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CIRCUS CAME TO TOWN

GLOBAL DAY OF ACTION

Chikoko unleashed the circus and fashion to Chicoans at CalSkate. Story C1

Activists participate in international peaceful demonstration. Video theorion.com/multimedia VOLUME 67 ISSUE 10

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

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Group attacks skater on campus bike path

CAMPUS >>

Juniper Rose STAFF WRITER

A Chico State student was assaulted with his skateboard about 2 a.m. Saturday on the bike path west of campus. The student, whose name is being withheld by police, was riding his skateboard northbound on the bike path along the railroad tracks behind Nettleton Stadium, Chico police Sgt. Rob Merrifield said. Five males were walking ahead of the student, he said. When the student attempted to pass the group, one of the men punched him, knocking him to the ground. “The other four guys jumped on him and started kicking and punching him,” Merrifield said. “One of the

A Dia de Los Muertos dance and celebration will be held

at 6 p.m. Saturday at Cafe Culture. The event will be put on by the Phi Sigma Iota International Foreign Language Honor Society, with funding by A.S. Sustainability. This festival will have many fun activities including a costume contest, dance lessons, live music and much more.

on suspicion of assault suspects hit him in the face with a deadly weapon. with his own skateboard.” The victim had serious Witnesses ran to assist One of the bruising, but was not hosthe victim, leading the suspects pitalized, Merrifield said. group to jump over a fence The student who was and run off, he said. hit him attacked did not know the Officers responding to in the males and had never had the call found the group face with any previous encounters on Nord Avenue just west his own with them, he said. of the bike path, Merrifield “It is possible that they said. The five males were skateboard. had been intending to rob identified as being responhim,” Merrifield said. “Or it sible for the assault. could have just been a ranAll five males were ROB MERRIFIELD dom assault.” arrested, he said. Three Students who live on of those involved were Chico Police sergeant Nord Avenue are scared aged 18 to 19 and taken to use the bike path and to Butte County Jail. A 16-year-old and a 17-year-old were try to avoid it at night, said Corey taken to Butte County Juvenile D’Angelo, a junior pre-nursing major Hall. One suspect was arrested who lived on Nord Avenue last year.

“Last year my parents did not want me to have night classes because they didn’t want me to ride home late,” D’Angelo said. “When I had night classes my roommate picked me up every time because I didn’t want to have to walk home.” Chico State students know the dangers of the bike path, but it can be difficult to avoid. “Either you go on a scary dark path where people can jump out and hurt you, or you go on a busy street where cars can hit you,” said Madison Lee, a sophomore liberal studies major. “Either way, I feel like it’s dangerous to get home if you live on Nord.” Juniper Rose can be reached at jrose@theorion.com

Source: Campus Announcements

Students sue CSU board over fee hike

BIG AIR Sasha Sinkevich, a sophomore pre-nursing major, competes during the Empire Wake Series Western Collegiate Regionals.

Andre Byik A SST. NE WS EDITOR

Chico will be participating in its third year of the international event “Thrill the World.” The event is open to all ages and will be held at 6:30 p.m. Saturday in the City Plaza. To participate you had to attend mandatory meetings. However, this will be a dance you will not want to miss watching. Source: Artoberfest.org

A unique dance group, Pilobolus, will be performing at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Laxson Auditorium. The dance group combines mime and acrobatics into their dance choreography to create an unforgettable performance that will leave you wondering, “How did they do that?” Source: Chico Performances

NPR’s Planet Money will discuss the economy and its ever changing situations at 7:30 Friday in Laxson Auditorium. They will be breaking down difficult economic theories so that every audience member can understand them, not just an economics major. Planet Money’s Alex Blumberg and Adam Davidson will be sure to leave attendees with some extra knowledge and also some laughs.

A class action lawsuit on behalf of about 175,000 California State University students could see the CSU dolling out tens of millions of dollars in refunds if students win the case. The lawsuit, Keller v. Board of Trustees of CSU, alleges that the CSU breached its contracts with students by increasing fees after initially requiring students to pay a different amount for the fall 2009 term, according to an email sent to students from a calstate.edu address. The CSU denies it was illegal to increase fees or tuition and “denies that it entered into enforceable contracts with the students not to increase fees or tuition, or that it violated the covenant of good faith and fair dealing,” according to the email. “It would be impossible to breach a contract,” said Erik Fallis, a spokesman for the CSU Chancellor’s Office. “There is no contract signed between the university and the students.” The CSU’s relation with students is statutory, not contractual, Fallis said. A fee increase of $336 was charged to most full-time undergraduate students in fall 2009 due to a cut of $584 million to the CSU, Fallis said. The CSU could pay millions is students prevail, Fallis said. Students from 19 CSUs would be eligible for refunds if they did not receive a Cal Grant or State University Grant that offset the fee increase, according to the email. Some may choose to opt out. Rena Brovelli, a senior nursing major, remembers the fee increase in 2009, but after working hard to get to Chico State, there’s no way she wouldn’t pay that additional fee, she said. “I don’t think anyone will opt-out,” said Arpit Shah, a junior computer science major from India. The CSU claims that “at least some students indicated that they preferred and consented to the increase in fees and tuition,” according to the email. Some students prefer higher fees to lowered quality of education, Fallis said. Meetings between the two parties will determine further proceedings this week.

Source: Student Announcements Andre Byik can be reached at abyik@theorion.com

INDEX >>

Flyin’ High

For more on the Empire Wake Series Western Collegiate Regionals, see B1

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

Bidwell Mansion park closure looms Dani Anguiano STAFF WRITER

Bidwell Mansion may soon be closing its doors for good. The decision is based on the California budget crisis, which led officials to announce plans to close the state historic park May 2012, along with 70 other state parks. The mansion was once the home of Gen. John Bidwell, the founder of Chico, and his wife, Annie Bidwell. But recently, a “Save the Mansion” fund was created in hopes of prolonging the park closure by at least another year. Terry Duffert, a Chico resident, has toured the mansion several times and thinks it has brought him closer to Chico, he said. “It’s sad to see it close,” Duffert said. “It’s a real loss of the history of Chico.” Parks were selected for closure based on statewide significance, visitation and fiscal strength, according to California State Parks. With that methodology, Bidwell Mansion shouldn’t be closing, said Amber Drake, tour guide supervisor at the park. “Bidwell mansion is important not just to Chico, but to California,” Drake said. Though the mansion has a statewide

significance, it doesn’t do as well in the fiscal strength area, Drake said. The cost of running the mansion is around $200,000 annually, and in revenue the RELATED park makes around $57,000 annually. For editorial on More than half of Bidwell Mansion the budget goes closing, see A10 to staff expenses, though over time the staff has been reduced to include several part-time employees and Drake, the only full-time employee. If the park is closed, the government will still have to pay to maintain the park, which includes heating and air, landscape maintenance, security systems and pest control, Drake said. The staff will be laid off and the building will no longer be available to tour, but tax dollars will still be used. California State Parks are one tenth of a percent of California’s budget, Drake said. No decision has been made on what will happen to the artifacts if the mansion is closed as planned. Supporters of the mansion are hoping that the Save the Mansion fund can support the park for another year, said Michael Magliari, >> please see BIDWELL | A8

Zingg warns of $4.1 million cut to school Griffin Rogers STAFF WRITER

Chico State is preparing for a $4.1 million budget cut in the spring 2012 semester, a result of the California failing to meet revenue goals that would defer a $100 million cut. Chico State President Paul Zingg presented his university report at Thursday’s Academic Senate meeting and focused on the budget situation, which “remains totally in flux,” Zingg said. California has a trigger that would cut $100 million from the California State University system if certain revenue goals aren’t met by the end of the year. Since revenues in the current academic year have been inconsistent, the CSU is prepared for the cut, Zingg said. Chico State’s reserve funds would weaken the blow, but seeing that the reserve funds are already low, this defensive effort could diminish backup funds entirely, said Mike Kotar, the Faculty and Student Policies chair. Every year, the CSU hands the state a budget request to fulfill the needs of the system’s 23 universities, said Mike Uhlenkamp, a spokesman for the CSU Chancellor’s Office. This year, the CSU is asking for an additional $315 million that would take effect in the next academic year starting July 1. The proposed budget would be broken down in several ways, the most notable of which would be $100 million toward enrollment growth and $95 million toward increasing faculty compensation, according to a Sept. 21 CSU press release. Although California has been experiencing statewide cuts, asking for a multimillion-dollar budget increase is routine, he said. “We’ve been cutting so much that naturally we’ve been asking for more,” Uhlenkamp said. In the current academic year, the Department of Finance told the CSU that there would be no cuts in the beginning months of 2012 if the system reached $4 million in revenue by the end of 2011. In August, there was room for optimism, Uhlenkamp said. Now, he describes the CSU’s chance of dodging a $100 million budget cut as “not good.” Along with the discussion >> please see CHANGES | A8

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Five Chico State athletic teams stand in first place after this weekend’s competitions. Sports B1-B4

Features Learn to make cheap and original Halloween decorations and costumes. Story D2

Opinion Werewolves square off against vampires in a popculture battle of the sexiest. Story A10


A2 |

NATION >>

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

WEATHER >> today | sunny

thursday | sunny

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friday | sunny

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saturday | sunny

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sunday | sunny

monday | mostly sunny

76 47

75 48

tuesday | sunny

73 47

WORLD NEWS >>

President Barack Obama announced the completed withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. The 39,000 troops will be returning to the U.S. in December, though 150 troops will remain to assist in arms sales. Following their return, Obama can declare the nine-year war over. The president had made a pledge in his 2008 campaign to end the war in Iraq.

Bangkok — Recent floods, said to be the worst in decades, will last another four to six weeks, the country’s prime minister said. The situation is very dangerous and has led to the deaths of about 350 people and displaced more than 110,000 people from their homes. Tactics for draining the water have changed, leaving some concerned that the amount of water cannot be safely controlled. Source: BBC

Mumbai, India — Unwanted names were shed in India as 285 girls were allowed to change their names that meant “unwanted” in Hindi. This was done in hopes of fighting gender discrimination in India. Many girls changed their names from “Nakusa” or “Nakushi” to match those of Bollywood stars such as “Aishwarya” or more traditional names like “Vaishali,” which means prosperous, beautiful and good. Source: Associated Press

Sydney — Occupy Sydney protests were raided by about 100 police officers resulting in dozens of arrests. Several protesters against corporate greed had been sleeping in a business district town square for days despite camping equipment being seized. The raid began around 5 a.m. Saturday and included several homeless people who had joined the demonstrators. Source: Reuters

Somalia — The French woman Marie Dedieu, who was being held captive in Somalia, has died after one month of being kidnapped. This may be in response to her medical condition and medication that was being withheld. Officials heard of her death through contacts that were negotiating her release, however the date and other specifics surrounding the death are currently unknown. Source: BBC

Tugi, Cameroon—The impoverished area of Tugi, a small town south of Nigeria, is the birthplace of two twins conjoined at the chest and abdomen. The possibility of an operation separating the two is slim. In addition to the obvious concerns of money and access to health care, the parents are facing issues of superstition, as some believe the birth was a bad omen. Source: CNN

Source: CNN

U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton dismissed a lawsuit brought forth by the state of Arizona and Gov. Jan Brewer. The lawsuit accused the Obama administration, particularly the Justice Department and Department of Homeland Security, of failing to secure the ArizonaMexico border and failing to stop the “invasion” of illegal immigrants. The federal judge dismissed the case, offering that it was a political issue and not something for the court to decide. Source: MSNBC

CALIFORNIA >>

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

INVOLUNTARY CLOSURE Bob Galia [left], owner of the North Valley Holistic Health marijuana dispensary, serves one of his last customers on Wednesday. The store was forced to close after the federal government told Galia’s landlord that he could either choose to evict the tenant or lose his property.

Feds smoke out dispensary Dani Anguiano STAFF WRITER

The Fresh and Easy Neighborhood Market Inc. is recalling its bagged spinach because of suspicions that it may be contaminated with Listeria, a bacterial organism that can cause fatal infections in the young and elderly. Currently, no illnesses have been reported. The recall was set in motion after a bag of spinach tested positive for Listeria. The product was sold in stores throughout California, Nevada and Arizona. Source: Associated Press

North Valley Holistic Health has had its last toke. The local marijuana dispensary served its last patient Wednesday due to the federal government’s crackdown on California’s medical marijuana industry. “Right now, we’re giving it away,” said Robert Galia, CEO of the dispensary, regarding marijuana for his patients. North Valley Holistic Health on Highway 32 is one of many dispensaries closing across California because of the crackdown on dispensaries providing marijuana to patients, since it is still illegal under federal law. After government officials alerted the landlord that he would have to forfeit his property if he continued renting to

the Chico dispensary, he chose to evict his tenant. In addition to the 16 people employed by the dispensary, people all across Chico are feeling the impact. The closures are not fair, said a fifth-year business administration major who did not want to be named. “I have had problems with sleep and anxiety for a while,” he said. “This is the only thing that helps.” The issue of dispensaries closing has many questioning the legality of marijuana use. For Lynn and Melodie Van Erden, parents of a prospective Chico State student, marijuana use isn’t a concern of theirs. “I have mixed feelings because it is breaking the federal law, but ultimately I don’t care about marijuana use,” Lynn Van Erden said. “Going after it is a waste of

our taxpayer dollars.” It is estimated that California dispensaries produce sales taxes of as much as $105 million, according to the California State Board of Equalization. The patients the dispensary serves could begin growing their own supplies or buying from illegal dealers, both of which don’t provide tax revenue, Galia said. That is one of a few economic outcomes, said Mark Morlock, professor of economics. “This will drive the market underground again, making it more dangerous,” Morlock said. “And it’s a loss of tax revenue.” The controversial issue of marijuana use brings differing opinions to light across campus. Some don’t see the problem with marijuana use, like Allison Harger, an open marijuana user and senior kinesiology major. Despite this, she feels unsure about whether it

should be legalized, because she fears it could be overtaxed. Marijuana should be taxed, said Li Ju, a senior geography major. “I think the government should control it,” Ju said. Whether marijuana is legalized by the federal government or not, employees of the dispensary are feeling the effects. “I had to let 16 people go,” Galia said. Harold Young, the customer service manager at the dispensary, is disappointed about the closure, and worried for the future, he said. The primary concern is the patients and the loss of their medicine. “Ultimately, they aren’t hurting us, they’re hurting the patients,” Young said. “You don’t see them closing down Walgreens or CVS.” Dani Anguiano can be reached at danguiano@theorion.com

More than a dozen earthquakes rumbled underneath Berkeley over the weekend. After Thursday’s 4.0 quake, smaller aftershocks, the largest of which registered 3.8, were felt throughout a large area. The first quake was rumbling enough to cause items to fall off shelves. No injuries have been reported. Source: Los Angeles Times

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POLICE BLOTTER Information cited directly from Chico Police Department or University Police Department. University Police Wednesday, 6:37 p.m.: Suspicious vehicle reported behind O’Connell Technology Center. “Male in older gray van ‘burning rubber and driving out of control,’ per reporting party. Lights are not on.” Wednesday, 6:55 a.m. Transient problem reported in Siskiyou Hall’s men’s restroom. “Appears to be a homeless man taken up residency. He left prior to University Police Department arrival.”

Female making threats trying to stab people in the room with a curtain rod. Female has been trying to shoot meth.

THURSDAY, 7:13 P.M. Chico police records

Wednesday, 10:30 p.m.: Drunk in public reported. “Female appears very drunk. Having trouble standing up on her own. Drinking unfounded, female stated she had been up studying for midterms, she had felt lightheaded and fell, however she declined medical assistance and sustained no injuries.” Friday, 12:09 a.m.: Medical aid – non-alcohol related. “Report of subject having panic attack. Reporting party contacted CPD and requested ambulance for roommate who he thought was having a panic attack.” Friday, 10:43 a.m.: Battery reported. “Victim of a human bite as a result of a fight. When reporting party advised CPD would be contacted remandated reporting subject fled. Reporting party concerned about infection.

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Chico Police Thursday, 7:13 p.m.: Influence of drugs reported on the 2000 block of the Esplanade. “Female making threats trying to stab people in the room with a curtain rod. Female has been trying to shoot meth. Two subjects still holding her down/she is fighting them.” Thursday 7:20 p.m.: Gun reported on the 1000 block of the Esplanade. “Reporting party states male on motorcycle with dog in milk crate: Husky puppy possibly. Subject said he was tailgaiting him and then pulled a handgun out of his side bag and yelled profanities. Continued on East First Avenue towards Warner. Reporting party now at home.” Thursday, 8:10 p.m.: Gun reported on the 500 block of the Esplanade. “Subject in red convertible was driving erratically northbound on the Esplanade. Reporting party yelled at him that he was the worst driver ever. Subject slammed on his breaks in front of North Star Mills and waived a hand gun at the reporting party and said something to the effect of ‘Let’s finish what you started.’” Thursday, 8:56 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported on the 300 block of West Second Street. “Subject was asked to leave because he carried a bag of knives into the bar. Subject said he had to have them because he was a ‘prospector.’ Subject refused to leave the front of the bar. Subject still out there but not causing any problems. Reporting party just wanted to make officers aware. No contact needed.” Saturday, 7:56 p.m.: Suspicious subject reported on the 100 block of Cohasset Road. “Male subject hiding in the shadows to the front of the restaurant in the planter area. He is sitting there yelling profanities. Too dark for description.” –Compiled by Andre Byik

Safety sought in moonlight walk Raquel Royers STAFF WRITER

Students, faculty and University Police came together to roam the campus on Thursday night with the same goal in mind – safety. The Moonlight Safety Walk brought together about 150 people willing to donate their time to make Chico State safer. The walk was put on by the Public Safety Advisory Committee and sponsored by the President’s Office, University Police Lt. Robyn Hearne said. “We have several eyes, which makes it easier,” Hearne said. “This is a very focused group of folks going out there.” Student input is one of the most important aspects of the Moonlight Walk, Associated Students President London Long said. “Students can really connect and feel like they are a part of the public safety on our campus,” Long said. “I think it’s really important for students to be involved in these decisions.” The campus was split up into four areas and individuals could choose which group they wished to go with. Each group had a representative member from organizations such as University Police and Facilities Management and Services. When a hazard or safety concern was identified, it was written down on a list and also marked with blue tape or a pink ribbon so it could be found later. Forty safety concerns were noted from a group roaming areas around campus housing, Shurmer Gym and surrounding areas near the bike path. Tree trimmings, inactive lights and blue emergency phones were the most common hazards documented. Lighting is one of the biggest concerns for the campus after the sun goes down. University Police tries to have the proper amount of lighting in campus areas that are frequented often. This includes walking paths, parking lots and bike paths. One major problem is that there are many “unofficial” paths that are used to cut through to the main bike path from campus, Hearne said. Students need to identify a main route that will be taken to get to the bike path so that the university can make it the safest route. “Students need to make the decision,” Hearne said. “If it were determined that a certain area is ‘the route’ then let’s light it up like a Christmas tree.” The lists of hazards that were found will be counted and sent to Facilities Management and Services, Hearne said. Facilities Management and Services is good at fi xing the things presented to the department, said Marvin Pratt, director of Environmental Health and Safety. A lot of the

THE ORION • MICHELLE REINMUTH

LIGHTS OUT University Police Lt. Robyn Hearne and Jaypinderpal Virdee, Associated Students commissioner of Community Affairs, look for potential safety hazards around Acker Gym during the Moonlight Safety Walk on Thursday. lighting projects on campus stemmed from previous walks. In the future, University Police plans to install security cameras above blue lights in order to identify the caller and monitor the problem, Hearne said. The cameras would lead to a safer campus. Jaypinderpal Virdee, A.S. commissioner of Community Affairs, thinks the blue lights are of huge importance to student safety on campus, he said. “I think student safety is a huge priority on campus,” Virdee said. “I am happy that I can participate in this and help to ensure that each student is as safe as possible.” Raquel Royers can be reached at rroyers@theorion.com

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

A5

Police prepare for party prowlers

I think all the craziness takes a fun holiday and turns it into a bad thing.

