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VOLUME 22 ISSUE 1 SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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Meet your student union president

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Matthew Good and guests at Sun Peaks

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Golf team finally has a woman 6

Campus is hoppin’

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PHOTO BY SAMANTHA GARVEY

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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September 5, 2012

Editorial/Opinions Deathbed memories

Editor’s Note Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief No one ever rolls over on their deathbed to impart their last wisdom upon their children or grandchildren and says, “I wish I would have worked harder,” or, “I wish I would have been in more of a hurry.” I don’t know this for a fact — maybe one of those things has indeed been said in just those circumstances — but I just can’t picture it. I mean really, can you picture a scene in a heartwarming drama, the audience sniff ling, and the old man in the hospital bed leans toward his estranged granddaughter who he’s just been reunited with after years of family turmoil, and he whispers to her, “Eighty hours a week at the office wasn’t quite enough,”

before the high-pitched f lat-line sound of the heart monitor kicks in? No. They say things like, “I should have slowed down and looked around,” or, “I wish I would’ve gone to more of your father’s hockey games,” or “I wish I’d learned to paint a sunset.” And why do we picture them saying these things and not those things? Why do we picture that character saying, “I wish I’d gotten to know you better,” instead of, “Why didn’t I put more away for retirement?” Because deep down we know we should work less, love more, slow down and appreciate life — but can’t convince ourselves to do so — and we like to see real life ref lected in these types of films. We know we’ll regret all that time we spent at the office trying to look busy to our bosses — when we actually finished our work hours earlier — but we convince ourselves it’s necessary sacrifice to get ahead in the world. We know we’ll wish we spent more time with our friends and family instead of picking up those extra shifts at that shit job we don’t care about (working for people that we know don’t care about us) — but we need that newer version of the superphone we already own, right?

As a post-secondary student, you can correspond this sentiment to your friends (or roommates or whatever) asking if you want to go watch the latest installment of the Batman franchise, and telling them you need to study for an exam you’ve already prepared for, because for some reason you think that the essay question might be different than the one your professor told you would be on the test, and you’ve just got to ace it. Or you’re asked if you want to go out into the woods for the night, pitch a tent by a fire and roast some weenies and marshmallows, but you decide to stay home and play on your Facebook between Tweets, interspersed with pages of Heart of Darkness for your literature class. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not telling you to ignore your studies in favour of having fun. That would be irresponsible of me. I’m asking if you can see yourself looking back at these years spent at school and wistfully remembering all the time you spent at your desk or in the library. Make time for the things you want to remember later in life, my friends. Because I can’t picture that character saying “I wish I’d worked harder,” and neither can you. editor@truomega.ca

Positions Available

Management positions available at The Omega for the 2012/13 academic year Are you a highly motivated, independent worker with a reliable vehicle, a valid driver’s license and a passion for marketing? Are you an experienced bookkeeper or business manager with accounting experience familiar with non-profit organization finances? We want to hear from you! The Omega is currently hiring a business manager and an advertising and distribution manager for the upcoming fall and winter semesters. Position 1: Business Manager The ideal candidate for this position will be proficient in all aspects of accounting and bookkeeping. Responsible for the financial transactions of the organization and oversight of the advertising and distribution manager, the successful candidate will likely only be required for approximately ten (10) hours per week at The Omega offices, but will be required to keep constant watch on the financial aspects of the business. Compensation and benefits: -Salary of $800 per month

-Tuition reimbursement for one course (up to three credits) at TRU -$50.00 per semester textbook allowance -Reimbursement of on-campus parking fees to a maximum of $50.00 per month Position 2: Advertising and Distribution Manager

The ideal candidate for this position will be a self-starter with a valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle, and a passion for marketing. Responsible for all aspects of advertising with the publication including sales and invoicing, as well as distribution of the publication, this position will work closely with the business manager to ensure that revenue generation is at a level allowing the organization to succeed, as well as planning special events and interacting with readers through social media. Compensation and benefits: -$80.00 per issue honorarium -Commission on new advertising accounts -Tuition reimbursement for one course (up to three credits) at

TRU -$50.00 per semester textbook allowance -Reimbursement of on-campus parking fees to a maximum of $50.00 per month Interested parties may submit a resume including references and covering letter to:

Two sides to a coin Well folks, here we go. It’s time or contribute photos or stories to for another year at Thompson Rivers this publication, you can force your required fees to provide you with University. I know I’m ready to make the new and exciting learning opportunities. most of it. The Students’ Union houses Let me start off by introducing myself. My name is Taylor Rocca and funds clubs for a wide range and my job with The Omega is to of interests — academic to religious and everycopy edit the conthing in between. tent that goes into Join a club, meet your independent some new people student newspaper and learn some (see bio on opposite new things. page). Take advantage It is yours beof your student cause you pay into dollar. it. Don’t believe If you’re gome? Check your ing to pay it, you tuition and fees might as well do breakdown at Myeverything you TRU.ca. can to ensure you While you were get the best bang checking out your for that buck. tuition breakdown, TRUe Thoughts CUEF provides you probably noTaylor Rocca great opportunity ticed you pay into for students to obthe campus comΩ Copy/Web Editor tain funding for a munity radio station, 92.5 The X, as well as the Stu- variety of activities and learning experiences, but I could probably dents’ Union. write an entire piece on that alone. Wait! It doesn’t stop there. If you keep scrolling down the ex- (Editor’s note: This piece will come hausting list of fees and levies, you soon, so keep an eye out for it.) TRU has a beautiful campus. will also see you pay into a health and dental plan and something It is full of beautiful people with called the University Enhancement amazing aspirations and goals. If there is one thing I noticed last Fund (CUEF). With student debt continuing to year, it was the absence of a rockrise, it can be frustrating to look at a ing campus community culture – but that doesn’t mean you can’t get lengthy receipt of dollars and cents. Trust me, going into my seventh involved and fill that void. Make this campus somewhere year of post-secondary education, I know all about student debt. But let that everyone wants to hang out after classes end. me paint a brighter picture for you. Make those extra fees worth The scene might look gloomy when you eye the bottom line of paying. Don’t complain about them your term balance but within those bills and student loan payments lies while you fail to take advantage of the opportunity to engage in a dy- the opportunities they provide you. Step a little outside of your comnamic university experience. Lectures and labs are important fort zone and not only will you feel but so are social events and extra- you’ve made the most of your dollar, you’ll also feel you’ve made curricular activities. Students learn plenty inside the the most of your university experiwalls of the university, but there is ence. These can be the best years of much to be learned outside the rigid structures of the institution, as well. your life, don’t let them slip away The services mentioned are just a unfulfilled. There are always two sides to a few of the means for students to get involved — not only enriching their coin, so flip it over and see what’s on own university experience, but also the other side before you spend it. that of their peers. Whether you volunteer at CFBX,

Mike Davies, Editor-in-Chief By email (preferred) at:

Got some words of wisdom for

editor@truomega.ca

your fellow students? Comment

Or by mail at: The Omega, TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper 900 McGill Road, TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010 Kamloops, BC V2C 5N3

on these articles at theomega.ca

Positions will remain open until filled.

tell us about some of the other

The Omega would like to thank all applicants for their interest however only those selected for interviews will be contacted.

articles we’ve been doing. Some

No phone please.

calls

or

drop-ins

and help us to help each other. While you’re there, why not

of them are pretty good.

