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VOLUME 21 ISSUE 29 MAY, 2012

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Family friendly campus? It could be 3

Get this album, and watch for the tour

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37th Annual Peace Walk

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Is our government walking away from childcare?

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PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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May, 2012

Feature Canadian childcare in crisis: Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief After finding out that May is National Childcare Month, I thought I’d do a nice little piece on the fact that Thompson Rivers University (TRU) has its own on-campus childcare facility devoted to both university students and staff, how student-parents can (and should) take advantage of the day care and how much its very existence benefits the campus community as a whole. While all of this is undoubtedly true, I found that the story simply would not be sated with such a cursory examination of the subject — at least as far as how it relates to the topic of National Childcare Month. Many people had strong opinions on the subject — most of which were extremely negative illustrations about the current state of childcare in this country — so I went deeper to explore what was causing all the emotion behind this heated topic. I knew going in that I personally pay a large percentage of my family’s income to have my child in a day care facility, but he enjoys it, he gains social skills, he learns something new seemingly every day he’s there, and really, I just chalked it up to, “That’s what you have to do. It’s not like we can afford to have one of us staying home with him.” I didn’t realize that the situation was far more complicated than just the out-of-pocket expense incurred by parents, and I decided that National Childcare Month is the perfect time to examine what the current state of childcare is in Canada, what we can do to improve that situation and who is working on doing just that. Is there a “crisis” in Canadian childcare? In a 2008 UNICEF report, Canada tied for last place among 25 developed countries on early childcare services. The report — in which Canada failed to meet nine of the ten benchmarks — seems to lend support to the idea that we, as many say, are in a childcare “crisis” in Canada. The only standard that Canada met in the UNICEF study was the benchmark acknowledging that 50 per cent of staff in accredited early education services have obtained post-secondary qualifications. The Canadian Childcare Resource and Research Unit (CCRRU), whose mandate is “to collect, organize and synthesize early childhood education and child care information resources and to make them widely available,” also released a report in 2008, where they found that there were only regulated — meaning licensed — childcare spaces for 18.6 per cent of 0-12 year-olds in Canada, and only 20.3 per cent of 0-5 year olds. This means that 79.7 per cent of children under the age of six did not have a licensed space available. According to that same study, the growth in the total number of childcare spaces available had gone down from 50,831 per year (average) between 20012004 to only 29,791 in 2007-2008. While these statistics alone

What can be done about it and who is trying to help?

