Shopping Guide News of Fulton County - September 21, 2022

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SUPPORT LOCAL YOUTH Pumpkins

TAX SERVICE

Mums

Fall Decor

Local Honey

Individual | Business | Farm

Rochester Optimist Club Pumpkin Stand

574-505-0813

803 E. 9th St. Fall Decoration Packages Available Call Becky Mahoney 574-529-3266

By Appointment Only 9581 E. 100 N., Akron, IN 46910 E-mail: tom@tombauterscpa.com

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Wednesday, September 21, 2022

Vol. 65, Issue No. 38

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www.shoppingguidenews.com We Are Friendly Days, Nights & Weekends

Bob’s Plumbing, Electric & Drain Cleaning Bob & Candy Licensed Female Electrician

Call Me! I Answer All Calls!

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOR Local graphic artist loves promoting the work of creative people %\ /$85,( /(&+/,71(5 6WDII :ULWHU “I love promoting the work of inspired, creative people,” stated Jessica Shafer, Rochester. “Whether I’m featuring the works of talented artists in an art show at my gallery, or working to help businesses with their graphics, website, marketing or social media as a branding consultant, I’m meeting people who have learned to think outside of the box.” Shafer earned a degree in studio art with a concentration on graphic design at Indiana University, Bloomington. So, she’s an artist herself.

“I started serving artists with the publication of ‘Digital Wolf Magazine’ in 2018,” Shafer explained. “In the publication we feature ‘creative natives,’ area artists who have something to share with our readers.” On May 1, 2021, Shafer opened The Native Nook. “Our building is beside The Times Theater. It’s a membership-based gallery where artists can showcase and sell their work. In the gallery, we work with local and nationwide artists, such as those from Tennessee, Michigan, Maryland and Oregon. Each month we feature a different artist in an art show. We’ve also had live music and poetry reading at our facility.”

October 1, 2022 Saturday 4-7 PM 703 Main Street Rochester, IN 46975 (Arlington Pub House) For Questions: Lindsay Barts 574-514-1016

She encourages creativity. “I work behind the scenes to promote the different activities we have at The Native Nook. I make posters, post information on our website and advertise the events.” Shafer loves talking about the latest projects the artists are working on. “I call it talking shop. I enjoy inspiring our artists. I’m interested in what they are working on next.” With a smile, Shafer continued, “Artistic people live in a world of their own. They see things in a different and creative way. They are also able to come up with new ways to do things, seeing the detail in the world. Since many of them work at home on their creations, our place is a destination where they can come and meet with likeminded individuals and brainstorm. Artists rarely engage in small talk. They’re busy discussing thoughts, dreams and ideas.” As a branding consultant, Shafer works with businesses who want to expand their outreach. “For example, I am working with Jarrety’s Place in Rochester. With my graphic arts ability I created their restaurant menus. I also helped the new owners with their marketing designs, web outreach and social media.” Shafer’s mission statement is: “Art, Communication, Collaboration.” “Touching base with unique individuals and businesses, help-

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October 11 • 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Owl’s Nest, North Webster

10 Games - 10 Guns • A 50/50 cash drawing will be held, door prizes, cash bar and food will be available as well. • Tickets are $100 a piece. A limited number of tickets will be sold and tickets will go fast. Must be 21 to play. • For additional information or to purchase tickets call Steve Foster at 574-527-5782. (IGC#015510)

10 GUN DRAWING EVENT - Firearms provided by Two Bear Arms Glock 43X Pistol Benilli Nova Wetlands 12 Gauge Shotgun Glock 19 “Don’t Tread On Me” Edition 9mm Pistol Ruger LCR 357 Mag. Revolver Henry Golden Boy .22 Rifle

Ruger 450 Bushmaster American Camo Rifle Glock 19 “We The People” Edition 9mm Pistol Smith & Wesson SD9 9mm Pistol Ruger American .243 Cal. Rifle Springfield Saint AR-15 Rifle

All firearms will be available for paperwork to be completed at Two Bear Arms Gun Shop. Please check TBAgunshop.com for hours and location.

$57,67 :,7+ $ 0,66,21 ³ 5RFKHVWHU JUDSKLF DUWLVW -HVVLFD 6KD IHU·V PLVVLRQ VWDWHPHQW LV ´$UW &RPPXQLFDWLRQ &ROODERUDWLRQ µ 3KRWR SURYLGHG E\ /HDK 0HUUL[ ing them reach their full potential by revamping their business graphic designs, allows me to be a resource person to the entire community.” Spending most of her life in Rochester, Shafer feels a special connection to the community. “I have a family history in the area. I’ve known people in Fulton County for many years.” One of the things Shafer loves to do is travel to various art galleries in different states. “I traveled to Clarksville, Tenn. to meet one of

The Native Nook’s featured artists at Art Link. I’m planning a trip to Seattle in the future to meet up with another artist.” Shafer lives with her two cats and a dog. “I go paddle boarding with my Labrador, Bay. I also enjoy camping and traveling. For fun I play the harmonica and ukulele.” Those interested in connecting with Shafer can visit her website: www.digitalwolfnetwork.com. She can also be contacted through email at digitalwolfnetwork@ gmail.com.

Showley seeking re-election for county council District 4 seat Jim Showley, county councilman District 4, is seeking re-election in the November election. He was born and raised on a family farm in the southwestern corner of Rochester Township and graduated from Rochester High School in 1967. He attended Indiana State University and served in the U.S. Army 44th Engineer Battalion in South Korea. He and wife Judy have two children: Ryan, wife Hope, of Rochester; and Kara of Brownsburg. They also have three granddaughters, Taylor, Lauren and Chayse. Showley is retired from the Rochester Sale Barn, which he owned for 23 years. Previous to that he worked for 15 years in the farm credit field, finishing as president of Peru Production Credit. Showley was appointed to the Fulton County Council in 2016 and is currently seeking his third term. As a councilman he served on the community corrections board, local emergency planning committee and emergency management agency. Additionally, he currently serves on the board of directors for FEDCO, serving as the county council’s appointee. He is part of the initiative to bring broadband to every home in Fulton County and is on the county council ARPA committee, which disburses funds for com-

-,0 6+2:/(< munity improvements. Showley enjoys serving on the county council in the hopes of making Fulton County a better place to work and live.

Weight loss support group meets Tuesdays Take Off Pounds Sensibly, T.O.P.S., a nonprofit weight loss support group, meets at 3:30 p.m. each Tuesday at the Fulton County Public Library. Each meeting begins with a weigh-in at 3:30 p.m. followed by a meeting/program. The first meeting is free. More information is available at tops.org.


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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Department of Education announces 2023 Teacher of the Year finalists

Good Neighbors Good Neighbors is a column in which readers share friendly advice. To ask or answer questions, write the Shopping Guide News, Good Neighbors, P.O. Box 188, Milford, IN 46542; fax 800-886-3796; or e-mail abias@the-papers.com. Please no phone calls.

Editor’s Note: The Good Neighbors column is for people looking for hard-to-find or old items or for people seeking advice, not for items you can find in a local store or sell through the help of a classified ad. The Elkhart County Humane Society suggests those “Good Neighbors” asking for good homes for free pets take some time interviewing those who show interest. The humane society recommends those attempting to re-home a pet have a conversation with any perspective new owner about the responsibilities of having a pet and ask about who lives in the home, what the pet’s daily routine will be and if the perspective new owner has veterinary care lined up for their new family member. —o—

Free kittens

Good neighbors: Free kittens to good home, two white blue-eyed females and one black and white male. Call (574) 491-4609 and leave a message.

Walnut boards

Good neighbors: I have 20+ 3- to 5-inch-wide solid walnut boards, varying lengths, most 3-plus feet. I hate to burn them or throw them away. Lots of other scrap wood also, as well as several elm trunk pieces, approximately 2 feet long. Call (817) 688-2986 and leave message.

New questions Foggy glassware — Was wondering if any good neighbor knows how to get the foggy water stain off glassware? Reply through this column. — A reader Organ — Does anyone have an organ they no longer want? Call (574) 354-9413. Aqua-Scooter repair — Looking for technical assistance on Arkos orange Aqua-Scooters with snorkel. Units do not run: Model AS-500. Located in Syracuse. Call (765) 479-2379. Baby bed mattress — I’m looking for a clean, gently used mattress for an older style baby bed, 19 inches by 3 feet. If you have one you’re ready to pass on, I’d be happy to hear from you at (574) 223-2470. Also, I have a WeeRide bike seat for baby that needs a new home. Seeking vehicle — I am looking for a vehicle that someone may be able to donate. I am willing to trade my breeding pair of Siamese cats. One is a ragdoll and they are both purebred. Call (574) 847-9040.

5RFKHVWHU 2SWLPLVW &OXE 3XPSNLQ 6WDQG NHHSV JURZLQJ 7H[W DQG 3KRWRV %\ '$9,' +$=/(',1( 6WDII :ULWHU Thursday, Sept. 22, marks the first day of fall, and if there is one event that embodies the spirit of the season, it is the Rochester Optimist Club’s Pumpkin Stand, which is currently up and running at 803 E. Ninth St. in Rochester. Longtime Optimist Jack Townsend has played an integral role in the Pumpkin Stand since its inception, which he reckoned was around 25 years ago, when a wagon of pumpkins was wheeled into the Walgreen’s parking lot. The event was held in different locations until the Fulton County Community Foundation provided a permanent home, complete with a pavilion and plenty of display space. Another welcome improvement came in the form of a sidewalk, donated by Todd Brooks. However, Townsend’s own history with pumpkins and gourds goes back further. “I’ve been growing pumpkins since I was 7 years old.” The pumpkin stand has grown in every way since those humble beginnings, in its own way mirroring the paradoxical nature of fall, represented by both the overflowing cornucopia of harvest and the brown, withered shocks of Indian corn. According to Optimist Club President Greg Mellinger, last year’s pumpkin stand raised around $60,000, all of which is pumped back into the community, going toward numerous youth organizations such as the Boy

Scouts, Girl Scouts, scholarships for high school students, Blacketor Sports Complex, The Times Theater and much more. In keeping with this spirit of reciprocation, each day sees a different group of volunteers showing up to lend a hand, reminding one of the busy bees Mellinger and fellow Optimist Jim Straetor brought to the pumpkin patch to help fertilize the pumpkin blossom, in the process producing a custom brand of honey you can also purchase at the stand. “It’s a win-win,” affirmed Teresa Houser, who oversees the stand with Vicki Onstott. Recent volunteers included folks from Habitat for Humanity, Matthew’s Market and Fulton County Animal Shelter. And those volunteers have been showing up since the week after Memorial Day, when 10 acres of pumpkins and gourds were planted, then cultivated, then harvested. “It takes a lot of labor,” added Mellinger, who reeled off several other volunteer groups: National Honor Society, high school sports teams and the Junior Optimist Clubs.

But pumpkins and gourds are just the beginning. Houser pointed out the stand is already on pace to match last year’s number of 1,600 mums sold. Other items include corn shocks, straw bales, purple asters and the fall decor inventions of Robin Burkett and Pat Goode. “Nobody has variety like we have, and people come from far and wide,” said Houser, noting visitors from Michigan, Ohio and Chicago. “Facebook make a huge difference to us,” she added. Another draw is the prices. “Most things are less than $10. We want everybody to be able to afford something.” Another newer offering is a fall display package. Optimist volunteers will deliver and set up fall displays for businesses or individuals. Last year they sold 120. “Every year gets bigger and better,” Houser marveled. The Rochester Optimist Club Pumpkin Stand is open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, visit facebook.com/ optimistclubrochesterin.