SHANNON SYDOW Junior liberal arts major

Juniper Rose STAFF WRITER

An estimated 10,000 out-oftowners will be joining Chico State students as they hit the streets in costumes for one of Chico’s biggest party weekends of the year. Chico police discussed preparations and expectancy for the upcoming Halloween weekend at a meeting Wednesday. Police officers from the Chico Police Department and surrounding areas will be on duty in downtown Chico from 6 p.m. Friday through 6 a.m. Tuesday, said George Laver, interim lieutenant and incident commander for this year’s Halloween operation. Friday and Saturday nights are expected be the most active, so the majority of police resources will be focused on those nights, Laver said. Chico police want to raise awareness about ways to prevent events getting out of control, he said. “Ninety-nine percent of the issues that we deal with on Halloween weekend are a result of alcohol consumption,” Laver said. An estimated 60 to 75 arrests are expected to take place per night on Friday and Saturday, he said. Most of these arrests are the consequences of being drunk in public, resisting and delaying an officer, fighting and, occasionally, a stabbing or shooting. Visitors who come to Chico from out of town have a big influence on the weekend, he said. “They don’t look at potential consequences the same way that our students do,” Laver said. “It’s kind of a hit and run — play hard, act a fool and leave before anyone knows who you are.” Halloween in Chico can be overwhelming, said Shannon Sydow, a junior liberal studies major. “I haven’t really gone out on Halloween because it’s just too crazy for me,” she said. “A lot

FILE PHOTO • JEB DRAPER

NOT PLAYING AROUND Police detain a man during last year’s Halloween festivities. Police expect to make up to 75 alcohol related arrests on both Halloween weekend, when an estimated 10,000 out-of-towners visit. of people come here and it just gets to be too many drunk people doing stupid things in one place at one time.” The size of crowds on Halloween weekend lead to a higher likelihood of people committing serious crimes because people feel braver and more secure in a large group, he said. “The bigger the group, the more anonymous you can remain,” Laver said. “If you remain in the back your chances of getting caught are, quite frankly, next to nothing.” It is recommended that people keep their parties small and restricted to just their friends,

he said. “If you don’t know people, don’t let them in your house and don’t let them in your party,” Laver said. “We also encourage people to call the police before masses of people show up at their doorstep and things get out of control.” For additional safety, a bottle ban will be in effect for a 72-hour period from 7 a.m. Saturday to 7 a.m. Tuesday, he said. The bottle ban is designed to create a “glass-free zone” from Flume Street on the east to Cedar Street on the west and from West Seventh Street

to Big Chico Creek, Laver said. The intent is not to prevent people from drinking in this area but to prevent them from using glass bottles, he said. “Glass tends to break and cause people issues, and if you break a bottle it can become a stabbing instrument,” he said. Students anticipate Halloween weekend with an array of mixed feelings. There are other options than partying, Sydow said. She anticipates spending Halloween in with friends or going out to a movie. “I think all the craziness takes a fun holiday and turns

it into a bad thing,” she said. “I just kind of try to avoid everyone on Halloween and just do something away from everyone else.” Going out during Halloween weekend is a choice, said Josh Miranda, a junior mechatronic engineering major. “I’m from Chico, so I’ve experienced the normal side and the crazy party side,” he said. “I don’t usually associate myself with that part of college and I pretty much avoid it completely on Halloween.” Other students look forward to Halloween. “I think it is going to be pretty big this year again,” said Russell Rogers, a senior applied computer graphics major. “The fact that it’s on Monday — it’s not going to affect me. I don’t have class until 11 the next day anyway.” Halloween in Chico was a cultural shock for Fyisal Al-Mohawes, a senior marketing major and international student. There is nothing similar to Halloween in Saudi Arabia, Al-Mohawes said. Creative costumes can be funny and a way to break the ice, meet new people and have a good time, he said. However, students should also be aware and careful not to offend others with their costumes. “Sometimes people dress in traditional Saudi Arabian clothes — it’s not right to wear that on Halloween,” AlMohawes said. “People think it’s funny, and it might be funny, but some people think it’s offensive.” Halloween is fun for someone who is new to the city, he said. Four years of Halloween in Chico have all been positive experiences. “I’m even waiting for Halloween right now,” AlMohawes said. “Seriously. I’m a senior and I just have one semester left. I will definitely miss it.” Juniper Rose can be reached at jrose@theorion.com


A6 |

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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Future Wildcats get preview of campus

This town is nothing like I thought it would be.

STEPHEN GRIFFEY Prospective student

Katherine Deaton STAFF WRITER

Chico Preview Day hosted hundreds of prospective students, touring much of campus and parts of downtown Saturday to see if Chico State was the place to apply for next fall. Every department and student service was represented. Current high school juniors and seniors traveled in packs, many accompanied by parents, as they walked through the Bell Memorial Union auditorium. Informational guides and free pens advertising the departments and organizations were handed out in hopes of capturing the interest of prospective students. Preview Day is put on by Admissions and Records every year and is meant to attract students who are trying to decide what kind of school to apply to, said Wendy Needels, assistant director of Admissions and Records. “It’s kind of an open house,” Needels said. Ryan Viera, a high school senior from Livermore, was candid about his hopes for a fulfi lling college career. “I just want a good college experience,” Viera said. “I’m

not as outgoing as I’d like to be.” For some, the college experience began on a San Francisco-style trolley rented for the event that gave tours of the campus and the downtown area every 20 minutes. Hannah Petree, a senior at Franklin High School in Elk Grove, was pleasantly surprised by the tree-lined homes of Legion Avenue that border campus while riding the trolley. “Oh my God,” she said. Petree and her parents, David and Kathy Petree, were impressed with the look of campus, as well as the design and amenities of the Wildcat Recreation Center. “It’s application form time,” Kathy Petree said. “We’re checking out a few schools to get into the spirit of things.” Not all students have parents on-board with the decision to apply for Chico State. Allie Griffey and her parents Stephen and Becky traveled more than 100 miles from Winters, which is south of Chico, to look at the campus and learn more about the musical theater program. The friendly atmosphere and look of the town are

THE ORION • MICHELLE REINMUTH

CAMPUS TOURS Visitors listen intently while standing outside the Shasta and Lassen residence halls. Campus tours were just one part of the all-day event, which showcased all Chico State has to offer. positive aspects of the campus, Allie Griffey said. But she realized she might not be able to have a car to visit home on the weekends. With Chico’s reputation for parties, parking was the last thing on Stephen Griffey’s mind, who thought it would be a lot dirtier, he said. “This town is nothing like I thought it would be,” Stephen Griffey said while riding the trolley along West Third and

WALKING TALL The walk featured various teams, like the Wonderous Women, which combined efforts to raise money for breast cancer research and awareness.

Hazel streets. The new perspective on the city coupled with his daughter’s desired major seemed to curb his concerns and help him enjoy the day’s events. Excitement seemed to take hold of most in attendance but apprehension followed close behind. Viera is considering Chico State because he has a friend graduating with him in the spring that plans on

attending next fall, he said. He also knows high school graduates from 2011 that are now attending Chico State. Viera doesn’t want to be completely alone after graduating high school, he said. “I’ve never been away from everybody I’m really comfortable with for a long time,” he said. Katherine Deaton can be reached at kdeaton@theorion.com

Greeks goal to help out many charities, groups up, and we provided the networking. Through our STAFF WRITER community service, we help A mural painted in yellows, their progress.” Maurice Conner from Phi greens and browns depicting Cesar Chavez overlooked Beta Sigma and friend Ryan executives and Greek organi- Walton will be restarting the zation representatives at the Men Against Rape and SexMulticultural Greek Council ism program in an attempt to help raise awareness of safety meeting Friday. The council meets biweekly issues on campus, as well as to collaborate on programs provide services for women and issues involving the 10 who have been affected by the issues that the group recognized cultural covers, Conner said. fraternities and sororWhile the group is ities on campus. not exclusively run The council by fraternities on discussed the philanThrough campus, many memthropic works of the bers of the council represented organizaour support tions at the meeting. community showed for the program’s It plans to support service, we reinstatement. the upcoming Up ’til help their Other upcomDawn letter-writing ing events include fundraiser to donate progress. a canned food drive money to St. Jude in November, sponChildren’s Research sored by Kappa Hospital by requiring Alpha Psi, to help most of the council’s PATRICK DAVIS provide food for members to attend Kappa Alpha Psi many during the and participate. holiday season, Nic Alonzo, the and a dress donaGreek recruitment chairman, spoke to the coun- tion sponsored by Lambda cil and emphasized the Sigma Gamma that will proimportance of Greek participa- vide prom and homecoming tion at the fundraiser, which dresses for girls in the foster has a “Get in the Game” foot- care system. Juan Guzman, director of ball theme this year. “Many people think of it as Chico State’s Movimiento a Greek event,” Alonzo said. Estudiantil Chicano de Azt“So we need to go out and lán, was also present and made mention of the group’s show what we can do.” Patrick Davis, a junior annual Christmas toy drive. The idea to sponsor a business information system smajor from Kappa Alpha Psi, scholarship in the future to discussed the success of a help those interested in joinrecent program, “Project Mar- ing one of the multicultural row,” and announced that the organizations they reprenonprofit organization will be sent was brought forward by coming back within the fi rst Malcolm McLemore, adviser few weeks of November due to to the council. They hope to raise $10.000 to institute the high donation numbers. “It’s important to use our the scholarship. network to build theirs,” Davis said. “Their organiza- Aubrey Crosby can be reached at tion was just being started acrosby@theorion.com Aubrey Crosby

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

Walkers take strides toward cure Dani Anguiano STAFF WRITER

Students took steps against breast cancer Sunday morning in Bidwell Park during the second annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk. The event, put on by the American Cancer Society, consists of individuals and teams walking to raise money. The primary goal is to celebrate breast cancer survivors, raise money and educate, said Matthew Foor, director of the local American Cancer Society office. The chance of a woman developing an invasive breast cancer during her lifetime is less than one in eight, according to the American Cancer Society. Survivors of breast cancer hosted several booths at the event. Janet Taylor, a program coordinator for Reach to Recovery, is a 12-year breast cancer survivor. The program helps male and female survivors cope with their experiences. Taylor described the importance of the support the program gives and emphasized that those who work for the program must be cancer survivors themselves, in order to offer the best support. In addition to booths, the event

featured speaker Jan Hasak, a breast cancer survivor and author. She was primarily there to offer support and provide awareness about a little known disease, Lymphedema. This is a condition in which fluid is retained, causing tissue swelling and is common among breast cancer survivors who have had lymph nodes removed. This year the organizers attempted to draw a larger student population by setting up informational tables around Chico State. “This year, out of those involved, it’s about 30 percent students,” Foor said. The event provided an opportunity for many fraternities and sororities to continue their philanthropic work. Derrick Siplin, a member of Phi Beta Sigma and a junior psychology major, feels that being a part of events like Making Strides is important, he said. “Events like these, they show who cares in the community, and who wants to offer support,” he said. Some participants had experience with other events offering support to those with cancer and survivors. Samantha Grimaldo, a liberal studies major and member of Lamda Theta Nu, was previously involved with St. Baldrick’s. Everyone knows someone affected

by cancer and people are coming together to find a cure, Grimaldo said. Many students felt the need to be involved because a family member had fought breast cancer. Cody Collins, a junior electrical engineering major, participated in the event with other members of his fraternity. Collins’ grandma had cancer and the event was a way to raise awareness, he said. While some students were involved with this event for the first time, Jah Moua, a sophomore nursing major, has participated for two years. “I volunteered with the cancer society,” Mou said, “I’m in the nursing program and I have an aunt who had cancer.” While discussing student involvement, Foor praised Chico State students for their contributions. “Thank you to all the wonderful Chico State students for participating and volunteering,” he said. “I am impressed by the way they have really stepped up.” The group plans to continue recruiting Chico State students and increasing student involvement next year. Dani Anguiano can be reached at danguiano@theorion.com

“ “

M.E.Ch.A. pushes for student involvement through ‘campus-wide movement’

When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes our duty.

JUAN GUZMAN M.E.Ch.A. director

Aubrey Crosby STAFF WRITER

A meeting of Chico State’s Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán chapter Friday brought forth ideas for increased student involvement in causes that directly affect them Two of the six invited organizations were represented at the meeting in Bell Memorial Union. One week prior to the meeting, Juan Guzman, director of of M.E.Ch.A., and former director Luis Munoz drove to Sacramento in a black sedan armed with notepads for taking notes at the “Indigenous Day of Resistance.” The resistance was a

Native American protest against Columbus Day held in Cesar Chavez Park in downtown Sacramento. While making his way through the block-wide park filled with about 1,000 student protesters and members of the “Occupy Sacramento” movement, Guzman became inspired to start a multi-organizational political action group to advocate for student interests at Chico State, he said. “When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes our duty,” Guzman said. He spoke to a middleaged man, who said he was a homeless California State University graduate, while standing next to a shopping

cart full of his belongings. “I see these occupations, you know, and wonder why we aren’t doing anything on campus,” Guzman said. “It upsets me that there are more Butte College students there when Chico is down the street.” Joe Banez , Associated Students director of Legislative Affairs, and Aaron Rodriguez, A.S. commissioner of Multicultural Affairs, attended the meeting. They plan on looking at issues affecting Chico State students on their quest for a higher education. One of the group’s goals is to promote cultural diversity at Chico State, Rodriguez said. “My frustration comes from student organizations,”

Rodriguez said. “They don’t put anything out there. A group of white guys in a building can only bring so much culture to the campus.” Budget cuts and rising tuition are also at the top of the group’s agenda. One of Banez’s current projects includes lobbying for the passing of the Working Families Student Fee Transparency and Accountability Act, or Assembly Bill 970. The bill would require that any raises in student fees be accompanied by a timely notification. A petition is being planned in additon to an awareness meeting for the bill. “Students can send in letters and it’s so easy,” Banez said. “Not only would they

be informed, but they can get involved right then and there.” Guzman wants to build a council outside of M.E.Ch.A in order to help gain support and begin a campus-wide movement, similar to the Action Rally protest two years ago, he said. Guzman claims that the Action Rally movement, which quickly fell out of the public’s attention, was lacking a strong unified foundation capable of maintaining momentum for the cause. “I don’t want this to be about just one group,” he said. Aubrey Crosby can be reached at acrosby@theorion.com


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

A7

Rehab, residents clash over safety ALCOHOL STATISTICS Binge drinking is a problem on college campuses, and approximately one in five college students drinks on a weekly basis, according to talkrehab. org. Alcohol is the third leading cause of death among ages 15 to 24.

RESOURCES Skyway House 564 Rio Lindo, Suite 103 (530) 898-8326 CADEC Student Services Center Room 190 (530) 898-6450

Kjerstin Wood ASST. NE WS EDITOR

Safety concerns were raised last week when the Chico Planning Commission approved a land use permit for a rehabilitation center on the Esplanade. The Skyway House has provided substance abuse treatment in Chico for 18 years, with no history of violence that would prompt the safety concerns, said Jennifer Carvalho, executive director of the Skyway House and Chico State alumna. Protect North Esplanade was the group that spearheaded the appeal, which was denied after lengthy debate at the Chico Planning Commission’s meeting Wednesday. The Skyway House has signed the lease and is now receiving bids from contractors, Carvalho said. Rehabilitation centers are a good thing, said Colby Saunders, a junior criminal justice major. “Drug abuse is a disease and almost anyone can get addicted to drugs in the right circumstances,” Saunders said. Skyway House has a “sterling reputation” in the community, Carvalho said. The center’s goal is to be good community partners and provide treatment resources. Sober living environments, support groups for young adults and outpatient services are just a few of the resources Skyway House offers, and that extends to the student community as well, Carvalho said. The location on 3105 Esplanade will be a women-only rehabilitation facility. Carvalho, who moved to Chico in 1984 and stayed here after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in geography, encourages students to get involved in the community decision-making process. Students should be involved in local politics and what is going on around them, said Shalene Mitchell, a junior human resources major.

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

FRESH START Previously a Montessori school, the Skyway House will offer residential sober living environments for clients. Bids from contractors are currently being accepted and reviewed for the necessary renovations. “We live here, we should know what is going on,” Mitchell said. “Personally I think that building rehabilitation center that can reach out help women in trouble is a great idea.” As far as students utilizing Skyway House services, during treatment for addiction, most return to a comforting family environment, said Theresa Fagouri, program coordinator of the Campus Alcohol and Drug Education Center. The cost of rehabilitation, or even just the medical detoxification stage alone, is more than $7,000, Fagouri said. Insurance does not cover all these costs, if it covers it at all, which is why most students need family support when

being rehabilitated. Skyway House is a nonprofit organization that charges a “fee for service” in the amount of $3,000 for its residency programs, Carvalho said. They do not offer any medical detox. “We want to provide the most therapeutic and serene setting for clients,” Carvalho said. Full-time college students have shown that they are less likely to use drugs than their peers who are the same age but not enrolled in school, according to teens.drugabuse.gov. Kjerstin Wood can be reached at kwood@theorion.com

Bicycle theft attempt thwarted by vigilant student Brenna Dillman STAFF WRITER

An attempted bicycle theft outside of Taylor Hall was foiled Wednesday when a witness reported the incident to University Police about 3:45 p.m. A male student saw two suspects using bolt cutters to cut a bike lock and called police, according to a University Police bulletin. While on the phone with the dispatcher, the student saw the two put their bolt cutters into a backpack and walk off campus. The student then followed the suspects and gave descriptions to police.

Police officers caught the suspects in the parking lot at 35 Main Street. The suspects were both 16 years old so names were withheld. The officers did arrest the two suspects and they were advised to stay off of campus for seven days, following California Penal Code. The owner of the bike involved was found easily because the bike was registered, which was a key factor in this case, police said. In fall 2010, Breana Horvath, a senior recreation administration major, had her bike stolen from the racks facing the street between Tehama and Whitney

halls. The theft took place in the evening between 6 and 8 p.m. Horvath had a cord lock, and her bike was not registered, so she felt it unnecessary to report to University Police, she said. “If it was registered there is no way they could have told it was mine because it was the blue beach cruiser from Walmart that probably 1,000 other girls have,” Horvath said. Between Jan. 1 and June 30, 50 bicycles were reported stolen, and between July 1 and Oct. 24, 58 bikes were reported stolen, according to University Police statistics. This increase has students on

campus concerned about the number of thefts going on. “I’m always nervous about my bike lock not working or it getting stolen,” said Mallory Parker, a junior communications studies major. If she saw a similar situation, she would do the same thing and call the police, Parker said. When she sees bike locks that aren’t fully locked she tries help the owner by fixing them, but often gets worried people might think she is trying to steal the bike. Brenna Dillman can be reached at bdillman@theorion.com

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Chalk draws out occupy cause Bikers want more stall selections Dario Gut STAFF WRITER

Colorful chalk designs covered a sidewalk near City Plaza Monday in an effort to bring people together and shed light on issues plaguing people worldwide, Occupy Chico demonstrators say. Two weeks have passed since the movement began with waving signs and open tents. Now, additional visuals are given to passers-by in the form of chalked pink hearts, creative symbols of peace and games of hopscotch on a Broadway Street sidewalk, near the Occupy Chico hub. “Chalk is the easiest way to engage people immediately because people only have a certain time frame for you to talk to them,” said Joe Aqueoes, an enthusiastic leader for the movement. “When we are creating art there is a way to get people active, and in return we beautify the place and that brought a lot of smiles to people’s faces.” The group is trying to emphasize the importance of community and unity, making a popular place like City Plaza a canvas to spread their message. “We want to raise awareness and inspire people to act against the injustice,” Aqueoes said. “Our plans right now are to grow here in the plaza and get more people to take an active role.” There are many different people and different organizations doing important work, Aqueoes said. Whether it’s the issue of food, sustainable

THE ORION • MICHELLE REINMUTH

STANDING TALL Occupy Chico demonstrators gather at City Plaza on Saturday. energy or health care, the demonstrators draw people in to liberate their purpose, he said. “We are investing our time now into sharing resources and building a different value system where we change people’s hearts and minds,” Aqueoes said. City Manager Dave Burkland has seen the art downtown and has spoken with members of the group. “The group has been very cooperative,”

Burkland said. “They have worked with us and some of our concerns.” City Plaza has been a popular gathering spot for demonstrators for years. “They can be there as long as they don’t block traffic or interfere with other events,” he said. “I looked at it yesterday RELATED and it’s chalk and it does VIDEO wash off very quickly.” Ryan Rusty, an Occupy Check out the Occupy Wall Chico demonstrator, said Street video on the movement is “not a The Orion.com protest.” “We are trying to promote peace, which is why we drew these different pictures and figures on the ground,” he said. After two weeks, the demonstrators have held steady at City Plaza as they try to get more people around the community to join their movement. “We will stay out here for as long as it takes,” Rusty said. Occupy Chico demonstrators have a goal in mind. “It’s all about freedom and fairness,” said Craig Finley, a participant in the movement. “Fairness is the key word. The support we get from all the honking shows that we should be here.”

Deciding which Associated Students employees should receive discounts and what those discounts should be is no easy decision. The current controversy stems from a decision made last semester, after deliberating for nearly the entire semester, to change the nature of the A.S. discount program to include all A.S. employees. The change gave all A.S. employees a 10 percent discount at all A.S. businesses and took away special discounts Wildcat Store employees received on books, and discounts A.S. Dining employees received on meals. This decision has been lauded by the A.S. employees who never had a discount before and blasted by those who had discounts modified or taken away. It is a very encouraging

program and smart because it influences more employees to keep their business within the A.S., said Quinn Mattingly, a senior communication design major and the general manager of KCSC Radio. “I think the board made an intelligent and fair decision by implementing that discount,” she said. In multiple A.S. board meetings this semester the most consistent theme to emerge has been one of “equity” among the A.S. businesses and more unity among employees when discussing the discount policy. If unification is the goal, then some question why all employees are not promoted in the same way or required to wear the exact same uniform, regardless of what business they work for, said Geoff Cohen, a senior communications studies major and an A.S. Dining employee. “It’s a different type of

dgut@theorion.com

job, it’s a different scenario,” Cohen said. “You don’t automatically get the same thing.” It makes sense that the different businesses would have different discounts given that they all have different job requirements, said Joanna Bloese, a senior agriculture major and Adventure Outings trip leader. Equality was not even an issue until they started talking about it and made it into one. “Its not bad or good to give everyone the same discount,” she said. Discounts offer incentives to working in different areas of A.S. and differentiates the different businesses within the A.S. structure, said Rob Corey, a senior finance major who works in the computer service area of the Wildcat Store. Students can intuitively figure out that they are a part of A.S. They don’t need an overarching discount to understand that.

