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BALMORAL’S TRACI & CARLETON BROOKS Show Jumping Superstars from WIHS Leone Equestrian Law • Dominique Gonzalez Brandi Cyrus • Janelle Henningsen


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Ramble On FaRm

PRemieRe Facility OF the PhiladelPhia main line Dominique H. Damico ~ Berwyn, Pennsylvania ~ 484-325-0380

best OF luck at indOORs

Mia Latran and Rockwell & Rockingham

Gabrielle Sokolow and Northwind’s Lost Boy

Gabrielle Sokolow and Super Cool

Katie Ray and Rockaway

~ Horses and Ponies for Sale ~


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theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 5

AVA I L A B L E F O R P U R C H A S E

CENTURION Stunning Equitation Horse 7 yr old gelding 16.2hh Holsteiner

FOR VIDEO AND PRICING Contact Magnolia Farms Savanah@magnoliafarms.com


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Pick up a book! Order Kim Ablon Whitney’s book “Winter Circuit” on Amazon – search “The Perfect Distance”.


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 9


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ORION FARM

WISHES BEST OF LUCK AT INDOORS TO

Dreamland &Abigail Brayman 2014 GRAND PONY CHAMPION, PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL HORSE SHOW

LINDA EVANS 413-530-9685 • orionpny@aol.com Massachusetts • Wellington, Florida

ESSEX CLASSICS raising the standard of equestrian style


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Taylor Harris Ins Medal Finals at Capital Challenge 1.

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Upper Marlboro, MD, September 27, 2015. 1. Karen Healey and Tasha Visokay. 2. Mary Elizabeth Cordia. 3. Natalie Templeton and Prophecy of Silverado, California, finished 3rd. 4. 12-year-old Ellie Yeager finished 2nd. 5. Michelle Raue in the work-off. 6. Winner Catalina Peralta. PHOTOS © PIPER KLEMM.


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PETER WYLDE AND LEVLAND AT THE 2015 USHJA INTERNATIONAL HUNTER DERBY FINALS (LEXINGTON, KY). PHOTO © OLIVIA SCHRAGER.


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Fox Lea Farm Camp Series 2015 1.

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Venice, Florida. 1. Mary Eufemia, the National Hunter Derby. 2. Hayley Waters and Qurint, the Grand Prix. 3. Penny Brenan, the Welcome Class. 4. Samantha Senft and Early Morning, the Grand Prix. 5. Penny Brennan, the Grand Prix. 6.Hayley Waters, the Grand Prix. 7. Kris Killam, the Welcome Class. 8. Carson Cavalline, the Futures Grand Prix. PHOTOS © DOMINIQUE GONZALEZ.


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THINK AHEAD! DEADLINE:JAN 5 FOR ALL MATERIALS

Call 541-905-0192

THE STALLION ISSUE

theplaidhorsemag@gmail.com OCTOBER 2015 FEATURES:

EDITOR’S NOTE

Pg. 28 Style Native: Brandi Cyrus

Heading to indoors is an exciting time of year. And exhausting. Anyone who denies the pure exhaustion of indoors is not telling the whole truth. The pressure is high and sleep is low – and it is a great time to learn to keep centered and remember what is important. Only one person will win a blue ribbon in each medal. LOREM IPSUM DOLOR SIT AMET, CONSECTETUER But hundreds of riders UTUT WISI ENIM AD MINIM DOLORE EU VENIAM. will “win” as they achieve PHOTO © PHOTOGRAPHER NAME. personal bests, get great performances out of their horses, conquer their nerves, ace a physics test while at indoors – there are so many ways to win – so celebrate it when you do!

Pg. 40 Leone Equestrian Law Pg. 62 WIHS: Show Jumping Superstars Pg. 70 Equitation Stars: Dominique Gonzalez ON THE COVER: KAITLYN VAN KONYNENBURG WINNING EMO TRIP OF THE SHOW IN THE JUNIOR HUNTERS AT THE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW, 2014. PHOTO © SHAWN MCMILLEN PHOTOGRAPHY.

CONTACT THE PLAID HORSE: WRITE: Piper Klemm, Ph.D., 14 Mechanic Street, Canton, New York 13617 CALL: 541-905-0192 EMAIL: theplaidhorsemag@gmail.com WEBSITE: theplaidhorse.com FACEBOOK: facebook.com/theplaidhorsemag TWITTER: twitter.com/plaidhorsemag @plaidhorsemag INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/theplaidhorsemag @theplaidhorsemag PINTEREST: pinterest.com/theplaidhorse TUMBLR: pinterest.com/theplaidhorse ISSUU: issuu.com/theplaidhorsemag


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For Lease:

Qualified for 2016 Pony Finals in the Large Pony Hunters

ORCHARD HILLS

GHIRADELLI

2015 HITS OCALA Reserve Circuit Champion Large Green Pony. At 2015 USEF Pony Finals he finished with a 9th in the Model, a 10th in the Under Saddle, 24th Overall Large Green Pony out of 85 ponies, and 5th Overall Welsh Pony! Tank is very simple, brave to the jumps, and walks the lines with ease. Absolutely no prep, he is the “stall to ring” type. Anyone can ride him. Currently ranked 11th in the nation for the Large Green Ponies. This wonderful pony is for lease. Owner/Breeder: Alex Mager aamager@aol.com • 352-266-6071 Breeding, selling, and leasing high quality Ponies, Hunters, and Jumpers All Aluminum... Lean, Light and Every Bit as Strong

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TONYA JOHNSON, of Berkeley, CA, is an equestrian mental skills coach and an A-circuit competitor with a master’s degree in sport psychology. Her book, “Inside Your Ride: Mental Skills for Being Happy and Successful with Your Horse” is available on Amazon.com.

HEIDI KEENEY, of Troy, NY, has a background in art and works in Information Technology. You might see her with her camera at equine events in the Northeast. In equine photography three of her favorite things come together­art, technology and horses.


SINCE

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HARRISON K-9

theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 21

SECURITY SERVICES, LLC

Offering the finest internationally titled European German Shepherds for your family’s protection. 803-649-5936 • www.Harrisonk9.com info@harrisonk9.com • Aiken, South Carolina Free DVD available upon request.

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IF IT’S NOT A HARRISON K-9, IT’S JUST A DOG.


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Morganville, NJ 07751 •732-591-9600 www.BayMarFarms.com

2015 Rated Regional II Shows: All USEF, M&S, NJPHA, NJHSA, NAL October 18 • December 5 January 10 • February 14

2015 Schooling Shows: All M&S, NJPHA, NJHSA October 25 • November 15 December 13 • January 21

Hunters • Jumpers • Equitation

TPH INTERNS

OLIVIA SCHRAGER, 15, of Miami, FL, shows mainly in the equitation and hunters and enjoys photography. @oschrag @findthedistance

MACKENZIE SHUMAN, 17, of Monument, CO, is a Junior at Lewis Palmer High School. She rides her horse, Quintessence, in the Junior hunters and competes on the Hunter Run Farm IEA team. @quintessence1


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 23

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For knowledgeable and friendly service call us at

800-842-9021 We take time to educate you so you make the right decisions for your insurance needs. www.FrysEquineInsurance.com info@FrysEquineInsurance.com

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Shops and dealers’ inquiries welcome! ALL SALES FINAL • NO RETURNS Call or fax for orders, price list & business policy. PHONE: 775-267-4861 • FAX: 775-267-4573

Summerwood Farm • Ponies for Children Division prospects and started ponies by *Telynau Royal Charter, Land’s End Monarch, Sugarbrook Blue Pacific, and Blue Who. Contact Amy Redman • 248-760-5178 www.summerwoodwelsh.com • MI & FL

Best of Luck to Summerwood’s Ponies in the show ring in 2016!


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HONESTY, EDUCATION, AND A GOOD WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH TRAINERS & PROFESSIONALS YOU CAN TRUST ARE KEYS TO THE BEST PONY SHOPPING AND SELLING EXPERIENCES.

Six Tips for Successfully Matching

Pony Buyers & Sellers with Stefanie Mazer

#1. TRUST YOUR TEAM Educate yourself as best you can about the process of buying and selling and find a trainer or agent that you trust. A good trainer or agent will continue to educate a client throughout the process and will put the needs of the client and a good match ahead of his or her own interests.

Ideally, the entire process should be honest and transparent – but you as a client must be educated enough to understand when it’s not. Being wellinformed also creates a climate of full disclosure and will help you to recognize routine or commonplace factors in the process – factors that could end a deal or trigger fear about the transaction in an uneducated buyer or seller. Once you have selected someone to work with, listen to and follow the advice offered. The experience they bring to the table is paramount.

#2. BE REALISTIC Buyers and trainers need to be realistic about what exactly they can and cannot live with in a pony. Sellers need to be completely honest about the pony’s habits, behaviors, and preferences. Even the best ponies may not be a good fit for every program. Be realistic about what your program does and does not have to offer and ask yourself if this would be a good fit for the pony. #3. WORK WITH PEOPLE WHO BUY AND SELL ALL THE TIME There are people in the industry that keep getting repeat business after repeat business after repeat business and there is good reason for this – they only represent animals that they fully believe in and stand behind. People know them for this and respect them for it. So buy and sell with experienced buyers and sellers who have good connections, can give you the most options, and are well-practiced in bringing a telephone call to the result of a pony sold or bought. People are trusted in volume and duration for a reason.