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Deer Processing & Taxidermy Over 30 Years’ Experience Kewanna, IN 46939

Several Flavors In Sliced Jerky & Pan Sausage

574-205-0093

3

Please Call Or Text Ahead - Limited Space

The Indiana Department of Education announced the top 10 finalists for the 2023 Indiana Teacher of the Year. “Nearly everyone can remember their favorite teacher, the person who taught them, encouraged them and inspired them to achieve their dreams,” said Dr. Katie Jenner, Indiana secretary of education. “Indiana is home to exceptional teachers across the state, and this year’s top 10 Teacher of the Year finalists are especially impressive. Our teachers’ work matters today and will continue to impact students throughout their entire lives.” The 2023 Indiana Teacher of the Year finalists are: •Kathleen Avery, South Bend Community School Corporation •Amanda Beck, Tippecanoe School Corporation •Jason Beer, Southwest Allen County Schools •Tara Cocanower, Bluffton-Harrison Metropolitan School District •Joshua DeBard, Lebanon Community School Corporation •Amanda Fox, Penn-Harris-Madison School Corporation •Helen Hearon, Mill Creek Community Schools •Kelly Hine, Zionsville Community Schools •Courtney Ramos, MSD of

Wayne Township •Karisa Schwanekamp, Plainfield Community School Corporation For over 60 years, the Indiana Teacher of the Year program has recognized outstanding teachers across the state who are making a difference for Hoosier students. With the mission of inspiring, rejuvenating, and celebrating the teaching profession, the program encourages schools to nominate their local Teachers of the Year for this statewide honor. Finalists are selected from these applicants by a committee made up of former Teachers of the Year, IDOE staff, educational organization leaders, business and community leaders and representatives from higher education. The Indiana Teacher of the Year, who will be announced later this fall, will work to help elevate the teaching profession in Indiana, as well as represent Hoosier teachers at the national level.

Feldman named to president’s list Jorie Feldman, Rochester, was recently named to the president’s list at Southern New Hampshire University.

Eagles #852

1081 East 4th Street • Rochester, IN • 574-223-4655

Serving Fulton County, Indiana The Largest Circulation Publication In Fulton County

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Out-Of-County: Phone 1-800-733-4111 OFFICE HOURS: 8:00-5:00 Monday 8:00 - 4:00 Tuesday Thru Friday Closed For Lunch Daily From Noon to 1 P.M.

www.shoppingguidenews.com Shopping Guide News Of Fulton County reserves the right to refuse for publication any advertising that is considered offensive, misleading or detrimental to the public, the newspaper or another advertiser and to edit advertising at its discretion.

Publisher, Ron Baumgartner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rbaumgartner@the-papers.com Business Manager, Annette Weaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . aweaver@the-papers.com Editor-In-Chief, Deb Patterson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dpatterson@the-papers.com Editor, David Hazledine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dhazledine@the-papers.com Director Of Marketing, Steve Meadows . . . . . . . . . . . . .smeadows@the-papers.com Advertising Manager, Bill Hays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . bhays@the-papers.com Advertising Representative, Cris Aldridge . . . . . . . . . . . . caldridge@the-papers.com Office Manager, Alison Handy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .rochester@the-papers.com Circulation, Elaine Pearson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .epearson@the-papers.com Commercial Printing Sales Representative Rodger Salinas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rsalinas@the-papers.com Commercial Printing Customer Service Tina Carson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .tcarson@the-papers.com Rich Krygowski. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rkrygowski@the-papers.com DEADLINES Editorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday 2:00 Display Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday 2:00 Classified Line Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monday 2:00 PRODUCTION Shopping Guide News of Fulton County is digitally composed on Macintosh Computers using Digital Technology’s Newspaper Publishing Suite Software and Photoshop software. Ads and ASCII (generic) text may be submitted on Jaz, Zip or floppy disks or can be PDF’d and e-mailed to adcomp@the-papers.com. If you have any questions give us a call and we’ll walk you through it.

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8,500


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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OBITUARIES Jackie S. Widman

Janet Marlene White

Family Focus Employee

Women Of The Moose Charter Member

Jackie S. Widman, 46, Rochester, passed away at 7:55 a.m. Monday, Sept. 12, 2022, at the Pulaski Memorial Hospital, Winamac. She was a breast cancer survivor since 2016. On Dec. 17, 1975, Jacqueline Sue Widman was born in Winamac. She was a treasured daughter of Paul and Betty Davis Widman. Growing up she -$&.,( 6 shared her childhood with two sisters, Tracy and :,'0$1 Christy. With great Cavalier pride, Jackie graduated from Culver Community High School in 1994. During her high school years, she was a member of the Business Club. With a desire to help others and continue her formal education, Jackie went to Indiana State University to study social work. She earned her bachelor’s degree in 1998. Persevering to continue on, she graduated in 1999 from IUPUI in Indianapolis with a master’s in social work. She was currently employed with Family Focus in Valparaiso. To relax, Jackie enjoyed crafting; her specialty was creating tumblers or using her Cricut machine to make custom gifts for her family and special friends. She found great joy in baking cakes and decorating to suit the special occasion or theme. Painting on canvas with acrylics or watercolor was a way to express her thoughts and feelings. A huge Cubs fan, Jackie also enjoyed relaxing by watching a movie or listening to music. Paramount in Jackie’s life was her family. She enjoyed getting together for spirited game nights, celebrating special occasions and spending time at the holidays making memories. Left to cherish Jackie’s memory are her daughter, Grace A. Stevens, Rochester; parents, Paul and Betty Widman, Rochester; two sisters, Tracy Widman and her husband Greg Bayer of Atlanta, Ga., and Christy Havron and husband Jeff of Rochester. She was an aunt to Brandon Havron, Joshua Havron, Zoe’ Bayer and husband Windsor Jones and A.K. Bayer. A celebration of the life of Jackie Sue Widman was held at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16, at Good Family Funeral home, 1200 W. 18th St., Rochester. Pastor Bruce Russell officiated. Her family received friends from 4-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, at the funeral home and an hour prior to services on Friday. Burial followed at Leiters Ford Cemetery. Memorials in lieu of flowers may be made to the Fulton County Animal Education and Adoption Center, 1540 Wentzel St., Rochester, IN 46975 or The Fulton County Cancer Fund, through the Northern Indiana Community Foundation, 227 E. 9th St., Rochester, IN 46975. Online expressions of sympathy may be made to Jackie’s family at goodfamilyfh.com.

Anna S. Winnie Lab Technician

Anna S. Winnie, 56, Logansport, formerly of Rochester, passed away at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022, at her residence with her family by her side. She was born June 29, 1966, in Dayton, Ohio, the daughter of Paul Harper and Zella Carolyn (Harry) Harper Graham. On Sept. 23, 2006, in $11$ 6 :,11,( Rochester, she married Robert Neil Winnie and he survives. Anna had worked as a lab technician for Rochester Metal Products for many years. She had attended The Cross Church and had a passion for collecting butterflies, cows, working in the garden and going to yard sales. Survivors include her husband, Robert N. Winnie, Logansport; daughters, Sarah Miles, New Carlisle, Heather Weyant, Rochester, and Stacey Weyant, Rochester; son, Joshua (Amanda) Weyant, Rochester; stepdaughter, Amber Schleppenbach, Logansport; stepson, Zach Winnie, Logansport; 12 grandchildren; father, Paul Harper, Pittsburgh, Ohio; mother, Zella Carolyn Graham, Greenville, Ohio; brothers, Scott (Twila) Harper, Kimmell, and Chris (Jodi) Harper, Decatur; and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her stepfather, Charlie “The Tuna” Ward; and stepmother, Judith Nill Harper. No services are scheduled at this time. Memorial contributions may be made to the Fulton County Parks and Recreation Association or any wildlife and nature preservation organization. Arrangements by Zimmerman Bros. Funeral Home, Rochester. Online condolences may be expressed at zimmermanbrosfh.com.

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Janet Marlene White, 87, Rochester, bid us a fond farewell on the early evening of Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2022. On Oct. 27, 1934, Janet Marlene Keesey was born in Akron. She was a treasured daughter of Odie Merle and Nona Van Lue Keesey. Janet came into the world destined to be a charmer as the namesake of -$1(7 two screen star beauties, Janet Gaynor and Marlene 0$5/(1( :+,7( Dietrich, two of her father’s favorite actresses. She was classy, sassy and lived up to the name with a likable personality and glamor girl, looks that eventually caught the eye of her first husband, William A. Anderson. From their union came four wonderful children, Debbie, Karen, Tracy and Doug. The family tree continued to grow with the blessings of two more generations. Growing up in a large and loving family, Janet was the youngest of 12 siblings. She attended the Akron Schools then graduated with the Akron High School Flyers Class of 1953. Later that year on Dec. 5, 1953, she married William Anderson. Sadly, he preceded her in death on April 28, 1984. On Feb. 17, 1989, Janet married Tom White in Rochester. They shared 22 years of life’s adventures. Sadly, he preceded her in death on Oct. 20, 2011. As a homemaker, Janet enjoyed life living on Lake Manitou while being involved with her many interests and activities. She was a good cook, had an eye for antiques and was a charter member of the Women of the Moose since 1973. She was a member of the Eagles Ladies Auxiliary since 2012. A lady of diverse interests, Janet was Julia Child, Martha Stewart, American Pickers and the Antique Road Show all rolled into one. She had a knack for knowing value, she had a flare for decorating and she made a profound art of making a house a home. Janet could laugh at herself yet she possessed the skills of strength when life treated her roughly. Janet took everything in stride, all the way to her exit. Her greatest attribute was her ability to love with her whole heart and in return, she was loved fiercely. Left to cherish Janet’s memory are her children, Debbie (Mark) Tyler and Karen Anderson, both of Rochester, Tracy Anderson and wife Yolanda Sandoval of Seattle, Wash., and Doug (Angie) Anderson of Rochester; five grandchildren, Corey (Jenny) Tyler, Craig (Jenna) Tyler, Courtney Tyler, Mindy Schwarte and companion Pandgey Parry and Angie (Ryan) Rich; 11 great-grandchildren, Shaela, Shelby, Shandy, McKinzie, Kennedy, Landon, Luke, Tyler, Riley, Hannah and Emerson; a sister, Pat Stansbury of Rochester; and special lifelong friend since first grade, Nellene Rentschler. Preceding Janet in death are her husbands, William A. Anderson and Tom White; seven sisters, Doris Ellis, Mable Florence Baber, Helen Putterbaugh, Evelyn Miller, Ruby Cumberland, Katheryn Hatch and Sue Smith; and three brothers, Robert Dean Keesey, Raymond Keesey, and Fred Keesey. A celebration of the life of Janet Marlene White was held at noon Saturday, Sept. 17, at Good Family Funeral Home, 1200 W. 18th St., Rochester. Her family received friends from 10 a.m. till the hour of the service. Chaplain Tim See officiated. Burial followed in the Rochester IOOF Cemetery. Memorials in lieu of flowers may be made to the Fulton County Cancer Fund through the Northern Indiana Community, 227 E. 9th St., Rochester, IN 46975; The Lake Manitou Association, P.O. Box 376, Rochester, IN 46975; or the Alzheimer’s Association, 322 Eighth Ave., 7th Floor, New York, NY 10001. Online expressions of sympathy may be made to her family at goodfamilyfh.com.

