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VOLUME 22 ISSUE 5

OCTOBER 3, 2012

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Dean of law contrasts styles of justice 4

Kamloops examined over time at KAG

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WolfPack soccer at Hillside Stadium 10

TRU ties to Tahrir Square

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TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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October 3, 2012

Feature

Results of a revolution

TRU Athlete describes fighting a revolution and the struggles that remain in Egypt Samantha Garvey Ω Roving Editor

city filled with protesters, signs, slogans and demands. At the top of the list was the resignation of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak. Mubarak took presidency in 1981 when President Anwar Sadat, sitting right next to him, was assassinated during a Cairo parade. When Mubarak moved from vice president to the top job, he declared a state-of-emergency, which allowed authorities to search, question and detain people without cause and it remained in place for the length of his rule. “He stole our rights for 30 years,” Rehim said. It was three days later, on Jan. 28, 2011, then called Day of Rage and now referred to as the Day of Revolution, that the streets of Cairo and other cities around the nation, filled with protesters, in every direction all headed to Tahrir Square, all with a purpose, a mission and without any intention of failure or doubt. “I thought, ‘I’m going to move with them,’” Rehim said. “It was the first time for me to take action.” On that morning, Rehim heard commotion outside his home and he went to join the masses. The sight was hard to comprehend.

Tahrir Square everyone is welcome. We are making the change right now,” Rehim said. But he never made it to the square on that first voyage. Tear bombs deployed by Egyptian police took over his lungs, forcing him and many other protesters to return home. But he was lucky. He wasn’t shot with a rubber bullet -- or a real one. Eighteen days after the initial conflict in the streets, Hosni Mubarak resigned. The announcement made by newly appointed Vice-President Omar Suleiman caused an eruption of celebration in Tahrir Square, once again completely packed. The celebration lasted all night.

Mohamed Abdel Rehim is a 6’8” WolfPack volleyball player, a Muslim student from Egypt and has experienced a national revolution first-hand. He has stood with five fellow TRU squad members opposing another Canadian university volleyball team and with one million fellow citizens opposing corrupt leader of 30 years. He is working towards his bachelor of science and shares with millions TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year of 2011: The Protester. He comes from halfway around the world, a country of rich history and rough political transition. Tensions maintained Rehim arrived at TRU in September 2011, choosing the school over scholarOn Feb. 1, 2011, ten days before ship opportunities in California and Mubarak’s resignation, the army reCalgary. He said head coach Pat Henleased a statement that they would not nelly was quick to recruit him and has fire on peaceful protests. been supportive all along. Volleyball Rehim said it is because the military has always been a skill. Even his older chose the people over the president that brother plays professionally in homeEgypt did not match the timeframe, viotown Cairo. lence or death tolls of Libya or Syria. Transitioning to Canada has had its A report released by the Arab Netgood and bad aspects, Kamloops fallwork for Human Rights, estimated 841 ing short of the liveliness to be found in people in total had been killed during Egypt’s capital city. the revolution, not includ“[Kamloops] is ing 26 Egyptian police the place I want to force members. go to escape the Hosni Mubarak faced 30 million people trial for failing to halt the outside my door in killing of protesters. On Cairo,” Rehim said, June 2, 2012, he avoided but added that the pictures of campus —Mohamed Abdel Rehim the death penalty. Now an 84-year-old inmate with online didn’t show failing health, he is servany snow or ice. “I’ve seen the most number of people ing life in prison. Minister of the interior Now beginning his second year of Habib Adli also received a life sentence study and second season with TRU I’ve ever seen in my life.” In all likelihood, it was more people but Mubarak’s two sons and six other Athletics, Rehim has three on-campus classes, one co-op course, one online- than anyone will ever see in their life- officials were acquitted. “Change doesn’t happen overnight,” learning course, a part-time job, one or time. Rehim was still a two to three hour Rehim said. After power was handed two practices every day and two games nearly every weekend from October to walk away from his destination, but as over to the Armed Forces, unrest and the streets began to converge the people dissatisfaction infected the country. February. Riots, protests and demonstrations con“If you saw my schedule, you would were packed tighter. “These people, it’s Egypt going out tinued in several cities. At its height, cry,” he said. the violence took the lives of nearly 80 from their buildings,” he said. The number of protesters in Cairo’s people at a soccer game in Port Said on A revolution first-hand Tahrir Square numbered more than a Feb. 1, 2012. “What’s going to happen eventualMobilizing a nation and uniting all million people, according to Al Jazeera. No matter where the people came ly… maybe five [years], the whole Midcitizens in a country of nearly 90 million people happened in large part because from, what they did for work, their age, dle East will be belong to the people,” gender, religion or status, Egyptians Rehim said. “I’m optimistic about this, of social networking. Only a year and a half ago, it was achieved equality that day. In that as- but it needs time.” Hisham Qasim, a newspaper publishthrough Facebook and Twitter that the pect, one demand was already achieved first protest was orchestrated. On Jan. against an oppressive regime that the er and prominent human rights activist 25, 2011, formerly an annual holiday people no longer recognized as legiti- in Egypt, agreed. “Starting five years [from now], when commemorating the police force in mate. “That’s where I felt at this point in you’ve began to build the instruments of Egypt, Tahrir Square in the centre of the good government, democracy and proper judiciary parliament, establish civilian rule, the military will have to give up their privilege,” he said in an interview with Al Jazeera. On June 16 and 17, 2012, Egypt held its first legitimate democratic election and with 51.73 per cent of the popular vote, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood became the country’s leader. The brotherhood’s most frequently used slogan, according to BBC, “Islam is the solution,” is cause for concern among non-Muslims in the country (although Morsi has announced the official slogan has been developed into “Renaissance Project” for practical purposes). Archbishop Anba Pachomius, acting Patriarch of the Coptic Orthodox Church, has criticized the new president

“It was the first time for me to take action.”

—PHOTOS VIA FLICKR COMMON LICENSE for expanding the number of portfolios in government while keeping Christian representation low, according to local newspaper Al-Shorouk. From the brotherhood’s perspective, it’s a story of perseverance and patience leading to ultimate success. The Ikhwan (the Arabic translation of Muslim Brotherhood) was established in 1928 and has long reported support from the people. It was banned from running in elections in 1954 after being blamed for an assassination attempt on then Prime Minister Gamal ‘Abd al-Nasser. Mubarak allowed candidates from the party again in the 1980s, but scattered throughout elections of the next three decades were boycotts from the party in protest. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, Mubarak thwarted the political efforts of the Ikhwan with arrests of the candidates and restricted voting in areas of strong support. In 2011, the ministry of the interior issued a statement blaming the Ikhwan for encouraging the beginnings of the revolution. Many see today’s situation in Egypt as Morsi against the Armed Forces. According to Al Jazeera, Morsi sacked seven top members of the military and rearranged the constitution to give himself much of the legislative and executive power that once belonged to the military. Rehim pointed out that the media in Egypt has been no friend to Morsi. Between the state-owned media and the private outlets, many formed postMubarak, much coverage has been accused of being in favour of the military over Morsi, according to Al Jazeera. “[Some] people think, ‘He’s going to make women wear the veil, he’s going to stop alcohol, he’s going to make no beaches, no swimming,’” Rehim said, adding none of those things have come to be. “The thing is, [the same people] they are in control of our media still.”

Innocence of Muslims Threatening the development of peace and equality in Egypt is the video Innocence of Muslims, not only depicting the Prophet Muhammad, which is against Islamic principles, but also showing him as a fraud and a womanizer. Egypt has issued warrants for eight people reportedly responsible for the film, seven Egyptian-American Coptic Christians and Florida pastor Terry Jones. Coptic Christianity in Egypt comprises 10 per cent of the population, the largest religious minority. Clashes and violence have been reported between this group and Muslims in Egypt for years, well before the revolution. Last month, reports circulated about nine Christian families leaving their homes in the Sinai Peninsula after receiving death threats, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP) news agency, but different accounts varied of whether families left voluntarily or left at all. Egypt has reported more than 200 injuries through this most recent wave of riots, where the United States Embassy walls were scaled and the American flag was torn down. Rehim condemned the violence. “I, myself, and probably my family are opposing the idea of attacking or protesting in front of the American Embassy or trying to break into it or burn it.” Coptic Christians in the United States and Egypt, as well as Muslims, have all publicly condemned the Innocence of Muslims video as well as the resulting violence. “The Egyptian people, both Muslims and Christians, refuse such insults on sanctities,” was Morsi’s public statement. “I don’t care if you’re Shia (Muslim), Sunni (Muslim), Christian, Jewish, Atheist— we are all equal,” Rehim said. Much like in the first moments he entered Tahrir Square, Jan. 28, 2011, with no importance on background, religion, job or status, “… we are all equal.”