would indicate a major problem, the main reason that many consider Canada to be in a childcare “crisis” is the lack of a publicly funded and delivered system for childcare — one of the main benchmarks Canada failed to meet that was highlighted in the UNICEF study. “Crisis, I think, is the correct way to characterize where Canada is at,” admitted Darcie Beggs, senior equality officer with the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE). According to Beggs, CUPE represents about 9000 childcare workers across the country, and “has long worked hard in coalition with other unions, childcare activists, etcetera to ensure that Canada has a national childcare program that is publicly funded and delivered.” Unfortunately, she said, their pleas to the government have largely fallen on deaf ears over Ryder Dobson has some fun swinging from a bar during outdoor play time one afternoon at the past few years. the TRU Childcare facility. —PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES “The federal government has basically abandoned childcare issues,” she said. “When this govOne of the main changes pro“’The Plan’ combines the best (0 to18 months) and 32 children ernment came to power, one of the first things they did was to of public education with the best (18 to 60 months). Their waitlist posed in “The Plan” is that control of childcare would move quash the deal that was made be- of childcare,” according to Sha- is over 350. According to Annie Shiel, a from the Ministry of Children tween the provinces and the then ron Gregson, long time childcare federal Liberal government to ac- advocate and CCCABC spokes- reporter for The McGill Daily, and Family Development to the tually introduce a childcare pro- person, as well as easing the fi- many student-parents turn to Ministry of Education. This change is a significant gram,” which she said is the main nancial burden on families by nannies or non-government-subcause of the “crisis” in Canadian putting a cap on parent fees at $10 sidized childcare facilities (some one, according to Beggs, “beper day and see families earning of which are unlicensed and op- cause childcare is also childcare childcare. Because of the lack of federal less than $40,000 per year incur erate out of private residences) and learning, and we know how because they just can’t wait for a important it is for the learning funding and policy, according to no user fees whatsoever. “Just as children have a right spot to open somewhere for them. part of childcare to be seen and Beggs, “[childcare has] now beWhen you compare those num- recognized.” come a market-based approach to go to school, they have the rather than, if you will, a sys- right to access high quality child bers to the current “spaces availShe thinks that too much pubtem-based approach to deliver- care. Child care should not just able versus waitlist length” situ- lic mindset about childcare faing childcare. Because there isn’t be for parents who are wealthy or ation in B.C., you start to think cilities is that they are basically that it is a bit of give-and-take as babysitters where people drop enough quality childcare where lucky,” she said. Gregson pointed out some sim- far as the non-subsidized system off their kids for the day, and not there are trained workers who have decent wages and benefits ilarities between “The Plan” and is concerned. enough emphasis is placed on Sure it costs more than $7 per them as being places of teachand are actually trained early Québec’s public childcare sysday, but far less than $45 to $60 ing and early childhood developchildhood educators, people have tem, which has a $7 user fee. Despite the price being right — even before you take into ac- ment. to use their own resources to try for parents count the $100 monthly cheque to find care “We’re not just providing day however, a families outside Québec receive care,” Hardy said. She has been for their kids lack of ac- from the government (per child) in the childcare field for 26 rather than c e s s i b i l i t y to help with childcare, with low- years, and thinks the change is there being to the public income families qualifying for long overdue. a system for facilities in more assistance once registered ensuring that “In an ideal world, every that prov- in a facility — and I couldn’t school would have a wing for there is qualince — due find anyone out west who sat on a early childhood education, and ity care in in large part childcare waitlist for three years, it would be appreciated for its our commuto the num- either. nities.” value,” she said. The TRU childcare waitlist, for ber of people She added According to Beggs, it is a going after example, is currently hovering in natural fit for childcare to come that the result those $7 per the 200 per cent of spaces avail- under the umbrella of the Minisof a lack of day price tag able range, according to Marian try of Education. public fundservices — Hardy, executive director of the ing and de“We’re used to having the creates other Cariboo Childcare Society, the government deliver programs livery is that s i g n i f i c a n t non-profit organization that op- in schools, so it’s a good fit and for-prof it erates the TRU childcare facili- easy shift to expanding the [eduproblems. centres are M c G i l l ties. —Sharon Gregson growing to cation] program to include the That’s a far cry from the 700- early learning and care centres Un i ve r s i t y’s compensate o n - c a m p u s plus per cent range seen many as well.” for a market that has too few public, non-prof- day care centre, known officially places in Québec. Hardy said She also thinks the shift makes as the Centre de la Petite Enfance TRU student-parents can “real- sense both in terms of changing it facilities. CUPE’s desire for a publicly de McGill, for example, serves istically expect to wait 12 to 18 the mindset, as well as logistifunded and delivered system for 106 children of McGill students, months,” which is less than half cally. childcare has caused CUPE to staff, and faculty, but there are of the expected wait-time at Mc“The facilities are already throw their support behind The close to 800 children on the wait- Gill. there,” she said. “The infrastrucThe University of British Co- ture is in place to house a quality Community Plan for a Public ing list — a list that sees parents System of Integrated Early Care waiting about three years for an lumbia (UBC), the largest child- centre, and it’s partly the stratecare provider of any North Amer- gic shift to think about it not just & Learning — or as it is com- available space. Because the centre is govern- ican post-secondary institution, as day care, it’s not babysitting, monly known in the British Columbia childcare community, ment-subsidized, those fortunate has recently added even more but it’s really learning and care enough to have a space pay just spaces for children, and delegat- and the services can be delivered simply “The Plan.” $7 a day, which is likely why the ed more of its budget to child- by qualified early childhood edwait-list is so long. Private day- care, including $100,000 per year ucators.” “The Plan” cares in Montreal can cost from for ten years (beginning in 2008) Hardy agrees, but admitted “The Plan” is a proposal that has around $45 per day to upwards of from the Capital Projects Acqui- that “trying to get everyone sition and Construction Fund. been put forward by the Coalition $60. to the table is the problem,” in Despite adding spaces and terms of changing the mindset The other government-subsiof Child Care Advocates of BC (CCCABC) and the Early Child- dized facility reserved for the throwing money at the prob- en masse. hood Educators of BC that they McGill community — the SSMU lem, their waitlists haven’t gone claim would ease, if not resolve, (McGill’s Student Society) Day- down — but they haven’t gone With files by Annie Shiel and care — has spots for eight infants up, either. the current childcare “crisis.” Micki Cowan

“Childcare

should not just be for parents who are wealthy or lucky.”


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 29

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

May, 2012

Volume 21, Issue 29

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff

Editorial Welcome to summer 2012 at TRU

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Will resume fall 2012 SPORTS EDITOR

Will resume fall 2012 Copy Editor

Will resume fall 2012 Photo Editor

Will resume fall 2012 News Editor

Editor’s Note

Roving Editor

Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief

Will resume fall 2012 Will resume fall 2012

omegacontributors Samantha Garvey, Adam Williams, Jess Wind

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Follow us on Twitter: @TRU_Omega and “Like” us on Facebook. Do it. Seriously.

Greetings, fellow TRUers (TRUites?) and welcome to the first 2012 summer edition of The Omega! For those of you who are new to the school (or the newspaper) let me explain a few things about who we are and what we do here at The Omega — and for those of

you familiar with the publication, bear with the newbies for a minute, would you? The Omega is your independent, student-run newspaper on campus (and online). This means we aren’t controlled by TRU administration, the student union, or any other entity. We represent you, the students and staff of TRU, and are responsible to you, as well. What are we “responsible” for, you ask? Our goal is to help you take a break every now and then, and during that well-earned break, to inform and entertain. We try to balance the serious with the lighthearted, the depressing truth with the celebration of achievement. During the fall and winter semesters — or September to April, if you prefer — we print every week, hitting the stands around campus on Wednesday morning. But that’s when we have a staff — over the summer I get to do this myself, with the occasional volunteer contributions from others (like, for example,

