONDAYS, 1:30–2:30 P.M. WITH HOST THERESA NANCE.

Yes, He is a Piece of Good he Rev. Dr. Calvin McKinney is a childhood friend of mine. I write that as a proud admirer of this phenomenal young man who went into ministry at a very young age and stuck it out. Actually, it’s 40 years of sticking it out, so to speak. In May, the congregants at Calvary Rev. Dr. Calvin McKinney showered him with all kinds of accolades for his years of service. Clerics from all corners of the metropolitan area came out in droves; and rightfully so for the man who has met with presidents and has had some of the most prominent ministers befriend him since his youth. I can recall as a newspaper reporter, the excitement that permeated the Passaic, NJ community when it was learned that the Rev. Jesse Louis Jackson was spending the night at Calvin’s parents’ home at the Aspen Place Projects. Rev. Jackson, as they said, was hotter than hot and paid a special visit to the pastor and family. But we knew. We always knew at the Community Baptist Church in Paterson, NJ that Calvin was going to be something great. No, not simply because he prayed like an adult when he was a young boy, but because he carried himself as if he knew God Himself had something wonderful in store for him. God has, indeed, made it happen. Rev. McKinney has served his community in numerous capacities ranging from commissioner of the Housing Authority of the City of Passaic, NJ to executive board member of the Garfield/Lodi, NJ Branch of the NAACP. He has been moderator of a statewide ministers’ group, ministered in 30 U.S. states and on the continents of Africa, Europe, Asia, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands; and

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He has made us proud. He has made us take stock of the incredible life that God has given him. several years ago, orchestrated the construction of a megachurch. On March 19, 2006 the members of Calvary Baptist Church left their old home, originally purchased for $3,500, and moved into a new $10 million dollar, state-of-the-art edifice that sits majestically on Passaic Street in Garfield, NJ. McKinney presently serves on the Governor’s staff as chair of the Commission on Faith-Based Initiatives for the State of New Jersey; chairman of the board of trustees of the U.C.C. Day Care Center #100; trustee, Passaic County Community College; a board member of the Bergen County NJ Urban League; and a member of Mt. Zion Lodge #50, F. & A.M. (PHA) of Hackensack, NJ. Not bad for a man who was raised in local housing projects, but there were always great expectations for him. Despite their surroundings, he and his siblings couldn’t fathom doing anything wrong because Mr. John Henry McKinney, their daddy, held a tight grip on his kids to make sure they wouldn’t shame God, their family or themselves. Young McKinney practiced his Daddy’s teachings on his own siblings, never mind that he was not the eldest and when he became a father modeled that same strict code among his own children. Yes, he is a piece of good and I write that as a term of endearment. He travels extensively and by all indications will one day become president of the National Baptist Convention and won’t that be grand? Married to his childhood sweetheart, Brenda, for many years, they have three children, Terrence, Gina and C.J. (Calvin Junior). And, the “boy” preacher is now a grandpa, thank you very much, several times over. He has made us proud. He has made us take stock of the incredible life that God has given him. He has embraced a noble cause . . . the cause of Christ. www.thepositivecommunity.com


neW York theologicAl seminArY celebrAtes the 25 AnniversArY oF the Women’s center And 111 YeArs oF gender Justice th

Dr. Cynthia Diaz June 27th through June 29th 2012, New York Theological Seminary set aside three days to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Eleanor Moody-Shepherd Resource Center for Women of Faith and 111 Years of an institutional commitment to gender justice. Participants and speakers from across the country travelled to acknowledge past achievements and affirm present day accomplishments of women from all walks of faith traditions. The conference began with the “Women on the Frontline AWArds dinner” at The Interchurch Center. Hundreds gathered to honor the five women who have served as directors from the inception of the Women’s Center, to present day leadership, along with 25 Women who have notably served on the “frontline of gender justice.”

NYTS MDiv student and Mistress of Ceremony Alexie Torres-Fleming [above], introducing the keynote speaker, author of While the World Watched, the Rev. Carolyn Maull McKinstry, [right]

[Above left] NYTS MDiv student Pamela Jones standing next to the quilt she created that was presented to Rev. McKinstry. The angel motif was patterned after the plaque commemorating the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church (Birmingham, Alabama). Each honoree received a framed smaller version of the quilt. [Above right] NYTS MDiv student and United States Disabled Veteran Larissa Andreeva salutes the 25 honorees celebrated at the “Women on the Frontline AWArds dinner”

Former And Present nYts boArd members honored [Left to right} Board member and alum, Dr. Gloria Nixon Pone [seated] is presented the Woman on the Frontline Award by NYTS MDiv student and Development Director for CPUR, Lori Hartman. Minister Gail Davis, NYTS alum [standing right] presents the award to former board member and alum, Cecilia Loving.

The keynote speaker, the Rev. Carolyn Maull McKinstry, author of While the World Watched; the only written eyewitness account of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, shared the story that she has shared with millions on Oprah, 20/20, CNN and MSNBC. Her narrative stirred the hearts and social justice minds of the multiracial, multicultural and multigenerational audience. The conference included workshops, plenaries and extensive discussions related to leading women on the frontline, 21st century leaders and youth on the frontline. The 25th Anniversary celebration continued with a two-week intensive course on “The Intersection of Womanist Hermeneutics and Prophetic Preaching” taught by biblical scholar the Rev. Dr. Renita Weems. The Women’s Center is enjoying a season of women, men and youth celebrating the past; as they look towards the present; in anticipation of unlimited dreams of the future. Dr. Cynthia Diaz is the Director of Student Affairs and Vocational Discernment at New York Theological Seminary and serves as the Director of the Eleanor Moody-Shepherd Resource Center for Women of Faith. Photos by Bob Gore

NYTS | 475 Riverside Drive, Suite 500 | New York, NY 10115 | (T) 212-870-1211 | (F) 212-870-1236 | www.nyts.edu


Conference of National Black Churches Convention

L–R: Dr. W. Franklyn Richardson, chairman, CNBC and The Honorable Charles Rangel, Congressman NY 15th District. The Honorable James Clyburn, Congressman SC 6th District luncheon at CNBC National Consultation.

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he Conference of National Black Churches (CNBC) represents nine of the largest historically black denominations with 30 million people and more than 50,000 congregations worldwide. Members are African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church; African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Christian Methodist Episcopal (C.M.E.) Church; Church of God in Christ (COGIC); Full Gospel Baptist Church Fellowship Int’l; National Baptist Convention of America, Inc., Int’l; The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., National Missionary Baptist Convention of America, and Progressive National Baptist Convention, Inc. The organization held its national convention in May in Washington, D.C. In keeping with their

Dr. Suzan Johnson Cook, Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom

mission to serve as a unified voice of black religious bodies that seeks to improve the quality of life for African Americans and promote faith into advocacy, among the speakers were Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus; and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, both of whom addressed the attack on voting rights. “Today as Attorney General, I have the privilege – and the solemn duty – of enforcement, of enforcing this law, and the other civil rights reforms that President Johnson, Dr. King, and so many other courageous leaders and activists once championed,” said Holder. Rev. W. Franklyn Richardson serves as chairman of the board; Jacqueline L. Burton is president.

L–R: Bishop John H. Adams, founder and chairman emeritus, Conference of National Black Churches (CNBC); Jacqui Burton, president, CNBC; The Honorable Alexis Herman, recipient of the Dorothy I. Height Humanitarian Award; Reverend Al Sharpton, recipient of the Fred L. Shuttlesworth Social Justice Award; Dr. W. Franklyn Richardson, chairman, CNBC; Dr. Frederick D. Haynes, III, board member, CNBC.

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www.thepositivecommunity.com


oFFeR YouR eMPloYeeS Real

RetiReMent BeneFitS (not just PennieS FRoM heaVen. ) Wouldn’t it be nice to give those who are so faithful, hard-working and loyal the kind of retirement benefits they really deserve? Now you can. In fact, when you add social security benefits to the equation, career members can enjoy their golden years with as much as 86%* of their pre-retirement income. Others can retire quite handsomely, too. And no one will have to worry about where their next nickel is coming from. To learn more, send for our free guide, “Faith in Numbers,” or download it now at: MMBB.org/numbers. Or call 1-800-986-6222.

Real Planning, Real SolutionS. that’S ouR Calling. *Source: 2010 Retirement Income Study. Based on 15+ years of participation.


L–R: Kim George (Harlem Arts Alliance); Curtis Sherrod (Harlem Community Development Corporation); Barbara Askins (125th Street BID); Soica Mphahele (Artist), Blondel Pinnock (125th Street BID)

Money B u s i n e ss , M o n e y & w o r k

Photos: Karl Crutchfield

Bid Banners Go Up

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f you’ve been to 125th Street in Harlem recently, you couldn’t help but notice the beautiful, colorful banners suspended on light poles from Fifth to Morningside Avenues. The banners are the result of a project initiated by 125th Street Business Improvement District (BID) that showcases the cultural vitality of Harlem along the famed street and we are pleased to say that The Positive Community is one of five

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on 125th Street sponsors. Back for its fourth year, the BID ON CULTURE project was created to commemorate Harlem’s legacy as the crossroads of diverse cultures in America. The banners will remain on display for one year. A total of five winning designs were selected from the more than 70 submissions from artists who answered the BID’s call for entries, which were reviewed by a panel to determine those that best www.thepositivecommunity.com


The Artists L–R: Tomo Mori; Jacob Lawrence banner Justin West; Moon banner Marivel Mejia; Lady in White banner Soica Mphahlele; 125th Street banner Laura Gadson; Brownstones banner

responded to the theme, Harlem: A Cultural Legacy, with the highest artistic quality. The winning designs brought a particular beauty that truly reflects the diversity, energy and creativity of 125th Street, the heart of Harlem and were announced on June 26th at the Dwyer Cultural Center. The 125th Street BID seeks to maximize the value of the 125th Street corridor by initiating efforts that solidify its identity as Harlem’s primary cultural district. Enhancing the streetscape of 125th Street through the BID ON CULTURE project represents a major part of these efforts. In June 2011, the Honorable Congressman Rangel placed the 2011 winning BID ON CULTURE banners into the Congressional Record for the second time. Congressman Rangel wrote, “The BID ON CULTURE banners have added to the branding of 125th Street as the center of culture in Harlem, highlighting our commu-

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nity’s diversity, history, and contributions to and throughout our nation and the world.”   “The Banner program is one part of a larger commitment from the 125th Street BID to maintain the heritage and encourage the ongoing revitalization of 125th Street as a premier arts, culture and entertainment destination. This project takes this cultural sensibility beyond buildings,” said BID President and CEO Barbara Askins. “The unique banners celebrate Harlem’s cultural heritage with the local cultural community playing an important role. The partnerships with Harlem Arts Alliance and Harlem Community Development Corporation have been the key to bringing this competition to the community.” In addition to The Positive Community, banner sponsors are TD Bank, Aloft Harlem Hotel, Con Edison and The City College of New York.

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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“WHAT’S HOT IN HARLEM?” - Crossword by the 125th Street Business Improvement District

For crossword answers visit: www.125thstreetbid.com V

Across 2. Working closely with the NYPD, the BID Public Safety _________ patrol the district daily, serving as an extra set of eyes and ears. 4. The _____ Harlem Hotel is the first hotel of its size built in Harlem in over 40 years. 5. She made her singing debut at age 17 at the Apollo Theater on November 21, 1934. 7. “Harlem, ____ ____ ___!” –Chant for 125th Street BID’s “Harlem Holiday Lights” Program 10. This American contemporary art museum, the _____ ______ in Harlem, is located on 125th Street between Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard and Malcolm X Boulevard. 16. The State Office Building on 125th Street is named for _____ _____ _____ __. 17. Catch a movie at the _________ _______ Movie Theater on 125th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard. 18. “Harlem: A Cultural _______” – 2012 “BID On Culture” Banner Competition theme 19. 125th Street is often referred to as the ______ of Harlem. 20. In the mid 20th century, the landmark Hotel ______ on 125th Street and Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd boasted visitors such as Louis Armstrong, Sugar Ray Robinson, Lena Horne, Josephine Baker, and more. 21. The BID ________ Team, who can be recognized by their red uniforms, provide street cleaning services from 7 am to 7 pm every day.


ART D I N I N G

SHOPPING

EDUCATION

M U S I C

CULTURE

D E V E L O P M E N T

Be the First to Get the Savings, deals, promotions, events, news, & more @125thstreetbid

Harlem BID

www.125thstreetbid.com

Down 1. 125th Street is also called ______ Boulevard. 3. 125th Street is famous for attracting poets, writers, scholars, musicians, and artists during the era called the Harlem ______. 6. Each year, the 125th Street BID and Manhattan Community Boards 9, 10, and 11 partner in the “_____ ____ _____” Program to light up 125th Street from river to river. 8. 125th Street is nestled between the East and _____ Rivers. 9. The 125th Street BID is managed by the 125th Street _____ Management Association. 11. Between June and November you will find the 125th Street ________ ________ at the plaza of the Harlem State Office Building 12. The Roaring Twenties were the golden age of ____ music, and Harlem remains one of the best places to listen to this genre. 13. 125th Street used to be called “The Hollow Way” due to the “125th Street _____” running underneath the street. 14. The 125th Street BID’s boundaries encompass 125th Street from Fifth to _____ Avenues. 15. Former President ____’s office is on 125th Street.


Bridge Street Development Corporation

F Pastor Cousins and Rev. Waterman at the 2011 Clergy Breakfast hosted by the Coalition for the Improvement of Bedford-Stuyvesant

Rev. Waterman and former CEO Rhonda Lewis at the 2011 Clergy Breakfast

or the past three years, Bridge Street Development Corporation in partnership with the Coalition for the Improvement of Bedford Stuyvesant has brought together churches throughout Central Brooklyn to celebrate Empowerment Sunday in the hopes of helping congregations meet the challenge of surviving one of the toughest economic periods in modern times. By assembling clergy for Empowerment Sunday as well as a Clergy Breakfast, Bridge Street Development Corporation’s aim is to connect congregations to valuable resources including foreclosure prevention assistance, financial counseling, assistance to first time home buyers, and other services designed to help families achieve financial stability and create generational wealth.

Bishop Hezekiah Walker

Emilio Dorcely, acting CEO of BSDC addresses the congregation at Love Fellowship Tabernacle

“Thin Clients” & Mobile Computing for Small Business

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or many small business owners, spending time at the office is becoming more and more of a luxury. With days spent out on sales calls, networking, running errands, or generally being “out-and-about,” owners often have limited time for staying on top of day-to-day operations. Fortunately, recent advances in technology provide powerful methods for staying connected while on-the-go. Only a few years ago, mobile computing required lugging a laptop around with you everywhere you went. These days, owners and employees can accomplish a remarkable amount of tasks using a “thin client” and a cloud model for business computing. A “thin client” is a device used primarily as a display and input device that’s connected to a remote (or cloud) server, which makes storage capacity and processing power less important. Examples include netbooks, Smart phones, ultra-light laptops, and tablets. Your business’s data and productivity

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The Positive Community Summer 2012

applications (e.g., Microsoft Office, QuickBooks, etc.) reside in the cloud. Think of it like the old mainframe/terminal model, where data lived and heavy-duty processing occurred on the centrally located mainframe (in this case, the cloud), and workers interacted with the mainframe through terminals (thin clients) at their desks. Only now, your “terminal” goes with you wherever you go, and you can access the “mainframe” from anywhere you have an Internet connection. This cloud and thin client model provides many benefits to small business owners. Imagine striking up a conversation with a possible new customer at a coffee shop and being able to pull up a presentation on ROI on your Smart phone. Or imagine nurses in a medical practice being able to access diagnostic literature and patient records from a lightweight tablet instead of a bulky laptop (not to mention being able to update those records in real-time).

Best of all, you don’t need a Fortune 500-sized IT budget to take advantage of this cutting edge technology. CMIT Solutions has the answers to all your technology questions, from Windows tips and tricks to malware protection to cloud computing. Contact us for a free, no-obligation technology assessment, and you’ll understand why CMIT Solutions is the trusted technology advisor for 1000s of small businesses across the nation. Cecil Cates 973.325.3663 ccates@cmitsolutions.com CMIT Solutions of Northern Union County 55 Union Avenue Suite 114 Summit, NJ 07901 www.cmitsolutions.com/nunioncounty www.thepositivecommunity.com


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The Positive Community Summer 2012

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Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Abyssinian Receives $500,000 Grant from Coca Cola

Former NYC Schools Chancellor, Joel I. Klein now a consultant with News Corp

Muhtar Kent, chairman/CEO of The Coca-Cola Company Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts

Photos: Seitu Oronde

The grant will ensure that students at Bread & Roses Integrated Arts High School have access to books, technology software and hardware to support the school’s curriculum. Sheen Wright, president/CEO, ADC

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he Coca-Cola Foundation, the global philanthropic arm of The Coca-Cola Company, awarded a $500,000 grant to the Abyssinian Development Corporation (ADC), a Harlem-based not-for-profit community and economic development organization, to establish a student media center within Bread & Roses Integrated Arts High School. Muhtar Kent, chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company, announced the grant during ADC’s Harlem Renaissance Day of Commitment Leadership Breakfast. “The Abyssinian Development Corporation shares Coca-Cola’s passion for education—for making sure today’s young people get a strong start in life,” Kent said during the announcement of the grant. “It is our most profound desire, in all we do, to create value and make a lasting, positive difference for individuals and families in this community and around the world.” The grant will ensure that students at Bread & Roses Integrated Arts High School have access to books, technology, software and hardware to support the school’s curriculum. The high school had been beset with a severe shortage of materials, supplies, desks, and chairs, and a record of persistently low-achievements, until it was assumed by ADC in 2010.