ON THE COVER: Sept. 4 saw the flooding of campus with fresh new faces ready to learn. First-year orientation featured community groups from campus and the Kamloops community promoting causes, businesses attracting business and lots of free swag for all.


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 1

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

September 5, 2012

Volume 22, Issue 1

Published since November 27, 1991

Meet The Omega

Your 2012/13 Omega editorial team is...

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Mike Davies editor@truomega.ca 250-828-5069 BUSINESS MANAGER VACANT NEWS EDITOR

Devan C. Tasa

news@truomega.ca ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Brendan Kergin

arts@truomega.ca SPORTS EDITOR

Adam Williams sports@truomega.ca

Taylor Rocca

ROVING EDITOR

Copy/Web

Samantha Garvey

roving@truomega.ca COPY/WEB EDITOR

Taylor Rocca copy@truomega.ca

omegacontributors Dora Rodriguez, Anna-Lilja Dawson, David Dyck, H.G. Wilson, Marvin Beatty, Tristan Becker

publishingboard

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * VACANT INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

Mike Davies

Editor-in-Chief

Back for another year at the helm of The Omega, Mike is looking to continue moving forward with everything in his life, including the student press. Overseeing this talented bunch of journalists, he’s in charge of layout and design, as well as making sure the paper has the information the student body wants and needs by assigning stories and managing editorial workloads. He also works as the national opinions and humour editor for Canadian University Press (CUP) where he scours student publications and shares the best of the best to deliver to other campus papers for consideration. When not putting together a paper for you fine folks or finding content from CUP papers to share with campuses nationwide, he’s finishing up the last year of his bachelor of arts in English rhetoric and professional writing while laddering into the journalism program to get a degree there, too. Off campus, he likes to play and read with his two-year-old son, Sven, who is developing into quite the little man before Mike’s eyes, and he tries to find time for as many rounds of golf as he can afford. Every now and then you’ll see him somewhere trying to tune out the world while sinking into a good football game with a beer in his hand. Don’t hesitate to contact Mike regarding anything editorial or design related in The Omega, whether you have a story to pitch or a comment on anything you read between these pages.

Hailing from Calgary, Alta., and coming to The Omega via The Hockey News in Toronto, Taylor Rocca is a copy-editing force to be reckoned with. He is also very humble. Entering his seventh year of post-secondary education, Taylor has a bachelor’s degree in recreation, sports and tourism from the University of Alberta and is working towards his bachelor of journalism degree at TRU. While you might not see him news-hounding on campus like his other Omega compatriots, Taylor still holds a valuable spot on the ladder that is The Omega news-editing process. He puts the polish on all the content you read within this newsprint. See a spelling mistake, grammar error or misplaced piece of punctuation? Blame this guy. In his spare time, Taylor slugs away on the microphone at The X 92.5, TRU’s campus community radio station.

Want to get involved? Contact any of our editors with story ideas that might fall under their section. We always need and appreciate people pitching in! All our contact information is available at theomega.ca (or on the left side of this page)

copyright

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 0C8 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editor@truomega.ca Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Follow us on Twitter: @TRU_Omega and “Like” us on Facebook. Do it. Seriously.

Devan C. Tasa

Brendan Kergin

News

Arts and Entertainment

Entering the final year of his journalism degree, Devan is hoping this will be the final foray of his six-year post-secondary journey. Calling Prince George home, Devan contributed a number of news stories to The Omega during the 2011-12 academic year. As this year’s news editor, his goal is to connect readers with the people and places in which important decisions are made. From university officials to student politicians, campus clubs to city hall, Devan has you covered. Student engagement plays an important role in what Devan does, so if your campus organization is working on an event, an important decision has gone undetected or you simply want to write a few stories yourself, give him a shout.

Originally from Victoria (a fact he’ll probably mention to you), Brendan is a big fan of B.C., especially after a summer internship in Fort McMurray, Alta. A big advocate of local beer and indie music, he can often be found with a pint in some corner of a pub or music venue. A fan of the truly great sitcoms, he just finished burning through 30 Rock and is working on reviewing Arrested Development before it makes its triumphant return. British current-eventpanel shows are also a passion, and one day he intends to bring that genre to Canada. When you first meet him he’ll probably have an energy drink in his hand. Speaking of hands, he’s left-handed. No, he doesn’t drink hot drinks, especially coffee. Yes, that’s a little weird, but what’s life without being a little curious?

Adam Williams Sports New to Kamloops after spending seven years in Edmonton, Alta., Adam is a graduate of the University of Alberta and a journalism student at TRU. A lifelong fan of the NHL’s Los Angeles Kings, he enjoyed watching L.A. secure its first Stanley Cup victory this summer so feel free to congratulate him the next time you see him. Adam will make sure you’re never left in the dark when your friends talk about “that local sports team.” Focusing primarily on TRU WolfPack teams, he will also delve into the world of professional sports, offering opinion and analysis. It is Adam’s goal to provide a complete sports picture for The Omega’s readers, ensuring no team is left uncovered. Follow Adam on Twitter @AdamWilliams87.

Samantha Garvey Roving Samantha Garvey is a Kamloops and TRU lifer. After completing a bachelor’s degree in psychology, she came back for round two and is in her final semester of a bachelor of journalism. Entering her sixth and (hopefully) final year at this university, she has been involved in many different scenes, including arts and music, recreation and sport, clubs and activism. Samantha has also been a programmer with 92.5 The X for more than five years. Her role as roving editor is to ensure that nothing important slips through the cracks of our coverage, whether it be news, culture or sports, on campus or in the community. Stop by The Omega during Samantha’s Wednesday afternoon office hours (12 p.m. to 1 p.m.) to share your feedback or have a chat.