Christopher T. Strayer Corrections Officer

Christopher T. Strayer, 55, Akron, passed away at 2:42 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022, at St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis. He was born March 1, 1967, in Kokomo, the son of Vernon Thomas Strayer and Wanda Jane (Wilson) Strayer Anderson. On Feb. 2, 2006, in Logansport, he married Teresa Pastucha and she sur- &+5,6723+(5 vives. 7 675$<(5 Christopher had worked as a corrections officer at the Miami Correctional Facility, Bunker Hill, and had also worked for Zimmer in Warsaw, and Wilson Foods and Transco, both of Logansport. He enjoyed muscle cars and spending time with his grandchildren. Survivors include his wife, Teresa Strayer, Akron; children, Dustin Strayer, Jeremy Strayer and Jacob Strayer, all of Logansport, Shaela Strayer, Peru, and Jordan Strayer, Akron; 15 grandchildren; sister, Cindy Strayer, Logansport; brother, Joshua Anderson, Logansport; stepmother, Donna Strayer, Lynchburg, Va.; stepsister, Beth Rudd, Lynchburg, Va.; stepbrother, Chuck Butcher, Hurt, Va.; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded by his parents; sister, Tammy Reed; brother, Jerry Strayer; and three grandchildren. Funeral services were conducted at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21, at Zimmerman Bros. Funeral Home, Rochester. Friends visited from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home. Burial was in the Odd Fellows Cemetery, Rochester. Memorial contributions may be made to the Christopher Strayer Memorial Fund. Online condolences may be expressed at zimmermanbrosfh.com.

Rex J. Drudge Rex J. Drudge, 89, rural Mentone, died at 10:55 a.m. Sept. 12, 2022. He was born Jan. 15, 1933. On June 30, 1956, he married Alma G. Setser. She 5(; - '58'*( preceded him in death June 29, 2016. He is survived by his children, Eddie (Rebecca) Drudge, Claypool, John (Karla) Drudge, Warsaw, and Rose Zartman, Leesburg; daughter-in-law, Christina Books Drudge, Jacksonville, Fla.; 10 grandchildren; several great-grandchildren; and sister, Martha Klinger, Atwood. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife, Alma Drudge; son, Rodger Dean Drudge (July 2022); sister, Marie Applegate; and a brother, Norman E. Drudge. A memorial service was held Sept. 16 at Cook’s Chapel Church, Warsaw, with military honors. Interment was in Harrison Center Cemetery, Etna Green. King Memorial Home, Mentone, was in charge of arrangements.

Peggy Lou Eaton Peggy Lou Eaton, 83, rural Mentone, died at 6:45 a.m. Sept. 14, 2022. She was born Nov. 4, 1938. On Nov. 22, 1956, she married M. Garwin Eaton. 3(**< /28 He preceded ($721 her in death May 9, 2021. Surviving are her children, Kevin (Terri) Eaton, Claypool, Greg (Flo) Eaton, Morrisville, N.C., Kelly (Jeff) Howard, Rochester, and Stacy (Kenny) Johnson, Claypool; 10 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; sister, Shirley (Larry) Polk, Leesburg; and a brother, Merl (Linda) Tinkey, Akron. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Garwin; a greatgrandson; and brothers, Richard John “Dickie” Tinkey and Norman L. Tinkey. Services were held Sept. 19 at King Memorial Home, 101 N. Tucker St., Mentone. Interment took place in Palestine Cemetery.

Cecil Andrew Guess Cecil Andrew Guess, 80, Argos, died at 5:10 p.m. Sept. 10, 2022. He was born Nov. 10, 1941. On Aug. 26, 2000, he married Sharon L. Edwards; she survives. Also surviv- &(&,/ $ *8(66 ing are sons, Johnny (Cheyenne) Guess, Argos, and Jeremy (Monica) Smith, Greenwood; daughters, Cindy (Joe) Conley, Rochester, Sandy (Dennis) Monnier, Rochester, and Karen Guess, Tippecanoe; 14 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; and sisters, Helen (Rich) Gay, Manteno, Ill., and Betty Sandling, Lowell. He was preceded in death by his parents; a granddaughter; brothers, Johnny Guess, Raymond Guess, Jack Guess Jr. and James Guess; and sisters, Nancy Hutchcock, Grace Culver, Ruby Heatherly, Bobbie Tucker and Sue Barnett. Services were held Sept. 16 at Earl-Grossman Funeral Home, Argos. Burial was in New Oakhill Cemetery, Plymouth.

Continued on page 5


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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

5

OBITUARIES Continued from page 4

Steve Overmyer

Steve Overmyer, 80, South Bend, a native of Rochester, died Sept. 8, 2022. He was born Jan. 9, 1942. In 1964, he married Judith, who survives. Also surviv67(9( ing are his chil29(50<(5 dren, Stephanie Nevins, Urbana, Ill., Christopher “Chris” (Laura) Overmyer, Carmel, Andrew (Kimberley Jurawan), Jupiter, Fla., and Sheryl Overmyer, Evanston, Ill.; his sister, Suzanne “Suzy” (Howard) Jones, South Bend; five grandchildren; and three spoiled granddogs. His brothers, Stanley, Stacey and Stuart Overmyer, predeceased him, as well as his son-in-law, Thomas Nevins. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9, at Christian Life Center, 1717 N. Hickory Road, South Bend. The family will be available to visit starting at 1 p.m.

BIRTHS Leah Elizabeth Kreft Logan and Sarah (Doty) Kreft are the parents of a daughter, Leah Elizabeth, born at 3:38 p.m. Sept. 11, 2022, at Woodlawn Hospital, Rochester. Leah joins a brother, Clayton, 4. Ezra Lee Michael Garbison Jonathan and Jasmine (Fett) Garbison are the parents of a son, Ezra Lee Michael, born at 6:36 a.m. Sept. 13, 2022, at Woodlawn Hospital, Rochester. Ezra joins two siblings: Paetyn, 9, and Emilie, 7.

Junior Achievement brings back scavenger hunt Join Junior Achievement serving Fulton County as it celebrates the return of its Scavenger Hunt. The next hunt will be held from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25. Hunters will start at Rochester Middle School and scour the town for the items on their list. Teams will return to RMS for food and to calculate their loot. The team with the most points wins. Teams and sponsorships are open at secure.qgiv.com/for/ mccs2/event/794830. Registration is just $55 before Oct. 1 and $60 between Oct. 1-15. Event sponsorship, which includes a team, is $300. Food sponsorship is $100 and prize sponsorship is $50. If you wish not to register online, contact Beth Miller at beth. miller@ja.org or (574) 551-4698. All funds raised will remain in Fulton County and go toward the JA programs in Rochester and Caston schools, along with the Youth Outlet Center. Gather your team and register today.

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Rochester’s very own ‘Tarzan of the Apes’ %\ '$9,' +$=/(',1( 6WDII :ULWHU Editor’s note: This is part two of the story. Part one appeared on the front page of the Sept. 14 edition of the Shopping Guide News. In 1919, Lincoln challenged the world heavyweight boxing champion, and while some thought it merely a publicity stunt, he had in fact been a sparring partner of former champion James Jeffries 10 years prior when only 16 years old. In 1921, Lincoln reprised his Tarzan role, this time in the 15part serial, “The Adventures of Tarzan.” Early on in the series, his depiction continued as it had in 1919; however, censors took issue with his bare chest. “Censors claimed it was poor taste for family viewing,” he said. Between Tarzan films, Lincoln starred in the serial “Elmo The Mighty,” which was shown in Rochester. An advertisement read, “Think of it, a man from our own city, one of the greatest and strongest men on the motion picture screen today can be seen at the Paramount every Monday for 18 weeks starting Oct. 20.” In 1922, Elmo was cast in “Quincy Adams Sawyer” along with two other Hoosiers, John Bowers of Rushville, who played the title role, and Louise Fazenda, a comic actress from Lafayette. Lincoln’s last depiction of Tarzan was in 1927, but it was not his last role in a Tarzan film. In 1949, 31 years after “Tarzan of the Apes,” and after leaving the acting business, Lincoln had a brief turn as a jungle fisherman in “Tarzan and the Magic Fountain,” starring Lex Barker. Elmo was paid for one day’s work, and

later complained when the studio used him for publicity pictures with Barker. “They got a million dollars worth of publicity for the new Tarzan,” he said. On the set, Lincoln spoke with film publicist Ezra Goodman, who later wrote “The Fifty Year Decline and Fall of Hollywood.” “They’ve refined Tarzan down today,” said Lincoln. “He doesn’t run through trees anymore or tangle with lions. ... When I played Tarzan I was up in the tree tops most of the time.”

That same year Lincoln returned to Rochester to visit his mother, Eldora Linkenhelt, and later moved her to California. An assistant manager of the Times Theater at that time, Robert Walters started an Elmo Lincoln fan club, which continued into the 1970s. In 1988, Walters and Fulton County Historical Society also helped organized a one-time commemorative stamp to celebrate the 70th anniversary of “Tarzan of the Apes.” After leaving Hollywood, fed up

with bit-parts he said “don’t even pay for groceries,” Lincoln is reported to have spent time in Salt Lake City, Utah, where he may have been involved in the junk and steel businesses. He was also briefly a partner in a silver mine. Elmo Lincoln died in Los Angeles in 1952. For more information on Elmo Lincoln, including an exhibit featuring many photos, films and books related to him, visit the Fulton County Historical Society Museum, 37 E. 375N, Rochester.

Logansport Memorial Cancer Care Center offers: • CT / MRI / PET Scans • Chemotherapy / Infusion / Immunology • Nuclear Medicine

• Surgery & Biopsy Procedures • Radiation Oncology

• Nurse Navigators • Genetic Testing


6

Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

WWW.SHOPPINGGUIDENEWS.COM

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A Tribute to Hometown Heroes - Military Appreciation

&$5 6+2: 681'$< 6(37(0%(5 7+ 30 Garden Tractor Pull Sunday, September 25th • 12 PM

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Carnival Rides • Free Circus Live Pro Wrestling Benefit Auction • 5K Race Food & Craft Vendors Laser Tag • Chainsaw Carving Live Entertainment . . . and much more fun for all ages!

)5(( $'0,66,21

SEPTEMBER

24-25


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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

2022 Kewanna

September 23-25

Fall Festival FRIDAY, SEPT. 23

4:00 PM- Games, Food, Arts, Craft Vendors & 10:00 PM Walter Dobbins Chain Saw Carving - Main 4:00 PM — ADVENTURE FAMILY CIRCUS FREE 4:00 PM- KIDS EAT FREE (16 and under) 6:00 PM Cookies - Sponsor: SHOOK SHACK Hot Dog - Sponsor: BECCA’S CONCESSIONS BBQ - Sponsor: CJ’S 5:00 PM DJ - NIPSCO Stage Sponsor: LOCAL FARMERS 6:00 PM Cornhole - Tennis Court 5:00 PM Registration 7:00 PM- Night Shift Band - NIPSCO Stage CLOSE Sponsor: ROCHESTER METAL PRODUCTS 7:00 PM — ADVENTURE FAMILY CIRCUS FREE 9:00 PM Live Pro Wrestling - Baseball Diamond Sponsors: PRO TREE SERVICE, LOCAL FARMERS, LUKE 631 DEALS

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24

7:00 AM11:00 AM 9:00 AM2:00 PM

Biscuit & Gravy Breakfast - Midway Sponsor: VFW POST #1121 Book Giveaway - Library Sponsor: KEWANNA PUBLIC LIBRARY

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 Cont’d.