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NYC Councilwoman Inez Dickens and Patricia Butts

During the event, ADC awarded Muhtar Kent the Harlem Renaissance Day of Commitment Leadership Award, recognizing his global commitment to building sustainable communities. ADC is the only community-based organization designated as an Educational Partnership Organization by the U.S. Department of Education. ADC also operates Abyssinian Head Start, and sponsors the Thurgood Marshall Academy Lower School and the Thurgood Marshall Academy for Learning and Social Change. The Coca-Cola Company and The Coca-Cola Foundation have a strong legacy of supporting educational programs dating back to the Company’s earliest beginnings. In 2011, Coca-Cola invested more than $19 million in educational initiatives to support academic scholarships, first generation college scholarships, mentoring, school drop-out prevention and reading and literacy education programs. Founded in 1989, Abyssinian Development Corporation is a not-for-profit comprehensive community and economic development corporation dedicated to building the human, social and physical capital in Harlem. ADC has leveraged over $600 million of investments in the Harlem community and has over 140 employees. www.thepositivecommunity.com


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Columbia University Salutes The Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce on Harlem Week 2012 Columbia and City Expand Program for Minority, Women and Locally Based Contractors

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atherine Jallim Jallim has has owned owned her her own own construction construction business business for for 11 11 years years atherine and thought thought she she knew knew everything everything there there was was to to know. know. Then Then she she was was acacand cepted into into Columbia Columbia University’s University’s two-year two-year construction construction mentorship mentorship cepted program, where where she she learned learned even even more. more. program, has “helped “helped my my company company improve improve in in marketing, marketing, networking, networking, its its safety safety ItIt has program,” she she said. said. “I “I have have increased increased my my bonding bonding capacity capacity since since learning learning how how program,” to do do itit here, here, and and II have have received received six six contracts contracts since since joining joining the the program.” program.” to Columbia has has aa rigorous rigorous commitment commitment to to minority, minority, women women and and local local Columbia (MWL) business business enterprises enterprises and and supports supports this this commitment commitment through through aa variety variety (MWL) of initiatives. initiatives. The The construction construction mentorship mentorship program program was was formed formed in in conjuncconjuncof tion with with New New York York City’s City’s Department Department of of Small Small Business Business Services Services (SBS) (SBS) in in tion January 2008. 2008. Since Since then, then, professionals professionals from from 53 53 firms firms have have graduated graduated and and January garnered more more than than $60 $60 million million in in construction construction trades trades work work with with the the city city garnered and Columbia. Columbia. and “From the the beginning, beginning, our our vision vision was was to to create create aa mentorship mentorship program program that that “From would benefit benefit MWL MWL firms firms in in the the construction construction trades trades industry industry and and help help idenidenwould tify firms firms that that might might be be able able to to work work with with Columbia Columbia or or other other large large instituinstitutify tional firms,” firms,” said said Joe Joe Ienuso, Ienuso, executive executive vice vice president president of of Columbia Columbia University University tional Facilities. “We “We have have been been successful successful in in both both regards.” regards.” Facilities. The two-year two-year mentorship mentorship program program includes includes academic academic work work in in such such toptopThe ics as as marketing marketing and and communications, communications, disputes disputes and and negotiations, negotiations, insurance insurance ics and bonds, bonds, as as well well as as project project planning planning and and sustainability. sustainability. Professionals Professionals in in the the and

“The city city has has made made tremendous tremendous progress progress inin expanding expanding the the opportunities opportunities “The available to to minority minority and and women women business business owners owners under under available Mayor Bloomberg’s Bloomberg’s leadership, leadership, but but there there isis still still more more to to do,” do,” said said Mayor Rob Walsh, Walsh, commissioner commissioner ofof the the city’s city’s Department Department ofof Small Small Business Business Rob Services.“With “With partners partners like like Columbia, Columbia, we we will will continue continue to to help help Services. minorityand women-owned businesses succeed.” minority- and women-owned businesses succeed.” program work work on on aa case case study study and and are are assigned assigned mentors mentors from from big big construcconstrucprogram tion firms firms to to help help them them learn learn the the challenges challenges of of bidding bidding on on large-scale large-scale projprojtion ects. When When they they complete complete the the program, program, participants participants receive receive aa certificate certificate from from ects. Columbia’s School School of of Continuing Continuing Education. Education. Columbia’s “As aa small small company company we we learned learned how how to to retain retain good good employees, employees, to to promote promote “As our business, business, and and demonstrate demonstrate credibility credibility as as aa company,” company,” said said Yam Yam Gurung, Gurung, of of our Harlem-based J&Y J&Y Electric Electric and and Intercom Intercom Co. Co. Inc., Inc., who who isis halfway halfway through through Harlem-based the program. program. “Since “Since the the market market isis so so competitive, competitive, we we have have to to constantly constantly imimthe prove our our skills skills to to gain gain aa competitive competitive advantage.” advantage.” prove Last year, year, the the city city expanded expanded its its minorityminority- and and women-owned women-owned business business efforts, efforts, Last which had had previously previously been been confined confined to to the the public public sector, sector, to to include include opportuniopportuniwhich ties with with private private companies companies and and organizations. organizations. Columbia Columbia isis one one of of 11 11 founding founding ties partners in in the the Corporate Corporate Alliance Alliance Program, Program, aa public-private public-private partnership partnership that that partners aims to to connect connect MWL MWL participants participants to to opportunities opportunities with with corporate corporate partners. partners. aims

Thewinners winnersofofthe theYear Year11Case CaseStudy StudyCompetition, Competition,ananintegral integralpart partofofthe theconstruction constructionmentorship mentorshipprogram, program,hold holdtheir theirawards. awards. From Fromleft: left:Yam Yam The Gurung,J&Y J&YElectric Electricand andIntercom IntercomCompany CompanyInc.; Inc.;David DavidMuñoz Muñoz(mentor), (mentor),Skanska SkanskaUSA USABuilding BuildingInc.; Inc.;Kimberlee KimberleeKelley, Kelley,Artisan ArtisanConstruction; Construction; Gurung, JorgeBarbosa, Barbosa,U.U.Arias AriasCorp. Corp. Jorge

“The city city has has made made tremendous tremendous progress progress in in expanding expanding the the opportunities opportunities availavail“The able to to minority minority and and women women business business owners owners under under Mayor Mayor Bloomberg’s Bloomberg’s leaderleaderable ship, but but there there isis still still more more to to do,” do,” said said Rob Rob Walsh, Walsh, commissioner commissioner of of the the city’s city’s ship, Department of of Small Small Business Business Services. Services. “With “With partners partners like like Columbia, Columbia, we we will will Department continue to to help help minorityminority- and and women-owned women-owned businesses businesses succeed.” succeed.” continue The University’s University’s goal goal isis to to spend spend at at least least 35 35 percent percent of of all all construction construction The dollars with with MWL MWL firms firms and and have have at at least least 40 40 percent percent of of its its construction construction laladollars bor force force made made up up of of women, women, minorities minorities and and local local workers. workers. “We “We have have some some bor of the the most most aggressive aggressive goals goals around,” around,” said said La-Verna La-Verna Fountain, Fountain, vice vice president president of for Construction Construction Business Business Services Services and and Communications. Communications. “It “It would would be be imimfor possible to to achieve achieve them them without without the the active active support support of of our our MWL MWL Advisory Advisory possible Council made made up up of of local local industry industry experts experts like like the the Greater Greater Harlem Harlem ChamChamCouncil ber of of Commerce, Commerce, the the Harlem Harlem Business Business Alliance Alliance and and the the New New York York Women’s Women’s ber Chamber of of Commerce.” Commerce.” Chamber Columbia University University has has received received aa number number of of accolades accolades recently recently for for its its Columbia groundbreaking work. work. In In May, May, the the facilities facilities department department was was recognized recognized for for groundbreaking outstanding advocacy advocacy on on behalf behalf of of the the MinorityMinority- and and Women-Owned Women-Owned BusiBusioutstanding ness Enterprise Enterprise Community. Community. Fountain Fountain herself herself received received the the MinorityMinority- and and ness Women-Owned Business Business Enterprise Enterprise Advocate Advocate of of the the Year Year Award Award in in June. June. And And Women-Owned Tanya Pope, Pope, executive executive director director of of Construction Construction Business Business Services, Services, was was named named Tanya an Outstanding Outstanding Woman Woman by by the the National National Association Association of of Professional Professional Women Women an in Construction. Construction. in In addition addition to to the the construction construction certificate/mentorship certificate/mentorship program, program, the the EuEuIn gene Lang Lang Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship Center Center at at Columbia Columbia Business Business School School continues continues gene to offer offer aa two-year two-year program program providing providing specialized specialized assistance assistance to to aa wide wide range range to of MWL MWL firms. firms. The The University University also also isis expanding expanding its its role role as as the the host host of of the the of first and and only only Small Small Business Business Development Development Center Center (SBDC) (SBDC) serving serving Harlem Harlem first and Upper Upper Manhattan, Manhattan, which which will will provide provide technical technical assistance, assistance, training training and and and support to to entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs, small small businesses businesses and and nonprofit nonprofit organizations organizations in in the the support local community. community. local

Visit http://news.columbia.edu/mwl http://news.columbia.edu/mwl to to learn learn Visit more about about Columbia Columbia University’s University’s MWL MWL initiatives. initiatives. more


McDonalds Owner/Operators Raise Funds for Scholarships

Honored guest Rick Colon, who serves as restaurant support officer East Division for McDonald’s; Owner/Operator Ron Bailey; and Roland Parish, chair and CEO of the National Black McDonald’s Owners Association

Photos: Don Sherrill

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he NY/NJ Black McDonald Operators Association hosted its 18th Annual Scholarship Fundraiser Thursday, July 12th, at the Westminster Hotel, Livingston, New Jersey. Proceeds from the event benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities African American Future Achievers Scholarship and the NY/NJ BMOA Scholarship Fund. The event honored the achievements and humanitarianism of National Black McDonald Operators Association Chair & CEO, Ronald Parish and Restaurant Support Officer of McDonald’s USA East DIvision, Rick Colon. Linda Dunham, RMHC Chair and NY/NJ BMOA member; Ron Bailey Harlem, NY McDonald’s Owner and Operator, and a host of key national BMOA and RMHC committee members were in attendance.

BMOA President Harry Staley and his Wife Annis Alston Staley

The NY/NJ BMOA is the tri-state chapter of the National Black McDonald’s Operators Association, an organization founded in 1968 to provide a support system for African-American McDonald’s Owners/Operators across the country. The NY/NJ BMOA is comprised of 18 black operator entities, owning 67 stores throughout New York and New Jersey. Restaurants within the NY/ NJ BMOA gross an impressive $180 million annually in sales. During the past seven years NY/NJ BMOA has raised half a million dollars in scholarship funds for college bound youth in NY and NJ through the fundraiser. The NY/NJ BMOA aims to be an example of entrepreneurship and provide career opportunities for members of their communities. Additionally, the organization works to bring awareness to the many programs that RMHC has available in the community including health, education, the arts, civil and social services.

NY/NJ Black McDonald Operators Association Awards 13 Scholarships

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his year’s Ronald McDonald House Charities African American Future Scholarship luncheon was held on June 5 at the Crystal Plaza in Livingston NJ. Thirteen scholarships were given out to young gifted and black students from throughout the tri-state area.

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Ronald McDonald with Brian Hairston owner/operator; Jamil Jennings, recipient of The RMHC-AAFA Robert Lee Dunham Memorial scholarship; Linda Dunham, RMHC Global chair and wife of the late Lee Dunham; and Brian Custer of SNY. www.thepositivecommunity.com


September 7-9, 2012 Hilton East Brunswick Hotel

3 Tower Center Boulevard East Brunswick, NJ Room Rate $99.00 –Free Parking Call 732-828-2000

Richard Smith, Convention Chair James Harris, NJSC NAACP President

“Gospel Extravaganza Concert” Kim Keenan Byron Cage

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The Baker’s Son How America’s Largest Caribbean Franchise was born

BY GLENDA CADOGAN

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rowing up in the small farming community of Border in St. Andrews Parish Jamaica, Lowell Hawthorne had dreams of being a minibus driver and president of the Minibus Association on his native island. He realized one half of this dream when he purchased a minivan and quickly became one of the most popular drivers on the island. He transcended the other part of the dream when he instead became the president and CEO of Golden Krust Bakery & Grill, one of the largest black-owned franchises in the United States. The son of a village baker, Hawthorne’s life has been an extraordinary journey. In his upcoming autobiography, The Baker’s Son, Hawthorne chronicles this journey and speaks of the challenges, constraints and obstacles he had to over-

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come to get to the top. The book details his humble beginnings in Jamaica, his coming to America and life in a Bronx project, his life as a civil servant and his educational pursuits. The moving narrative is described by former Prime Minister of Jamaica, P.J. Patterson as “inspirational” and “an invaluable guide to success.” In an interview with The Positive Community, Hawthorne took a panoramic view of the landscape of his life and summed it up with a simple sentence: “It is with God’s grace at my side that I have been able to do all that I have done.” The sixth in a family of 11 children, Hawthorne’s saga began in the rural community where his parents, Ephraim and Mavis, ran a small bakery attached to the family home. “We had no electricity and no running water,” he said, “but we had strong family values that were instilled in us by our parents who were very much involved in the church. I was born into the business but was determined that I wanted to do much more than deliver bread for my parents, so I first became a farmer and reared chickens, pigs and goats. Then came the minibus and finally I bought a DJ set and became known as Sir Wasp International.” Hawthorne’s American sojourn began in 1981 when most of the family migrated to New York City and took up residence in the Bronx. Culture shock aside, getting acclimated took some doing. “It was a long while before I found permanent employment and when I did, my job as an assistant stock handler at the NYPD was not enough to care for my wife and four children,” he recalled. But certainly Hawthorne could not have earned the DJ name “Sir Wasp” without having a bit of sting. So with his penchant for tenacity, he struggled through the obstacles, which included a period of public assistance. He gained his college education and degree, which enabled him to advance his career to become an accountant. continued on next page

The son of a village baker, Hawthorne’s life has been an extraordinary journey.

In his upcoming autobiography, The Baker’s Son, Hawthorne chronicles this journey and speaks of the challenges, constraints and obstacles he had to overcome to get to the top.

www.thepositivecommunity.com


COVERSTORY THE BAKER’S SON continued from previous page

With banks refusing to lend them money, the Hawthornes mortgaged their homes, borrowed from friends, and created a susu (an investment circle where members contribute a static Golden Krust flagship store, where it all began in 1989

amount each week and when their turn comes they receive all the money col-

Interior of the newest store in Tamarac, Florida.

Then came one of those Easter visits from his father who was a migrant farm worker at the time; “My father would bake some lovely Easter buns in the basement of my sister’s apartment and it brought back so much warm memories of my childhood,” said Hawthorne. The buns not only satisfied the palate but once again gave Hawthorne a taste for the business. He gathered his 11 siblings and their spouses in his apartment and threw out the prospect of going back into the family business. They immediately bought into the vision. And so “operation family bakery” was put into action. With banks refusing to lend them money, the Hawthornes mortgaged their homes, borrowed from friends, and created a susu (an investment circle where members contribute a static amount each week and when their turn comes they receive all the money collected that week). In short, he did everything possible to come up with the initial capital. In three months they raised $107,000 and with eyes set on a property on Gun Hill Road in the Bronx, the first Golden Krust Bakery opened in August of 1989. “It has been a tremendous journey since that day,” said Hawthorne. “In the first three years we opened seven stores and in six years had more than 20 stores in New York, New Jersey and

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lected that week). Connecticut. By then everyone wanted to be a part of the Golden Krust concept.” Thus the world of franchising came into view. There is a poignant pause at this point in the saga as Hawthorne tells for the first time in an interview, the backstory of how the famous beef patty was born. “One of the regrets I have is that my father never taught us how to make Jamaican beef patties. In his bakery, the specialties were bread, buns and cake and that’s what we learned,” he explains. “So for the first couple years of the existence of Golden Krust Bakery we purchased patties from one of the major supplies in the United States. But it seems as though our rapid growth became a threat, so the supplier decided to clip our wings and in 1993 discontinued our patty supply.” The news, says Hawthorne was devastating. “My wings were clipped and I did not know how to make beef patties.” In the face of this challenge, the Hawthorne clan once again came together with their entire team to figure out a way to heal and grow new wings. And so they did. As the leader of the empire, Hawthorne travelled around the world in search of solutions. “We struggled for a long time, but after about seven months we had somewhat perfected a patty,” he said with a sense of accomplishment. In ensuing years the company moved into mass production and now has the capacity to produce 400 patties per minute. “It has not been easy,” Hawthorne admitted regarding that part of the journey. “But with every challenge comes an opportunity. If it were not for that obstacle placed in my way, I don’t think we would have become one of the largest producers of Jamaican beef patties today.” One of Hawthorne’s personal mantras is that “calculated risks not taken are opportunities missed.” Indeed the franchising of Golden Krust was a calculated risk that yielded

www.thepositivecommunity.com


(L-R) Lorna Hawthorne, Lloyd Hawthorne, Jacqueline Robinson, Lowell Hawthorne, Lauris Campbell, Milton Hawthorne and Velma Hawthorne

It was all, indeed, a tall order, but on May 23 1996, Golden Krust received its franchise license and since then there has been no looking back. The company now has 120 stores in nine states and produces nine different flavors of patties. tremendous dividends and propelled Golden Krust to a position of distinction as the most successful Caribbean enterprise in the United States. “After doing my preliminary research on franchising, I approached an attorney who told me that the first thing we had to do is to knock down all 30 stores we had at the time and remodel them to look alike. I was taken aback by the recommendation,” he recalled, adding, “But I was determined. Then we were confronted with the various manuals we had to produce. There was a franchise manual followed by others on compliance, construction and operations. Then we had to prepare financial statements and put cookie cutter type systems in place.” It was all, indeed, a tall order, but on May 23 1996, Golden Krust received its franchise license and since then there has been no looking back. The company now has 120 stores in nine states and produces nine different flavors of patties. In addition to franchising, the Golden Krust brand has two other channels of operations: the retail channel which services Costco, Sam’s Club, dollar stores and 7,000 supermarkets, and the institution channel serving New York City Public Schools and the penal system. Part of Hawthorne’s vision is to take Caribbean cuisine mainstream by 2020. “I believe we will be able to achieve this goal by focusing on our three main channels—retail,

www.thepositivecommunity.com

franchise and institutional,” he opined. In an America where this dream is realized, Hawthorne hopes to see the Jamaican beef patty take a place alongside a slice of pizza, a bagel and Chinese noodles. Hawthorne is as proud of his Christian upbringing and way of living as he is of his beef patties. “Faith without works is dead,” he believes. “I have the faith and I’ve done, and am doing the work.” It is this same faith and Christian values that give him both roots and wings. And it is also what he says brings him the most pleasure outside of the business. “I love leading people to praise God.” And as the worship leader at the Church of the Nazarene, he gets an opportunity to do so every Sunday morning. “This is my joy,” he said. “And so, too, is starting my day with prayer and devotion. My aim every morning when I wake up is to find something to keep me going for that day. Sometimes it is the 20-30 children who we were able to give scholarships to last year. Other days it is my wife, Lorna, and our four children. Other days it is my father’s legacy or the entrepreneurial spirit of my brothers and sisters. And some days it is our franchisees.” Whatever the inspiration that comes up that day, Hawthorne draws on it to strengthen his determination, maintain discipline and nurture the desire to live in the fullness of what it means to be, the baker’s son.

