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DR. THOMAS JOHNSON

AT THE BROWN CENTER

SHANGRI LA

OFFERS GARDENING TIPS

RICK LEWANDOWSKI IS A MAN OF NATURE

Spring 2019


TABLE CONTENTS OF

CULTURE

Shangri La......................................................................6

CRAFT

HOME

HEALTH

COMMUNTY

FEATURE

ON THE SCENE

BOOKS

WHY I LOVE ORANGE COUNTY

Fairy Garden...............................................................10 Angel Care Home Health..........................................11 Rick Lewandowski a «Man of Nature»....................12 Local Author Releases First Book............................14

O

The Brown Center......................................................16 Keep Orange County Beautiful................................20 See Who Was Seen Out And About.........................23 Dan Mohan.................................................................31

On the cover: Lamar State College Orange President Dr. Thomas Johnson stands on the staircase in The Brown Center.

2016 & 2018 "Training Company of the Year" 2013 & 2017 "Partner of the Year"

409-883-3731

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PUBLISHER LETTER LIFE • HEALTH • GROUP PROPERTY • CASUALTY INSURANCE

GRANDKIDS,

BASEBALL

AND AZALEA BLOOMS By Bobby Tingle

A

Azalea blooms, baseball and lazy afternoons at the ballpark with grandkids are a wonderful treat in Spring.

There is no shortage of fields where ball games are being played across the spectrum of ages from little bitty to professional. My favorite stadium is Dudy Noble Field in Starkville, Mississippi on the Mississippi State campus, home of the Bulldogs. (Mostly because it is close to grandkids, who are willing to take in a game with me.) It is a nice venue for college baseball; the fans are engaged, the crowds are usually substantial and the baseball is generally top notch.

Please join us on Sunday

Taking grandkids to the ballpark is not mostly about the baseball. Coke or some other hydration fluids are a necessity. Trips to the facilities are then inevitable. Questions abound. But you don’t have to know much about baseball to answer the questions because most are about something other than baseball. One fine spring afternoon Hunter, Ethan, Kinsley and I were at the ‘Dude’. The ‘Dawgs’ were hosting a conference rival, the University

of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, not to be mistaken with the University of Alabama in Birmingham. Hunter, heavily influenced by his father, yet not having a clue what was transpiring on the field, stood up from time to time, aimlessly gazing anywhere but at the field and yelled, “Roll Tide!” His sense of fair play toward his cousin Ethan, who is equally influenced by his father, prompted him to say, “Ethan, stand up and say ‘Go Dawgs!’” Ethan dutifully responded. The other fans loved it. I don’t remember who won the game. I remember being mortified that Kinsley would be kidnapped in the women’s restroom because she was too old to go in the men’s restroom and I was not going in the other one with her. But alas, she emerged safe and sound. The sun was bright, the air was crisp, the baseball was good and somewhere along the way I am sure I glanced at an azalea bush in full bloom. Take time to enjoy your favorite things this Spring. 

SUNDAY

Worship Service 10:00 a.m. – Lutcher Memorial Sanctuary

TUESDAY & FRIDAY

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Gillespie Building

902 Green Avenue Orange, TX 883-2097 MONDAY - FRIDAY

ORANGE NEWSMEDIA, LLC PUBLISHER Bobby Tingle

DESIGNER Dawn Burleigh Design2Pro

PHOTOGRAPHY

Presbyterian Day School (Ages 18 months - 5 years) 883-4116

Dawn Burleigh Van Wade

www.firstpresorange.com

Dawn Burleigh

WRITERS

Van Wade Holly Westbrook

AD TRAFFIC AND SALES Candice Trahan Bobby Tingle

ABOUT Orange Living is published and distributed by Orange Newsmedia, LLC for Orange County

residents promoting and encouraging the cultural and social scene in the Greater Orange Area. For information about advertising, to ask a question or make a comment about our magazine, contact Orange Newsmedia, LLC at 409-883-3571 or by email at editorial@ orangeleader.com.

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April 13, 2019 (9 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

Free Admission & Free Butterflies

Activities begin at 10:30 a.m. • Butterfly release at 3:30 p.m. starkculturalvenues.org

2111 West Park Ave., Orange, TX 77630

Š2019 Nelda C. and H.J. Lutcher Stark Foundation. All Rights Reserved.


SHANGRI LA’S

GETTING READY

By Holly Westbrook

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FOR SPRING

• Photos by Holly Westbrook

“The Shangri-La Garden is in the mist of spring preparations,” Director of Horticulture Jennifer Buckner said. The combination of gardens and nature at Shangri La presents a serene oasis for retreat, relaxation, and renewal, as well as the opportunity to explore, discover and learn. “In April, the bees will return, and the hives will come back for the kids to see and understand their importance they have (toward) the environment and pollination of all plants. It lends education for the kids the (eco-system) and gardening,” Jennifer said. “We do everything organically,” Jennifer added. “We are very careful of what we do here to help nature and not hurt it.” Each year in April, Shangri La celebrates Earth Day during their Eco-Fest celebration. The day gives way to family friendly events, highlights sustainability and natural history. Local and regional organizations and businesses host booths that provide information about earth-friendly products, services, and opportunities. Games, activities, and engaging presentations provide entertainment for everyone. The day culminates with an inspirational Butterfly Release to take place this year on Saturday, April 13 at 3:30 p.m. “Some annuals only last until the heat of summer, while others will thrive until the first frost,” Jennifer said. “For color that lasts more than just a season and comes back year to year, consider planting perennials. Many perennials are great for attracting bees and butterflies.” First designed by H.J. Lutcher Stark to demonstrate his interest and love of tropical plants, the Hanging Garden is thought to emulate the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the seven ancient wonders of the world. Today, the Hanging Garden is a showcase of lush tropical and sub-tropical flowering and foliage plants including Bird-ofparadise (Strelitzia reginae), Lily of the Nile