11:00 AM- Mike Goble: DJ Karaoke - NIPSCO Stage 12:30 PM Sponsor: EVAN’S INSURANCE AGENCY 11:00 AM- Games, Food, Arts, Craft Vendors & 11:00 PM Walter Dobbins Chain Saw Carving - Main 11:00 AM — ADVENTURE FAMILY CIRCUS FREE 11:00 AM- KIDS EAT FREE (16 and under) 1:00 PM Corn Dog - Sponsor: PORK “N” OUT Kettle Corn - Sponsor: POPPERS KETTLE CORN 1:00 PM Tribute to Home Town Heroes Parade Grand Marshall: MILITARY APPRECIATION 2:30 PM KEWANNA H.E.A.R.T. BENEFIT AUCTION Sponsor: LUKE 631 DEALS 2:30 PM- 5K Race Registration 3:30 PM Kewanna Fire Station 3:00 PM- Bill Forness: A Tribute to Johnny Cash 4:30 PM NIPSCO Stage - Sponsor: THE KIBITZER TAVERN 4:00 PM — ADVENTURE FAMILY CIRCUS FREE 4:00 PM Chief Kewanna 5K Run and 2 Mile Walk for Fun - Fire Station Little Chief Fun Run (Ages 8-12) FREE Papoose Pow-Wow (Ages 2-7) 7:00 PM — ADVENTURE FAMILY CIRCUS FREE 7:00 PM Christian Strutz (Acoustic Guitar) - NIPSCO Stage - Sponsor: UPRIGHT IRON WORKS

8:30 PM- Bill Forness: A Tribute to Johnny Cash 10:00 PM NIPSCO Stage - Sponsor: RTC.COM 10:00 PM Live Pro Wrestling - Baseball Diamond Sponsors: LOCAL FARMERS, HARDESTY PRINTING OF ROCHESTER

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25

10:00 AM1:00 PM 11:00 AM12:00 PM

Grace Scott Band - NIPSCO Stage Sponsor: EVAN’S INSURANCE AGENCY Games, Food, Arts, Craft Vendors & Northern Indiana Pullers Garden Tractor Pull Behind Fire Station 11:00 AM Weigh-In 2:00 PM — ADVENTURE FAMILY CIRCUS FREE 2:00 PM- KIDS EAT FREE (16 and under) 4:00 PM Chocolate Covered Banana - ALAN SCHWARDE 2:30 PM- Bill Forness: A Tribute to Johnny Cash 4:00 PM NIPSCO Stage Sponsor: BALDWIN AND COMPANY 4:00 PM Walter Dobbins Chain Saw Carving - Main

SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PLEASE CHECK INFORMATION BOOTH.

$<Q@ "PI G < Q D O N @ " O 0C@ Chuck

of Rochester 418 E. 9TH ST., ROCHESTER

7


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

8

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2022 Kewanna

Hey Kids . . Enjoy The Free Rides!

Fall Festival September 23-25

Have Fun at the Festival!

574-653-2265

123 East Main Street Metzger Chapel • Kewanna

Ǩ 1619 Main, Rochester

574-223-4920 FULTON COUNTY SOLID WASTE DISTRICT RECYCLING CENTER 1452 Wentzel Street • Rochester, IN • 574-223-4939

REDUCE ➟ REUSE ➟ RECYCLE!

Kewanna Metal Specialties, Inc. 419 W. Main Street Kewanna, Indiana (574) 653-2554

Enjoy The 2022 Kewanna Fall Festival! Kewanna’s Annual Rummage Rumble Saturday, Sept 24 • 8am-1pm Proud to call Kewanna “home” since 1960!

O&R BUILDINGS

, LLC

PHONE: HONE: 574.893.4690

FAX: 574.893.4560

Agricultural • Post Buildings • Industrial Commercial Garages • Steel Buildings • Concrete Residing • Metal & Shingle Roofing • Overhead Doors

In Business FREE! Estimates Since 1965 P.O. Box 307, Akron, IN 46910

Tax isn’t black and white.

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HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Sat. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

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ENTERTAINMENT AREA

Have Fun @ The Festival!

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23

4:00 PM The Great KALITA Sponsor: WEBB’S FAMILY PHARMACY 5:00 PM Dr. Insecta Sponsor: HIZER FARMS 6:00 PM Dinosaur Dimensions Sponsor: GOOD OIL COMPANY 7:00 PM The Great KALITA Sponsor: SPLIT ROAD MEDIA 8:00 PM Dr. Insecta Sponsor: VFW POST #1121 9:00 PM Dinosaur Dimensions Sponsor: AMERICAN LEGION

Your Touchstone Energy® Cooperative The Power Of Human Connections

P.O. Box 230 (1448 W. SR 14), Rochester, IN 46975 Office Hours: Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24

11:00 AM Dr. Insecta Sponsor: LOCAL FARMERS 1:00 PM Singing Ventriloquist Sponsor: BEACON CREDIT UNION 3:00 PM The Great KALITA Sponsor: CRAIG WELDING 5:00 PM Dinosaur Dimensions - Tent Area Sponsor: WOOF INC., LEITERS FORD TAVERN 8:00 PM Dr. Insecta Sponsor: LOCAL FARMERS 9:00 PM Dinosaur Dimensions - Tent Area Come meet the Dinosaurs! Sponsor: UPRIGHT IRON WORKS 10:00 PM The Great KALITA Sponsor: FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK

Phone: (574) 223-3156 www.fultoncountyremc.com

ENJOY THE FESTIVAL!

Mary’s Stitch & Knit & Baker Vac LLC

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25

12:00 PM The Great KALITA Sponsor: PLYMOUTH TUBE CO. 1:00 PM Dr. Insecta Sponsor: CRAIG WELDING 1:00 PM Dinosaur Dimensions Sponsor: BEACON CREDIT UNION 2:00 PM Singing Ventriloquist Sponsor: ROCHESTER METAL PRODUCTS 3:00 PM Dinosaur Dimensions Sponsor: PLYMOUTH TUBE CO.

7937 S. State Rd. 25, Rochester, IN 46975

574-835-6054 HOURS: Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appointment CREDIT/DEBIT ACCEPTED

YAY FESTIVAL

HAVE FUN!

!

We understand all the shades of gray.

Baldwin And Company A Trusted Name Since 1963

• INCOME TAXES • PAYROLL • BOOKKEEPING

&

Phil’s

Automotive Repair

OR

2759 N. 200 W., ROCHESTER, IN 46975 OWNER:DEVON RENSBERGER RENSBERGERREPAIR@GMAIL.COM

2130 E. Market Street Logansport, IN 46947 (574) 753-3498

MON.-FRI. 8 A.M.-5 P.M.

814 Main Street Rochester, IN 46975 (574) 223-2454

574-223-2759

5158 N. 825 E., Mentone, IN 46539

800-863-6584 574-598-6000 Fax: 574-598-6001

www.craigwelding.com


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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

9

2022 Kewanna Fall Festival September 23-25

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1720 E. SR 14 • Rochester, IN

574-223-2151


10

Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

WWW.SHOPPINGGUIDENEWS.COM

The small town with a big heart has even bigger festival There are a lot of great festivals in Indiana, but Kewanna boasts a unique, one-of-a-kind experience, the annual Kewanna Fall Festival. Over the past 19 years, the Kewanna Fall Festival has become a favorite of Fulton County and beyond. The festival is an entire weekend of fun with tons of family events, including carnival rides, games, live entertainment, 5K run, parade, car show, townwide garage and yard sale, and so much more.

This 2022 Kewanna Fall Festival begins Friday, Sept. 23, and will continue through Sunday afternoon, Sept. 25. “For a small town, our attendance is pretty amazing,” said Festival Director Ashley Van Lake. Last year there were approximately 30,000 attendees over the course of the event. “We have attendees come from all over. We attract entertainment and vendors from across the county.”

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maps are available at local businesses. The festival hits full swing Saturday at 1 p.m. with the traditional Hometown Heroes parade. Van Lake stated, “We are showing our military appreciation for our parade this year. We’re proud of them all, but especially of our local service men and women.” Traditions, like the yearly parade and guest honorees, are important to the Kewanna Fall Festival. Other traditions include free performances from Adventure Family Circus along with the Kids Eat Free program, which allows kids age 16 and younger to eat free at participating food vendors. Live Pro Wrestling, a cornhole tournament, the annual Benefit Auction, and Walter Dobbins’ chainsaw carvings are some of the other returning favorites. The first Kewanna Fall Festival was held in 2003. The event was the creation of Tom Mate and local nonprofit Kewanna’s H.E.A.R.T, Inc. Tom, his wife, Diane, and son Luke

originated from Chicago and were eager to utilize their unique knowhow to create an event celebrating their new home in Kewanna. After many successful years, Mate chose to coach and train volunteer Ashley Van Lake to take up leadership for the event. Van Lake, a lifelong resident of Kewanna, fully accepted the director’s role with the passing of Tom Mate shortly after the 2021 festival. Van Lake added, “There will be games, food, arts, craft vendors, and rides on the midway going through the festival. There really is something for everyone. Bring your family and come visit with us at the 2022 Kewanna Fall Festival.” The festival schedule is subject to change. Check the information booth for complete times and details of events. Kewanna is located on SR 17, 3 miles south of SR 14. For more information, contact Van Lake at (574) 230-3756 or ashley52684@gmail.com.

Fall Festival events at Kewanna public library

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More than 19 vendors are listed for the 2022 Kewanna Fall Festival, including food, crafts and specialty goods. There are 12 entertainers scheduled to perform over the course of the weekend. Entertainment kicks off at 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23. The entertainment tent, located just south of Union Township Park, will have a full schedule of shows each day. Doctor Insecta, who brings an assortment of big and unusual bugs, will return this year, as will magician The Great Kalita. “We try to make it better every year,” said Van Lake. Some new improvements and additions for this year’s festival are interactive laser tag, Dinosaur Dimensions and a singing ventriloquist. Saturday is the “big day” at the festival according to Van Lake. The day starts with Kewanna’s annual Rummage Rumble, a townwide garage and yard sale that will run approximately 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.; individual sale hours may vary. Sale

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Kewanna Union Township Public Library has planned several special events on Saturday, Sept. 24, in conjunction with the Kewanna Fall Festival. These events include a free book giveaway, meet and greet Fulton County nonprofits, patron appreciation booth, and story time on the lawn. The free book giveaway will be held 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.. Everyone is welcome to come and select books of their choice from their free

giveaway collection. They have books for all ages. Stop in and pick out a bagful. The library will also be hosting a meet and greet Fulton County nonprofits in the Performing Arts Room. The meet and greet will be held 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for community members to learn more about local service organizations and to find out what they have to offer. Be sure to visit the library for this special opportunity. Visit the patron appreciation

booth during the Kewanna Fall Festival. Treats and giveaways will be available 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Story time on the lawn will be held at noon. Children of all ages are welcome to relax in front of the library and listen to a variety of popular children’s books. All of these programs will be held at Kewanna Union Township Public Library, 210 E. Main St., Kewanna. For more information, call the library at (574) 653-2011.