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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HARLEM WEEK 38th Year Kick-off Gracie Mansion Reception Carib News tribute – Pictured left to right – Jamaica’s Council General Herman Lamont; Council General of Japan Shigeyoki Hiroki; MTA’s Jim Harding; MTA’s Michael Gardner; and FOX 5’sDave Price Photos: Images of Us

L–R: Kim Jasmin of JPMorgan Chase; scholarship recipient Shamir Bailey; Marcy McCall of Emblem Health Inc., grant recipient Dante Brown, executive director of Harlem Jr. Tennis & Education Program; and Karl McCall, chairman, SUNY Board of Trustees

L–R: Coca Cola’s S. Madison Bedard; scholarship recipient Denera McCullough; Peter Nawabi of Heineken USA; and Board Member Dr. John Palmer, who accepts a grant on behalf of the Greater Harlem Chamber of Commerce Tina McRae (2nd right), is joined by Tim Zagat (Left); Mayor Bloomberg (2nd left) and NYS Assemblyman Keith Wright (right) in accepting Sylvia’s Restaurant’s 50th Anniversary honors on behalf of the Woods Family

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Honoree Jackie Rowe-Adams (center) is presented an award by City Council member Inez Dickens (left) and Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Jr. (right). Cheryl Saunders, with Cornelius Ricks of the Harlem Law Library

L–R: Bandleader Ray Chew; Emmis Broadcasting’s Donyshia Benjamin; Deon Levingston, general manager WBLS and Voza Rivers, GHCC VP www.thepositivecommunity.com

Photo: Wali Amin Muhammad

n Thursday, July 19, 2012, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg kicked off the 38th anniversary of HARLEM WEEK with an official gala reception at Gracie Mansion. The afternoon affair included an excerpt performance by the male cast members of the Tony award-winning play, Porgy & Bess. In addition to the performance, HARLEM WEEK honored Carib News on its 30th Anniversary and Jackie Rowe Adams for her tireless community activism and commitment to antiviolence. There was also a moment of silence honoring Soul Food Queen Sylvia Woods, who passed away that afternoon. Members of the Woods family were scheduled to attend the ceremony, which saluted the 50th Anniversary of Sylvia’s Restaurant. Themed Harlem: Where the World Meets the World, this year’s HARLEM WEEK events will celebrate Harlem’s global presence and international legacy. Activities include the Great Day In Harlem “Sunday Classics” on July 29th in honor of radio legend Hal Jackson, Economic Development Day, Sr. Citizens Day, The Percy E. Sutton Harlem 5k Run& NYC Family Walk-A-Thon For Peace in Our Communities and special salutes on August 18 celebrating the 50th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence with music from the legendary Bob Marley and an outdoor screening of the critically acclaimed documentary Marley and on HARLEM DAY, salutes honoring the 100th anniversaries of South Africa’s African National Congress and Japan’s Sakura Festival and much more.


CONGRATULATIONS on

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Where Faith & Knowledge Meet

The Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Newark (serving

Bergen, Essex, Hudson and Union counties) offer a positive, encouraging and safe environment where children can grow in body, mind, and spirit. Our caring, qualified teachers provide a strong academic foundation. We are deeply committed to helping students develop into productive, responsible adults and citizens with goals and direction. 3 97% of graduates advance to college 3 NJ core content standards met or exceeded 3 High academic standards 3 Christ-centered values

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www.thepositivecommunity.com


Education TEACHING, LEARNING, MAKING A DIFFERENCE

For photos, video and more visit www.newarklrs.com

Roundtable Wrap-Up

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igher Education is central to advancement for individuals in the workplace and in life generally today, and it is vital to the nation that more of its citizens have access to higher learning that is affordable. The Positive Community’s recent forum on the subject helped to shine urgent light on many of the critical questions that must be addressed if higher education is to continue being the vehicle for upward mobility and social progress for the nation in the days ahead.

Rev. Dr. M. William “Bill” Howard senior pastor Bethany Baptist Church, Newark NJ

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here is little change without confrontation. Therefore, I was blessed to be at the recent roundtable that positioned the community, church, and the world of academia to dialogue with each other to evaluate, access, and ultimately address the challenges in both our homes and educational institutions. The Positive Community magazine has proven once again to be relevant for our times and is serving as a tool that God is using to bring the necessary change agents together for the good of our people.

Dr. Joseph E. Woods, senior servant leader & pastor St. Phillips Church, Hamilton NJ General Secretary, General Baptist Convention of New Jersey

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he Positive Community established the right mix of people, panelists, issues, and venue to ensure that a conversation beyond immediate issues and concerns would occur concerning how we can improve the quality of higher education in our community. Douglas Bendall, PhD, president The Newark School of Theology

Thanks the Sponsors of the Next Roundable:

Financial Education Seminars The Newark Leadership Roundtable Series Continues:

Sat. September 29th: The Business Roundtable ● Bank On It! www.thepositivecommunity.com

● Money Matters ● To Your Credit

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Scenes From The Education Roundtable At The Newark Club

Richard M. Roper Moderator

Guest Speakers

Dr. Antionette Ellis-Williams

Rev. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III

James Harris

Daryl D. Garrett Jr.

Rev. M. William Howard, Jr.

Founder, Director, Female Leadership Development Institute & Research Center

Pastor, Abyssinian Baptist Church, Harlem

State President, NAACP New Jersey

Development Manager, Hope Community, Inc.

Pastor, Bethany Baptist Church, Newark

Photos: Vincent Bryant, Wali Amin Muhammad, Laurence Rice, Maurice McCoy

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www.thepositivecommunity.com


Special Guest Dr. Joseph E. Wood General Baptist Convention, New Jersey

Courtney McAnuff

Theodore T. Johnson

Vice President for Enrollment Management Rutgers University

VP of Human Resources & Exec. Dir., Office of Compliance, Training and Community Relations, NJIT

Special Guest Rev. Dr. James Forbes Pastor Emeritus, Riverside Church, Harlem

Rev. Dr. David Jefferson Sr. Pastor, Metropolitan Baptist Church, Newark

R. Douglas Bendall

Samuel Delgado

Founder, President Newark School of Theology

Vice President, External Affairs, Verizon NJ

Acknowledgements: We offer our deepest gratitude to Al Koeppe, president and CEO of the Newark Alliance; Clement A. Price, Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor of History and founding director of the Institute on Ethnicity, Culture and the Modern Experience at Rutgers Newark; and Rev. Dr. M. William Howard, senior pastor of Bethany Baptist Church, Newark for their vision and wisdom in the development of the NLRS. See highlights online at www.thepositivecommunity.com complete transcripts available

www.thepositivecommunity.com

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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NYCAS

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�ooray

Grads

he Brooklyn Center for the Performing Arts at Brooklyn was the site of the commencement ceremony of NYCAS, a division of Touro College on June 4, 2012

for the

Dr. Gerald David presents a Special Award for Excellence in Human Services to Leah Clinton

NYC Fire Commissioner Salvatore J. Cassano, keynote speaker at the Commencement Exercises

Buffalo State

Proud graduates crossing the stage Dean Eva Spinelli-Sexter congratulates graduates

Congratulations to Twanna Gilford, who graduated Buffalo State with a doctorate of pyscology

Private and Corporate Catering: For group sales and reservations, please call 212-222-4545

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The Positive Community Summer 2012

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These are Exciting Times at The City College of New York

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hese are exciting times at The City College of New York as it continues to unveil new offerings and opportunities for both the community and the world at large. Broadway legend Ben Vereen spoke there during Black History Month. Lillias White, the award-winning singer/actress also had a concert there, as did mother and daughter jazz divas Carmen Bradford and Melba Joyce. There was even an appearance on campus by Nicole Ari Parker and the cast of “A Streetcar Named Desire,” for a discussion hosted by College President Lisa S. Coico. Now in the second year of President Coico’s tenure, City is redoubling its efforts to serve and offer quality educational opportunities to the community surrounding its 35-acre campus on Hamilton Heights. “City College is renowned for its outstanding programs in, among others, engineering and the sciences; for its notable alumni and for its wonderful diversity,” said Karen Mackey Witherspoon, vice president, Government and Community Affairs. “What President Coico decided when she took office was to engage the community more and make it a larger part of our success story.” This is increasingly reflected in some of the College’s offerings and events. In addition to launching a scholarship program to bring in some of the best and brightest high school graduates from the neighborhood, CCNY has ramped up programs designed to help empower the community. Entertainer Ben Vereen’s February talk at the College on blackface minstrelsy was a highlight of the revamped Aaron Davis Hall’s (ADH) performing arts program. Other ADH highlights included a concert by Lillias White and a first ever joint performance by jazz vocalists Carmen Bradford and her daughter Melba Joyce. Now headed by Gregory Shanck, the Aaron Davis Hall’s mandate is to bring

world-class artists and performers to CCNY year round. “This is a way of renewing our commitment to bringing great art and culture to our beautiful campus and community for all to enjoy,” said vice president Witherspoon. Topping this was a visit on campus by director Emily Mann and the cast of the theatre classic “A Streetcar Named Desire” for a discussion in May. President Coico emceed the conversation by Nicole Ari Parker, Blair Underwood and Daphne Vega and other cast members of the Broadway production. CCNY’s “Windows on Amsterdam” community art gallery, which opened last fall, is another new initiative. Located in the North Academic Center (NAC) plaza on Amsterdam Ave. and West 136th Street, it provides artists in Upper Manhattan space to display their work. An innovative component of the public gallery is an outdoor space for monthly “art on the wall” projection exhibits. This, too, is part of President Coico’s mission to cement City College’s ties in different spheres, including the arts, said Dr. Myrah Brown Green, CCNY executive director of arts and culture. Dr. Green’s office was also instrumental in the recent “Jazz on the Plaza” presentation in partnership with Jazzmobile. For three consecutive Mondays in July, vocalist Allan Harris, Yosvany Terry and Buyu Ambroise, performed on the North Academic Center Plaza along Convent Avenue. In addition, through its Continuing and Professional Studies department (CPS) City College has introduced several short-term training programs designed

to empower members of the community (and beyond) seeking new skills and knowledge. These range from a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) training program to acting workshops by actors Khalil Kain and Lonette McKee, to new food management classes, to self-empowerment classes by “America’s Psychologist,” Dr. Jeff Gardere, to CASAC (Credentialed Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor) training and a host of other classes. The courses are largely in response to requests from residents of the Greater Harlem community for training opportunities to prepare them for the demanding job market, said Sharon Mackey-McGee, CPS Executive Director. CCNY’s outreach is not restricted to adults. In a first for a New York City school, CPS brought the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp to City College. Fifty-two middle school students form Harlem and the five boroughs participated in the camp, designed to inspire them to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). They also got to meet the camp’s founder, former NASA astronaut Bernard Harris Jr., who talked about his fascination with science and answered campers’ questions. For more information about CPS and its course offerings, please call (212) 650-7312 or visit www.cps.ccny.edu. Their Fall Open House is currently scheduled for Wednesday, August 29th at City College beginning at 10am. From all accounts, the sky’s the limit, too, for The City College in its quest to serve the community.


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Immaculate Conception High School

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n June 3, 2012 Immaculate Conception High School in Montclair, NJ graduated 53 young men and women, 100 percent of whom will be attending four year colleges/universities this fall. The Class of 2012 received over $4 million dollars in scholarships and awards.

Siblings Bénédicte (left) and Benjamin Lusamba were both outstanding students throughout high school. Bénédicte finished in the top 10% of her class and will attend The University of Tampa in Florida. Benjamin is the Valedictorian of Immaculate Conception’s Class of 2012 and will continue his studies at The University of Chicago

L–R: Top Row: Toddler Guillaume (Rowan University), Charles Carter III (Assumption College); Bottom Row: Breanna S. Williams (Fairleigh Dickinson University), Amadi Hayes (Marymount University), Kiona Smith (Montclair State University), Nyasia Castaneda (Hillsborough Community College followed by Florida State University) and Dia Darby (Franklin Pierce University). L–R: Taasheim Crum will attend Albright College; Class of 2012 Salutatorian, Darius Chisolm, will continue his education at Montclair State University.

Bishop Air High School

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enobia Michele Rasbury is a graduate of Bishop George Ahr High School in Edison, New Jersey, Class of 2012. Zenobia, who graduated in the top 10 percent of her class, received many awards and scholarships including, Benjamin Bannaker award for Excellence in Science Achievement, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital Scholarship for Academic Achievement and the National Merit Scholar Outstanding Participant award. She will be a pre-med student at the University of Pennsylvania in September majoring in Behavioral Biology.

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New York School of Theology

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ew York School of Theology held their graduation on June 21, 2012 The Rev. Dr. Alfonso Wyatt, recently appointed to the NYTS Board of Trustees, received the Doctor of Ministry degree.

Grads

Photos: Bob Gore

The Rev. Diane Nelson, associate pastor, Church of God of East Flatbush in Brooklyn, NY, received the Master of Divinity degree and received the Bible Award for scholarly work in the New Testament.

Dr. Nadja Fidelia, DMin, recently appointed to the NYTS Board of Trustees, received the Doctor of Ministry degree.

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The Rev. Dr. Leslie Duroseau, pastor of South Hampton United Methodist Church, received the Doctor of Ministry degree.

Delaware State University

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harles U. Eke Jr. graduated from Delaware State University in May with a Bachelor of Science in Biological Sciences. Charles, the Son of Chief Charles U. Sr. and Lillian Eke of Plainfield, NJ graduated Summa Cum Laude with a 3.93 grade point average.

Photo: Laurence Rice

for the

L–R: Charles Ug o Eke Sr, Mrs. Lillian Eke, Mayor Sharon Briggs of Plainfield, NJ and the graduate, Charles U. Eke, Jr.

Essex County College L–R: Essex County College President Dr. Edythe M. Abdullah, keynote speaker and Newark Mayor Cory Booker and ECC Board of Trustees Chairperson Rev. Reginald Jackson get together shortly after the ceremony held at the Prrudential Center. www.thepositivecommunity.com

Dr. Gale Gibson, senior vice president/chief academic officer, (center), spends a moment with Essex County College’s two top graduates, Salutatorian Carla Alvarez-Valverde, of Bloomfield at left, and Valedictorian Renata Martin of Kearny, at right. Both students are the recipients of the prestigious 2012 Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Transfer Scholarship.

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ore than 1,300 members of the Essex County College Class of 2012 received their hard earned Associate degrees and specialized certificates at the 43rd annual Commencement held May 23 at Newark’s Prudential Center. Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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This Summer, Explore Your History By R.L. Witter s summer is winding down, perhaps you’ve completed your beach novel or seen all of the big summer blockbusters and you have some free time. Head over to your local public library and check out one of the following books or movies and continue your exploration of black history.

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BOOKS Setting the Record Straight: American History in Black & White By David Barton By citing historical and public records available to anyone, and giving one these resources, this book does more than "open your eyes." It feeds your mind and teaches you to not accept many of the established sources of politically correct messages about the origins of this country, and the self-serving politically slanted "truths" that are 180degrees from reality. Buy it, read it, and check the resources for yourself—if you dare! Creating Black Americans: African-American History and Its Meanings, 1619 to the Present By Neil Irvin Painter Painter offers a history written for a new generation of African Americans, stretching from life in Africa before slavery to today's hip-hop culture. The book describes the staggering number of Africans forcibly transported to the New World, most doomed to brutal servitude in Brazil and the Caribbean. Painter looks at the free black population, numbering close to half a million by 1860 and provides a gripping account of the horrible conditions of slavery itself. Painter traces how through the long Jim Crow decades, blacks succeeded against enormous odds. We read about the glorious outburst of artistic creativity of the Harlem Renaissance, the courageous struggles for Civil Rights in the 1960s, the rise and fall of Black Power and the modern hip-hop movement.