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 25 FARMORE STATE OF THE ART AND MIA GREEN, A SUCCESSFUL MATCH PUT TOGETHER BY STEFANIE MAZER. PHOTO © SHAWN MCMILLEN PHOTOGRAPHY.

#4. LOOK PAST THE RECORD Simply checking a pony’s USEF record often does not tell a potential buyer very much. Ponies don’t get sold sitting in a barn. They get sold by being seen at horse shows and because people are talking about them and showing them. Sometimes the best ponies are tasked with the hardest job – very inexperienced children – and while they may always be safe and saintly, they might not be winning for their valued efforts. Working off the word of people you trust and who have seen the pony show a lot can be a much better indicator of how suitable a pony will be for your purposes. #5. DON’T BASE YOUR DECISION ON GETTING THE BEST DEAL As far as pricing goes, don’t go out looking for the deal. This is not about making money or saving money. It is about finding the right match and spending within your range. Figure out your price range, then choose an appropriate and safe pony that your child can learn on. Leave your wanting-to-get-a-deal mentality to other aspects of your life. Buyers and sellers are best served by finding the best match that they feel would be the most successful. #6. ACKNOWLEDGE THE INHERENT RISK Be realistic. Buyers and sellers may have good intentions, but remember that these are transactions with inherent risk. You may have the best trainer, the most honest seller, and everyone may be acting correctly in every situation, but these are animals that are being bought and sold so there is inherent risk. Purchasing and showing an animal is always a gamble. Everyone needs to be prepared of the possibility that things can go wrong with any pony prior to purchase. There should be no hard feelings if everyone is being honest and the gamble goes south.

STEFANIE MAZER is the trainer at Forget Me Not Farm in Wellington, Florida. She supervises the selling and purchasing of several dozen quality ponies every year. If you are interested in contacting her about Winter Circuit Sale Pony opportunities and pricing, email Stefanie@forgetmenotfarmfl.com or telephone 561-346-4228.


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twitters to retweet 2.

BRANDI CYRUS

@thebrandicyrus 3.

RIDERS 4 WELL BEING

@r4wellbeing 4.

USHJA Children's and Adult Regional Jumper Championships (North Region) at Showplace Productions at Ledges Sporting Horses. Roscoe, Illinois. 1. Kesley Taylor, Child Individual, Gold. 2. Zone 5, Adult Team, Gold. 3. Lisa Baker, Adult Individual, Gold. 4. Zone 5, Child Team, Gold. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.

QUEENIE PRODUCTIONS

@QueenieShows


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 27

Fine Used Saddles For Sale Love Your Saddle GUARANTEE! 14 Day Trials

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INQUIRIES: KATANA O’BRIEN • 314-520-2576


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BRANDI CYRUS LOOK #1 – WHAT I’M WEARING:

Huntley Equestrian breeches

(shop.huntleyequestrian.com) Equi In Style mandarin orange shirt (equiinstyle.com) Kingsland Belt (usa.kingslandstore.com)

Since we’re transitioning into Fall, I thought this schooling look was very appropriate. It’s tough to wear darker colors in the Summer because it’s so darn hot, but I love to pull out my black breeches in the Winter. These are some really fun riding pants with a colorful pattern and red zippers on the back pockets. The red accents look great with this shade of orange. The look is complete with a perfectly matching EIS shirt. Even when it’s colder, it’s nice to have the mesh panels down the sleeves because we all know it gets hot really fast when you’re riding – no matter the season!


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STYLE NATIVE


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LOOK #2 – WHAT I’M WEARING:

Huntley Equestrian jacket (shop.huntleyequestrian.com) Alessandro Albanese shirt (shop.alessandroalbanese.com) Kingsland breeches & belt (usa.kingslandstore.com)

I love this color palette! The baby pink lining adds a great contrast and really brings out the richness of this navy jacket. This show coat is very lightweight and the lining is actually mesh so it breathes really well too. I matched it with a navy belt, and what really stands out about this look is the subtle detail of the black waistband on these white breeches. Wearing a navy belt with them really makes it stand out! This showjumping look is fantastic on my grey mare, and it could also look really striking if you’re riding a dark bay or black horse.


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PHOTOS © MANDY MOORING


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intagrams to envy

THE BOOT AND BRIDLE

@thebootandbridle

7.

KAKI APPAREL

@kaki_apparel

Showplace Fall Classic at Lamplight Equestrian Center, Wayne, Illinois. 1. Gia Rinaldi. 2. Lindsey McDonald. 3. Olivia Pollina. 4. Ashley Vogel. 5. Claire Stockard. 6. Courtney Berlin. 7. Hannah Hoch and Olivia Markman. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.

MINDY CORETZ

@mindyrebeccaa


Lyla

theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 33

OFFERING FOR SALE OR LEASE JUMPER, OCALA, FL 10 YEAR OLD, 16.1 HAND, HOLSTEINER MARE

LYLA’S HIGHLIGHTS:

• 4th in the 2012 NAL $10,000 Childrens Jumper National Finals • 2012 Zone 6 Childrens Jumper – High Champion • 2013 Zone 6 Low Junior Jumper Champion • 4th in the 2014 Adequan/ FEI North American Junior Young Rider Championships – Class 1 Junior Individual Phase One

• 2nd in the Randolph College/USEF Junior Jumper Individual Phase One, Pennsylvania National Horse Show

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THE WAITING GAME: Handling Down Time at Fall Shows

BY TONYA JOHNSTON, MA The fall season’s important classes, medal finals, indoor venues, and special shows often have unique schedules that may cause you to have more down time in your show day than normal. The added free time is not necessarily bad or good, what is potentially difficult is being thrown off of your regular routine when it matters most. This can lead to things like over-thinking, butterflies and (strangely enough) mental and physical fatigue. Here are some strategies for handling this added down time with composure and confidence, as well as great personal examples from some top riders and trainers.


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“I get to the ring at the beginning of the day, walk around and get a feel for it and learn the course. I spend about an hour just thinking and planning and then I go hang out [elsewhere].” – Kaitlyn Van Konynenburg, Grand Champion 2015 U.S. Junior Hunter Finals West

NUTRITION: Eating foods that work for you is of course

WATCHING: Think carefully about how much you

essential as an athlete, particularly when you want to be at your very best. Adrenalin and excitement at important fall shows will often mask your energy level, so waiting until you feel hungry is risky. Instead, plan out your healthy snacks and meals ahead of time so you are sure to balance your day. Down time can afford you the opportunity to go “off campus” to get food that is more enticing or nutritious, but going to the grocery store and bringing your ideal snacks and meals is also a great option. When showing in unfamiliar cities it is helpful to bring snacks from home or map out where the best grocery stores are ahead of time so you can be sure to go there early in your trip.

want to watch, and make specific plans to do what is best for you. Just because you go 73rd in a medal final does not mean that watching 48 trips is necessarily a good idea. Be strategic and disciplined about which riders, how many, and from where you want to watch to maximize your energy and effort.

“When you find yourself with down time it is good to check in with how you feel and take the opportunity to eat some protein and drink something with electrolytes if possible.” – Hope Glynn, Sonoma Valley Stables

“I watch about 20 trips but then go back to the barns. I don't like to watch to many trips because you can freak yourself out.” – Victoria Colvin, Champion 2014 Maclay Finals

Keep your food consistent so that you reduce the amount of change your body goes through and you have a better chance of staying in your comfort zone – both physically and mentally. By taking action to maintain your nutrition routine you are also putting in positive effort, action and attention to detail that will add to your confidence.

Watching your ring from various vantage points before and after the course walk (if you have one for your class) is a way to use your time productively as well. As they say, “Information is power” and this acclimation process or “ring research” before you show will create increased confidence and comfort in a new and/or pressurized environment.

“When waiting for a class I will always eat a banana… They seem to calm me down, weather that's actually chemical or mental I don’t know… [but] always eat a banana when waiting for a class.”– Geoffrey Hesslink, Champion 2014 USET Talent Search Finals East

“The best thing for me is that I make sure not to watch too many people. I go through the list and watch the riders that I know will do very well… if I watch too many people it causes me to over-think and change my plan.” – Sydney Hutchins, Champion 2014 USET Talent Search Finals West

“It is good to watch your course some, especially if you have a chance to watch professionals do it before you go. My clients and I talk a lot about each horse [because] I think it's important to look at the course with your horse’s tendencies in mind.” – Amanda Steege, Ashmeadow Farm


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MUSIC: Music is a terrific way to add fun and positive energy into your down time or preparation routine. Things to remember: 1) keep your music fresh and new so it is engaging and fun, 2) make sure you have varied playlists so you can adjust your music based on your mood, and 3) incorporate some upbeat music to dance/walk around/move to so it facilitates a warm-up for your body as well as your mind. “I enjoy listening to music to help dial in my focus.” – Ashton Alexander “I come back to the ring about an hour before I show and sit and meditate on what I am going to do while listening to music.” – Kaitlyn Van Konynenburg “I like listening to music when I have to wait.” – Victoria Colvin