Updates and happenings in the area The Rochester Kiwanis’s annual turkey dinner will take place Monday, Nov. 7. Tickets are available from any Kiwanian. The meal will be available for dine-in or carry-out. —o— The Cross is holding “Road to Recovery,” a community event to raise awareness for recovery in Fulton County, Saturday, Oct. 1, at Blacketor Sports Complex in Rochester. The free event will begin at 8 a.m. with warm-ups and a fun walk with Ace Fitness. Following at 9 a.m. will be cardio drumming and a softball game. Yoga will take place at 9 a.m. with more softball games following at 1 a.m. and 11 a.m. At noon, there will be testimonials and a free hamburger and hot dog lunch. Additionally, there will be kids’ games, face painting, an obstacle course, bounce house, cotton can-

dy, snow cones and popcorn. All events are free. Sponsors of the event include Rochester Ford, Ag Technologies Inc., Mike Anderson Rochester and Shepherd’s Family Auto Group. —o— Fellowship Guild of Rochester First Baptist Church will participate in a Dairy Queen sponsor night from 4 p.m. until closing Wednesday, Sept. 28. Proceeds from the evening will be designated for mission projects. —o— Are you looking for support to lose weight? Take Off Pounds Sensibly, “T.O.P.S.,” is a nonprofit weight-loss support group. It meets each Tuesday at the Fulton County Public Library. Weigh-in begins at 3:30 p.m. and the meeting/program follows. The first meeting is free. More information is available at tops.org.

Beacon Credit Union, along with the Beacon Ag Group, has announced the 2022 Rochester Member Appreciation Day will take place during regular business hours Friday, Sept. 23. This year will mark 91 years of serving its member-owners. Beacon is showing its appreciation by celebrating their member-owners with themed events at the Member Centers, located at 504 Main St. and 430 Rouch Place Drive, Rochester. Members can expect food, fun and excitement with Beacon Credit Union staff.

ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH AND DAN’S FISH FRY PRESENTS THE CARR

6TH ANNUAL FISH AND TENDERLOIN FRY

YOUT ONLY

Includes: Coleslaw, Chips & Cookies

OCTOBER 6 • 4:30-7:30 p.m.

At The Fulton Co. Historical Society Museum 37 E. 375 N., Off Of U.S. 31 Tickets Are $11.00 Each Call 574-223-6898 For Tickets Or Pay At The Door


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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

75+ VINTAGE CARS & TRUCKS – HONDA MOTORCYCLES 30+ Studebakers – IH – Ford – Kaiser-Frazer-Crosley-Nash-Plymouth-Packard – Dodge - VW & More! 50+ TRACTORS, 6+ GLEANER COMBINES, EQUIPMENT, TRAILERS PARTS FARM EQUIPMENT & TRACTORS – MASSIVE QTY. AUTO & TRACTOR PARTS – MOTORS – PELLET STOVES – LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT 200+ DIECAST CARS & FARM TOYS – TRAIN SETS – 50+ MODEL CARS – ADVERTISING – PEDAL TRACTORS • ADVERTISING SIGNS

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11


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

12

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FA L L FA R M I N G SWCD provides many services for local farmers

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In the summer of 2022, Megan Malott succeeded Lois Mann as the new executive director for Fulton County Soil and Water Conservation District. “She has some big shoes to fill. She did an amazing job here at SWCD,” said Malott. Despite her busy week working with area high school students on the annual educational water rafting trips on the Tippecanoe River, which SWCD hosts in conjunction with Arrow Head Resource Conservation and Development Councils, Malott took the time to respond to questions from Shopping Guide News about services SWCD provides local Fulton County farmers. The following is an edited version of the interview. Why is SWCD important for farmers and the ag industry? The SWCD educates and supports the importance of soil health. Soil health and water quality is important to everyone, not just farmers. It matters because what we grow we consume and it enters into our bodies. If you do not have healthy soils then you lack good yields and nutrients.

The Rochester Downtown Partnership and the City of Rochester would like to invite you to celebrate our Hometown Heroes We are honoring our first responders and active/retired/late military by displaying banners with photos, name, branch of military and rank from the light poles over downtown Rochester. These banners will be displayed from January - May 2023 then presented back to the family as a keepsake. Order forms can be found at the Chamber of Commerce office or any of our public libraries (Rochester, Fulton, Kewanna, Aubee or Akron). Bring your completed form and $150 to the Chamber office and email us your digital photo (300dpi minimum) to rochesterherobanners@gmail.com. If you don’t have a digital copy, stop by any of our libraries and they will be happy to assist you. All proceeds will go to beautifying our downtown area. Orders will be processed on a first come, first serve basis. Space is limited and location of the banners can not be guaranteed. Please direct any questions to 574-224-2666.

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3/$17,1* &29(5 &5236 ³ )XOWRQ &RXQW\ 6RLO DQG :DWHU &RQ VHUYDWLRQ 'LVWULFW UHQWV D FRYHU FURS VHHGHU 6:&' LV DOVR KRSLQJ WR EH DZDUGHG D JUDQW ZKLFK ZLOO SURYLGH D FRYHU FURS FRVW VKDUH SURJUDP IRU IDUPHUV 3KRWR SURYLGHG E\ )XOWRQ &RXQW\ 6:&' But soil health is more than that. Healthy soil helps to regulate the Earth’s climate and preserves more carbon than all of the world’s forests combined; it absorbs water like a sponge before becoming saturated, making it more resilient in a dry year because it supports a landscape that is more resistant to the impacts of drought, flood or fire. It improves water quality by retaining more water, which reduces runoff from cropland. Strong soil health goes further in meeting the needs of a growing population and food production. Healthy soils are crucial for healthy plant development, human nutrition and water filtration. Unhealthy soils cause infertility, erosion, droughts and water

pollution. Worked soils are hotter because we removed all the cover from them, which causes the sun to heat them up quicker. Some research shows working the soil increases weeds because you work the weed seed back into the disturbed soil, which increases the survivability of the seed. Did you know sediment is the No. 1 water pollutant? I did not until I started working here at the SWCD. I believe if we can educate ourselves and those around us and put it into practice, we can make a difference in resource conservation. What services, educational or otherwise, do you provide for farmers? We support and assist local farmers with good farming practice opportunities. The SWCD helps offset the cost to try new conservation practices on the farmland and encourages best management practices while improving the environment. Fulton County Soil & Water just applied for a Clear Water Indiana grant Sept. 8. If awarded the grant, the SWCD will provide a cover crop cost-share program for farmers. This program will help offset the cost of the cover crop practice, so the farmer doesn’t have to undertake all the risk. Cover crops have been shown to recycle nutrients in the soil left over from the cash crop, suppress weeds, stimulate soil biology. … Some encourage nitrogen production of bacteria and release phosphates and other micronutrients from the soil. They also serve as foliage to livestock and wildlife. If awarded the CWI grant, the cost-share program will include the option of a three-way mix for cover crops. This would mean the whole county, if using only one or two species of seed, would pay out at $10/acre, but for three-plus seed species it would pay out at $20/acre. For the Lake Manitou Continued on page 15


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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FA L L FA R M I N G

The Joneses keep up with the Polypay sheep on their Hidden Valley Farm What started as a family participating in 4-H traditions has turned into something much larger. Glen and Chris Jones own and operate Hidden Valley Farm, which sits just northeast of Rochester, one of the few farms in Indiana to produce a commercial volume of sheep. The Joneses were both school teachers with children who were 10-year 4-H’ers. Through their children’s time in 4-H they mainly had Hampshire sheep. In 1987 they attended one of the first national Polypay sales and purchased four ewes and a ram. They now are retired from teaching and have 80 ewes; selling lambs for breeding, market and various others uses. Over 35 years, they have established a network within the Polypay sheep community. “People east of the Mississippi river, if they have or want a Polypay, they know of us,” joked Glen as his wife, Chris, was quick to add it wasn’t always that way. “We have built up a reputation over the years.” The Hidden Valley Farm is registered with the National Sheep Improvement Program as breeders of Polypays and they have even hosted a field day associated with the Indiana Sheep Association. Over 100 breeders and farmers came to that event, in which the Joneses gave a tour of their farm while they provided information and education on production. At 10 years old, Glen was given an orphan lamb to raise, and he continued to raise sheep as he got older. He participated in 4-H shows. “I’ve always been around sheep,” Glen stated. Chris grew up on a family farm; however, she wasn’t invested into sheep until she married Glen. Initially, the interest in Polypays was purely for fun. Glen explained that Polypays are a composite breed, which means four different breeds make up one Polypay. This particular breed of sheep is known to have a high lifetime prolificacy, large lamb crop at one year of age, ability to lamb more frequently than once per year, rapid growth rate of lamb and desirable carcass quality. Immediately, they knew it was the right decision. “The extra income is nice,” laughed Chris after Glen shared that 79 of their ewes had 168 lambs, a 200% lamb crop from maternal ewes. According to their website, hiddenvalleypolypays.com, they have already sold out of the ewes for this year. They will sell an average of 12 rams a year, said Glen. When you have over 100 sheep, there is work to be done. The Joneses grow their own hay to feed the flocks. During the fall and summer months the ewes will pasture; at the Hidden Valley Farm they implement intensive rotational grazing methods. The rotational grazing has helped the Joneses keep their livestock healthier and therefore leads them to have a better estimated value. When it comes to the values, Chris shares there are a

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0((7 7+( -21(6(6 ³ &KULV DQG *OHQ -RQHV RZQ DQG RSHUDWH +LGGHQ 9DOOH\ )DUPV QHDU 5RFKHVWHU ZKHUH WKH\ UDLVH 3RO\SD\ VKHHS 7KH\ EUHHG UDLVH DQG VHOO WKHLU VKHHS 3KRWR E\ $OLVRQ +DQG\ lot of variables to help determine if a sheep will be sold to breed or sold to market. The higher the number, the better the sheep is for breeding. Lambing usually begins in February and will continue through March. The Joneses check on their lambs three times a day during the lambing months. A Polypay ewe can give birth to triplets or quads, leaving at least a dozen for the Joneses to raise on milk replacer. Up until about four years ago, Glen did his own shearing of his flock. The Joneses begin shearing a month before lambing season begins. He said it can take approximately five minutes to sheer one sheep. Although most think sheep are mainly raised to sell wool, the Joneses raise their flock to breed and sell at market as the Joneses’ success comes from selling to breeders or to market. “There is little value and little demand for wool,” Glen shared. Looking forward, the Joneses plan to maintain the Hidden Val-

ley Farm. “It keeps me busy,” Glen said with a smile on his face. With their passion of Polypays the Joneses have been able to grow their family farm hobby into a family farm business. For more information about Polypays or the Hidden Valley Farm, visit their website or call (574) 204-3442.

