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VOLUME 21 ISSUE 22 March 7, 2012

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Adrian Miller interview

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TRU Art Gallery has eclectic exhibit 7

TRU hosts another championship 13

Help coming to displaced students

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PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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March 7, 2012

News Student senator feels “singled out”

Adrian Miller released from detainment, not allowed on campus after-hours added to bail conditions Cavelle Layes Ω Contributor

Student senator Adrian Miller feels he was singled out after he was released on bail last Friday only to learn about the TRU “lockdown” that was put in place. TRU’s student-elected senator, Miller questions university officials’ right to take the actions they have taken. “They have made a mockery out of their own rules and policies,” said Miller in an interview just moments after his release. “They have made a mockery out of the law and justice and I don’t think that’s right.” Miller believes that his rights as a student have been trampled on and even compromised in many ways. TRU officials asked the court earlier Friday morning to completely ban Miller from campus after he had allegedly been found sleeping in computer labs the week before. The judge however did not believe this action was fitting to the situation and instead, as a condition of bail, told Miller he was prohibited to be on campus grounds between the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. “I have seen other people sleep-

“They are definitely trying to get to TRU and wonders why they are ing [in] labs,” said Miller. “They have slept in labs when I have been the students scared of me. I don’t coming at him so hard now. “I don’t think they have any speknow if it’s working but they’re sleeping.” cific grounds,” said Miller. TRU officials have tried going definitely trying,” said Miller. He wants to know where the stuMiller said he knew the univerthrough the court system more than once in an attempt to keep sity wanted him gone but didn’t dent union has been during this whole experience. Miller off campus only to be de- think they would go this far. “They are supposed to be pro“I now know that they are willnied each time. tecting the rights “They are now of the students,” he trying to do it adsaid. ministratively, by “Where are they seeking to suspend when these things if not expel me inhappen? definitely from the “They say they university,” said have advocacy and Miller. all these services, He believes they but I would really are trying to do like to know what this by “using their —Adrian Miller they are doing beinternal academic cause I have never polices and proceseen them. dures.” “I have never received a phone When asked why he believes the ing to do anything to win and I school has singled him out Miller didn’t know they are willing to go call or so much as an email. They responded, “It’s about politics. to this extent just to try to destroy have never asked, ‘is there anything we can do to aid you.’” They don’t like the fact that I’m one person,” said Miller. Dustin McIntyre, VP internal TRU has, “a lot of money and a on the senate and that I am on the governorship…. They haven’t been lot of power. They have just about for TRUSU said that Miller’s isable to defeat me yet, so this is all the Kamloops law firms on sues range beyond the scope of what the organization deals with. their side. their last chance. “If he is being held on charges “They are a powerful entity, so “They are simply trying to beat somebody down. It hasn’t worked to know that they are doing this to by the RCMP, there is nothing we yet and it is not going to work lat- one person, to one man, it’s a little can do to support him in those issues,” said Dustin McIntyre, and sad.” er.” Miller doesn’t believe anything refused to speculate on what issues Miller believes that these achas changed since he first came Miller is referring to in his claims tions are simply, “scare tactics.”

“I am going to graduate from Thompson Rivers University whether Thompson Rivers University likes it or not.”

about their lack of presence around his case. Miller hopes that other students will use him as an example for standing up for one’s rights and not allowing yourself to be pushed around. “If you do have an issue with the university I don’t think that my stor y should scare you off. “I think you should always stand up for yourself, don’t back down,” he said. “If you scream loudly enough they will come at you hard but don’t be scared.” As for whether he will be retur ning back to TRU again next year Miller replied, “I am going to graduate from Thompson Rivers University whether Thompson Rivers University likes it or not.” Editor’s note: Diana Skoglund, TRU’s Media & Communications co-ordinator has since confirmed that the added security measures are in fact a response to Adrian Miller’s situation, stating, “We’ve consulted with external campus experts on campus security and we’ve really carefully considered it, and that’s why we’re taking these measures.”