ON THE COVER: Many celebrate the downfall of the Mubarak regime. This man perches precariously atop a statue, flag in hand, expressing his joy. FLICKR COMMON LICENSE PHOTO


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 5

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

October 3, 2012

Volume 22, Issue 5

Published since November 27, 1991

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Editorial/Opinions

Why is being ICBC is “the worst” decent …but maybe because we can’t compare it to anything? worthy of Now picture the government (the Now add to that picture the idea adulation? that McDonalds itself is the com- owners of McDonalds in this hypo-

NEWS EDITOR

Devan C. Tasa

news@truomega.ca @DCTasa ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Brendan Kergin

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Samantha Garvey

Editor’s Note

COPY/WEB EDITOR

Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief

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Taylor Rocca

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omegacontributors Natalie Serafini, Micki Cowan, Luke Henderson, Mark Hendricks, Catherine Fortin, Courney Dickson, Rachel Phan, Kassandra Mitchell, Matthew Pflugfelder, Arpad Hovath, Michelle Ferguson, Justin Bell

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An article published Sept. 26 in the Vancouver Sun proclaimed that the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) — the Crown corporation that provides auto insurance and vehicle operation licensing — “has been ranked the worst automotive insurer in the country - by its own customers.” Is this seriously a surprise? Picture, if you will, this hypothetical situation: you like McDonalds more than you like Wendy’s, A&W, Subway and all the other fast-food joints available as options. You prefer the products and prices at the iconic golden-arched establishment to those of its competitors. Now picture a world in which Wendy’s, A&W, Subway and all other competitors didn’t exist. Would you still like McDonalds? Of course you wouldn’t. You’d say “that’s cheap, crappy food and terrible service,” because you have nothing to compare it to that would make it look good.

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thetical situation) making it illegal for you to eat food unless you periodically bought some food from McDonalds. (It is illegal to operate a motor vehicle in B.C. unless you purchase insurance for that vehicle and ICBC is the only provider.) Now picture that the company in question is also supposed to be using its revenue to serve the public good (as Crown corporations are designed to do) but instead spends its revenue on huge severance and compensation packages. Art Kirkner, who was hired in 2008 to cut costs at ICBC, was compensated $88,500 for the loss on the sale of his home in the United States; $18,780 for real estate commission; more than $13,000 for moving and storage; more than $10,000 for temporary accommodations, plus other expenses in 2010, according to documents obtained by CBC. A total of $188,681 were filed as “expenses” compensated to Kirkner in 2010 on top of his salary and bonuses of over $315,000. He “left” the corporation soon afterward and was given 12 months severance. Would you maybe not be a huge fan of McDonalds if all these hypotheticals came true? If you were the company in question, would you wonder why people’s opinion of you was so low? I completely understand. Personally, I want the option for my dinner to be a chicken sandwich from Wendy’s, a poutine from A&W and a box of Timbits for dessert. editor@truomega.ca

Despite all of the complications and unexpected speed bumps along the road towards an education, students have an awful lot to be thankful for. I know I take those things for granted far too often. That’s why around this time of year I try to make time within my frantic and hectic schedule to stop and think, if only for a moment. I think about all that I have, from my friends to my family to my professors and the opportunity to gain an education. It can be really easy to allow assignments and projects to consume and frustrate you while you fail to acknowledge everything in your life that is on the upswing. Why is it important to do this? Because you never know when any of this could be snatched from our grasps, either temporarily or permanently. Life is truly short and good things don’t always last so it is important to appreciate them while they’re within our reach. Speaking of being thankful, how grateful am I for the conversations that exist within my life? Let me tell you... How important is it to have good conversation? The simplicity of this concept is perhaps lost on some. I’m not necessarily talking about a contentious political debate — though that could apply. I’m not necessarily talking about a riveting discussion about history and how it has impacted our world — though that could apply. I’m not necessarily talking about passion-

ate banter between two fans of rival sports teams, though…. I’m talking about simply sitting and having a conversation about nothing in particular with someone who holds a place of importance in your life. I like to think that I’ve always valued good conversation in my life, but I have reached the conclusion that I have just recently discovered how amazing good conversation is and how it can contribute to my well-being. As students, I think it is more important now than ever before that we come to this realization. While you may not spend as much time with your classmates or university friends as you have with your high school pals from back home, these are times in your life that will stick with you forever. The people you study with could very well end up being people you work with when you move on from this institution and establish yourself in what your life will become. For many reasons, having these good conversations is an important thing at this stage of any student’s life. Whether you build the connections that will foster future professional networks or whether you build relationships that will result in a lifetime of friendship or something more, this is a critical time to establish longstanding strong connections. Make sure you don’t take those conversations, relationships or friends for granted because they can disappear just as quickly as you discovered them. copy@truomega.ca

Appreciation simplified

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pany that causes this lack of options for you. Would you maybe like it a bit less? Perhaps that level of dislike for its products and services becomes a situation of resentment, annoyance or anger? Might you perhaps be less impressed with the constant cost-increases that would surely arise at Ronald’s eatery if it didn’t have to keep its prices down due to similar products being offered just down the street at competitive prices — especially if that company itself was causing such a monopoly to occur? In an article from the free-market proponents, The Fraser Institute, the lack of competition with ICBC causes numerous problems, from the management structure of the organization itself right down to the products and services — and the cost of those products and services — that the consumer receives. “Unlike private companies in competitive markets, government protected monopolies are not required to constantly innovate, compete for consumers, ensure efficient and effective staffing levels and pay, offer competitive prices and/or high quality services including more options,” according to the article released Sept. 18, 2012 by Mark Milke and Niels Veldhuis. So in this hypothetical situation where McDonalds is the only fastfood option, it has been increasing the cost of its products (but not the quality of those products) and it doesn’t let any competitors enter the market to provide any comparison for the consumer.

TRUe Thoughts Taylor Rocca Ω Copy/Web Editor October is typically a month where students become consumed by stress, assignments, papers, mid-term exams and presentations. I know all too well about this because as I write this I find myself running on a mere three hours of sleep with a stack of work so high I can’t even see the top. While it might seem like a difficult thing to put all of the commitments and deadlines aside, I hope that students remember to take a breather this coming weekend. After all, this weekend is a time to give thanks for all that we have. I’m not intending to be preachy here, but let’s be real — each and every student on this campus has something to be thankful for — whether that happens to be the privilege to attend classes or the good fortune of having friends who are there to carry them through the storm.

Natalie Serafini

The Other Press (Douglas College) NEW WESTMINISTER (CUP) — I like to be appreciated. Whether for doing well or doing good, it’s always nice to be acknowledged. Yet although I’m a firm believer in showing gratitude for acts of kindness, there is a difference between gratitude and adulation. There comes a point where my eyes cannot stop themselves from rolling. That point was crossed in the aftermath of an eight-yearold girl returning $4,000 to its rightful owner. I know what you’re thinking: “It’s a little girl! Let her have her praise! It was very nice of her to return the money!” The applause Abbie Jacobson of Maine received on her first day of school was adorable. Perhaps the front-page article detailing Abbie’s good will and deep moral character was a bit over the top. The sold-out Justin Bieber concert tickets that were given to her by the Bank of Maine were definitely excessive. First off, the money wasn’t hers, so she returned it to the rightful owner. This is not a novel concept. Why should people be rewarded for doing the decent thing? Granted, if I lost $4,000 and it was returned to me, I would learn to be more careful with my possessions — I might not be so lucky next time. Not everyone returns money that isn’t theirs, but it’s not so special that she did. There’s no moral dilemma here: you either do the honest thing, or you don’t. She did the honest thing. Let’s move on with our lives. Not to say that kids are stupid, but they don’t necessarily think to do something wrong. It may not even occur to them to keep something that isn’t theirs. This isn’t the sign of an ethical spine of steel. If someone refrains from doing me wrong because they’re oblivious to other options, I don’t think of them as the most moral peas in the pod. Besides, she’s an eight-year-old kid: what’s she going to do with $4,000? Now, a little side note on the Bank of Maine, which generously donated Justin Bieber tickets to Abbie and her family. John Everets, Chairman of the Board and CEO of the bank, after reading of Abbie’s Bieber-love in the Portland Press Herald, reportedly said that this was “a chance to do something nice for a beautiful little girl.” More like it was a chance to get some much-needed good press. I’d be more impressed by Everets if he were focused on improving the lives of those he serves, namely his banking customers. It’s interesting that the Bank of Maine has chosen to do something nice for a little girl following a stint of bad press. They’ve been in trouble for “unsafe and unsound banking practices,” and faced criticism from Occupy Maine protesters on their foreclosing of people’s homes. Suddenly, their name is in the news for a reason other than unsafe banking practices — they’ve diverted attention to a superficial act of supposed kindness, and now everyone loves the Bank of Maine. Trust me, I appreciate what Abbie Jacobson did, and I think it’s wonderful if she’s encouraged to be a good person. What I hate is this mind set whereby doing something decent gets you a massive, disproportionate reward. Abbie Jacobson’s story, while sweet, distracts from the truly relevant matters. Too often we ignore those bigger issues in society, preferring to focus on superficial stories. I’d rather ignore the little acts of decency that should be expected and focus on the important issues.