(Agapanthus sp.), Amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybrids), and Yesterday-today-and-tomorrow (Brunfelsia pauciflora ‘Eximia’) to mention just a few. According to the Jennifer, Mr. Stark designed the garden to allow plants to cascade over the tiered edges of the stone terraces - the same stones he laid down in his first design. Giant cast-iron pots, called sugar kettles, collected by Mr. Stark, were originally used to boil down sugar cane, turning it into crystallized sugar or syrup. The two Frog Ponds in the Tree Ring Plaza are part of the original garden and were constructed in 1955 for use by Mr. Stark as Water Lily Pools (look closely and you may see red ones right now.) They are surrounded by small gray cobblestones from Dunkirk, France – stones once used in the ballasts of ships returning from Europe to the United States. Leslie Pierce, a gardener at Shangri La for six years, said she was has been working with the earth to plant from a young age with her grandma. Leslie was found cutting ferns back that had turned brown due to cold weather. “We cut the flowers back (to allow new growth),” the warmly clothed Leslie said while holding large sheers in gloved hands. Asked if she had tips for everyday gardeners, she said, “When you buy a plant from a store, such as Wal-Mart, you should plant it immediately, but if you are planting from a seed you should do so now.” “You need to water all plants,” Leslie continued. “But do not over water. Cut dead leaves and flowers off to allow for the plant to thrive. And, always keep them well fertilized.” “Whether you’re planting in the ground or in pots, over watering can kill your flowers,” Leslie said. The Perennial Border, like most gardens, is a constant work in progress. Visitors should explore the garden frequently throughout the year to discover new plants being assessed for use in the garden. This landscape offers garden visitors the opportunity to take home ideas for their own landscapes.

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The Pond of the Blue Moon is encircled by azaleas that reflect off the water. It’s an especially beautiful sight in the spring when the azaleas bloom. As part of managing the aquatic areas, the water is dyed to reduce sunlight penetration, therefore, reducing algae growth. The dye is non-toxic and safe for fish and aquatic life.

“Most gardeners plan for spring by looking at seed catalogs during winter, or for this time of year, visiting local garden centers,” Jennifer said. “For summer blooms, start looking for plants now. Many of the long-lasting annuals such as caladiums, pentas, begonias, coleus, and more can be planted in early April and lasts until first frost.” A 600-foot long border of plants offers visitors a chance to explore a broad range of flowering and foliage plants adapted to gardens of the Gulf Coast Region. Plants must be able to withstand the rigors of heat, humidity, heavy soils, and high rainfall.

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Sweet Glow Garvinea® Gerber Daisy is a top performer in the landscape. It survives mild winters with its evergreen foliage and blooms reliably most of the year. Most of the plant is the uniformity of flowering and tall flower stems. This variety comes in many colors.

“We have many plants on display at Shangri La Gardens that thrive in Southeast Texas’ environment and we encourage readers to visit us to determine the range of plants that can be used for landscapes and in containers,” Jennifer said. Plants that are most commonly grown on this border are known as herbaceous perennials. These are plants that survive year after year, but frequently die back to the ground during the winter. In addition to being regionally adaptable, plants on the border are selected for reliably good flowering, diverse flower colors, attractive foliage throughout the often-steamy hot summers of southeast Texas, and serve as nectar sources for butterflies, bees, hummingbirds, and a range of other valuable traits. Found sill working in the cold rain, Leslie said, “I don’t want to stop ‘till it’s done – even in the rain.” When there are pink bluebonnets before you even step foot inside Shagari La gate, would you stop for rain? A Houston tour group kept on walking despite the cold and drizzle. Other visitors did the same too. 

The spring blooms of the Hanging Garden are just the beginning of the floral display for the tropical garden At Shangri La Botanical Gardens. Pictured are Minerva Amaryllis with cool season annual pansies and cardoons in the cast iron sugar kettles.

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ORANGE, TEXAS CONTAINERBOARD MILL International Paper is a force for good in our communities. We make sustainable investments to protect and improve the lives of our employees and mobilize our people, products and resources to address critical needs in the communities where our employees live and work.

NEARLY

34%

75%

OF OUR FIBER IS THIRD-PARTY CERTIFIED

OF OUR MILL ENERGY COMES FROM RENEWABLE BIOMASS

WE RETURN

95% 19% REDUCTION 52,000 30%

OF THE WATER WE USE BACK TO WATERWAYS

REDUCTION IN GHG EMISSIONS SINCE 2010 IN AIR EMISSIONS BY 2020

39%

REDUCTION IN SERIOUS SAFETY INCIDENTS SINCE 2010

EMPLOYEES IN MORE THAN 24 COUNTRIES

AWARDED

$945,000

IN 2017 GRANTS TO THE PINEY WOODS THROUGH OUR FORESTLAND STEWARDS PROGRAM WITH NFWF

Unless noted, information above is based on 2016 global data.