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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For 52 years, Mike Norman has been farming the gently rolling hills outside of Akron. He planted his first corn crop on his family’s farm at age 14 and has been working hard ever since, raising both grain crops and feeder calves for beef. But despite his 70 years, Norman radiates energy and enthusiasm for his work. He credits this in part to his embrace of environmentally friendly land management practices such as the use of cover crops and no-till planting. “It makes farming more exciting,” he enthused. “I’m more in tune with nature. … I take care of the soil and it takes care of me. … Conservation is how I farm and how I live.” He currently farms around 550 acres and raises 40 beef cows. Norman has been on the Fulton County Soil and Water Conservation Board for 30 years and was named a “River Friendly Farmer of Indiana” in 2013 by his peers at the local, state and federal levels. “You need everybody’s blessing. I was honored.” Norman started no-till farming in 1985 when his father unwittingly purchased a no-till planter. “I saw it and the lights turned on,” Norman recalled. In fact, his acquisition of conservation practices was primarily inspired by his own observations on the land he had worked for decades. For example, he would have a spot where two fields were separated by a fence. When the fence was removed, and the land was planted, it would produce the best crop. “Tillage is a negative thing to do to the soil.” However, he did not plant his first cover crop until 1995, when he planted corn on land where a wheat crop had failed. And although wheat is not considered an ideal cover crop — it does not fix oxygen efficiently — it was the best stand he had that summer. Now he plants cereal rye as a cover crop in the fall. Norman also expected the ground to be dryer, used up by

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protects the new furrow from crusting over in a beating rain. Norman has been greatly influenced by the work of certified soil scientist Ray Archuleta. “That man changed my life.” He heard Archuleta speak at a seminar in 2005, and during the speech Archuleta explained that a mere thimbleful of soil contains more organisms than there are people on Earth, and a great number of them are aquatic in nature. Having a large number of microorganisms is essential to soil health. Norman has compared soil Continued on page 15

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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FA L L FA R M I N G

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River-friendly farmer Continued from page 14 temperatures between adjacent fields, one using no-till and cover crops and the other using traditional techniques. On one hot day in June about three years ago, the traditional field’s soil reached 124 degrees F., while the

SWCD

Continued from page 12 Watershed, they would receive $20/acre regardless whether it is a three-way mix. If farmers are interested, the SWCD rents a cover crop seeder to plant cover crops, and a 30-foot I&J Roller Crimper if farmers want to do a non-chemical termination. Please contact the local office for details at (574) 223-3220, ext. 101. We will start in October with cover crop planting. This is available now. The SWCD hosts field days, which have covered cover crops, no-tills, grazing with live animals on cover crops and grazing pas-

no-till/cover crop field measured 84 degrees. “That’s soil health,” he said. That is also a field more likely to survive a drought. Yet another negative result of excessive tillage and erosion, according to Norman, is the releasing of sediment into local water-

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ways. “The number one pollutant is not chemicals. It’s sediment.” When considering the growing hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico, believed to be tied to sediment runoff from Midwest farms, Norman stated, “We need to do a better job. Everybody does.”

tures for farmers. We have partnered with Purdue Extension to host a breakfast for farmers to get farmer input and did Q&A’s on cover crops and on field days for private applicator recertification points to be able to maintain your license to use chemicals. We have handouts here at the office on cover crops, cover crop pollinator practices, management-intensive grazing in Indiana and removing invasive species. We send out local ranking group surveys and host a meeting every year to learn what resource concerns for conservation are in Indiana.

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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FA L L FA R M I N G

Rose Farm is about much more than beef

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In 1984, Roger Rose assumed ownership of his grandparents’ Rochester farm. Since then he has worked to not only build a natural, grass-fed beef herd, but has also molded the farm itself into an environmentally friendly

habitat, which is home to a diversity of native plants, trees and animals. “It’s an unconventional operation for this part of the country,” said Rose of his farm, which primarily raises beef that is grass finished without antibiotics or growth hormones. One hundred ninety acres is

divided into two grazing cells in which the animals are moved from one section to another. It is a delicate yet labor-intensive dance, which allows the pastures to replenish while also ensuring the cattle are never far from a freshwater source. In the northern section, Rose Continued on page 17

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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FA L L FA R M I N G A glimpse of Fulton County agriculture statistics

According to the most recent Census of Agriculture County Profile, Fulton County, there are 635 farms totaling 214,452 acres of land, an average of 338 acres per farm.

Fulton County shares 1% of the state agriculture sales; 78% of the sales are crops and 22% are from livestock, poultry and products. Farms use 92% of land for cropland, with 25,065 acres being ir-

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rigated. Farms within the county use several different practices of land use: 29% of farms use intensive till, whereas 26% use reduced till. The no-till practice is being used on 23% of farms. Only 16% of farmland implements the cover crop practice. Farms across the county can range from 1 acre to 1,000-plus acres. The census shows there are 206 farms in Fulton County with 10 to 49 acres and 164 farms with 50 to 179 acres. About 66 farms tend 1 to 9 acres of land, and 73 farms within the county have 1,000 or more acres of farmland. Top crops in acres for Fulton County are corn for grain, totaling 103,290. Soybeans for beans are the second top crop with 77,129 acres. Finishing out the top five are hay, wheat and corn for silage for a combined total of 9,104 acres. According to the 2022 United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service estimates, Fulton County has a total of 13,800 cows, includ-

ing calves. Fulton County has approximately 1,700 cattle raised for beef whereas there are about 3,100 cows raised for dairy. That means there is 9,000 calves within the Fulton County area. The census also shares the livestock inventory for the county. Hogs and pigs are the highest livestock inventory with approximately 22,192. Fulton County also has 773 sheep and lambs accounted for in the livestock inventory, in addition to 763 horses and ponies. The census county profile also shows 96% of farms are family

farms. Only 26% of farms hire for farm labor. A mere 4% of Fulton County farms sell directly to consumers. There are a total of 1,052 producers in Fulton County, according to the county profile. Of those, 723 are male and 329 are female. There are 596 producers between the ages of 35 and 64. Within the county there are 306 producers who are 65 years or older and only 150 who are less than 35. You can take a look at the United States Department of Agriculture statistic information at www. nass.usda.gov/agcensus.

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Rose Farm Continued from page 16 does custom grazing, finishing around 90 cow/calf pairs for third-party customers from May 1 through October. “We take them on a per head basis and graze them through the summer. … We raise them to the point where they can be weaned.” To the south is his own herd, around 100 head of cattle, including 40 cows and calves in various stages of finishing. Rose’s herd started as Hereford cattle, with cows bred to Angus bulls, resulting in a slow transition to predominantly Angus characteristics. “That’s the direction we are going in the future,” he said. Rose selects for bulls able to finish on grass. “The key to grass finishing is the animal’s genetics.” The farm has found a “small niche” Rose said has grown rapidly over the years. The finished animals are primarily marketed by a third party. “We focus on the production end.” Cattle management, said Rose, is “very time-consuming.” A solid perimeter fence must be maintained around each grazing area. His daily routine involves building temporary fences while the herd is moved to the next paddock, clearing fence rows of fallen trees and brush and keeping the animals supplied with water. “I like to clip pastures after each cycle. Grazing tends to encourage undesirable species.” He must also clip ungrazed grass so it does not go to seed. Rotational grazing allows ungrazed pastures time to “rest.” Rose has also learned the art of controlled burning over the years, which is crucial to the maintenance of grasslands. Rose keeps an eye on the overall environmental health of his land for a number of reasons. Along with the cattle operation, the farm has conservation ease-

ments and supports wetlands and other areas rich in wildlife habitat he can lease for hunting. There is also a growing timber stand, and he is optimistic about future forestry endeavors. “It’s a very diversified operation,” he observed. Creating a wide diversity of plant and animal life requires keeping invasive species from choking out native ones. Containing invasive species, said Rose, “keeps me up at night. … We want to be as biodiverse as possible.” At 67 years old, Rose also hopes to make it to the farm’s 100-year anniversary in 2041, and see a future generation continue his dream of a peaceful coexistence with nature.

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

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FA L L FA R M I N G

Rochester FFA student — future entrepreneur

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Keegen Reinhold, member of Rochester High School FFA, has always been passionate about agriculture. He grew up learning about farming and immersed in the farm life; which is one of the many reasons he is choosing to pursue a future in dairy farming. Reinhold attests that he is a very active part of his dad’s and his grandpa’s farms and considers them both to be great learning experiences. At his dad’s farm, he has taken away valuable knowledge on the purchasing of beef cows and working up

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the herd. His dad’s farm also offers custom bailing and services of that nature. He has also learned how to effectively expand a customer base through the advancements of his dad’s farm. By watching his family’s farms grow and being a part of those changes, Reinhold was able to gather valuable tools that will help him achieve his future goals of starting his own herd. Farming is what he is meant to do; he only became more sure of that while getting more involved in his family’s herd and becoming a more active part of the farming community through FFA. Reinhold would say

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he has multiple Supervised Agricultural Experience projects on ownership happening at once through his family’s farms. A pivotal point for Reinhold was when he first got into FFA, stating it “pushed me harder.” As an already driven individual, being in an environment with people who shared the same goals and interests only made him want to pursue a career in agriculture that much more. The hands-on experience he gets on his family farms pairs with the knowledge that being a part of the FFA program is setting him up to be a successful entrepreneur. Reinhold is excited to start his own herd one day and for all the things he has yet to learn. He especially looks forward to having himself to thank for his future accomplishments; he is adamant about paving his own path.

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Allied Pools 574.835.0387 Paul & Angie Caudill, Owners

6786 N. 250 W., Rochester, IN caudillservices@yahoo.com • Sales • Installation • Above Or Below Ground Pools • Pool Openings • Pool Filling • Chemicals • Parts • Liners • Winterization

FREE ESTIMATES

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Roofing

him along the way thus far, but he is ready to start his entrepreneurial journey in dairy farming. “I would really like to do it myself, not piggyback off anyone else,” Reinhold stated. It is important to Reinhold that he is independent in terms of farming in the future; he will have the knowledge and experience to succeed on his own, so he wants to push himself to do that. Reinhold hopes to have a plan in action after he graduates from high school to begin his own livestock herd.