STAFF WRITER

The vailability of bike stalls has recently caused a stir among students, including a Facebook protest, and is now a topic of conversation at Associated Students meetings. During recent A.S. meetings, Natalie Lessa, the commissioner of Environmental Affairs, led the discussion about how to make students happier and what the current bike stall situation is. There has been an increase of 500 bike stalls on campus since last fall, according to a University Police survey done The this year. This is greatly benoptions eficial, since there has been a are there, 44 percent increase in number of bikes using stalls since last it is up fall. University Police found to the that only 60 percent of bike students stalls are being used, yet 50 to use bikes were locked to areas not in stalls and illegal. them. The fact that a large number of bikes are parked outside of DAVID WEBB the stalls may be based on the Alternative placement of the racks, said Transportation David Webb, a senior public Committee member relations major, also part of the Alternative Transportation Committee. A lot of the overflow in bike racks is because of people parking right next to their class. Students should realize that they can park their bikes farther away and walk to class instead of having their bikes impounded. “I think we do a really good job at making the bike racks available,” Webb said. “The options are there, it is just up to the students to use them.” A student survey led to the purchase of a new type of bike stall, identifying them as the “most desirable,” which were recently placed near Ayres Hall, Lessa said. The stalls were purchased from Oroville and therefore supported the local economy. Student opinion was an important factor in getting new bike stalls, said Christine Gilbertson, a junior psychology major. She primarily uses the bike racks by Holt Hall and doesn’t like to use certain other racks on campus. “I hate the ones by the PAC,” Gilbertson said regarding the Performing Arts Center bike stalls. “They don’t fit with my basket.” It is important to realize that whenever bike racks get taken out, for construction or other reasons, they are replaced elsewhere, Lessa said. There are never fewer bike racks on campus. With 80 percent of students living within two miles of campus, it is really important to stress the needs of bikers, Lessa said. “It is great to see Chico State support bike riders,” she said, “and to see we’re never decreasing, only increasing bike stalls.”

“ “

Dario Gut can be reached at

A.S. employee discounts under debate Orion Staff

Brenna Dillman

“If you work in the A.S. there should be some sort of incentive,” Corey said. “It doesn’t all need to be the same, but at least offer some sort of discounts.” It is ultimately the A.S. board of directors that will make a decision on the discounts and that is not a responsibility Government Affairs Committee officers take lightly. They want as much information as they can get since this policy will be implemented throughout the entire A.S., said Joe Banez, A.S. director of Legislative Affairs. “It is important to thoroughly digest the proposed plans and see what is the best fit for the entire A.S.,” Banez said. “As a voting board member I want to talk to as many A.S. employees as I can.” The Orion can be reached at editorinchief@theorion.com

Brenna Dillman can be reached at

BIDWELL: Closing would be ‘detrimental,’ senator says

bdillman@theorion.com

continued from A1

history professor and vice president of the Bidwell Mansion Association. State Sen. Doug LaMalfa, R-Richvale, has been supportive of efforts to save the mansion for a while, Magliari said. On Wednesday, LaMalfa will host a town hall meeting in the Chico City Council Chambers to come up with solutions to keep the mansion open. LaMalfa could not be reached for comment. The approaching closure of Bidwell Mansion has impacted Chico residents and students alike. Some students enjoy spending their time around the mansion, like Marco Poort, a sophomore electrical engineering major. “It’s a really nice place,” Poort said. “The college exists because of John Bidwell.” The mansion has been open to the public for tours since the mid 1960s, but before that it belonged to the university, Magliari said. The mansion was called Bidwell Hall and was used as a dormitory, They have The mansion has items somewhere of significant historical they can value, including artifacts made by the Mechoopda come and tribe for Annie Bidwell, see artifacts Drake said. made “They have somewhere by their they can come and see artifacts made by their ancestors. ancestors, and they can share that with others,” Drake said about members AMBER DRAKE of the Mechoopda tribe. For Tour Guide local elementary students, Supervisor the field trip to Bidwell Mansion is often considered a rite of passage, Magliari said. Some students call Chico their hometown and remember visiting the mansion as a child, said Cristina Perez, a sophomore civil engineering major. “I came here for a field trip, and my brother did too,” Perez said. Donations to the Save the Mansion fund can be made by delivering checks to the Visitor Center at Bidwell Mansion.

“ “

CHANGES: Four new minors considered continued from A1

of CSU system’s continuing budget battle with the state, new general education pathways and department name changes were the focal points of the Academic Senate. The bulk of the meeting was spent introducing and debating new minors in the GE Pathway. The minors are under revision. The process started a couple of years ago with the purpose of providing desirable pathways that could benefit students by simply fulfi lling GE courses, Kotar said. “It has been a big collaborative effort,” he said. Students taking 18 units in a specific pathway would qualify for a minor, which gives students recognition for their achievements and a bonus to add to their resume, Kotar said. Faculty and staff have been working diligently over the past year to create the 10 new pathways, and the passing of the fi rst three minors is a major achievement, he said. The minors that passed were: diversity studies; ethics, justice and policy; and great books and ideas. The faculty is trying to offer students a package of courses built around a consistent theme, Kotar said. After a few small amendments, all were passed with no senate members opposed. Additionally, four new minors were introduced Thursday and will be acted on during the next Academic Senate meeting in November. Along with changes to pathways, students will also see some minor name changes in the social science and journalism departments. Taking effect in the next academic year, certain options within the two departments will be reworded for clarity and modernity, Kotar said. “They are trying to promote themselves in an up-to-date manner,” he said.

THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

PARK CLOSURE The Italianate-style Victorian mansion faces closure due to mandated state budget cuts to 70 state parks. The mansion was completed May of 1868.

Dani Anguiano can be reached at

Griffin Rogers can be reached at

danguiano@theorion.com

grogers@theorion.com


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NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

A9

Affinities, Parallels and Differences: Contemporary Chinese Art and Its Western Counterpart guest speaker Xiaoze Xie, the Paul L. & Phyllis Wattis Professor of Art at Stanford University Featured speaker for the CSUC Humanities Center 2011-12 theme “China and the West�

November 2 7:30 PAC 134, followed by a reception in Trinity

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Introduction and analysis of works by some key Chinese artists in a contemporary context. Since the 1980s, experimental art in China has been heavily influenced by the styles, ideas and strategies of the West. Combining such influences with the history and culture of China, artists have created work that shares affinities with its Western counterpart and yet is different and unique. This event is co-sponsored by the Humanities Center and the Department of Art and Art History


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opinion A10 |

Thumbs Up to the satisfying crunch of Chico’s many fallen leaves.

Thumbs Down to candy canes being sold alongside candy corn at Target. What, are we just skipping holidays now?

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Thumbs Up to pumpkin-flavored everything.

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EDITORIAL >>

Advocacy by student body necessary to save tradition Bidwell Mansion is under siege. More than a century after its construction, a battle is being fought to maintain Gen. John Bidwell’s home as a place where his legacy can be remembered. A general built Bidwell Mansion, but the battle to preserve it must be fought by an army of informed, vocal volunteers — Chico State students. In many ways, the aim of every university student is to keep traditions alive through the preservation of knowledge. Chico State is a place where dust jackets are dusted off, history is dog-eared and classical canvases are carefully canvassed. Every single student at this university is RELATED a steward of some kind For more on the of tradition, mansion, see A1. whether in the fine arts, sciences or their chosen profession. It would be a great loss to Chico State if one of the traditions we all share was lost because we did nothing to protect it. The only reason why Chico State and Bidwell Park are still thriving today is due to the generosity of John and Annie Bidwell, who donated their property and livelihood to this city. That same generosity is repeated every year, as Chico’s third and fourth graders tour Bidwell Mansion to ground themselves in a real piece of Chico’s history. That legacy, like most of American history, like the current status of Bidwell mansion, is one of uncertainty. A year before it was completed, Bidwell Mansion was still an unfinished house without a family. John Bidwell began construction of the $60,000 villa in 1865 hoping that Annie Kennedy would consent to marry and share the mansion with him. But in March 1867, Bidwell was still writing letter after letter to Kennedy, trying to win her hand in marriage. “I care nothing for what the world calls wealth and affluence,” he wrote. “They have no charms for me without a tender being to share them with me.” Kennedy eventually accepted Bidwell’s offer and became Annie Bidwell in April 1868, just in time for completion of Bidwell Mansion. John built the mansion hoping, even in the depths of the unknown, that it might someday be a place where his legacy could thrive. A century later, as the product of that legacy, every Chico State student should share Bidwell’s faith in this period of economic uncertainty, and help keep the doors of Bidwell Mansion open.

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

Cassidy Gooding OPINION COLUMNIST

With all the vampires and werewolves running wild through modern media, Chico citizens can surely expect a few to pop up during Halloween weekend. However, most ladies don’t realize just how easy it is to pick these characters traditionally thought of as monsters out of a regular crowd of males. Though it may initially sound silly, bloodsuckers and howlers are everywhere. The last time a friend complained that her boyfriend overreacted to a small upset and became very aggressive and unreachable, he was probably having trouble suppressing his wolfish rage. And that last breakup, after which you felt drained of hope and feeling? Chances are you had been dating a vampire. Originally, these villains were created to scare children into obedience or explain phenomena that people didn’t understand, such as plagues or mental disorders undefined by their limited science. Today, vampires sparkle or wear rings that let them walk in the sunlight. They try to drink animal blood, some of them have random superpowers, and, according to the most popular books, movies and TV shows, they are very good in bed. Women around the country are fantasizing that their own Edward Cullen or Bill Compton will whisk them away to a life of secrecy and constant frustration. Werewolf hype is catching on a little slower. Having taken their spot as the underdog in many stories, they are found mostly as the secondary supernatural group.

Bram Stoker, author of the quintessential 1897 vampire novel “Dracula,” must be turning in his grave. Many writers who thought these characters belonged in the horror genre, as well, would probably find the romanticized and poppy versions annoying. But for my best friend and me, they’ve helped create a new cataloging system for men. The newest generation of vampires and werewolves, though all the stories and situations are different, have similar respective characteristics. This makes it both simple and hilarious to find that so many guys I meet fall into one of the two categories. Vampires traditionally were undead creatures of the night. In my world, they’re mysterious bad boys. Usually boyish in charm or looks, wrapped in dark colors and bitingly witty. This breed of guy is inexplicably attractive. They’re as confusing as they are charismatic, and experience has taught me to be wary. Despite the adventures I’ve shared with a few of the blood-suckers, there has always been a sneaking suspicion that they’re keeping dark secrets. And in the worst scenarios, the vampires I’ve dealt with have left me feeling stung and bled of energy. Werewolves, on the other hand, are a whole different animal. In folklore, their affliction is a disease. Lycanthropy is passed through bites, and once infected, a werewolf becomes a vicious, bloodthirsty animal on the eve of each full moon. Otherwise, they are normal people tortured by their monthly secret. The werewolves I’ve encountered are

somewhat similar. They usually travel in packs, characterized by big smiles and warm dispositions. However excitable and popular they may seem, though, these fellows can also be moody and temperamental. They’re not usually the brightest of their peers, but make up for it with an infectious optimism that belies hidden anger problems and a sense of vulnerability that seems odd, considering many of them are very physically fit. It is easy to fall in love with a werewolf because of the comfort and safety they exude. However, a couple of the ones I’ve gotten to know harbor fears of rejection and imperfection, which can translate to neediness or clinginess. Of course, these categories generalize and gloss over many things that make every guy different, but it’s fun to think back and place people I’ve met into one of the two. My friend and I have had long conversations about why one guy must be a werewolf, or laughing that it’s no wonder two other guys, considering their groupings, don’t get along. But it has also helped me steer clear of guys that, on first impression, practically seem to have fangs, or not be surprised when that dude who was so good at giving me puppy dog eyes later tries to mark me as his territory, so to speak. Ladies should always be discerning, though, during Halloween or otherwise. Because though vamps can be alluring and wolves can be sweet, both camps can pack a mean bite. Cassidy Gooding can be reached at cgooding@theorion.com

Earth reaches 7 billion mark; planet overpopulated, strained Jake Buffenbarger Jak OPINION COLUMNIST

The world did not end Friday, nor will 2012 bring about fire and brimstone, like so many claim it will. However, there are threats to the human race not being talked about by religious fanatics but instead by educated men of science. By the end of the month, the RELATED world’s population will reach For more on an astonishing the seven billion mark, see 7 billion peonext week’s ple, according to Features section. estimates by the United Nations. In the past 100 years humans have experienced unprecedented exponential population growth due to advances in food production and distribution, according to Yale.edu. Although the abundance of people may seem like a blessing, it is in fact a threat to our species as a whole. Resources are already strained enough as it is with the current population.

to the

Letters Editor

Read the guidelines below for information on how to submit your own Letters to the Editor Editorial Board The opinion editor can be reached at

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Generally, developing countries have much higher growth and death rates than developed countries. Countries that have low child survival rates do so because of a lack of modern medicine, family planning and a natural human tendency to not put all of our eggs in one basket evolutionally. Due to the hardwiring of human brains, adults in countries with high child mortality rates make up for the potential loss of their young by having multiple offspring. This gives them a better shot at passing on their unique genetic code, which is the primary objective of all life. The global population will grow to a staggering 9 billion by 2050, according to a 2009 United Nations press release. Unfortunately, a majority of these people will be born into the developing world. Right now in SubSaharan Africa, 43 percent of the population is under the age of 15, according to a briefing paper prepared by the United States Agency of International Development.

Gia Martucci SENIOR, LIBER AL STUDIES

I would like to share my opinion in regarding the weekly column “Greek Speak.” I find it frustrating that a newspaper which represents a diverse student population favors a small portion of our campus community. The Orion encourages letters to the editor and commentary from students, faculty, staff, administration and community members.

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

Combine this with the region’s high fertility rate and the future of the already poor area is uncertain. The consequences of overpopulation tie into many things including deforestation, unsanitary cities, desertification, air pollution, a lack of jobs, over consumption and disease. However, some argue that, following current population trends, the most endangered

Chico State prides itself on the many options for students who choose to get involved on campus, so many of which offer the same benefits stressed in the weekly article. Associated Students programs, honor societies, cultural organizations, professional or special interest clubs all provide students with opportunities to

• Letters and commentaries may be delivered to The Orion, Plumas Hall Room 001. Deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Letters are also accepted by e-mail and go directly to the opinion editor at opinioneditor@theorion.com

• Commentaries should be limited to 500 to 700 words and are subject to editing for length and clarity. Please include your phone number.

resource is water. More than one out of six people lack access to safe drinking water today. It seems that people who are lucky enough to live in the western world lack awareness. A lot of people have never even heard of overpopulation as a threat. I asked 10 students at this campus what they feel is most endangering our species, and only one said overpopulation. Three students pointed to the supposed 2012 apocalypse, one to a nuclear-capable Iran, one to nuclear devices and the other four stated that they felt there were no impending problems. The ignorance about the problem makes us weak and vulnerable. However, we are not powerless. The only way to curb population growth is through raising the quality of life in the poorest developing countries, which means donations. Through education, family planning and improved infrastructure, the population growth of developing nations can be slowed. Jake Buffenbarger can be reached at jbuffenbarger@theorion.com

enhance their college experience. These students also have memorable stories about friendship, leadership and personal growth to contribute. Our diverse student body deserves equal opportunity to share so I propose that the column “Greek Speak” simply be a space for the many great campus leaders to voice their experiences.

• Letters to the editor should be limited to fewer than 300 words, must include writer’s name and phone number (for verification) and are subject to condensation. Please include your year in school and major, or your business title.

• The Orion does not publish anonymous letters, letters that are addressed to a third party or letters that are in poor taste. The opinions expressed by The Orion’s columnists do not necessarily reflect those of The Orion or its staff.

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Thumbs Down to using fake IDs to get into Panama Bar and Cafe Halloween weekend. You’ll probably get caught. Story D2

Thumbs Down to the out-of-towners who come and trash our city on Halloween.

Thumbs Up to having three costumes for Halloween — the only time of the year where multiple personalities are encouraged. Story D2

opinions all week @ theorion.com

Thumbs Up to the men and women’s soccer and cross-country teams for taking first place in the conference. Studs! Stories B1, B2, B4

OPINION

Thumbs Down to wearing dark costumes at night, while jaywalking, during Halloween weekend. Story D4

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

A11

LIZ COFFEE A L P H A G A M M A D E LTA

GREEK SPEAK >> Editor’s note: Every week, Greek Speak will feature a different voice from a member of Chico State’s Greek community.

companies, according to money. cnn.com. The increasingly diverse business world needs to learn from itself. If we pay attention to competence, rather than gender, the nation could recover from its economic slump and better communities everywhere, including our campus. But ladies, don’t worry, we’ll still hold the door open for you.

When I was 12 years old, I was diagnosed with type one diabetes. After just being promoted from the sixth grade, my doctor told me that my life would be different and it was the hardest thing to hear. In middle school, I tried to hide my diabetes, hating how it made me different. I hated how kids thought that I could not eat sugar and how mothers did not want me to sleep over at their house for fear of my “fragile” health. I had to explain that I was special, and not broken, to almost everyone. But I was not alone for very long. My older brother was diagnosed just six months later. As much of a shock as it was to my family to have both children be diabetic, it was comforting to have someone close to me who was going through the same thing. He understood how it felt and how it shouldn’t hold us back. I arrived at Chico State worried about my health and the support there would be in college. Until one day my freshman year, I walked by Selvester’s Cafe-by-the-Creek and saw red, buff and green balloons flying with advertisements for a diabetes fundraiser. I walked in and immediately fell in love with the sorority women campaigning for a cure for my disease that also affects one in 200 people. As my freshman year progressed, the talk around the dorms was “Are you going to rush? Which one do you want to join?” I had no idea. When formal recruitment came, we were all nervously escorted into each of the shiny sorority houses, greeted with smiles and lemonade. By my last stop, I was a little worn out and with a coffee in hand entered the Alpha Gamma Delta house. I don’t consider when I got my bid or my initiation the moment I joined AGD — it was the very moment I walked into that big yellow house. I was introduced to a woman who also has diabetes. These women were actually excited about contributing to a cause that positively impacted my disease. Having someone who knew exactly what I was going through in my life again was just awesome. I no longer had to hide and could completely be myself with these women. Over my past two years as an Alpha Gam, I met my best friends, became the social chair and am having the time of my life with all my sisters. “You are judged by the company you keep” was a phrase my mother always taught me. I chose Alpha Gamma Delta to be the company I keep because I love everything that they stand for. College is a life changing experience and the people you surround yourself with are a huge influence on developing who you are as a person. I now live in the big yellow house that I first walked into almost two years ago, and I know that even after I move out in May, Alpha Gamma Delta will always be my home.

Marty

Liz Coffee can be reached at

The benefits granted by Power Balance bracelets supposedly come from two shiny holograms embedded into the surface of the silicone wrist band. The discs are said to be programmed through a “proprietary process” that is “designed to mimic eastern philosophies that have been around for hundreds of years.” A money-back guarantee is available.

Power Balance LLC has been criticized by the Austrailian Competition and Comsumer Commission for making misleading advertising claims regarding the effects of the power balance bracelets. As a result, the company admitted that there was no scientific basis for the claims it made in it’s commercials. The bands retail for $29.95 on powerbalance.com.

Sources: powerbalance.com

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

dailyfinance.com

Power Balance: an unbiased study Quinn Western OPINION COLUMNIST

As I slip the white rubber band onto my wrist and watch the hologram glisten in the sunlight, I can feel the power radiating through my body. Power Balance bracelets contain a hologram that designers claim optimizes the energy flow of the human body, leading to an improvement in strength, flexibility and speed. I put these claims to the test and was not disappointed. An assistant and I chose Chico State students at random and performed the same Power Balance tests that are performed in the commercials. Tests subjects reached behind their backs as far as possible, balanced on one foot against a slight push and performed toe touches. Each subject performed each task twice with a different bracelet — either the Power Balance bracelet or a regular Lance Armstrong style band. We found that when a subject didn’t know which bracelet they were wearing, they always improved during the second trial. Of the seven students we tested, three of them were already wearing Power Balance bracelets. But just because all the evidence proved me wrong, that doesn’t mean that the bracelets don’t work — because they most certainly do. I’m wearing a Power Balance bracelet right now and I feel like I’m typing at lightning speed. Senior recreation major Elisanne Wells-Garcia was a subject for the Power Balance test and was one of the students that wears one herself.

Wells-Garcia used to think the bands were dorky, but has been hooked on wearing them since last summer. “I trip a lot so I wear it when I run to psych myself out,” Wells-Garcia said. Some people say the power of these bracelets is all on the wearer’s head. But if that’s the case, how do you explain all of these great athletes achieving greatness and other real life occurrences? The effectiveness of Power Balance products is so revolutionary that one can’t believe they paid a mere $30 for this energy. Buying a Power Balance bracelet is like buying superpowers, and what’s wrong with that? Batman did it. I’m sure that he was sporting a Power Balance bracelet underneath the black gloves. Why stop at just bracelets? I’d buy underwear with these holograms in a heartbeat. And as soon as Power Balance cereal hits the shelves, Wheaties will become “the breakfast of usedto-be champions.” Former NBA player Shaquille O’Neal, who gave a testimonial for Power Balance LLC, experienced increased energy and power on the court after wearing the silicone bracelets. “And then when I took it off, I went back to normal,” O’Neal said in a Power Balance promotional video. Ever since I scored a back-to-back birdie-eagle on the golf course when wearing the bracelet I have found myself using it in everyday life, not just in athletic tasks. I don’t see why any athlete doesn’t go into to their game or match decked out in holograms from head to toe.