Vision 2020 Goals

We recognize the importance of aligning our business with the needs of the world around us and we’re committed to continuous improvement and transparency around our sustainability goals. We set 12 voluntary goals with a 2010 baseline aimed at improving our impact on people and the planet, and are happy to share our progress. To find out more about our Vision 2020 Goals, visit internationalpaper.com

We delivered and distributed boxes to Orange County neighborhoods to assist in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

We proudly sponsor and We support the Southeast Texas Food Bank with volunteer at the Special donations and volunteers. Angels Rodeo for special needs residents in SE Texas. ©2018 International Paper Company. All rights reserved.


A SPRING CRAFT COMBINING FANTASY AND FUN

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Spring is a season of rebirth marked by flowers pushing through the soil and tender green leaf buds appearing on trees. As adults begin tinkering in their gardens and clearing away the vestiges of another winter, children also can get into the spring gardening spirit — with a touch of whimsy mixed in. A fairy garden is the perfect project. Fairies are mythical beings of romance and folklore that appear in ancient stories passed down by various cultures. Diminutive in size, fairies are often depicted as spiritual or supernatural

Begin by collecting the materials needed. Materials will vary depending on each individual project, but some good suggestions include: • a container, such as a flowerpot, basket, wine barrel, or another vessel that will hold soil • potting soil • stones, pebbles and glass baubles • pea gravel • small plants, such as clover, moss and succulents • twigs • miniature garden accessories and figures Begin by filling the container with the soil. Then arrange the plants as desired while still in their individual potting containers to get an idea of the layout. When the design is established, use a spoon or small trowel to plant the greenery.

beings in possession of magical powers who live in close proximity to mortals. Fairies tap into the imaginations of children, who may be enticed by fairies’ mischievous and/or magical attributes. A desire to capture fairies can inspire a great spring crafting project. Fairy gardens can be constructed in just about any container and make an enchanting addition to a home landscape, patio or child’s bedroom. It’s easy to get started today.

Now is the time when the whimsy can set in. The child can create a fairy home, a garden, walkways, and much more with natural materials. Many craft stores even sell ceramic and plastic fairy furnishings. Gravel and stones can add color and extra appeal. Some peat moss or trailing Spanish moss can serve as the finishing touches. Once completed, it’s time to wait to see if the fairies will come for a visit. 

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ANGELS CARE HOME HEALTH

OFFERS TIPS FOR GETTING HELP FOR DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY

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The aging process can take a toll on the body – both physical and mental. As we age, we are more likely to suffer from chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, COPD, and arthritis. Our ability to function becomes limited. Plus, we are more likely to experience social hardships, like the loss of a loved one, as well as financial stresses, like rising health care costs.

Symptoms

Many seniors – and even some health care professionals – assume that feelings of sadness and anxiety simply come with the territory of growing older. While it’s true that emotional experiences of anxiousness, grief, and temporary “blue” moods are normal as we age, depression itself is not normal; neither are anxiety disorders. These experiences can also sometimes increase with seniors during the Holiday season. Treatment is available for both of these mental health conditions.

Treatment 


If you or a loved one are experiencing persistent depression that interferes with your ability to function, or if you worry excessively about routine events and activities, you can get help and it’s easily available. Angels Care Home Health provides the following information on depression and anxiety to assist you in getting the help needed if you feel you might have these common conditions. What is Depression? Major depression (also called clinical depression) is a mood state that goes way beyond feeling occasionally sad or blue. It is a serious medical condition. It affects thoughts, feelings, behavior, mood and physical health. In the U.S., nearly 15 million adults suffer from major depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. In fact, it is estimated that by the year 2020 major depression will be second only to ischemic heart disease in terms of the leading causes of disability in the world. Signs of Depression • Depressed mood (sadness) • Poor concentration
 • Insomnia • Eating or sleeping more or less than you used to • Feeling nervous, restless, irritable, empty
 • Excessive guilt and thoughts of suicide

Some symptoms of depression are also signs of other serious conditions. That’s why it’s important to get them checked out by your health care provider. These symptoms include: • Being very tired and sluggish • Frequent stomachaches 
 • Frequent headaches • Chronic pain Fortunately depression is treatable in most people. In order to get an accurate diagnosis, your health care provider will first rule out other possible medical conditions that present similar symptoms as depression, such as hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), complications from substance abuse or dependence, infectious diseases, anemia and certain neurological disorders. Antidepressant medications or psychotherapy, or a combination of the two, are usually effective treatments for late-life depression. 
 Anxiety Disorders 
 Just like depression, anxiety is another common condition that falls under the mental health umbrella and often goes undiagnosed, yet is highly treatable. Anxiety disorders in general affect about 40 million American adults, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. 
Common anxiety disorders include: 
 • Generalized Anxiety Disorder - Excessive worrying over everyday problems, can’t relax, startle easy, have difficulty concentrating. 
 • Panic Disorder - Sudden attacks of terror, usually accompanied by a pounding heart, weakness, faintness, or dizziness. 
 • Social Phobia - Overwhelmingly anxious and excessively self-conscious in everyday social situations. 
 • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Persistent, upsetting thoughts and the use of rituals to control 
the anxiety these thoughts 
 Treatment 
 The goal of treatment is to help a person function well during day-to-day life. A combination of medicine and cognitivebehavioral therapy works best. Medications