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A Kid's Guide to African American History: More Than 70 Activities (A Kid's Guide series) The first man to die fighting in the American Revolution, a onetime chief of the Crow Nation, the inventors of the banjo and peanut butter, and the first clockmaker in this country were all great African Americans. This book includes more than 70 hands-on activities, songs, and games that teach kids about the people, experiences, and events that shaped African American history. Children will have fun designing an African mask, making a medallion like those worn by early abolitionists, playing the rhyming game “Juba” and more. 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About African American History By Jeffrey C. Stewart Jeffrey C. Stewart takes the reader on a journey through African-American history that is pithy, provocative, and encyclopedic in scope. It will entertain as well as instruct, and can be read from beginning to end or opened at random and read without confusion. Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority By Tom Burrell “Black people are not dark-skinned white people,” says advertising visionary Tom Burrell. In fact, they are much more. They are survivors of the Middle Passage and centuries of humiliation and deprivation, who have excelled against the odds, constantly making a way out of “No way!” Burrell poses ten disturbing questions that will make black people look in the mirror and ask why, nearly 150 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, so many blacks still think and act like slaves. Life Upon These Shores By Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Informed by the latest, sometimes provocative scholarship and including more than seven hundred www.thepositivecommunity.com


PROFILES

images—ancient maps, fine art, documents, photographs, cartoons, posters—Life Upon These Shores focuses on defining events, debates, and controversies, as well as the signal achievements of people famous and obscure. Gates takes us from the sixteenth century through the ordeal of slavery, from the Civil War and Reconstruction through the Jim Crow era and the Great Migration; from the civil rights and black nationalist movements through the age of hip-hop to the Joshua generation. Gates bracingly disabuses us of the presumption of a single “black experience.” The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America By Khalil Gibran Muhammad The idea of black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America, as were African Americans’ own ideas about race and crime. Chronicling the emergence of deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals by explicit contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants, this fascinating book reveals the influence such ideas have had on urban development and social policies. When I Was a Slave: Memoirs from the Slave Narrative Collection (Dover Thrift Editions) A book of more than 2,000 interviews with former slaves, who, in blunt, simple language, provide first-person accounts of their lives in bondage. It includes some of the most detailed, compelling, and engrossing life histories in the Slave Narrative Collection, a project funded by the U.S. Government. An illuminating source of information. DVDs Unchained Memories (2003) Over 70 years after the Great Emancipation, the memories of some 2,000 slave-era survivors were transcribed and preserved by the Library of Congress. These first-person anecdotes, ranging from the brutal to the bittersweet, have been brought to vivid life in this unique HBO

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documentary special, featuring the on-camera voices of over a dozen top African-American actors. Slavery and the Making of America Narrated by Morgan Freeman, this landmark, fourpart series examines the history of slavery in the United States and the integral role it played in shaping the new country's development. The variety of cultures from which the slaves originated provided the budding states with a multitude of skills that had a dramatic effect on the diverse communities. From joining the British in the Revolutionary War, to fleeing to Canada, to joining rebel communities in the U.S., the slaves sought freedom in many ways, ultimately having a far-reaching effect on the new hemisphere they were forced to inhabit. Disney Presents Ruby Bridges The inspiring true story of one little girl whose strength and dignity helped change history! When Ruby is chosen to be the first AfricanAmerican student to integrate her New Orleans elementary school, she is subjected to the true ugliness of racism. But guided by the love of her mother and father, Ruby's heroic struggle for a better education becomes a lesson for us all. Roots (1977) I can still remember watching this “television event” when I was a small child. The week when Roots was originally televised was the ONLY time my family EVER watched television during dinner throughout my entire childhood. I watched the DVDs this past winter with my husband and we were engrossed as it was very much a different experience watching as an adult. Kunta Kinte, Kizzie, Chicken George and all of the other memorable characters are there and the performances are truly amazing.

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L-R: Dr. Ralph C. Watkins, commencement speaker; Dr. Warren Dennis, director of Metro Urban Ministry; Carole Mitchell-Pierce, DMin graduate and Dr. Gregg Mast, president

New Brunswick Theological Seminary Dr. Raynard Smith, associate professor of Pastoral Care and graduate Sanghoun Sue

Graduates L-R: Dawn Seaman, Ida Rosario, Ann Riley and Sylvia Page

Graduates Charlesetta Holmes and Barbara Hodge

Commencement Speaker, Dr. Ralph C. Watkins

Photos: Linda Pace

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ew Brunswick Theological Seminary 2012 Commencement Ceremony was held on May 19th at Kirkpatrick Chapel in New Brunswick.

Picture of commencement graduates and attendees. Fernando Linhares is the gentleman in the front

New Covenant Christian Academy

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ew Covenant Christian Academy’s tradition-rich graduation was a glorious display of the K-12 leadership academy’s vision, which is to train academically equipped, spiritually minded leaders who will make a difference in the world. Members of the 8th grade graduating class made school history by reciting from memory a poem entitled, The Eighth Grade Proclamation, by Terrence Jones. This year’s graduation demonstrated the leadership skills of several alumni who provided musical accompaniment, directed the school choir and served as the commencement speaker. For more information about NCCA visit on-line, www.nccacademy.org or call 908.756.3322

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Photos: Laurence Rice

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Stephanie DeGeneste, M. Ed. co-founder, principal NCCA

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L–R are: Wahfes Mitchell, Jahnaton Grant, Janayda Spencer-Whitfield, and Terrence Jones. www.thepositivecommunity.com


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Bergen oers more than 140 academic degree and certificate programs taught by nationally recognized faculty at locations in Paramus, Hackensack, Meadowlands, Fort Lee and Mahwah. For more information, visit www.bergen.edu/fall2012 or call 201-493-3771.

Find us on Facebook at facebook.com/BergenCommunityCollege.

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New Dean of Duke Chapel Rev. Dr. Luke A. Powery

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he Reverend Dr. Luke A. Powery of Princeton Theological Seminary will become the new dean of Duke Chapel, Duke University and will begin his new position on September 1. Powery, 38, is the first black dean of Duke Chapel, has taught at Princeton Theological Seminary since 2006, where he is the Perry and Georgia Engle assistant professor of homiletics. He has taught courses and lectured at numerous other educational institutions and has been a frequent guest preacher and singer at various congregations and conferences “Luke Powery is a compelling preacher whose gifts of mind and heart will be evident to all who hear him,” Duke University President Richard Brodhead said. “He will give a powerful presence to the life of the spirit and will connect

issues. Duke University is historically affiliated with the United Methodist Church, but services at Duke Chapel are ecumenical. It has one of the largest congregations and is home to one of the most active religious life programs on a U.S. campus. More than 30 campus ministers and chaplains provide leadership to more than 1,500 Duke students involved in religious life on campus. Rev. Powery is the author of Spirit Speech: Lament and Celebration in Preaching (Abingdon Press, 2009). His most recent book, Dem Dry Bones: Preaching, Death, and Hope, on the spirituals as a resource for preaching, was published by Fortress Press in July. Powery’s teaching and research interests include the Holy Spirit and preaching; lament, loss and Christian hope; African American preaching and worship;

The dean of Duke Chapel plays an integral role in connecting the academic and spiritual lives of the university's students, faculty and staff. In addition to overseeing planned worship, counseling and preaching, the dean serves as a focal point for ethical and theological discussions on campus covering a wide range of topical issues. with every part of our community -- students, faculty, staff and our Durham neighbors." Powery received his bachelor of Arts degree from Stanford University, his M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary and his Th.D. from Emmanuel College, University of Toronto. As dean, Powery, who was selected from a field of more than 130 applicants, will oversee the operation of the chapel, which has a staff of about 25 and several student interns. The dean of Duke Chapel plays an integral role in connecting the academic and spiritual lives of the university's students, faculty and staff. In addition to overseeing planned worship, counseling and preaching, the dean serves as a focal point for ethical and theological discussions on campus covering a wide range of topical

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and worship’s relationship to social justice. Seeking to spread the Gospel through both the spoken word and song, he has recorded on albums representing musical forms as diverse as Christian hip hop and children’s nursery rhymes. Raised in the Holiness-Pentecostal tradition, Powery was ordained by the Progressive National Baptist Convention and has served in an ecumenical capacity in religious settings around the world. Prior to entering the academy, he was associate pastor of the International Protestant Church of Zurich, an interdenominational and intercultural congregation in Switzerland. He also has served as campus minister at Westminster Choir College of Rider University in Princeton, NJ. Continued on page 86 www.thepositivecommunity.com


Learn something new this summer School may be out of session for the summer, but learning is always in season. Here are some ways you and your child can make the most of summer learning.

 Reading is the most important thing you can do to help a child learn. Visit your local library, exchange books with other families, and use summer reading lists offered by your child’s teacher or school librarian.  Visit a museum or planetarium. Many museums offer reduced family rates and free summer programs. Take advantage of the educational opportunities right here in New Jersey.  Plant a garden. Planning, planting, and maintaining a garden is a great way to apply many of the concepts learned in science and math classes.  Put on a show! Research shows that participation in the arts can play a critical role in academic and social development. Encourage your child to be creative. When parents and educators work together, our children are the winners!

New Jersey Education Association‌ working for great public schools for every child. Barbara Keshishian, President Wendell Steinhauer, Vice President Marie Blistan, Secretary-Treasurer Vince Giordano, Executive Director Richard Gray, Assistant Executive Director/Research Director


Photos: Darryl Hall

Reginald T. Jackson Elected AMEC Bishop Congressman Donald Payne Jr. congratulates Bishop Jackson while Mayor Dwayne D. Warren City of Orange looks on.

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ev. Reginald Jackson, executive director of the Black Ministers Council of New Jersey and pastor of St. Matthew AME Church in Orange, was elected bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AMEC) at their 49th Quadrennial Session of the General Conference. Bishop Jackson is now one of 21 AMEC bishops worldwide and only the 132nd since the denomination’s founding by Richard Allen during the late 1700s.

First Bethel Celebrates 50 Years

Jackson has been assigned to the 20th District in South Africa, and will lead the church’s Ecumenical office. Jackson is looking forward to his new assignments and a smooth transition from his pastor’s position at St. Matthew and said he will be calling the members of the Black Minister’s Council together in order to choose a successor. Jackson has been one of New Jersey’s most influential pastors politically and as an activist for civil and human rights. Photos: Vincent Bryant

Three generations of James: L–R: Grady James IV, Grady James V and Grady James III

First Lady Sharon James with husband Rev. Grady James III

L–R: First Lady Dorothy Campbell, Rev. Dr. Guy Campbell and Rev. Dr. Lester Taylor, who delivered the Word.

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irst Bethel Baptist Church of Irvington, gathered with friends at the Galloping Hill Caterers in Union, NJ. The anniversary theme: “Honoring our Faith; Securing our Future.” Among the luminaries present were, General Baptist Convention NJ President Rev. Dr. Guy Campbell and wife Dorothy; Rev. Dr. Lester W. Taylor, moderator for North Jersey Baptist Assn.; and Rev. Dr. Gerald Lamont Thomas, national chairman of the Progressive NBC Social Action Committee. Sis. Dolores McDowell, president of the Women’s Auxiliary for the North Jersey Dist. Missionary Baptist Asso., gave stirring remarks saying, “Rev. and Sister James (who is 2nd Vice-President of the Women’s Auxiliary) are as beautiful on the outside as they are on the inside.”

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Culture M U S I C ,

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Khalil Gibran Muhammad: Keeper of a Cultural Trust By R. L. Witter

hen Howard Dodson announced plans to retire from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture after more than 25 years as its director, there was a collective gasp in the black community. What would become of the Schomburg? Who could possibly be trusted to take the reins of an institution so central to Harlem and black culture in general? Enter Khalil Gibran Muhammad. The young, Chicagobred, Ivy League-educated history professor “felt honored and privileged to be on the candidate list” for the position. Was it kismet? Some felt it was ordained by the hand of God. After all, history was in his blood. The great-grandson of the Hon. Elijah Muhammad, founder of the Nation of Islam and the son of Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Ozier Muhammad, the family business was history. But as a child, the young professor had no aspirations to be part of academia or black history beyond completing his business degree and being “a very rich business person.” He began working as a teen at a Hyde Park computer store, doing “a lot of gopher work” before advancing to selling computers. It was an experience he had at the University of Pennsylvania that would forever change him and spark the passion that would lead him to study race and American history extensively. In January 1993, “A white student columnist was describing MLK as a communist who wanted to redistribute white people’s money to black people…,” Muhammad recalled as the beginning of the series of events that set him on his path toward studying and dis-

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secting race in American history. “The same essay described Malcolm X as an ex-pimp and a hatemonger and threw in for good measure something nasty about Elijah Muhammad, which seemed a little personal.” In a subsequent column, the same student “’wrote that Penn had a ‘dirty little secret’ with regard to the admission of under qualified black students. So enough was enough,” Muhammad explained. “The feeling I had was that I was under attack—that all of us as black students were under attack.” With racial tensions escalating on campus, Muhammad circulated a petition demanding the removal of the columnist from the paper for publishing hate speech, but nothing came of it. To add insult to injury, a group of women of Delta Sigma Theta were called “water buffalo” by several students in a public campus space. There was still no action taken by school authorities. To compound things, Muhammad took part in a student protest that entailed confiscating 14,000 copies of the daily school newspaper. As he walked away with a stack of papers, he was confronted by campus security, an off-duty Philadelphia police officer. The confrontation ended with Muhammad being struck with a baton and arrested. At no time was he asked for student identification. “The cop assumed I was just some random black guy; he didn’t respect me as a student,” Muhammad recalled. He was never booked; no charges were ever filed for the incident. But he was most definitely yelled at with obscenities, hit with a baton, handcuffed and taken away in a police cruiser while countless white faces looked on. The incident led to an arbitration hearing to determine the police officer’s future and any discipline he might receive. By the time the arbitration took place, Muhammad had graduated and secured an accountant position at Deloitte and Touche. He explained, “My concontinued on next page

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CULTURE A CULTURAL TRUST continued from previous page

servative appearance in my suit and tie didn’t feed into assertions that I was a ‘radical Black Panther wannabe.’” To this day he recalls what was said to him at the conclusion of arbitration: “You should have a criminal record.” Khalil Gibran Muhammad emerged from that experience different. “It changed me. I was not the same person.” Within two or three weeks he made the decision to attend graduate school. “It took me 22 months to study and save,” he recalled. “But the seeds were planted and they blossomed.” In 2004 he received his Ph.D. in American History from Rutgers University; he then became an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Vera Institute of Justice before taking a faculty position at Indiana University. In 2010, Muhammad published his first book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime and the Making of Modern Urban America. Authoring the book was truly a case of necessity being the mother of invention. He wanted to look at working class history. “Black people wanted to work,” he opined. “Look at A. Philip Randolph.” He searched for books that discussed the struggle —“personal, political and professional combined.” But he couldn’t find them. “When I sought out books that spoke to labor and the criminalization of black people together, I found nothing.” Muhammad lamented. “I wanted to ask the academic question that would tell that story. European immigrants were working class —there were volumes of books on them, but none on African Americans.” Glen Loury, the first black tenured professor of Economics at Harvard University, hailed the book as “the most significant work in the study of race and American society to have appeared in the past decade.” At the intersection of American history, race, immigration and labor, Muhammad’s book boldly shines a light on the constructed ideas, beliefs and statistics used to support claims of black inferiority and criminality. If any singular phrase in the book could possibly summarize it, it is that “Whites commit crimes, but black males are criminals.” At forty years old, Muhammad’s wisdom, composure and scholarship reach far beyond his years. His historical knowledge and professorial demeanor belie his experiences as a young black man in America. We touched on

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two current and controversial issues in the black community. “The Trayvon Martin case is emblematic of the culture of the South,” he explained. “The culture of vigilantism as it applies to the would-be black criminal. Northerners empower police to control the population of the poor and the black —the criminal. ‘Stop and Frisk’ makes it okay to question black males as they move from place to place.” He went on to explain the further damage done by these policies and beliefs, “They’ve effectively caught both ends by criminalizing the teaching of ethnic studies and challenging of politicians… We now have two generations who are at risk of being advocates of ‘stop and frisk’ and mandatory drug imprisonment.” July marks Muhammad’s one-year anniversary as director of the Schomburg Center and offers him an opportunity to reflect on the significance of his position there. “Since arriving at the Schomburg, some people assume this direct connection because of my lineage. They see it as divine or the hand of God.” He continued, “My great-grandfather died when I was three-years-old. My sense of legacy is filtered through my father and his family… I grew up knowing who he [Hon. Elijah Muhammad] was and loving him through my family, but my experience was not the same as the members of the Nation of Islam; my dad had that.” While he carries a Muslim name and was raised in the Muslim faith, Muhammad became a Christian when he was eighteen. Having embraced both his passion for history and his family’s place therein, Muhammad has found a home at the Schomburg. It seems fitting to find him among the more than ten million artifacts in the Schomburg’s collection. When asked about any particular favorites or items of special interest he replied, “Everything I use.” Muhammad is excited to mark the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and that there are two handwritten copies of the document at the Center, one written in Abraham Lincoln’s own hand. “That singular document was to be the basis for the education of an entire generation,” he opined. “We’re reminded that freedom is hard fought, not guaranteed” and that “people have no right to lay claim on another person.” What more would he like people to know about himself and the Schomburg Center? “Everyone needs to visit the place that holds the footsteps of the people who documented the world we live in; it matters,” he said. “We need younger people here. They need to know it and value it. The Schomburg has the resources and potential to shape and inform race and relations in this world.” And with this brilliant young man at the helm it surely could do that. There very well might be some divine component to Muhammad’s appointment. www.thepositivecommunity.com


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Rev. Tracey L. Brown

Photo: Deacon Richard E. Barber, Sr.

First Female Moderator in 107 Year History of MCBA

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iddlesex Central Baptist Association of New Jersey, Inc., one of seven district associations in the State of New Jersey affiliated with the General Baptist Convention of New Jersey and the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., announced the election of Rev. Tracey Brown as moderator. The association was organized 107 years ago on July 12, 1906 at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in New Brunswick, NJ by the Reverends E. W. Roberts, L.L. Croom and others. Rev. Brown is the first female moderator in the history of the Middlesex Central Baptist Association and the General Baptist Convention of New Jersey. The history-making election was held during MCBA’s 107th Annual

Session July 7-13 at the Second Baptist Church in Rahway, New Jersey. Rev. Dr. James Easley was host pastor. After a final report and spirit-filled message by outgoing moderator Rev. Dr. Ronald L. Owens, the nominating committee report announcing Rev. Brown’s election, presented by Rev. John R. Taylor, pastor of the Friendship Baptist Church of Trenton, was greeted with great enthusiasm and a standing ovation by the 300 delegates and visitors. Rev. Brown had previously served as vice-moderator. Reverend Tracey L. Brown is senior pastor and founder of the Ruth Fellowship Ministries of Plainfield, NJ. Licensed to preach at the age of 13, she is a native of Newark, NJ, attended Montclair State University

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ith the theme, “Remembering the Past to Build a Better Future,” the Eastern Baptist Association (EBA) convened their 91st Annual Session at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Brooklyn, Rev. Larry W. Camp, pastor. EBA represents over 300 churches in Kings, Queens, Richmond, Nassau and Suffolk Counties.

Rev. Washington Lundy, VP Northeast Region National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.