At the end of his promotional video for Power Balance, O’Neal vowed to continue wearing the magical bracelets, even saying that he would increase his edge by decking himself out in even more Power Balance merchandise. “Wristbands, necklaces, T-shirts, over the heart,” O’Neal said. These bands of glory are slowly, but positively showing up and improving our daily lives. Senior biology major James Johnson has worn his black band every day for the past two years. “It looks cool right?” Johnson said. “If I don’t wear it I just look silly.” There’s a student who has his priorities straight. For the first three or four months, Johnson was performing better in tennis and basketball, he said. It must have improved other areas of his life for him to keep wearing it for so long. “It’s just a fad that probably doesn’t have much merit,” said Rachel Bennett, a senior recreation major. Those like Bennett who refuse to see the power behind Power Balance will never see that these bracelets are diamonds in this rugged, sloppy and uncoordinated world of ours. We must cherish each and every one like we care for the children of tomorrow. These are the bracelets of the future. Quinn Western can be reached at questern@theorion.com

Gender cooperation needed in economy Marty Salgado OPINION COLUMNIST

I was sitting in a diner having a very nice lunch with my lady friend. When the check came toward the end of the meal, I grabbed it, and she stared at me awkwardly. “You really don’t have to pay for my meal,” she said. I smiled. “You really don’t have to worry about it,” I said. “I was just checking to see how much I owed for the tuna.” I believe in gender equality, whether in the restaurant or the struggling American economy. And I’m not the only one. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand has been promoting a “call of action” for American women to step up and be a part of the solution to America’s economic crisis. Gillibrand’s campaign harkens back to the iconic “Rosie the Riveter” campaign from World War II, which portrayed a hardworking woman flexing her

right arm bicep with the words “We can do it!” superimposed over her picture in large white letters. This campaign inspired millions of women to get factory jobs in support of thet war and assured their place in America’s workforce after the conflict ended. Because more women are graduating as undergraduates, and with advance degrees, women have the opportunity to take hold of the job market, Gillibrand said. “And women-owned small businesses are some of the fastest growing small businesses in the whole country,” Gillibrand said in an interview with Ann Curry. In other words, men have screwed up, so they need to step aside. Like Gillibrand, I believe America’s women have enormous

ILLUSTRATION BY • CHELSEA ROSS

potential to drag our struggling economy from the depths of debt, and financial instability. I grew up around a lot of women and I think highly of them. But rather than promoting women to take the reins of our economy by themselves, we should promote economic leadership on the part of both genders. No one should be ahead of any one else — we should all be on the same footing. Today, there are only 12 women in CEO positions for Fortune 500

Salgado

can

be

msalgado@theorion.com

reached

at

ecoffee@mail.csuchico.edu

PIECE OF MIND >> Which are better: werewolves or vampires? “I would love to be a werewolf. I’d snuggle with myself.”

“Vampires have cooler teeth, and they suck blood, which is cool.”

“I like Edward. He sparkles.”

“I’m more of a vampire person. Mostly because of the underworld movies, and Kate Beckinsale is fine.”

Alyssa Rodriguez

Greg Evans

Julia Haug

Ian Twamley

freshman | exercise physiology

senior | business

freshman | anthropology

senior | journalism


A12 |

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sports

The Chico State women’s soccer team is tied for first place with Sonoma State after two home o e wins Story B4

STAT ’CAT B2 WILDCAT OF THE WEEK B2 GAMES SCHEDULE B5

sports orts all week at theorion.com theorio

Y OCT. 26, 2011 WEDNESDAY,

a g n i k ma

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Allie Colosky SPORTS EDITOR

Stay on your feet

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RIDING HIGH With a home-field advantage, Chico State wakeboarders sophomore Justin Payton [right], junior Marley Tiff [above] and junior Jordan Handel [below] fly high above the competition Saturday.

Wildcat wakeboarding dominates weekend on lake Andrew Delgado STAFF WRITER

G

ERBER — “Oohs” and “ahhs” were heard from the crowd as Chico State’s wakeboarding team relied on their skeezer and back rolls to acquire a bid to nationals. The Wildcats swept the open division and took first and third in the intermediate division Saturday at the Empire Wake Series Western Collegiate Regionals. The fourth stop on the wake series tour brought 80 riders from nine schools to Villa Lagos Lake, just outside of Chico, to compete in a bracketed competition. The three top teams earn a spot at nationals, held in Las Vegas in May. The one-day event kicked off early in the morning to a cloudless sky and a row of spectators as the beginner division took to the water. All eyes were on the riders as they soared through the air and slammed hard into the water. The competition was separated into five divisions: beginner, women’s, intermediate, advanced and open. Riders were scored on style, composition, execution and amplitude, and were given two passes to land their best tricks. University of Arizona, Arizona State University, Long Beach State,

University of Oregon, Boise State, Cal State Northridge, Central Washington University, Sacramento State and Chico State were in attendance. Half of the riders had competed by noon, and the competition became more of an all-out practice session as people from different schools mingled together, watching other riders and giving advice on tricks. Chico State was confident coming into the event and expected to win or at least place and have a chance at nationals, said senior Rob Way, a rider and also a safety officer on the boat. In the intermediate division, the ’Cats took first and third and saw a personal achievement for junior Jordan Handel, as he landed a raley, a superman-like trick, at the end of his run. “It was the first time he attempted it and it paid off,” club president senior Jason Glaser said. The ’Cats dominated the open division, sweeping the field with sophomore Justin Payton taking first, Way second and sophomore Chad Payton third. Chico State’s wakeboarding team is nationally ranked at No. 2, behind the University of South Florida, after finishing in second place at the ALT games earlier this year and winning the national championship in 2010. Due to the recent closing of the

Forebay Aquatic Center where the team trained, a new location was needed in order for the team to continue thriving. Not only did the team not have a place to practice, they were in need of a boat to practice with as well, as theirs was sold with the aquatic center. Glaser was able to save the club and find a location at Villa Lagos Lake, a private lake 30 minutes from Chico, as well as lease a boat from a member on the team. “Forebay had horrid conditions,” Glaser said. “It was always cold and choppy. We would have to do shore pick-ups, and that took time.” Villa Lagos Lake has been ideal for the team and is the perfect setting to try out new tricks and progress in the sport, he said. Way came to Chico State just for a chance to be on the team and has emerged as one of the top riders on the team, he said. “Our president did it big this year getting a state of the art boat and an awesome private lake,” Way said. “We have access to the lake every day, and we wakeboard every day.” Competing on the lake that they practice on paid off for Chico State rider in the end. Andrew Delgado can be reached at adelgado@theorion.com

’Cats clinch decade of CCAA titles Sarah Bohannon STAFF WRITER

Winning its 10th straight California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship title this Saturday, the men’s cross-country team has now held the title for a decade. The men’s team led the way as soon as the gun sounded, said Adrian Sherrod, this year’s individual men’s CCAA champion. “From the gunshot like straight to the front,” he said, “Isaac and I went straight to the lead, along with Dayne Gradone, Joseph Rivera and everybody.” RELATED By the first mile of the See women’s five-mile course, except for cross-counthe green and gold Cal Poly try coverage, Pomona jersey of Ryan Carstory B2 rell, the only runners seen at the head of the race were from Chico State – all 10 of them, Sherrod said. It stayed that way for the rest of the race. This year’s goal was the same as last year’s — sweep the competition, get first through fifth place and a perfect score of 15. In order to do that, the Wildcats knew they had to get that green and gold jersey out of the mix. Picking up their pace, then slowing it down, Chico State’s runners began to strategize against Carrell, Sherrod said. “When you throw surges it really messes up your mechanics,” Sherrod said. “You think you’re getting really tired, but realistically, what’s going

PHOTO COURTESY OF • CCAA.SMUGMUG.COM

’CATS CROWD THE FRONT Chico State runner junior Isaac Chavez leads a pack of Wildcat runners in Saturday’s California Collegiate Athletic Association conference finals. Chavez finished the race in second behind teammate senior Adrian Sherrod with freshman Johnny Sanchez taking third. on is that we’re messing with your body.” Their tactics were to no avail. Crossing the finish line in Chico’s coveted fifth place, Carrell frustrated Chico’s perfect 15 score. With about half a mile to go, in an attempt to make sure Carrell wouldn’t outsprint any of them, Sherrod and Isaac Chavez picked up speed

’Cat’ Fights? W H AT S CO M IN G U P

The Chico State volleyball team plays host on “Dig for a Cure” night when they face UC San Diego at home. The first serve will take place at 7 p.m. Friday in Acker Gym.

B

and broke from the pack, Sherrod said. Gaining the lead, freshman Johnny Sanchez, this year’s CCAA Newcomer of the Year, soon made his move, broke from the pack and caught up to them. “Towards the end it shows that I won,” Sherrod >> please see CROSS-COUNTRY | B4

TO DAY I N

sports

oct. 26, 1984 Basketball legend Michael Jordan played the first NBA game of his career for the Chicago Bulls. Jordan put up 16 points in the Bulls 109-93 win over the Washington Bullets.

To pay or not to pay After almost half a century of debate, student-athletes may be cut a bigger check than ever before. The National Collegiate Athletic Association has recently submitted a proposal to increase grants to student-athletes up to $2,000. NCAA President Mark Emmert said that the increase in grants and scholarships would allow student-athletes to more closely cover the cost of attending college. College athletes have some of the most grueling schedules of all students. With NCAA regulations requiring student-athletes to take a full course load and remain on track toward their degrees between practices, heavy road schedules and midterms, many athletes would be crazy to try to find a part-time job to pay for their college experience. If you had asked me whether or not the jobs of these student-athletes is worthy of a pay stub, my first response would be a hell no. Stubborn me would say they should appreciate the opportunity to even be playing sports in college and not push their luck. That was before I came to Chico State. But after being around college athletes and hearing about the lives of my best friends who play college sports, I cannot imagine a more rewarding way to acknowledge the efforts of the athletes who give up social lives, sleep and relationships to continue doing what they love. Many Chico State athletes receive recognition for their academic achievements – achievements that are difficult to attain by any student. Nursing body aches between class and practice, many sleepdeprived Wildcats have even found time for charity work. The Chico State softball team has participated in two charity events, which included the “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” on Oct. 1 and “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer” on Sunday. I think that if the majority of NCAA athletes are anything like the athletes I know, then letting conferences increase grants to student-athletes is an obvious yes. Chico State is already on the same page as Emmert as far as helping student-athletes with tuition increases. Athletic Director Anita Barker introduced the Don and Merle Batie Soccer Scholarship before the start of the Chico State men’s soccer game Friday. An anonymous donor has agreed to match dollar-fordollar any gifts up to $50,000 before Dec. 31. NCAA student-athletes are playing under a mandate that hasn’t changed in 40 years, Emmert said. In obvious economic troubles across the nation, college students feel enough pressure to pile on their course loads, work extra hours at their part-time job and still maintain a decent GPA upon graduation. My friends in athletic programs up and down California deserve that recognition. I’m glad Chico State is able to give that opportunity where it can. Allie Colosky can be reached at sportseditor@theorion.com

[ jock talk ] To me, it’s karma for all the bad stuff they’ve done in the past.” -Ndamukong Suh The Detroit Lions defensive linesman said in response to accusations of unsportsmanlike conduct, following the injury of Atlanta Falcon’s quarterback Matt Ryan.


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SPORTS SHORTS >> Recap of Chico State Athletics

sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

SOCCER

’Cats dominate competition, clinch 1st place Dariush Dias Azmoudeh A SST. SPORTS EDITOR

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

Both the men’s and women’s soccer teams are in first place in the California Collegiate Athletic Association North Division ahead of Sonoma State. Sunday’s match up between the two colleges will play a key role in determining the winner of the division. The women’s team is tied with the Seawolves but lead on overall record while the men’s team is three points ahead of its rival. source: chicowildcats.com

Chico State alumnus and San Jose Earthquakes forward Chris Wondolowski fell short of earning his second straight MLS Budweiser Golden Boot. Wondolowski’s 16th goal of the season tied D.C. United’s midfielder Dwayne De Rosario as the league’s top goal scorer. The Golden Boot, ended up going to De Rosario for having 12 assists over Wondolowski’s three. Source: theorion.com

The men’s golf team won its second tournament of the season on Oct. 18. Senior Kyle Souza won his second individual title of the season, his third in a row, shooting 4-over par. Both the men’s and women’s golf teams saw action on Monday and Tuesday. The men traveled to Seaside to participate in the Otter Invitational and the women went to Santa Rosa to compete in the Sonoma State University Collegiate. For more information about golf, visit The Orion’s website at www.theorion.com. Source: chicowildcats.com

Wildcat of the Week

Alia Gray women’s cross-country The Chico State women’s cross-country team won its fourth straight California Collegiate Athletic Association title Saturday in Santa Rosa. Senior Alia Gray took home first place individual honors over the weekend after sitting out the entire 2010 season due to injury. Both cross-country teams travel to Spokane, Wash., for the National Collegiate Athletic Association Championships Nov. 5. Wildcat of the Week is a regular feature meant to acknowledge the contributions made by individuals to the team. Winners are chosen by The Orion sports staff from nominations taken from all sports. To nominate: sportseditor@theorion.com

With two wins in the final regular season homestand, the Chico State men’s soccer team stands atop the conference in first place. The Wildcats showed their dominance in both games with a 2-0 win Friday against Cal State East Bay and a 3-1 victory against Cal State Monterey Bay Sunday. The two wins helped the ’Cats take first place in the California Collegiate Athletic Association North Division from rival Sonoma State and second place in the whole conference. Chico’s conference record now stands at 9-3-2 with 29 points. With a tie and a loss over the weekend, Sonoma trails the ’Cats by three points with an FINISHING 8-4-2 conference record. REGULAR Against the Pioneers, the SEASON ’Cats started strong by applying offensive pressure early on. The ’Cats face Within 10 minutes of the Humboldt State game, a corner kick by senior at 3 p.m. Friforward Ferid Celosmanovic day in Arcata bounced around the box and then travel to face rival before it was deflected to the Sonoma State feet of junior midfielder Micah 11:30 a.m. Miranda, who knocked the ball Sunday in a in from inside the box to give game that may Chico the early lead. determine first The ’Cats continued to conplace in the trol the game from all sides North Division. of the field and pressured the midfield, forcing East Bay to lose the ball. Chico State’s defense held the Pioneers to a total of seven shots throughout the entire game, none of which were on frame. The ’Cats continued to get their second goal and dig a deeper hole for the Pioneers. The second goal came off the foot of sophomore midfielder Luke Palmer from 28 yards out and rocketed into the top left corner of the goal. “A lot of time, Felipe tells me not to shoot those because I always hit them over,” Palmer said. “But I just went for it and it worked out.” Head coach Felipe Restrepo was proud of Palmer’s goal and said it was the best one of his career. “He does it every day in practice,” Restrepo said. “It finally paid off and happened in a game.” On Sunday, a day celebrating the seniors who were playing their last regular season home game, the ’Cats repeated their dominance but this time against the Otters. Once again, Chico State wasted no time on offense and got the first goal of the game in

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

RACK ’EM UP Senior forward Ferid Celosmanovic continued to rack up his season goals as he scored his ninth goal of the season Sunday for Senior Day. The Wildcats took sole possession of fi rst place of the California Collegiate Athletic North Division with wins in their final two home games.

GAME 1

GAME 2

Chico State

2

Chico State

3

Cal State East Bay

0

Cal State Monterey Bay

1

the eighth minute from Celosmanovic. “It’s great, I couldn’t ask for anything else,” Celosmanovic said. “We seniors came up with a celebration, and we ended up doing it so that was awesome.” Celosmanovic first timed a volley into the net on a lob pass from senior midfielder Ryan Struckmeyer. Ten minutes later, the Otters tied up the game. However, the ’Cats took the lead back before the half ended on the 44th minute with another volley, this time by freshman forward Adam Black for his first goal as a Wildcat. Freshman forward Octavio Guzman scored the last goal for the ’Cats on the 54th minute after a goalkeeper’s error left Guzman a clear path to the goal.

Chico State’s defense and offense proved too much for the Pioneers and the Otters to handle. In both games combined, the ’Cats outshot their opponents 37 to 10 and only allowed two shots on goal. “When your defense is playing that well, you got a lot of confidence on staying on your line and not having to go out to make a big save,” sophomore goalkeeper Sam Evans said. Riding on a four-game winning streak, the ’Cats look to close out the regular season this weekend with two away games and their grip tight on their current first place standing. Dariush Dias Azmoudeh can be reached at dazmoudeh@theorion.com

Wildcats win fourth straight conference title Sarah Bohannon STAFF WRITER

Rolling hills and rocky, tread terrain couldn’t slow down the Chico State women’s cross-country team this Saturday, as the runners cruised through this year’s California Collegiate Athletic Association Championship. This year’s victory at Spring Lake Regional Park in Santa Rosa was its fourth straight title and eighth in the last 10 years. Crossing the tape at 21 min- You’ve just utes, 7.1 seconds, Alia Gray got to keep won the individual women’s trucking, CCAA title outrunning Cal Poly Pomona’s second place Tifjust keep fany Dinh by more than six knowing seconds. that it will However, unlike the men’s be really team, Gray didn’t lead the race until its end, she said. With worth it in 500 meters left in the race, she the end. broke a wall and kicked it into high gear. “Just the fact that I’m AMY SCHNITTGER healthy and I’ve had a pretty women’s solid season of training,” Gray cross-country said. “That’s more than I can ask for in a senior year and a senior season.” Sitting the bench with an injury puts a lot of things into perspective, she said. Coming in behind Gray and Cal Poly Pomona’s Dinh was Chico’s Amy Schnittger. Schnittger earned her fourth top three finish this year with a time of 21:27.6. RELATED Rounding out the team’s scorers were All-American For men’s Shannon Rich in 10th, folcross-country lowed by Katie Spencer in coverage, see B1 11th and freshman Tiffany Helfin, this year’s women’s CCAA Freshman of the Year award winner, in 12th. Even though they won the title, the women didn’t quite reach their goals. Having high expectations after last year’s team won 10 of the top 15 places, this season’s team wanted to do more of the same.

“ “

PHOTO COURTESY OF • CCAA.SMUGMUG.COM

YET ANOTHER WIN Chico State’s Amy Schnittger took third place in the California Collegiate Athletic Association conference finals over the weekend. The junior helped the women’s cross-country team take home its fourth consecutive CCA A title and its eight in 10 years. “Our girls did really well last year, so we were trying to do that again this year,” Schnittger said. “The conference was a little bit faster this year though, so that didn’t quite happen.” Schnittger thinks her team is doing great, but it’s a long season, she said. “You’ve just got to keep trucking, just keep knowing that it will be really worth it in the end,” Schnittger said. Like Schnittger, Gray is excited for her team.

“I want to see our team do really well at regionals,” Gray said. “We have some people who are a little bit new to those kinds of national competitions, so I’m really excited for them.” The team is scheduled to go to Spokane, Wash., Nov. 5 to compete in the NCAA Championship West Regional. Sarah Bohannon can be reached at sbohannon@theorion.com

STAT ’CAT >> VOLLEYBALL

16

The number of kills racked up by sophomore outside hitter Alex Shurtz during the Wildcats loss to San Francisco State Saturday. Shurtz’s kills weren’t enough, however, as the ’Cats dropped the match in four sets.

MEN’S CROSSCOUNTRY

9

The number of top 10 finishes by the men’s cross-country team in the California Collegiate Athletic Association conference finals in Santa Rosa Saturday. The Wildcats won their 10th straight CCAA title.

SOCCER

10

The number of Wildcat goals scored by both the men’s and women’s soccer teams this weekend. The ’Cats won all four games in their final homestand of the regular season.


sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

Men’s

Sable

VILLAESCUSA CROSSCOUNTRY

FILE PHOTO • JOSH ZACK

Men’s

Women’s

SOCCER

CROSSCOUNTRY

Goalkeepers sophomore Sam Evans [BELOW] and junior James Stroud are within top 5 in the program’s history with their low goals-against average with averages of 0.77 and 0.64 respectively.

Chico State men’s cross-country 10th straight CCAA title led by junior Adrian Sherrod [BELOW], sophomore Isaac Chavez and freshman Johnny Sanchez.

The junior setter became only the 3rd Wildcat in the program’s history to reach 3,000 assists. Villaescusa reached that milestone during Friday night’s win against Cal Poly Pomona.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

FILE PHOTO • SARAH BOHANNON

FILE PHOTO • SAMANTHA YOUNGMAN

RECORD BREAKING Fall 2011 has seen multiple Chico State athletes reach milestones in the athletics program history.

Makenzie

SNYDER

Won their 4th straight CCAA championship and 8 in the last 10 years. Senior Alia Gray took home 1st place and received individual honors.

B3

6th Wildcat to reach 1,000 career kills. With 1,045 kills, the junior moved to 5th on the all-time career kills list.

FILE PHOTO • SARAH BOHANNON

FILE PHOTO • JOSH ZACK

Wildcats tally many milestones in autumn Dariush Dias Azmoudeh A SST. SPORTS EDITOR

Reaching milestones takes patience, determination and a whole lot of dedication. This fall semester has been extraordinary for the Chico State athletic department with multiple Chico State athletes passing some major milestones in their own sports. Volleyball has recently seen a couple milestones passed by some players. Junior outside hitter Makenzie Snyder achieved her 1,000th kill on Oct. 8 during the Wildcats win against Cal State L.A. Afterward, Snyder was surprised to hear what she had just accomplished. “I didn’t really notice it until somebody told me,” Snyder said. “When you play volleyball for your entire life and reach a milestone in college, it’s really cool.” Snyder became the sixth Wildcat to achieve that milestone, and on Friday night against Cal Poly

Pomona, she passed Traci Ciapponi and moved into fi fth place on the all-time kills list. She currently holds 1,045 kills. Another milestone was reached by a teammate during Friday night’s win against the Broncos. Junior setter Sable Villaescusa reached her 3,000th assist with 30 total during the night, making her the third player to do so for Chico State. “They are both very talented,” ’Cats volleyball head coach Cody Hein said. “I was not surprised when I recruited them that they were good, but they’ve gotten better.” As a whole, the volleyball team may reach a 20-win season for the fourth time in the program’s history. That would also be the fourth time in the last six seasons. The team’s overall record is 15-6 and the team has seven games remaining in the regular season. The record for most wins in a season is 23 set by the 2009 team. It would be a nice thing to achieve, but the team is focused

on each game as they play, Hein said. Volleyball isn’t the only sport to have seen some milestones passed. Women’s soccer forward Lisa Webster has been busy moving up on several lists this season. This year, she made her way into the top 10 all-time goal scorers for the ’Cats and is currently in ninth with 20 goals. With two regular season games left, she may move to tie for seventh. “Obviously it feels good, but I couldn’t have done it without my team,” Webster said. “I go out every game wanting to win and just work hard for my teammates.” Webster also is currently ranked fifth in all-time assists with 18 assists and is one shy of a three-way tie for third place. Overall, the team is on track to tie for the fewest losses in the history of Chico State women’s soccer. The record is four, set by four different teams. The current ’Cats team has four

with two regular season games remaining. Freshman goalkeeper Brianna Furner is also close to achieving several milestones. She currently has eight wins, which is one win away from making it to a 10th place tie for single season victories. Furner’s goals-against average of 0.83 has her sitting in eight place. The goalkeepers for the men’s team are also closing on low goals-against average. Both junior James Stroud and sophomore Sam Evans are currently within the top five for single season goals-against average. In 10 games, Evans has reached an average of 0.77 and through six games, Stroud has reached 0.64. The men’s cross-country team just finished winning its 10th straight conference championship on Saturday in Santa Rosa and will look for its 13th straight top 10 finish in the NCAA Championship on Nov. 5 in Spokane, Wash.

