__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 1


2 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 3


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 4


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 5


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 6


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 7


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 8


9 • THE PLAID HORSE


10 • THE PLAID HORSE


11 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 12


13 • THE PLAID HORSE


14 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 15


16 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 17

Congratulations to our Sales Graduates Qualified for USEF Pony Finals 2018 PONY MEDAL

MEDIUM PONY HUNTER

Alexandra Miller Kaitlyn Lancelle Bates

Champlain Heart of Gold Dream Come Blue Posh Dressed to the Nines!* Saved by the Bella* Sunrise* The Bees Knees Vermont Ruby Fox* Vermont Golden Graham Mr. Monk All Inclusive Celebrity Silly Putty* Rosewood* Heart to Believe Happy Days Poker Face Modern Love

PONY JUMPER

Miracles Happen* Cartier* SMALL GREEN PONY HUNTER

Dressed N Dapper Loafer’s Lodge Penelope Pineapple MEDIUM GREEN PONY HUNTER

Champlain Heart of Gold That’s Funny LARGE GREEN PONY HUNTER

Spot Lite Stoneledge Bodes Well Vermont Here’s the Gold SMALL PONY HUNTER

Blueberry Hill* Pineapple Jennifer Grey* Sir Dragon* Somermist Bellanova Tarry-A-Bit Sweet William* Pocket Full of Sunshine* Heavens to Betsy* Babybel Loafer’s Lodge Penelope * PREVIOUS PONY FINALS RIBBON WINNER

LARGE PONY HUNTER

Cherrybrook Skye Blue* Dreamsicle* Jessandi Famous Amos* Hidden Springs Woodstar* My Little Black Dress+ Reservations Required* Top That*+ Stonewall Texas+ Stonewall Eleanor*+ Stonewall Top Call+ Until Tomorrow* + BY HILLCREST’S TOP HAT

Stonewall Farm • 920-889-0028 S TO N E WA L L P O N I E S@YA H O O.C O M • I XO N I A , W I S C O N S I N


18 • THE PLAID HORSE

Photo © Shawn McMillen Photography

Copperfield

is the ultimate teacher small pony! This adorable, reliable 12 year old small pony gelding is ready to teach his next young rider how to be a star. “Monkey” is a pony finals veteran who was top 10 overall his green year and was 6th over fences and 6th overall in 2017! No prep, no stop, no spook and always changes leads which makes him the perfect pony to give any kid confidence to go from short stirrup right to the smalls. Available at Pony Finals. Contact Brooke Brown (610)-836-2951 or brownstoneponies@gmail.com.

THE HORSE CARE ISSUE

Publisher

PIPER KLEMM, Ph.D.

P. 22

PUBLISHER’S NOTE Piper Klemm Ph.D.

P. 26

LAKE PLACID BUCKET LIST Vyla Carter

P. 34

TECHNICOLOR TRIBUTE Sissy Wickes

LISA DALY

P. 44

INNOVATION AT SPY COAST Nina Fedrizzi

Web Director & Blog Editor

P. 48

BREECHES & BODY IMAGE Rennie Dyball

P. 52

THE GROOM CRUNCH Dianna Babington

P. 56

ERIN MCGUIRE Grace Salmon

P. 62

OLD SALEM FARM SPRING HIGHLIGHTS Lindsay Brock

P. 68

COVER STORY: ERICA QUINN Sissy Wickes

P. 72

RICHARD SPOONER Sissy Wickes

Editor-in-Chief

SISSY WICKES Art Director

LAUREN MAULDIN Advertising

NANCY HALVEY LIZ DAVOLL MICHELLE DECKER RUMANES MINDY PLESS Digital Director

AVERILL PESSIN Summer Associates

GRACE SALMON ISABELLE FEINSTEIN VYLA CARTER

CONTACT THE PLAID HORSE

WRITE Piper Klemm, Ph.D., 14 Mechanic St, Canton, New York 13617

CALL 541-905-0192 WEB theplaidhorse.com EMAIL piper@theplaidhorse.com FACEBOOK facebook.com/theplaidhorsemag TWITTER @PlaidHorseMag twitter.com/PlaidHorseMag

INSTAGRAM @theplaidhorsemag instagram.com/theplaidhorsemag

PINTEREST pinterest.com/theplaidhorse GOOGLE + The Plaid Horse Mag TUMBLR theplaidhorsemag.tumblr.com SNAPCHAT theplaidhorse ISSUU: issuu.com/theplaidhorsemag

ON THE COVER: ERICA QUINN AND PENELOPE AYERS' LANCASTER IN THE 3'3" PRE-GREEN HUNTERS. PHOTO: A&S PHOTOGRAPHY 2018.