Photos: Wali Amin Muhammad

Eastern Baptist Association

earning a bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology, and was inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame for Women’s Basketball in 2008. Rev. Brown is a graduate of the Lott Carey Foreign Baptist Convention Pastor’s Excellence Program and received a diploma from the Zimbabwe Baptist Seminary for Pastoral Training. In accepting this high honor, Rev. Brown humbly remarked: "I am grateful to the association for their confidence and thankful to God for the opportunity to serve in this leadership position. I look forward to the challenge.” An installation service will be held in late September. For more information please call Rev. Dollie Hamlin, Associate Minister Ruth Fellowship Ministries at (908) 922-2485.

Rev. Curtis Whitney, treasurer EMBC

L–R: Adrian Council, presented The Countdown to Freedom poster to Rev. Ronald Grant, president Empire Missionary Baptist Convention of NY (EMBC) and Rev. Alvin Barnett, moderator, EBA

L–R: First Lady Dorothy Lundy with Sister Mae Henry, site chairperson EMBC

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L–R: Bishop Winfred J. Pippen, coordinator 91st Annual Session; Dashun Burrell, associate minister, First B.C. of Deer Park www.thepositivecommunity.com


Harlem Spirituals leads epic journeys

through New York City's neighborhoods tracing the roots of African American Heritage and culture.  Our award wining tours will fascinate, educate and inspire you.    From African Americans living in New York City in the 17th century to present day thriving communities, learn about  the achievements and contributions of these fearless New Yorkers who have paved the way for generations to come. Our exciting programs let you experience the Harlem Gospel tour with Sunday Brunch, a night on the town in Harlem with a Soul food and Jazz tour, the legendary Amateur night competition at the Apollo theater or join us to explore African American Heritage in Manhattan, the Bronx or Brooklyn. We offer great packages with hotels and Broadway shows that are ideal for groups, individuals, family reunions and  your out of town relatives.

join us on

Travel Group

Gospel & Jazz Tours

WWW.HARLEMSPIRITUALS.COM

Presented by

Co-Presenter www.thepositivecommunity.com

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Honors for Dr. William H. Collins Jr.

D

r. William H. Collins Jr. was honored during a celebration of his 50 years of service and 80 years of life at Marina Del Rey in the Bronx. Dr. Collins has served 50 uninterrupted years as the leader of the music ministry of the Mount Herman Baptist Church. Prior to joining Mount Herman in 1962, Professor Collins or “ Prof” as he is affectionately known, served in the United States Air Force where he was chapel organist, as well as a personnel specialist. He received degrees in music from Savannah State College, Candell Conservatory of Music and Manhattan School of Music, started Collins Music Studio, recorded two solo albums and contributed an essay for the New African American Jubilee Bible published by the American Bible Society. In 2003 he recieved an honorary doctorate of Sacred Music from the Richmond Virginia Seminary. For more on Dr. Collins visit www.thepositivecommunity.com

L-R: Pastor Joan J. Brightharp, Rev. Marion J. Franklin, honoree Dr. William H. Collins Jr. and Pastor Wenzell P. Jackson

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UMBA Convenes at Walker Memorial

O

n July 21, 2012 the 3rd Quarterly Session of the United Missionary Baptist Association (UMBA) was hosted at Walker Memorial Baptist Church in the Bronx, Rev. Albert J. Bush, pastor. The general theme, “United, Missionminded, and on the Move for God.” Opening night featured a stirring sermon by past-moderator, Rev. Dr. Isaac E.B. Graham. Lowell Hawthorne, chairman & CEO of Golden Krust Caribbean Bakery & Grill gave an uplifting talk about his faith, his business and his new book, The Baker’s Son.

Carrie Mobley, faith-based community advocate for NY 12MAR Positive Community 4-5x4-5_Nyack 3/27/12 11:32 AM Page 1 Rev. Albert J. Bush with State Senator John Sampson Rev. Isaac Dr. Graham

L–R: Second Vice Moderator Rev. Dr. Anthony Lowe, UMBA Moderator Rev. Lee Arrington and Lowell Hawthorne

Photos: Wali Amin Muhammad

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Lowell Hawthorne signing books

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The Positive Community Summer 2012

www.thepositivecommunity.com


FAITH, FAMILY & FITNESS NIGHT! Join us for an evening of exciting professional women’s basketball, followed by a post-game concert!

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Nicois is . . . Un-di-ni-a-bel Grace & Peace, t is my pleasure to present to you a minstrel who encourages the world to engage in conversations with God about their purpose, love and destiny. Nicois Harris (just call her Nicois) is a young lady who brings us new, refreshing sounds of worship for both our listening pleasure and for God’s glory. Her unconstrained voice and unique interpretation allow every song to stand out as the Virginia native blends gospel with urban grooves, praise and worship and Christian rock music to give us a sound destined to get God’s attention and for any audience to enjoy. You can easily tell that she was musically influenced by Karen Clark-Sheard, Israel Houghton, Casting Crowns and Hillsong. “God told me that my ministry is to the nations . . . my music has an international flair,” Nicois explained. In 2011, her international flair took her to Ghana to minister to people who just want a taste of the God we serve. This year she’s scheduled to visit more countries to impact them with her mission to

I

This gifted and powerful artist has also shared the stage with stars such as Vickie Winans, Karen Clark-Sheard, Shirley Caesar, Martha Munizzi, Phillip Carter & SOV and Daryl Coley—just to name a few.

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The Positive Community Summer 2012

create music based on God’s word that will bring forth the vision. Nicois is committed to her church family and is the worship leader and choir director at Agape Embassy Ministries in Alexandria, VA. When she was a young adult, it was easy for her to use her talent to get gigs in the secular industry, but it wasn’t long before her calling began to tug at her spirit. She explained, “There was something on the inside of me that was saying, ‘this isn’t right; this isn’t what you’re supposed to be doing.’” The singer-songwriter found her creative passion in penning her own expressions after the loss of her father and began to explore where it could take her. She wrote and produced a few jingles and wrote a song in 2002 called “Everyday Blessings,” which was also featured in Sunjada Films’ independent movie UNITY. This gifted and powerful artist has also shared the stage with stars such as Vickie Winans, Karen Clark-Sheard, Shirley Caesar, Martha Munizzi, Phillip Carter & SOV and Daryl Coley—just to name a few. In 2010 Nicois released her four-track EP, Undeniable; this year she expanded the project to include 11 songs and released a gospel blend renamed Un-di-ni-a-bel, that serves one purpose—to entertain our King! So why should you have the CD in your music library? It salutes our Lord and commands that everyone from everywhere proclaim that He is wonderful, marvelous and glorious! Her beautiful voice compels statements to just contain God and His truth. “We’ve all come to the point where we realize we’ve become crazy about things that really have no value when it comes to God.” Nicois shared. And she is right. We’re in a day and time that we have to constantly be reminded to keep God and His word first. The world is happening, life is going and you become overwhelmed in it and/or by it, but Jesus will always be the answer and He will forever be Undeniable.

www.thepositivecommunity.com


Funny Lady Kim Coles Headlines Supernatural

C

Photo and text: g.r.ma g.r.mattox o

�ooray

L–R: Gilda Rodgers, Caryl Lucas, Kim Coles and Candace Kelly

Grads

omedienne Kim Coles (third from left) recently returned to Crossroads Theater in New Brunswick for Supernatural: The Event. The day-long natural hair care experience, produced by authors Gilda Rogers, who heads Frank Talk Multi-Media Network; Caryl Lucas, motivational speaker and communications expert; and natural hair care specialist/founder of the Curl Prep hair care line, Candace Kelley, featured seminars and demonstrations, a natural hair art show, a short documentary and the debut presentation of a theatrical stage reading on the subject along with a three-floor bazaar featuring Africaninspired art, handcrafted accessories and hair care products. Coles, the featured performer and currently host of Are You Normal, on the OWN network, brought her special brand of stand up to this cultural experience, drawing side-splitting laughs from the audience with personal stories of her life and career.

CELEBRATE THE SENSATION

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www.thepositivecommunity.com

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Tickets can be purchased at the Newark Symphony Hall Box Office located at 1030 Broad St. Newark, NJ Tickets can be purchased at the Newark Symphony Hall Box Office located at 1030 Broad St. Newark, NJ For information call: (973) 643-8014 or www.newarksymphonyhall.org For information call: (973) 643-8014 or www.newarksymphonyhall.org

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The Positive Community Summer 2012

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e to the Community.

ew Jersey, Inc. is now UnitedHealthcare But changing our name hasn’t changed all the families choose us. You still get the same doctors, pecialists, the same large network of hospitals. e to UnitedHealthcare Community Plan says er community, over 3.3 million members strong, ry. So, New Jersey families can be confident ame great care.

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By Herbert D. Glenn

A

Photos: Herb Glenn

Spreading Gospel Music to Preserve Christian Tradition

s blacks migrated from the Southern parts of the United States, culture and tradition were important values that resonated within the church experience. Gospel music, which originated from the Blues, was a method of teaching messages from the Bible and praising God in music and song. Gospel has a deep history emanating from Chicago, the capital for Gospel music. Thomas A. Dorsey, a leading blues pianist known as “Georgia Tom,” who combined Christian praise with blues and jazz coined it “the gospels,” was the musical director of Chicago’s Pilgrim Baptist Church for more than 40 years and came to be known as “the father of gospel music.” The history of gospel music and the preservation of the traditional values it created are celebrated annually in New Jersey because of the passion and energy of Dr. Albert J. Lewis, Jr. Born and raised in Newark, Lewis is recognized as the father of New Jersey’s Gospel Music Month, and credited with making Newark the gospel music capital of New Jersey. “It was important to create a day of recognition because in New Jersey, Newark was the mecca of gospel music. Singers would come from all over to fellowship and produce records at the Savoy Recording studio with the late Rev. Dr. Lawrence Roberts,” he recalled. What began as Gospel Music Day has expanded to a statewide celebration and exceeded Lewis’ expectations. “Governor McGreevy appointed me the Director of Gospel Music in the state of New Jersey and convened a group of prominent ministers and gospel historians to proclaim the month of June as Gospel Music Month,” he explained. Lewis has fond memories of artists who performed in Newark in its heyday: the Fields Singers, a singing ensemble that included members of his family; the Frierson Singers; Dr. William A. Scafe with the Antioch Gospel Singers and of course, The Drinkards, the singing family that brought us Cissy Houston and Dianne Warwick. “We never imagined it would go beyond New Jersey; it was strictly for New Jersey. People live and die in Newark and never learn its historical richness and contribution to the African-American Diaspora,” said Lewis. As a gospel historian, Lewis has amassed memorabilia dating back to the beginning of gospel. Proclamations, certificates, awards and pictures are displayed in

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Dr. Albert Lewis with Tony Smutko of Shoprite, a major sponsor of Gospel Music Month

his office as a make shift museum. “There were conversations about creating a museum, but we were asked to share the building and I felt that there were cultural differences in the agreement and didn't pursue the plan. It would have required many resources I was unable to acquire. It was better to ‘stay in my lane’ and continue the effort to make gospel music a mainstay for those who followed my television and radio shows,” he explained. “Newark has a unique history that includes many gospel music pioneers. People like Jeff Banks, Leon Lumpkin, Lloyd Reese as well as Bernice Bass and Rev. Lawrence Roberts all left many artifacts and personal belongings to me.” Although Lewis is best-known as a television and radio personality, his first priority is the World Gospel Music Association (WGMA). In existence for more than 44 years, it is the oldest religious musical association in New Jersey. “WGMA is the umbrella of all of the activities that I do today,” Lewis remarked. “It started as a conference/convention New Jersey experience specifically held in Newark. There was no intention to travel...” When questioned why a local convention that did not travel outside the state contained “World” in its name Dr. Lewis responded, “The objective is to have the world come to us.” And the world does just that. WGMA hosts gospel music lovers from around the world at its annual conference and workshop, which convenes during the last week of September culminating on the first Saturday in October. Gospel Music Month has come a long way from its humble beginning in the basement of Newark City Hall where Cissy Houston and Savion Glover performed the first time in 1992 as featured guests. For his dedication and sincerity, Newark now has a Dr. Albert J. Lewis, Jr. Boulevard. Lewis was also inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Detroit, Michigan, where a duplicate copy of his street sign is on display. www.thepositivecommunity.com


CORRECTION: On page 78 in the June 2012 issue under “Omega Pi Phi Worships Together” caption should read: Members of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity recently worshipped at First Corinthian BC in Harlem. Chapters represented are: Psi Lambda Lambda, Xi Phi, Epsilon and Eta Pi.

GOSPEL TOP TEN Jason Nelson- Shifting The Atmosphere André Crouch- Let The Church Say Amen Marvin Sapp- My Testimony Pastor Charles Jenkins- Awesome Mary Mary- Go Get It Youthful Praise/JJ Hairston- After This Fred Hammond- I Feel Good

Photo: Wali Amin Muhammad

Upcoming Special Issue!

September Education Issue To Advertise Call:

Tamela Mann- Take me to the King

973-233-9200 or Email:

L'andria Johnson- It's Gonna Be Alright

Positive.corp@verizon.net for rates & deadlines

William McDowell- I Won't Go Back www.thepositivecommunity.com

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Harlem’s Musical Legacy BY RON SCOTT

D

uring the raging 1960s, one of James Brown’s many hits, “Say It Loud, I’m Black and Proud,” became an anthem from Harlem to California. The song was a funky extension of Harlem’s profound musical legacy dating back to the early 1900s. Brown’s vocals and stinging beats reflected the revolutionary times—precisely what music does. It entertains while documenting societal movement from a political and cultural stance. Miles Davis’ creativity led him to a melodic, electronic free style that forged jazz fusion with albums like Jack Johnson and Bitches Brew. As a sign of the times, drummer Max Roach recorded his album We Insist! Freedom Now Suite. On Harlem’s eastside known as “Spanish Harlem” and in the 60s as “El Barrio,” they were swinging to salsa with a crew of young Latino musicians that included Tito Puente, Johnny Pacheco, Eddie Palmieri, and Joe Cuba. Graciela Peréz-Grillo came from Cuba to Spanish Harlem in 1943 and began singing with her step-brother Machito and the Mario Bauza big band. Jazz critics referred to her as the Latin Sarah Vaughn. For over three decades she was a dominant entertainer who performed at the Apollo Theater on a regular basis. She, Machito and Bauza played a significant part in the creation of Afro-Cuban jazz and New York City’s Latin music sound. By 1904, blacks were moving uptown to Harlem from Herald Square and San Juan Hill (West 60s). James Reese Europe, one of the great bandleaders of his time, often performed for white society. His music didn’t scream “black power,” but the strong spirit and pride in his performances were evident. In1912, his Clef Club Orchestra, made up of professionally trained Harlem musicians, was the first black orchestra to perform at Carnegie Hall. Blues is the foundation of most styles of American music. Louis Armstrong was a blues master and Charlie Parker’s improvisations often hit on the blues. Duke Ellington and Count Basie composed blues pieces for their orchestras. Louis Jordan adapted the big band sound “jump blues,” which

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became the basis of r&b. The early rock & roll stars voiced the blues in their repertoires. If there is anyone who can speak about Harlem’s musical legacy, it’s Voza Rivers, president and executive producer of the Harlem Jazz & Music Festival. “Harlem is known as the capital of black music from gospel to r&b, jazz and the blues,” he explained. “We are connecting our past so our future can continue the legacy.” It was 25 years ago that Rivers and a few music legends such as Chuck Jackson, Nancy Wilson, Tito Puente and Max Roach, discussed the need for a strong production company in Harlem to keep the music alive while promoting its history. This was the beginning of the Harlem Jazz & Music Festival, which has become the major producing arm for HARLEM WEEK performances. Other artists who were part of forming the organization were the great singers Johnny Hartman and Dakota Staton. Over the years the festival has built quite a base—a home grown brand that has been producing great music of many genres for Latin Heritage Month, Black Music Month at the Schomburg Center, as well as projects at the Apollo Theater and with the National Black Sports Hall of Fame. This year Max Roach the organization will be partnering with City College’s Aaron Davis Hall and the Manhattan School of Music. “It feels fantastic to be a part of the Harlem Jazz & Music Festival. It’s exciting to know God has blessed me to look back at all the things I have done,” reflected Chuck Jackson, legendary r&b singer. “Voza Rivers played a very important part in my life, getting me involved in this project. I was just happy to help; it has grown tremendously.” Recently, at the 38th Annual HARLEM WEEK reception at Gracie Mansion, hosted by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Rivers announced that renowned musician, orchestral arranger, bandleader and music director Ray Chew will be the musical director for HARLEM WEEK and the executive producer and musical director of the Harlem Jazz & Music Festival. www.thepositivecommunity.com


“I am happy and honored to be joining the wonderful legacy and tradition that was spawned by Lena Horne, Harry Belafonte, Chuck Jackson, Max Chuck Jackson Roach and Tito Puente,” declared Chew. “I am pleased that this is not the only event we have on the table but [that this is] a year round initiative. We will be bringing new events for the community. I am pleased to be appointed the executive producer of this great organization and joining forces with Lloyd Williams and Voza Rivers.” Chew became the music director of American Idol, in 2010. He is a former member of the Saturday Night Live Band, music director for Showtime at the Apollo, and bandleader on The Singing Bee. He was the bandleader for the 2008 Democratic National Convention and Barack Obama’s Inaugural Ball in 2009. He has worked with Aretha Franklin, Alicia Keys, Shakira, Beyoncé and Stevie Wonder among others. This year’s HARLEM WEEK theme is: “Where the World Meets the World.” Special musical salutes will take place on several days: August 18: Dancing in the Street - celebrating the 50th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence with music from that country’s revolutionary son, Bob Marley; an outdoor screening of the critically acclaimed documentary Marley (4pm-7pm); “Uptown Saturday Nite” Tribute to Bob Marley (7pm-10pm). August 19: HARLEM DAY will honor the 100th anniversary of South Africa’s African National Congress and Japan’s Sakura Festival (10am-4pm) West 135th Street. On the 5th Avenue stage (12noon-7pm) there will be salutes to South African music legends Hugh Masekela, Miriam Makeba and a special tribute to Nelson Mandela. Also Jazzmobile will present “Great Jazz on the Great Hill” (12noon-7pm) in Central Park West. August 25: Tribute to Don Cornelius & Soul Train (12noon7pm) on the St. Nicholas Avenue stage at 135th Street. The Outdoor Film Festival presents Amandla!: A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony featuring Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekla, Abdullah Ibrahim, and Vusi Mahiaseia, in St. Nicholas Park. For a complete listing of HARLEM WEEK activities visit harlemdiscover.com.

www.thepositivecommunity.com

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The History of African American Music: Part 1 "The Old Plantation," South Carolina, about 1790. This famous painting shows Gullah slaves dancing and playing musical instruments derived from Africa. Scholars unaware of the Sierra Leone slave trade connection have interpreted the two female figures as performing a "scarf" dance. Sierra Leoneans can easily recognize that they are playing the shegureh, a women's instrument (rattle) characteristic of the Mende and neighboring tribes.