The women’s cross-country team also won the conference championship on Saturday, making it four straight. Even coach Gary Towne is setting records after receiving 14 CCAA Coach of the Year awards. Golf’s Kyle Souza started the year strong with two individual wins, as well as team wins in the first two tournaments. Including the NCAA National Championship from last year, Souza is on a streak of three individual tournament wins. With already two wins in the season, Souza may see himself approaching the record for most wins in a season. But men’s golf coach T.L. Brown has his team preparing for one tournament at a time. “Our goal is to play and focus on the next event,” Brown said. “We’re not trying to focus on what we’ve done until the very end.” Dariush Dias Azmoudeh can be reached at dazmoudeh@theorion.com

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This ad paid for by Not In Our Town Glenn County A Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition


B4 |

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SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Wildcats win 2, sit pretty atop CCAA North Division GAME 1

Allie Colosky

Chico State

4

SPORTS EDITOR

Cal State East Bay

1

With hopes for postseason action slipping away in a packed conference, the Chico State women’s soccer team stormed to the top of the conference, winning its last two home games of the season. The Wildcats thrashed Cal State East Bay 4-1 Friday night before routing Cal State Monterey Bay 1-0 Sunday. The two wins put the ’Cats’ record at 8-5-3 overall and 8-4-2 in the California Collegiate Athletic Association. They tie with Sonoma State at the top of the North Division heading into their final two regular season games. “They are finally starting to realize the offensive opportunities they have,” head coach Kim Sutton said. “We had very few chances and we finished them.” In only her third game of her career playing at forward, junior Shelby Dunlap scored her second goal of the season off a cross from senior forward Lisa Webster. Webster carried the ball up the far side of the field with finesse before crossing the ball to Dunlap, who drilled it into the far post. The ’Cats struck again before halftime when they put away a ball that bounced around dangerously in the Pioneer’s penalty box before Webster got a foot on it and blasted it in from five yards out. After the half, Chico State continued to roll when

GAME 2

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

KICKING COMPETITION Junior forward Melissa Pease avoids a slide tackle in the Wildcats 4-1 win against Cal State East Bay Friday. The ’Cats are tied with rival Sonoma State for first place in the California Collegiate Athletic Association North Division after sweeping their final two home games. freshman midfielder Megan Tabler took control of a cross from senior forward Dara Karnofsky. It was her first collegiate goal. “It’s exhilarating,” Karnofsky said. “We’ve been connecting really well in practice so I was just trying to relax.” Sophomore midfielder Scotie Walker sealed the ’Cats’ offensive run with a chip over the goalie from 15 yards out.

Sophomore defender Carly Singer started the attack with an aggressive run from the back before placing a long ball perfectly at Walker’s feet. Singer’s aggressive ball control set off multiple attacking opportunities for the ’Cats. “My style of play is not just bombing it from the back, but playing to feet and switching the points of attack,” Singer said. The Pioneers stole the

shutout from Brianna Furner with a goal in the 88th minute, but Chico State walked away triumphantly nonetheless. On Sunday, the Chico State women’s soccer team extended its winning streak to Senior Day by trouncing Cal State Monterey Bay. The ’Cats five seniors – Webster, Karnofsky, Blake Lopes, Molly Downtain and Kasey Wall – were honored in a pregame ceremony.

Chico State

1

Cal State Monterey Bay

0

With plenty of emotions running around, it was important to focus on the game, rather than getting hyped, Downtain said. “It’s a bittersweet weekend,” she said. “Glad we got two wins, but it is a sad moment with my last game on this field.” The lone goal for Chico State against the Otters came when Webster beat a couple of defenders before sliding a pass through to freshman Tabler outside the penalty box. Tabler took a couple dribbles before a slide tackle from Monterey took her down inside the box. “That was a great move by Tabler,” Sutton said. “It was a fantastic possession on her part.” Singer took the penalty kick and the Otters didn’t stand a chance after that. The ’Cats fi nish out the regular season on the road this weekend with a push to hold sole possession of fi rst place in the CCAA North Division. They kickoff at 12:30 p.m. Friday against Humboldt State and then again at 2 p.m. Sunday against rival Sonoma State.

STAFF WRITER

sportseditor@theorion.com

PAWS UP Sophomore outside hitter Alex Shurtz hit a seasonhigh 16 kills in Friday’s match against Cal Poly Pomona. The Wildcats downed the Broncos in three sets.

After a two-game losing streak, the Wildcat volleyball team bounced back on the road and split two matches against Cal Poly Pomona and San Francisco State. On the road the ’Cats are 11-4. Their record at Acker Gym is 5-2. The ’Cats started off at Cal Poly Pomona on Friday night with a sweep of three sets. Assistant coach Carson Lowden said that after a tough two games at home against Humboldt State and Sonoma State the previous weekend, the team came into practice ready to fi x things and do better on this road trip. Junior Jessica Leek led the team in kills Friday night with nine, followed by sophomore Alex Shurtz and junior Makenzie Snyder who both had eight. Leek also had three service aces and Snyder had two. “It was definitely a back and forth game,” Lowden said. The first set was a battle between Chico and Pomona with the ’Cats eventually winning the set 25-22. The ’Cats fell behind early in the second set, but that was put to an end with kills from Leek, freshman Lindsay Quigley and Snyder, who also added a service ace. Good plays by the ’Cats,

GAME 2

GAME 1 Chico State

3

Chico State

1

Cal Poly Pomona

0

San Francisco State

3

paired with nine errors by Pomona, put the ’Cats back on top 14-8. In the second set, Leek and freshman Lauren Orozco each had a pair of service aces and the ’Cats claimed that set with a score of 25-15. After falling behind early in the third set, the ’Cats battled their way to a 26-24 win and a sweep of the game. “We really played well as a team and had confidence that we were going to win,” Snyder said. It wasn’t one of the prettier performances for the team, but overall it was a good team win, Lowden said. “We worked pretty well as a team,” Quigley said. The sweep at Pomona completed the ’Cats’ sweep of the season series against the Broncos. On Saturday the ’Cats took on the Gators of San Francisco State, where Chico ultimately fell in four sets. In Saturday’s game, Shurtz racked up a season-high 16 kills. Snyder and Leek contributed 13 kills of their own. Junior Sable Villaescusa had 43 assists on the night, and Orozco racked up 18 digs. The ’Cats fell behind early in the first set but came back

with the help of a service ace by Villaescusa and kills from Shurtz, Quigley and Snyder. The Gators came back to take the lead after going back and forth with the ’Cats and ended up taking the first set 25-22. Again, in the second set, San Francisco came out with an early 7-1 lead. The ’Cats kept battling throughout the set, but the Gators ended up claiming the set with a score of 25-22. Chico took the early lead in the third set and with the score tied at 22 the ’Cats took control and took down a 25-22 win. The Gators took control of the fourth set and held the lead throughout. The score of the final set was 18-25. The ’Cats were down big in the fourth set and waited too long to go on a run of their own, Lowden said. “It was a tough game,” Quigley said. “They played really well.” Defense was a struggle and they let a lot of balls drop that they would normally get to, Snyder said. Earlier in the season Chico beat the Gators in four sets at home in Acker Gym. The loss to San Francisco drops Chico to fourth place in California Collegiate Athletic

FILE PHOTO • JOSH ZACK

Association standings. “The little things have been letting us down,” Lowden said. As a team, they have a good offense and defense, so the focus going into the upcoming games will be to focus on perfecting the little things, Lowden said. “We really want to win in

ULTIMATE

’Cats Frisbee holds ultimate tournament ULTIMATE WIN [left] Chico State liberal studies major Giulia Fanti attempts a throw around UC Berkeley’s Linnea Delucchi [right] during the ultimate Frisbee tournament held in Chico over the weekend.

our home gym,” Snyder said. The ’Cats are at home this weekend with big games against nationally ranked teams UC San Diego and Cal State San Bernardino. Both games are in Acker Gym and are scheduled to start at 7 p.m. Sarah Goad can be reached at sgoad@theorion.com

CROSS-COUNTRY: Wildcats pack top 10 continued from B1

said about his conference title. “But it was more of a mutual decision.” Being a junior and the oldest of the three, Sherrod said that Chavez told him it was his turn to go get something for himself. “So it’s like 100 meters to go and he just looks at me and he just says, ‘Hey you want to take it?’” Sherrod said. After that Sherrod took the lead and kept it, clocking in at 25 minutes, 39 seconds. Chavez and Sanchez ran in to the finish right next to him at 25:39.1 and 25:39.8 – tenths of seconds behind. “I could have been third, Johnny could have been first and Isaac could have been second, and it wouldn’t have made any difference,” he said. Senior Joseph Rivera was the fourth scorer for Chico, crossing the tape at 25:43.5. Sophomore Dayne Gradone began the line, followed by senior Miles Dunbar, sophomore Alfonso Cisneros, seniors Josh Linen and Joey Kochlacs, and freshman Jeremy Brummitt. Sarah Bohannon can be reached at

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

DARA KARNOFSKY senior forward

Allie Colosky can be reached at

Volleyball splits weekend series, falls to fourth place Sarah Goad

It’s exhilarating. We’ve been connecting really well in practice so I was just trying to relax.

sbohannon@theorion.com


sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

FALL 2011

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

B5

WILDCAT SPORTS SCHEDULE

MEN’S SOCCER

WOMEN’S SOCCER W 8-0

Aug. 18

@Dominican (scrimmage)

L 2-0

Aug. 27

Southern Oregon (scrimmage)

@Seattle Pacific

T 0-0

Sept. 1

@Western Washington

W 2-1

Sept. 3

Sept. 9

Sonoma State

L 2-0

Sept. 11

@Cal State Stanislaus

Sept. 16

@Cal State Dominquez Hills

Sept. 18 Sept. 23 Sept. 25

@Cal State East Bay

Sept. 30 Oct. 2

VOLLEYBALL W 2-0

Sept. 2

Alaska Anchorage

L 3-2

T 1-1

Sept. 2

Western Oregon

W 3-1

@Seattle Pacific

L 1-0

Sept. 3

Dominican

W 3-0

@Western Washington

T 0-0

Sept. 3

Western Washington

W 3-0

Sept. 9

Sonoma State

W 2-1

Sept. 6

@William Jessup

W 3-0

W 2-0

Sept. 11

@Cal State Stanislaus

L 2-1

Sept. 9

@Sonoma State

W 5-0

Sept. 16

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-1

Sept. 10

@Humboldt State

W 3-0

@Cal State L.A.

T 2-2

Sept. 18

@Cal State L.A.

L 1-0

Sept. 13

Simpson

W 3-0

@Cal State Monterey Bay

L 2-1

Sept. 23

@Cal State Monterey Bay

W 3-0

Sept. 16

San Francisco State

W 3-1

W 1-0

Sept. 25

@Cal State East Bay

W 2-1

Sept. 17

Cal Poly Pomona

W 3-2

Cal State Stanislaus

T 0-0

Sept. 30

Cal State Stanislaus

T 1-1

Sept. 23

@Cal State San Bernardino

L 3-0

Humboldt State

W 2-0

Oct. 2

Humboldt State

W 1-0

Sept. 24

@UC San Diego

W 3-2

Oct. 7

UC San Diego

W 2-1

Oct. 7

UC San Diego

T 0-0

Sept. 28

@Cal State Stanislaus

W 3-0

Oct. 9

Cal State San Bernardino

L 3-1

Oct. 9

Cal State San Bernardino

L 1-0

Sept. 30

Cal State Monterey Bay

W 3-2

Oct. 14

@San Francisco State

W 1-0

Oct. 14

@San Francisco State

L 2-1

Oct. 1

Cal State East Bay

W 3-0

Oct. 16

@Cal Poly Pomona

W 1-0

Oct. 16

@ Cal Poly Pomona

W 2-1

Oct. 7

@Cal State Dominguez Hills

W 3-0

Oct. 21

Cal State East Bay

W 2-0

Oct. 21

Cal State East Bay

W 4-1

Oct. 8

@Cal State L.A.

W 3-0

Oct. 23

Cal State Monterey Bay

W 3-1

Oct. 23

Cal State Monterey Bay

W 1-0

Oct. 14

Humboldt State

L 3-2

Oct. 28

@Humboldt State

3 p.m.

Oct. 28

@Humboldt State

12:30 p.m.

Oct. 15

Sonoma State

L 3-0

Oct. 30

@Sonoma State

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 30

@Sonoma State

2 p.m.

Oct. 21

@Cal Poly Ponoma

Nov. 4

CCAA Semifinal

TBA

Nov. 4

CCAA Semifinal

TBA

OCt. 22

@San Francisco State

Nov. 6

CCAA Championship

TBA

Nov. 6

CCAA Championship

TBA

Oct. 28

UC San Diego

7 p.m.

Nov. 11-13

NCAA Championship Far West Regional

TBA

Nov. 11-13

NCAA Championship Far West Regional

TBA

Oct. 29

Cal State San Bernardino

7 p.m.

Nov. 19

NCAA Championship Quarterfinal

TBA

Nov. 19

NCAA Championship Quarterfinal

TBA

Nov. 2

Cal State Stanislaus

7 p.m.

Dec. 1-3

NCAA Championship Tournament Final Four

TBA

Dec. 1-3

NCAA Championship Tournament Final Four

TBA

Nov. 4

@Cal State East Bay

7 p.m.

Nov. 5

@Cal State Monterey Bay

7 p.m.

Nov. 11

Cal State L.A.

7 p.m.

Nov. 12

Cal State Dominguez Hills

7 p.m.

Nov. 17-19

NCAA Championship Tournament Pacific Regional

TBA

Dec. 1-2

NCAA Championship Tournament Elite Eight

TBA

Aug. 17

Yuba College

Aug. 23

@UC Davis

Sept. 1 Sept. 3

L 3-1

W 3-0 L 3-1

CROSS COUNTRY Sept. 10

@Humboldt Invitational

Oct. 22

CCAA Championships

Sept. 24

@Stanford Invitational

Nov. 5

NCAA West Regional

Oct. 1

@Willamette Invitaional

Nov. 19

NCAA Championships

Oct. 15

@Santa Clara Invitational

Note: Home games are in bold. Tournaments are in italics.

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Check out the Nebula in the Features section for comics - D5


B6 |

sports all week @ theorion.com

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

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arts

Nick Manitta, a communication design major, makes films. Story C3

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STUDY BREAK C2 A SOUND SALVATION C4 DAILY DOSE C5

arts all week at theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Leila Rodriguez ARTS EDITOR

Girl with the flower

acquired flowy little black dress. “That’s what they’re about.” Any of the five designers could be seen after the show selling merchandise, talking to fans or piling up chairs. “We gotta pack up all this stuff,” designer Nel Adams said. “We’re movin’ on. The circus goes, comes to town and leaves.” Adams has been designing for Chikoko for seven years now. It is her staple in this world, she said. Prior to working in design, Adams was involved in circus shows, performing in skits. “Spectacular, Spectacular, Spectacular” had its own share of skits, one of those being an intermittent acrobatic act provided by Chico State’s Acrobatics Club. The club was started a year ago and those who performed, about eight or so, were the more experienced of its members and have been with the club since it started. Other club members were there too, like senior Mary Carpenter, a geography major and vice president of the Acrobatics Club. They were excited about the group’s first big show and had been practicing their routine for the past two weeks, Carpenter said. Whether it was the gravity-defying acrobatic acts, the risqué stripper pole solo routine or the opera ballad, Chikoko had the audience on the edge of their seats. Some even took to standing so they could dance if they suddenly felt inclined to, as many were doing. “Spectacular, Spectacular, Spectacular” was a show that truly lived up to its name — simply using the adjective once would not have done it justice. The women of Chikoko deserve a tip of our top hats for giving the Ringling Bros. a run for their money.

Zoning in on zombies Lifeless stares, hovering and heavy breathing accompanied by light groans and blood dripping from the mouth — yup it’s a zombie and he’s after your flesh or brain. With Halloween coming up and The Beach’s Zombie Prom, it’s that time for the living dead to wander the streets of downtown Chico and that weird game of throwing socks at each other. Zombies are on the brain. Literally. It got me wondering, could Chico survive a zombie apocalypse, where all societal rules are tossed aside and people get into survival mode? Absolutely. Depending on when the outbreak occurs, students would have the upper hand. If it occurs on the weekend we’re all dead because many are too friendly when drunk and could mix up a zombie for a drunk in a great costume as a limping stud to take home for the evening. Also the women in heels would be the first to go. Running in 3-inch heels is cause for disaster and slows a person down. If we’re lucky, we’ll have to fight off the slow-moving zombies opposed to the more recent breed of Hollywood zombies whose limbs somehow are restored and super-powered for fast running. Then our only problem will be the number of zombies. Ideally most students would pack their cars and head home, a few would stay ready and willing to fight the horde. With that, one needs to be prepared. If the outbreak occurred while on campus, Butte and Holt halls are great places to take refuge. It’s too confusing for students to navigate. Bidwell Mansion can house many in its three-story home with 26 rooms. It provides an elevated shooting range and multiple exits. It’s also slightly isolated and has many main streets leading away from it. It would be good to have Max Brooks’ “The Zombie Survival Guide” book on hand along with lots of weapons. Though it is based on fictitious scenarios, when faced with real flesh-eating zombies, it would be helpful to know how to fight them off properly. There are plenty of gun supply stores to stock up on ammunition, including one just off the Esplanade. Travel lightly. If anyone’s ever played Left 4 Dead 2, they understand the necessity of an ax, machete, sword and health pack. A guitar in this case would be useless. A cross bow is quieter than a gun. Zombies are attracted to noise so Ivy Street will be the first pillaged. Thankfully Chico has a Costco and Walmart — all good stores for hiding out and gathering supplies. Don’t go organic. Organic food doesn’t have much shelf life. And more importantly, stay together. Fighting off hordes single-handedly just means you’ll die sooner. Take it from every zombie film ever made, aim for the head and avoid car alarms.

Jen Moreno can be reached at

Leila Rodriguez can be reached at

jmoreno@theorion.com

artseditor@theorion.com

SHOW ME YOUR TEETH Sherrie Wells, a Chikoko model, gets into character on the runway for the circus-themed fashion show at Cal Skate on Saturday.

CHIKOKO embraces

FASHION, FREAKS

PHOTOS BY • ORION STAFF

Jen Moreno STAFF WRITER

Clowns, bearded ladies, acrobats and stilt walkers all under one roof can only mean one thing — the circus has come to town. Chico-based fashion line Chikoko brought everyone under the big top for “Spectacular, Spectacular, Spectacular,” a circus-inspired fashion show held Friday at Cal Skate. Doors opened at 6 p.m., and the ringmaster hit the stage at 7:30, leaving guests plenty of time to try their hand at some games for a prize, to peruse Chikoko’s one-of-a-kind pieces being sold or to satisfy their curiosities at any one of the sideshows. From inside to out Cal Skate was transformed, and those working the event weren’t the only ones with red noses. Chicoans dressed for the occasion in their own circus-esque attire with colorful tutus being the No. 1 choice among females. Each model strode fiercely up and down the runway with confidence as loud and bold as the pieces they were wearing. The Chikoko store had the same pieces for sale that night, so fashionistas could take the look from the catwalk to their closets. One woman did just that. And instead of waiting until she got home to show off her Chikoko original, she slipped away during intermission for a wardrobe change immediately after her purchase. “They always bring fun and really unusual fashion,” said Zoe Sigler, wearing her newly

WALKING A TIGHT ROPE Runway model Dallas Pirritano [above] shows off a Chikoko piece as part of the “Spectacular, Spectacular, Spectacular” fashion show. [right] A masked model teases the audience during her runway time.

VIRAL VIDEOS >> speaking

“They say you only bring heartache, but I know you brought a bottle of wine.” Acid House Kings “This Heart is a Stone” 2006

“Spongebob sings Dynamite ” YouTube

“Dora Walk It Out ” YouTube

Clips from the beloved SpongeBob SquarePants cartoon are synced to sing “Dynamite” by Taio Cruz.

Dora the Explorer keeps it gangster to “Walk it Out” by Unk.