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 19


20 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 21


22 • THE PLAID HORSE

Tuesday’s Failure is Full of Grace (and out of breath).

I meant to train, but forgot about it for a few weeks. Then travel and horse shows, and I showed up on the morning in April 7th with some Under Armour and ready to take on the 28 degree morning. Snow fell, ice covered the road, and we lit onto the trails which contained soupy melted stream and mud sections, as well as a few icy slopes that required focus not to fall. I caffeinated heavily, ran slowly, and to my surprise, finished just fine in 40:41. I bet against my own iron will and pride, and I was wrong. The science experiment data fell against my preconceived notions of what was possible. Racing around for an ever- stimulating spring horse show season, I didn’t

PIPER AND FRIENDS AT THE SAPPHIRE GRAND PRIX OF DEVON, MAY 2018.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: For those of you who track my happenings,

even lace up my sneakers and attempt to run after the 5k. I hadn’t run since that victorious day and, although not

I ran my first 5k in April of this year. This was not some sort of

opposed to it, there simply are not many

goal or practiced achievement. It stemmed from a conversation at

running races in the middle of nowhere

dinner one night in which a friend claimed that anyone could run a

small town America.

5k. Adrenaline rush and push, going as slow as possible, anyone could do it. I simply didn’t believe it. So, I signed up for a 5k in my

All of this leads me to today, a

hometown of Canton, New York in mid-April.

nondescript Tuesday in June. I woke


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 23

up, worked until I couldn’t even, and took a break to go into town to donate blood. I walked home, eating a bag of Cheezits - my treat to myself every time I donate blood - and checked my phone. A friend posted that there is both a one mile run and a 5k starting literally a few hundred feet from my house, starting at 6:30 pm. Well, I can’t pass that up. Right? Well, I did just donate blood and it’s a bad idea. But it’s also getting moving, getting going, right here, and has a $2 entry. I can’t not. I work until 6, get dressed and eat some cashews and wander over. As I hit the top of the hill, I read the course description - it’s flat for people to get their best times - and I see the EMT ambulance. I’m not sure what hits me. I just suddenly think, “I can run the 5k.” That’s not correct, my rational side kicks in. I have no caffeine, no blood, and having one under my belt, I’m not sure pride will carry me very far. I walk over to the sign-up tent - men sign up on the left, women on the right. I wait in line, get to the front, and see two forms. I just put my name on the 5k one. Piper Klemm, age 29. I can do this. Right? I walk across


24 • THE PLAID HORSE

the grass to sit on the side of a hill and wait - maybe

through my front door. This was dumb, I’m a quitter.

catch up on some phone calls and emails.

I peel off toward my house where Adam is waiting for me with dinner. My second 5k attempt was a

I run into my friend and we hold her baby and catch

resounding failure.

up with all forms of life. I look around and I could just go to sleep. For those looking for foreshadowing in

Which leads me to the age old question, is

this story, here it is. I didn’t even particularly feel like

it better to run the mile and be a success or

standing up.

attempt the 5k and be a failure?

I am sitting on the grass chatting with my friend

For the 5k failure, I ran more, pushed harder, and

when the gun goes off. I leap up, say goodbye, and

mentally prepared (at least in the moment) than

make a break towards getting across the starting line

I would have for the 1 mile theoretical success.

with the back of the pack, careful not to be blocking

Although probably not under a doctor’s advisement

anyone who is taking this seriously. I hit some beats

or coach’s plan, last night I became a better runner,

on my iTunes and get rolling.

a better trained athlete, and learned exactly where my limits are (which I clearly hadn’t learned prior). I

I run for a bit and talk myself up that I can do it. I

am better - in this instance - for failing at the higher

round the first bends with the crew. After a bit, I start

goal than I would have been with success in the more

to notice people passing me. Am I going that slowly?

minor goal.