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September 5, 2012

News Law school flourishes despite complications “It was a very good communal environment,” he said. “Everyone Ω Roving Editor was pretty tight-knit and very helpful. I found it very collegial andAfter more than 30 years of the talking to other students at other same law school options in Canada, universities, at other law schools, TRU changed the landscape, open- that has been a real positive to ing a new law school in Sept. 2011. TRU.” Fischer added that the Kamloops After accepting 75 students into its inaugural class, how has the law law community has been excellent school established itself over the to the school, providing opportunities to network with those already first year of its existence? “Our main theme, we are at- in the field. TRU’s youth as a law school tempting to blend learning the law hasn’t kept the with learning students away. the professional Last year the skills to put that school anticipated knowledge to 65 students but use,” said dean sent out 75 acChris Axworceptance letters to thy. “[That is] a create a buffer for unique combo rejections. and will make However, every our students student responded more marketable with a ‘yes’ in in the future. reply and 75 stu“What we hear dents joined the from lawyers Kamloops camacross the provpus. ince [is that] peoKyle Nagy was ple are impressed one of those stuwith what we’ve dents. achieved.” He was acceptBut that was no ed to TRU as well easy feat. “Tryas the University ing to establish of Ottawa. law school at He said the fact TRU has been an TRU is new did enormous chalfactor into his lenge,” Axworthy decision, but he said. chose it because Ever y thing from establishing —Chris Axworthy he wants to live and work in B.C., salaries for new so it would be betstaff to admission for students through the registrar ter to go to school and network here too. came with difficulty. “For students who are sure about “At every turn, we’ve had challenges at this university ... We have themselves, it doesn’t matter the had significant success outside the pedigree that’s behind them beuniversity. All of our challenges cause they’re going to get a quality education, great opportunity to nethave been within the university.” “Part of the challenge is recog- work and relationship with lawyers nizing that law has different needs in the community,” Fischer said. This year, the law school rethan an undergraduate program,” said Robert Fischer, president of ceived 600 applications and is the TRU Society of Law Students ready to welcome 80 more students under the banner of first-year law. (SLSTRU). Eventually the third and fourth “The growing pains of being new, setting up services and getting floors of Old Main with be the jobs and the career office, that was home to law students, but the construction on that building is not sort of a challenge.” But the experience of the students scheduled to be complete until may not reflect the obstacles of the Sept. 2013. In the meantime, the Brown first year. Fischer said the student body has established a camaraderie Family House of Learning serves as a temporary home. not found at other schools.

Samantha Garvey

“Part of the

challenge is recognizing that law has different needs than an undergraduate program.”

Prominent local figures, including Kamloops mayor Peter Milobar (far left) and TRU president Alan Shaver (grey suit, middle) cut the ribbon at the opening of the new TRU School of Law on Sept. 6, 2011.

— OMEGA FILE PHOTO

Tech Tips Samantha Garvey Ω Roving Editor

The TRU wireless network will ask you to re-log in each time you attempt to connect to the web. Rather than having to repeatedly enter your credentials, sync your devices to the Eduroam network and every time you come to campus they will connect automatically. Now you can encrypt your USB stick. After plugging it into a USB port, click the drive icon on your screen. Select ‘Turn On Bitlocker’ and enter a password. Each time you plug in your USB it will ask you for that password so no one else can access your files.

You can do this with your laptop as well, essentially adding another password in order to connect. To do so, make an appointment at the IT Service Desk, Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m, BCCOL140 and HL104. Storage space on the network has increased. Students can save 2GB of data on the H:/Drive compared to 500MB last year. An additional 1GB is available on F:/Drive. Did you know you can access these files from off campus? Remote access is available by logging in at http://truvpn.tru.ca or http://mytruvpn.tru.ca. For any tech questions, contact the IT Service Desk at 250-8526800 or ITServiceDesk@tru.ca.

Want a 500GB external hard drive? Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter, giving us your best headline from orientation or back-to-school barbecue.

Under Construction Samantha Garvey Ω Roving Editor

Despite another academic year starting up, Old Main remains functional but still under construction. The roof went up over the two new floors of TRU’s main building this summer. This is the first of two phases and was scheduled to be finished Sept. 6. The shell of the building was completed at the end of August, but additional siding and finishing touches are now expected to be done at the end of the month. Students and staff are asked not to use the entrances on the east wing of the building. 169 staff members were dis-

placed from Old Main during the construction, according to TRU’s website. All staff members returned to their offices the last week of August. The second phase will begin next summer and is expected to be completed before Sept. 2013. According to Christopher Seguin, TRU’s vice president advancement, the first phase cost more than $1 million, which was covered by past surpluses. “When the university has surplus funds at the end of the year [they go] to projects like this,” Seguin said. The next phase is estimated at $9.5 million. TRU has applied to the province for $7.4 million and intends to fundraise the rest from private sources, according to Seguin.

Construction on phase one of the Old Main revitalization is behind schedule, but should cause little disturbance to the fall semester.

—PHOTO BY MARVIN BEATTY


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 1

News

From toddler to the top

A long road back to the Thompson Rivers University Students Union for McIntyre Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

While many past presidents of TRUSU can claim to be connected to the student union for a long time, not many can claim a tie that stretches back as far as current president Dustin McIntyre’s. When McIntyre was young, his mother was the secretary for the University College of the Cariboo’s student union, which later became TRUSU. One of his first memories as a child involved the student union. “I remember being a kid, sitting behind the front desk, playing with toys, while she worked the front desk and dealt with students,” he said. Born in Kamloops, McIntyre moved to Vancouver when he was 11 to live with his mother, who eventually moved back to Kamloops when her son was entering grade 12. “I stayed and lived by myself in Vancouver for grade 12 and then stayed there for about five years, then I decided it was time to come back home,” McIntyre said. Before he came back, he attended Capilano University and Douglas College. “I came to TRU in hopes of getting my acting degree,” he said. “It just wasn’t the right fit for me, so I was bouncing around and then I ended up taking classes with [anthropology professor] Lisa Cook and she was fantastic.” McIntyre kept taking Cook’s anthropology classes until he decided to become an anthropology major with a First Nations

certificate. “It resonated with me,” he said. “You get to study culture, as well as history and you get to study different people. I really, really enjoyed it. It was challenging.” In his first year at TRU, McIntyre worked at the TRUSU-run Common Grounds coffee shop. It was there he decided to run for the student union. “I was really passionate about helping students,” he said. “I felt TRU could do a lot of great things and to do those properly I felt I had to be involved in TRUSU.” He first became the arts and science representative, then the vice president internal, and finally president. Heading into the new academic year, two accomplishments stand out to McIntyre from his time as an elected member of TRUSU. The first is being part of the successful lobbying effort asking the city to accept more transit hours to make the bus system more efficient. Those changes will take effect this fall. The other is getting the university to release exam dates earlier. “It really makes an impact on every student,” he said. “Students need to know if they can work, if they can go home, if they can travel back to their country. They need to know when their exams are.” Over the summer, he and the TRUSU executive were also successful in getting state-of-theart security phones installed where the new bike shed will be and the common area in front of the Campus Activity Centre.