C2 |

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arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Chico band brings beats back home to Senator

a look at upcoming distractions

> Compiled by Mark Rojas

“Captain America: The First

Kayla Wohlford STAFF WRITER

Avenger” - Available now on Blu-Ray and DVD

●●●●● In 1941, Steve Rogers graced the cover of the comic “Captain America Comics #1,” feeding Adolf Hitler a fist full of American justice. Now, Chris Evans wears the stars and stripes in “First Avenger,” the awesome origin story of the most patriotic superhero in the Marvel universe. An experimental serum helps Rogers undergo the most impressive bodily transformation since Barry Bonds. Hugo Weaving, who is no stranger to playing the bad guy, does such a good job that you might want to change sides and chant “hail HYDRA.” Check out the special features to see how they made Weaving look so bad ass. “Battlefield 3” - Available now for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and PC

●●●●○ Gaming company EA proclaims its new game “Battlefield 3” is “above and beyond the call,” taking a stab at the upcoming “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3.” If the launch trailer and early online multi-player beta are to be taken seriously, it makes the decision between the two war games very difficult. “Battlefield” is a serious thrill ride, first-person shooter with plenty of destruction, expansive maps and amazing graphics. “Jurassic Park” trilogy - Now in Blu-Ray high definition

●●●●●

Grounded in reggae and looking to promote optimism, Mystic Roots Band is spreading its high-spirited sound throughout the world. The band started out playing local bars and backyard parties. More than 10 years later, it has established a name for itself and now travels the world performing with some of the biggest names in the reggae/hip-hop musical genre, including The Expendables and Pato Banton. “We get to see different countries and play different music,” band founder and vocalist cootdog said. “Our wealth is intangible.” The band wants to send out uplifting messages through their music and bring about a feeling in the crowd, new vocalist Katherine Ramirez said. Their mission remains to promote positivity through their music. “Music is supposed to invoke emotion and bring happiness,” cootdog said. Mystic Roots recently took its uplifting tunes and traveled overseas with the U.S. nationwide Pacific Rim tour. The band visited Japan, Guam and Hawaii entertaining U.S. troops abroad. “It was amazing,” bassist Dane-Jah Lund said. “We experienced a whole different culture and got to share part of everyday American life with them.” With roughly 100 shows this year, the band plays benefit concerts and big festivals, including Reggae On the Rocks at the Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Colorado. “There’s a stone hallway at Red Rocks where famous artists throughout time have visited and signed the wall,” tour manager Mikey CaliKidd said. “Mystic Roots got to sign their name on that

wall and it was amazing.” The band’s newest album, “Cali-HI,” was released in 2010 and named one of the “Best Reggae Albums of 2010” by iTunes. The album was like a yearbook of the band’s experiences and progress, cootdog said. It incorporated the different styles they had worked on over the past seven years. The title is a fusion of California and Hawaii to represent their California style fused with the musical experiences they gained while spending time in Hawaii. “We got great positive feedback from ‘Cali-HI,’” Ramirez said. “People would come up to us and tell us we did great and that’s what keeps us playing.” Inspired by their fans, the band likes to incorporate that inspiration into their music, she said. The best thing about performing is connecting with the audience and making people happy, Lundy said. “The energy between you and the crowd is great,” he said. Mystic Roots is currently working on a new album titled “Camp Fire.” The album will feature Ramirez as the band’s new main vocalist and include new mixes. They want to continue to evolve their musical styles by including two discs, the first with reggae sounds and the second with electronic/techno song remixes. “Camp” is to symbolize the first disc with strong reggae melodies and “Fire” represents the second disc’s faster and fierce material. “Every album is a chapter in the saga,” cootdog said. “In the new album we want to include more songs with a love vibe.”

STIR IT UP Katherine Ramirez [above] of Mystic Roots Band drops vocals Saturday. Mystic Roots drummer Alec Wheatley [below] does a cool trick during their set.

Kayla Wohlford can be reached at kwohlford@theorion.com

PHOTOS BY • BRETT EDWARDS

It is hard to believe that “Jurassic Park” is old enough to be a freshman. This film helped usher in a new era for filmmaking as computer graphics brought extinct monsters back to life. Now they will be even bigger in super awesome high definition and remastered sound to make the walls shake when the T-rex roars. Wired.com reports that science is currently working on reverse-evolve dinosaurs, made a reality by manipulating chicken DNA. Maybe they should watch these movies first. If it happens, heed the words of Samuel Jackson: “Hold on to your butts.” Coldplay-”Mylo Xyloto” - Available now

●●●●○ The new single “Paradise“ reminds you that Coldplay is like U2 but with a little less of Bono’s yodeling. Is there anything more emo sounding than “Every Teardrop is a Waterfall”? But the title is misleading, as the song from Coldplay’s new album is

THE ORION • CHELSEA BEIGHTS

JAIL BIRDS [left to right] Tina Levitan, Tina Grace, Whitney Elliott, Toni De La Guerra and Dominique Barnett are excited about a stolen bottle of Comet.

surprisingly upbeat and catchy. “Mylo Xyloto” is very true to the Coldplay style but switches things up as Rihanna joins on “Princess

Play invites guests into cell block tales

of China,” providing an interesting contrast to frontman Chris Martin.

Juan Mejia STAFF WRITER

She & Him- “A Very She & Him Christmas” -Available now

●●●●○ Halloween is this week, but Zooey Deschanel and M. Ward want you to get in the Christmas spirit. Singing about the frosted window panes and Santa Claus coming to town, Deschanel makes you forget that it’s still 70 degrees outside. Traditional songs like “Silver Bells” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” are sure to be great study aids when finals come around. “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” sounds even better than it did in the movie “Elf,” which would serve as an amazing combination for a holiday get together.

Bringing a look into the life inside prison and relationships that develop behind bars, a troupe of former inmates looks to the stage to deliver a message. “Women Behind the Walls” came to Chico on Sunday, bringing a cast made entirely of former inmates in a play that examines the relationships between five cellmates and how their decisions have affected them in an exposition at the Chico Women’s Club. A play full of prison puns, sex and an array of lighthearted prison humor did not get in the way of a serious story in which each of the five women clearly explained the actions that brought them to their current state. A victim of domestic violence turned into a convict for defending herself, a former prostitute pregnant in prison, a woman that has never tried drugs in for a drug crime, a spoiled drug addict and an accidental arsonist rounded off the main characters. The play was written by Claire Braz-Valentine while at a writer’s retreat in a women’s prison in Chowchilla. Former inmates are used for the main cast to provide a clearer story and

first hand experience while helping them conAfter the show, there was a forum where the tinue on the path free of crime. cast, producers and audience could casually Amid jokes and serious messages, musical converse about life in prison and the current numbers were sprinkled, taking the audience state of each of their lives. for a spin of talent that these women “This has been a great opportunity have gained in only five weeks to be a part of something greater than of rehearsal. myself,” said Whitney Elliott who plays “They only see someone they don’t Heather. “Hopefully we can show people trust,” said Tina Grace onstage as that although we’re cons and recovering The day Valdetta. “The day the jury put their drug addicts, we can go to a better place the jury eyes on me, I was guilty.” and make up for it.” The play deals with the chemistry After words of encouragement and put their between the characters and getting stories, people thanked the amateur eyes on used to life in prison. The set was performers for helping bridge the gap me, I was that society has created for them. With static and there were no act breaks or guilty. intermissions in order to mimic life little or no previous theater experiinside prison as much as possible. ence, these newfound actors have “Sometimes people don’t see the decided to tell a story of something humanity in the person, the backvery close to home. story of why or why not they may “When you take away the drugs and have done something,” director Molly the crime, you have to replace it with TINA GRACE Williams Stuckey said. something else,” Grace said. “This has Valdetta About a month ago the piece was shown me that I’m not just an inmate, re-envisioned. Wanting to see more not just a criminal, there’s so much of the story and the characters in a natural more to me than that. I’m a person.” light, showing the humanity of the characters made them drop lighting and provided a door Juan Mejia can be reached at to a more character driven story, she said. jmejia@theorion.com

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arts all week @ theorion.com

ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

C3

Artist parts fans with siss, boom, bang Brooke Hespeler STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • FRANK REBELO

FINE FREAKS k.d. lang greets a full house at her Tuesday Laxson Auditorium concert.

k.d. lang and the Siss Boom Bang blew the roof off Laxson Auditorium Saturday to the delight of her many eager fans in the crowd. After an enjoyable introductory performance by British country singer Teddy Thompson, lang entered the stage with her fun faux hawk and cool tailored suit. The audience’s response was a deafening chorus of cheers and whistles. “Good people of Chico!” lang yelled out to the screaming fans. “I think I may have fallen in love. Just from my short 24-hour experience here, I’m guessing there are a lot of freaks in Chico, but I’m guessing that the finest of freaks are here tonight. For the next two hours, let those freak flags fly Chiconatrons!” And they did. The crowd was filled with some of lang’s most adoring fans, who were able to identify each song from her set list with just the opening chord. From the sensual “Constant Craving” to her heartbreaking cover of Rufus Wainwright’s “Hallelujah,” attendees hung on her every line and note. They danced, sang and cheered their way through the whole two hours, never losing their energy or enthusiasm. The small venue created an intimate environment. There was a sense of camaraderie between lang and the audience. “What can you say about k.d.?” devoted fan Sherry Nelson said. “She’s super fantastic — a really sweet lady. She’s funny and has the most beautiful, clear voice in existence.”

lang strutted her way across the stage, as comfortable as could be. In addition to showing off her impressive vocal range and deft guitar-playing, she danced around the stage and interacted with the Siss Boom Bang band, as well as the audience. Her attitude was playful and light, and she brought smiles to every person in Laxson. “Not only does she have the best pipes in the business, but she’s a fabulous entertainer and a fabulous person,” said Stacy Cepello, who came from Sacramento to see his favorite singer. One of the highlights of the night was when a fan in the audience announced that lang’s birthday was in a few days, so the entire audience stood up and sang “Happy Birthday” to a blushing lang. “Well, that was a first,” she said shyly after taking a small bow. Another evening highlight was when lang showed off her banjo playing skills. “I feel the need to issue this disclaimer now,” she said as she tuned the instrument. “You may experience a strange pulling sensation towards the stage now. This is normal. The banjo, I have learned, is a bit of a chick magnet.” After the two hours of freak flag flying, the audience was very sorry to see her go. She performed three spectacular encore songs to multiple standing ovations, before finally bidding the audience adieu. One can only hope that she will grace Chico with her presence again very soon. Brooke Hespeler can be reached at bhespeler@theorion.com

Student creates art behind camera lens Nicole Walker STAFF WRITER

THE ORION • BRETT EDWARDS

MOTION PICTURES Senior Nick Manitta trades his camera phone for a real camera.

When all else fails, use a cell phone. People rely on cell phones for communication, applications and, on occasion, catching quick clips of a spontaneous event worth capturing. Those impromptu times, for instance fourwheeling with a friend while he is doing unbelievable tricks that make for great footage, are when a cell phone is required, said Nick Manitta, a senior in communications design. Using a cell phone to create videos is one way Manitta expresses and perfects his craft in filmmaking. Out of his 10 creations TO VIEW MANITTA’S cinematic he shot one only using FILMS VISIT: his phone. “I like to show others www.youtube.com my perspectives and the User name: nmanitta way I see things,” he said. When Manitta got the idea of filming his friend Ryan Ivanusich and the four-wheeling expedition in Coos Bay, Ore., in August, Manitta was on an ATV four-wheeler as well, Manitta said. This made it difficult to shoot some of the footage because he was using a Droid phone and it wasn’t easy keeping it stable while having to brake and hold the throttle of the quad at the same time, he said. After the footage was shot, it was time to edit. While using the program Final Cut Pro, it could take from four to eight hours to edit a 30-second production, depending on how intricate the shots are and how long it will take to find audio that matches the scenes, Manitta said. The whole process is time-consuming. But seeing the final product come together makes it all worth it, he said. It takes a good idea,

the right equipment, set-up, lighting, editing and other people to rely on for tasks one cannot do alone. Ideas stem from whether there is a client or if you are just shooting a random, spur-of-themoment video, Manitta said. “I also find it helpful to watch the video without sound because you can see the aesthetic values and focus solely on the cuts,” Manitta said. The media program at Chico State makes this possible, he said. The equipment is great and professors do everything they can to prepare students for the industry and what is to come. Manitta may have it figured out now that he is a senior, but that wasn’t always the case. Coming into Chico State as a freshman, he was undeclared and was unsure what his career path would be, Manitta said. But he had been interested in movies since he was young, and being the creator behind the scenes ended up being exactly what he had a passion for and that is what he would do. “Nick has a high propensity for success in my opinion, because he is dedicated and he has built a solid foundation to work from,” said Dan Carter, a Chico State media production specialist in academic technologies and a lecturer for the communications design department. With the industry being such a large field, the career choice of producing films is a very competitive one to strive for, he said. “I can see Nick working in the industry, definitely behind the scenes,” said Kayla D’Alonzo, a senior in communication design. He would do well as a director, cameraman or technical director, she said. “It just comes naturally to him,” D’Alonzo said. Nicole Walker can be reached at nwalker@theorion.com

BEE’S PRETTY LITTLE THINGS

Tricks to make iconic, practical Halloween costumes at home Brittany Comas Br STAFF WRITER

Halloween weekend is fast approaching and so are exams. If you’ve been hitting the books too hard, chances are you haven’t had time to find a costume. I’ve put together four do-it-yourself costumes that you can arrange in just a couple of days with a couple of bucks. Most of these items can be found at local thrift stores or discount retailers around town. Remember, DIY always requires some treasure hunting and creativity, but it’s always worth it in the end. Brittany Comas can be reached at bcomas@theorion.com

SOME THRIFT STORES FOR YOUR DIY COSTUME NEEDS: ARC Store 2020 Park Ave. (530) 343-3666 Thrift Queen 641 Nord Ave. (530) 342-4282 American Cancer Society Discovery Shop 752 Mangrove Ave. (530) 343-6178

FOR MORE DIY COSTUME IDEAS See story D2

WOMEN’S

MEN’S

Daria Morgendorffer, MTV’s animated apathetic teen, has her very own look that cult-followers love. As one who never follows what’s “in,” Daria sports an orange T-shirt underneath her green notched collar jacket and a black pleated skirt that falls about an inch above her knee. Black combat boots tie her look together. Forever 21 has all different styles of combat boots that are budget friendly. Don’t forget the round eyeglasses that adorn her face. Pop out the lenses to any cheap old sunglasses and voila.

Paulie Bleeker is the adorable baby’s daddy in the 2007 film, “Juno.” Paulie runs track for his high school team and wears the brightest and shortest pair of yellow running shorts throughout most of the movie. If you don’t want to bear your whole leg, go for bright yellow basketball shorts instead and hike them up just a tiny bit. His high school colors are yellow and maroon and, luckily, Chico State’s bookstore has a maroon sweatshirt that looks similar to Paulie’s in the movie. Add a yellow sweatband around your head, tube socks pulled up to your knees and some old running shoes and the Paulie Bleeker look is complete.

Punky Brewster was an iconic ’80s character with her own unique style. Punky always layered her shirts under an old beat up vest. Wear a long-sleeved colorful shirt underneath a shortsleeved tee of a different color. Put a vest over the top of it and add some eccentric buttons. Next, find a pair of old loose jeans, or borrow your boyfriend’s. Roll them up to just a few inches above your ankles and wear two mismatching shoes with colorful socks. For your hair, put it in two pigtails with colorful scrunchies. Make sure your look isn’t too put together. Punky would’ve never cared if the part in her hair was crooked. Lastly, roll up a classic bandana and tie it around one knee. Very Punky.

Dexter Morgan is everyone’s favorite serial killer on Showtime’s series “Dexter.” For this costume, wear any dark pair of jeans in your closet with an olive-colored long sleeve tee or thermal. Find a pair of work boots or old hiking shoes out of your dad’s closet or a thrift shop. Don’t forget a plain black apron and black latex gloves so you don’t leave any evidence of your Halloween escapades behind. Dexter is always very careful. To give the look an added scare factor, smear fake blood across the apron and add a little splatter on your face.


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ARTS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

A SOUND SALVATION

Website eases pain of creating mixes online Eli Gibbs STAFF WRITER

When selecting tracks to put into a musical playlist, my first focus is always genre. Knowing what your genres are will allow you to better select tracks and create playlists that will be pleasing to your audience. When I am looking for tracks to mix together, I focus on more than just one genre. The key of a track will determine mixing quality. Knowledge of chord progessions is helpful in this situation. Another thing to consider is the beats per minute. BPM is what will allow your tracks to sync properly when mixing. If one track’s BPM is different, the tempo must be changed for the two to align. I was making a playlist on my computer one day when my father told me about how he used to have to make mixtapes. He would put a blank cassette in the cassette drive on his boom box and record his favorite songs one by one. It amazes him when I explain the shift in culture and technology that allows professional disc jockeys to live mix more than an hour of music for an audience. About five months ago I discovered 8tracks.com, a website that takes the concept of creating a mixtape and applies it to a social, online structure. 8tracks is a quick way to discover music through an online mix. Each mix is at least eight tracks and therefore roughly 30 minutes or more. Not only can you listen to these user-submitted mixes, but you can create your own as well. “Think radio in the 1970s, mixtapes in the 1980s, and DJ culture of the 1990s through today,” 8tracks explains. My favorite part of 8tracks is the way you can search for mixes. Searching by artist finds

mixes with that artist, hoping that you will then find other artists similar to them. But an even more effective way of searching is by specific genres. 8tracks utilizes genre tags that users associate with the music in their mixes. So, if I were searching for a specific genre such as “minimal house,” I would not select just the tab that says “house.” Rather, I may select “house music,” “minimal” and even “electronic” to narrow my search down even more. Most of the mixes on 8tracks are genre specific, and I tend to stray away from mixes that Think do not follow radio in genre because the 1970s, I find them to be ranmixtapes dom. Random in the tracks com1980s, piled in a list will seldom be and DJ favored over a culture, of flow of music the 1990s that adheres through to genre. Though today. 8tracks is not mixing 8TRACKS your songs WEBSITE together like a DJ aims to do, it still creates a way for users to attempt to create flow in their mixes. In April, they added a free iPhone application, and they are currently working on developing an app for the Android market. With the app, just like with the website, anyone can favorite tracks and mixes, allowing users to enjoy easy access when they want to find their favorites later. I have been sharing mixes with friends since I learned how to burn CDs. 8tracks allows me to have a very similar social experience over the internet.

“ Reggae king lays beats, crown at show “

Eli Gibbs can be reached at egibbs@theorion.com

THE ORION • MICHELLE REINMUTH

ROCKING STEADY King Hopeton brings love and hope to his reggae sound at Cafe Culture’s Saturday performance.

Miguel Rocha STAFF WRITER

King Hopeton’s braids hang all the way down to his knees. He has not cut a single strand in 17 years, but they’re not weighing him down. Hopeton was the king of the stage Saturday night at Cafe Culture, where he shared his hope of world peace through reggae beats. The singer from Jamaica started playing classical piano music before he went in to reggae. When he is on stage he feels music and the people accepting it, he said. “Reggae is my heart,” he said. Hopeton uses a lion as his logo as a representation of strength, family and king, he said. He has quite the resume working with artists like Sean Paul. Other great singers have also passed through his music donating their skills to be recorded with him. His inspirations are King David and Solomon because they both played instruments, such as the harp, before they became kings. And they played beautifully, he said.

Although it was a long way to Chico from Jamaica, fate brought him here, Hopeton said. “In this Earth, all is destiny,” he said. For Hopeton, music brings out people’s true essence, and it makes him be the real him and represent what he stands for, and that is world peace, he said. It all started back home when he helped people off the street, Hopeton said. He took care of them before they turned into criminals and helped them with music and some would become great artists. Music can bring world peace, he said. When artists campaign, they come together and gather a crowd, akin to Michael Jackson’s peace tour. Genre doesn’t matter, as long as the lyrics and energy are concentrated on the message. He is not yet finished with his message of world peace, Hopeton said. In fact, he is barely starting and it might take forever. “If it’s going to take forever, fine,” he said. “It can happen tomorrow, right now.” People have to believe it’s possible, Hopeton said. Everybody needs to join into that

monday tuesday ORIONday thursday friday

force. It doesn’t make sense killing another human being. Every country within their own regime, they want pace. People have to come together and agree with each other. Brooke Piercy, a freshman psychology major, liked the energy and the lovely people at the show, she said. Piercy also enjoyed the lyrics to all of the songs. “Reggae makes me feel happy and calm,” she said. Piercy’s friend Aimee Zarzynski, an undeclared freshman, also enjoyed Hopeton’s laid-back sound. “It gets me dancing,” Zarzynski said. Jon Trefault, a junior criminal justice major, had never heard Hopeton’s music, but he was looking for a good time. “Good music, good people, good times,” Trefault said. Hopeton’s song “Crying out for Peace” is a plea for peace, justice, love and hope, which is needed in this world. “Tons of it,” Hopeton said. Miguel Rocha can be reached at mrocha@theorion.com


daily dose events all week @ theorion.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

<< T ODAY

Tech N9ne 8 p.m. @Senator Theatre $25 advance Tech N9ne performs with Krizz Kalico, Kutt Calhoun, Jay Rock, Flawless and Lower Level.

T H U R SDAY

F R I DAY

Camp Fright Night

Jimmy Grant CD Release Party

7 p.m. @ Blue Room Theatre $7

8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda $5

Stop by for some spooks at The Blue Room’s Annual Haunted House.

Grant’s newest album of gypsy jazz tunes is ready to his stores. Grant draws influence from bluegrass, country swing, jazz and the music of Django Reinhardt.

Folk Music Fridays 2 to 5 p.m. @ Augie’s Fine Coffee & Tea Cafe

SAT U R DAY

SU N DAY

JACKIE GREEN

Haunted House

7:30 p.m. @ El Rey Theatre $22.50 advance

4 to 9 p.m. @ Elks Lodge $10

Jackie Green performs with Jabe Beyer.