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October 3, 2012

News New B.C. advanced education minister to focus on trades, not tuition Micki Cowan

CUP B.C. Bureau Chief VANCOUVER (CUP) – B.C. has a new captain at the helm of the Ministry of Advanced Education. John Yap, who is also the minister for multiculturalism, took over the advanced education portfolio in early September as part of a major cabinet shuff le by Premier Christy Clark. He replaced Naomi Yamamoto, who had held the position since March 2011. In an interview with the Canadian University Press, Yap made it clear that he is intent on ensuring more trades training is available at post-secondary institutions. “If I were to sum up the focus in the short-term, it is to ensure we have the facilities and programs to do trades training.” This aligns with the Liberal government’s promise to prioritize job creation. Yap said there should be about a million job openings in B.C. in the next ten years, with 43 per cent of these requiring some trades training. Beefing up trades training programs and facilities now will help to train the workforce for those job openings.

“It’s important we offer British Columbians the opportunity to fill those positions and encourage those that are in school and thinking about career options that they consider, if it’s right for them, a career that is well paying and rewarding, in the trades.” His plans are already underway. This week he announced $29.2 million will go towards two new trades buildings at Camosun College. One building will focus on marine and metal trades, while the other will be for mechanical trades. The portfolio he is taking over saw $70 million in cuts over three years in the last budget and was the only major sector to see an overall funding reduction. Yamamoto, his predecessor, also came under attack earlier this year for a confidential email from a reporter that leaked from her ministry to a Liberal donor. Yap, however, said that he has confidence in B.C.’s higher education system. “I am myself a product of a university here in B.C. I [got] a degree in science and then a Masters in business administration, which helped me appreciate the immense value of a post-secondary education because it prepared me for work life.”

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When asked about the province’s increasing dependency on tuition to fund post-secondary institutions, he said now is not the time to reduce dependency considering the economy. B.C. is the province increasing its dependency on tuition at the fastest rate in Canada. And as for other tenants of affordability — in trades or otherwise — Yap thinks the current system is affordable enough, so long as the tuition cap of 2 per cent remains in place. “We’re confident that with the caps on tuition fee increases and the supports that are provided by student aid programs, whether it’s bursaries or grants or student loans or scholarships — we’re making our system of colleges and universities accessible for British Columbians.” Despite criticisms about the increasing cost of higher education in B.C., Yap defended the province’s schools, that two of his children went through. “Millions of dollars have been put into supporting our colleges and universities to prepare our students,” he said. “It’s a great college and university system and I’m looking forward to working with the many people who make it work so well.”

Norris Berg Music Director

Christmas Frolics

7 pm Sat. Dec. 8 & 2 pm Sun. Dec. 9, 2012



Western Tribute 7 pm Sat. March 2, 2013



Movies ‘n More! 7 pm Sat. May 4, 2013

Calvary Community Church 1205 Rogers Way Admission: Adults $10, Children $5, Family $25

Do you play an orchestra instrument? TVCO is currently looking for new players, especially strings. We rehearse Mondays from 7–9 pm. Contact tvco_notes@shaw.ca for more information.

New Student Senator Welcomed

New Research Centre Proposed

Controversial former student senator Adrian Miller’s senate seat has been filled by another person. Chrystie Stewart, a law student and former vice president of the TRU Society of Law Students, will be occupying the seat until the term ends in December. Before the senate meeting Sept. 24, the seat was listed as vacant on TRU’s website. Stewart was among the seven students that ran in an online election held between Dec. 8 and Dec. 22, 2011 for the four student senator positions and received the fifthhighest number of votes. Of the people who received seats, Miller got 160 votes, Dylan Robinson had 67, Jordan Del Giudice received 46 and Chris Albinati brought in 45. Stewart received 42 votes. Before being elected to the senate and the board of governors, Miller filed a lawsuit claiming TRU failed to reasonably accommodate his disability and medical problems, the nature of which was left unspecified. That lawsuit is still unresolved. He was sworn in as a member of the senate, but was unable to be sworn in as a member of the board of governors due to being in jail at the time for a charge of violating a probation order stemming from a mischief conviction.

TRU is one step closer to establishing a new research centre that will look at making better real-world decisions through mathematical models. Senate voted to support a proposal to establish a Centre for Optimization and Decision Science at its Sept. 24 meeting. In TRU nomenclature, a research centre isn’t necessary a physical place, but a formally structured organization of researchers. Examples of problems the centre would tackle by producing mathematical models include the design of efficient work facilities, the optimization of process to achieve a minimum cost, balancing conf licting interests and using limited resources effectively. The centre would build on research strengths TRU already has, wrote Rick Brewster, the chair of mathematics and statistics, in a memo. “We have researchers with experience solving real-world problems from industry and government,” he wrote. “In creating the centre we can leverage this capacity in more opportunities for our faculty, our students and the surrounding communities.” The board of governors must approve the creation of the centre before it gets off the ground.

But where has the compromise gone? Dean of law examines differences between European and Aboriginal Peoples’ justice

Axworthy also mentioned a letter given to Prime Minister Ω News Editor Wilfred Laurier in 1910 when he visited the chiefs of the local Western society finds it hard Secwepemc, Nlakapamux and to compromise because of its hisOkanagan nations. tory — and it’s getting worse, The letter described how setTRU’s founding dean of law tlers took ownership of their Chris Axworthy told a public lands away and pushed them into seminar. poor, unproductive lands. According to Axworthy, when Despite this, the letter asked people compromise to find a sothe government to compromise lution, everybody is better off. with the nations and work to es“To me, it’s a process and an tablish treaties. outcome,” he said. “I don’t see As of today, compromise as the there are still none. lowest common deDespite our atnominator, I see it tempts to escape as the product of our euro-centralworking hard to get ism, it still grips to a solution which us today with part could be beneficial of that being an to everyone.” unwillingness to Yet, there seems compromise. to be less comprowas mise today. In the —Chris Axworthy a Axworthy Saskatchewan United States, ReNew Democrat publicans that promIn European culture, a crimi- member of parliament from 1988 ise not to work with Democrats win their primary elections. In nal is sent to an adversarial court to 1999. He was also a cabinet Canada, the conservative govern- where a judge is supposed to de- minister in the Saskatchewan ment uses omnibus bills to mini- termine the truth after hearing provincial government from 1999 arguments from both side, while to 2003. mize legislation. He then ran twice unsuccess“The reason I’m puzzled by this in some Aboriginal cultures, a is it seems to me that we all com- sentencing circle is used where fully for the federal Liberals promise: with ourselves, with our the criminal faces the victims before becoming the dean of the families and friends every single and community he or she harmed. University of Manitoba’s law At one sentencing circle Ax- school in 2008. day of our lives,” Axworthy said. Axworthy spoke on Sept. 27 in “Yet somehow, when we reach out worthy attended in Regina, it was beyond that fairly close network, found the perpetrator was acting the environmental sciences dewe lose all sense of what makes out and stealing credit card num- partment’s seminar series, which sense and we don’t compromise as bers because he didn’t like his is held every Thursday at 3:30 p.m. in room S203 in the science mother’s boyfriend. much as we used to.” “If he had gone to the judge, building during fall semester. For most of the speech, AxworThe next seminar features Dathy compared European approach- been given probation, that would es to the approaches of Aboriginal have never arisen,” he said. “No- vid Green, a biology professor at Peoples. The subject of crime was body would have known why he Simon Fraser University, in S203 on Oct. 11. was acting out in that way.” one example he used.