All grown up, Dustin McIntyre returns to lead the student union his mother worked for all those years ago.

—PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

Over the next year, McIntyre has two main goals, both of which are connected to tuition and the provincial election. “My goal for my presidency this year is to get the board of governors to actually listen to us this year and take into consideration the needs of students and not increase tuition by two per cent,” he said. But it’s not a failure of his presidency if TRUSU isn’t successful in doing that, in his opinion. In fact, it’s rare to see a tuition hike increase at the rate of inf lation come to an end.

The College of New Caledonia’s Students’ Union was successful in stopping it for the 2011-12 school year. McIntyre said he was talking with them to discuss their strategy. McIntyre also aims to increase student voter turnout in next year’s provincial election. Over the next year, TRUSU will be hosting tables to get students registered to vote and to inform them about post-secondary issues. He hopes students will examine each party and their respective positions.

McIntyre said he faces two major challenges in his work. The first is student apathy and making them aware of the student union. “Those are things we deal with every day, is making sure that people understand and feel that the student union is valuable to them,” he said. The other challenge is effecting change in the university structure. “Once you’ve got something so big, it becomes an immovable object,” he said. “We have to help TRU change for the better to help students.”

Line in the sand: University of Saskatchewan students track path of Enbridge pipeline Anna-Lilja Dawson The Sheaf (U of S)

SASKATOON (CUP) — For 14 days in late July and early August, two University of Saskatchewan students travelled the 1772-kilometre route of Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. During this time they took photos, captured video and documented the personal stories of residents of the communities along the pipeline’s projected path. Tomas Borsa, a political studies and psychology student, and Tristan Becker, a recent political studies graduate, made the trip from Bruderheim, Alberta to Kitimat, British Columbia. Teaming up with Skyler Flavelle from Whistler B.C., the group set out to create a multimedia project titled Line In The Sand. Borsa blogged their travels at lineinthesand.ca while Becker and Flavelle took care of the photography and videography, respectively. According to their website, the project will culminate with a published book “comprised of images, essays and commentary from those affected by the pipeline.” The Northern Gateway pipeline is a project by Enbridge Inc. — a Calgarybased energy company — that would carry an estimated 525,000 barrels of

heavy crude oil a day from Alberta’s oilsands to Canada’s West Coast. The project is intended to open up access to emerging Asian markets, where demand for oil is at an all-time high. Many communities nestled around the Northern Gateway’s planned pathway feel that the pipeline’s construction is beyond their control as efforts to protect their land have so far been futile, Borsa said. He said the passing of Bill C-38, a 425-page omnibus budget bill that, along with several other new laws, allows the government to exempt federal projects from environmental assessment, greatly limited those who could speak at public hearings regarding the pipeline. In addition, Enbridge has provided strict mediation that has reduced the topics open for discussion and limited a speaker’s time to 10 minutes. Borsa said creating Line In The Sand was necessary to help share the opinions of those who are most concerned with the proposed pipeline. What he found surprising was the clear-cut difference in public opinion between B.C. and Alberta. In B.C., where a vast amount of the pipeline will cut through First Nations territory, some communities oppose the pipeline so strongly that they have rallied together for a ban on oil pipelines and

tanker projects within their territories. The majority of these communities depend heavily on already fragile ecosystems for their livelihoods and cannot afford the risk of an oil spill endangering the environment. The militance shown in communities facing serious risks was shocking to Borsa, who said that people will go as far as lying down in front of bulldozers to protect their land. The greater the risk to a community, the more open and willing the community members were to share their stories, he said. Enbridge has offered communities along the projected path a 10 per cent equity stake in the project in an attempt to increase support for the pipeline. The company recommends that this money be used to fund cultural centres and build schools in their communities. Borsa said that many communities have refused the offer and remain opposed to the pipeline. He said that there is no middle ground to be found for communities that support the pipeline but still harbour concerns for the environment. The few people that the Line In The Sand group found who are in favour of the Northern Gateway project in B.C. were Shari Green, mayor of Prince George, and Joanne Monaghan, mayor of Kitimat. Both were unavailable for comment when Line In The Sand re-

Loretta Bird and Brian Ketlo fish with a homemade net on the Nadleh River.

—PHOTO BY TRISTAN BECKER

quested an interview. Borsa found that Albertan communities were generally accepting of the pipeline, due to what he believes is simply more familiarity with the mining and oil industries. Economically speaking, Alberta has more to gain than B.C., with more job creation and much more money going directly to the province — Alberta will receive $30 billion over a period of 30 years while B.C. will receive $6 billion.

Borsa said that Albertans were more concerned with whether or not Canada should wait for the price of oil to rise before opening up to international markets or if the Asian markets are the best place for Canadian resources to be exported to. He added that if the project does move on to the construction phase, Line In The Sand must return. “It ramps up the urgency of us going back.”


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September 5, 2012

Life & Community Not just a ski resort, but oh what a ski resort Editor-in-Chief

A mere 45 minute drive northeast (give or take) from Thompson Rivers University, perched on the side of Tod Mountain, or rather nestled in the valley below, is the village of Sun Peaks. Most know the name. It is, after all, the second largest ski resort in Western Canada (behind onlyWhistler Blackcomb) and if you’re in Kamloops, you see their signs and promotional material seemingly everywhere. What most don’t realize, however, is that it’s much more than a ski hill. It’s a community of about 500 permanent residents, complete with a mayor, a grocery store and even a fire hall — and it’s growing. For the outdoorsy folk, head up to the village before the snow flies for a round of golf at the highest elevation you can swing a club at in B.C. or hit the trails on your mountain bike. Or you can join in on the North Face Dirty Feet Mountain Run, being held this weekend. On Sept. 8 runners can take on the valley floor for a five-kilometre run, or be more ambitious and take on the mountain itself for a 16-kilometre trek up the face of the mountain and back. For a more social event, there’s the upcoming authentic Bavarian Oktoberfest. “There’s a bunch of ex-patriot Germans putting it on, so it’ll be truly an authentic experience, complete with the costumes, hats and dancing,” said Brandi Schier, coordinator of media and marketing for Sun Peaks Resort. And of course, come November, there’s the reason that most people know of Sun Peaks — the world-