It still feels like I’m running. I desperately skip songs looking for something that will force me to keep up. I

This is all, in part, why you have a coach. But the

start to feel my lungs. I keep running. As we continue

goals, the sit downs and planning sessions with your

in on the race, more people pass me, I’m still running,

coach - that is up to you. For my riding, I am timid

but not successfully, and I notice that the pathway- I

and make all reasonable attempts to bolster my

had no idea where it was going- was headed straight

confidence instead of tearing it down. For my spirit,

to my house.

I crave the next level, to push through, to be better than I am. In that sense, I crave trying until I can’t

As we close in towards my house, my lungs feel

breathe, can’t move, can’t… I crave the hunt to

like they filling; I feel like I’m drowning. I have

failure. Where is the limit? Jump on in and find out.

no blood and I can’t breathe. As this was not a

planned excursion, I have no water or reprieve and

(FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM AT @PIPERKLEMM)

didn't look at the weather and find myself very overclothed. I break to the walk and try to catch my lightheadedness and walk at a pace that will get me

BY TPH PUBLISHER PIPER KLEMM, PHD


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 25


26 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 27


28 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 29


30 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 31

1.

2.

3.

4.

The 153rd Upperville Horse & Colt Show Presented by St. Bride’s Farm. Upperville, VA, June 4-10, 2018. 1. Alison Wichman & Kix. 2. Marilyn Little & Clearwater. 3. Dawn Vileno & Super 10. 4. Jennie Towner & Britta of Berga. PHOTOS @ JULI PHILLIPS, VISPERA PRODUCTIONS


132••THE THEPLAID PLAIDHORSE HORSE

Sapphire Grand Prix of Devon Wins by McLain Ward 1. 1999 - Twist Du Valon, owned by McLain Ward & Harry R. Gill. 2. 2002 - Viktor, owned by McLain Ward & Harry R. Gill. 3. 2004 - Goldika 559, owned by Double H Farm. 4. 2006 Capitano, owned by Sir Ruly Inc. 5. 2007 - Sapphire, owned by McLain Ward & Blue Chip Bloodstock.


theplaidhorse.com theplaidhorse.com••July July2018 2018••332

6. 2009 - Sapphire, owned by McLain Ward & Blue Chip Bloodstock. 7. 2012 - Antares F, owned by Grant Road Partners, LLC. 8. 2013 - Rothchild, owned by Sagamore Farms. 9. 2017 - Rothchild, owned by Sagamore Farms. 10. 2018 - Clinta, owned by Sagamore Farms. PHOTO @ IRENE ELISE POWLICK.


34 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 35

Lindsay Maxwell’s famed hunter, Technicolor, tragically died this spring due to complications from cardiomyopathy. The stunning bay gelding was as kind as he was talented, as beautiful as he was athletic.

~

Technicolor burst on to the national horse show scene at The Devon Horse Show in 2016 when, with Nick Haness aboard, they lit up the board with exceptional over fences scores of 91, 92, and 95. At the most prestigious outdoor show in the United States, a new star had travelled from the west coast to illuminate the hunter ring. For the next few years, Technicolor continued to shine in both the professional divisions and the amateur division with Lindsay in the saddle. In his too short career, Nico, as he was called, was Champion at almost every major event, including the Devon Horse Show, Pennsylvania National Horse Show, and Washington International Horse Show. He was Champion or Reserve Champion in 38 out of his 58 lifetime shows, or two out of three horse shows in which he competed. Anyone who was lucky enough to be touched by this horse, whether watching him compete or riding him, will forever remember his grace, talent, and brilliance.

Godspeed, Nico. .


36 • THE PLAID HORSE

Photos Deb Dawson Photography, Irene Elise Powlick, and The Book LLC.