Samantha Garvey and Adam Williams this month). Which brings me quite naturally to my plea to you, my fellow TRUans (TRUbivores?). If you’ve ever wanted to see your words (or photos) in print, get in touch. We’re always looking for interesting stories or photos that represent aspects of university life — or reviews of books, films or music that other students should check out. University is about the sharing of information after all, and here I am offering you another avenue for that endeavour. Okay, now that I’ve gotten my selfish begging out of the way, I’d like to give something to you — a piece of sage advice. I’ve been going to school for a long time. I’ve done it wrong at times and I’ve done it right at others. Balance is the most important thing you need to figure out, so get on that. It’s awesome to meet new people, socialize (read as “party”) and join extra-curricular clubs and activities

while you’re in school — especially during the summer months. If that’s not really you’re thing, because you feel you’re here to get an education so you should just buckle down and do it, that’s fine too. But you need both to be happy, you really do. If you party so hard that you’re forced to withdraw or redo classes later because they turn out to be prerequisites or whatever, the fun you’re having now is going to piss you off — trust me. If you do really well in your classes, but you leave here looking back and wishing you’d met a few people and maybe gained some connections for later in life, you’ll be equally disappointed. Alright — I’ve asked for something and offered something, so I’m done for now. Get in touch with me for ways to get involved with the paper, and enjoy your summer. See you again next month. editorofomega@gmail.com

How to create a “family friendly” campus

Student-parents need to “advocate for themselves” to cause administrative change Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief It is almost universally accepted that the Canadian childcare situation is in a state of crisis (see story opposite page), and that the situation directly affects university campuses, and post-secondary students — but how, and to what extent? Well, it’s simple really — studentparents have more going on in their lives, and the childcare situation makes it even more difficult for them to better themselves by achieving the higher education that we all are attempting to do by enrolling at post-secondary institutions. I’m not saying that you’re not busy if you don’t have a child, so just settle down, but if you aren’t a parent, I’d just ask you to picture how busy you are, and then add the responsibility of raising another human from scratch. “The administration section of universities need to come to the realization of the benefit of cooperation with and support of childcare facilities,” according to Marian Hardy, executive director of the Cariboo Childcare Society, the nonprofit organization that operates the TRU childcare facilities, adding that though their relationship with administration is a good one (better than most institutions, she thinks) it could always be better. She said that part of that cooperation needs to be making the campus “family friendly,” in order to support student-parents as well as encourage more people to enrol, saying that it’s possible that failure to do so is keeping people from choosing TRU as an option when considering which institution to attend. An article published by The Concordian (Concordia University) in October 2010 cited research compiled by Tricia Van Rhijn and Donna S. Lero for the University of Guelph has student-parents accounting for “close to 11 per cent of the total student population in Canadian universities,” which would suggest that this demographic is, in fact, a significant one. Floriann Fehr, a TRU nursing professor and parent of children who have attended various childcare facilities in Kamloops (including the TRU on-campus facility) also thinks that the overall attitude of universities need to change toward a more “family friendly” one that acknowledges this demographic before the childcare situation will improve on post-secondary campuses — a change in

attitude that would affect students without children in some ways as well, though perhaps not as immediately. Fehr is currently pursuing her PhD in higher education and administration, and her doctoral research has her focussing on post-secondary students and their ability to balance work, school, and life. One of the biggest barriers in achieving that balance, she said, is childcare. “The school (TRU) itself doesn’t even know how many of its students are parents,” she said, and added that there are “check-boxes” for various other demographics — “visible minority,” “Status Native Canadian” and others — on the admission forms, but for some reason parents get left out of the research. As such, she claims, little effort is made to cater to their needs. Which is why, she said, “You need to advocate for yourselves.” Whether it is demanding family-friendly services from your institution, or simply opening lines of communication with your professors about the extra demands on your time, student-parents need — and should expect — more flexibility from their institutions. Concordia University in Montreal has developed a certain measure of the “family friendliness” that Fehr is discussing by opening the Concordia University Student Parent Centre (CUSP), where support can be found for their student parents, an idea initiated by Concordia’s dean of students, Elizabeth Morey. The centre is designed to share resources — information on childcare facilities, health promotion services, and the psychological support needed for overburdened student parents, as well as a place to meet others in similar situations and socialize in a way more conducive to their lifestyle. “[Student parents] don’t have the same options to meet other students, and to go out,” said Kristy Heeren, who was the director of CUSP in 2010. “Many student-parents struggle with isolation and loneliness, especially single parents, and international students who are new to the city,” and CUSP is one of the ways that Concordia has acknowledged and addressed the burden on this demographic. “CUSP is another great help because it is a place where student parents can get together and see how others in similar situations balance parenting and school,” according to Concordia student-

Some staff and children take a moment outside the TRU Childcare facility to advocate for a “family friendly campus.”

parent Anna Chigo. “As CUSP members, student parents have the chance to get involved in events such as monthly cook-outs, clothing, toy and babysitting exchanges, while making friends with other student parents in the process.” Other post-secondary institutions have similar “family-friendly” programs and services. The McGill University Chaplaincy, for example, houses the McGill Student Parents’ Network, a community of parents, children and student volunteers that hosts a number of programs to support families, such as in-house babysitting, and events that allow student parents to network and share stories. One program, “Study Saturdays,” occurs once a month and provides childcare services and a healthy lunch for a few hours while parents can study. As far as how TRU (or any other institution that people feel need attitudeadjusting) can begin to become more “family friendly,” Fehr recommends that student-parents initiate the change by contacting their professors before each term and let them know that they have added demands on their time — not that they want special treatment, but just to inform them so they aren’t caught unaware when classes are inevitably missed, etc. — and help raise the awareness of the campus community in general in that way.

—PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES “When [professors] start seeing these letters all the time, they might start to understand that they are dealing with a significant demographic and that things are more difficult for them,” she said, and that change in awareness is needed if institutions are truly going to consider themselves “family-friendly,” and continue to develop in a way that recognizes a key demographic necessary to encourage returning and mature students as well as another generation of potential ones. After all, those kids that are 5 years-old right now will be looking for a university to attend in less than 15 years, so developing an infrastructure for student parents now could have a large effect on enticing another generation of students not so far down the road, according to Fehr. So even if you’re not a parent in search of childcare or in school to be an early childhood educator, you might want to consider what is best for both student-parents and for your institution. Post-secondary institutions have at their fingertips a demographic that they could impress now leading to higher enrolment down the road. They certainly don’t want current students to be telling their children in 15 years that they should consider attending, “Anywhere but where I went.” With files by Anna Chigo and Annie Shiel


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May, 2012

Life & Community Kamloops’ oldest public building represents power of community Formanski remembers attending the Sunday School, which was the Ω Contributor largest in Canada at that time, in 1957. No longer a church, the public space can be used for any sort of It was 1995 when Melody Forgathering and has been for travel manski was out for a walk in downshows, art galleries, weddings, futown Kamloops with a friend, Kate nerals, and more. Lawrie, and as they passed the old, When the building was first connearly decrepit St. Andrew’s church structed in 1887, it was done so on she thought, as many people would donations and volunteer work. have, “Somebody should do someCanadian Pacific Railway donatthing about that.” ed the land, and the Luckily for the citemployees donated izens of Kamloops, labour for construcFormanski did. tion. Giggling as she Members of the told the story about community of Fort the process to save Kamloops (populaSt. Andrew’s, she tion 500), pitched in said that although the time and donations building was in disto complete St. Anrepair, with four feet —Sheila Park drews for Christmas of water in the baseDay of that year, costment and in need of ing a total of $5000. a new roof, she began Sheila Park, another Heritage So“It’s important to preserve what working with City Council to restore Kamloops’ oldest public building we have,” said Fane. She said our ciety member, says the building repback to a beautiful and useful space. history makes our city more vibrant resents the power of community in Kamloops. At the time, council had been con- and interesting. “They built it hoping community Janet Doubt moved to Kamloops sidering a parkade for that area, but after presentations, fundraising and when her daughter Jane-Ellen was would grow around it,” she says. “And it did.” donations, the renovations began in five. They used the afternoon to enjoy a trip into early memories of the 1997 and were completed in 1998. The Kamloops Heritage Society is “We were tearing down our his- church. “I love history, to see how people looking for stories and information tory,” she explained, “and that bothlived,” says Jane-Ellen. She remem- about Tranquille on the Lake to be ered me.” It was two years of Formanski’s bers the bus that travelled around the archived for the public. If you have and many others’ hard work to see to neighbourhood streets of downtown any information, big or small, conthe completion of what is now called Kamloops gathering the children for tact Melody Formanski at 250-3774232 or heritage@ocis.net. Sunday School. St. Andrew’s on the Square. To celebrate, the Kamloops Heritage Society held a fundraiser tea under the 24 metre-high steeple on Sunday, May 6, with over 30 people in attendance, for the building’s 125th birthday. Ruth Fane has been a board member of the society for the last four years. It was formed specifically for the St. Andrew’s project but is now moving on to other historical tasks as well.

Samantha Garvey

“They built it hoping

community would grow around it. And it did.”

St. Andrew’s on the Square, the oldest public building in Kamloops, celebrated its 125th anniversary on Sunday, May 6 with a tea put on by the Kamloops Heritage Society.

—PHOTO BY SAMANTHA GARVEY

A couple of bicycling events to keep in mind Bike To Work Week and Heart and Stroke Foundation Big Bike event coexist soon in Kamloops Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief Kamloops is once again one of the more than 20 communities provincially that will participate in Bike To Work Week (BTWW), which runs from May 28 to Jun. 3 this year. According to James Gordon, one of the organizers of the Kam-

loops event, “Bicycling is such a great form of transportation and so BTWW is trying to encourage people to use it to get around.” According to Gordon, BTWW is a vehicle (no pun intended) to highlight issues like traffic congestion, fossil fuel dependency and healthy lifestyle choices, all while coming together as a community and having some fun.

The week-long event will feature morning “Celebration Stations” in front of the Kamloops Law Courts (Columbia Street) where volunteers will be giving out coffee, fruit and breakfast snacks, newspapers, prizes and entries into the draw for a Kona Bicycle courtesy of The Bicycle Café in Valleyview, long-time sponsor of the event. Celebration Stations happen

Organizers have been working hard (and in dangerous conditions, apparently) to ensure the success of the 2012 Bike To Work Week event. Running from May 28 to June 3, the week is an opportunity to promote “a healthy, enjoyable and sustainable form of transportation.” Check out biketowork.ca/Kamloops or “Kamloops Bike To Work Week 2012” on Facebook for details and ways to get involved.

—PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

Monday May 28 to Friday Jun. 1 from 6:30 to 9 a.m. The Bicycle Café is also offering free courses in bike maintenance at their Valleyview location on May 16 and 23. Get in touch with Marcia Dick at Marcia.a.dick@gmail.com or 778-470-5695 if you are interested in volunteering to help out, and check out biketowork.ca/kamloops or find them on Facebook for more information on how to get involved. Coincidentally, the Heart and Stoke Foundation Big Bike event comes through Kamloops at the end of May, as well. The Heart and Stroke Foundation is celebrating 50 years of promoting awareness, advocacy and providing research funding for cardiovascular issues, and their Big Bike event raised over $7 million in over 200 communities nationwide last year. The four-day Kamloops event featured 36 teams last year, and raised over $100,000 for the foundation. This year’s ride will begin at the Curling Club downtown on Victoria Street and wind through downtown, as groups of up to 29 riders will power a single bicycle (hence the “Big Bike” title of the event) and you can show your support by registering a team, finding a team to donate to, or just get downtown and cheer them on. The Big Bike event will run Tuesday May 24 to Friday Jun 1. Check out heartandstroke.ca for information on the foundation itself or bigbike.ca for information about the event.

theomega.ca


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 29

Arts & Entertainment Album Review: Detail of Distance

Kim Churchill somehow successfully blends too many ideas together in one amazing journey

Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief I’m always wary when random CD’s show up in my mailbox with letters from agents or producers (usually a generic press release) asking for a review. I’m wary because most of these albums are just horrible. I can’t overstate how truly disgusted I feel about the world when I put these things in my CD player because these “musicians” are getting signed and being allowed — and in fact encouraged — to share their repulsive excretions with the masses. Usually, however, I can give them over to a staff writer to review, and laugh when they come back at me with “Why did you make me listen to that?” Unfortunately, I have no staff over the summer months, so I fired Detail of Distance by Kim Churchill into my computer and waited for it to load, wishing I had a beer in my hand — or a triple scotch. Wow. This album is pretty much the polar opposite of everything I just said. At times Churchill implements a slightly Celtic, Eastern-Canada feel but at others he invokes a more purist “folk medley”

style seemingly more suited to a 1960’s sit-in. At times he slides into a British pop, Coldplay-type vocal inf lection while at other times raspy — almost grunge — sounds come from his throat in offering his poetry. Churchill’s melodies and style sound like his songs should be over-complicating themselves, but the sounds and genres being utilized are so subtly incorporated into his clearly folk-rock background, and done so in a brilliantly seamless way, that they just kind of touch the surface of what he’s doing rather than being blatant or obtrusive mimicry. Coded in Concrete opens the album, and rightly so. Light fingerpicking with harmonica to accent the melody calls one back to their days listening to old Simon and Garfunkel (assuming one had those days) for about two-and-a-half minutes, then seamlessly develops a rockfeel reminiscent of mid 1990’s The Watchmen mixed with oldschool John Mellencamp/Tom Cochrane (I told you it was complicated) before dropping back into its folky tones, and is a perfect introduction to the complex multi-faceted three-quarters of an hour to follow. Bathed In Black will likely

make it into my regular in-car rotation, with its driving rhythm and Dave Matthews-esque guitar/vocal combination — it’s a highway-driving tune in the same league as Golden Earring’s 1973 classic Radar Love. According to the obligatory accompanying press-release, the album is “clearly highlighted by the album’s standout track Season’s Grind.” I disagree. Though Season’s Grind is likely the most marketable track on the album for mass-audience consumption, it’s hardly a “standout track,” though that might just be because the whole album is so good. I haven’t listened to an entire album and not wanted to skip any tracks on the second listen for a long time. Thanks for that, Churchill. It’s rock and it’s folk, but it’s not folk-rock the way you hear that genre in your head. It’s classic rock and modern at the same time. There are touches of country in some places as well. I genuinely have a hard time placing this effort in a genre. If I was managing a music store (do those still exist?) I might have to seriously consider putting it in the “other” section.

—IMAGE COURTESY INDICA RECORDS

At times haunting and echoing, at times driving forward with a purposeful, contagious energy, Detail Of Distance will definitely not be staying on the rack at

the office with the various atrocities we receive in the mail. It’s coming home with me. Detail of Distance is set to be released May 15, 2012.

Album Review: The Music of Smash Jess Wind

The Cascade (UFV) If you are anywhere near primetime on Monday nights, you’ve seen the ads for the latest musical dramedy on television. No, not Glee: The College Years, but close. NBC’s musical within a musical, Smash, has released their soundtrack featuring original songs from the show as well as numerous covers. It could easily be called Katherine McPhee ft. her co-stars as McPhee lends her voice to over half of the 13 tracks. The first song on the album is McPhee’s long awaited single “Touch Me,” which doesn’t appear in the show until episode eight. Its sexy club tone will attract buyers until they realize that it is the only song on the album that feels this way. A quick glance at iTunes proves this: the album, which launched on May 1, reveals immense popularity for the single and considerably less interest for the rest of the ballads and Broadway tunes. For those that do venture beyond the first track, songs two through eight are covers of popular singles. Listeners will recognize Christina Aguilera’s “Beautiful” (sung by McPhee), Michael Buble’s “Haven’t Met You Yet” (sung by Nick Jonas) and Florence and the Machine’s “Shake it out” (also sung by McPhee), among others. Megan Hilty, McPhee’s nemesis on the show, gets two believe-inyourself ballads by Jessie J (“Who You Are”) and Carrie Underwood (“Crazy Dreams”), but it is too bad that they are squished between McPhee singing “Stand” (originally Donnie McClurkin) and “Beautiful.”