class ski resort opens and floods with visitors from all over the world. The Austrian Nordic Ski Team uses it for their training, so that is saying something. “It doesn’t have to be hard on a student budget, as some people think,” said Schier, pointing out there’s a misconception about the expense of winter sports. September and October is a great time to look for cheap gear, according to Schier. “People are looking to upgrade,” she said, “and they’d like some money to put towards that new gear, so they’re willing to get rid of some pretty gently used gear at a good price.” She also suggested carpooling and buying a season’s pass as ways to make it less costly to head up for some winter fun. “You only have to make it up about seven or eight times to get the value out of the pass,” she said. For those who aren’t downhillseekers, there are plenty of ways to experience a Canadian winter that don’t involve lift-tickets. Snowshoeing, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing and tubing are all available at the village. The outdoor activities aren’t the only reason to make the trip up, according to Schier. “It’s a great place to meet people,” she said. “There’s a pretty healthy student body that comes up here regularly. I’ve always found it to be an extension of the TRU social scene.” For more information on the village of Sun Peaks, the resort or any of the various amenities available go to sunpeaksresort.com or grab a few friends and make the quick trip up Highway 5 to Heffley Creek and take a right up into the hills. You’ll be there in no time and can see it for yourself.

ABOVE AND BOTTOM LEFT: Some of the European inspired architecture that welcomes, if also confuses, visitors to the village of Sun Peaks BELOW: Sun Peaks plays host to many great events, such as the free acoustic show headlined by Matthew Good on Sept. 1.

—PHOTOS BY KERGIN/DAVIES

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7

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 1

Frosh 2012: DIY container CBC gets into web-based music gardening for your dorm room H.G. Watson

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor With download sales increasing each month and physical copies of songs being sold less and less, the web is becoming the home of new music, away from MTV and broadcast radio. Even one of the most traditional of broadcasters has made a move into web-based music platforms. CBC, the old, stuffy, boring father of Canadian broadcast media, has created a unique, user-friendly popular music centric website. CBC Music is similar to what Myspace has become, with pages for bands to put their music in an effort to share it with fans. Rather than the unfocused mess that can occur on Myspace, CBC Music is a more curated place with a goal. It calls itself the new home of Canadian indie music and it’s understandable why it would make that claim. It provides space for musicians to post songs, bios and social media links, allowing fans access to bands, whether they are up-and-coming or long-time veterans. Fans can also sign up, listen to music and put together playlists of their favourite songs and participate in discussions on a variety of topics hosted on the site. It’s not just a place for artists to show off their wares and

consumers to pick through what they like. Online radio stations play music constantly and there are some hosted programs with semi-well known hosts and programs that are turned into podcasts. The most well known of these is probably the R3-30. R3 is a reference to the fact CBC Music used to be known as Radio 3, and 30 is the number of songs counted down each week; the classic look back at the popular songs of the week. With a multi-faceted platform like this, CBC Music did get itself into some legal hot water with music and broadcast corporations who were upset that CBC was, in some ways, circumnavigating the established cor porate industry, but the national broadcaster was victorious in court. What makes this all so slick is the fact it’s ver y much directed at younger generations whose entertainment and lifestyle is based online. Young people aren’t turning on the TV or tuning the radio. When they do go out, activities often have a web-related aspect, be it people Tweeting, posting photos online, or organizing through Facebook. For media companies, f inding a way to gain consumers online is the big battle for our generation and CBC Music is making a strong move. Oh, and it’s free.

thursday september 13 black matter (sex cult) w./nouveau & DJ virtue

The Lance (University of Windsor) WINDSOR (CUP) — The student diet is famously known for the staples of Kraft Dinner, ramen noodles and bags of frozen perogies that only cost a few bucks. But imagine your mac and cheese spiced up with some fresh hot pepper or a nice kale salad to complement your ramen. Heck, how about just some nice herbs to liven up your frozen food? It’s entirely easy and possible to grow these fresh foods no matter how little space you have. Artist and gardener Samantha Lefort was living in a tiny Vancouver apartment when she decided she wanted fresh food 24/7, 365 days a year. “I didn’t have access to a balcony or a community garden … I wanted something that was fresh and as close to the soil as I could get it.” The importance of truly fresh herbs, vegetables and fruit can’t be understated. “As soon as you pick any fruit or vegetable from the stalk, it starts to lose a good portion of its nutrients.” Produce from the grocery store has to travel hundreds of miles before it can be purchased — by the time it is, a lot of nutrients are gone. “Eating food that as close to the ground as possible as soon as it is picked is healthier for you.” When getting started, Lefort recommends only starting with the food you actually want to eat.

thursday september 20 peacetreaty (dim mak) w./ nouveau & Hunter

—IMAGE COURTESY THE LANCE

“Use stuff that’s simple — herbs are the best thing to start with because you can use them a lot and you get used to interacting with them in your kitchen space or dorm space.” Herbs such as mint grow like weeds so they don’t need a lot of support to get going (they also allow you to make delicious and fresh mojitos). You can also purchase starter herbs that allow you to get a head start on growing instead growing right from the seed. The Internet is a treasure trove of gardening information — treehugger.com, letspatch. tumblr.com and victorygardensvancouver.tumblr.com all have great information on container gardening. Lefort was kind enough to give The Lance a primer on how to grow our own herbs and veggies quickly and easily in simple containers that can be made from found objects.

tuesday october 2 dragonette w./nouveau data romance young empires

Container gardening: A how to: This guide will help you build a self-watering water bottle container to grow herbs in. You need: • a bottle with a spout • soil • some rocks • a piece of cotton or water absorbent fabric (it needs to plug the hole of the spout) • seeds, or an herb starter Step 1) Cut the water bottle about ¼ from the bottom so that the planting area is larger than the water reservoir Step 2) Place your fabric through the spout and tie a knot in the side that will make up the planting area. This is so soil doesn’t breach through. Step 3) Put some drainage rocks in the bottle all around the fabric — this provides drainage and stops the soil for mixing with the water.