Dia de los Muertos with Jahny Wallz 6 p.m. @Cafe Culture $10

Elks Ladies invite you to their Haunted House where they will have games, pinatas, prizes for costumes and dinner.

| C5

necessities T U E SDAY

MON DAY

Special Halloween Showing of Rocky Horror Show

Take Back the Night 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. @ Trinity Commons

7:30 p.m. @ Chico Cabaret $16 admission

Take back the Night will be Nov. 3, but to lead up to that night, they will be out tabling in the Free Speech Area.

Step into the time warp with Chico Caberet as they put on The Rocky Horror Picture Show for your delight.

Come join some great Latin beats along with food, disc jockeys and a costume contest.

Get folky at Augie’s every Friday.

ILLUSTRATION BY • LINDSAY SMITH

options >> TODAY

Cafe Coda’s 5-year Anniversary Show 7 p.m. @ Cafe Coda Come celebrate with Cafe Coda as they cheers to fi ve great years.

Museum Without Walls Lecture series 7:30 p.m. @The Card Center $5-$10 Check out the Mechoopda Maidu Tribe lecture on “Mechoopda Maidu and the Nome Cult walk.”

T H U R SDAY

F R I DAY

Michael Parenti

Sound the Trumpet

7 p.m. @Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. $20

7: 30p.m. @ Harlen Adams Theatre $15 general

Political activist Michael Parenti and comedian Will Durst host An Evening of Political Humor to benefit KZFR.

Pilobolus 7:30 p.m. @ Laxson Auditorium $21 students Dance troupe Pilobolus will perform the incredible and astonishing mix of dance, mime and acrobatics that have made it internationally famous.

Chico State Jazz X-Press welcomes master musician and trumpeter Walter Blanton.

4th Annual Halloween Party Fundraiser 9 p.m. @ The Arroyo Room $35 advanced only 21 and older

SAT U R DAY

BETA Halloween Bash 7:30p.m. @ Lost On Main Come in your best costume to Lost On Main as HOT MESS and SLEESTAK perform.

The Butte Brothers 8 p.m. @ Cafe Coda

SU N DAY

MON DAY

Dance Church

Bear-E-Oke

10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture $8

9 p.m. @ Madison Bear Garden

Come to Cafe Culture with a skip in your step and praise in your heart for the mind, body and soul exercises with David Winglifter.

The Butte Brothers perform with Lise Welch and Pope & the Pagans.

Calling all jukebox heroes – The Bear hosts a karaoke night every Monday until closing time.

Happy Halloween!

T U E SDAY

International Forum: El Clasico 4 p.m. @ Ayres 120 Free Matthew Robertson, a graduate student of history at Chico State presents “El Clasico: More Than a Game” as part of this week’s International Forum.

Dance Sanctuary 6:30 p.m. @ Cafe Culture Swing on by Cafe Culture for an evening with Five Rhythms Dance Wave.

Costume contest, dancing, a disc jockey, beer, wine and a good time.

STAFF FAVORITES >> HALLOWEEN MOVIE “Halloween” — John Carpenter’s creepy cult classic was filmed on a budget slashed almost as much as it’s heroines. Using ingenuity behind the camera, excellent acting and an implacable nightmare villain, Halloween still scares me to this day.

>> Ben Mullin Opinion Editor

“Hocus Pocus” — This has been my favorite Halloween movie since I was little. I always wanted a cat that could talk. Also Bette Midler, Sara Jessica Parker and Kathy Najimy as the Sanderson Sisters make me laugh every time.

>>Jamie Hazelton Sports Designer

“Donnie Darko” — With a haunting soundtrack, an ethereal feel and one hell of plot, Donnie Darko may be the most complex Halloween film around. While not like your typical holiday films (see left), this movie about a schizophrenic teenager really digs into life’s greater meaning and follows our hero, Donnie, to several discoveries. >> Liam Turner Art Director


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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Turn Your

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All Metals CRV/Recyclables Car Batteries Iron/Tin Appliances

Located at 878 E 20th Street 530.343.7166 Mon-Fri: 8am-12pm, 1pm-4pm Sat: 8am-12pm Sun: closed

*NOTE: Call ahead for appliances Directly across from Sierra Nevada Brewery Also located in Oroville & Durham

    

 





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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26 , 2011

Ally Dukkers F E AT U R E S E D I T O R

The Ally Way

FRIGHTFUL FESTIVITIES [clockwise from top left] Cody Collins, a junior electrical engineer major, helps position pumpkins at Patrick Ranch as part of a service project with his fraternity Alpha Gamma Rho. Steven House of Hamilton City dressed as an evil clown and scared visitors of the corn maze at Country Pumpkins where he has worked for two years.

PHOTOS BYY • AARON DRAPER

SPOOKY SPOTS Vanessa Applegate, a senior biology major, travels through the corn maze at Country Pumpkins.

Events encourage alternatives to parties Kathleen Dazzi STAFF WRITER

S

kimpy costumes, drunken crowds and cops on horses fill downtown during Halloween weekend. While many students go to parties or bars multiple nights in a row, not everyone goes out or can last the whole weekend. There are many ways to enjoy Halloween in Chico sans alcohol, such as a trip to the pumpkin patch, a haunted corn maze, the Blue Room Theatre’s haunted house or watching scary movies with friends. All of these activities provide some alternatives for students. Emily Coker, a senior nutrition and food sciences major, plans to go and g out one or two nights g watch scary movies the

HAVE YOUR OWN HALLOWEEN

rest of the weekend. She also plans to buy pumpkins at the pumpkin patch to carve in time for Halloween, she said. Some pumpkin patches include TJ Farms, Patrick Ranch and Country Pumpkins. Students and families can cut their own pumpkins straight from the vine and prices vary with size. Colleen Rodman, a senior English major, will buy pumpkins for decoration but thinks carving them would be too messy, she said. To celebrate Halloween, she will go to house parties and head to the haunted corn maze one night with friends. Country Pumpkins features a haunted corn maze every Friday and Saturday in October from 7 to 10 p.m. Participants pay $8 and must bring flashlights to find their way through the maze in the dark. Another option for those looking opt

for some thrills is the Blue Room Theatre’s Camp Fright Night. Admission is $7 to the haunted house and runs from Oct. 26-28 for families. A scarier show, aimed for an older age group is offered Halloween weekend from 10 to 11 p.m. Without leaving the comfort of a living room, scary movies can provide the same effect as a haunted house or corn maze. This month Blockbuster and All the Best Video have Halloween movie specials with sections marked in stores. All the Best Video has an all ages Halloween section called “Spooktacular” and a horror section called “Halloween Horror.” The movies in this section are all $1 for every day of rental. Halloween movies rent fast and are at a first come first serve basis, said Mike Brown, All the Best Video >> please see HALLOWEEN | D5

Rent a scary movie

Check out a local event

“The Thing” “The Exorcist” “The Night of the LLiving Dead” “The Texas Chainsaw Chain Massacre” “The Ring” “The Shining” “Silence of the Lambs”

Camp Fright Night The Blue Room Theatre’s annual haunted house Oct. 26-30 7 to 10 p.m. 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult Special adults only showing Oct. 28-29 10 to 11 p.m. $7 at door 139 W. First St. TJ Farms Pumpkin Patch Oct 1-28 2 to 6 p.m. weekdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekends

3600 Chico Ave. Free admission Pumpkins $6 to $40 depending on size AutumnFest 2011 at the Patrick Ranch Museum Pick your own pumpkins, try the pie contest or farm tour Oct 14-30, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 10381 Midway, between Chico and Durham Country Pumpkins Haunted Corn Maze Oct. 28-29 7 to 10 p.m. 7152 Highway 32, Orland $8

Halloween personality Halloween gives us the opportunity to take on a new personality and be someone else for a day. We have one day, or multiple days in Chico, where the holiday is spread over the weekend, to step out of our normal lives and step into another character. You have 362 days a year to be yourself. Halloween is almost my favorite holiday, next to my birthday, and I put a lot of thought into my costumes. I don’t just buy the generic packaged ones. A great costume can’t be bought at one store and needs to be well thought out. I suggest being something creative, getting into character and taking a night off from being you. Some of the best types of costumes are inspired by pop culture. Pick a celebrity with a big personality that you can play around with, and have a fun time being them for the night. Last year my friends and I were all celebrities, including Kat Von D., Amy Winehouse, Christina Aguilera and myself as Ke$ha to take to the streets of Chico. We had a lot of fun pretending to be these female icons and were able to really get into character, unlike with many generic costumes. Most people don’t get as into their costumes as we do. Many women will throw on a bikini and some fangs and call themselves a vampire. Instead, I encourage you to go for something more inspired this season and lose yourself in character. I suggest departing as much as possible from your everyday look. A sexy costume can be a great way for a modest person to let loose and to step out of their comfort zone. You may find that your costume instills a confidence that might inspire you to bring it into your everyday life. Of course, alcohol is prevalent at most Halloween parties in the college scene. These cocktails and shooters will only help to convince yourself and others that you have taken on a new identity for the night. The year before I was Ke$ha, I dressed up as Michael Jackson and spent the night yelling “Hee, hee” and tipping my hat. I got so into character that I had a blast pretending to be the King of Pop. Halloween and pretending to be someone else is all about the attitude you put into it. Even if your costume doesn’t make you look exactly like who you are trying to impersonate, convince people of who you are. Have confidence, use your character’s lingo and vocabulary and have fun with it. Halloween is a tradition I don’t see many going against, and it’s also a great excuse to dress up and escape our day-to-day lives in order to take on a foreign personality. Ally Dukkers can be reached at

PHOTO COURTESY OF • EVERYSTOCKPHOTO.COM

FASHION >> Shorts and dresses in October

featureseditor@theorion.com

Compiled by Chelsea Beights

DICTIONARY

Halloween walk of shame [hall• o • ween • walk • of• shame] When someone leaves a house wearing the same costume they partied in the night before. I totally did the Halloween walk of shame this morning in my head-to-toe chicken outfit. source: urbandictionary.com

“shek-o”

“I tried to put

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warm weather.”

Lindsay Stevens

Sabrina Moris

Alisha Chmura

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junior | kinesiology

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FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

S STAFF COMMENTARY CO

Custom accessories trick to cheap celebration

face SE X COLUMN>>

Lexi Brister S E X CO L U M N I S T

Sexy costumes It’s not for everyone, but my boyfriend loves it when I wear lingerie, especially the really raunchy, see-through kind. When I put on something scandalous, sex with my boyfriend reaches a whole new level of hot. With Halloween this weekend, there’s a great opportunity to become someone different in the bedroom. The last time I tried roleplaying to give my bedroom exercises a creative edge, it was so awkward that my ex-boyfriend and I decided boring sex would be better. We realized later that the attempt was so disastrous because we were trying to force our fantasies onto each other under the restrictions of reality. The great thing about Halloween is that you can reinvent your sexual persona at a time when everyone else is doing the exact same thing. You’re able to get the spice without the awkwardness. I have an older female friend who has a Halloween tradition in which she and her husband get dressed up for a friend’s party separately. They don’t tell each other about their costumes, and when they get to the party they make a game of finding and hitting on each other as if they were single. Doing this takes them back to their days when sex meant clothes-ripping, wall-shaking ecstasy, she said. Her advice, however, is to make sure you pay close attention to who you’re going home with. Her husband wore a popular mask one year, and she repeatedly had to double-check that the man she was flirting with was, in fact, her husband. The thrill of having sex outside the normal latenight bedroom routine is extra arousing. Scott Haltzman, M.D., author of The Secrets of Happily Married Men, writes that “part of enjoying tantalizing sex is experiencing a level of escape.” A holiday for dress-up is the perfect excuse for some raunchy fun. For singles, getting into costume and strutting your stuff as someone other than yourself usually means lowered inhibitions, which can make sex more exciting. Most of my single male friends say Halloween is their favorite holiday, because the women become more daring and often go out in nothing but lingerie. Even the ones who wear actual costumes are usually donning some “sexy” version of whatever character they’re trying to be, so the atmosphere becomes sexually charged. While I’m not a huge fan of this tradition, I do fully support the right to be whoever and whatever you want and to take full advantage of the opportunity to go totally crazy. A word of caution is to beware the bartender. I’ve said it before but it must be said again: Keep the alcohol intake under control. Nothing ruins an ultra-sexy moment quite like fumbling with a costume to get the deed done. If the public role-play-forprivate-intimacy thing isn’t for you, Halloween can still be a great chance to sex up your bedroom wardrobe since costumes and lingerie usually go on sale the day after. Whether married, single or otherwise committed, the key to any experimental activity is to get really into your role. So whatever you dress up as, make sure you play the part. Lexi Brister can be reached at sexcolumnist@theorion.com

cardboard box and some paint. Stephanie Geske STAFF WRITER

The days of trick-or-treating have turned to skimpy costumes and just as much walking but none of the candy. Halloween marks a weekend for students and guests from out of town, and although Chico State no longer ranks in the top 10 of Playboy’s Top Party Schools list, it’s a weekend that screams with the possibility of a good time. With the holiday season coming up, students everywhere will be figuring out how little they can get away with spending on costumes and decorations for Halloween. Modest plans include creativity and lots of DIY.

COSTUMES: “Halloween is the one night a year when a girl can dress like a total slut and no other girls can say anything about it,” according to the movie “Mean Girls.” Most of Chico is well aware of this tradition, but sometimes going funny or creative can get more looks than wearing next to nothing. A costume that’ll float One costume idea that is both funny and allows you to pair up with a friend is to dress up as the Titanic and an iceberg. Liz Coffee, a junior business administration major, created her Titanic costume for a social last Halloween using a

To man the Titanic you need: • A cardboard box • Suspenders • Paint (black, red, white) • Optional: black shirt, tie, black skirt Rotated cardboard box to a diamond shape around her and painted to look like the ship. Instructions: • Paint entire box black except for a white stripe 1.5 to 2 inches wide at the top and one in red at the bottom. • Write “TITANIC” in white on one side, along with small white squares in rows. These are the lights of rooms on the ship, so they don’t have to be in a particular number of columns. • The box will be shaped around you like a diamond, and once it’s dry you can hoist it to yourself with suspenders. Coffee’s friend dressed in a white tube top and skirt and wrapped see-through, blue, sparkly fabric around her shirt. To sink the ship You need: • A white tube top • A white skirt • Blue-purple tulle fabric • Optional: glitter Instructions: • Put on the shirt and skirt and wrap the fabric around your top, either pinning or hot-gluing to create a rumpled effect. • If you choose to, spray glitter on yourself.

Classy girls wear pearls Take cues from the woman who began the iconic little black dress by keeping it classy on Halloween as Audrey Hepburn. Most women own a black dress or know a friend who does, so wear that, stick your hair in a bun and grab lots of pearls. The breakfast scone, Tiffany’s and the cat are optional. Miss political Since 2008, Sarah Palin has been a target for comedians and the general public alike, thanks partly to Tina Fey and partly to herself. A quick browse searching for “Halloween costume” on Google Images took me to a picture of a girl wearing an American flag bikini with a sash that read “Miss Alaska” on the front and “Miss Vice President” on the back. Considering how easy it is to create a sash and how many other times a bathing suit like that could be worn, I’ll just leave that idea right here. Never say never to last minute costumes Men seem to have it easy. They can be a superhero with a simple graphic T-shirt or poke fun at “bros” with a flannel and a hat, but men who work for costumes are always fun. Making fun of pop culture is always good for a few laughs. Brush your hair forward, put on some skinny jeans and a purple hoodie to be Justin Bieber. Anyone can work this costume, so check out Jenna Marbles’ take on YouTube.

THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

BODY OF ART Adriana Curiel, a sophomore social work major, gets her face painted with black and white to resemble looking like a skeleton.

DECORATIONS AND ACCESSORIES: Rhinestone pumpkins Instead of carving your pumpkins, give them some bling. You need: • Fake pumpkins • Rhinestones • Glue Instructions: • Set rhinestones on pumpkins however you choose, either sporadically or in a spider web design. Sugar skulls Have your makeup be your costume by painting on a Dia de los Muertos mask. These work best with intricate details and crisp lines. You need: • White face makeup or costume face paint • Black costume face paint • Black liquid eyeliner

PHOTO COURTESY OF • LIZ COFFEE

ON BOARD Liz Coffee [LEFT], a junior business major, and Emily Thimjon her friend visiting from out of town made a Titanic and ice burg costume.

• Colors of your choice if you choose to paint on more designs like flowers Instructions: • Cover your entire face in white makeup, stopping at the jaw line. • Paint around your eyes in black, from your eyebrows to under-eye circles. • Paint your nose black. This can be done in a number of ways, as some people choose to cover the whole nose while others leave a strip of white on the bridge. • Draw a line from lip to ear like the Joker’s smile with the fine tip of liquid eyeliner. Cover the line with vertical marks, even on your lips. • Add flourishes and dots around your eyes. Some choose to trace flower petals around black painted eyes instead.

More bang for your buck Cheap Halloween finds to add to your costumes and how to save even more: • Neon wigs from Walmart are priced at $5 and can work with any costume from a fairy to one of Nicki Minaj’s back-up dancers. • If you want a different costume every night, see if you can swap with your friends. • Dollar Tree carries decorations, all priced at the ever-affordable $1 each. • Jo-Ann Fabrics and Crafts priced nearly all Halloween costumes and decorations at 60 percent off last week, and they will be on sale and going fast as Halloween approaches. Stephanie Geske can be reached at sgeske@theorion.com

STAFF COMMENTARY

Underage partiers use costumes for illegal fun Molly Rose Livingston STAFF WRITER

My sophomore year of college, my roommate and I both had fake IDs. Mine was a pretty good match, while hers barely resembled her. However, there was one weekend that hers was almost guaranteed to work. The holiday celebrated by changing your appearance and dressing up as something, or someone, you are not — Halloween. For me, this holiday tends to involve showing a lot of skin and possibly some fishnets. For Halloween that year, while I was donning a classic minimal-clothing costume, she was painting her face and arms orange, sporting a green wig, white eyebrows and a pair of white overalls. Sexy she was not. An oompa-loompa isn’t most women’s go-to costume. We were living in the Bay Area at the time and she was going to a San Francisco club with a group of friends who were of legal drinking age. She perfected her costume plan for weeks, hoping she wouldn’t have to face the embarrassment of being turned away. Halloween is about disguise. It is dedicated to pretending to be something you are not. Everyone knows the guy in the scrubs stumbling around drunk on Halloween with a stethoscope did not attend medical school and is just playing dress up. But altering your appearance to be someone

you’re not, such as an older person who can legally partake in drinking when you are not yet of age, can be illegal. In California, getting caught with a fake ID is expensive. Fines can range from $250 to $1,000, 24 to 32 hours of community service and a one-year suspension of your driver’s license, according to the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control website. Age verification and ID checking is taken seriously by any establishment that wants to keep its doors open for business. At Panama Bar and Cafe, IDs are first checked by sight, and then run through a machine that takes the information from the magnetic strip. Lastly, a picture is taken of the ID and the person entering. The photos are kept in case anything happens that evening, said Russ Baker, head of security at Panama’s. Serving alcohol to a minor is a major offense in California, and Panama’s takes checking IDs seriously to ensure minors are not served. “We are very careful,” Baker said. “We are not going to take that chance.” If a minor is served alcohol, the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control will fine the bartender who served the drink $3,000, the business will be forced to close for seven to 14 days and its liquor license can be revoked, Baker said. False zombie wounds and Avatar face paint during the Halloween weekend can sometimes

complicate the ID checking process. Masks and hats can be easily removed to allow an ID to be checked, but face paint can sometimes be a problem, Baker said. Facial features need to be visible to allow bouncers to verify an ID. “If it’s easy enough to tell it is them through the face paint, come on in,” he said. Danielle Parra, a senior event management major, sometimes used a fake ID in high school at liquor stores and sushi bars in San Francisco and her hometown of Novato. Parra, who paid $100 for an ID with her picture and information, doesn’t think a Halloween costume will help fool a bouncer if your fake ID doesn’t look like you. “Fake IDs are surprisingly hard to pass off, especially in Chico,” she said. As for my old roommate, her costume did the trick of masking her appearance. Her plan worked and she enjoyed a weekend of illegal, and unattractive, drinking in the city. I advise everyone to use caution this Halloween weekend. Bars are on high alert, the police are even stricter during holidays and getting caught could cost you. After a few months of fun with her fake ID, my roommate did get caught. The bouncer called the cops and she received a court date. I can’t imagine the bar scene was worth the fines she had to pay. Molly Rose Livingston can be reached at mlivingston@theorion.com

WORD OF MOUTH >> Do you think ghost stories can be real? Related story D5 “I think they are real. I come from Mexican heritage, and I know many people who swear by the stories.”

“They could be, but there are some people out there who just like to scare people and be creepy.”

“Some can because there are pretty convincing ones about haunted houses, and I don’t see how someone could make that up.”

Korina Saavedra

Eric Lipsky

Jocelyn Fiset

freshman | social work

sophomore | business information systems

junior | communication design


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FEATURES

LOOKING BACK >>

c. 1981

COSTUME CONNOISSEUR Christy “Costume Chris” Sullivan, owner of Alter Ego costume shop holds up a dress in her shop.

c. 1983

c. 1985

THE ORION • KEVIN LEE

c. 1986

c. 1988

c. 1988

c. 1995

NOW Alter Ego Costumes is the oldest costume shop in Chico and stays open year-round at 2260A Park Ave. Owner Christy Sullivan has been in the business for more than 20 years. Before the shop was on Park Avenue, it was on Orange Street, closer to students and the campus, Sullivan said. Alter Ego has more than 4,000 square feet filled with costumes such as Disney princesses, cowboys, superheroes and more, she said. There is also a Renaissance booth with costumes from a thousand years ago and many accessories are sold. Students can only rent costumes or get them custom made, Sullivan said. She will only sell items that are not being rented regularly. Every costume rental comes with

a complete package and free alterations, she said. Prices range from $20 to $80. “These are not costumes in a bag,” Sullivan said. Authentic reconstructed vintage costumes are more expensive as the price varies, she said. To get Halloween started, Alter Ego hosted a fashion show Oct. 2 presenting 150 costumes, some made by local designers, Sullivan said. “We wanted to get everyone excited for Halloween,” she said. The store is open Tuesday through Saturday noon to 6 p.m. “Students can tell us what they want, and we’ll put it together,” Sullivan said.