MENTAL PREPARATION: With added down time you will have ample opportunity to utilize all of the mental skills that get you focused and in your groove before you show. Energy management, self talk, breathing, and visualization are terrific choices. When you have a long wait time you have an ideal opportunity to visualize yourself riding the course and executing your specific plan. Be sure your visualization includes the last moments of your wait at the back gate, the opening circle and course, as well as the positive emotions and satisfaction as you exit the ring after a job well done. “[To prepare] I normally sit by myself, close my eyes and imagine jumping the course through my own eyes as if I were actually doing it, including counting my strides out loud and turning my body like I will eventually in the ring.” – Geoffrey Hesslink “I visualize... I know my horse and where I might need left leg or right leg or where I might need to slow down. I repeat the video until I picture it going perfectly and then I zoom in on what I'm doing where. When it's time to show I feel like I have trained my body and a lot of it just happens.” – Amanda Steege

MENTAL BREAKS: So you have such a long wait that you want to “get away” and take a break, but what should you do? General distractions that will not wear you down mentally such as reading, playing a game, napping or chatting with friends about non-horse subjects are all great ways to pass the time. “I think it is important to not over-think the course which I always want to do. So I need to find things or do things to distract me. Whether that means reading a book, talking with friends or even sleeping.” – Geoffrey Hesslink In addition, doing things that feel productive but are not directly related to your ride can burn off extra energy that would otherwise turn into anxiety. Working, homework, chores, polishing boots, organizing equipment, helping someone else prepare are all examples of useful downtime strategies. “When I need to pass the time, I find small things to do that will keep me focused but not obsessive. For example I braid all of my jumpers, so I might use that downtime to practice on one of the other horses.” – Kelli Cruciotti, 2015 $100,000 Devon Grand Prix winner “The best way I spend downtime waiting to show is helping set jumps for the other kids we have showing. I like to watch some of the trips then stay busy… I do not [want to] watch so many I start to over-think things.” – Ashton Alexander, top junior rider TONYA JOHNSTON, MA is an equestrian mental skills coach and an A-circuit competitor with a master’s degree in sport psychology. Her book, “Inside Your Ride: Mental Skills for Being Happy and Successful with Your Horse” is available on Amazon.com. Tonya can be reached by phone: 510-418-3664, through her website: TonyaJohnston.com, or on Facebook: facebook.com/tonyajohnstoncoach.


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Summer's End Horse Show, Silver Lake, Wisconsin. 1. Teddi Pritzker. 2. Lisa Campbell. 3. Katherine Gemmell. 4. Jordan Sachs. 5. Margot Petersen. 6. Diane and Elle Wilson. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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Adult Equitation at Capital Challenge Horse Show 1.

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7. 6.

Upper Marlboro, Maryland, September 26, 2015. 1. Nicole Lyvere and All In. 2. Hannah Hlopak of The Woodlands, TX. 3. Alex Maida and Tolstoy. 4. TPH Contributor Tonya Johnston. 5. Mindy Coretz. 6.Laura Owens of San Francisco, CA. 7. Dana Brawley. PHOTOS © PIPER KLEMM.


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CONGRATULATIONS

Photos by Randi Muster

to Lucille Allegre riding Panda Shamu for winning the GGT–Footing™ 2'6" Children’s Medal at the Southeast Medal Finals

Representatives from GGT -Footing™ Catherine Trice and Cynthia Brewster-Keating

www.ggt-footing.com


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Can Horse Shows Be Affordable?

BY JESSICA E. CHOPER OF LEONE EQUESTRIAN LAW An affordable horse show is an oxymoron, but making a horse show more affordable is not. Horse shows are expensive. Entry fees alone are costly, but when you factor in related expenses, the costs can become exorbitant, especially for riders desiring to show on a regular basis. While horse shows will never be inexpensive, these tips may help owners minimize some of their costs.


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Identify Goals

Before showing, set objectives and realistically ascertain the level of competitiveness of both horse and rider. The offerings at horse shows can vary greatly, as can horse show costs. The size, competitiveness, and cost of horse shows varies greatly, and some are more suitable to a rider and horse’s level compared to others. Riders trying to qualify for prestigious competitions or capture annual awards require one type of horse show, whereas riders and horses in need of basic experience and exposure can achieve their goals at less competitive venues, such as local schooling shows. Schooling or unrecognized horse shows may offer less expensive entry fees, enabling a green horse or rider additional funds to enter more classes. Compare office fees as they can vary widely among schooling horse shows. USEF fees are not imposed at unrecognized horse shows, which could offer some minor savings. Every rider competing at a USEF recognized show should consider USEF/USHJA membership as non-member fees can be costly. Entering multiple USEF horse shows as a non-member can be more expensive than the cost of a yearly membership.

Transport

Transporting horses is costly. Consider whether it is advantageous to send your horse with a commercial operator versus purchasing a trailer and transporting the horse yourself. Having others transport your horse can be less burdensome, but can also be costly. If commercially transporting the horse, be cognizant of geographical considerations. With most transporters charging by the mile, finding horse shows closer to home that offer suitable divisions can save money and still allow both horse and rider exposure to horse show rigors and off the property obstacles.

Prepare for Horse Show Day

Be organized. Prepare a permanent check list of essentials, such as tack, pads, clothing, bandages, and accessories such as spurs and a stick. Review the list a few days in advance of the show to make certain that the quality and condition of all tack and attire is horse show appropriate. Purchase everything you will need in advance. If showing regularly, consider tack and supplies for use only in competition, subjecting tack to less wear and tear and minimizing replacement costs. Plan for the need of items on horse show day that are not routinely used at home, such as ear plugs, rain sheets, or spurs. If the horse will be braided, have yarn and all items necessary to braid and unbraid at the horse show. Last minute purchases from horse show vendors can add considerable and unnecessary costs to the horse show day, as well as unneeded stress before even entering the ring. Once you have identified goals and matched horse shows accordingly, submit entry forms on time. Many horse shows penalize riders for entering a horse show beyond the entry deadline, and avoiding such costs is a simple means of saving money.


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Horse Show Day

Learn to braid a mane and tail. The more competitive and selective the horse show, the more likely braiding is required. If showing several times a month, braiding costs can exceed several hundred dollars. To make shows even more affordable, braid for others if time permits. An efficient and competent braider can recoup costs of entry fees by braiding several horses on horse show day.

Don’t Leave the Horse Show with Just the Horse

Be organized and don’t leave supplies or tack behind. Leaving martingales on a fence after removing it for the under saddle class will inevitably occur at least once, whether self-grooming or not. Driving off the premises without a grooming box filled with everything from rags to hoof polish happens. Have a written check list of major items brought to horse Groom for yourself if you can clean, tack up, and still have shows and peruse it before departure. Walk to the ring the energy and focus to ride well. Be organized, prepared, before leaving the grounds to retrieve tack or supplies and capable of doing so if feasible. If problematic, bring left on the premises. Doing so can avoid the expense of an equestrian friend or family member to help for the day. replacement costs before the next horse show. Ensure Not only does grooming involve preparing the horse and that all tack has permanent labels, optimizing your rider for entry into the ring, but often involves last minute chance of retrieval if tack is left behind. relays to the trailer or stable area to address unexpected Before the day ends, hang up clean show coats instead needs that arise ringside. While it is often easier, and of crumpling them into the back of the van. Clean sometimes essential, to pay for grooming services, it is tack instead of allowing sweat and dirt to accumulate. more cost effective to do it yourself. Maintaining products and clothing already owned can Enter classes wisely as each class and division costs avoid the premature demise of valuable items. money. If your horse is not a stellar mover and the Horse shows are not inexpensive endeavors and costs division has numerous better movers, consider skipping go well beyond entry fees. An understanding of all that the under saddle class. If you are experienced and your is involved in preparing for and competing in a horse horse had opportunity to school, paying for a warm-up class may not be essential. Match your division with your show is the first step to assessing whether costs can be contained. abilities. If horse and rider are not competitive on the A circuit, opting for the children’s hunters rather than the pony hunters can save entry fees. Tying the riders JESSICA E. CHOPER is a leader of the team at Leone goals to the classes entered can be an efficient way to save Equestrian Law. An attorney with expertise in equestrian money. matters, medical malpractice, nursing home litigation, and appellate practice, she also is a lifelong equestrian, A rider’s horse show day can start at 5 AM and end well having competed successfully in both the junior and after dark. Bring enough beverages and food to the show amateur divisions. She was inducted as a member of to last throughout the anticipated length of stay. On site food vendors are not only costly, but often require waiting the National Championship Equestrian Team into the Mount Holyoke Inaugural Athletic Hall of Fame. in long lines when time is tight. Packing in advance saves money, eases stress, and allows riders to spend more time Have questions or need legal help? Leone Equestrian Law preparing for entry into the horse show ring. is available 24/7 for any issue, big or small. Just call 201-444-6444, email Help@EquestrianCounsel.com, or visit EquestrianCounsel.com for more information.


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 43

Stonewall Texas A Rising Star in the Large Division • qualified 2016 pony finals • see usef # 5263734 • available immediately

available to try at Indoors Terri and Allison Wherley Glen Rock, Pa • 717 434 5435 www.hunterglenfarm.com


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Chicago Hunter Derby Presented by Canadian Pacific 1.

2.

3.

4.

6.

7.

8.

5.

9.

Antioch, Illinois, September 5-6, 2015. 1 & 9. Winner Kelley Farmer. 2. Chicago Equestrians for a Cause. 3-7. Everything was decorated and catered as a world class hunter event. 8. Ryan Sassmanhausen. PHOTOS © MARCIN CYMMER PHOTOGRAPHY.