monday october 22 dada life w./ 12th planet caveat & nouveau

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8

September 5, 2012

Arts & Entertainment Canadian icon at Sun Peaks

Matthew Good and guests play a free show at the mountain Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor Canadian rock icon Matthew Good headlined a stripped down, acoustic day at Sun Peaks Resort with Victoria’s Vince Vaccaro, Qualicum Beach’s Wil and Vancouver’s Stef Lang. Headliner Matthew Good is one of the essentials in Canadian rock over the last 20 years. No longer the skinny lead singer of an angry quartet, the man has matured. While there is evidence in the albums, it’s more evident on stage. Totally comfortable in front of 3,000 people at the peak, he opened with the classic “Strange Days” and proceeded bouncing between his band’s material, his solo work and an at-ease backand-forth with the audience. With a stiff drink, Good shared a meandering series of thoughts between songs, at one point stopping for a smoke obtained from the crowd which resulted in him nearly being hit by a lighter thrown by an overly excited fan from 50 feet away. It was an interesting chance to see an artist sometimes known

as arrogant and pretentious being himself on stage, with an attitude that suggested he was playing a few songs for friends instead of an incredibly varied demographic sitting on the side of a ski hill. Vince Vaccaro started the day off completely alone, just himself and a six string guitar opening the festivities. In bright red plaid with a wilting mohawk he looked like a punk rocker on his day off. Vaccaro’s performance was more akin to a busker, playing with energy and force despite the lack of accompaniment. A spotty attendance early in the day didn’t slow Vaccaro, who stayed upbeat playing a selection of indie acoustic songs. His performance was aided by the fact many of his songs originate with an acoustic guitar. Wil took up the cause as a duo, with Wil Mimnaugh bringing drummer Kevin Haughton along. An experienced pair, Wil’s genre lands more in the folksy rock area, with a heavy, stomping, up-tempo rhythm and a guitar with occasional twang in its driving chords. With crazy strings hanging off the end of his guitar, and a great

beard, the performance injected energy into the growing crowd. Mimnaugh looked like a man enthusiastically passionate about playing the music and appreciative of the crowd’s attention. By the time Stef Lang, wearing extraordinary pants, had set up on stage with a laptop on a stool, there was an interesting mix of people before her, with day trippers, vacationing families, permanent residents and the financially well-off travellers expected at a resort. With a Nelly Furtado-esque style and songs themes ranging from bad break-ups to critiques on society’s ideal attractive woman, Lang seemed a pop rock pleaser, playing to a broad crowd. She relied on the laptop for rhythm and to fill out her sound. An outdoor stage at the base of the ski hill offered audience members the option of a free general admission area or a ticketed VIP section directly in front. With such a large free area for people to set up blankets and chairs right next to the centre of Sun Peaks, the day took on a festival feel with the first musician on stage at 1 p.m. and Good leaving around 7:45 p.m.

Ye Olde Canadian Music Corner

Taylor Rocca

Ω Copy/WebEditor

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor

Ever wonder what might occur if the musical musings of Iron Maiden, Daft Punk and Justice were to make sweet love and conceive an even more dynamic, powerful and fun group of performers? Wonder no more. Tupper Ware Remix Party (TWRP) was originally formed in Halifax, N.S., though now operate out of Toronto. With high-energy keys and guitars, TWRP wows audiences with bombastic, over-the-top theatrics and costumes tied together with an outerspace storyline. The story goes that TWRP was formed by a group of extra-terrestrials who crash-landed on Earth, eventually taking human forms in an effort to defeat boredom not only for their own good, but for the good of humankind.

Electronic party rock is the best way to describe the tunes of this outlandish group of enthusiastic and creative musicians. Their act has earned them enough notoriety to land opening gigs with bands such as Shout Out Out Out Out, Mother Mother, and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes. Apart from preparing for the release of a brand-new five-song EP, entitled The Device in mid-September, the band claims to have assisted with the landing of NASA’s Curiousity rover on Mars while also “incubating a legion of Neil Armstrong clones to expedite the human race’s exploration of outer space.” Check out the tracks “LazerHorse “and “Over 9000!!!” and you will be abducted by the electro-rock outrageousness that is TWRP.

Jon and Roy have been around Victoria for awhile and don’t really own a huge name in the mainstream. Despite this, odds are you’ve heard a song or two of theirs. The catchy little folk duo keeps it basic with an acoustic guitar and drums. Basic, yes — simple, not always. Some of Jon and Roy’s perfect little audio gems have popped up on commercials and TV shows across North America, including Scotiabank and Volkswagen advertisements. The key to their success seems to be the fact they thrive on making enjoyable music.

It’s not edgy or dangerous or groundbreaking. You can play it for your grandmother or four-year-old nephew. While normally that would hint at something bland with beige lyrics, that’s just not the case. Jon and Roy have found something pop groups in the 1950s and ‘60s had in some ways, and reinvented it to create a relaxed West Coast sound. To my ears, it’s catchy, relaxing and relatable, which is gold. With four albums out (and some solo work by Jon) there’s plenty to choose from, but the happiest little song ever is “Little Bit of Love.” You can’t not like it. Your ears won’t allow it.

Kergin and Rocca think they’re qualified to critique Canadian music because they have a radio show. Think you can do better? Contact Mike at editor@truomega.ca with a couple-hundred words on a lesser-known Canadian band and get in the Canadian Music Corner!

ABOVE: Matthew Good headlines the acoustic show at Sun Peaks Sept. 1. BELOW: Wil rocks out and gets the crowd going before Stef Lang (bottom) takes over.

—PHOTOS BY BRENDAN KERGIN


9

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 1

Arts & Entertainment Woody Allen at it again To Rome With Love is very Midnight in Paris Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor After the success of Midnight in Paris, it seems Woody Allen liked the idea of using a famous and historic European city as the setting for a film. In To Rome With Love the one central plot point for all the stories is the city. The film is four stories, at some points five, as one story splits in two for a while. There’s a clerk who becomes inexplicably famous, a newlywed couple who become separated on their honeymoon, a shower-singer who becomes an operatic-sensation and an architect with a romantic dilemma and what appears to be an semi-visible friend. While romance, cheating, sex and fame are themes touched on often by each story, there isn’t much that ties them together. The characters never interact with people from the other plots, they don’t all visit the same site and it’s not even clear how long each story is. One appears to take place over an afternoon or day, while others could be days or weeks, and another has to be months. While Allen has never found the constraints of logic particularly binding, it does leave the audience wondering at times. Of course, there are plenty of scenes, dialogue and cinematography to charm us, winning us over with quick wit, clever shots and twisty plots. It lacks the grandeur of a film, and the jumping back and forth between stories seems unnecessary since they aren’t linked in anyway. There isn’t a culminating scene where they all tie together, so why not put them one after another and not leave the audience waiting for that moment? Aside from that, it’s a Woody Allen film, full of great lines and

Belle Starr intrigues with selection of covers Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor

—IMAGE COURTESY PERDIDO PRODUCTIONS

put-downs, absurd moments and plot twists that leave reality behind. There’s also a great deal of referential humour for those welleducated in literature, art and the more high-class cultural interests, but while it’s fun to hear an Ezra Pound line slipped in, it seems the references are less homage to the originator and more often used as the set up to an insult. The characters come off pretty self-absorbed most of the time. The Italian actors introduced to North American audiences are

great and international star Roberto Benigni has the strongest single performance as the bewildered clerk. In general, the Italian language plots seem more relatable than the egotistical Americans, but that’s Allen’s style lately. In short, To Rome With Love is not Allen’s finest work. If you’ve seen Midnight in Paris and enjoyed the European scenery as a background/almost a character, To Rome With Love is a passable follow-up. If you haven’t seen Midnight in Paris, watch that first.