Devan C. Tasa

2012-2012 Season

News Briefs

“You know, the euro-centric response to crime is to punish, to be driven by revenge,” he said. “That’s what we do — we take a criminal and punish them.” But in general, Aboriginal Peoples take a different approach. “For the most part, what Aboriginal people do is they attempt to restore the victim, the community and the perpetrator,” Axworthy said. “They attempt to make things better after this breakdown in social behaviour.”

“...the euro-centric response to crime is to punish, to be driven by revenge.”


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 5

News

International Intonations

Particles collided, results undecided Luke Henderson Ω Contributor

O’Neil said. The LHC was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and went fully operational in 2008. O’Neil told the audience Canada has contributed $70 million to the project so far. The LHC also has a website where a live feed of the experiments in the LHC can be watched at http://lhc.web.cern.ch/lhc/ The talk was the first of a science seminar series being held on Thursdays at 12:30 in room S273 of the science building. The next seminar will feature Peter Mahaffy, a chemistry professor from King’s University College on Oct. 4.

Riots in China, Google in trouble and controlling brains with lazers? Sony and Microsoft.

Mark Hendricks

Ω Contributor A new particle has been discovered that could be the elusive Higgs boson scientists have been Foxconn Riot in China in search of for around 50 years, a Simon Fraser University physiChinese-based electronics cist told TRU students. manufacturing giant Foxconn, Dugan O’Neil, who worked which sprang into infamy after at the Large Hadron Collider a series of suicides among work(LHC) where the particle was ers in 2010, is again facing ladiscovered, was the speaker at bour problems after a riot broke a seminar hosted by TRU’s sciout Sept. 23. ence department Sept. 27. The current particle physics model states all things are made of particles, but doesn’t explain why they have mass. One theory is particles gain mass by interacting with a theoretical particle called a Higgs boson. The newly discovered The riots began when workparticle could be that theers from Henan province beoretical particle. gan fighting with workers from “We haven’t proved Shandong province. [it’s] the Higgs boson yet, Guards then moved in to stop but it’s not just a really the fighting and severely injured cool new particle,” O’Neil one of the workers from Shansaid. dong, causing other workers to The particle was discovfight back. ered during an experiment As China moves further along in the LHC, a 27-km long the path of human rights, riots super structure buried 100 like these seem bound to hapmeters beneath the Swiss– pen. French border. “It’s a mess,” Wang Zhiqian, In the LHC, single para recruiter for Foxconn told the ticles were fired at each Washington Post, “The guards other at the speed of light often abuse their power over the where they collided inside workers.” the 7,000-ton ATLAS parFoxconn is one of the largest ticle detector. electronics manufacturing comThe central part of the Compact “Think of it as a 100 Muon Solenoid barrel with the panies in the world. It’s responmegapixel camera, with vacuum tank, at the Large Hadron sible in part for the production very fancy pixels taking of many popular electronics deCollider at CERN. 40 million pictures a secvices from well-known manu— PHOTO COURTESY ARPAD HORVATH/ facturers including Apple, Acer, ond,” O’Neil said. WIKIMEDIA COMMONS The scientists are monitoring for the particular Higgs boson reaction between the two colliding particles, which occurs once every second. Other reactions are taking place at a billion times per second, which makes finding the reaction the scientists are interested in difficult. The immense amount of data is sorted out using computer algorithms. You are invited to a lecture by “Now all we have to do is close our eyes and imagine [the data] in 10 dimensions” O’Neil said jokingly. His audience was mostly science students and professors who eagerly listened. Steve Sadler, a third-year TRU The Better Angels physics student, attended the talk. Sadler shared his exciteof Our Nature, ment for this new discovery. a History of Violence “People always say that everything in physics has been discovered,” he said. “Something new is happening.” “There’s different opinions Friday, October 12 at 7pm of the significance [of the find> TRU Grand Hall, ings],” said Mark Paetkau, a Campus Activity Centre TRU physics professor who organized the event, “but it will Free admission help explain the universe.” There could be practical apTo find out more call plications to finding the Higgs boson decades in the future, 250.377.6119 O’Neil said. “Those who invented lasers didn’t envision DVDs and scanners,” he said. The researchers at the LHC are still working to confirm their findings. “We’re preparing the experiment by November for analysis to rule out the Higgs boson,”

President’s Lecture Series

Where you can find out more: www.nytimes.com Google Executive Detained Google was forced to remove a defamatory political video after officials arrested their Brazilian head of operations. Brazilian laws prohibit public criticism of political candidates, so when Google refused to remove YouTube clips accusing mayoral candidate Alcides Bernal of illegal activities, the Brazilian courts struck back. A 24-hour ban of Google and YouTube was issued and Google executive Fabio Jose Silva Coelho was arrested. He was questioned and then later released. Google representatives have disavowed responsibility for the video.

“Being a platform, Google is not responsible for the content posted on its site,” an email statement to CBS said. After seeking all possible avenues for appeal, Google ceded to the demands of the Brazilian courts and removed the video. Google’s policies with their videos have always put a primary focus on freedom of speech.

For instance, it refuses to remove the inf lammatory “Innocence of Muslims” video in countries outside of the Middle East. Requests to remove videos for political purposes are not new. Between the U.S. and Brazil, Google claims to have received 381 requests to remove content in the final half of last year. Where you can find more: www.cbsnews.com Controlling Brains With Lasers Researchers hope by manipulating the nervous systems of simple creatures they will gain a better understanding of our own. A group of researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute discovered that by using lasers to trigger individual neurons in the brain of a microscopic worm, they were able to manipulate its behaviour and senses. Researchers were able to make the worm turn in any direction of their choosing and trick the worm’s senses into thinking there was food nearby. Researchers hope their work will lead to a better understanding of the ways neural pathways work. This knowledge could then be applied to animals with a more complex nervous system, such as humans. Where you can find out more: www.sciencedaily.com If you have interesting international tidbits you think people should know about, contact Mark at hendricksm12@mytru.ca.

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6

October 3, 2012

Life & Community

Bombing...in the best possible way

JobFest:

a rock ‘n’ roll way to promote job market awareness

Yarn bombing takes Kamloops Catherine Fortin Ω Contributor

The international public art phenomenon of yarn bombing will soon take Kamloops streets by storm. This contemporary style of street art involving yarn wrapped around statues, posts and other public structures is a new wave in the public art scene, changing the traditional views of knitting and crocheting. The Kamloops Art G a l l e r y (KAG) and City of Kamloops will be collaborating to transform downtown Kamloops through the art of yarn bombing. A total of 148 trees to be yarn bombed on Victoria Street from First to Fifth Avenues. The KAG will work with a variety of knitters, stitchers, crocheters and fabric artists to create this array of art. It’s not just senior citizens taking on this art form, youth of all ages are beginning to expand

on the yarn bombing sensation. At an informative session at the KAG on Sept. 29 Leanne Prain, author of Yarn Bombing: The Art of Crochet and Knit Graffiti, said “Yarn bombing is something youth and teenagers are starting to get passionate about.” The KAG needs volunteers. With no experience necessary, participants of all levels and ages are welcome to join, leaving this a great opportunity for TRU students to get involved and decorate downtown Kamloops. “This is definitely something TRU students should take notice of and participate in,” said Stephanie Patsulsa, a visual arts student at TRU who attended the information session at the KAG. This community-based project will be f illed with public knitting oppor tunities and workshops, allowing ar tists of all skill levels to share techniques while working to cozy

Samantha Garvey Ω Roving Editor

Kamloops is getting more colourful due to possibly the least offensive form of vandalism in history. —PHOTOS BY CATHERINE FORTIN

up Victoria Street. Those interested can join the online community of yarn bombers “Yarn Bombing Kamloops” on Raverly- www.raverly. com/groups/yarn-bombing-kamloops. The KAG also leads “Knit n’ Sip” at the Noble Pig Brewhouse

on the first Monday of the month from 5 to 7 p.m. starting the first week of October. Want to help in another way? KAG is in need of unused wool, yarn, crochet work or old knitted blankets. Drop off donations at the Kamloops Art Gallery at 465 Victoria Street.