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 45


SHOWPLACE PRODUCTIONS

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CONGRATULATES THE WINNERS OF THE 2015 IHJA “A” MEDAL FINALS


SHOWPLACE PRODUCTIONS

theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 47

CONGRATULATES THE WINNERS OF THE 2015 MARSHALL & STERLING MIDWEST FINALS


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Join us in Wellington this Winter!

Sophia Calamari and Unforgettable Winner USEF Pony Finals Medium Green Model & Under Saddle 2015

Isabella White (age 7) and Clovermeade My Boyfriend’s Back at USEF Pony Finals 2015

Mia Green (age 8) and Farmore State of the Art at USEF Pony Medal Finals 2015

Caroline Passarelli and True Colors Winner USEF Pony Finals Over Fences 2014

photos © briar field farm, shawn mcmillen photography, and Sportfot.

Limited space available for training with Stefanie Mazer and special rates for top quality sale ponies during Pre-Circuit and the Winter Equestrian Festival.

Stefanie Mazer • (561)-346-4228

Stefanie@ForgetMeNotFarmFl.com • www.ForgetMeNotFarmFl.com Forget Me Not Farm, Wellington, Florida


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 49

Best of Luck WISHES

True Colors and Augusta Iwasaki in the Medium Pony Hunters

&

Tazmanian Devil and Mia Green in the Small Pony Hunters

at The Pennsylvania National Caroline Passarelli and True Colors Winner USEF Pony Finals and Washington International Over Fences 2014 Horse Shows photos © briar field farm, shawn mcmillen photography, and Sportfot.

Isabella White (age 7) and Clovermeade My Boyfriend’s Back at USEF Pony Finals 2015

Limited space available for training with Stefanie Mazer and special rates for top quality sale ponies during Pre-Circuit and the Winter Equestrian Festival.

Stefanie Mazer • (561)-346-4228

Stefanie@ForgetMeNotFarmFl.com • www.ForgetMeNotFarmFl.com Forget Me Not Farm, Wellington, Florida


50 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 51


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Quality prospects available at all times. 304-870-7277 • www.somermistfarm.com


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 53

Grady Lyman & Sinatra’s Ruhm. Photo © Katie Browne.

The choice of champions. Ranch, Farm & Equine Contact: Stacey Cinquini Direct/Text: (949) 289-4722 Fax: (949) 429-8097 Email: stacey@cinquiniins.com Web: www.cinquiniins.com Facebook: Cinquini Insurance Services LLC Twitter & Instagram: @CinquiniIns Lic #0G96286 / 0I72676


54 • THE PLAID HORSE GRACE PROCHILO, 15, OF WILSON WYOMING AND IRASIR IN THE JUNIOR HUNTERS AT THE NATIONAL HORSE SHOW (LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY) IN 2014. PHOTO © SHAWN MCMILLEN PHOTOGRAPHY.


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 55

Busy Kids, Busy Lives Balmoral Builds Well-rounded Young Horsemen Throughout the Country ◼ BY PIPER KLEMM

In today’s world, busy kids have busy lives. Academics are more rigorous and intense than ever, there are more horse shows than ever, riders show more horses than ever – the question is asked over and over – how do you find time for horsemanship, quality, and keeping it fun all at the same time? Traci and Carleton Brooks’ Balmoral seems to have the answer. Operating out of two facilities in Southern California, Balmoral keeps specific programs for junior riders with busy schedules. Many of the riders at Balmoral live on the west side of Los Angeles and attend academically-oriented schools, which can potentially keep their horse time down. To accomodate this, Balmoral works with each rider, often teaching lessons before school to fit everything in. Working on demanding schedules, Balmoral tailors individual programs to reach the goals of junior riders from all over the country. Balmoral caters to a rider’s schedule and location, so riders of all levels can enjoy the advancement coming from working with industry veterans Carleton, Traci, and assistant trainers Jean Wingis, Katie Ledoux, Lexi Wedemeyer, and barn manager Jennifer Taylor.. Many riders fly in for the weekend and meet their horses at horse shows. Balmoral takes care of all of the details to make it possible for riders to keep up with their busy lives at home. Being ‘in town’ and in convenient locations can make life stressful – the horses have to walk down the street to get to the ring and are often subject to noise, vehicles, and construction in the surrounding areas. All of this makes them very relaxed and well-prepared for the activity of horse shows. Balmoral’s program is so fun that many of the mothers of junior riders who have never ridden start taking lessons. Horses like Now How Z and Once show in both the upper level national level classes and adult classes at California shows with moms learning to ride. On top of all that, Traci and Carleton are always bringing

along their own young horses up the ranks. Sable Road is currently leading the country in the Green Conformation Hunters. Let’s get to know three junior riders at Balmoral: GRACE PROCHILO: Grace Prochilo, 15, of Wilson, WY, found a winning program when she joined the Balmoral team. Commuting to shows in California and around the United States, Grace’s success has brought her to The Devon Horse Show (PA), The Pennsylvania National Horse Show (PA), The National Horse Show (KY) and many more with Teton Farms LLC’s Irasir. All three of Grace’s Junior Hunters qualified for Indoors in 2015. Irasir, a 14 year old Swedish Warmblood Gelding (Iroko x Rassasine) currently MACI ANDERSON AND MERLIN THE MAGNIFICENT.


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leads the country in the Small Junior Hunter 15&U and was Champion at USEF National Junior Hunter Finals- West (Del Mar, CA). Grace’s horse Pandora was recently Champion at the Capital Challenge Horse Show (MD) in the Second Year Green Hunters with Hunt Tosh. She also inspires her younger sister Kyra Russell, 10, who rides with Balmoral and shows her ponies Red, White, & Blue and Fun Factory in the Children’s Ponies.

RELAXED PONY FUN AT BALMORAL IN LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

MACI ANDERSON: As is the case with many riders, Maci Anderson took her first riding lesson ever at Balmoral. Maci, 10, of Pacific Palisades, California, started 2015 in the Short Stirrup divisions. Maci moved up with Merlin the Magnificent through the ranks to Children’s Pony Hunters winning tricolors at HITS Thermal (Thermal, CA) and then the Medium Pony Hunters at the end of the circuit. They continued their success throughout the spring and summer learning the ranks of the pony hunter divisions. Maci and Merlin, a 12 year old British Riding Pony gelding (Lannorth Debonair x Royale Glory), competed at their first national horse show together in August, USEF Pony Finals (Lexington, Kentucky), where Maci won the Sportsmanship Award. Maci's younger sister Sadie Anderson also rides and shows with Balmoral. Sadie, 8, recently moved up from cross-rails to the short stirrup with her ponies Social Butterfly and Goldfish. KAITLYN VAN KONYNENBURG: Kaitlyn, 17, of Pacific Palisades, CA, who is in her last junior year, has achieved her goals riding with Balmoral for the last seven years. Her accolades are literally too long to list, but

ABOVE: BALMORAL BARN MANAGER JENNIFER TAYLOR WITH HER SON CODY. LEFT: GRACE PROCHILO, CARLETON AND TRACI BROOKS, AND KAITLYN VAN KONYNENBURG ENJOYING HITS THERMAL (THERMAL, CA) IN 2015. RIGHT: KAITLYN VAN KONYNENBURG AND COMMISSARIO AT USHJA INTERNATIONAL HUNTER DERBY FINALS (LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY) IN 2015. PHOTO © SHAWN MCMILLEN PHOTOGRAPHY.


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include Grand Large Junior Hunter Champion at The National Horse Show (Lexington, KY) 2014 with Wish List, Champion at USEF Junior Hunter Finals – West in 2015, Reserve Champion in the Small Juniors at The National Horse Show with Triton Z, Equus Trip of the Day at the Washington International Horse Show in 2014, as well as a celebrated start in the USHJA International Hunter Derbies this year. Kaitlyn earned the top placing Junior Rider award in the Challenge Round at International Derby Finals in August with Homestead. Beyond all of her success in the show ring, Van Konynenburg is a testament to Balmoral’s program. She goes to a brick and mortar school and loves to spend time focusing on artwork as well as her time at the barn. “Kaitlyn is the big sister of the barn. She mentors all

of the younger riders and they all look up to her. She is a great role model for them – she works really hard. She comes to the barn every day and does anything that needs to be done – rides extra horses, cleans tackwhatever is in store for that day,” says Traci Brooks. While she has a tutor at Indoors, she is in traditional school and keeps a balance between education and horse shows. “I really like it because I get to have the best of both worlds. It is really fun – my school friends text me that they watched me show online and I get to go home and go to football games and stuff,” says Van Konynenburg. Interested in joining the Balmoral team? Learn more at www.BalmoralFarm.com or contact Traci Brooks (310-600-1967) or Carleton Brooks (760-774-1211).


A Finals Primer 58 • THE PLAID HORSE

number of riders in the class. The number of points needed ranges from 13 in states season means one thing: finals are coming. It means longer with less horse shows like Oklahoma and days at the barn, no stirrups, and prep over harder courses. Minnesota to 50 in large states like New But with all the finals available for riders, it is sometimes hard York and New Jersey with lots of shows and to keep them straight. Below is of many of the finals, and what exhibitors, adding point bonuses. According each rider must have accomplished to be able to attend. to USEF rule EQ110.5f, “The points required by each individual state will be determined PESSOA/US HUNTER SEAT MEDAL FINAL by the population density of that state for Date and Location: October 11, 2015 at the Junior riders designated Hunter or Jumper Pennsylvania National Horse Show in Harrisburg, combined with the number of USEF Medal Pennsylvania. classes held in that state.” Class Structure: Two rounds. The first is a normal Final Structure: All riders compete in a over fences round, and the top 4 are called back for a final preliminary round and the top 25 are called test. The judge can call back more if necessary. back for second round. Then the top 4 test, Qualifying Criteria: Riders accumulate points by and sometimes the judge will ask for a placing 1st-4th all the way to 8th, depending on the horse switch. BY EMMA DUBINSKY • For equitation riders, the fall


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 59

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THE ASPCA MACLAY FLAT AT THE NATIONAL HORSE SHOW (LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY) IN 2014. PHOTO © PIPER KLEMM.