Three women take to the fiddles and vocals in the newly-formed Belle Starr. The trio takes its name from an Oklahoman outlaw, a rare female bandit in the Old West, however, the band is a Canadian creation. Each woman has taken her own respective path to the band; Kendel Carson grew up in Alberta and Victoria playing in symphonies and Celtic bands, Ottawa native Stephanie Cadman is not just a fiddler, but an experienced step dancer, while Miranda Mulholland of Guelph, Ont. also has Celtic music experience in addition to her time with the wellknown indie band Great Lake Swimmers. The EP is the women’s first release as Belle Starr and a step in a new direction. While all have some Celtic background, The Burning of Atlanta is firmly in the western genres. Covering songs by Dolly Parton and Fred Eaglesmith will do that. In fact, all the songs are covers. While the fiddles are prominent at points, the music is filled out with a number of other musicians. All the women provide vocals though, harmonizing well.

The EP starts off in a slightly strange place with a version of the Talking Heads “This Must Be The Place,” but it works, as much a testament to David Byrnes’ song-writing as Belle Starr’s re-inter pretation, replacing electronic sounds with f iddle and giving the post-punk song a fuller sound. From there the pieces are much closer to the originals, as they cover songs originally down as folk/country/roots. While “Summerlea” is a great sad cowboy song and “Jolene” is yet again done well, there isn’t much to differentiate Belle Starr from a variety of similar acts. While press releases and advertising media tout them as great f iddle players, the EP lacks this to a certain extent. With the songs’ standard str uctures, there isn’t much solo jamming, which would seem to be something they would want to play up. The vocal harmonies are great, but when nearly every photo features the band members holding a f iddles, you might expect a bit more. I wouldn’t spend money on a studio album, but it would be interesting to see Belle Starr play live where those f iddle skills might be on display.

Fashion looks locally:

Ideas for chic looks on a budget Dora Rodriguez Ω Contributor Start the new school year in style because summer isn’t completely over and bright colours are still in. Play them up. Kamloops has a great local selection of fashion, there’s no need to drive to Vancouver to find chic, trendy outfits. For the first week of school try a little vintage inspiration with a pair of flattering, bright-coloured, high-waisted shorts, combined with a white front-tie top. You can make your legs look miles long in amazing black wedge ankle boots, both trendy and comfortable. Take advantage of the last summer days with a Cleopatra inspired golden necklace, zirconia studs and black and snake skin cuffs. This look works for school because it’s a classy, laid-back and playful look. Pair the outfit with a messy undone hairstyle and minimal makeup. Everything pictured is student priced too, just under $70 at the Stitches in nearby Aberdeen Mall.

—IMAGE COURTESY GUN STREET MEDIA

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10

September 5, 2012

Sports

WolfPack golf preview: 2012

New recruits and a ladies program have team looking to make big strides Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

The TRU WolfPack golf team has undergone drastic roster changes heading into the 2012 season including the addition of Natasha MacKenzie, the first female golfer in the program’s history. A native of Kamloops, MacKenzie will blaze the trail for the ladies program four years after the addition of the golf team to TRU’s athletic portfolio. “[Being on the team] is awesome, it’s nice to get it started,” said MacKenzie, whose aspirations of playing for TRU started back in 2011. “At the beginning there was a little bit more pressure. Having a girl on the team I kind of had to prove myself, but now it’s cool and we all get along.” MacKenzie has been golfing for three years and was turned on to the sport at the urging of her husband. She already boasts a career best round of even par, but is still modest and open about areas where she needs to improve. “Long irons,” said MacKenzie, laughing, “and my mental game. It’s tough, when you’re down a couple strokes, it’s hard to have the mindset to get it back.” MacKenzie is the only athlete to commit to the ladies side of the program, though it is an area that has plenty of room for growth. In the team golf setup, the WolfPack could have up to three ladies competing, with only two scores counting to the overall team score. Should the demand be there, the program has space to carry up to five athletes. The development of the ladies program is something that has come on suddenly, but it’s a development that

head coach Bill Bilton Jr. is pleased to see. “My commitment to the university was that if, or when, a [ladies] team would come up I would take it on as well. It makes sense that the kids practice here at The Dunes, I’m coaching them, might as well do that at the same time,” said Bilton, who is also the vice-president of operations at The Dunes at Kamloops.

WolfPack golfer Natasha MacKenzie (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

“The girls team kind of just evolved at the last minute. Natasha came to me just a month ago. So we look to build on that going forward.” While the introduction of the ladies program is a huge step for the university and its athletics program, it will come with its fair share of challenges. The golf team receives support from the university, but little to no funding, which means players are required to fundraise for their seasons. It’s certainly the largest challenge facing both the men’s and women’s team this season. “They have to bring the community

together in order to make the program work, to the tune of $20,000-$30,000 per year. So it’s a big financial obligation,” Bilton said. “But as far as the cohesiveness of the team it’s all good. There’s a good chemistry there.” The golf team has undergone drastic changes this season, with only two players returning to the roster. Chase Broadfoot and Tim Birk are the team’s sole veterans and will be counted on to lead a squad full of youngsters. That said, age doesn’t necessarily mean much in the world of competitive sports and coach Bilton has liked what he’s seen from some of the new recruits. Bilton singled out Nic Corno, shooting consistently in the low seventies, as the newcomer who has impressed most in the young season. “I like to hear it. It just shows that the practice we’ve been putting in has really helped my game,” Corno said. “I just want to do well as an individual and try and help our team finish in the top three so we can make nationals.” The Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) National Championship will take place in Oshawa this season and it’s clear that the WolfPack is intent on being one of the teams to make it there. It would be a return to form for the team, who won the championship in 2009. “Obviously the focus, you can’t lose your focus, is on winning a provincial championship,” Bilton said. “Then from there, hopefully we can earn a spot [at nationals] and head that way.” Regardless of how the team finishes this season, it’s clear that the program is heading in the right direction. The WolfPack has enjoyed a fair amount of success in its early existence. The addition of the women’s program and its ability to attract

She may have only been golfing for three years, but Natasha MacKenzie has already shot even-par and joins WolfPack golf as its first female member.