are an important part of treatment. Cognitivebehavioral therapy helps a person understand their behaviors and how to gain control of them. Avoiding caffeine, illicit drugs, and even some cold medicines may help reduce symptoms. A healthy lifestyle that includes exercise, enough rest, and good nutrition can help reduce the impact of anxiety. 
 Many people with anxiety disorders benefit from joining a self-help or support group and sharing their problems and achievements with others. Talking with a close friend, family member, or a member of the clergy can also provide support, however it is not a substitute for care from a mental health professional. 
 Caregivers can also to consider nursing services for their loved one to oversee their physical and mental health and to obtain 24/7 support and education for themselves, as a care giver, about communication strategies and environmental modifications that can be made to reduce and prevent problematic behaviors and safety risks. The goal of home health is to keep your loved one in the home for as long as possible, as safely as possible. 
 Another option is to see if your loved one can benefit from the Angels Care Home Health Behavioral Health at Home Program. The program was developed to provide care for patients and families suffering from behavioral health issues and, if a patient qualifies, can help with anxiety, depression/ grief, difficulty coping, uncontrolled anger, hallucinating behavior, psychosocial issues, emotional withdrawal and more. 
 The first step in treating a mental disorder such as depression or anxiety is to realize that something is wrong and that help is available. It’s never too late to get a correct diagnosis and get the proper treatment needed to enjoy living day to day. For more information about the Behavioral Health at Home Program or to find out more about home health services, call the Angels Care office in Liberty at 936-336-2224 or visit angelscarehealth.com. Angels Care Home Health is a Medicare-certified agency proudly serving Liberty, Beaumont and the surrounding areas. 

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Lewandowski a

“Man of Nature” FOR SHANGRI LA By Van Wade

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Photos by Van Wade

There is simply no doubt about it, Rick Lewandowski is a “Man of Nature” and he loves every single second of it. Lewandowski has been the Director of the beautiful Shangri La Gardens in Orange since 2013 and loves the adventures of going to work each and every day. “I just love being outdoors and out in nature and you can basically discover new things every day,” said Lewandowski. “My grandparents were the ones that really got me involved at a young age, playing and working in the vegetable gardens and smelling the roses.” Lewandowski has more than 30 years of experience in the garden and horticulture field. He was director of the 587-acre Mt. Cuba Center for 13 years in Delaware. He oversaw the transition and enhancement of this premier native plant garden from private du Pont family estate to non-profit organization. This included the establishment of collections-based programs, extensive plant exploration efforts, development of an innovative native plant evaluation program, the launch of lifelong learning programming, and creation of a comprehensive conservation initiative. He spent 16 years with the Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania where he served as Director of Horticulture and Curator of the Living Collection, where he conducted horticultural and medicinal plant research, collaborative plant evaluation, and led several plant exploration trips to Asia. He found out about Shangri La and came to Orange to see the beautiful gardens and he and his wife Veronica were infatuated immediately. “I fell in love with this area the first time I visited and I was hooked,” said

Lewandowski. “It’s such a beautiful place and I’m such a nature junkie and Southeast Texas has everything to offer. From the coastal beauty, bayous and vegetation that we have here locally and then there is the Pineywoods up in the Jasper and lakes area, it’s truly special. I love spending time in the woods. This region is an outdoorsman’s dream.” Of course, the late Michael Hoke, who really was the main cog in getting Shangri La going again when he was director, did not have to twist Lewandowski’s arm. “It’s not a ‘virtual’ experience when they come here, it’s an educational one, and it helps open their eyes about nature,” said Lewandowski “Michael Hoke, what a tremendous man he was,” said Lewandowski. “He had so much love for the outdoors and thrived with people young and old, teaching them about nature. He was so instrumental in helping make Shangri La what it is today.” Of course, Shangri La, like much of Orange County, took a hit with Hurricane Harvey, but it has made tremendous strides to get back going. “The bulk of our repairs and construction is done,” said Lewandowski. “We still have a few details we’re still working on with a couple of our exhibits. It’s been a steady progress, but it remains as beautiful as it ever was.” Shangri La offers so much for the public and for folks of all ages, including such adventures as the Saturday Adventure Series, Up Close with Nature and EcoRanger Summer Camps. There are plenty of numerous events schedules throughout the year as well such as the Scarecrow Festival, the Eco-Fest Butterfly Release and Christmas Strolls.

Shangri La Director Rick Lewandowski loves the beauty of nature Orange and Southeast Texas brings on a daily basis.

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“We have so much to offer here for anyone to enjoy and we’re now free to the public,” said Lewandowki. “Our Christmas Strolls has always been a big hit. This year, it was incredible as we set an attendance record.” Lewandowski is certainly proud to be a part of Stark Cultural Venues. “It’s been tremendous to be able to work with such professionals on a daily basis,” said Lewandowski. “They love everything about Shangri La and what it brings to the culture to our area and the nature educational opportunity it is for the entire community and beyond. It’s been great collaborating with the Stark Museum and the Lutcher Theater and Stark Cultural Venues has a tremendous niche. We also have so many wonderful volunteers and loyal friends that are so dedicated to what we want to accomplish.” Lewandowski really enjoys kids that visit the venue for a magical learning experience. “It’s not a ‘virtual’ experience when they come here, it’s an educational one, and it helps open their eyes about nature,” said Lewandowski. “It’s great to look at some of those young faces and see that they realize there is something out there when they look out the backdoor. It’s great for our youth to take stock in nature and to learn how to preserve it and get out there and roll in the grass a little.” Lewandowski has been in a lot of places in the world, even with great experiences in the Himalayas, but wouldn’t trade it for what he loves to do most. “I’ve been to some tremendous places but I’m most comfortable where I’m at right now,” said Lewandowski. “This area is a nature man’s dream. Get me in the woods and along the bayous and I’m a happy man.” Lewandowski and his wife Veronica have two children, Michael and Erin, and they just recently became grandparents after young Harper was born in August. “We love it here,” said Lewandowski. “I look at my job more as a magical adventure. I’m still learning about nature every day and if I can help people understand it more and learn more about things such as conservation, it will help preserve nature for future generations to come.” 