The first half of the album falls flat for both fans of the show and folks searching for exciting covers of already famous songs. Eventually, at track nine, the original music from the show begins: Broadwaystyle tunes about Marilyn Monroe. It is at this point in the album that a story seems to emerge and it would be fair to consider the last five tracks separately. Hilty starts with “Let me Be Your Star,” a track that highlights Monroe’s early years in the business. Then McPhee brings us “20th Century Fox Mambo” which moves into the lengths that Monroe went to for her fame. The story continues with a warm duet by Hilty and Will Chase (acting as Monroe and Joe DiMaggio) dreaming of a normal, fameless life. Then on to “Let’s Be Bad,” again by Hilty and the album closes with the pairing of Hilty and Chase for one more love ballad. By the time the album finishes, you have forgotten where it began. Hey, wait a minute, what about the other 30-plus songs that have been featured on the show? Unfortunately many of the more “comedy” flavoured tracks didn’t make the cut – a feeble attempt at sticking to a common theme? Viewers are, no doubt, feeling less than fulfilled with the seemingly random selection of songs for this first soundtrack from the show’s first season; non-viewers won’t make it past the first couple of songs, if they even care to purchase the entire thing. NBC’s The Music of Smash comes off feeling confused and divided, a bad compromise between the show’s pop singles and original music. A select few of the songs shine on the album, but here’s hoping a second release is not far behind.


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May, 2012

Sports

‘Pack-ed full of signings

TRU squads are busy inking recruits to improve upon last season’s performances Adam Williams Ω Contributor

It’s been just a few weeks since the school year ended and already TRU’s sports teams have been busy. In a sense, summer is the most important time of the year for athletics at the University, as managers and coaching staffs work to lock up new recruits for a new year of WolfPack sports. Here’s an advance look at some of the bright young stars joining up with TRU squads for the coming year.

just see more and more strength coming from us. These girls (the recruits) are going to be pushing our vets from last year. Vets have to step up and do the job or they won’t be here.” The WolfPack will be attempting to repeat as league champions this year and will look to improve on their fourth place finish nationally.

Women’s Soccer The WolfPack women’s soccer team has announced the signing of Madison Ellis, of South Kamloops Secondary. Ellis is the fifth prospect to sign with TRU from the Kamloops Secondary soccer program. “Madison is more of a defensive midfielder,” said head coach Tom McManus. “She can play in a wide midfield role, usually in the centre. She will be able to hold the ball for you or distribute it well. She is an extremely athletic girl.” While the WolfPack will only have one spot available at Midfield, Madison is confident in her ability to compete with a number of the team’s veterans. “I think I can measure up to the standards set by them,” she said. “I know it will be different than what I am used to but I am confident I can earn my spot on the team.” Joining Ellis as recent WolfPack signings are Striker Courtney Daly of South Kamloops Secondary and Courtney Burnett of Langley, BC. Ellis will join a plethora of young talent at the forward position, a group that boasted three first year and two second year players last season. “We lost only one player through graduation and to win the provincials and finish fourth in the country was an accomplishment,” said McManus, “I

WolfPack recruit Courtney Daly (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

Men’s Basketball Sometimes, recruiting is nothing more than a game of chance. Just ask WolfPack Basketball prospect Tre Haslom. Haslom is the most recent athlete recruited to play for the WolfPack in 2012-2013 and according to head coach Scott Clark, it was little more than a coincidence that the team stumbled across Him. “We had been contacted about a point guard at Olympic,” he said. “Chas (Kok, Assistant Coach) went down to see Olympic play. He was really intrigued by Tre more than anybody else. Chas had played against him in some open gyms down at Skagit Valley. He knew

him from that. All those factors combined to have us recruit him.” Haslom is a versatile athlete that can play both forward and guard. Playing for the WolfPack at TRU will be his first opportunity to play Canadian Basketball. The WolfPack followed up Haslom’s signing with by locking up highlysough-after point guard Troy-Rose Grant, who played the last two seasons in Toronto, suiting up for the Regional Elite Development Academy. Grant expressed nothing but excitement when speaking of his opportunity to play for TRU, and coach Clark had a similar attitude about the signing. “I think when you look right now, he is young. But once he goes through the growing pains of understanding what I want and what it is to be part of a university team, going to school and being away from home, he really wants to be a basketball player and I think he wants to put the work in. You have to get excited about working with someone like that.”

them to go through their CIS careers. Graham just gives us that stability. He will get a chance to get his reps in with the younger players and that’ll provide a continuity for the future” Stolkier will be joined next year by libero Blake Majcher. Majcher comes to TRU after playing last season with the Medicine Hat College Rattlers. “We really need to make a stand defensively and improve in that aspect of the game. We have a fairly big team and do some good things at the net but out back court needed to be shored up” said Hennelly, “Blake has a reputation of being a tenacious defender.”