—PHOTO COURTESY TRU ATHLETICS standout first year athletes like Nic whirlwind, but it hasn’t dampened Corno demonstrates the strength of her enthusiasm. its recruitment efforts. Access to a “I’m just excited to get started,” facility like The Dunes at Kamloops MacKenzie said. “I’ve never played and a solid coaching staff should against any other universities, this is bring the team success for years to all new to me, but it’s going to be a come. really good experience.” For Natasha, just being a part of The WolfPack will host the seathe team is a victory of sorts. It’s clear son’s opening tournament Sept. 8-9 that the last few weeks have been a at The Dunes at Kamloops.

SFU conditionally approved for NCAA as first non-American school David Dyck

The Peak (SFU) BURNABY (CUP) — The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has conditionally approved Simon Fraser University (SFU) for membership. This will make SFU the first Canadian school to be accepted in the century-old organization. While SFU has been a member for the past three years, the decision was made recently to grant an exception to SFU’s lack of U.S. accreditation in order to compete in the post-season. This gives SFU the chance to win an NCAA national — now international — championship. “It’s the culmination of a total campus commitment from President Petter to Tim Rahilly to everyone you can think of, to become the first international school to join the NCAA,” SFU’s athletic director, Milt Richards, told The Peak. “It’s a tribute to Simon Fraser; if we weren’t such a great university academically, this wouldn’t happen. “To make a long story short, the president’s council [the policy makers for Division Two] had a meeting,” Richards explained.

“They discussed it and basically said, ‘Here’s what we’re going to do for Simon Fraser: as long as you’re a candidate for accreditation,’ which we are, ‘as long as you’re accredited by your country’s accreditation, we’ll waive the bylaw that says you have to be accredited by a U.S. accreditation.’ ” While Canada has no accreditation agencies similar to those in the U.S., SFU’s membership in the Association of Colleges and Universities of Canada (AUCC) has served as an acceptable replacement. The AUCC is a lobby group that represents over 90 universities nationally. Meanwhile, SFU is currently still in the process of gaining U.S. accreditation with the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU). It is projected that SFU will not earn full accreditation until 2017. Richards made it clear that despite being in the NCAA, SFU teams will still compete against their Canadian rivals. “We would not have enough games and contests and matches if we only played U.S. schools, and we are a Canadian institution, and we’re proud of being in Canada,” said Richards.

Richards explained that the process for joining NCAA’s Division Two — the only division that has voted to allow international institutions to join — takes three years. In the first two years, the candidate institution is ineligible for championships. He stated that last year’s men’s soccer, women’s basketball, track and field athletes, swimming, and wrestling all would have had good chances to be in the NCAA nationals, but were ineligible. “Softball would have made it the way they finished the season,” said Richards. “When you have a really competitive program and you tell a student athlete that they can’t compete in championships? You hate to talk about negative recruiting, but you know other people talked about that; well that’s now been removed. That’s a big deal.” “I’m ecstatic for the whole department, we definitely have some very strong teams,” said volleyball head coach Lisa Sulatycki. “You look at the men’s soccer team last year, who didn’t get their chance, and now they’re going to have their chance to do that.”


11

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 1

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Across 1. Like some columns 5. Strike 9. Cheerless 13. Paella pot 14. Maintain 15. Not fine 16. Acquisition method 19. Ones at the helm 20. “You don’t say!” 21. “___ time” 22. Old Icelandic literary work 23. Snubbing 31. West Indian folk magic 32. Catch 33. Farm call 34. Fabric 35. Acadia National Park locale 37. Bakery buy 38. Extreme suffix 39. Foofaraw 40. Ism 41. Eluding an officer 45. Feeder filler 46. Legal org. 47. Catalog 50. Eccentric 55. Kamikaze run? 57. X-Men villain, and namesakes 58. Place 59. Big name in pineapples

60. Eyelid woe 61. Leavings 62. Abreast of

36. Passage 37. Lookout point 39. Aggravation 40. Harsh Athenian lawgiver 42. King Mark’s bride 43. January’s birthstone 44. Old calculator 47. Does something 48. Dirty coat 49. Cut down 50. Coconut fiber 51. African antelope 52. Play thing 53. Capital near the 60th parallel 54. Adult-in-waiting? 56. U.N. workers’ grp.

Down 1. Cries at fireworks 2. Map 3. Further 4. Watch feature, perhaps 5. Fourth letter of Hebrew alphabet 6. Exceedingly 7. “___ go!” 8. Bygone polit. cause 9. Tree type 10. **** review 11. Sheltered 12. Maryland stadium 15. Gregor Johann ___ 17. Dander 18. Certain federal tax 22. Distinctive flair 23. Show fear 24. Having a lot to lose? 25. Boxing blows 26. Not dis 27. Kind of jack 28. Candidate’s concern 29. Standards 30. Reached 35. Unaccompanied compositions

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LAST MONTH’S ANSWERS

sudokueasy

3 7 8

2 3 8 6

MYLES MELLOR AND SALLY YORK

4

crossword

6

“Aggressive Acts”

Notice anything wrong with The Omega? Bring it to our attention and win a prize. We may have done it on purpose just to keep you on your toes...or you might just be helping us get better. Either way... you win!


12

September 5, 2012

Handbook Give Away OUTSIDE OLD MAIN SEPT 5th 11AM - 3PM

2012 Back-toSchool BBQ CAMPUS COMMONS SEPT 7th 11AM - 3PM

CAMPUS COMMONS SATURDAY SEPT 8th 1PM - 5PM

FREE CONCERT Clubs Day

NIGHTS CAMPUS COMMONS FREE POPCORN 7:30PM SEPT 19TH

OUTSIDE OF OLD MAIN SEPT 18th 11AM - 3PM FREE ICE-CREAM!

Big Thank-you to our generous community Sponsors!

Don’t miss out! Follow us on twitter @trusu15 and join us on facebook.com/trustudentsunion

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment

September 5, 2012  

The September 5, 2012 edition of The Omega

September 5, 2012  

The September 5, 2012 edition of The Omega

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