Want to add excitement to your spring semester? Check these out– all majors welcome!

JOUR 101

Intro to Communication

JOUR 130

Writing for Professional Audiences (may take instead of ENGL 130)

JOUR 244

Intro to Public Relations

JOUR 255

Intro to Online Journalism

JOUR 260

Writing for Mass Media

JOUR 310

Entertainment / Media / Culture (Upper Division Theme A)

JOUR 311

Women / Men / Media (Upper Division Theme F)

JOUR 313

International Communication

JOUR 322

Journalism History

JOUR 325

Magazine Writing

JOUR 329

The Orion (writing, copy editing, video, graphic design, photography, multimedia, advertising sales)

JOUR 353

Photojournalism

JOUR 411

Race / Diversity / Media

JOUR 424

Public Opinion and Propaganda

*no pre-requisites required.

-Compiled by Tasha Clark

Every year the Campus Alcohol and Drug Education Center works to keep students informed and safe regarding popular drinking holidays like Halloween. Since the glass ban for holiday weekends went into effect five years ago, rioting and environmental protection have also been top priorities, CADEC program manager Shauna Quinn said. This year a few changes have been made to the usual routine of handing out water bottles. The goal is to give students a safe place to take a break from heavy drinking, Quinn said.

C

St.

c. 1980

“Repo Man” and “Sid and Nancy,” along with many action pictures with stunt men. Juanita Johnson worked at The Costume Shop when it was open. “Everybody wanted to be Cinderella,” she said. “As far as guys go, there isn’t anything special, but overall the ’70s has really been popular.” If students weren’t sure of what they wanted, there was a costume album they could browse through, Johnson said. “Our goal is to have the customer leave with the costume complete,” she said. “Not just the dress but the gloves, hat and so on.”

B ig

ar

c. 1980

Vol. 41 issues 1-15 fall Oct. 21, 1998 “OPEN Costume shop gets goulish” As Halloween approached in 1998, the urgency of finding that just-right costume increased. Students didn’t want to be one of the slackers that created an excuse for a costume five minutes before going out. The Costume Shop on Mangrove Avenue had racks of tailored get-ups and shelves brimming with wigs and other novelty accessories. Shop manager Theda DeRamus had costume rentals starting at $15, with the most expensive at $65, she said. DeRamus had a lot of experience in wardrobe, she said. She designed

CADEC’s staff prepares for a safe Halloween

UC CS

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THEN

Campus Spotlight:

oC h ic

ree

D3

St. me Flu

c. 1975

1998 | Costume styles change, prices increase

WEDNESDAY, OCT.26, 2011 |

k

St. h t 7 W.

problem, they’ve had to THE ORION • LINDSAY SMITH

GLASS BAN For holiday weekends police enforce a glass-free zone from Flume to Cedar streets and Seventh Street to campus. take large measures. The Orion: : Is there one major concern with crowd control? Quinn: That was the point of the alcohol ban. When students threw glass bottles at police officers five years ago, they established the perimeter where you’re not allowed to have glass at all.

The Orion: What are The Orion: What you doing differkind of response do you ently this year than CADEC HOLIDAY get from students when what you’ve done PLANS you hold this event? previous years? Quinn: It’s always Quinn: For one CADEC will very successful. Last thing, we had a be giving out year we handed out lot of complaints water bottles 700 water bottles, about trash last and grilled and the sandwiches year, because cheese sandare always a big hit. we attached fliwiches outside ers to our water the BMU for The Orion: What bottles with rubfree Hallowallows you to put ber bands, so this een weekend. on this event? year we’re gluing Quinn: We use the them. We’ve also money we get from teamed up with the Safer Universities Madison Bear Gargrant to do this event and othden, so they’re going to be ers, including Labor Day. cooking grilled cheese sandwiches instead of the cold The Orion: What’s the peanut butter and jelly sandone message you want wiches we usually do. to get across to students with events like this? The Orion: Are there any Quinn: The whole idea is major differences in commuto educate students about nity involvement this year? alcohol laws and the danQuinn: All of the Chico ger of high-risk drinking. We police forces will be in just want to keep them safe. town this year to help with crowd control. Ever since -Compiled by Lexi Brister rioting became a huge


D4 |

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Taylor Western FOOD COLUMNIST

I have a Halloween movie night planned with my friends this weekend, and I really want to impress them with a full meal that will be so good it’s scary. The night will include a bunch of classic Halloween movies such as “The Shining” and

Halloween dinner and dessert: pumpkin lasagna, trick-or-treat pie “Rosemary’s Baby,” and we will be starting out the night with my favorite movie, the John Carpenter classic, “Halloween.”

PUMPKIN LASAGNA

1 hour

x 10

Ingredients

If you think you’re too old for fun Halloween foods, think again. I am making an unusual dish of pumpkin lasagna for the main course. Many people might be surprised to find that pumpkin can be used as a savory dish as well as a Halloween decoration.

This is a large recipe so you can freeze the leftovers. For a dessert, I am making a trick-or-treat pie decorated with fingers and toes, but don’t worry, they’re made out of chocolate. If you love candy bars, this recipe will give you the

chance to eat all your favorites at one time. If you want to plan a laid-back get-together with friends, get cooking and have a happy Halloween. Taylor Western can be reached at foodcolumnist@theorion.com

serves 10

Directions

1 thirty-two ounce can of pumpkin puree $1.68 WinCo 1 jar pasta sauce such as marinara $1.50 Big Lots 1 thirty-two ounce can tomato sauce $1.09 WinCo 1 box lasagna $1.68 WinCo 1 fourteen-ounce can of chicken stock 58 cents 5 Italian sausages with casing removed or one package ground sausage $2.68 WinCo 1 large container or 2 pounds of ricotta cheese $3.49 WinCo Cinnamon, nutmeg and Italian seasoning $1 each Dollar Tree 1 egg $1.61 WinCo 1 package mozzarella cheese $1.88 WinCo 3 cloves garlic chopped 38 Cents each WinCo 1 onion chopped $1.38 WinCo 1 zucchini chopped 33 cents Salt and pepper if needed

Boil water and add lasagna, olive oil and a dash of salt. Preheat oven to 350 F. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large saucepan, add garlic, onion and zucchini. Season with Italian seasoning and with salt and pepper if needed. Cook until tender. Add sausage and break down with wooden spoon. Add tomato sauce and chicken stock. In a separate bowl, combine ricotta cheese, pumpkin and egg. Add cinnamon, pepper and nutmeg. Pour a bit of sauce into bottom of a large baking dish. Start with first layer of lasagna noodles. Spread pumpkin mixture on top of lasagna noodles and top with a bit of tomato sauce. Repeat layer by layer with tomato sauce, pumpkin mixture and noodles. Once pan is full, sprinkle with mozzarella cheese. You can also top it additionally with breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese.

THE ORION • LARRY POCINO

PUMPKIN DINNER Pumpkin lasagna make with cheese and sausage takes one hour to cook and can serve up to 10 people.

TRICK OR TREAT PIE

15 minutes

x8

Ingredients

serves 8

Directions

4-5 candy bars, such as Reese’s Pieces, Snickers, Milky Way and Twix. The candy bars are 68 cents each, and if you buy two, you get a third free at WinCo. Be sure to grab one of the coupons attached to the stand for this deal). 4 tablespoons half-and-half $1.98 WinCo 1/2 cup peanut butter $2 WinCo 4-5 graham crackers or chocolatecovered graham crackers $1.58 WinCo 1 sixteen-ounce container of whipped topping such as Cool Whip $1.28 WinCo 1 stick butter $2.78 WinCo 3 tablespoons sugar $2.48 WinCo Variety of Halloween-themed candies such as gummy worms. Based per pound, bulk food at WinCo

Preheat oven 350 F. Start by melting one stick of butter. Break up graham crackers and add to butter. Sprinkle in sugar and mix well. Press mixture in pie tin. Bake in oven for 10 minutes. Melt down candy bars on a double boiler while crust bakes. Combine with peanut butter and half-and-half. Stir until smooth. Fold in Cool Whip with melted candy bar mixture. Pour into pie crust. Drizzle with chocolate syrup and sprinkle with Reese’s

Pieces. Add gummy worms to make it look like they’re crawling out of the ground. I used chocolates that looked like fingers and toes to make it look like it was sticking out of the pie. Freeze for four to six hours or overnight. Top with other candies for a second layers. This is your time to be creative. The pie is solid, so you can easily top it with whatever you want. If you have cookies, sprinkles or any other type of sweets, go wild. I hope this sweet trick makes this dessert an awesome treat.

SKELETON IN THE STREET During Halloween weekend it is important to wear bright colors and follow laws, said Chico police. Bright costumes can prevent someone from getting hit by a car at night. FILE PHOTO • JEB DRAPER

Chico police promote pedestrian safety downtown during hectic holiday weekend Christina Rafael CONTRIBUTING WRITER

During a typical weekend night, hundreds of young adults flock downtown, drink at bars and break an elementary law that can cost them their lives. As of Sept. 13, there have been at least 23 accidents involving pedestrians in Chico, seven of which involved pedestrians crossing a road without using a crosswalk, or what is commonly referred to as “jaywalking.” It is commonly the younger students who are less careful, said David Bird, a University Police officer. “New students are typically 18 years old when they come to Chico State,” Bird said. “They have crosswalks in their hometowns, and they look like the ones we have here in Chico.” Halloween enhances the already present pedestrian danger with the number of people it brings that are walking the streets at night and the elevation the holiday brings to drinking. As the holiday approaches, University Police, as well as the Chico Police Department, begin to prepare their officers for crowds, Chico police Sgt. Rob Merrifield said. “We’ll have lots of officers out on foot, horseback and on

bicycles,” Merrifield said. In addition to beefing up the visibility of downtown officers, Merrifield said they will be on foot and focusing on the west side of downtown, issuing tickets to pedestrians who cross against red lights or jaywalk. “Drivers will MORE ON have many HALLOWEEN distracSAFETY tions with all the cosSee story A5 tumes and craziness,” Merrifield said. As drivers make their way downtown, many pedestrians become less visible in masks or dark clothing, Bird said. “Cars, people, drunks and bats don’t see black clothing very well at night,” Bird said. Although Halloween brings attention to pedestrian safety, University Police often tries to be a known presence to students, especially freshmen, Bird said. “I co-wrote a program called Freshman Safe Start, which is now a mandatory program for all freshmen staying in the residence halls,” he said. “We talk about everything from drugs, alcohol, smoking, sexual assault, rape, hate crimes and walking in a crosswalk.” The program is co-sponsored by the Psychological

Counseling and Wellness Center, the Gender and Sexuality Equity Center and Safe Place. David Stephen, director of University Housing and Food Service, is involved with the program. “The program content is basically geared to giving new Chico State students the resources and tools they need to safely navigate their new community,” he said. Allison Alcaraz-Smith, a senior psychology major said some intersections are dangerous. “The downtown by the college, there’s no designated intersections over there and everything is dark.” Students have access to safety information from Merrifield and the Chico Police Department as well as from University Police, but common sense will ultimately help them navigate this Halloween. “If walking at night, assume that drivers cannot see you,” Merrifield said. Merrifield recommends that students get a LED light to attach to their clothing. “Yes, a blinky light looks dorky, but so does getting run over,” he said. Christina Rafael can be reached at editorinchief@theorion.com

THE ORION • LIAM TURNER

CANDY PIE Trick-or-Treat pie made with 4 to 5 different candy bars, graham crackers and other Halloween candies.

History, traditions of Halloween similar to current celebrations Michaela Boggan STAFF WRITER

For most people, Halloween is about candy and pumpkins, but in other parts of the world, this holiday represents a religious festival. The American idea of Halloween can be traced back to traditions practiced by the pre-Christian religions in a Celtic festival of the dead called Samhain, said Sarah Pike, professor of religious studies. Samhain is still celebrated by the contemporary Pagan religion, which began in the 1940s and has focused on reviving pre-Christian religions, she said. The festival takes place Oct. 31 through Nov. 1 and marks the end of the harvest, the shifting of seasons and the transition from light to dark months. Contemporary Pagans also believe there is an intimacy between the world of the living and the dead during this time of year. It becomes a time in which one can communicate with the souls of the dead, she said. The festival of Samhain took place in both personal and public environments. Public festivals consisted of bonfires, dressing in clothing that resembled an earlier century, feasting and adults playing tricks on others, Pike said. If a person chose to celebrate this festival independently, then it usually involved isolation, meditation and looking at the darkness within oneself, she said. There is an association between the traditions practiced in the Samhain festival and what the American culture has done by making these types of practices its own. Other traditions associated with Halloween that were created in America include the carving of pumpkins, the view of Halloween as a day of evil and as a day to consume alcohol and party in college towns, Pike said. In our society Halloween is a day associated with darkness, dressing up and feasting on candy, which all relate to the Samhain holiday, she said. Noor Alsadah, a senior business information systems major, has chosen not to experience the stereotypical college aspect of Halloween because of the dangers of what can happen to her and her

5-year-old son that night. “That night students get drunk, killed and raped,” Alsadah said. “It’s just not worth it.” She has chosen to combine her Muslim religion tradition of Halloween with the American tradition, she said. Halloween in the Muslim religion is celebrated in the middle of Ramadan and is a day in which people dress in new clothing and attend a festival in the evening HALLOWEEN that includes indulging FACTS in candy, Alsadah said. In Ohio, Iowa Alsadah usually and Massadresses her son in a chusetts the costume for Halloween Halloween and takes him to get night of tricktreats and candy at the or-treating is mall, various neighboroften referred hoods and downtown, to as “Beggar’s she said. Night” Although she doesn’t usually dress up, this The word “Halloween” was year she will make an exception, because her first used in the 16th century son asked her to. “I think I am going to Irish and be a bumble bee or TinScottish immiker Bell,” Alsadah said. grants brought Halloween is unimthe tradition portant to some, while to North Amerothers prepare all year ica during the for this day. For Kaitlyn 19th century Ahrbeck, a freshman source: hallowpsychology major, it is eenhistory.org a day filled with fun traditions that she shares with her family. Throughout her childhood, Halloween celebrations consisted of going to the pumpkin patch, carving pumpkins, baking pumpkin seeds, dressing up and going trick-or-treating, she said. This is going to be her first Halloween away from home, and she is going to miss sharing it with her family, but she is excited for a new Halloween experience, Ahrbeck said. She plans to dress up and go out to a party with friends and is keeping an open mind, because she is not sure what to expect, she said. “All I know is Halloween is going to be crazy,” Ahrbeck said. Michaela Boggan can be reached at mboggan@theorion.com


THE ORION • JOSH ZACK

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 |

D5

GHOST WRITER Author Jodi Foster [left] and friend Idie Hererra had haunted experiences at their apartment complex on Parmac Road.

THE ORION • BRETT EDWARDS

Book exposes paranormal activities in apartment Tasha Clark STAFF WRITER

In 2000, Jodi Foster found a phone cord wrapped tightly around the neck of her daughter’s doll. For 30 days, Jodi Foster, a Chico resident, and her daughter Hannah Foster witnessed paranormal activities in their apartment. Foster didn’t believe in the activities happening at fi rst, she said. “I didn’t want to believe — are ghosts real?” Jodi Foster said she thought. Foster had multiple dreams of a young woman being kidnapped and then found out they may be linked to an unsolved 1976 murder case of Chico State student Marie Elizabeth “Marliz” Spannhake, whose last place of residence was the apartment Foster lived in, she said. The case received a lot of national attention, and Foster published a book this month about the series of events titled, “Forgotten Burial: A Restless Spirit’s Plea for Justice.” She kept quiet about the case for two years, because the evidence was private information, she said. She wasn’t able to work on her book until 2010. “With this book, Marie’s story is starting to be told,” she said. In the book, Foster mentions the activities that occurred in her home and how she helped police with the case, which she still does from time to time, she

said. The book can be purchased at Lyon Books and Learning Center, Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com. There will be a book signing Nov. 10 at Lyon Books and a book signing at the Chico State Wildcat Store toward the end of November, she said. Kelsey Barnett, a junior exercise physiology major, is interested in buying the book and reading what the writer has to say, she said. “I believe the author is doing the victim a favor by getting her story out there,” Barnett said. Foster’s daughter Hannah thought the spirit was her mother’s friend and would call her by the victim’s nickname, “Marliz,” Hannah Foster said. She also drew a picture that was similar to Spannhake and always saw her in the bathroom mirror. “She would smile at me when my mom did my hair,” she said. Jodi Foster was interviewed by the California Department of Justice and the Red Bluff Police Department, she said. They also did a background check to make sure she wasn’t involved in the case since her dreams matched the information they had. Spannhake was kidnapped and strangled, while her body was buried in a mountainous area in Red Bluff, Foster said. Cameron Hooker was found guilty and sentenced to 104 years in prison.

“The couple did sick and twisted things,” she said. Using Foster’s information, Red Bluff police are trying to indict Janice Hooker in order to take her to trial, Foster said. Even though Foster doesn’t live in the complex anymore, her friend Idie Herrera has lived there for six and a half years and began experiencing paranormal activity after the fi rst year. From September to January 2005, Herrera saw items move around in her home but didn’t know if it was the same spirit since different things happened, she said. Afterward she had a priest bless her home, and the activities stopped, she said. “I feel you don’t welcome spirits in your home,” Herrera said. “You tell them to go rest their soul.” Foster is amazed that other tenants are experiencing the same things she did, including a tenant that lives in her previous apartment, she said. “It continues to be haunted, which is interesting to me,” Foster said. Foster knows there are people out there that don’t believe spirits exist, she said. “Be an open-minded skeptic,” Foster said. “Investigate fi rst, discover evidence second and draw the conclusion last.”

kdazzi@theorion.com

UNDERSTANDWICH by Cody Sevedge

JANK HANK by Griffon Lyles

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION

66- Metal pin 67- Plains native 68- Fast fliers 69- Snow conveyances 70- Clublike weapon 71- Smoke deposit Down 1- Quickly, quickly 2- Back 3- Architect Saarinen 4- Blueprint detail 5- A lot 6- Capacitance units 7- Decree 8- Eye sore 9- By the day 10- Sign of spring 11- Actor’s parts 12- Grenoble’s river 13- Passover feast 21- Tabula ___ 24- Russian drink 25- Did the butterfly 26- Anklebones 27- 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet 28- Diner orders 30- Makes well 31- Black bird 33- Tall tales 35- Bread spread 36- 100 dinars

THAT MONKEY TUNE by Michael A. Kandalaft

37- Salinger girl 38- 24 hour periods 41- Bit of film, to a photog 44- Goals 46- General ___ chicken 48- Aztec god of rain 50- Autocratic Russian rulers 51- Month of showers 52- Establish as the truth 53- Alleviated 55- First name in cosmetics 57- Glimpse 58- Comic Rudner 59- Miss 60- ___ facto 61- The Green Hornet’s sidekick 62- Formerly, formerly

store manager. The most popular Halloween movies include “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” “Hocus Pocus” and “Under Wraps,” a movie that was filmed in Chico, Brown said. A lot of people also pick classic horror films like “A Nightmare on Elm Street,” “Halloween” and “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” series. Blockbuster assistant manager Roger Cruz suggests Freddy Krueger and “Friday the 13th” for those looking for something scary and “The Goonies” and “Scooby-Doo” for all ages. Every Friday of this month at Blockbuster, Halloween movies are 49 cents a night, and anyone in costume on Halloween will receive candy in stores. Vinny Gutierrez, a freshman business administration major, is looking forward to dressing up in his toga, he said. But on the nights he doesn’t go out, he is ready for trickor-treaters at his house. “If I get any I am prepared with bags of mini-snickers,” Gutierrez said. “Sorry, no king-sized.” Kathleen Dazzi can be reached at

BEAR JAIL! by Devon McMindes

Across 1- Ancient Athens’s Temple of ___ 5- Rubs out 9- Seine spot 14- Leak slowly 15- ___ accompli 16- Uneven 17- River in central Switzerland 18- Salver 19- Angered 20- Beget 22- Caterpillar rival 23- Besides 24- One who osculates 25- Attempts 29- Remove hair 32- Ambush 34- Captivated 39- Came down to earth 40- Diarist Nin 42- One of the Simpsons 43- Medieval musician 45- Passionate 47- Dread 49- Mends a shoe 50- Thin candles 54- “Seinfeld” uncle 56- Mine prop 57- Gramineous 63- “______ by any other name…” 64- Light air 65- On ___ with

continued from D1

tclark@theorion.com

COMICS >> CROSSWORD COURTESY OF BESTCROSSWORDS.COM

HALLOWEEN: Events bring holiday traditions to Chico State students

Tasha Clark can be reached at

nebula CROSSWORD CHALLENGE >>

THE ORION • AARON DRAPER

PICK THE PERFECT PUMPKIN James Stonich, a junior recreation administration major, helps place pumpkins at Patrick Ranch for a service project with members of Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity.

GUY WITH A PHONE by Larry Pocino


D6 |

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FEATURES

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

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The Orion - Fall 2011, Issue 10