Lindsay memorializes her feelings about her beloved mount: “I feel truly blessed to have been graced with Technicolor. He not only had the biggest personality of any horse I have met, but also the biggest heart. Nico was a champion to the core, and I am incredibly grateful to have shared in his journey through his incredible show career. Even more than the ribbons, I am forever grateful for the countless wonderful memories and lessons Nico gave me. I cannot help smiling and crying every time I think of his beautiful face. He truly was my horse of a lifetime.”


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 37


38 • THE PLAID HORSE

Miranda Bradley Fine Art Custom pet portraits. Find me on Facebook! plumbrook@hotmail.com


39 • THE PLAID HORSE


40 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 41


42 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 43


44 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 45


46 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 47


48 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 49

Move Our Sport Forward When all is said and done, it’s easy to say you didn’t win a class because you don’t have “the look.” It’s a whole lot harder to learn how to ride well. And isn’t that what we’re all after? JUNIORS OPEN UP... “I definitely feel pressure to maintain a certain size… a certain weight and breech size in order to ‘make up’ for the fact that I do not have long, natural lines.” “I have a bigger chest and bottom, but the rest of my body is thin. I see those assets as a downside because it gives me a disadvantage in the ring... in a show coat, my chest makes me look bigger then I actually am. I’ve gained 5 pounds and it makes me extremely anxious. The fear of gaining weight weighs over me.” “Before puberty, I naturally fit the “thin” look, so I never had body image issues. But ever since I gained some weight (a normal amount for a teenager), there isn’t a day that I ride that I don’t wish I was thinner.”

“I am small and thin. I have been “blessed” with a fast metabolism, which has always made it difficult for me to gain weight. Topics like this have always made me a bit uncomfortable because I feel I have the opposite problem of pretty much everyone else, but I think changes need to be made. Until we can normalize people with normal bodies, we won’t be able to end this issue with horse shows being seen as just a beauty pageant.” “From no one other than myself do I feel pressure to maintain a certain look, size or weight. I struggle with my weight constantly. Body image is the largest challenge that I have to face every second of every day.” “To achieve the equitation look, I have gone to unhealthy extremes that ultimately failed, all in pursuit of a look that does not equate to performance in the saddle. While the non-equestrian world has taken great leaps in the subject of body-confidence and positivity, this has not translated over to the horse world as one might think.”


50 • THE PLAID HORSE


5.

1.

2. 3.

4.

The Devon Horse Show & Country Fair, Devon, PA. May 24th - June 3rd, 2018. 1. Summer Place & Madeline Thatcher. 2. Sandy Ferrell gives Hemingway some love after winning a class in the 3'6" Green Hunters. 3. Dr. Betsee Parker’s Harvard Hall & Scott Stewart. 4. Stella Wasserman & Boss won the Small Junior Hunter 15 & Under Stake to nab the division championship. 5. Britta Stoeckel & William Hill after winning a class in the Amateur Owner Hunters 18-35. PHOTOS @ IRENE ELISE POWLICK

theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 51


52 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 53


54 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 55


56 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 57


58 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 59


60 • THE PLAID HORSE 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Kentucky Spring Classic I, Kentucky Horse Park, Lexington, KY, May 8-13, 2018 1. Diamond D & Charlotte Novy in the Low Jr. Jumpers. 2. Catch Me & Scott Stewart. 3. Amateur Owner Hunters 3'6 at Kentucky Spring I. 4. Alexis Ortiz winning the USHJA Jumping Seat Medal. 5. Anna Robson in the WIHS Jumper Phase. 6. Hannah Hoch & E.V. Commander performing in the WIHS Jumper Phase. PHOTOS @ EMY LUCIBELLO.