Passage of time: a passage of water TRU assistant professor and photographer looks at Kamloops over time Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor The name Kamloops comes from the Shuswap word Tk’əmlúps, which means meeting of the waters, in reference to two rivers meeting. Now know as the North and South Thompson, the two channels intersect becoming the Thompson River. This waterway comprises the subject matter for a new exhibit at the Kamloops Art Gallery created by Ernie Kroeger, a photographer and assistant professor in the visual and performing arts department at TRU. Confluence, an exhibit at the Kamloops Art Gallery, is a collection of historical and current photographs Kroeger has gathered with one, sequential subject matter over time; the confluence of the Thompson Rivers.

The show also displays a text portion looking at the different iterations of Kamloops discovered by Kroeger during his search through the city’s history. While Kroeger has put on shows before, Confluence didn’t come to fruition like other projects. “This time it came more out of teaching. I teach a history of photography course and so I sometimes use all kinds of images, like world history,” Kroeger said. “I thought I would put some Canadian content over the years, into my history class and then B.C. content and then Kamloops content. Give students a local flavour.” He was able to collect the photos from a variety of sources, primarily scouring archives in Kamloops and online archives in major Canadian cities such as Calgary, Victoria and Ottawa.

“That was really interesting, to realize that these images of Kamloops were everywhere,” Kroeger said. His inspiration came somewhere a lot closer to TRU. “I would say some of the inspiration came out of teaching this class,” Kroeger said. “I started using some of those images in my PowerPoint presentations.” The photos range in age with the earliest taken in 1865 just 25 years after the birth of the medium in Europe and eastern North America. To get the pre-Canadian picture the photographer would have had to travel great distances by horse, carrying bags of equipment. “At the time they had to carry all this equipment,” Kroeger said. “They had to carry chemicals and glass plate negatives and they had to make their negatives.”

The first few photographs of Kamloops were taken as part of an expedition by a colonial administrator. The city wouldn’t see another photographer for six years. Confluence takes these historical pictures and allows the viewer to compare the same section of landscape over time, up until the late1960s. From that point in time there are only a couple more photographs, including a recent picture of Kroeger taken by his wife while he walks on the riverbed during a period of low water and images taken from Google Earth, staring down on the intersection from orbit. For those interested in comparing the landscape and human interaction with such a central point of Kamloops, Confluence will be flowing on until Nov. 3 at the Kamloops Art Gallery.

—IMAGES USED BY PERMISSION

The campus was treated to more live music tied to awareness campaigns as JobFest, a provincial government initiative to inform youth about today’s job market, took the stage, Thursday, Sept. 27. Arranged by the Career Education Department on campus and third-party marketing company Inventa, JobFest parked itself outside the west entrance to Old Main, with a stage and tents for information, swag and interactive job-related activities. The event was completely funded by the provincial Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Innovation. The event kicked off at 2 p.m. and lasted until 8 p.m. Event organizers estimated 350 students visited and accessed the tools. Featured was the headliner Vancouver band, Halfway to Hollywood, as well as local talent Jodi Doidge and Mohsin Zaman. Throughout the musical acts were speeches from Kamloops workforce leaders including Mike Miltimore, president of Lee’s Music, Todd Stone, president and CEO of iCompass, and Kevin Cudmore, manager of development and assessment of Automotive Training Standards Organization. The provincial government was highlighting its online tools and resources for job seekers. “We hope it’s fun as well as informative,” said Shawn Read, student employment coordinator with the Career Education Department at TRU. While he admitted there are many challenges within the job market, there are ways to overcome and land a rewarding career. He said in order to successfully find a job, it is important for students to connect their learning objectives with employment goals and often students have too narrow a scope. “The more f lexible and more mobile [graduating students] are, the more successful they’ll be in transitioning to the world of work,” he said. Read said raising awareness of the methods to land a job was the goal, as well as promoting the Career Education Department and the services it offers. Although a large crowd never formed, the performers had zeal and the campus had more energy because of them, whether or not TRU students came in search of career advice. JobFest will be visiting more than 50 locations throughout the province this fall. For more information and to access the online tools and resources visit: http://jobfest2012.ca/


7

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 5

Arts & Entertainment

Folk Music Canada introduces award for industry innovators

Michelle Ferguson

The Fulcrum (U of Ottawa) OTTAWA (CUP) — Innovative folk music may sound like an oxymoron to some, but for Folk Music Canada, it is a reason to celebrate. In November 2012, the organization will hand out its first ever Innovator Award at the 2012 Canadian Folk Music Awards, to be held in Saint John, N.B. The honour will be given to a pioneer of the folk community. “The purpose is really to underline things that people are doing that set a new mould in the folk world,” said Tamara Kater, executive director of Folk Music Canada. While folk music is usually described as traditional, Kater insists that it should not be considered stagnant. “Even though folk is based on tradition, it’s something that really comes from the people,” she said. “The music of the people never really stands still.” It’s sort of ironic, then, that the sector of music that’s been given the “traditional” tag would reward innovation, while the majority of the mainstream music industry has fought tirelessly — and often illogically — against it. One might recall earlier this year when the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) sued LimeWire for $72 trillion, which is almost all the the money that exists in the world economy. Ridiculous claims like these are part of major labels’ vehement refusal to adapt to the age of technology and the free culture movement. But over at Folk Music Canada, the kind of innovative thinking that could straighten out the music industry — without trying to force a new generation of consumers to conform to an old school of business — might actually be rightfully rewarded. Unlike most music awards, the innovator award is not centred on the art form

Although not the focus of the award, musicians can also be nominated. Artists who have found new ways of approaching the music or who have created a new model for collaboration are examples of potential nominees. Vancouver-based singer-songwriter Dan Mangan, who played at this year’s Ottawa Folk Festival, is a prime example of a Canadian musician who stands on the fringe of folk. On his third album, Oh Fortune, Mangan truly pushes the envelope by collaborating with many improvisational and experimental musicians to create a refreshing sound. In many ways, the award itself could be considered innovative; according to Kater, not only is it the first award created by Folk Music Canada, but it’s also the first of its kind. “There are other likeminded organizations that give out awards as well,” said Kater, “but we don’t really know of anyone who is giving out recogni—Tamara Kater, tion to a new, cutting-edge, or innovative aspect of the executive director, Folk Music Canada community.” The nomination process is also different from tawa, other than the Ottawa Folk Festival. most awards; nominees are chosen by The Ottawa Folklore Centre, founded members of the folk community, in the in 1976, acts as a hub for local talent and hopes that this will draw attention to efdeveloping musicians by selling instru- forts that may otherwise go unnoticed in ments, hosting events, and providing les- such a large, decentralized body of fans. Due to the broad nature of the award, sons for an array of unique instruments such as the Sri Lankan drum and the Kater admits that she has no expectadjembe. Spirit of Rasputin’s, an event cre- tions when it comes to the list of nomiated in 2009 after a fire burned down the nees. “It’s the first year that we are opening iconic Rasputin Folk Café, also provides opportunities for locals to showcase their up to the community to bring in nominations,” she said. “So in many ways, we’re talent. In 2010, these two organizations came as curious as everyone else to see what together to create a series of “folkcasts,” is going to come in and we’re asking the an online concert series that could be ac- community around us to identify things cessed through YouTube or the Ottawa that they see as innovative.” Due to the media attention, and in Folklore Centre website. These “folkcasts” are the kind of the hopes of receiving a greater numeffort that could be nominated for the ber of nominations from the commuFolk Music Canada innovator award. nity, the deadline for nominations — Unfortunately, they stopped being pro- originally set for this week—has been extended to Sept. 30. duced in 2011. or on a musician’s recordings. Instead, Folk Music Canada wishes to focus on the development of the folk community as a whole. “What we’re looking for is something that is new,” said Kater. “[This] can come from any aspect of the folk community. It could be an artist manager who found a new way of having management relationships with their artist, or it could be a festival that found a new way of operating, and who, for example, is not reliant on government grants.” Ottawa, which just came off its 18th annual Folk Festival, has a thriving folk community. But, as far as innovation goes, it’s hard to tell how the city fares. There are two main institutions that promote and celebrate folk music in Ot-

“The music of the people never really stands still”

Album review: Black Birds Are Dancing Over Me Courtney Dickson Ω Contributor

Fifteen years after his first record and former Juno-nominee Danny Michel still knows how to create a pleasantly unique sound. Danny Michel and the Benque Players released their latest album, Black Birds Are Dancing Over Me, on Sept. 18. His tenth studio album has a beachy, reggae, folksy feel. If you’re already missing the long, hot days of summer, this album brings back the feeling of lounging in the sun, beverage in-hand. Michel worked with Ivan Duran in Belize, bringing the raw CentralAmerican culture to life on this eight-song mix. The album features members of the Garifuna Collective - a local Belizean group that is quite talented. Though the album is similar to some of his other work, Michel uses diverse instrumentals to keep the sound fresh. Through the album, traditional Garifuna drums, turtle shells, saxophone, cowbells and even donkey jaw-bones are heard. It may seem gross, but donkey jaw-bones are a regularly used instrument in Belizean music. Black Birds Are Dancing Over Me is authentically Belizean while still

—IMAGE COURTESY SIX SHOOTER RECORDS appealing to Michel’s Canadian audience. The backup vocals from the Garifuna Collective made this album different from anything heard in North America. “Into the Light,” the fourth track, has a Maroon 5-esque quality about it, but that shouldn’t fool listeners. This song features the most traditional Garifuna instrumentals on the album.