By Gwen Moten

“A Nation of Dancers, Musicians, and Poets”

S

ince we are all God’s children, what makes us —people of African descent— different? What distinguishes us culturally from others? The African, Gustaavas Vassa, wrote in 1789, “We are almost a nation of dancers, musicians, and poets.” In her book The Music of Black Americans: A History, Dr. Eileen Southern tells us that foreign visitors who came to the shores of Afrika found political organizations of kings, governors, and noblemen or lesser forms of clans, tribes or kinship groups. But as they traveled the 3,400 miles from Senegal to Angola (also known as The Gold Coast, The Ivory Coast, and The Slave Coast) they experienced music as primary in the lives of African people. There was music, movement and worship for all occasions and ceremonies. Ceremonial music underscored festivals that commemorated agricultural rites, celebrated the installation of kings or bringing together important chiefs of the nations, reenacted historical events of significance and signaled preparation for war or embarkation upon a major hunting expedition. Ceremonial music was used for religious rites to worship the gods or lesser deities and spirits, and also for common experiences —like celebrating a birth and each growth event in life and death. There was even recreational music for after-dinner entertainment. Foreigners saw all types and sizes of drums hollowed

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out from tree trunks and used as instruments. These strangers from a different land also heard unknown sounds from pitched instruments —bells, castanet-types, gong gong, balafon (xylophone), sansa and mbira (finger pianos), flutes, bagpipe-types, horns, fiddletypes, harps, lyre-types, lutes and banjo-types. Though shackled, denied, and forcibly removed from where these sounds and instruments originated, Africans carried within them the ability to recall and recreate those distinctive sounds from a variety of ancient cultures. In the new world, these cultures abundant with dancers, musicians and poets became distinguished with their field hollers, call and response, work songs, improvisations, polyrhythms, blue notes, textures, harmonies, percussions, vocal sounds, melisma and syncopation. But most importantly, the people of African descent were a people of community and spiritual possession – the foundation upon which Africa American music was formed and developed. Because religion and culture were intricately interwoven and dance helped to express belief and worship, the “ring shout” had all the defining elements such as call and response, percussion, syncopation, coded messages, and pantomime, to help solidify the African tradition in America.The ritual may have originated among enslaved Muslims from West Africa as an imitation of tawaf, the mass procession around the Kaaba that is an essential part of the Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca. If so, the word www.thepositivecommunity.com


distinguishing footprint toward the development of distinctive and genuine (authentic) American music. The Negro Spiritual, often using Old Testament text, provided a means of easing sorrow, connection with the Spirit (ancestral and divine) and coded communication with other slaves and non-slaves. If a classification of these songs is possible, we might consider the following examples of songs and their categorization: Tempo: slow and melodic “I’ve Been ’Buked and I’ve Been Scorned” and “There is a Balm in Gilead” Tempo: fast and rhythmic “Zekiel (Ezekiel) Saw de Wheel” and “Elijah Rock”

Kalimba

Sekere-adua "shout" may come from Arabic sha'wt, meaning a single circumambulation of the Kaaba. In the ring shout the singers moved circularly counterclockwise in a shuffle without crossing their feet. This cohesiveness of the community and oneness with the Spirit was a spiritually binding force for the enslaved African in America. An important accompanying and lead instrument in African and African American music was the drum. In the early decades of slavery, dance gatherings and drums were permitted to be used by the slaves. But in 1739, after enslaved Africans in South Carolina led an organized uprising called the Stono Rebellion, laws were enacted that restricted the use of drums. This was a direct retort by the slave owners upon learning that drums were used for communication. A few slave state locations like Place Congo (Congo Square) in New Orleans permitted drumming for certain occasions. Even without the drums, slaves used their bodies to provide percussive rhythms and sounds with hand clapping, foot stomping and pitched notes. By way of the ring shout, along with the moans and groans and memories of the mixed tribes of the African people providing free labor in the New World, traditional cultural roots were still maintained but adapted in field hollers, rhythms, harmonies and folk songs. One outgrowth of folk melodies developed mostly in the fields was the Negro Spiritual. It was a group interactive endeavor. When not in the fields, these melodic moans and groans were often a transitory expression of peace and calm. This communal effort and the invoking of the spirit through music served as the culturally www.thepositivecommunity.com

Form: call and response “In Dat Great Gittin’ Up Mornin’ ,” “Go Down Moses” and “Swing Low Sweet Chariot” Emotionalism: sorrow songs “Nobody Knows de Trouble I’ve Seen” and “No More Auction Block for Me” Introspection & Intersession of Deity “I’m Trouble in Mind,” “Give Me Jesus” and “I Want Jesus to Walk Wid Me” Coded Messages “De Gospel Train,” “Steal Away” and “Wade in de Water” Singing of the Negro Spirituals or “corn ditties,” as they were called, was frequently discouraged in many of the organized churches of the day. The conflict of the cultural significance and value of the Negro Spiritual was ever present throughout the free states. Yet, praise houses, camp meetings, bush meetings and ‘the secret church’ provided those who were enslaved a safe haven to express, release and unite in a time of separation. In the free-state locations of the republic and as early as the beginning of the 1800s, Americans of African descent were performers, composers, and musicians focusing on other music genres including the classical (European-based) styles of music. In my next article, I will explore the variety of African American music and show the paths these musical forms have taken. Gwen Moten is an American Cultural Specialist, and CEO/Executive Director of Theatre World Music Service, an educational, arts programming and entertainment company. The article was excerpted from The History of African American Music, a lecture and theatrical production by Gwen Moten and B. Dexter Allgood, Ph.D. Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Afri tage Statecan American Heritival wide Parade & Fes

The African American Heritage Parade Committee in New Jersey presented a First Class Parade and Festival on Memorial Day Weekend 2012 dedicated to a First Class Statesman (late Congressman of the 10th Congressional District) the Honorable Donald M. Payne, Sr.

PREMIER

SPONSOR

ANCHOR SPONSOR

HERITAGE CELEBRATION 2011-12

HERITAGE CELEBRATION 2011-12

REVEREND DR. GRANVILLE A. SEWARD COMMEMORATES 60 YEARS OF PREACHING THE GOSPEL

NEW JERSEY ANNIVERSARY SERVICE:

Picture

OHIO ANNIVERSARY SERVICE:

10:00 A.M. Sunday, August 19, 2012

10:00 A.M. Sunday, August 26, 2012

Greater Abyssinian Baptist Church 88 Lyons Avenue Newark, NJ 07112

Shiloh Baptist Church 720 Mt. Vernon Avenue Columbus, OH 43203

Reverend Allen S. Potts Pastor

Reverend Dr. Otha Gilyard Pastor

For additional information, please call 973-325-5969 or email COL40105@yahoo.com

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www.thepositivecommunity.com


Keynote Speakers Thursday, September 27, 2012 26th Annual Senior Symposium on Black Aging Opening Session

26th Annual Senior Symposium on Black Aging Luncheon

Keynote Speaker

Keynote Speaker

Speaker

Molefi Kete Asante, PhD.

Bishop Donald Hillard, Jr.

Sheila Y. Oliver

Temple University

26th Annual Senior Symposium on Black Aging Luncheon

NJ General Assembly Speaker

Cathedral International

Friday, September 28, 2012 20th Annual Youth Symposium Opening Session

20th Annual Youth Symposium Luncheon

Donald K. Tucker Leadership and Community Change Awards Banquet

Keynote Speaker

Keynote Speaker

Keynote Speaker

Antoinette K. Ellis-Williams PhD.

John H. Jackson, Ed. D, JD.

Terrence I. Melvin

Director Lee Hagan Africana Studies Center, New Jersey City University

The Schott Foundation for Public Education

President Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU)

Saturday, September 29, 2012 Leadership Family Unity Breakfast and Forum Keynote Speaker

Dr. DeForest B. Soaries, Jr. Senior Pastor First Baptist Church of Lincoln Gardens

Contact Information: For Exhibits, Sponsorships, and Registration Information Please Call: 973-824-7463 • Fax: 973-824-2212 • www.njbic.org


Health P r e v e n t i o n , T r e atm e n t & C u r e

Kandake House Greenhope Services for Women

G

reenhope Services for Women Inc. opened its new home, Kandake House in East Harlem on May 19, 2011. One of only a few woman-centered re-entry treatment programs in the country, Kandake has the capacity to house 72 women and 28 children. Its on-site child development center works with children up to five years old. Greenhope accepted its first mother and child family in April 2011 and, since then, a total of 23 children have lived at Kandake House and benefited from being with their mothers, instead of in foster care. Treatment is provided in a gender-responsive, trauma-sensitive modality. Clients are educated about addiction in a safe space where feelings and issues are addressed. They graduate and go into aftercare services and into Greenhope’s Alumnae Association where follow-up counselors and outpatient services continue for up to two years. “Our outpatient programs serve over 200 women annually. Greenhope is further unique in that it unapologetically teaches women to put their self-care first, to honor their own voices, and to set proper boundaries in their lives. Greenhope provides a woman the safety and therapeutic care she needs in order to give herself permission to choose a better life,” explained Executive Director and President, Dr. Anne R. Elliott. Dr. Elliott holds master’s degrees in Divinity and Religion as well as a Ph.D. in Systematic Theology from Union Theological Seminary. She has taught at both Union and New York Theological Seminaries. Since joining Greenhope in 1996, Dr. Elliott has increased the residential capacity from 14 to 72 women and quadrupled the ambulatory census. Greenhope serves over

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400 women per year in the residential and ambulatory programs combined. In addition, she has raised over $20 million in operating and capital support to build Kandake House. Dr. Elliott is also actively involved in local and nationwide advocacy efforts that address the burgeoning problems of the prison industrial complex and the exponential increase of women in prison. Kandake House, where residents live for a period of 12 to 18 months, is licensed by the N.Y. State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS). Greenhope uses a holistic approach in its treatment model. Residents participate in healing arts and traditional treatment models. A few of the innovative approaches that enrich the lives of the women who once faced the world without hope, include storytelling, journaling, the creative arts, attending live theatre, meditation, massage therapy, yoga, acupuncture, rooftop gardening and horticulture. Funding is provided by New York City, New York State, federal government agencies, and private foundations. Individual treatment plans are set by fully licensed substance abuse counselors, social workers and case managers to ensure that the women maintain sobriety, Continued next page www.thepositivecommunity.com


Kandake House

Continued from previous page complete treatment plan goals, secure jobs, participate in training programs or school, secure housing, reestablish ties with children, and meet criminal and family court mandates. “Greenhope has maintained a less than 10 percent recidivism rate for the past decade, an amazing number and well below the national average of 50 percent,” Dr. Elliott reported. Joann Rivera-Baker is an exemplary model of a successful Greenhope graduate. After 15 years of substance abuse and five years of a seemingly unending cycle of incarceration, her life took a 180˚ turn when she enrolled in Greenhope’s outpatient program in 1993. RiveraBaker graduated from Greenhope in 1994 and received a certificate of completion in computer training from FEDCAP Rehabilitation Services, where she was immediately hired as a clerk in the Workshop department. With the desire to grow in her career, she obtained an administrative assistant position at Bronx AIDS Services, obtaining knowledge about HIV/AIDS and valuable experience in the administrative field. Ms. Rivera-Baker went on to serve on the Urban Health Plan’s board of directors for seven years. Happily married and the step-mother of three, she says she enjoys life more today, does everything that she has always dreamed of doing and takes pleasure in va-

www.thepositivecommunity.com

cationing, reading books, attending plays, taking dance classes, running, and enjoying her grandchildren. “My experience with Greenhope has taught me that I can become a productive member of society and that I am a beautiful, intelligent, and phenomenal woman that can accomplish anything that I put my mind to.” Currently the production coordinator at the Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation, she has been a member of Greenhope’s board of directors for three years and is the president of the Greenhope Alumnae Association. Greenhope’s Alumnae Association was established in 1999 as an ongoing support for graduates once they complete the Greenhope program. Members of the association serve as community advocates and mentor women who are still in treatment. The Alumnae Association plays a role in educating the broader community about the plight of women in prison and the specific need for woman-centered treatment programs. Over the years, the Alumnae Association has developed such a well-organized and unified membership that in 2010 they independently applied for and were awarded a $20,000 grant from the Presbyterian Committee on the Self-Development of People. Ms. Rivera-Baker says, “It has become very important for me to give back to the new ladies at Greenhope. To let them know that they can stop the cycle, reclaim their lives, and reunite with their families.”

Summer 2012 The Positive Community

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Moving to the left/moving to the right Party time again/whether sun or rain Move to the left/move to the right We must all unite/stop the fuss and fight And move to left/move to the right It’s time for action/and celebration So on four, move to the left/move to the right One, two, three, four...

...Movin’ Sesame Flyers International & the Socarobics Movement

A

t first glance the early morning scene at the Peadegart Park in Brooklyn is misleading. And hearing Caribbean music like the soca classic “Movin” only adds to the confusion of what sounds like a “trini-style” carnival party taking place. But on closer examination the true nature of the group “movin’ to the left and movin’ to the right” is revealed. It is a free community outdoor exercise program organized by Sesame Flyers International, Inc (SFI). And the sound emanating from the park is the music that drives the participants in what is they call -- socarobics. SFI is a multi service community-based organization catering to the needs of youth and adults in Brooklyn. The agency provides a comprehensive, holistic strategy to youth and community development with culture an art at its core. But to many Brooklyn residents, the fun-filled exercise program has been their way of staying in shape for the 12 years since the classes started. Each morning during the spring and summer months, more than 200 residents of all ages converge on the park located in the East Flatbush section of Brooklyn for a 90-minute workout to the pulsating rhythms of authentic Caribbean soca and calypso music. The class is conducted by a charismatic instructor, Matthew Griffith, who has earned his stripes as “The Miracle Man,” due to the success stories of some participants, which some call nothing short of a miracle. Griffith is a former soccer and volleyball player who took over the exercise program, which was formerly a small in-

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house session at the Association’s headquarters on Church Avenue in Brooklyn. Using a combination of soca rhythms, he takes participants through an aerobic session that is both physically effective and fun. “This program is designed in such a way that it is beneficial for people of all ages,” says Griffith. “It is a true community event in which the entire family can participate. Over the years I’ve had the joy of seeing people not just feel good, but actually improve their health. Currently we have a participant who is in a wheelchair and works just as hard as everyone else to get in shape. I’ve been witness to stories like a woman who was able to Continued on page 87

www.thepositivecommunity.com


NURSING HOME OR YOUR HOME? NOW THERE’S A CHOICE.

VNSNY CHOIC Managed Lon E MLTC g Term Care

The health plan for with complex he New Yorkers alth needs.

ELIGIBLE FOR MEDICAID? CALL NOW FOR THIS FREE BROCHURE FROM THE VISITING NURSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK 1-855-AT CHOICE (1-855-282-4642) TDD/TTY: 711 9 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday Or visit www.vnsnychoice.org Even if you need help with day-to-day activities like bathing, dressing and preparing meals, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York has a health plan to help you live safely and independently at home. In fact, our plan has kept members out of a nursing home for almost five years on average.*

*January 2012 VNSNY CHOICE membership data © 2012 VNSNY CHOICE

Client: VNSNY Job Number: VC-209-12


PHILIP M. BONAPARTE M.D. ON CALL

Chief Medical Officer, Horizon NJ Health/Officer of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey and Vice President of Clinical Affairs

Doctor on a Mission hile most people take a vacation filled with fun and relaxation, Philip M. Bonaparte, MD, vice president, clinical affairs/chief medical officer at Horizon NJ Health, spent his vacation serving those in need during his eighth medical mission to Jamaica. Assisted by his wife, Tracey, Dr. Bonaparte volunteered to treat patients in the mountainous coffee farms of St. Andrew Parish at a clinic known as Mavis Bank.