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ASPCA MACLAY FINALS Date and Location: November 1st, 2015 at the CP National Horse show at the Kentucky Horse park in Lexington, Kentucky Class Structure: One over fences round and then the top 12 riders are called back for a flat phase. Qualifying Criteria: Riders accumulate points by placing 1st-4th in the class. The points the riders receive for each placing go up the more riders are in the class. Once riders obtain the points they need for their state, which once again ranges from 13 to 50. After June 1st, if a rider has more than 60 points, he or she cannot compete in another ASPCA Maclay class until the regional final or they are ineligible to compete at regionals for that year. At regionals, the riders complete a course and then they are called back on the flat, no more than 24 at a time, in groups A, B, C, and so on. The flat counts for 50%, and the top riders move on to the finals. Final Structure: All riders compete in a preliminary round, and the top 20 return. There is also a flat phase for the top riders. USEF TALENT SEARCH – EAST Date and Location: October 2-4, 2015 at the USET Foundation Headquarters in Gladstone, NJ Class Structure: 1* (3’7), 2* (3’9), and 3* (3’11). The course must be over jumper style jumps. The top 12 return for a flat phase, and the riders must do a lengthening of stride at both trot and canter, as well as counter canter. Qualifying Criteria: A rider must earn 90 points, as well as a ribbon in a 2* class. A win in a 3* qualifies the rider for finals automatically.

SPENCER SMITH WON THE USEF MEDAL FINALS AT THE PENNSYLVANIA NATIONAL HORSE SHOW (HARRISBURG, PA) IN 2014. PHOTO © MARIA DONOVAN

WIHS EQUITATION CLASSIC Date and Location: October 23-24, 2015 at the Washington International Horse Show at the Verizon Center in Washingon, DC Class Structure: The riders compete in two phase: the hunter phase, in the hunter ring over 3’6 fences, and a jumper phase, in the jumper ring, over 3’6 jumper-style fences. The course use a timer. A point is subtracted from the score for each fault. Qualifying Criteria: The rider’s accumulate USEF TALENT SEARCH – WEST Date and Location: September 17-19, 2015 at Rancho points, and the top 30 from the east coast and the top 10 from the west coast are invited to Mission Viejo Riding Park in San Juan Capistrano, CA participate at finals. Class Structure: 1* (3’7), 2* (3’9), and 3* (3’11). Finals Structure: All riders compete in The course must be over jumper style jumps. The top both the jumper and hunter phase. Then the 12 return for a flat phase, and the riders must do a top riders return for a test before final ribbons lengthening of stride at both trot and canter, as well as are awarded. The order for the jumper phase counter canter. is the reverse order from the standing after Qualifying Criteria: A rider must earn 30 points, as the hunter phase, with the top scoring rider well as a ribbon in a 2* class. A win in a 3* qualifies the performing last. rider for finals automatically.


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 61

WEST COAST EQUESTRIAN MEDAL Date and Location: End of Summer 2016 at the Blenheim Summer Classic II in San Juan Capistrano, CA Class Structure: The course must be over jumper style jumps set at 3’6. A liverpool may be used, and the round is timed. There is no workoff required. Qualifying Criteria: For every class, riders accumulate points set at 10, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2,1 provided there are at least 8 riders. For every less rider, the points start at the lowest number possible. For example, if four riders competed, the points would be 4, 3, 2, 1. Each rider must accumulate 10 points to be eligible for the finals. Finals Structure: The first two rounds of competition are open to all riders. The top 15 will return for a third round. The first round is a power and speed class, but if a rider has a knockdown in the first part the pair continues on to the speed phase. Ribbons 1-6 are awarded. The second phase will be a normal jumper course, but must include a liverpool. The riders will return in reverse order from the round before. Ribbons 1-6 are awarded as well. The third round is a jump-off, and the top 15 riders return with averaged scores from rounds one and two. The score from round three is added to the average, and the class is pinned. No more testing is allowed. Ribbons and coolers are given for 1-10 separately for both juniors and amateurs. HUNTER HOLLOWAY IN THE WIHS MEDAL (WASHINGTON, DC) IN 2014. PHOTO © PIPER KLEMM.

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62 • THE PLAID HORSE

From Junior Riders to Show Jumping Superstars: Past WIHS Equitation Winners Share Their Memories By Lauren Fisher

MANY OF NORTH AMERICA’S TOP SHOW JUMPERS GOT THEIR START IN THE EQUITATION RANKS. Riders compete all year in order to qualify for the major finals, and only the very best are able to mark their place in history by taking one of the prestigious titles. For many of the United States’ best grand prix show jumpers, winning the WIHS Equitation Final is a memory that will always stand out. Those wins have served as stepping-stones on the road to unmatched professional careers, and WIHS proudly remembers all of its great winners. The 57th annual Washington International Horse Show will be held this year from October 20-25, 2015, during which the 23rd winner of the WIHS Equitation Finals will be crowned at Verizon Center in downtown Washington, D.C. Leading up to that week, WIHS had the opportunity to speak with a few of its most successful winning alumni…


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 63

PHOTO © AL COOK.

MCLAIN WARD 1993 WIHS Equitation Final Winner riding Polar Bear Trainer: Paul Valliere

Two-time Olympic gold medalist and 2015 Pan American champion McLain Ward got his start at WIHS as a junior and has since gone on to become one of the world’s best show jumpers. Ward is a fourtime winner of the prestigious WIHS President’s Cup Grand Prix. He returns in 2015 to defend his title as last year’s champion. Ward won the WIHS Equitation Finals in 1993 and still credits his background in equitation for where he is today. Here are his memories of that win over 20 years ago: HORSE: “I had a really nice horse called Polar Bear. It was a gray horse – very quiet. My father leased him

for my last equitation year and he was fourth in the medal final that year and second in the Maclay. He was a known horse and suited me great. He was a really wonderful character. He came from Eddie Horowitz originally, and my wife (Lauren) actually ended up managing Eddie’s stable to put herself through college a few years later, so it’s a small world.” TRAINER: “I was 17 then. I had actually already gone to work in Europe for a year and came back and wanted to try one more time to win the equitation finals, and so I was able to win a few at least. Paul Valliere helped me since I was around seven years old. The jumpers I did with my father, and Paul helped me in the equitation mostly.” WIN AT WIHS: “I always liked that class because it had the jumper phase, which suited my program and riding. If I could stay close in the hunter phase, I knew I had an advantage in the jumper phase. It was absolutely a big, exciting win for me. It was something that we had focused on. We won the regionals that year, and we were a little disappointed at the medal finals. That was a goal we had. The Maclay final still to this day irks me a little bit because I think we should have won it, but that’s judging and that’s how it goes. You have to let it go at some point in 25 years!” IMPORTANCE OF EQUITATION: I think the equitation helped me a tremendous amount, and I am very grateful for having the opportunity to do it. I think every young rider should do equitation at the high levels. I


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think it helps you in your discipline, it helps you in your riding style, and it helps you in your thought process. All of that is going to eventually apply to the sport if you choose to go on and do this professionally or at a higher level.” WIHS: “I love Washington. I love the fact that it is downtown. There are logistical problems that come with that, but it is like the old show at Madison Square Garden; you know what the logistics are before

CHRISTINE (TRIBBLE) MCCREA – 1996 WIHS Equitation Final Winner riding Schroeder Trainer: Leslie Howard

In 1996, a young Christine Tribble (who later married Irish Show Jumper Jonathan McCrea) finished out her last junior year with a very exciting win. She took her horse, Schroeder, into the WIHS Equitation Finals and landed a major victory. What the rider remembers most about that win is the incredible camaraderie between riders and trainers throughout this important competition. She has gone on to major accomplishments, such as double gold medals at the 2011 Pan American Games, but at WIHS McCrea still counts winning the equitation finals as her greatest moment. MEMORIES: “It was a long time ago now. I remember I went in the hunter phase, and I had a really great round. My horse could really be a hunter or an equitation horse, so I think I lucked out with that because he already went ‘huntery.’ I don’t remember where I finished, but I think I was in the top ten. I had a

you arrive. I think you get a great atmosphere. It is a really cool part of the city, and I really look forward to it every year.” JUDGING: “I think I have judged the WIHS Equitation Finals twice now. It is definitely a different perspective. I enjoy judging the equitation. I have judged the USEF Show Jumping Talent Search, WIHS, and the (ASPCA) Maclay Finals now, and I have enjoyed all three experiences. I am not looking to be a career judge, but I really think highly of the equitation and how it influences riders. I think it is important that people like myself get the opportunity to be involved with that because we bring not only really fresh and fair and neutral sense to the table, but we also bring what we see happening at the highest levels of Olympic Show Jumping sport. I think to be able to influence that is a great honor, and I really love to do it.”