“The First Night,” the second-tolast track on the album, sounds like it should be sung around a campfire on the West Coast. The backup vocals make an otherwise low-key song sound like a big, group production. If nothing else, this album will give listeners a greater appreciation for the use of a unique Mayan guitar.

Sam the Record Man at Yonge and Gould in its heyday.

—PHOTO COURTESY THE RYERSONIAN

Ryerson executives remember Sam the Record Man owner Rachel Phan

The Ryersonian (Ryerson) TORONTO (CUP) — In her current life, Julia Hanigsberg helps manage one of Ryerson’s newest projects, the Student Learning Centre, set to be built on the site of the old Sam the Record Man store. But as a teenager, the university’s vice-president administration and finance got her first job at a Sam’s store in Montreal in 1982, selling records to eager music lovers. Hanigsberg recalled that early brush with the famous Canadian company Tuesday, as she reflected on the death of its founder. Sam Sniderman died in his sleep on Sept. 23. He was 92. “While I was a student, I was a part-time cashier,” Hanigsberg said. “I loved the job, particularly the discount on records. I remember the day when staff was invited to preview this crazy new technology — the compact disc. None of us thought it would catch on because each disc cost about $40.” Hanigsberg recalls working on Boxing Day, which was a monumental occasion at all Sam’s stores because of its famous annual sale. “The lineup was around the block and never got any shorter all day,” she said. She didn’t meet Sam Sniderman until she arrived at Ryerson, but Hanigsberg remembers speaking with him about her experiences at his store. “Sam was wonderfully friendly with lots of great stories,” she said. “I shared my memories of working at Sam’s and we enjoyed talking about it.” At its peak, Sniderman’s oncethriving family business had 130 retail locations across Canada. The flashiest, most legendary was the flagship location on 347 Yonge St. that lit up downtown Toronto with its in-your-face sign that consisted of two gigantic LPs made of 800 lights. “He was certainly iconic,” said Ryerson president Sheldon Levy. “He was the one that could be credited with creating the energy and what I’d call the eclectic nature of Yonge.” Sniderman, the Toronto-born entrepreneur, was also a champion of Canadian music with a particular penchant for the obscure. In the 1960s, he tried to jumpstart the Canadian music scene by starting an allCanadian recording company. Sniderman was always willing to

part with both his money and his time in order to help fledgling homegrown talent. Sept. 24’s Polaris Music Prize gala was dedicated to Sniderman, to honour his contribution to Canadian music. Joni Mitchell, Gordon Lightfoot and The Guess Who were just a few of the up-and-comers who were guided by Sniderman, who told The Toronto Star “everybody” had sat on his sofa at some point. “The Guess Who were there when they couldn’t get a record made,” he said to The Star. “Anne Murray sat there saying: ‘Sam, if this record doesn’t work, I’m going back to Nova Scotia to be a gym teacher.’” For all his efforts, he became known by some as the godfather of Canadian music. He was also awarded the Order of Canada in 1976 and inducted in the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame in 1997. After his illustrious, decades-long career, Sniderman called it quits in 2001, passing ownership of the business to his two sons, Bobby and Jason, and his nieces, Lana and Arna. The record business had taken a hit as both Internet downloading sites like Napster and stores like HMV and Wal-Mart came to prominence. After attempts to revitalize the business were unsuccessful, Sniderman’s family eventually dimmed the lights on the Yonge Street store and sold the historic building to Ryerson University in 2007 for $23 million. It has since been demolished to create space for the planned Student Learning Centre, which coincidentally is one of Hanigsberg’s projects. “I’m very proud now to be working on a project that sits on the site of that flagship Sam’s store on Yonge Street,” she said. “We will certainly be doing the site justice with our new Student Learning Centre.” Ryerson spent $150,000 to have the iconic sign carefully dismantled piece by piece for its preservation. The sign has been in storage since then, but to honour Sam the Record Man — both the man and the store — Ryerson has promised to hang the oversized neon record in the new building. As for Sniderman’s legacy, Levy said, “he certainly deserves all the credit for what he did for the music industry, particularly the Canadian music industry. In our community, I think Yonge Street and its vibrancy (has) a lot to do with Sam — he was a character.”


8

October 3, 2012

Arts & Entertainment Album review: Ritual Tradition Habit

Novice author pens unlikely autobiography about sex, and little else

tye and has found increasing popularity on the Canadian West Coast, playing festivals such as Ω Contributor Vancouver’s Summer Live in 2011 and Canadian Music FestiIndie pop-rock’s The Belle val this past March. Game released its first fullThe six-member group has length album Ritual Tradition been building momentum over Habit yesterday, hoping to satisthe past two years and fy its growing fan base. after being named one Unlike its previous of the best bands of VanEPs Inventing Letters couver by The Georgia and Sleep to Grow, lead Straight, a path with no singer Andrea Lo takes destination but success complete vocal leaderseems laid out before it. ship. In the end, it’s an enHer dark tone and joyable album, consisability to perfectly tent in both sound and compliment the musifeel. With upbeat melocianship speaks voldies, strumming guitars umes to their growth as and beautiful piano riffs, a collective. it will leave people in a The Belle Game has good mood. a similar sound to that Fans who are delighted of Florence and the with the 12-track list will Machine, and listeners also get a chance to see will enjoy the sounds of The Belle Game at the piano, drums, guitars Rio Theatre in Vancouand even the trumpet ver next month. on occasion. It’s Lo’s The challenge for this voice that steals the group will be maintainshow however, deliv—IMAGE COURTESY SONY PICTURES ing its characteristic sound ering beautifully upbeat tracks, the overall feel of the al- while continuing to grow artistilyrics on every track. On the album’s second song bum indicates a budding future cally, creating something that is uniquely its own. “River,” Lo chiefs instrumen- for these indie art-rockers. Nevertheless, the new album Hailing from Vancouver, B.C., tal direction with her powerful voice, making it one of the al- The Belle Game recently opened suggests a step in the right difor international pop icon Go- rection. bum’s strongest songs.

Justin Bell

Kassandra Mitchell

The album’s single, “Wait Up For You,” does a good job of striking a balance between lyrical rhythm and percussion. The song lingers in your ears long after it’s over. Although “Salt + Water” seems out of place amongst stronger vocally-led

Ye Olde Canadian Music Corner

Taylor Rocca

Ω Copy/Web Editor

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor

It was a shor t drive-by, but boy was it wor th the ride. Edmonton’s Drive By Punch might not be making any new music or playing shows right now, but when it did, it captured an audience that would stay loyal to the group long after it went on hiatus. A pop-punk act with an edge, Drive By Punch engaged a signif icant audience within Edmonton, par ticularly at the University of Alber ta, where I f irst discovered the band at a show in the fall of 2006. I immediately fell in love with the angst-f illed and emotional lyrics. As quickly as I fell in love with Drive By Punch, my hear t was broken by the band as they

called it quits in April 2007. There is no telling whether or not the high school friends that comprised the group will ever retur n to the stage or studio together, but one can only hope. Despite being together for 10 years, Drive By Punch only released one full-length studio album, A Good Start to a Bad Day, in 2005. While the entire album is wor th a listen from star t to f inish, a few par ticular standout tracks include “A Good Start to a Bad Day,” “60 Seconds” and “Take This Finger As Goodbye.” Also wor th a listen is the 2002 six-song EP, Dear Flannagan which includes the tracks, “Your Loss,” “Breaking Point” and “Ten or 12.”