61 • THE PLAID HORSE


62 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 63


64 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 65


66 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 67


68 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 69


70 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 71


72 • THE PLAID HORSE


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 73


74 • THE PLAID HORSE you are young, you don’t realize what people are giving you. There were many 5 AM lessons before the show and hours of training. Jamie put her heart and soul into the business and her students. The amount of effort she put into me really surpassed what we were paying for.” Spooner speaks with heartfelt respect for the modern equitation trainer. “These equitation trainers work very long hours and put everything into their students. With Jamie, it was her blood, sweat, and tears, as well as my own.” The partnership forged of commitment and hard work reaped tremendous rewards as Spooner ascended the ranks of the equitation division. In 1988, he won the USET Finals, and was second in both the AHSA Medal Finals and the ASPCA Maclay Finals- all on the same horse named Reserve Bid. The young rider aged out of the junior ranks and, at the age of nineteen, rode his first jumper.

EDUCATION ABROAD AND THE WARMBLOOD Spooner turned professional and spent a few months riding for George Morris until he was hired by Captain Canada, Ian Millar. The path of his professional career veered away from the east coast of North America to mainland Germany. From the age of nineteen to his late 30’s, he spent as much time as possible learning from German rider, Hugo Simon. Spooner explains his desire to learn another system of training. “People want affirmation rather than education. I have always wanted to educate myself by understanding my ignorance.” Spooner committed to learning Simon’s European system, dressage based, and unlike anything that he had seen in the U.S. at that time. It was prescient that Spooner predicted the onset of the European Warmblood to the American equestrian scene. He saw that the future of the sport was not the traditional American Thoroughbred, but the Warmblood that now dominates both the hunter and jumper divisions. “I saw what was coming and knew that we needed to have interpreters for these horses because they were so different from the Thoroughbreds,” he explains. Seeing the wave of the future, he indoctrinated himself into the European system and brought it to the U.S. Anticipating the need for these skills, the young rider poised himself to fill a new gap in the U.S. equestrian scene. Asked how that strategy had worked for him, Spooner smiles, “So far, so good.”


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 75

SYNDICATES AND SPONSORSHIPS In May, 1996, Richard Spooner won his first Grand Prix at The Oaks in California. Soon after, on one of his frequent trips to Germany, he was looking at horses with Marcus and Meredith Michaels- Beerbaum and saw a beautiful gray standing in a stall. “I went into the stall to pet him, and asked if I could try him. They said he wasn’t for sale and wasn’t a good horse for North America anyway. But, somehow, I knew I had to have him.” Resolute in his pursuit of this horse, Spooner finally got to ride him and convinced the owners to sell. That horse was his first famous mount, Robinson. Spooner found the horse he wanted, convinced the owners to sell, but now what? He had to find sponsors to buy and support two horses: Robinson and Cosino. He began a process that has funded his career: putting together syndicates. “When I worked for Ian (Millar), I saw him do this, so I understood the idea. But, I was clueless about accountants and attorneys and LLC’s.” Clients and sponsors soon stepped up to support Spooner’s endeavors. As intrepid as riders are, most are awkward and reluctant to ask for sponsorship. “It is really hard,” Spooner admits. “It is hard to put yourself out there and ask peoplesome of whom you don’t know well - for money. Especially when we know that ‘equine investment’ is an oxymoron.” He approaches his sponsors with an opportunity to invest in the love of the sport and is quick to point out the inherent risks. Perhaps it is this attitude or his success in buying horses, but Spooner has had a loyal core group of sponsors for which he is extremely appreciative.

WORLD CUP FINALS  AGAIN Spooner carries the nickname, “Master of Faster,” a nod to his acumen at riding fast jump off rounds. His success on the international stage is noteworthy with an astounding record of 14 consecutive FEI World Cup Showjumping Finals. This prestigious competition is very difficult to qualify for and more difficult to compete in. Held all over the world from Geneva to Helsinki to Kuala Lumpur to Las Vegas, the event features the world’s best horse and rider combinations competing in a three day, multi- round format. Spooner’s repeated presence in the Finals event is testimony to his long career at the top of the sport.