LLC

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Lavon Shirk 574-377-9961 Serving Indiana Counties of Cass-Fulton-Kosciusko-Marshall-Pulaski


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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

19

FA L L FA R M I N G

Grazing philosophy

%\ 0$5. .(3/(5 ([WHQVLRQ (GXFDWRU $J $QG 1DWXUDO 5HVRXUFHV 3XUGXH ([WHQVLRQ )XOWRQ &RXQW\ I was at Purdue University several years back and I had a little time to kill. I was right next to the campus bookstore and decided to see how textbooks have changed since the 40 years ago I was there. I happened to see a book on philosophy and thought that would be interesting. Was I surprised to open up the book and see various mathematical equations? Philosophy can be found in many forms, but it should be rooted in logic. It seems that logic is a branch of mathematics and a branch of philosophy. I have seen various philosophies of grazing, and yes, you could boil them down to an equation — an equation that could predict many different items such as yield, cost, time, soil health, parasite load, erosion potential and many more. If your grazing philosophy is to continuously graze, then you have chosen a low-yield, lowtime option. Some would say it is a low-cost choice, but I would contend, with the high land prices we are experiencing, you need to figure in an economic term called opportunity cost. What are ways you could use that land and its value to make more money? Could it be cash rented for row crops? Could you increase the stocking rate by various more intensive management techniques? What about selling it and putting the money into another investment? A long equation that includes all the variables could be put together showing the value of this philosophy. Money is not everything. How do you put a value on the senses of sight, sound, smell, taste and touch? Well, actually you can do it. I would like to go experience a far-off land. How much am I willing to pay for that experience? Even wants and values can figure into the equation. Having a desire to raise your family in a certain way has value. Rotational grazing has various philosophies and end goals. One outcome may be to maximize the use of our land for an efficient grazing experience. This will require labor to move wires and rotate animals from pasture areas to others. Philosophies may branch off from there. I may place a higher personal value on animal welfare and drag shade structures from location to location. Even beyond that at the University of Missouri, researchers found that shade increased the overall pregnancy rate of cows by nearly 40%. Cows with shade had an overall pregnancy rate of 87.5%, while the pregnancy rate was only 50% for cows without shade. Research has shown that bulls with access to shade have increased semen counts. My personal philosophy when

0$5. .(3/(5 $15 (;7(16,21 ('8&$725 385'8( (;7(16,21 )8/721 &2817< grazing goats is to reduce their exposure to parasitic worms. They can kill animals. Keeping pastures high and utilizing

species that allow the goats to graze higher off the ground will decrease their potential of ingesting parasitic larvae that have climbed up the forage leaves. Grazing pastures close not only reduces the efficacy of the forage growth but the welfare of the animals. Not to mention, dead animals have no value. Another grazing philosophy is to maximize soil organic matter. A tour I was on featured a farm with that goal in mind. Forages being grazed by cattle were well beyond maturity and there was a lot of trampling of wasted grass into the ground. The perfect place to increase or-

ganic matter, their goal. This would be an ideal place for those seeking to be a market for carbon credits. In offset markets, carbon offsets are generated by those who can reduce emissions or sequester carbon, the grazer. These offsets are then verified and sold to emitters as a means of offsetting their carbon emissions. Alfalfa can add major amounts of carbon to the soil because the roots go deep. Some research work shows that alfalfa can sequester somewhere around 25% more than corn and soybeans. It is even better than perennial grasses when both are harvested for hay. Sounds

great but these carbon markets are having some growing pains. Maybe my grazing goal is to sell grass-fed beef. A person’s personal philosophy may be the promotion of this method due to their perceived environmental and nutritional benefits. The equation for this technique would include a longer time to market, increased hay cost, decreased grain cost and possibly greater marketing cost due to advertisements. It is very difficult to put value to various philosophies but each has its own cost/benefit rate. How you choose to run your life has expenses and rewards. It all fits into life’s equation.


20

Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

WWW.SHOPPINGGUIDENEWS.COM

End of year play for Elk’s Club Golf Course Men’s League The end of the Mens Golf League for the year at the Elks Club Golf Course, Rochester, was Wednesday, Sept. 15. The weather did not disappoint, with a perfect day for golf. All those who participated enjoyed golfing and the company of other players. There were approximately 26 teams for the event. Winners were: Randy Clark and Matt Gast, first; Mark Smiley and Greg Bauer, second; and Doug Vance and David Row, third. 3+2726 %< &5,6 $/'5,'*(

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Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

21

Malott named Fulton County SWCD director %\ '$9,' +$=/(',1( 6WDII :ULWHU In the summer of 2022, Megan Malott was named executive director for the Fulton County Soil and Water Conservation District, replacing Lois Mann. “She did an amazing job here at the SWCD,” said Malott. “I hope to do my best at being a good servant leader, to help educate and assist land managers with wise conservational practices in Fulton County.” Malott graduated from Maconaquah High School in 2004 and went on to earn an associate degree of applied science in design technology. She also worked for Bell Nursery & Green Circle Growers Nursery in Logansport. However, Malott first became involved with SWCD in Miami and Cass counties after investigating ways of managing her own family’s property. “My husband and I have 40 acres in Cass County,” she said. “It consists of a wooded area, marshland, meadow habitat, and a lot of it is what we consider muck. There are three huge ponds and a couple ditches and Tick Creek runs through our property. I enjoy watching birds and love nature in

general. Our woodland was becoming overgrown in bush honeysuckle, which is an invasive species.” Later, Malott reached out to the Cass and Miami county SWCDs and learned about programs and opportunities to “make the most of our 40 acres to help wildlife habitats.” This led to Malott’s involvement with programs aimed at children, which include nature hikes and scavenger hunts. “I have four children and knew my two younger ones would be interested in the program as well as my two nieces and two nephews,” she recalled. Malott was also connected with the Natural Resource Conservation Service and State of Indiana Cooperative Invasive Management. Mandi Glantz with SICIM created an invasive species removal plan and the Malotts were able to apply for a program to help with the removal of invasive species. Malott’s friendship with Leah Walthery of Cass County SWCD throughout this process led to her involvement with educational school raft days held in September. She was also able to help educate others on invasive species while working at the nurseries, handing out to customers infor-

mation she collected from SWCD. Malott has also been involved with scouting since her son Bradon joined Cub Scouts in 2014. “He transferred over to the troop in 2018, as did I, becoming an assistant scout master.” While there, Malott helped increase popcorn sales for two years at Popcorn Kernel. Her troop also planted over 250 trees for a conservation project at Mississinewa Reservoir State Park in 2019. “That was one of my favorite projects. It took a lot of hard work and support, but we accomplished it in a day.” Among Malott’s plans for the future include a number of potential projects tied to a Clean Water Indiana grant, which if awarded will lead to work with the Rochester City Parks Department creating a pollinator habitat in the area of an old fish hatchery, starting at Ninth Street. “This area is hard to maintain, so being able to create a maintenance-free pollinator habitat will be a blessing to those who have to upkeep it and to the bees, butterflies and other pollinators.” Malott looks forward to hearing from Fulton County residents about their interests. “This way

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NICE HOUSEHOLD AUCTION

Monday, September 26, 2022 at 4:00 pm

10257 Muckshaw Road, Plymouth, IN From South Michigan St., go west on Oakhill Ave., then south on Muckshaw Rd. to site. Gibson upright freezer; Kenmore refrigerator; 3 flat screen TVs; Pride elec. scooter; love seat; BR suite w/king size bed, chest, dresser & night stand; oak table & 6 chairs; 4 bar stools; desk; coffee & end tables; platform rocker; entertainment center; storage cabinet; Oreck sweeper; hedge trimmers; hand truck; numerous coolers; shop vac; hand tools; paper shredder; exercise bike; lamps; wall hangings; corner TV stand; miniatures & knickknacks; humidifier; card table & chairs; 3 wheel chairs; walkers & other handicap items; pots, pans & small kitchen appliances; other misc. items too numerous to mention. Terms: Cash or good check. Credit/Debit cards accepted with 5% convenience fee. ID required for registration. Everything sold “as is.” Not responsible for accidents or merchandise after sold. Statements made at auction take precedence over printed & digital material.

Visit www.oakcrestauctions.com for photos

Phil Crutchfield, Owner

6&287 /($'(5 ³ %HIRUH EHFRPLQJ )XOWRQ &RXQW\ 6RLO DQG :DWHU &RQVHUYDWLRQ 'LVWULFW GLUHFWRU 0HJDQ 0DORWW ZDV LQYROYHG LQ D QXPEHU RI VFRXWLQJ DFWLYLWLHV LQFOXGLQJ WKH SODQWLQJ RI WUHHV DW 0LVVLVVLQHZD 5HVHUYRLU 6WDWH 3DUN LQ 3KRWR SURYLGHG E\ 0HJDQ 0DORWW the SWCD will know how to serve the community and implement the best management practice, so we can be good stewards over the

land given to us.” For more information on Fulton County SWCD, call (574) 2233220, ext. 101.

PUBLIC AUCTIONS Meredith Adams Auction 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25, at 1611 Main. St., Rochester. Primitives and antiques, advertising, Ray Harm prints, toys, Coke cooler, vehicles, tools, motorcycle, vintage radios, and sidecar and more. Metzger Auction. Household Auction, Phil Crutchfield, Owner 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26, at 10257 Muckshaw Road, Plymouth. From South Michigan Street, go west on Oakhill Avenue, then south on Muckshaw Road, to site. Gibson upright freezer; Kenmore refrigerator; flat screen TV’s; Pride electric scooter; love seat; BR suite with king-sized bed, chest, dresser, nightstand; oak table, six chairs; bar stools; desk; platform rocker; entertainment center; storage cabinet; Oreck sweeper; hedge trimmers; hand truck; numerous

coolers; shop vac; hand tools; paper shredder; exercise bike; lamps; wall hangings; corner TV stand; miniatures, humidifier; card table, chairs, wheelchairs; walkers, other handicap items; pots, pans, small kitchen appliances; other misc. items. Oakcrest Auctions. NuLaw Partnership Auction 6:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26, 5 miles west of Plymouth on US 30 to Union Road then north 1 mile to Seventh Road, then west. Ball Auction and Realty Inc. Shannon And Amy Floor Auction 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, at Akron Community Center, 815 E. Rural St., Akron. Schrader Real Estate. Real Estate Auction 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 10, Lake Life Restaurant, 3687 N. Barbee Road, Warsaw. Open house is 6-7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 26. Metzger Auction.


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

22

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Garage Sales

BUYER BEWARE The Papers Incorporated cannot screen all advertisements to eliminate possibilities of fraud or misleading information. If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is. Persons responding to ads are advised to contact the Better Business Bureau in your area or the Indiana Secretary of State’s Fraud Hotline before sending any money. 1-800-223-8791

GIANT 6-FAMILY YARD SALE, 1027 E. 9th St. Thursday, Friday, Sept. 22-23, 8-5; Saturday, Sept. 24, 8-12. Vera Bradley, furniture, high chair, jewelry, air fryer, leather jackets, clothes all sizes, toddler/adult Harley clothes.

Free Free

A040

FREE KITTENS to good inside home, 9 weeks old, litter trained. 574-835-6329

Garage Sales

A070

LARGE POLE BARN SALE! 2842 Wabash Ave., Friday & Saturday, 9am-5ish. MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE, Thursday-Friday 8-4. Name brand clothes, all sizes. Baby-toddler items, house decor, small furniture, gym equipment, etc. 708 Sweetgum Road, Rochester.

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A070 Miscellaneous

BARN/GARAGE SALE. Pillows, dishes, pictures, cigar boxes, clothes, kids toys, CDs, DVDs, decor items, lots of miscellaneous. Small fishing pontoon, partially refurbished. 1066 Park St., Rochester, Friday, Sept. 23, 9-4; Saturday, Sept. 24, 9-1. FAMILY GARAGE SALE, Sat., 9/24, 9-2. 8014 W. 1000 S. Most items marked down 50%. Dining table & chairs, love seat, boutique clothing sm-2XL, men’s M-L, house & holiday decor, new child’s JD easel, kitchen bookshelf, lots of misc.