Two Polaris Prize Short List appearances, regular critical acclaim, recordings with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver and Jim Cuddy, praise from Rolling Stone, Blender and the New York Times, performances from David Letterman to SXSW, Juno and CCMA nominations and no hit songs. Kathleen Edwards is arguably the least-known music star in Canada. She’s had success off the major charts, but for some reason hasn’t crossed that line, not that she should for any reason. Country-style with indie-rock credibility and an edge, Edwards has been around for more than

10 years and built up a strong portfolio with smart lyrics from a smoky-sweet voice. A guitarist as well, she’s an incredible songwriter, creating accessible gems. With her most recent work, arguably her strongest album, she explored a more rock arena, leaning away from the twang of previous work, but she hasn’t left it completely. The track to check out from her right now is no doubt “Chameleon/Comedian,” which starts off light with some haunting vocals and amazing lyrics. It builds to beautiful landscape production with her still central guitar strumming along.

Kergin and Rocca think they’re qualified to critique Canadian music because they have a radio show. Think you can do better? Contact Mike at editor@truomega.ca with a couple-hundred words on a lesser-known Canadian band and get in the Canadian Music Corner!

The Griff (Grant MacEwan) EDMONTON (CUP) — Danielle Cousineau had never written a book before. She had written and directed short films and even made it to major film festivals. But writing a book was something she’s never done. So when she decided to set her mind to writing, it only made sense for the Edmonton-born author to write about the one thing she knew: her own life. “The person I was most interested in telling a story to was me, and I think I just needed to wrap my head around these big things that happened in my life at such young points,” said Cousineau, on the phone from her new home in B.C.’s Lower Mainland. Writing the book was an outlet for Cousineau. While she struggled with health issues and problems in her personal life, being able to sit down at the keyboard for hours at a time and write about her life was a form of catharsis. “I reached a point where I needed to look at the things that had happened to me in an honest and approachable light,” says Cousineau. “It was a lot easier for me to delve into looking at these really difficult things if I could mix in something I was comfortable with, which is sex.” Given that sex is a comfort zone for Cousineau, the title of her new book is unsurprising. She’s called it A Book: of Sex and Little Else. Cousineau doesn’t hold back much when it comes to her sexual escapades. While many of the names in the book are withheld for the sake of those involved, many of the details are not. That doesn’t mean it’s an autobiographical form of Fifty Shades of Grey. There are some graphic details in the book, and Cousineau wanted to alert people to the sexual nature of the writing. But the title is also meant as a form of irony. “The book screams irony,” says Cousineau. “At a certain point, I was getting quite risky. I was doing things I wouldn’t have otherwise done.” While her book delves into some of the problems she faced growing up, she also ran into issues in the publishing world. Getting the manu-

—IMAGE COURTESY RDM PHOTOGRAPHY script in front of a publisher proved to be problematic, since few accept unsolicited works. She had to fight to get an agent to represent her, and sent the book to eight different publishers, hoping for the best. That’s when she turned to online publishing. As a graduate of the Vancouver Film School and still an avid filmmaker, Cousineau has many contacts in the entertainment industry. They were telling her to try to publish the book online, on her own. One of the first places she checked was Kindle. The online book giant has a self-publishing arm, something Cousineau thought she would try out. She submitted a manuscript, thinking it would again take a while to hear back. Less than two days later, her book was being distributed through the Kindle store. “It was all kind of haphazard and fluky. It’s what happens when anyone writes a book.” A businessman in Australia loved it so much he helped her to pay for a small initial print of the book, which she is now touring with. With her first foray into the publishing world now behind her, Cousineau is already working on her next piece, a work of fiction. “It’s a way for me to write about the things I wanted to write about, without it having anything to do with me,” she says with a laugh.

Puzzle of the Week #4 – Fall Leaves That backyard of yours is just full of leaves: abcd of them to be precise. Given the clues following, how many leaves are there? 1. There is exactly one pair of digits that is the same. 2. Every digit is evenly divisible by every smaller digit in the number. 3. The solution’s arrangement of the digits is the fourth-highest value arrangement. 4. None of the digits are prime. 5. The sum of all of the digits is even. Special grammar question: Is the first clue grammatically correct, or should it be “There is exactly one pair of digits that are the same.”? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.


9

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 5

Arts & Entertainment

Film review: Feel the Wind

October concert previews

Kamloops Film Society collaborates with the Consulate General of Japan and The Japan Foundation for a free series Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor In the movie world, sports films often hold a special place for fans, taking the side of the underdogs and raising them to great heights. Feel the Wind, a Japanese production based on the book of the same name, starts at that bottom rung and takes the audience right along to the top. The story follows a ragtag band of students at Kansei University as they work towards their goal of competing in a nationally televised marathon relay. The race is the Hakone Ekiden and takes place just after the new year with 19 schools and one collected team competing for glory in front of their country. The Kansei team doesn’t start out as a team. They’re housemates first, 10 young men sharing cheap rent near school. Leader Haiji Kiyose collects them with the hopes of building a team for the Hakone Ekiden but doesn’t tell the group of his intentions until he’s recruited the final housemate and former high school track star, Kakeru Kurahara. Together the group works through individual issues, against rivals and to overcome the past. Of the 10 members, everyone has something to overcome in some way and this is the strength of using the marathon relay. Unlike other team sports, it’s an in-

dividual battle, but at the same time each teammate is working for the greater good. This solo battle/group responsibility creates an interesting balance for the plot to revolve around. The directing is solid, though there may be too many shots of people running. Some of the voice-overs can be confusing but the technique does allow for character expansion, so the issue breaks even. The acting is Japanese-esque, with a few moments overwrought, edging on cheesy. The good natured-ness of those scenes and the overall earnestness of the characters allows some give in that department. For films of the genre, the plot can be predictable, but it doesn’t make the film less enjoyable. The will-they won’t-they of the final competition does build up proper tension, especially since the race takes up the final act. It is a two-day race though. Plots aside from the central struggles take a back seat and can feel stapled on, with a romance that is never really explored and a coach with a history. These are likely due to the plot being taken from a book and making allusions to areas more fully formed on the page. The film was shown Thursday night as part of the Kamloops Film Society’s series of films in collaboration with the Consulate General of Japan and The Japan Foundation as part of a double feature on Sept. 27.

Secret Broadcast – Oct. 3 Heroes Pub, doors @ 7:30 p.m., $5 cover. Friendly Calgarian guitar-led indie-rockers will make a trip across the Rockies to play some crashing drums and bouncy guitars. They’re aiming for a double set. The show is the first of Heroes’s planned Live Music Wednesdays. Wide Mouth Mason – Oct. 16 The Dirty Jersey, doors at 8 p.m., $25 Long-time white-boy bluesmen Wide Mouth Mason will be taking another pass over the Thompson Rivers, playing songs spanning from a 17-year career. They played an enthusiastic set in Kamloops last year and there’s no reason to believe they’ve changed.

—IMAGE COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Contact arts@truomega.ca to review films, albums, books or theatre productions for us!

Album review: Deadmau5’s Album Title Goes Here Matthew Pflugfelder Ω Contributor

Deadmau5’s new album ref lects a major change in electronic dance music. Fans were left in the dark with new release Album Title Goes Here. For starters, the album was leaked on the Internet before its official release date (Sept. 25), which significantly impacted the anticipation of the new album. Sonically, most songs seeme to lack the climactic buildups and goosebump-inducing melodies he’s known for. Songs like “Fn Pig” have the listener waiting for minutes, which seem like hours, for some kind action. This leaves listeners wanting to change the song rather than wait for the money-shot. Album Title Goes Here is a more experimental approach to electronic dance music as it is nothing like previous work from deadmau5. Joel Zimmerman, better known as deadmau5, expressed his genuine hatred in Rolling Stone for the mainstream turn in which electronic dance music was headed. The genre has become a multimillion dollar industry with the hit single “Levels” by Avicii being played in every clothing store, bar and club around the world.

Electronic dance music was once the true definition of “underground.” The late-1980s gave rise to a trend known as acid house, which was performed illegally in abandoned, governmentowned warehouses with 808 systems and Roland synthesizers. Now electronic dance music has become a mainstream genre with the likes of Madonna hopping on the bandwagon. Album Title Goes Here ref lects Zimmerman’s frustration towards this recent direction within the electronic dance music scene. He has even taken his misgivings to Twitter, telling Madonna off for her recent album MDNA, as it seems to make a stark reference to the drug MDMA. He has also begun collaborating with artists outside of electronic dance music including Imogen Heap, Cypress Hill and the Foo Fighters. Zimmerman is also one of the first electronic dance music artists to cover a Radiohead song. Despite all of the controversy, it’s quite clear that deadmau5 is not a fan of the mainstream, even though a lot of his tracks have appeared on top-40 charts. Although he’s a blatant hipster, the end result of his previous work has been mainstream success. There’s no label for Zimmerman, which may work to his benefit or be the beginning of his demise.