good round in the jumper phase, and then all of a sudden it was like a whirlwind and everybody had to change horses for the final work-off. I switched with Hillary Schlusemeyer. Her horse was Pik Trump, and that horse had already won everything with Lauren Hough and Hillary. It was such a great horse, and I remember thinking how lucky I was to get to switch onto that horse.” SCHROEDER: “In the first two phases, I rode a horse named Schroeder that we owned. He was a super nice horse, but he could be a little bit difficult, so it was really exceptional that I got to switch on to such a nice horse at the end. I was not necessarily used to one that was so easy to ride. Schroeder got sold the end of that year because I was going to be an amateur. He went out to California. Karen Healey bought him with a client of hers, and it was two sisters that went on to do a lot of good things with him, so that was nice. He came from South Carolina and he had done a lot before I had gotten him, but I think I had him in his peak years. I was lucky to have him, and I was fortunate that my parents were able to buy him for me.” WORK-OFF: “I just remember that everybody was really trying to help each other out. Hillary was helping me with her horse, and I tried to help her with my horse. I went into the final phase, and I was like, ‘This horse is incredible. How lucky am I? I am on a machine!’ He went around and I had a good round, but I had no idea if I would move up enough to win because I didn’t get to see how everyone else did. We were back in the schooling area and you don’t get to watch a lot. Then you got back on your horse and went in the ring to see how you did. I was just standing there, and I had no idea. It was down to four and I’m thinking, ‘Wow, I could be fourth, this is awesome!’ Then it was down to three, and then it was two of us, and when they announced who was second, I knew that I had won and I was in total shock. It was a really special moment. It is a lot of hard work to get there and then to have that result is totally gratifying.”


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TRAINER: “I was training with Leslie Howard at the time and Molly Ashe was also the next in line behind Leslie, so between the two of them I had a lot of help and I give them a lot of credit because I definitely didn’t do it all on my own. That was a special day. Those equitation classes are always long days because there are so many in it and to come out with a win was really exciting.” IMPORTANCE OF EQUITATION: “I really think the formula that makes up the WIHS Equitation Finals is special because you have to be able to be that hunter rider, and you have to also be able to be that equitation/jumper rider. The time allowed comes into it in the second round. Yes, you are riding in the equitation, but it is a little closer to a jumper ride. You have to learn how to ride two different ways. You learn how to ride a jumper round and make it inside the time allowed and then you also have to be able

to ride a hunter round that is more flowing and needs a softer ride. It teaches you both things, and it helps you to really understand your horse. I am riding a horse in the grand prix right now, for example, that is kind of like a hunter. He doesn’t have a huge gearbox; he is a one-gear kind of guy, and you have to make it work. You have to stay inside the time allowed and that is tricky because I have to make tight turns. I feel like the equitation in general has also helped me down the road because you learn how to control your body. I think it is a great final, and it gives you a lot of confidence going forward.” GREATEST WIHS MEMORY: “To be honest, there is nothing that surpasses that day for me as of yet. That is the best thing that has ever happened to me at Washington. Maybe if I won the President’s Cup. I have been close a few times, but I have never won. I do enjoy the President’s Cup Grand Prix because a lot of spectators come to that class.” WORKING TOGETHER: “The biggest thing I remember about that that day is how much everyone helped each other when we switched horses. You watch these horses go with other riders, but you don’t really know them. You don’t know how it feels. There is a lot of stress just jumping on somebody else’s horse. As a junior, to jump those jumps and that kind of a course is a lot, and I just really remember everybody pulling for each other. It wasn’t cutthroat. The whole feeling in the schooling area was that everybody was trying to help each other, and that was key, because when it goes to the other end of the spectrum it isn’t very nice. At the end of the day, you want to win and you want to win against people doing as well as they can do, not that they screwed up so you won. You want to be the best of the best, so I will never forget that.”

PHOTO © JENNIFER WOOD MEDIA, INC.


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KENT FARRINGTON 1999 WIHS Equitation Final Winner riding Ginger Trainer: Andre Dignelli

Kent Farrington is currently the top ranked U.S. rider in the world and got a fantastic start to his career with major equitation victories. Farrington won the Pessoa/AHSA National Hunter Seat Equitation Medal Finals in 1998 and then topped the WIHS Equitation Finals in 1999, his last year as a junior. Farrington is also a winner of the coveted WIHS President’s Cup Grand Prix, among his many accolades worldwide.

PHOTO © AL COOK.

MEMORIES: “I was so keen on being a professional rider that I was already sort of thinking in my head what I was going to do next, but I thought that those were good practice events to have pressure situations where you had to perform well. I liked that final at Washington in particular because you had to trade horses, and as a junior rider that was one of my strengths. I used to catch ride a lot of horses. I had a lot of experience riding difficult horses, or hopping on one that I had never seen before and going right into the ring, so I really looked forward to that at the event.” TRAINER: “I had a couple trainers. I had Nancy Whitehead from Chicago, who trained me for most of my junior years, and then I had Andre Dignelli, who helped me in all of the equitation. He was there with me for all of the big finals.” HORSE: “I rode a horse named Ginger there. I had a different horse for each final. Andre was very good at making sure that I always had a nice horse to ride for the finals. It was a horse that was in his stable, owned by


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one of his clients that probably had more than one equitation horse, and they were generous enough to give me that one to ride. All of the horses from Andre were great. They were all very well schooled and he knew what he was doing to have the horses ready to go on an important day and have us ready as kids. We practiced a lot of equitation type courses and different things, so we were very well schooled leading up to the event.” WIN: “I remember afterwards, Andre said, ‘You know, I am really proud of you.’ Because my question to him was always, ‘Are you sure I have to keep doing this equitation stuff?’ I really didn’t like it. I just wanted to do the jumpers and he said that it was good for my career and a good way to get my name out there. He said that it would help me in the future to build my business and make a career for myself, and he was really right about that, so that was a good lesson from him. He obviously has one of the most successful training businesses in the horse world, so I think that was very good advice. After the finals, he said to me, ‘Okay, you don’t have to do this anymore. You won two of them, so you proved that you can do it and that it wasn’t just luck, so we’re good.’” FAVORITE WIHS MEMORY: “I would say my favorite memory was going there as a professional. It might have even been my first time riding there as a professional and I won the grand prix and I think I won one other class and was second in another one. I was also leading rider of the show. That was pretty cool.” FIRST TRIP TO WIHS: “As a junior when I first came to Washington, I didn’t come for the equitation, I just came for the junior jumpers. I remember I went in and I turned to my trainer at the time, who was Nancy Whitehead, and I said, ‘I don’t belong at this show.’ I had never been to a bigger show, and it was all the kids on the east coast and it was really intimidating. That was a huge deal for me at the time, being at the Washington show, and so many riders that I looked up to were there and all of these well-known junior riders were there. I remember my first experience there being a little intimidating, and Nancy said, ‘Well, you do belong at this show and you are going to go in there and we are going to win stuff anyway.’ So that is what we did. That was a good memory for me.”


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HARDIN TOWELL 2006 WIHS Equitation Final Winner riding Littlefoot Trainers: Missy Clark and John Brennan

Hardin Towell is the most recent WIHS Equitation Final winner we caught up with, and like his counterparts, Towell has since kickstarted a successful international show jumping career. Towell has not competed at WIHS since his win at the end of his junior career in 2006 and now looks forward to returning to compete on a whole new level. He has had a fantastic 2015 season, including his first appearance in the Longines FEI World Cup Finals and a CSI 5* win at Spruce Meadows Here are his memories of winning at WIHS:

Sloane Coles rode him there, and he was lovely. I went last. I came into the last round winning and then it was just a very easy horse to ride and I had a great round. That was a fantastic horse.” ROUNDS: “I remember the first round I was second and that was the hunter round. That was always more difficult for me because it was based more on the style. I think Haylie Jayne won that phase. Then the jumper round, I remember that I had very high scores. I had a 94 and a 95 I think, so I felt very confident with that. I was just determined. It was something that I really wanted to win, so it was nice to get it done.

MEMORIES: “It meant a lot to me because my position is not the best and even now I am still working on it. A lot of people thought that I was a little too sloppy for the equitation, so it was nice that my last junior year, I could put it together and win one of the finals.” TRAINER: “I trained with Missy Clark and John Brennan. They were great. I learned a lot from Missy, and she really helped me with my equitation. Some of things that she taught me, I still think about to this day when I’m jumping a big grand prix.” HORSE: “I rode a horse named Littlefoot that was owned by Missy and John. He was a great horse, and I was lucky to ride him. He could do it all, and he was very easy. When we switched for the final round, it ended up being Jessica Springsteen’s horse that she won a lot on, Papillon 136. He was very easy to ride too.

PHOTO © DIANA DEROSA.