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ROLITE OVERHEAD DOOR CO. Sales & Service — Commercial & Residential 6676 S. Old U.S. Hwy. 31, Macy, IN 46951 Mike Olinger

1-800-552-3309 Fax 574-382-2522

JOIN #TeamAAM ROCHESTER

Become a published author. We want to read your book! Dorrance Publishing trusted since 1920. Consultation, production, promotion & distribution. Call for free author’s guide 1-877-729-4998 or visit dorranceinfo.com/ads

Moving Sale

A088

HUGE MOVING SALE. Upright freezer good condition, loveseat, glider rockers, antique China cabinet, baby crib and high chair, area rugs, breakfast set, chairs, China set, antique green cans, quilts, table saw, bow and arrow, lots of kitchenware and decor and lots of books and much more. Sept. 22-24, 6890 SR 110, Argos, 8am-5pm.

BUSINESS SERVICES Exterminating

C140

Protect your home from pests safely and affordably. Pest, rodent, termite and mosquito control. Call for a quote or inspection today 844-394-9278

Handyman

C157

HANDYMAN TROY Small Remodeling, Decks, Landscaping, Odd Jobs, Garage Door Pressure Washing Call Troy

(574) 835-8499

Insurance AFTER 90 DAYS

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Rochester Telephone Company Currently Seeking Applicants For The Following Position

LINE CREW WORKER

2Q /LQH &ODVVL¿HG $GV 2QO\

A085 Lawn & Garden

JOB SETTERS I MACHINE OPERATORS I MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATES

$3,000 SIGN-ON BONUS

&216(&87,9( 5816 7+,5' 581 ,6 )5((

63(&,$/ ,16(57,21

C200

Dental insurance - Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance - not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1-855-526-1060 www.dental50plus.com/ads #6258

Lawn & Garden

C220

LOOK! Now stocking generators. New stock of Echo equipment. Lawn mowers, chain saws, trimmers, small engines, sales & service, new saws and chains in stock. 3871E 700N, Ramer Small Engine, 574-223-3572.

C220 Building Materials P040

Chain Saw Sharpening LAWN MOWER BLADES

Done At 1515 W. 450 N., Rochester

See Charlie 574-223-5230

135 Ft. Spool Of 6/3 Underground Cable 574-223-8374 Leave Message (Can be used to run electricity underground)

Fuel/Firewood

WALNUT REPAIR, starters, alternators, generators, costume hydraulic hoses & battery cables, tractor repair, mag neto repair, Mon.-Sat. dawn to dusk. 574-892-5968

TV Satellite

C400

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23. 1-866-479-1516

Misc. Service

C430

AT&T Internet. Starting at $40/month w/12-mo agmt. 1 TB of data/mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1-855-364-3948 HughesNet - Finally, super-fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866-499-0141 Vivint. Smart security. Professionally installed. One connected system for total peace of mind. Free professional installation! Four free months of monitoring! Call to customize your system. 1-833-841-0737 Discount air travel. Call Flight Services for best pricing on domestic & international flights inside & from the US. Serving United, Delta, American & Southwest & many more. Free quote! Have travel dates ready! 844-951-2014 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855-761-1725

MERCHANDISE Appliances

P020

FOR SALE: New dishwasher. Call 574-201-9939.

Pike Garage Doors Inc. Sales - Installation - Parts - Service

ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: • Plows and trenches cables and completes other excavation projects. • Sets poles and anchors. • Places aerial cable. • Splicing of cable and fiber. • Installs lines to customer premises. • Conducts other miscellaneous maintenance as needed. • Locate underground utilities.

Zimmer Stump Grinding

117 E. Third St. • Rochester • 574-223-2898

P100

COUNTRY COMFORT WOOD BURNER, fan, poker, brush, shovel. $700. 574-835-8686

Mechanical Services C228 Health Aids

This position requires a person comfortable and familiar with heavy equipment but also able to perform cable and fiber splicing, plows and trenches cables, complete other excavation projects, set poles and anchors, places aerial cable and install lines to customer premises.

We are an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer and maintain a drug-free workplace. Pre-employment physical examination including substance abuse testing will be performed. Interested candidates should send resume and/or application to: Rochester Telephone Co., Inc., 117 W. 8th St. Rochester, IN 46975 or hrdept@rtc1.com. Applications & Full Job Description also available online at www.RTC1.com

FOR SALE

P140

Attention oxygen therapy users! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. Free info kit. Call 877-929-9587

Health/Fitness

P150

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00. 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888-445-5928 Hablamos Español

Misc. Merchandise P200 Put on your TV Ears & hear TV w/unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original originally $129.95 - now w/this special offer only $59.95 w/code MCB59! 1-888-805-0840 Paying top cash for men’s sportwatches! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 833-603-3236 Prepare for power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator $0 Down + Low Monthly Pmt Request a free Quote. Call before the next power outage: 1-855-948-6176 Aloe Care Health medical alert system. Most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice-activated! No wi-fi needed! Special offer w/code CARE20 for $20 off Mobile Companion. 1-855-341-5862 Safe Step. North America’s #1 Walk-in tub. Comprehensive lifetime warranty. Top-of-the-line installation and service. Now featuring our free shower package & $1600 off - limited time! Financing available. 1-855-417-1306 The Generac PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1-877-539-0299 Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-833-610-1936

PETS

WE HONOR VISA & MASTERCARD

FREE QUOTES

574-224-9747 Eli Zimmerman

Dogs/Cats/Pets Q010 SHI-POO PUPPIES. 3 males, one female. $500 each. Available September 8th. Call 574-835-8499.

REAL ESTATE RENTALS DIY STUMP GRINDER RENTAL

Buildings For Rent U030 LIONS CLUB BUILDING - Special occasions, receptions, graduations, reunions. 574-223-0563


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

WWW.SHOPPINGGUIDENEWS.COM

23

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Rochester Metal Products celebrates 85th year Fulton County Chamber of Commerce named Rochester Metal Products its September 2022 “Member of the Month.” RMP will also be celebrating its 85th anniversary with an open house from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24. Visitors will be treated to food, drinks and tours of the facility at 616 Indiana Ave. There will also be drawings for some “Made in Rochester Indiana”

TRANSPORTATION Autos Wanted

W050

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES. Paying cash! Top dollar, will pick up. Call anytime 574-505-0855.

WANTED Junk Autos & Trucks Paying Fair Prices!

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Not Running? That’s OK We Will Pick It UP!

Misc. Auto

iron skillets. Rochester Metal Products traces its roots back to a school furniture manufacturing business that started in Richmond in the 1890s. The school furniture business evolved over time into other products, and in 1937 the iron foundry operation was moved to Rochester as a standalone company. RMP makes products for many industries, such as automotive, ag-

riculture, construction, pump and valve, hydraulic and rail. RMP is also a major recycler, with around 75% of their products made from recycled metal. The original brick structure along Fifth Street, originally used by a local circus, is still in use today, though growth in the business has led to many expansions over the years. Today the company has 200,000 square feet of manufacturing and of-

fice space along Indiana Avenue. RMP emphasizes quality and customer service, which starts with their 325 dedicated team members. A unique aspect of RMP is that it is an employee-owned company. In 2012, ownership of RMP was transferred to an Employee Stock Ownership Plan to maintain local ownership. Team member roles include melt-

ing metal, operating automated pouring equipment, operating core machines, operating auto grinders and trim presses, tool and die production, maintenance and inspection. RMP also supports various charities and youth programs in Fulton County. To learn more about RMP, visit rochestermetals.com.

Office Manager Position Available We have an immediate opening in our Rochester office: • Pleasant telephone etiquette. • Customer service oriented. • Must be computer literate. Macintosh helpful. • Good with detail and accuracy. • Some local news writing required. • Knowledge of or willing to learn point and shoot digital photography. • 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday • Benefit package available. Send Resume To:

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Sunny weather blankets annual Trail of Courage Myriads of visitors descended on the Fulton County Historical Society grounds last weekend’s Trail of Courage Living History Festival, held Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 17-18. The weather was warm for the annual event, which included a variety of activities, including a full

schedule of history related programs on the Chippeway Village stage and the Hillside Amphitheater stage, muzzleloading shoots, authenticity competitions for camps, booths and participant clothing, demonstrations of traditional crafts and skills, Indian and pioneer dancing for all, canoe rides and more.


Shopping Guide News of Fulton County, Wednesday, September 21, 2022

24

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Let’s study the Bible David trusted the Lord (Read: 1 Samuel 18:1-33) “God said, I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will.” Acts 13:22. David’s greatest test of faith was not

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when he faced Goliath; it was when he had to serve daily in Saul’s court. David’s faith was tested in different ways: First, David was tested by popularity 1 Samuel. 18:1-11. David was beloved by Jonathan, Saul’s son, and this in itself was an opportunity for testing. David would be the next king, but, by rights, Jonathan should inherit the crown. The friendship between these two men of God is a great example for us. Certainly there was no jealousy on Jonathan’s part because of the honor bestowed upon David.

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However, with Saul it was another matter, for David was popular with the people. The fact that the women praised David and not David’s God is significant. David was wise enough not to put too much stock in their words. But Saul’s heart filled with envy when he heard that David had more praise than he did. “As the fining pot for silver, and the furnace for gold; so is a man to his praise” Proverbs 27:21. Praise is like a hot furnace: it reveals what a person is really made of. The praise that made David humble only brought the dross to the top in Saul’s heart and revealed his pride and desire for glory. Second, David was tested by demotion 1 Samuel 18:18:12-16. Verse 5 suggests that David was the

head of Saul’s personal body-guard, but now he is demoted to being merely the captain over one thousand men. Did this change David? No. His faith was in the Lord, and he continued to serve and honor his king. This made King Saul all the more afraid. The king knew that God had departed from him and had given blessings to David. It takes real faith to experience a demotion before the eyes of the people and still maintain your humility and service. Third, David was tested by disappointment 1 Samuel 18:1730. Saul had promised one of his daughters to the man who defeated Goliath 1 Samuel 17:25, and now he was going to fulfill his promise. Notice David’s humility before the king in verse 18. But, did Saul keep his > edwardjones.com | Member SIPC

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word? No. The woman was given to another man. Then Saul tried to use his daughter Michal as a tool to slay David; for the king demanded an impossible dowry, hoping that David would be killed in trying to obtain it. But the Lord was with David, and he completed the mission successfully. It is unfortunate that he did marry Michal, for the union was never a happy one. While in exile, David lost Michal to another man 1 Samuel 25:44, but he gained her back when he started to reign at Hebron 2 Samuel 3:13-16. Her attitude toward David led to a complete separation later 2 Samuel 6:20-23. Read Ron Purkey’s free Bible study outlines atrcpbibleoutlines.com. Purkey has been an ordained Baptist minister for 50 years.

Beacon Credit Union announces Rochester Member Appreciation Day Sept. 23 Beacan Credit union, along with the Beacon Ag Group, announces details for the 2022 Rochester Member Appreciation Day. This year will mark 91 years of serving their member-owners. Beacon is looking forward to showing its appreciation by celebrating its member-owners with themed events at the member centers. The Rochester Member Centers will be celebrating with memberowners on Friday, Sept. 23, during regular business hours. Celebrations will take place at 504 Main St., and 430 Rouch Place Drive in Rochester. Members and expect food, fun and excitement with Beacon Credit Union staff. “Our member-owners are very important to us, they are the center of everything we do,” states Kevin Willour, president/CEO. “We are blessed and grateful to have their support. Without such great member-owners Beacon Credit Union would not be where it is today.” Follow Beacon Credit Union on social media for additional dates and locations.

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