Matt Mays – Oct. 22 (with Gloryhound and The Meds) The Blue Grotto, doors at 8 p.m., $20 advance sale. Juno-nominee and fan of the jean jacket, Matt Mays will bring an eclectic mix of rock. He’s toured with Blue Rodeo, been featured on fellow denim-devotee Sam Robert’s songs and featured rapper Buck 65 on his own work. A shaggy-haired Mays is touring to support his new album Coyote. Revolvr – Oct. 25 (with The Hunter and dj virtue) Cactus Jacks, doors at 9 p.m., $7 advance. Rising electronica DJ and social-media sound-effect sampler, Revolvr, will drop some bass on CJs. A fast-paced style has had Revolvr catch the ear of superstar Tiesto and is leading to his fast rise over the past year. For fans of electronic dance music this could be a chance to see a star on the rise (remember when Skrillex played here?).

Check out the online exclusive content at theomega.ca. Bonus reviews of concerts, films and albums that we just couldn’t fit in the paper (but are just as good as the ones we could).


10

October 3, 2012

Sports

A world-class education

Argentina’s national under-21 squad schools the ‘Pack, who continue preparations for season

Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

The Wolf Pack women’s soccer team returned to Hillside Stadium on Sept. 29 to face off against their interior B.C. rivals, the University of B.C. Okanagan (UBCO) Heat. The teams played to a 1-1 draw, with the Heat scoring in the 80th minute to tie the match. The goal came on a Wolf Pack defensive breakdown, but head coach Tom McManus was quick to point out the outcome of the match wasn’t due to just one mistake. “I just thought that we played poorly,” McManus said. “I think the first half was probably the worst 45 minutes we’ve played all year.” The match drew yet another large crowd to Hillside Stadium and all proceeds from the afternoon were donated to KidSport Canada in honour of Sports Day in Canada. Though the game ended in disappointment for the Wolf Pack, a few players put together outstanding performances. The ‘Pack’s only goal came on a great individual effort from Alanna Bekkering, who chased down a loose ball just before it went out of bounds and crossed it to Courtney Daly who netted her third goal of the season.

“Fantastic,” said McManus, when asked about Bekkering’s play. “Alanna is such a great winger, she’s got the strength and speed and just whipped a beautiful cross in and Courtney, what a great volley to finish it off.”

WolfPack forward Alanna Bekkering (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

With the draw, the women still sit comfortably atop the PACWEST standings. They’ve dominated individually thus far as well, as Blair MacKay was named PACWEST Player of the Week for the week of Sept. 26.

WolfPack men narrowly defeat UBCO fought off the Heat defenders to Adam Williams net his third goal of the season. Ω Sports Editor It’s a play that the ‘Pack have been working on in practice, in an With a 1-0 win over the Univer- effort to make use of Schneebeli’s sity of B.C. Okanagan (UBCO) exceptional throw-in abilities. When he was unable to play due Heat on Sept. 30, the Wolf Pack men’s soccer team has matched to injury, Schneebeli spent last season working to improve that their win total from last season. The match sat tied at zero for aspect of his game and his hard the majority of the 90 minutes, work paid dividends Sunday. “We’ve been working on that as both teams traded chances and goalkeeper Travis Froehlich was long throw play for a while and got it to work forced to make a this time,” Schfew keys saves. neebeli said. Though they “It’s the first were unable to time that’s hapcome out to an pened all year early lead, the and it worked Wolf Pack were out pretty well.” happy with their Heading into start. the second half “Well we of the season, came out in the the Wolf Pack first half and currently sit in we controlled a fifth place in lot of the play,” the PACWEST said co-head standings, two coach Sean Wallace. “It’s ‘Pack goaltender Travis Froe- points back of the Langara against a team hlich goes up for the ball vs. College Fallike this, they the UBCO Heat on Sept. 30. cons. don’t have a win While the yet, so they’re —PHOTO BY ADAM WILLIAMS team isn’t curvery dangerous. “They don’t have anything to rently in a playoff spot, there is lose and at the end of the first still plenty of time to work their half it was 0-0 and we said to the way into the top four. Wallace guys, ‘we gotta come out and take cited one area in particular that it to them. We can’t let them hang he hopes his team will be able to improve in the second half of the around.’” The Heat managed to hang season. “We just need someone to step around in the second half but it didn’t end up costing the Wolf- up and score a few more goals and it won’t be so tense,” WalPack. In the 82nd minute TRU pot- lace said. The Wolf Pack will return to ted the go-ahead goal. Austin Schneebeli worked the ball into Hillside Stadium Oct. 13, to face the box on a lengthy throw-in Quest University and Langara from the corner and Oriol Torres College.

MacKay said she was excited to receive the honour but cared more about the fact her team was able to shut out both of their opponents last weekend. A fifth year cocaptain of the Wolf Pack, MacKay echoed the sentiments of her coach after Saturday’s match. “I think it was a tough fight, UBCO is always a really good fight,” MacKay said. “They push really hard. I think it was unfortunate that we tied, obviously we’d have rather gotten the win. “I think we just need to win the knock-downs and be first to the ball right from the get-go [Sunday].” The Wolf Pack played to a tie on Sunday as well, coming back from a one-goal deficit in Kelowna. Though the result was similar, McManus was much happier with his team’s effort in the rematch. “We kept going strong after UBCO in the second half,” said McManus, in an interview with TRU Athletics. “To their credit, they came back and tried to push us. I’m definitely impressed with our character. These were two tough matches with our interior rival.” The Wolf Pack will play Douglas College and Kwantlen Polytechnic University next weekend, before returning to Hillside Stadium Oct. 13.

Alanna Bekkering streaks down the sideline during the WolfPack match against UBCO on Sept. 29 at Hillside Stadium.

—PHOTO BY ADAM WILLIAMS

That’s what you said For this week’s issue, we patrolled the grounds looking for your answers to this question:

Have you been to any WolfPack games this year?

Daniel Antuluv

KaterynaChorna

Jeromy Spence

“No. Not this year. I haven’t had the time because I’m busy studying. I want to go though.”

“I went to the first basketball game in September. It was exciting. It was my first basketball game. It’s not as popular in Ukraine.”

“I haven’t been to a WolfPack game yet. I’m really hoping to get to one soon.”

First-year sciences

Post-baccaleurate accounting

Third-year tourism

WolfPack Scoreboard Women’s Soccer Saturday: 1-1 draw Sunday: 1-1 draw Men’s Soccer Saturday: 1-1 draw Sunday: 1-0 Men’s Volleyball (Exhibition) TRU WolfPack vs. College of the Rockies: 3-0 WolfPack TRU WolfPack vs. UofC Dinos: 3-1 Dinos

Hockey (Exhibition, Eye-Opener Tournament at SAIT)

Golf

WolfPack vs. Innisfail Eagles: 6-2 Eagles WolfPack vs. SAIT Trojans: 4-3 Trojans, Double OT

Top TRU golfer: Chase Broadfoot 28th (161)

Baseball

Individual: Jarred Cailback of Camosun (143)

WolfPack vs Langley Blaze: 4-0 WolfPack WolfPack vs. Victoria Eagles: 12-2, 4-0 Wins for WolfPack

7th place team finish (654)

Winners:

Team: University of Fraser Valley (588)


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 5

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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12

October 3, 2012

TRUSU Membership Advisory Forum & Movie Night

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

Inside Job & Europe on the Brink

Since 1993 BC has slipped from the best funded post-secondary education system in Canada to 7th

Free Snacks!

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Ban

million plastic

bottles were sent to landfills in BC.

Join the campaign to elminate the sale of disposable plastic bottles on campus!

TRUSU Pride Collective

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SPO over 108 DI2011, L In L S A

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DISPO L L S A

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Wed Oct 10 at 6:00PM TRUSU Boardroom

Tues Oct 16 7PM Clocktower Theatre Free Admission! Free Snacks!

This Week: • Museum Exhibit and Basket Weaving Workshop • Stalled - Live at TRU Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment

October 3, 2012  

The October 3, 2012 edition of The Omega

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