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LOCAL AUTHOR PUBLISHES

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FIRST BOOK IN SERIES By Dawn Burleigh

Spencer Scogin knew he wanted to write since he was 11 years old after being inspired by young authors such as Christopher Paolini, author of the Eragon series. Born in Port Arthur, he moved to Orangefield where he graduated in 2011. He attended Lamar State College Orange prior to joining the US Airforce. After serving in the military for three years, Spencer developed a nerve disorder known as CRPS due to an injury while serving. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic (lasting greater than six months) pain condition that most often affects one limb (arm, leg, hand, or foot) usually after an injury. CRPS is believed to be caused by damage to, or malfunction of, the peripheral and central nervous systems. The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord; the peripheral nervous system involves nerve signaling from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. CRPS is characterized by prolonged or excessive pain and changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area, according to National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Unable to live as he once did, he began to pursue his dream. Spencer has enjoyed the world of fantasy for his entire life and dreamed of becoming a writer. As a boy, he scribbled down ideas and short stories, sharing them with friends and family, and growing his hunger to do more. “I have a love for fantasy and adventure,” Spenser said. In the culmination of his stories and ideas comes the thrilling start of his debut series, The Torem Chronicles. “The release date was faster than expected,” Spenser said. An original shipment to Amazon sold out in just a couple of days according to Spenser. While not in stores in Orange County at this time, it is available to check out at Lamar State College Orange Ron Lewis Library and Bridge City Public Library has expressed an interest in having a copy. When not writing, he enjoys time with his wife, Kristina, and son, Gabriel, as well as family and friends. The Shattering is available at Amazon and Barnes and Nobles. It is 234 pages and published by Fulton Books. 

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GRILLED

GARDEN Vegetables

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Ingredients • 8 small carrots with 1-inch greens intact, peeled • 6 green onions, cut into 3-inch pieces • 2 medium red and/or yellow bell peppers, cut into 8 wedges • 2 medium zucchini and/or yellow squash, cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces • 2 tablespoons Land O Lakes® Butter, melted • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh garlic • 1/2 teaspoon coarse ground pepper • 1/4 teaspoon salt

JEANS FOR THE MODERN COWGIRL

How to make 1. STEP 1 Heat gas grill on medium or charcoal grill until coals are ash white. 2. STEP 2 Place carrots, onions bell, peppers and squash into aluminum foil grilling pan. Drizzle with melted butter; sprinkle with garlic, pepper and salt. Place pan onto grill. Cover; grill, stirring occasionally, 8-12 minutes or until vegetables are roasted. 

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HOME OFFERS

INSPIRING BACKDROP FOR SOCIAL FUNCTIONS

By Dawn Burleigh

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Photos By Dawn Burleigh

Designed after a famous antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi built in 1790’s, The Brown Estate was referred to as the Linden of Pinehurst. Edgar William Brown Jr and his wife, Gladys Slade Brown, built and lived in the house. Antebellum is a Latin word that means “before the war.” In American history, the antebellum period refers to the years after the War of 1812 (1812–15) and before the Civil War (1861– 65), according to encyclopedia.com Linden is one of the oldest antebellum homes in Natchez, for six generations-one of the few remaining long-term family owned bed and breakfasts in the area. It is said that the design of the front door was the inspiration for Tara in Gone With The Wind. The main part of the house was built in 1790, with the east wing addition in 1818 and the west wing addition in 1849, according to www.visitnatchez.org Construction of the home began on October 8, 1954 and was finished in April 1956. Approximately 20,000 square feet, the house consists of four bedrooms, five bathrooms, two family rooms, a formal dining room, a drawing room (now a second dining room), library, solarium, kitchen with a butler’s pantry, freezer room, laundry room, an office and a hobby room. It also has a working basement. Sitting on 88 acres of land, the structure commands attention as one enters the grounds. Behind the magnificent home, is a water fountain just behind the solarium, adding the perfect touch to the house. Just past the gates and entering the rest of the property, one encounters not one but two bridges

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crossing the three-acre lake which has a second fountain constructed in the middle of the water. As one takes in the beauty of the gardens, the water and the architecture, one feels they have left all the hectic day to day behind and entered into a world of peace and tranquility. The solarium, water fountains, and bridges were added in 1965. With the solarium as the room most used for meetings, luncheons and receptions, it offers a glimpse into the beauty of the rest of the property. In Brown’s will, the land and home were originally to be given to the Methodist Church to be used as a nursing home. The church rejected it due to the difficulty in remodeling it to be a suitable nursing home. The church accepted land elsewhere in the county and the four sons of the Brown’s conveyed the home and a trust find to Lamar University. It is considered a public service division of Lamar State College Orange, Texas a member of the Texas State University System. The library, found on the first floor, is paneled with solid oak, hand carved in a linen pleat/ fold pattern, marred only by the two sword marks left from its early days in England, according to historical information provided by The Brown Estate Manager Terrie Smith.