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They brought everyone in the ring and announced it in reverse order, so I walked in and I was waiting. I had a pretty good feeling going in. I came into the final workoff with a pretty big lead, so it was not all that much suspense, which was nice.” THIS YEAR: “I haven’t shown at Washington since then and I am coming back this year, so nine years later it will be nice to return. I am taking one horse. I am really striving to qualify for the Longines FEI World Cup Finals again this year. I have done one qualifying event already and have some nice points. It will be a pretty light week, but it will be nice to get back there and show in that ring. It is always a nice time.” MOVING FROM JUNIORS TO GRAND PRIX: “It took a long time. I was actually talking to some younger kids recently, and I told them it takes a while. You have to ride a lot of 1.10m horses and a lot of different ones to get there. I have been lucky that Jennifer Gates has been very supportive of me and my career. I have had nice horses and they have given me a good opportunity, so it is nice that I have been able to take advantage of that.” LOOKING BACK: “It was just fun. I think when you are a junior you look at things in a totally different perspective than you do now. Back then, when I won WIHS finals, it was the biggest thing. It was great. Now when I look back, I think it was a great stepping stone. It is nice looking back and knowing that I won it, but more than anything, I think the experience and the discipline that I learned in that has helped me in the jumper ring and made me a better rider.”

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The Washington International Horse Show returns to Verizon Center in the heart of Washington, D.C. October 20-25, 2015. The WIHS Equitation hunter phase will be held on Friday, October 24, and the jumper phase and final work-off will be featured on Saturday, October 25. Come out to see the nation’s top young riders compete for one of the most coveted junior championships! For more information and a complete schedule of events, please visit www.wihs.org. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter for more info! • belleandboweq, bnbeq


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Young Riders: Dominique Gonzalez by Plaid Horse Intern Olivia Schrager

PHOTO © VICTORIA DEMORE.


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THE MOMENT DOMINIQUE GONZALEZ entered the ring for Region 3 ASPCA/NHSAA Maclay Championship in Jacksonville, FL, the first words out of the announcers’ mouths were, “There are Maclay’s in Puerto Rico?” Gonzalez, who shows 15, was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico and could ride before she could walk. At age 3, she commuted to Paris, France, while her father and trainer Terry Gonzalez, a professional in the equestrian sport, was showing and training in Europe. For many years, Gonzalez travelled around both the United States and Europe following the show circuit with her parents. When Dominique was in 7th grade, her family purchased a farm in Ocala, Florida to allow her to seriously focus on her own riding. The success that has followed her began when she met her match in the form of an equitation horse named Bentley, owned by James Gentleman. The pair instantly clicked, even though “Ben,” as she affectionately calls him, was very green when they first teamed up at

the beginning of 2014. With the training and miles that Gonzalez has put on this horse, the duo’s performance has only improved. Gonzalez’s most recent accomplishment was receiving 2nd Place in the prestigious SEMF Phelps Media Junior Medal with the help of the team at Don Stewart Stables and trainer Terry Gonzalez. This medal is unlike others throughout the country due to the fact that it runs the day before Region 3 Maclay Championships, making it attract some of the top riders in the country; there were over 95 entries in this year’s lineup. With a first round score of 86.5, Gonzalez went into the second round standing in 6th. Keeping her cool, she laid down yet another flawless trip and moved into the 2nd place position. Gonzalez also qualified for National Maclay Championships with a top 25 placing in the regional the next day. While Equitation is her main focus at the moment, she has also seen success in the Children’s Hunters, aboard her young horse Ingo de Kalvarie, owned by T. M. Hills Farm and Judy Boccacio, and in the High Children’s Jumpers, with Sharíf. Ingo de


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Kalvarie, or “Ingo” has been at her family’s barn, TM Hills International, for over a year now and Gonzalez, along with her father, has been responsible for most of his training. Sharíf or “Cherry” was imported earlier this year, and since then, the pair has received many tricolors in the Children’s Jumpers. Gonzalez plans to move into the Low Junior Jumpers and 3'3" Junior Hunters with theses two horses for the 2016 show season, and will no doubt see massive success.

Dominique Gonzalez Horse Show Highlights 2015:

2014:

•T  ricolors at HITS Ocala in the 15-17 Equitation • Wins and top ribbons, ASPCA Maclay and USEF Medal at Fox Lea Farm Camp Series • 2nd in the Southeast Medal Finals Phelps Media Junior Medal (out of 102) • 3rd in the Maclay at Southeast Medal Finals • Qualified USEF Medal, ASPCA Maclay Finals

•T  ricolors at HITS Ocala in 12-14 Equitation (Ocala, FL) Central Florida Hunter Jumper Association: • Circuit Champion in the Low Child/Adult Jumpers • Circuit 3rd Overall in the 12-14 Equitation

2013: Horse Shows in the Park (FL) Circuit Awards: • Top Junior of the Year • Top Jumper Rider of the Year • Top Equitation Rider of the Year • Top Hunter Rider of the Year • Top Pony Rider of the Year


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P ine R idge Equestrian Center LLC

Jayme Nelson

Eagle River, Wisconsin Boarding • Training • Young Ponies 715-479-7642


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SCOTT BRASH AND THE 13 YEAR OLD GELDING HELLO SANCTOS MADE HISTORY AT SPRUCE MEADOWS (CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA) WINNING THE ROLEX GRAND SLAM OF SHOW JUMPING IN SEPTEMBER 2015. BRASH'S FATHER STAN AND THE HORSE’S OWNERS ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. PHOTO © ERIN GILMORE/NOELLEFLOYD.COM


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Kama Godek and Air Force One at the FEI World Cup Finals in Las Vegas, Nevada.

info@andrewryback.com • www.andrewryback.com • (224) 318-5445


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A Dream Come True By Mackenzie Shuman Many riders each year spend countless hours working on counter leads, halts, rollbacks and many other challenges that may arise in the equitation ring. However, only those willing to take on one of the largest equitation finals walk into the arena for an ASPCA Maclay Regionals class. Janelle Henningsen recently qualified for and competed in the Region 6 class. Henningsen, a 17 year old from Greenwood Village, Colorado, trains out of Wells Bridge Farm with Paul Rohrbach. Taking six lessons a week, Janelle has gotten both herself and her horse, Thunderstruck, in the most competitive shape possible. So after many

Photos © Quintessence Photography.

months of hard preparation, Janelle and 'Thunder' were able to walk into the arena at the Region 6 Regionals for the ASPCA Maclay with confidence. “Once I am on Thunder preparing to walk into that ring I know him and I know we will put together a great course as a team. The second I walk into that ring no one is around me and it is just Thunder and I,” said Janelle, describing the experience of stomping down the impending nerves and going in the arena with all eyes on you. Once the round was finished, Janelle exited the ring with a smile knowing that she'd put forth a jumping round of a lifetime. Next, however, was the flat phase, an intense battle between the


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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: JANELLE AND THUNDERSTRUCK SHOW OFF THEIR SKILLS DURING THE REGION 6 REGIONALS FOR THE ASPCA MACLAY. JANELLE HUGS THUNDER AFTER BEING ANNOUNCED FOR FIRST PLACE DURING REGIONALS. JANELLE AND THUNDER EARLIER THIS SUMMER. JANELLE SHOWS HER HAPPINESS AS SHE PATS THUNDER WHILE WAITING FOR THE VICTORY GALLOP AFTER THE MACLAY CLASS. “THUNDER IS THE HORSE OF A LIFETIME,” JANELLE SAID ABOUT HER HORSE OF TWO YEARS.

top twelve riders called back after the jumping round to show off their talent at keeping their position perfect while tasked with tests such as the counter canter and lengthening of stride. Many of Colorado's top equitation riders and a few out of state riders were in that ring striving for the blue ribbon. Janelle’s hard work at home prevailed. Her dedication to the sport not only got her into the 3’6’’ equitation classes, but also won her first place at the ASPCA Maclay Region 6 Championships. Afterwords, Janelle let me know how it felt to be announced for first place: “Once the second place winner was announced a

whole abundance of emotions hit me. I started crying; I couldn’t believe all my hard work just paid off and my dream had come true. I never in my whole life ever expected that my dream from when I was 12 years old had just become a reality.” Janelle is now on course to go to the National Horse Show in Lexington, Kentucky for the ASPCA Maclay Finals. In addition to her hard work in the saddle, Janelle has been working doubly hard to get to the finals by helping provide some of the funds. Over the summer, she has worked diligently for Total Home Exteriors, a company owned by her boyfriend's family, and earned over three thousand dollars to put toward her trip to Kentucky to compete at the National Horse Show. Janelle's story is an inspiring one, one of a talented rider whose dream of making it to the Maclay finals has finally come true. This goes to show that no matter what your situation, your dreams can still become a reality. Janelle has certainly earned her place amongst the ranks of some of the best equitation riders out there by showing she has the dedication and passion for the sport to overcome any obstacles in order to make it to such a prestigious event.


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Lynnleigh Farm Hunter Show, Sandy, UT. 1, 3 & 5. Championship winner Gabriella Zupancic gives Swagger large praise for his efforts throughout the show. 2. Emily Gordon and longtime equitation mount Avion jump to win the UHJAChild/Adult Medal. 4. Amy Brubaker won the Adult Equitation division on new mount Birmingham. 6. After a successful round in the “Take Your Own Line” equitation class, which includes designing your own course, and also needs to include two tests, Shelby Savage smiles big after completing the course without stirrups. IRENE ELISE POWLICK / @JUMPERTHRUMYLENS.


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HITS Million Dollar Weekend, Saugerties, New York, September 6, 2015. 1. Liubov Kochetova and Urus 2. 2. Winner Beezie Madden and Simon. 3. Daisy Farish and Trivant. 4. Jonathan McCrea and Aristoteles V. 5. Tori Colvin and Echo Von T Spieveld. 6. Cormac Hanley and Twan. 7. Daniel Bluman and Conconcreto Sancha LS. PHOTOS © HEIDI KEENEY.