76 • THE PLAID HORSE

CRISTALLO The now 20 year old gelding Cristallo (Caretino x Cicero) has been with Spooner since his five year old year. He was retired in early 2018 while described by Spooner as “still the wildest horse in my barn.” Under Spooner, Cristallo competed in six FEI World Cup Finals, won five star Grand Prix’s all over the world, and was a frequent Nations Cup competitor. At one point, he was ranked as the best horse in the world. Cristallo’s temperament matches his talent: boundless. He was so difficult as a younger horse that Spooner contemplated selling him. Instead, the horse became the project of his wife Kaylen, an amateur rider who managed to get the horse on track for a long, impressive career. Lunging, cross country rides, flat work, and barrel racing (yes, barrel racing) to improve his turning ability were all part of Cristallo’s program. The talented bay defined unconventional and demanded that his trainers design creative, outside-of-the-box training methods for him. Cristallo’s success is a tribute to their efforts.

THE FUTURE Spooner is an avid teacher and clinician, most recently lending his time to the USHJA Emerging Jumper Rider Gold Star clinics held in Wellington, FL and Thermal, CA. Contrary to many professionals in the business, Spooner is very optimistic about the next generation of riders. “Our youth has a tremendous opportunity to show in top competitions and learn from older, more experienced riders. In North America, they can watch and access the European riders. They are gaining a different type of knowledge and a different skill set.” Spooner is extremely complimentary of the American system of riding and training. “The American system is clearly the best because it is set up as a training system. The vast majority of the North American Grand Prix riders are also trainers. Our young riders have opportunities that other people don’t and they have an association that is trying to educate riders from the grass roots levels up. It is so refreshing to see the support from the USHJA and USEF in funding educational programs.” Spooner is optimistic about the future of American showjumping. The prize money now available to Grand Prix riders throughout the U.S. has greatly impacted the level of riding in his opinion. “When I started, there was no opportunity to be a professional rider and actually make a living off of your prize money. That has changed with the


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 77 extraordinary money now offered. If you are lucky and have the right horse, you can make a living off of prize money. When the sport gets to that level, the riding ability at the shows improves exponentially because people can exclusively be professional riders.” The international complexion of the U.S. showjumping scene contributes to the quality of the American experience in exposing our community to the methods of Europeans. As a result, showjumping becomes more homogenous and less defined as European vs. North American. Richard Spooner retired two superstar Grand Prix jumpers, Robinson and Cristallo, as they approached their twentieth birthdays. With a nod to these exceptional partnerships, he looks forward toward his future and the young horses in his barn that may become his next famed mounts. He has two exciting Grand Prix horses in Quirado RC and Chatinus. Quirado RC, a very promising nine year old, was recently fourth in a World Cup qualifier and is owned by the McElvain’s Rancho Corazon. Chatinus, owned by himself and longtime sponsor Tracy Katayama Esse, is a bright light in the Spooner stable. Thoughtful, experienced, and generous, Richard Spooner is one to root for.

BY TPH EDITOR SISSY WICKES, PHOTOS SKYLER ALLEN, SOFIA BAIKER,

SIERRA JANSEN, LAUREN MAULDIN, AND V. HUGHES

RICHARD SPOONER:

How to be a successful Grand Prix Rider in 2018 1. Follow your own path Everyone is different. Be creative; be willing to take risk. Stretch your comfort zone to try new things and new ideas. 2. If you can’t invest in yourself, who can you invest in? Young, up and coming riders need to keep their eye on the ball. Focus on yourself and your education as a horseman and a rider. 3. Education is essential Everything you have done can be undone; everything you have can be unhad. Horses get old or sold or hurt, your bank account will get small, but education and experience last forever. 4. Choose learning over winning Don’t put results ahead of learning. Understand the process and the basics. You will fall back on them when things aren’t going well.


78 • THE PLAID HORSE

RAMM ARENAS POSSIBLE 2 PG SPREAD


theplaidhorse.com • July 2018 • 79


80 • THE PLAID HORSE

Profile for The Plaid Horse

The Plaid Horse July 2018 - The Horse Care Issue  

The Plaid Horse - America's Premier Horse Show Magazine July 2018 The Horse Care Issue Erica Quinn & Penny Ayer's Lancaster

The Plaid Horse July 2018 - The Horse Care Issue  

The Plaid Horse - America's Premier Horse Show Magazine July 2018 The Horse Care Issue Erica Quinn & Penny Ayer's Lancaster