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Inlaid above the fireplace is a bass relief woodcarving entitled, “Monk’s Revelry,” depicting times before the reformation, the 16th Century religious movement that aimed at reforming the Roman catholic Church and resulted in stabling the Protestant Church. The artist, from New Orleans, created the piece in 1908 and when it was completed, he attempted to remove his signature in the lower right corner of the work. On the ceiling of the same room, the molding depicts the signs of the zodiac. Mrs. Brown’s bedroom and dressing room is now the area bride’s prepare for their big day. The gold plated fixtures and wall-towall mirrors will make anyone feel like royalty. The original sink tops were made on onyx. In Mr. Brown’s office, another carving above the fireplace will capture one’s attention. It a scene from Aesop’s Fables made of marble. At the time of it’s construction, the Brown Estate cost a little over $1 million. To replace it today with the same quality materials and craftsmanship would cost over $10 million. The Brown Center is able to hold events from 7 a.m. – midnight, seven days a week. It is also available for tours by appointment. Office hours are 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. The Brown Estate of Lamar State College Orange is located at 4205 West Park Avenue in Orange. For more information on booking an event or scheduling a tour, call 409-883-2939. 

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Nancy Shirley • Florist

t s i r o l f a n a h t More

Nan’s Flower Shop 1605 Strickland Drive Orange Orangetxflowers.com 409-883-6267 or 409-670-3830

Silk Flower

arrangement

Cross

$69.95

Burlap Sayings Many sayings to choose from

$9.95

Daisy Doo Poo-Pourri Left side:

Handcrafted rustic plant decor

$69.95

Includes 2 – 2oz Before You Go Toilet Sprays

$19.95

Right Side:

Hand crafted rustic windmill wall décor

$34.95 Photos by Dawn Burleigh

with Flowers

$89.95

International Blend Coffee

An American and Viennese Roasted Blend with a Rich and Medium Bodied Taste

$12.95 Stand

alone shadow boxt

$64.95


TREES

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TRASH

KEEP ORANGE COUNTY BEAUTIFUL INSPIRES TO KEEP ORANGE CLEAN By Dawn Burleigh

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An organization, which began as Gateway Cities Proud, evolved into Keep Orange County Beautiful. Keep Orange County Beautiful (KOCB) is non- profit organization with a board, but technically no members. If you are a part of the group, then you are on the Board. “There are no dues to join,” KOCB Chair Deborah Bednar said. “We help coordinate projects.” “It started in 1996 with Tad McKee as the original Chair,” Sandra Cash said. “David Brown and Dennis Davis, during their lifetime, lived at Pinehurst Gardens next to the Brown Center in Orange and were major benefactors to Keep Orange County Beautiful, then known as Gateway Cities Proud.” “I was president of the Master Gardeners at the time,” Tad McKee said. “There was push for the counties to participate in beautification. The city manager [of Orange] at the time encouraged us.” The project also offered scholarships for kids and other projects funded through the sales of azaleas at the time. “The organization operates on funds provided through Brown and Davis. “David donated thousands of his mother’s prized daylily bulbs to sell and beautify Orange; such a wonderful gift to our community,” Cash added. Cash said those involved with the organization are passionate trees and keeping the county free of litter. “It’s my home,” Bednar said. “I want to enjoy it.” Cash said she does it for the community. The organization meets once a month at noon on the second Monday at Robert’s Steakhouse in Pinehurst. “We also have a website and Facebook page and we can communicate there,” Bednar said. “We have some very interesting projects we are working on and we are always looking for volunteers.”

Photo by Dawn Burleigh

Naomi, the mighty oak, a 25-foot tall Live Oak Tree was planted in downtown historical Orange in 2016. The owners, at the time, Leslie Barras and Kevin McAdams, were recognized as Hometown Beautification Heros for replacing a mature oak lost during Hurricane Rita in 2005.

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KOCB members, Salvation Army’s Captain Frankie Zuniga, his staff, and children of the Boys & Girls Club as well as Kenita Dougharty; Sabine Federal Credit Union’s President & CEO, a neighbor and a sponsor of the Boys & Girls Club as the non-profit organization receives the First Quarter KOCB Beautification Award on Thursday.

Photos courtesy of Keep Orange County Beautiful Currently, KOCB is working on committees to concentrate on • Beautification • Litter • Lobby for enforcement of litter laws

In addition, the damage that litter brings to the environment must be stopped. The more that the public can be educated about the damaging effects of litter - and what they can do about

“We need all the advocates we get,” Cash said. Cash is also known as one of the Trashy Ladies. She has been picking up litter on her street and in Orange for decades and said she has seen the amount of litter increase. Bednar said she leads by example. She has been a part of the Great American Trash Off prior to joining KOCB. “When Harvey was coming I said, ‘wait a minute, I have got to clean these drains out’,” Bednar said. “My neighbors thought I was weird, but my house did not flood. I made sure the water could move from my house.” Bednar said it is important to educate your neighbors about bags of leaves by storm drains preventing the flow of water. “You have to catch it before the drain or it’s gone,” Cash added. “It ends up in the bayou, river, the Gulf and the ocean.” A major role for KOCB is to educate the public to the value that trees bring to the environment and the need to maintain and grow that value.