Men’s Volleyball TRU is no stranger to PACWEST champions. In fact we have an entire Women’s soccer team of them. This coming season though, the Men’s Volleyball team will add a PACWEST champion of their own. Graham Stoliker is a setter, formerly of the Douglas College Royals. He is expected to be a big part of the team’s future and has prior experience with current WolfPack middle Nic Balazs and outside hitter Brad Gunter. “Graham is at Douglas College and could have stayed for two more years,” head coach Pat Hennelly explained. “He could have stayed there and transferred after [starting setter Colin] Carson was done. But what I am trying to do is improve the meshing of that group with Brad and Nic being two guys I went after hard on Team BC. I want to make sure that there is a good core for both of

WolfPack recruit Colten De Frias (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

Hockey The Wolf Pack have announced three signings in the past month, all of which are expected to bring considerable strength and scoring to the team. Forwards Rigby Burgart (formerly of the WHL’s Calgary Hitmen), Chase Edwards and Colten De Frias (both formerly of the Kamloops Storm), will be joining the squad

for the 2012-2013 season and will bring years of experience with them. “Chase is a gifted goal scorer and is very instinctive in the offensive end. Puck’s seem to find him,” said head coach Don Shultz. “He has an excellent shot and skilled hands. He is a good skater and has some physicality to his game. I’m looking for him to contribute offensively and has the potential to be a top-six forward.” According to Shultz, “Colten is a tireless worker and doesn’t shy away from any physicality. He has excellent speed and can score,” and Burgart will add size and grit to a team that needs it going forward. All three players are expected to see significant time in the coming season, while playing very different roles. Edwards and De Frias will be expected to provide a significant amount of the team’s offensive production, while Burgart is more of the stereotypical “role player.” “I’ve watched Rigby play since his first season in Quesnel and have admired the way he plays the game, said Wolf Pack general manager Chris Hans. “He’s an honest, tough player. I expect Rigby to play a significant role for the ‘Pack for years to come.” The Wolf Pack finished the 2011/2012 regular season with a 12-8-4 record, before recording 1 win and 2 losses in the playoffs. The team will look to improve on that finish in the coming year and Edwards, De Frias, and Burgart will be significant players in next year’s push. For more information on Wolf Pack off-season moves and events, go to tru.ca/athletics.

Disappointment again for baseball team Adam Williams Ω Contributor

The Wolf Pack didn’t look like a squad that managed to post a 17-11 regular season record as they hosted the CCBC League Championships in early May. The team was eliminated from contention for the league title in the semi-finals May 12, at the hands of the Prairie Baseball Academy Dawgs — bringing to an end what can only be characterized as a disappointing showing for the host team. After winning their first game against OCC 3-1 the Wolf Pack failed to record another victory in the four games that followed. “We just didn’t hit the whole tournament,” said Head Coach Ray Chadwick. “ When you don’t hit you have to pitch and play defence a lot better. We didn’t do that. We were lucky to get into the semi-finals.” The Wolf Pack are team that has battled through adversity all year, losing key players to significant injuries early on, but managed to finish the season with a very respectable record and even won 7 of their last 10 games. It was the type of clutch performance that would be crucial in the championships. Un-

fortunately, the Wolf Pack wasn’t able to sustain that high level of play. “We got here and went backwards,” said Chadwick, in concluding his characterization of the team’s season. “It wasn’t the time to do it.”

WolfPack baseball’s Alex Condon (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

The Prairie Baseball Academy Dawgs went on to win the tournament and capture their second consecutive league championship Sunday May 13, defeating the Vancouver Baseball Institute Mariners by a score of 5-1. The Dawgs were the favourites head-

ing into the week’s event and looked it, with 5 wins and 1 loss on the way to receiving the gold medal. While it was a tough weekend for the Wolf Pack on the field, there were a few bright moments in the week’s events. Prior to the commencement of this tournament play, the Wolf Pack made an impressive showing at the CCBC Awards Banquet, as three players took home individual awards. Alex Condon finished the season with league highs in home runs (9) and RBIs (30), David Hole was named the top hitter in the league with a batting-average of .374 and pitcher Denver Wynn finished tied for the most wins with 5 on the season. TRU was well represented on the league’s all-star teams as well, as Alex Condon, Tyler Lowey, and Denver Wynn were named first team all-stars, and David Hole and Jimmy Semaschuk were selected as second team all-stars. With the conclusion of the season, the Wolf Pack’s focus now turns to next year and the roster that will represent TRU on the field. Coach Chadwick is confident that the future is bright for the Wolf Pack. “As long as I’m here we will always be competitive. We will always be the top two or three teams in this league,” he said.

The Canadian Football League’s B.C. Lions will once again hold their spring training camp right here at TRU beginning May 30. The rookies arrive for a three-day camp before the veterens arrive. It is a physically and emotionally gruelling time for the players, and you can show them your support by getting out for Fan Day at Hillside Stadium on Sunday, Jun. 10. Bring your black and orange and get some autographs while you’re there.

—PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 29

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1. Donkeywork 5. Window type 10. “Love Will Find ___” 14. Puente ___ 15. Winter wear 16. Radial, e.g. 17. Con escapes from the “City of Festivals”? 20. Demagogue, for short 21. Plays mind games 22. Exigencies 23. Aces, sometimes 24. ___ lox 26. Some are secret 29. Diminish 30. Carney, to pals 33. Medicinal balsam 34. Daring Sufi 35. Former French coin 36. Con escapes from the home of ESPN? 40. Before now 41. Defeat 42. Italian magistrate 43. Nevertheless 44. British cape 45. Grim Reaper prop 47. 2.54 centimeters 48. Chutzpah 49. Scandinavian currency 52. Greek letter 53. ___ de deux

56. Con escapes from resort peninsula? 60. Drone, e.g. 61. Tyrone ___, American boxer 62. American record label 63. Snoop Dogg song 64. Sock fabric 65. Kid brother, e.g. Down 1. Pack (down) 2. Medley 3. Common contraction 4. Down and dirty 5. Works 6. Libertines 7. Chafes 8. Squeeze out 9. Police, with “the” 10. Addled 11. Owlish? 12. Bone-dry 13. Cravings 18. Bee, to Opie 19. Flip 23. ___ probandi 24. “___ Lunch” 25. Auricular 26. Safely distant 27. Deep valley 28. “The Hippopotamus” poet 29. Marriage announcement 30. English race place

31. ___ draft 32. Student getting one-on-one help 34. Kin 37. Dig 38. Powerful cartel 39. Romantic interlude (var.) 45. Shiny fabric 46. Attack with nails 47. Dickey 48. Bananas 49. Dole’s running mate, 1996 50. Shag rugs 51. Bribes 52. Murti 53. Corn ___ 54. Song and dance, e.g. 55. “Laugh-In” segment 57. ___ system (re: blood) 58. Neither’s partner 59. Western Pacific island E G G S

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8

May, 2012

Life & Community Peace is something to fight for

37th Annual Kamloops Peace Walk takes to the streets of downtown Kamloops yet again Samantha Garvey Ω Contributor

As has happened 37 years in a row, the faces around Stuart Wood Elementary had a little more paint on them one sunny May afternoon and the field was lined with many colourful signs. Because, as has happened 36 years in a row previously, the Kamloops Peace Walk was about to commence. The sun was high and hot as local musicians were crooning and playing guitar to the crowd before the microphone was returned to George Feenstra, the event’s MC. Music and speeches, poems and art were presented in preparation for the walk around the downtown core to promote peace, social justice and the environment. Despite the cheerful, sunny demeanour on May 5, the artists and speakers who took the stage and streets had a serious message — well, not one message but many. They hoped to shed light on significant local, national and international issues. Everyone at this event had been inspired to stand up and speak out, and pass the torch on to others to do the same. According to Anita Strong, member of the Council of Canadians, the co-sponsor of the event for the last 13 years, the goal of the day is more than awareness, but to call people to action. “I think the people go away from an event like this and get inspired to do something, to join a group, to speak out,” said Strong. “It makes me really happy that there is this kind of support,” she said. This year saw over 250 participants. “More and more people are getting involved every year,” said John Hall, the president of the Kamloops & District Labour Council, the other co-sponsor that has been involved since the first event in 1975. In his address to the crowd he touched on many injustices that Canadian workers have been subjected to.

“Many of our rights are being threatened. We’re here today because of a government that puts profit before people and profit before the protection of our environment.” Hall organized peace walks in the lower mainland before he moved to Kamloops and has been involved in this one since he arrived here 15 years ago. “It’s a matter of priorities and values, and we’d like to see the values that Canadians used to have,” said Strong. The issues discussed also came from a local level. Much of the art and many of the presentations were regarding the proposed KGHM Ajax mine, an open-pit copper and gold mine located 50 percent within Kamloops’ south east city limits. Charmian and Bill Ferguson were also in attendance. They (along with their children) organized the first walk 37 years ago, and have been active members of the Kamloops community for decades. “There’s no quick fix to anything,” said Bill. “It’s a slow process and it takes a long time.” One idea that was common to much of the day was that peace is something not to take for granted, but for each Canadian to actively fight for. “Peace cannot be passivity, it is a constant effort and takes great strength,” Athena Gradwell said to the crowd. She is a local activist who has spoken out against Ajax in the past. Having described the battle of peace, the swelling crowd took to Battle Street to begin the march around the downtown core. Feenstra kept the participants (including babies, dogs, and costumed and facepainted adults) lively and loud. In return, they were met with honks and cheers from the cars and sidewalks. The cheers were both positive and negative, some calling out from a pro-mining stance, for example. Upon their return, the crowd was treated with the sounds of local Kamloops band Caliente, who was crooning, “I am everyday people,” which was befitting a gathering promoting peace and equality

TOP: The longest running Peace Walk in the country begins at Stuart Wood Elemantary School before heading into the downtown streets of Kamloops. ABOVE: Local business owner and Kamloops city councillor Donovan Cavers. BELOW LEFT: Local artist Vaughn Warren and daughter Tesserae, 7, ready their signs in anticipation of this year’s peace walk BELOW RIGHT: Charmian and Bill Ferguson began the First Annual Peace Walk in 1975, and have been involved ever since.

—ALL PHOTOS BY SAMANTHA GARVEY

May, 2012  

The May, 2012 edition of The Omega

May, 2012  

The May, 2012 edition of The Omega

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