84 • • THE THE PLAID PLAID HORSE HORSE 84

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email: theplaidhorsemag@gmail.com THE PLAID HORSE: Piper Klemm PhD LLC (Publisher of The Plaid Horse) is not responsible for obtaining permission to use any photographs for either advertising or non-advertising use. All responsibility and liability regarding copyright and any other issue as to right of use shall be the submitters. Be sure you have the right to use the photograph(s) before you submit them for publication. When a photograph is submitted to use for publication, the submission of such photography is a warranty by the submitter to us that the submitter has the legal right to have such photograph and that the submitter will hold Piper Klemm PhD LLC harmless as to all costs incurred by Piper Klemm PhD LLC, including defense costs such as counsel fees, which Piper Klemm PhD LLC incurs as a result of publishing such photographs. Piper Klemm PhD LLC reserves the right to refuse anything which we deem unsuitable for our publication. We assume no liability for errors or omissions of advertisers copy and/or photos. Piper Klemm PhD LLC will not be responsible for any typographical, production, or ad copy errors, including inaccurate information provided by advertisers. Piper Klemm PhD LLC (Publisher of The Plaid Horse) ©2015 Piper Klemm PhD LLC.

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STONEWALL FARM

Congratulates

Congratulations Ava Massaro on the lease of Northwinds Times Square

Congratulations Lauren Barcikoski on her new pony Born This Way

Congratulations Emma Mechlin on the lease of Stonewall Black Pearl

Congratulations Jori Greene on the lease of Happy Days

Emily Elek • 920-889-0028 S T O N E WA LLP O N IE S@YA H O O.C O M • I XO N I A , W I SC O N SIN PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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STONEWALL FARM

Congratulates

Congratualtions Stella Wasserman on the lease of Silly Putty

Congratualtions Emily Okey on her new pony Paddington

Congratualtions Isabel Quiroga on her new pony Celebrity

Congratualtions Sophia Latifi on the lease of Clovermeade Babs Bunny

Always a selection of small, medium, and large greens for sale and lease. S T O N E WA LLP O N IE S@YA H O O.C O M • I XO N I A , W I SC O N SIN PHOTOS © LAURA WASSERMAN.


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STONEWALL FARM

Offers for Sale or Lease

Stonewall Stratus Large Pony

Sir Dragon Small Pony

Mr. Australia Medium Pony

Northwind Just Josh’N Medium Pony

Emily Elek • 920-889-0028 S T O N E WA LLP O N IE S@YA H O O.C O M • I XO N I A , W I SC O N SIN


theplaidhorse.com • October 2015 • 89

STONEWALL FARM

Wishes Best of Luck at Indoors to

Hidden Springs Woodstar & Elizabeth Woods

Stonewall Last Cloud owned by Two Point Equestrian LLC

Hillcrest’s Lorelei & Gabrielle Roderick

No Drama Owned by Peacock Ridge LLC

Always a selection of small, medium, and large ponies for sale and lease. S T O N E WA LLP O N IE S@YA H O O.C O M • I XO N I A , W I SC O N SIN PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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How Fit is Fit Enough? FIT TO RIDE BY KIM HARRIES For this month’s column I polled 20 riders of varying ages and ability levels and asked a few questions about riding fitness: Is the average time spent riding in lessons and hacking on your own enough? Or do you need more? Should riding alone be viewed as the “endall” for equestrians, or, like other athletes, can you

benefit from cross-training? Is riding a stand-alone event? “Heels down. Shoulders back. Shorten your reins.” These words are certainly never heard in any gym or studio but could our shortcomings be fixed out of the saddle? Since the majority of our issues in the saddle are physical, I would tend to answer yes, but I wanted to find out first-hand, from real riders with real problems and I conducted an experiment. Here’s a look at 3 of the riders from my poll. Let’s see if they benefit from some additional work off of their horses.

THE TEST SUBJECTS • Rider A is a 32-year-old mother of 2 who began riding as a child and now works her riding in around raising her family and volunteer work. Rider A says her biggest weakness in riding is her rounded shoulders and keeping her eyes up. I met with her to go over a schedule and we decided to meet 3 days a week for 30 minutes a day to work on developing strength in her back – particularly in her trapezius muscles to help her open up her chest – as well as shoulder stretches to regain mobility that she has lost. • Rider B is 15 years old and has ridden for 3 years with average consistency. She has decided she wants to try and qualify for a few equitation finals next year and knows she lacks the stamina required. Rider B struggles in flat lessons and has to take breaks. I met with her and we put a plan together that would work on her cardiovascular stamina and would include some Yoga classes to keep her body balanced and flexible. Since Rider B has a demanding school schedule and didn’t want her workouts to take any of her lesson time away, I recommended 2 yoga classes for her per week and gave her some “homework” to do on the weekends • Rider C is 50 years old, began riding in her mid 30’s, and rides mostly on weekends because she works full-time. Rider C rides with knots tied in her reins because she’s constantly being reminded to shorten them. Her long reins keep her control level in the saddle average at best and she is disorganized on landing from jumps. Rider C complains of a sore back that she says she has had for years. I arranged to meet with her 3 days a week at the Pilates studio to get her body balanced and to strengthen her core and back muscles without adding any concussion to her already aching joints.

THE RESULTS • Rider A began a strength training program, focusing on bringing her shoulders back, creating flexibility in her shoulders, and keeping her body tall while in the saddle. After 4 weeks of regular workouts, Rider A is able to keep her eyes up and open up her chest while riding. The strength she has found in her postural muscles is allowing her horse to be more balanced on landing from jumps because the roundness in her shoulders is gone. Rider A plans to continue twice a week with the exercises I have given her and also get some hand weights and bands for home. Rider A said, “The hardest thing about it was finding the time, but it’s totally worth it!” • Rider B is already experiencing greater cardiovascular stamina in her lessons after 3 weeks. Because she loves to run, I gave her a running schedule for her weekend mornings before going to the barn and found 2 yoga classes that fit into her schedule during the week. The days she doesn’t go to the barn she does Yoga. Rider B says, “Yoga is a great contrast to my riding. It lets me work on my focus, which helps me with my concentration when I’m riding.” • Rider C met me 3 times a week for private Pilates sessions and also found an hour on her lunch break to walk a couple of times a week. After just 5 weeks Rider C has almost no back pain at all, she is able to keep her reins short and stay in position on her horse because her core strength is supporting her body while riding. Even though Rider C is still only riding on the weekends her lessons are more productive and she has a happier horse. “The pain I have been living with in my back is virtually gone and I’m realizing that my balance is enhanced because of my overall core strength. Everyday activities that were becoming a struggle are easy again.” So I have to say that I’m convinced! I do think that you can get better at any level and at any age by assessing your weaknesses in the saddle and finding ways fix them. Keep up your riding absolutely! Put the time in that you need to bond with your horse and build the trust that it takes to be successful in our sport, but the next time you want to step it up to that next level don’t be afraid to “think outside the arena” and focus on how you can strengthen your half of the partnership. Yours in health, Kim Harries


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BE ONE OF A KIND: ADVICE FROM A PRINCESS

BY KC STEEGE-HUNTER • ILLUSTRATED BY LN LYDON-OLIVEIRA BOOK REVIEW BY JENNIE CARLETON In “Be One of a Kind: Advice From a Princess,” Steege-Hunter offers up a tale for children that conveys a powerful and muchneeded message for kids growing up in this day and age. With lovely illustrations by Lydon-Oliveira, this book is told through the eyes of a weanling named Maria who, bullied by her peers and desperately seeking love and acceptance, finds a mentor in Princess Nikki, the most admired horse in the stable. Under the guidance of Princess Nikki, Maria learns to embrace her individuality and, in doing so, reminds us that we are all special regardless of our differences. This book falls into the 6-12 year old age group,

which makes it quite versatile. It is a book parents can read to, or along with, their child, and older children can read it themselves. It also fills a void by finally providing parents with a children’s book that not only features horses, but also addresses the ever-growing need for teaching future generations the importance of self-confidence and acceptance of others. Every day children are exposed to harmful and unhealthy influences by a society that tells us what we should look like, how much we should weigh, and how we should behave in order to “fit in” and be “liked” or considered “popular.” It’s vital that we attempt to combat these influences as best we can, and sharing books like “Be One of A Kind” with them is an excellent start.

Stella Wasserman and friends at Blenheim Equisports (San Juan Capistrano, California). Left: With her Small Pony Hunter, Blueberry Hill. Right: Champion in the Medium Pony Hunters with Silly Putty, pictured with trainer Archie Cox. PHOTOS © LAURA WASSERMAN.


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Del Mar, California. 1. Mikayla Vosseller and Valentino 33. 2. Waiting for equitation results. 3. Emma White and Corland. 4. Marlaina Kent and Flags. 5. Anna Fogarty and Cartouche. 6 & 9. Isabelle Khoury and Wish Me Luck. 7. Kira Ferguson and Stay Lucky. 8. Victoria Lahaye and Perfect Image. PHOTOS © VANESSA HUGHES/LADYPHOTOGRAPHIC.COM.


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Profile for The Plaid Horse

The Plaid Horse - October 2015 The Indoors Issue  

The Plaid Horse Magazine October 2015 The Indoors Issue theplaidhorse.com

The Plaid Horse - October 2015 The Indoors Issue  

The Plaid Horse Magazine October 2015 The Indoors Issue theplaidhorse.com