it, the better off we shall all be, according to KOCB website. Litter gets blown around by wind and traffic or until it gets carried by water. It moves until a curb, building or a fence traps it. Once litter

has accumulated, it invites people to add more litter to it. HOW YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE • Set an example by not littering yourself! • Teach others why it's important not to litter • Remember that public areas are yours to enjoy and care for. • Hike only where there are trails • Have your school class make a list of different public areas and what they are used for. Visit them to see how they serve the community's needs. • Invite someone from a local park or nature center to visit your class and speak about the importance of caring for public areas and using them wisely. • Organize a group project to repair playground equipment, build benches or improve a neglected area. RECYCLE USE LESS STUFF BUY RECYCLED • Make each day a litter-free event! • Carry a litterbag in your car. • Make sure trash cans have lids that can be securely fastened. • Don't put loose trash in boxes. • Cover open loads on all trucks. • Make litterbags for your bicycle too and give them to your friends. • Volunteer to help organize a cleanup. • Report to local authorities any areas where people have illegally dumped garbage and debris.

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• Check dumpsters every day to see that top and side doors are closed. GET INVOLVED You can help Keep Orange County Beautiful! KOCB's role in Keeping Orange County Beautiful is to organize other elements of the community so that all programs become a community effort, rather than just a single group of dedicated people. The original Orange County Trash Off was a day set aside to help residents clear out heavy trash from their properties. The event is now known as the Community Wide Trash Off hosted by Shangri La Botanical Gardens. In the Spring of 2008, KOCB in cooperation with the Texas Forestry Service, donated 20 trees to the City for planting in parks. The area once known as ‘the circle’ where MacArthur Drive, Edgar Brown Drive and Strickland Drive intersect is one area that benefited from the trees. The 24 trees were planted in 2007. The tree planting was made possible because of donations from businesses and individuals. Over a year's time, one acre of growing trees will absorb all the carbon dioxide produced by an automobile driven 26,000 miles. Trees also trap and remove particulates from the air.

Trees help reduce storm water runoff and soil erosion and make the neighborhood more attractive. Tress cut traffic noise, give a home to songbirds and small mammals, restore our health and spirits and make our community the place we want to live, according to KOCB website. “We want to work on planting more trees,” Cash said. “But we have to work on the litter first.” The organization recognizes residents and businesses making an effort to improve the

appearance of Orange County with quarterly Beautification Awards. Most recently, Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club was recognized with the award for ‘it’s a generous and noble act to Protect, Preserve, Propagate and plant BIG trees,’ according to KOCB. It also recognizes Hometown Beautification Heros as the individuals are spotted through out the year. We would also like to register the master trees found in the community,” Sandra Cash said. “We lost a lot of master trees in Rita.” 

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ON THE

SCENE BC Chamber

Greg and Paulette Maddox

Chris Kovatch and Kim Davis

Carroll Holt and Betty Honeycutt

Johnny Trahan and Dean Crooks

01.14.19

Ralf Mims, Jeff Sanchez and Dean Granger

Terri Gauthier and Lanie Brown

West Orange Council member Shirley Bonnin and LaVerne McDonald

Van and Laura Wade

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ON THE

SCENE MLK Gala

01.19.19

Dresilla Anderson, Ashley Anderson, Hannah Gower and Courtni Jones

Barbara McMullen and Bobby Tingle

Essie Bellfield

Linda and Jesse Burrell

Bennie Taylor, Tammy Taylor and Rosetta Reed

Grover Roberts III and Terrie T. Salter

Pastor CW Crawford and Patricia Crawford

Bobby and Gayle Tingle

Kim Preston and Anthony Reed

Ron and Ola Kindle

Wendy Soloman, Anthony Haney and Johnathon Shelton

Laura and Van Wade

Terri and Brad Childs

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ON THE

SCENE Lamar 50th an Kick Off

01.23.19

Larry Spears Jr and Brown Claybar Captains Jan and Francisco Zuniga

Butch Campbell and Lane Martin

Suzonne Crockett and David Jones

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ON THE

SCENE Dueling Pianoes

Matt LaFleur and Denise Keszeg

Captains Francisco and Jan Zuniga

Elena Labardor and John Prather

Myrna and Mike Cedars

Johnny and Becky Trahan

The stars of the night David Morris and Brent Bobbitt

Kim and Paul Dickerson, Maureen McAllister, and Sherry Hommell

01.26.19

OPD Srgt. JD Taylor and Srgt. CJ Foreman

Kacey Harrell, Rita Sonnier and Della Gallien of Friends Helping Friends

Glynis Gothia and Terri Gauthier

Al Granger, Gina Simar and Dean Granger

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ON THE

SCENE Vidor Chamber

01.31.19

Jessica Boudreaux and Dynell Madden

Nicole Sparrow and Tanya Mitchell

Robert and Julia Viator

Robert Viator Sr and Robert Viator Jr

Sherry Ledoux and Robert Sutton

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ON THE

SCENE Mardi Gras

Gary and Jennifer Franklin

Clayton Adams and Lauren Zeto

Trisha and Larry Spears Jr, Justin and Kyndall Trahan

Rita Ballard and Joe Mires

Lori Ardoin, Betty Harmon, and Delores Stephens

02.09.19

Victoria Adams, Courtney Lewis, and Suzy Wimberley

Kerri Richard, Shea Brown, and Heather Thomas

John Green and Gina Simar

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ON THE

SCENE

2nd Annual Sabine River Ford Pro Rodeo and Livestock Show

02.02.19

Arlen and Bill Snyder Sr.