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The Mission After landing in Jamaica just past 4:00 a.m. Monday, the Bonapartes set out through the mountains by car, arriving at Mavis Bank clinic eight hours later. Eager to see patients, Dr. Bonaparte quickly changed into his medical coat, but he was told that the regular Jamaican doctor was scheduled to be at the clinic on Mondays and since the clinic was so small, there would be no space for him to work until Tuesday. When he returned the following day, Bonaparte found that the clinic was being renovated. “We had to use a tiny, make-shift space as our clinic,” he recalled. “Our patient waiting area was outside under a blue tarp.” Word had quickly spread that a doctor from America would be treating patients at the clinic; the tarpcovered waiting room was filled with patients. Adults and children came in droves. A few came by bus, but most walked to see this American doctor; some were carried over mountain trails to seek medical attention. Dr. Bonaparte treated infants, children and adults with a multitude

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of health problems. There were patients with thyroid problems, asthma, diabetes, arthritis, sexually transmitted diseases and hypertension. Although he had shipped supplies and brought medications with him, “It was never enough for so many.” When a man with high blood pressure needed medication, the most he could get was a three-month supply. “He needs that medication for a lifetime, not just three months and those meds can cost $2,000 a month in Jamaica,” Bonaparte reported. On Wednesday, a 45-year-old patient suffering from severe pain arrived. The man had seen another doctor, but the non-steroidal medication he had been prescribed was not helping to relieve his agony. After reviewing the man’s chart, Dr. Bonaparte asked a few simple questions. The man had experienced weight loss and his other symptoms became apparent. “When the man removed his trousers, so I could examine his hip, I found a huge mass that looked like bone cancer,” he said. “My sense is that the other doctor assumed it was arthritis and gave the man a prescription for that condition. But the man had all the bone cancer symptoms, so I immediately made arrangements for him to be admitted to the Kingston hospital.” Dr. Bonaparte also treated several patients who suffered from the sharp aches and pains of arthritis. “These people carry loads on their heads or backs as they go up and down the mountains.” he noted. “Most have no other way to get around. If they suffer from arthritis or other painful conditions, they still have to carry their food, water, supplies and everything they need. The

(Top–Bottom) Tarp-covered waiting room outside, Dr. Bonaparte in his “office” at the clinic,Tracey Bonaparte

wear and tear on those joints can be very painful; that pain is only aggravated as they step up and down, up and down these mountain trails.” Despite the challenges of long days, limited technology and a lack of medications in this isolated area, Bonaparte said he was energized by his patients and appreciated their warm hugs, beaming smiles and expressions of thanks for his help in offering them some access to care. Philip M. Bonaparte, MD has many roles that advance his lifetime mission of serving others who are less fortunate. Certified in internal medicine, he is a health care executive and chief medical officer at Horizon NJ Health, as well as an ordained bishop and pastor who founded his own ministry in New Jersey. On numerous medical missions to places such as India, Africa, Trinidad, Grenada and Haiti, Bonaparte pays for his own travel. He also purchases, packs and ships medical supplies and medications — as much as he can carry and mail— to treat patients. His medical skills are offered to those who live in isolated regions where few have ever seen a doctor or received care. www.thepositivecommunity.com


THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING

ANNOUNCES:

ANNOUNCES:

MAYOR CORY CORY A. MAYOR A. BOOKER, BOOKER, MAYOR CORY A. BOOKER, THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL MAYOR CORY A. BOOKER, THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL & THE COUNCIL& & THE MUNICIPAL MUNICIPAL COUNCIL &

“SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” OL BUS EXPRESS”

THE DEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT OF CHILD CHILD & & FAMILY FAMILY&WELL-BEING WELL-BEING THE OF THE MUNICIPAL THE OF & FAMILY FAMILYWELL-BEING WELL-BEING THEDEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT OF CHILD COUNCIL MAYOR CORY A. BOOKER, MAYOR CORY A. BOOKER, THE DEPARTMENT OF & FAMILY MAYOR CORY A. BOOKER, MAYOR MAYOR CORY CORY A. BOOKER, A. CHILD BOOKER, MAYOR CORY A.AUGUST BOOKER, 27-SEPTEMBER 14, WELL-BEING 2012 ANNOUNCES: THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL & THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL & THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL & THE THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL COUNCIL & & THEMUNICIPAL MUNICIPAL COUNCIL & ANNOUNCES: UST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 ANNOUNCES: THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING ANNOUNCES: HE THE DEPARTMENT OF OF& CHILD FAMILY & FAMILY WELL-BEING WELL-BEING HEDEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT OFCHILD CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING WEEKDAY HOURS: “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS”

“SCHOOL BUS 8:30 EXPRESS” “SCHOOL ANNOUNCES: “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” ANNOUNCES: ANNOUNCES: MONDAY FRIDAY A.M. ANNOUNCES: ANNOUNCES: AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 WEEKDAY HOURS: ANNOUNCES: AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012- 4:30 P.M. “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” EXPRESS”

AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14,2012 2012 3, 2012 CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER Y - FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2012 A. BOOKER, MAYOR3,CORY WEEKDAY WEEKDAY HOURS: HOURS: EVENING HOURS: THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL & WEEKDAY HOURS: MONDAY -14, FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. P.M. WEEKDAY HOURS: MONDAY FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. -- 4:30 AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 2012 AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 14, 2012 WEEKDAY HOURS: AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 14, 2012 MONDAY FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. THE DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 MONDAY FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M.A.M.-7:00 P.M. EVENING HOURS: CLOSED: SEPTEMBER 3, P.M. 2012 MONDAYMONDAY, - FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 3,8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 THURSDAY, A.M.-7:00 P.M. CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2012 City of of Newark Newark EVENING HOURS: City ANNOUNCES: WEEKDAY HOURS: EVENING HOURS: WEEKDAY HOURS: WEEKDAY HOURS: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A. A.M.-7:00 P.M. WEEKDAY WEEKDAY HOURS: HOURS: WEEKDAY HOURS: PTEMBER 6, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. EVENING HOURS: THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Cory Booker, Mayor EVENING HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. - AUGUST 4:30 P.M. THURSDAY, 30,HOURS: 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Cory A. Booker, Mayor MONDAY -- FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. --A.M. 4:30 P.M. MONDAY FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. MONDAY --MONDAY FRIDAY 8:30 FRIDAY A.M. 4:30 8:30 P.M. 4:30 P.M. EVENING MONDAY FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. 4:30 P.M. THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 8:30 PTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30A.M.-7:00 A.M.-7:00P.M. P.M. City of Newark CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6,3,2012 2012 A.M.-7:00 P.M. MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 2012 City of CLOSED: Newark CLOSED: MONDAY, CLOSED: SEPTEMBER MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 2012 8:30

“SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” “SCHOOL “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” BUS EXPRESS” “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS” “SCHOOL BUS EXPRESS”

THURSDAY, AUGUST 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 A.M.-7:00 P.M. P.M. CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2012 30, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 8:30 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M.Council Municipal Council Municipal THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Cory A. Booker,AUGUST Mayor27-SEPTEMBER A. Booker, Mayor THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Cory 14, 2012 EVENING HOURS: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. EVENING HOURS: EVENING HOURS: Donald M. Payne Jr., Council President & Councilmember, Councilmember, at-Large at-Large EVENING HOURS: EVENING HOURS: THURSDAY, 13,Payne 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. EVENING HOURS: SEPTEMBER Donald M. Jr., Council President & THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, AUGUST 2012 8:30 30, A.M.-7:00 2012 8:30 P.M. A.M.-7:00 P.M. City of Newark Anibal Ramos Jr., Council Council Vice-President Vice-President & North North Ward Ward Councilmemb Councilmemb THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30Anibal A.M.-7:00 P.M.Jr., Ramos & Municipal Council Council THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. WEEKDAY HOURS: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. P.M. Cory A. Booker,Municipal THURSDAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 6,6,2012 8:30 6,A.M.-7:00 2012 8:30 P.M. A.M.-7:00 Mayor THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:30 A.M. -at-Large 4:30 P.M. ayne Jr., Council President & Councilmember, Donald M. Payne Jr., Council President & Councilmem THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. P.M. THURSDAY, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 13, 8:30 13, A.M.-7:00 2012 P.M. A.M.-7:00 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13,2012 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. CLOSED: MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 20128:30

Augusto Amador, Councilmember, East Ward Ward Augusto Amador, Councilmember, East Jr., Council Vice-President & North Ward Councilmember Anibal Ramos Jr., Council Vice-President & North Ward C Municipal Council Ras J. Baraka, Councilmember, South Ward Ras J. Baraka, Councilmember, South Ward EVENING HOURS: Donald M.Mildred Payne Jr., President & Councilmember, C. Council Crump, Councilmember, at-Large at-Large THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Mildred C. Crump, Councilmember, at-Large Augusto Amador, Councilmember, East Ward Augusto Amador, Councilmember, East Wa Anibal Ramos Jr., Council Vice-President & North Ward Councilmember THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Carlos M. Gonzalez, Councilmember, at-Large at-LargeSouth Ward Ras J. Baraka, Councilmember, South Ward Ras J. Councilmember, Baraka, Councilmember, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2012 8:30 A.M.-7:00 P.M. Carlos M. Gonzalez, Luis Quintana, Councilmember, at-Large Luis Quintana, Councilmember, at-Large Mildred C. Crump, Councilmember, at-Large Mildred C. Crump, Councilmember, at-Larg Augusto Amador, Councilmember, East Ward Ronald C. Rice, Councilmember, West Ward Ronald Rice, Councilmember, WestWard Ward arlos M. Gonzalez, Councilmember, at-Large Carlos M. Gonzalez,South Councilmember, at-Lar Ras J.C. Baraka, Councilmember, Darin S. Sharif, Councilmember, Central Ward Darin S. Sharif, Councilmember, Central Ward Mildred C. Crump, Councilmember, at-Large Luis Quintana, Councilmember, at-Large Luis Quintana, Councilmember, at-Large Carlos M. Gonzalez, at-Large West War Ronald C. Rice, Councilmember, West Ward Ronald Councilmember, C. Rice, Councilmember, Office of Administration Luis Quintana, Councilmember, at-Large Office arin S. Sharif, Councilmember, Central Ward DarinofS.Administration Sharif, Councilmember, Central Wa Ronald Rice,Esq., Councilmember, West Ward Julian X. C. Neals, Esq., Business Administrator Administrator Julian X. Neals, Business Darin S.BRING Sharif, THE Councilmember, Ward TO FOLLOWING: TO PARTICIPATE PARTICIPATE IN IN THE THE PROGRAM, PROGRAM, PLEASE PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: Office of Administration Office ofCentral Administration TO PARTICIPATEIN IMMUNIZATION THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: RECORD FOR CHILD Department of Child and Family Well-Being IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD Department of Child and Family Well-Being ulian X. Neals, Esq.,TO Business Administrator Julian X.FOLLOWING: Neals, Esq., Business Administrato TOPARTICIPATE PARTICIPATE THE PROGRAM, PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD IN THE PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: INTHE PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID Office of Administration PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID TO PARTICIPATE IN PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: L’Tanya L. Williamson, Director L’Tanya L. Williamson, Director  IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID CHILD  IMMUNIZATION CHILD’S BIRTH RECORD FOR Julian X. Neals, CHILD Esq., Business Administrator CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE CERTIFICATE  IMMUNIZATION RECORD PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID FOR PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE Department of Child and Family Well-Being Department of Child and Family Well-Bein INSURANCE CARD PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID  INSURANCE CARD TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: TO PARTICIPATE INPROGRAM, THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE THE FOLLOWING: CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE OOPARTICIPATE TO PARTICIPATE INCHILD THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING PLEASE THE BRING FOLLOWING: FOLLOWING: PARTICIPATE INTHE THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: INSURANCE CARD  PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID L’Tanya L. Williamson, Director PROOF OF CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY UNIZATION RECORD FOR L’Tanya L. IN Williamson, Director CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE PROOF OF CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY IMMUNIZATION IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD Department of Child and Family Well-Being  IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD  IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD  INSURANCE CARD   IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR RECORD CHILD FOR CHILD  IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR CHILD  PROOF OF CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM, PLEASE BRING THE FOLLOWING: Utility, telephone or cable bill. All documentation must current, Office ofbe Communications  CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE  INSURANCE CARD Utility, telephone or cable bill. All documentation must be current, Office of Communications PARENT/GUARDIAN PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID NT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID  PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID   PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO IDCURRENT L’Tanya L.beWilliamson, Director  PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID PHOTO ID  PROOF OF NEWARK IMMUNIZATION RECORD FOR Utility, telephone or cable bill.of documentation must current, within 30 days days ofAll the time of of theRESIDENCY visit. PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID CHILD within 30 the time the visit. Kimberly DeHaarte, Acting Director/Press Secretary Secretary CERTIFICATE PROOF OForCURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE Kimberly DeHaarte, Acting Director/Press  INSURANCE CARD  CHILD’S BIRTH  CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE  PARENT/GUARDIAN PHOTO ID Utility, telephone cable bill. All documentation must be current, within 30 days of the time of the visit. D’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE  CHILD’S  BIRTH CHILD’S CERTIFICATE BIRTH CERTIFICATE CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE Utility, telephone or cable bill. All documentation must be current,  INSURANCE CARD  CHILD’S BIRTH CERTIFICATE  INSURANCE CARD within 30 days of the timeNEWARK of the visit.  INSURANCE CARD  Communications INSURANCE  DEPARTMENT INSURANCE CARD CARDOF Office of Office of Communications  PROOF OF RESIDENCY INSURANCE CARD RANCE CARD CHILD FAMILY WELL-BEING within 30CURRENT days & of the time of the visit.  PROOF INSURANCE CARD NEWARK DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING PROOF PROOF OF CURRENT RESIDENCY  OF CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY Newark Press Information Office  PROOF OF CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY  OF  CURRENT PROOF OF NEWARK CURRENT RESIDENCY NEWARK RESIDENCY Press Information Office OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING Office of Communications berly Acting Secretary Kimberly DeHaarte, Acting Director/Press Secr Utility, PROOF OFDEPARTMENT CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY Utility, telephone ormust cable bill. AllNewark documentation must be current, Director/Press PROOF OF CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEW JERSEY telephone or cable bill. All documentation beNEWARK, current, F OF DeHaarte, CURRENT NEWARK RESIDENCY Utility, telephone or cable bill. All documentation must be current, 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY Utility, telephone or cable bill. All documentation must be current, Utility, Utility, or cable telephone bill. All or documentation cable bill. All must documentation be current, must be current, DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING Utility,telephone telephone or cable bill. All documentation must be current, 920 Broad Street, Room 214 Utility, telephone or cable bill. All documentation must be30 current, Kimberly DeHaarte, Acting Director/Press Secretary 920 Broad Street, Room 214 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY within days of the time of the visit. within 30must days ofoftime the time of the visit. within 30 days of the time of the within 30 days oftime the time ofCHILD the visit. visit. DEPARTMENT OF & FAMILY WELL-BEING IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE one or cable bill. All documentation be current, within 30 days the of the visit. within 30 days of within 30 days of of visit. the time of theNEWARK, visit. within 30 days ofthe the time ofthe the visit. IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEW JERSEY Newark, New Jersey 07102 Newark, New Jersey 07102 IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE Newark Office Newark Press Information Office within 30 daysPress of theInformation time of the110 visit. 973-733-7580 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 973-733-7580 IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE Newark Press Information Office DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING 973-733-7580 OF CHILD & WELL-BEING 920DEPARTMENT Broad Street, Room 920 Broad Street, Room 214 DEPARTMENT OF214 CHILD & FAMILY FAMILY WELL-BEING DEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT OF CHILD OF & FAMILY & WELL-BEING FAMILY WELL-BEING DEPARTMENT OF CHILD &CHILD FAMILY WELL-BEING DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & FAMILY IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 920 Broad WELL-BEING Street, RoomNew 214 Jersey 07102 973-733-7580 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY Newark, New Jersey 07102 Newark, 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 110 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY NEW JERSEY 110WILLIAM WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 973-733-7580 IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE Newark, New Jersey 07102 OF CHILD & FAMILY WELL-BEING 110 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK, NEW JERSEY www.ci.newark.nj.us IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE www.ci.newark.nj.us 973-733-7580VACCINATE IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE STREET, NEWARK,973-733-7580 NEW JERSEY IMMUNIZATION/PROJECT VACCINATE 973-733-7580 973-733-7580 973-733-7580 973-733-7580 973-733-7580 www.ci.newark.nj.us www.ci.newark.nj.us ATION/PROJECT VACCINATE 973-733-7580 www.ci.newark.nj.us

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KAHLIL CARMICHAEL THE FITNESS DOCTOR

Kahlil Carmichael is the Pastor and Founder of It Is Well Living Church located in Monroe, NJ. He is the CEO of the Fitness Doctor Inc., a Fitness Rehabilitation and Wellness Consultation company. To contact Kahlil to become spiritually and physically fit visit www.itiswellchurch.com or call 732-921-3746

The Spirit of an Athlete he 2012 Summer Olympics are here and I am excited! Okay, well the games are in London, not here —but I’m still excited! Why am I excited you ask? I am excited because we have an opportunity to see some of the world’s finest athletes compete against one another and try to bring home the sports world’s ultimate prize, a gold medal! As I watch countries compete against one another, I am inspired to elevate and increase my fitness regimen. The discipline, determination, and distinct physical attributes of these athletes are praiseworthy and I must admit, a bit enviable. Perhaps this is just the motivation needed for you and me to challenge ourselves and see if the spirit of an Olympian resides within us. An Olympian is more than a participant in the Olympic Games, which are considered to be the world’s foremost sports competition in which more than 200 nations participate. An Olympian is an athlete who is in peak physical condition and competes among his/her sport’s elite. These are people who work through pain, hardship and every other obstacle for even a chance at Olympic glory. I fully understand that you most likely do not think of yourself as an Olympian, but you can be an athlete. You? Yes you! In my more than 20 years of helping people improve their health and get fit through proper exercise, I have come to the conclusion that everyone possesses the spirit of an athlete! All of us can be athletes and many of us already are, we just don’t realize it yet. The physically challenged, a sedentary mom or dad, an energetic grand mom, and especially the less-than-athletic person excluded from or picked last for sports as a child, all might possess the spirit of an athlete, they just have to unleash their inner athlete and begin training for life! Here are some ways to bring out your inner athlete and compete against your ultimate opponent, yourself:

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1. Find a physical activity such as cycling, skating, walking, playing basketball etc. or if you are wheelchair bound or physically challenged, lift light weights

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seated in your chair or try to push your self (as much as safely permitted) beyond your limitations! 2. Have some fun with yourself when participating in the activities of choice! If you are skating, imagine yourself competing at the Summer Olympic trials and you must reach your destination within a certain time; when walking, imagine you are walking to beat the all-time world record —held by your best friend who just lost 50 pounds. That will get you going! Don’t be afraid to use your imagination; people watching you are not aware of your thoughts and motivations. Have some fun!! 3. Hire a professional fitness trainer to intelligently push you beyond your physical ability so that you might go higher and achieve optimal and lasting results! I cannot tell you of the many clients, women in their 50s, 60s, 70s, who, thanks to the benefits of a personal trainer, are able to workout with more intensity and focus than if they were much younger. I believe we all possess an inner athlete! If we focus on the inner person and the internal power we possess, we can do what we once thought to be beyond our reach. Jesus declared, “It is the Spirit who gives life.” (John 6:63NKJV) Engage and utilize the life-giving Spirit to access the athlete within! Disclaimer: The information contained in this column is of a general nature. You should consult your physician or health care professional before beginning any exercise program or changing your dietary regimen. www.thepositivecommunity.com


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NORMA GOODWIN HEALTH POWER

Norma J. Goodwin, M.D. is founder, president and CEO of Health Power for Minorities LLC® (Health Power®) and editor-in-chief of www.healthpowerforminorities.com.

Combine Summer Fun with Health and Safety ow sweet the summertime is for those of us who love this season. It’s great to shed those winter jackets and coats, enjoy outdoor activities and events, travel near and far to exchange greetings, love and celebrations at family reunions and retreats or simply experience the joys of nature. However, we have been suffering under unusually high temperatures this summer, so here is some information to protect your health in this summer of 2012 and its record breaking on again-off again heat waves. As you read these summer tips, notice that for each of the lifestyle and behavioral situations listed, there is information on prevention, protection and management of the condition. Prevention is always the best option, but it’s wise to know the proper management and treatment if they do occur. Heat Exhaustion can develop after prolonged exposure to high temperatures, lack of fluids or an unbalanced replacement of fluids. People at increased risk for heat exhaustion include the elderly, those with high blood pressure (hypertension), and those who work or exercise in a hot environment. Prevention: staying cool, hydrated and not overheating your body with physical activity. Warning signs: heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, and fainting. If heat exhaustion is untreated, it may progress to heat stroke, which is more serious. Therefore, if symptoms get worse or last more than one hour, immediate medical attention should be obtained. Management: drinking cool, nonalcoholic beverages; resting; taking a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath; getting to an air-conditioned environment, and wearing lightweight clothing. Heat Stroke is the most serious heat-related illness and occurs when the body’s temperature control system is overloaded. Heat stroke takes place when the body can’t control its temperature. Body temperature rises too fast, sweating function fails, body temperature may rise to 106°F or higher in 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Warning signs: very high body temperature (above 103°F); red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating); rapid, strong pulse; throbbing headache; dizziness; nausea; confusion; unconsciousness.

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Management: Get the person to a shady area; administer a cool bath or shower; if humidity is low, wrap the person in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously. Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101–102°F. Get medical assistance as soon as possible. Other Summer Health Related Issues Each of the summer issues listed below is just one click away to a Tip Sheet or Section in the SUMMER Celebrationon Health Power’s website, www.healthpowerforminorities.com:. Protecting the Skin from the Sun; Protecting the Eyes from the Sun; Outdoor Cooking Tips; Safe Swimming Tips; Delicious Cultural Specialty Recipes; Weight Control Tip Sheets; Walking for the Health of it; 13 Approaches to Preventing & Reducing Stress; and Wise Drinking Tips. Alert: Affordable Care Act/”Obama Care” Monitoring and Advocacy Needed After Supreme Court Decision Although the Supreme Court has upheld President Obama’s Affordable Care Act (originally called “Obama Care” by foes, but now also carrying that name by the media and many strong supporters), there is much advocacy and monitoring to be done by supporters as this national law is implemented. Specifically, the Affordable Care Act calls for expansion of Medicaid by each state, with 100% of the related cost paid by the federal government for the first 5 years, then 90%, thereafter. However, this important provision is being challenged in some states by governors and other foes, which would mean that many poor Americans would remain uninsured. So if you agree on the importance of this law being fully implemented, stay well informed and actively advocate for its full implementation. See a summary of Affordable Care Act/”Obama Care” Myths and Facts in the Racial and Ethnic Channel of the Health Power website. Please e-mail questions for me or other Health Power experts to njgoodwin@healthpowerforminorities.com. Enjoy the rest of your summer! Remember: Knowledge + Action = Power! www.thepositivecommunity.com


“We know our community. We live here.” Dr Philip Bonaparte, Chief Medical Officer, Horizon NJ Health “I feel the need to make a difference, not only in my life, but in the lives of others. I am involved in health issues facing predominantly the African-American and Latino community. I understand what it’s like to come from humble backgrounds. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield lives in New Jersey and we believe in access to quality healthcare for every resident. To me......it’s as important as breathing air.”

Horizon NJ Health can help you and your family, too. If you are uninsured, enroll in our NJ FamilyCare or NJ FamilyCare Advantage plans. To see if you’re eligible, call 1-877-4-KIDS-NJ.

Horizon NJ Health Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ® Registered marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ®’ and SM Registered and service marks of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey. © 2011 Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey. Three Penn Plaza East, Newark, New Jersey 07105.


POWERY

Continued from page 50 “I am deeply grateful, overjoyed, humbled, and honored to be entering the living tradition of Duke Chapel’s ministry in word and deed to its various constituencies,” Powery said. “I look forward to continue, as the Chapel motto says, ‘keeping the heart of the University listening to the heart of God,’ which beats with love for the world.” Powery served as a member of the executive lectionary team for The African American Lectionary, an online ecumenical project funded by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. He is the recipient of numerous scholastic fellowships and awards from organizations such as the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion and the Fund for Theological Education. In 2008, The African American Pulpit named him as one of "20 to Watch," an honor given to 20 outstanding black ministers under the age of 40 who are helping to shape the future direction of the church. He is married to Gail Powery, with whom he has a daughter, Moriah, and a son, Zachary.

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SOCAROBICS

Continued from page 78 discard her walking stick after two months of working out with us. And then there is the 90-year-old grandmother who started off slow but is now able to keep pace with her younger classmates. It is their success which inspires me,” he says. The socarobics class begins the Monday following Mother’s Day each year and runs Monday to Friday 6:308:00 a.m. until September. The program is made possible with funds from area Assemblyman Nick Perry, who is an ardent supporter of community health. “The Sesame Flyers exercise program is one that we are proud of at my office because it is beneficial on so many levels other than the obvious one of keeping people in shape,” says Perry. “The cost of a gym membership is prohibitive to many people, especially in these challenging economic times. A free exercise class that provides an adequate alternative is something that we can all embrace.” Curtis Nelson, executive director of SFI was instrumental in getting the program off the ground in 2001. “I am proud of the way the program has grown over the years and for the opportunity we have to provide this service to the community,” he says. Raymond Luke, the Association’s chairman, embraced it as an opportunity to show that Sesame Flyers is more than just masquerade and steelband. “Though we are very proud of our achievements as a champion of Labor Day Caribbean Carnival band and winners on a dozen occasions, the fact is we are a full-fledged community service organization,” says Luke. “This exercise program is just one of the many services we provide annually as a way of building our community and making it a better place to live, work and raise a family.” Founded in 1983, SFI was born out of what Trinidadians call a “lime” with good friends and family at a house on Sesame Place & Irving Street in Petit Bourg, Trinidad. This was followed by a dinner discussion in New York City and subsequently an idea to form on organization put forward by founder Joseph Charles. The initial meetings and youth workshops were held in kitchens, basements, backyards of members and in Prospect Park on Sunday mornings. Recognized as one of the top eight youth community programs in New York City, SFI programs includes academic support, recreational programs, counseling services, cultural events, summer youth employment, computer literacy and job readiness. Over the past 29 years, the organization has enriched its name and recognition in New York’s cultural community by winning the “Band of The Year” title in the West Indian American Day Carnival Parade consecutively from 1999-2009. They again copped the title in 2011 and as the defending champions, are actively preparing for this year’s Caribbean Carnival on Eastern Parkway with their presentation of Fire & Ice. So if you are looking to get in shape this summer, there is still time to “move to the left; move to right” and catch the socarobics fever. www.thepositivecommunity.com

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am 29 years young and have had open heart surgery. Two years ago, I had to have my mitral valve repaired to reverse my diagnosis of borderline congestive heart failure due to an enlarged heart caused by severe mitral valve prolapse. I stumbled upon the notification that I needed to have open heart surgery during my internship as a cardiac ultrasonographer. I was asymptomatic and probably would not have known today that my life was indeed threatened had I not received the important exam called an echocardiogram. I have been interested in the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular health for quite some time since two very important people in my life have suffered from heart disease, one fatally. However, I never imagined heart disease would directly affect me and have such a major impact on me personally. As a result, my interest has now grown into passion about the movement and the fight to end heart disease. I wish to get involved with the American Heart Association in hopes of spreading awareness and to educate the youth that this disease affects all ages and in some cases can be a silent attacker. My hope is to relay the message to the young that it is essential to prioritize heart health. I am blessed to be here and to be able to share my story so that possibly one more life can be saved in return.

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MWANDIKAJI K. MWANAFUNZI THE WAY AHEAD

A Holy Nation But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light. Once you were not a people, but now you are the people of God; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy. —1 Peter 2:9-10 (New International Version)

“N

ation” gets highlighted for many people each summer. On July 4, folks celebrate, via fireworks and barbecues, the birth in 1776 of the modern nation-state called the United States of America. On August 17, other folks (and some of the same folks) celebrate the birth of Marcus Garvey, whose early 20th century organizing highlighted the concept that people of African descent throughout the world comprise a nation that should be strengthened. To which nation, America or the black nation, do we owe first allegiance? Neither. We who truly look to God through Jesus Christ as our King are firstly part of the “holy nation” that Peter wrote about. Any other nation is secondary at best. God comes before American patriotism, before black nationalism, before everything. After giving to God what is God’s, there is plenty left to give to the American nation-state and to the black nation. Yes, I’ve heard some folks insist that “America is a Christian nation.” But Peter’s 1st century A.D. letter was addressed to Christians scattered throughout various geographic locations, according to its opening greeting (read verses 1 and 2 on your own). In 2012, Peter’s message still reasonably applies to believers in Jesus Christ wherever we reside. Christians as a whole comprise the “holy nation” of whom Peter wrote. In America, some speak of “God and country” with what sounds like equal reverence. They remind me of the first century Roman Empire, where authorities did not care what religion a person practiced as long as that person agreed that Caesar was a god. Today, it often seems similar pressure is put on Americans to deify America. Meanwhile, in black communities, when some folks who espouse “race first” hear black Christians praise Jesus, they call us “ignorant” or “brainwashed” for clinging to what they call “the white man’s religion.”

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But Christ explained to his disciples: I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinedresser. Every branch in Me that does not bear fruit, He takes away; and every branch that bears fruit, He prunes it so that it may bear more fruit. You are already clean because of the word which I have spoken to you. Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself unless it abides in the vine, so neither can you unless you abide in me… If anyone does not abide in Me, he is thrown away as a branch and dries up; and they gather them, and cast them into the fire and they are burned…. If you keep my commandments, you will abide in My love; just as I have kept My Father’s commandments and abide in His love . . .” —Excerpted from John 15:1-10 [New American Standard Bible]

So as Christians, we are instructed to ground ourselves in Christ and keep His commandments. Anything that anyone else says we should do to demonstrate that we are “true” Americans or “conscious” black people holds up only if it grafts into the “true vine,” i.e. Christ. Figuratively, we should allow anything not grafted into that vine to wither. We should try to always apply a Christian value system when dealing with issues around the globe, the United States, and the black community at home and abroad. We should avoid chauvinistic rigidities like “America right or wrong,” as well as the uncritical “black is always where it’s at.” If some Americans accuse us of being unpatriotic, or some blacks call us Uncle Toms, remember what Christ preached on the mount: Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you. —Matthew 5:11-12[NIV]

By focusing on Christ, and by trying to do the word and not merely hear it, the Black Church probably outdoes the black nationalists in facilitating independent black schools, practicing Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics), and aiding Africa and the Caribbean; not that we are competing. But following God’s plan results in good getting done.

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GOOD NEWS FROM THE CHURCH AND COMMUNITY

www.thepositivecommunity.com Summer 2012

Vol. 12, No. 7

Publisher Adrian A. Council, Sr. Editor-in-Chief Jean Nash Wells Associate Editor R. L. Witter Sales Angela Ridenour Adrian Council, Jr. NGS Communications, Inc. Satori MPR Church/Community Affairs Coordinator Faith Jackson Contributing Writers Sonja Gracy Dr. Phillip Bonaparte Linda Armstrong Mwandikaji K. Mwanafunzi g.r. mattox Rosemary Sinclair Patricia Baldwin Rev. Theresa Nance Rev. Reginald T. Jackson Herb Boyd Glenda Cadogan Toni Parker Helene Fox Rev. Dr. Joanne Noel Rev. Dr. Johnny Ray Youngblood William Parrish Jeanne Parnell Photographers Bob Gore Wali A. Muhammad Seitu Oronde Rev. Dr. William L. Watkins, Jr. Darryl Hall Vincent Bryant Donovan Gopie Linda Pace Hubert Williams Art Direction & Layout Penguin Design Group Martin Maishman The Positive Community Corp. 133 Glenridge Avenue Montclair, NJ 07042 973-233-9200 Fax: 973-233-9201 Email: news@thepositivecommunity.com Website: thepositivecommunity.com All contents © 2010 The Positve Community Corporation. All Rights Reserved. This publication, in whole or in part, may not be reproduced, stored in a computerized or other retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, or by any means whatsoever without the prior written permission of The Positive Community Corporation. Any opinions expressed herein are solely the opinions of the writer(s) and not necessarily those of The Positive CommunityTM, its management or staff. The Positive CommunityTM reserves the right to retain all materials and does not assume reponsibility for unsolicited materials.

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The Last Word BY R.L. WITTER his summer many Americans have caught Olympic fever! Whether rooting for favorite NBA players on the men’s basketball team, Cullen Jones in the pool or Usain Bolt and Lolo Jones in Track and Field, Americans everywhere can be heard chanting “U-S-A!!” and “America Rocks!!” Pint-sized 16-year-old gymnastics powerhouse Gabrielle Douglas had her fair share of admirers, and sadly, critics and detractors. Thousands of people took to the internet not only to laud her athletic abilities, competitive spirit and grace under pressure, but also to hurl insults about her hair. The only thing more tragic than the fact that anyone at all felt the need to be rude and make snarky comments about the child’s hair while she was competing in an arduous, physically demanding sport in front of the entire world was that the majority of the people with nothing nice to say seemed to be other black women. In a uniquely American move, rather than laud Gabby’s talent and accomplishments (just being on the Olympic team is pretty incredible), people chose to tear her down rather than celebrate her mastery of her craft. Perhaps taking to social media and commenting on internet websites aren’t tantamount to bullying, but these behaviors are most certainly scraping the bottom of the barrel. In a time and place where we have enough children harming themselves and others because of taunting, teasing and even physical attacks, why is this tolerated? Where do our young people get the idea that this behavior is somehow cool or acceptable? They get it from the media and our conspicuous consumption of snark, sarcasm and cynicism. Every time we open a magazine or view a webpage that asks, “Who wore it better?” or castigates someone’s appear-

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Gabrielle Douglas

ance, or upload a less-than-flattering photo of an unsuspecting person so that we and others can make tasteless and mocking comments, we are tacitly endorsing this practice and signaling our youth that it is permissible. As people of faith, we know that a person’s worth is not measured by his or her wealth, education or beauty, but rather by their generosity, humility, morals and actions. The Positive Community aims to maximize the exposure of the great deeds of people in our local and extended communities while contrasting and minimizing the all-too-common negativity that garners entirely too much attention in this world. We subscribe to the belief that by uplifting one another we all triumph, whereas by denigrating even one person, we all fail. So as the Olympics come to a close and I begin to root for my favorite team for the World Series and my husband dons the colors and logo of his favorite football team, we are reminded that we can support our teams, families, friends, coworkers and community without having to tear down, insult or bully others. By celebrating the talents, victories and accomplishments of all, we end up with more victory parties, promotions and awards to enjoy all around —regardless of who won. We’re choosing to honor good sportsmanship, integrity and Godgiven ability above allegiances to any one specific team. More important than being a member of “Team USA” or the Giants or Jets, we’re striving to be part of “Team Human Kind” with emphasis on the kind portion. And to Gabrielle Douglas and every other competitor who carried his or her self with dignity and class at the London 2012 Olympics, Thank you!! We appreciate your hard work and dedication, and that of the village that raised you, too! www.thepositivecommunity.com


The Positive Community’s

Great Countdown to Freedom The Grand Jubilee

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n January 1, 2013, America will observe the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation—the sesquicentennial commemoration. From the date January 1, 1863 to the present we, as a group are blessed with an enormous opportunity to measure, assess and define our American journey, our claim on the American Dream.

Below is a cultural narrative—our story—an oral history, a brief presentation of our deep collective experience that dates back

to before this nation’s founding: The Cultural Narrative African Americans are a unique people with a peculiar history in this land. Brought to these shores in chains from Africa as slaves in the early 1600s, our people toiled and suffered as captives in brutal bondage for a quarter of a millennium (250 years). On January 1st 1863, two years into the Civil War, the Emancipation Proclamation, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, became law, signaling an end to slavery. On that day, the African American community of the United States of America was born. One hundred years later, in August, 1963, at the height of the civil rights movement, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stood in front of the Lincoln Memorial as he led hundreds of thousands to a “March on Washington” seeking an end to discrimination and Jim Crow segregation in the South. It was a demand for full citizenship rights for the people in what has been called “The Second Emancipation.” Forty years after Martin Luther King’s tragic assassination in 1968, America elected its first black president, Barack Obama (2008). In one hundred years between the first and “second emancipation,” in the midst of bitter persecution, humiliation, lynching and the denial of basic human rights, the resiliency of the African American spirit continued to shine brightly in religion, business, invention, sports and in the creative arts—music, fashion, dance, language, literature and theater. Indeed, original American art forms and a popular culture which has become the envy of the world were founded upon the souls of a forlorn people! And that is our story-the Truth, Beauty and Goodness of a loving and gifted race revealed! An Extraordinary History Ours is an extraodinary history of trial, tribulation and triumph that we must never forget! This is the story that we must tell our children and be ever remembered. We the people, descendants of the Great Emancipation, must tell our story to each other reminding ourselves, over and over again of the great, noble struggle and sacrifices of those who came before us. This is our story, our cultural narrative, our Grand Jubilee and springboard into a great and prosperous future—a vision of hope and progress; health and wholeness; peace and goodwill! January 1, 2013 the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclaimatiom—The Grand Jubilee! To become a Community Partner or Sponsor: Call Today 973-233-9200.


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Summer Issue 2012  

The Summer 2012 issue of The Positive Community magazine