Cooper, Randi, Chris and Carter Smith Robbie and Cheryl Hood

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ON THE

SCENE

Mardi Gras Munchkin Parade

02.23.19 Richard Sims, Cooper Meaux and Pam Sims

Krewe C’est LaVie Anna Mathews

Kellie Derouen

Connection 03.07.19 Breakfast at First Financial Bank

Aubrey and Keagan Derouen

Tommy Gunn, Austin Mellon, and Dean Granger

Shawn Sparrow and Robbie Hood

Tadd McKee and Gisela Houseman

Kacey Harrell and Pam Honeycutt

Teryin and Jim Surber

Stephen Lee and Caleb Meadows

Pam Berry, Terry Berry, Brielle Wolfford and Kathy Flanigan

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WHY IINLIVE ORANGE COUNTY

By Dan Mohon

• Photo by Dawn Burleigh

My first exposure to Orange came as a young man while working for a Pharmaceutical Company. After my first visit, I called my wife to tell her about the progressive and friendly town of Orange. As a sales representative, I called on Scholars Drug Store, owned by Harvey Fergerson and Flip Flippen, Dr. Roy Griffin, the pathologist at Orange Memorial Hospital, and Nate Williams at William’s Drug Store, among many. These men were representative of the friendly people I encountered in Orange. Nate Smith frequently took me to lunch at Charlie Sprout’s BBQ and the Jack Tar Hotel. Little did I know that a few years later my family would move to Orange and remain 44 years.

Stark House provides an excellent view of living in the 19th and 20th Centuries. People in Orange also have a heart for caring for others. The civic organizations are diligent in providing services for persons in need. I personally have been involved over 40 years in the Lions Club Charity Carnival, which helps provide eye care both locally and jointly on a state and international level. The Lions Club helps provide a special camp for special children also. Neither can we overlook the fun family activities that the carnival provides.

crisis time in their lives. Groups have also organized to refurbish and consign buildings for community use, such as the Heritage House and the Train Depot. We have numerous Churches in Orange, which get involved in helping others as well. They also enhance our Community by serving as a reminder of a God who calls us to a higher standard of living in our world.

Caring, however, is not limited to civic organizations.

I personally have had the privilege to serve our Community in a number of ways and have always come from those experiences with many friends and joy from giving of myself.

I have experienced many times our citizens come together to help someone during a

Why do I love living in Orange County? For all the reasons above, plus many more! 

Orange has been a great place to own a business and make a living. Industry has brought people from all over the world to work here, thus making an interesting mixture of ideas and cultural backgrounds. This influx of diverse people enhances our forward progression as a city and county. Having good education organizations also improves the quality of life in an area. We have five good school districts and an exceptional performing Lamar State College. My family has been intricately involved in several of these. Our sons graduated from LC-M High School, well prepared for college. My wife taught 20 years at West Orange Cove Schools and part time in Orangefield ISD, and I have served many years on the Lamar Foundation Board, which promotes funds for scholarships to Lamar. Also, in Orange we are very fortunate to enjoy the activities the Stark Foundation provides. Shangri La, the botanical gardens, are exquisite to view plus they provide workshops for children, special events for Easter and Christmas, and hosts the Beaumont Symphony each year. Additionally, the Lutcher Theater brings to Orange outstanding venues and a visit to the

Dan and Manon Mohon

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COME ON OVER FOR A REAL CAJUN EXPERIENCE! HEART OF THE CAJUN PRAIRIE JOIE DE VIVRE A LITTLE JOY OF LIVING ACADIA PARISH TOURIST COMMISSION

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47th RAYNE FROG FESTIVAL

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(always last weekend in April)

Wednesday-Saturday, May 08-11, 2019,

Saturday & Sunday, April 27-28, 2019

10 am until Midnight

Benefit for St. Jude Hospital This festival, held the last weekend in April since 2003, highlights the rich culture & music of this Cajun Town. Founded by Steve and J.C. Carriere, this festival features some of the hottest Cajun, Rock, Zydeco and Country bands around. All proceeds going to St. Jude Children's Research in Memphis, this event has raised nearly $130,000 for St. Jude. Come help us fight Cancer! Church Point City Park 100 East Darbonne Street Church Point, Louisiana woodstock4stjude@aol.com www.cajunwoodstock.com

RAYNE FESTIVAL MUSIC AND FOOD EXTRAVAGANZA

Carnival 10:00 am - 12 Midnight 206 Frog Festival Drive Gossen Memorial Park Local and out-of-town food vendors including Rayne Non-Profit Organizations Arts & Craft Show Musical Entertainment by popular live bands 12 Noon till Midnight Carnival Specials Great Family Fun! Souvenirs Poster www.raynefrogfestival.com Facebook: raynefrogfestival

ONGOING ATTRACTIONS - Visit acadiatourism.org for details

Kelly’s Landing 1109 Robert’s Cove Road Crowley, La. 70526 337-788-0546

Crowley Motor Co. & Ford Building 425 North Parkerson Avenue Crowley, La. 70526 337-788-0824 www.crowley-la.com

Le Vieux Presbytere Rue Ivy Lejeune & South Rogers Street Church Point, La. 70525 337-684-5692

Laissez les bons temps rouler

Profile for The Orange Leader

Orange Living April 2019  

Orange Living April 2019  

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