Criticism of arts faculty funding may not be warranted Regardless of the opinion of many students, the numbers say that arts gets more than its share of the funds D. Mark Crown Ω Contributor

A growing number of students at Thompson Rivers University are troubled by the direction of the faculty of arts. This according to bachelor of arts student Alexandra Moulton, who believes the university needs to do more to show students that they are valued. “I think TRU just has to show that it has an interest in the arts program, because right now it doesn’t feel like they do,” she says. “There is so much emphasis on business, it kind of feels like arts is an afterthought.” Those sentiments are echoed by Kayla Schibli, a B.A. student majoring in sociology who is disappointed with the choices available to her in class selection. “I have had a really hard time f inding classes that I have been interested in,” she says. “Not having a poli-sci [political science] major is just dis-

gusting to me.” But Michael Mehta, dean of the faculty of arts, disagrees, and is encouraging students to continue in their studies. “Students in arts programs across this country have historically felt like poor cousins,” he said. “Although I understand these sentiments and appreciate where they are coming from, it’s important to remind people that in most universities, including TRU, an arts education is the cornerstone of institutions.” In response to these comments Schibli said, “Definitely not. They [TRU] put a lot of their funding into specific areas like the nursing program and the tourism program, and although they are not the cornerstones of the university, they receive the majority of the funding for sure.” This belief is held among many students at the university, but it may not be entirely accurate. The base operating expenditures for the last fiscal year show that compared to the full-time

TRU average expenditures (per student) 2011/12 School of Business and Economics School of Trades and Technology Faculty of Social and Educational Development TRU Average School of Tourism Faculty of Sciences

$8,747 $12,159 $17,751 $19,547 $22,689 $25,946

School of Nursing

$31,237

Faculty of Arts

$36,097

While it is important to realize that these are averaged figures, it certainly brings into question the complaints from many students about funding allocation. —IMAGE BY MIKE DAVIES

equivalent student count, the faculty of arts actually received more money per student than any other academic division. The average expenditure per student at TRU is $19,547. But the faculty of arts spends $36,097 per student, which is 85 per cent higher.

By way of contrast the school of business and economics only spends $8,747 per student, which is 55 per cent below the university average. “I personally don’t believe that arts is underfunded,” Mehta says. “Arts programming is highly variable in its cost structure, and

theomega.ca

as a result you are likely to find some faculty and students, depending on their discipline and program, feeling this way while others do not. “Our growth, impact and saliency to the wider world depends upon our ability to meet changing student and societal needs.”


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

THE

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www.theomega.ca

March 7, 2012

Volume 21, Issue 22

Published since November 27, 1991

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editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

Editorial

Maybe your lint trap will cause problems one day

Step up to help those displaced by apartment fire

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Roving Editor

Taylor Rocca Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Cavelle Layes, D. Mark Crown, Amy Berard, Devan C. Tasa, Lee Richardson, Sarah Henderson, Simon Braun, Angela Espinoza, Fraser Caldwell

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

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Editor’s Note Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief Every one of the over 100 apartment doors in my building on Dalgleish Dr. had a note from building management taped to it last Friday. The notes asked all residents interested in helping out to leave extra housewares and useful items in the building’s laundry room in order to help those displaced by the fire that roared through Copper Ridge Apartments on Mar. 1. I immediately cursed myself for effectively “spring cleaning” my apartment last fall. Many of you reading this may have not been so effective though, so I encourage you to pitch in wherever you can. Have you got an extra toaster or coffee maker in a closet somewhere? Maybe a bag of clothes you haven’t been able to con-

vince yourself to get rid of because you “might wear them again one day?” Think about what you would need if your apartment burned down or f looded and you didn’t think about rescuing the stuff in your Tupperware cupboard, or didn’t grab your travel mug, hairdryer or Snuggie before you had to evacuate. Why not take your extra things — really, do you need them anyway if they’re “extra” things — to the Salvation Army at 269 Tranquille Rd. on the North Shore because that’s who would be helping you if you ended up in a similar situation. Major Wayne McTaggert of the Salvation Army says that the organization is also supplying displaced residents with vouchers for the Salvation Army Thrift Stores to aid in the replacement of furniture, clothing or housewares. A fundraiser has been organized by a few communityminded TRU students and will be held at Manhattan Grill ( just off campus by the Trades and Technology building entrance and behind Walmart) on Thursday, Mar. 8 from 5 to 9 p.m. You can get a beef, chicken or salmon burger or a pound of chicken wings with your choice of side garden salad or fries for $15 and help the cause. Tickets are available at the TRUSU membership desk by Common Grounds in the Independence

Centre (attached to the Campus Activity Centre). They will have a few tickets left for sale at the event itself, but it is appreciated if you get your dinner ticket ahead of time at the membership desk to avoid complications — like not getting one of the leftover tickets. An emergency bursary fund is available to help the students affected as well. Those interested in helping out financially who can’t make it to the fundraiser at Manhattan Grill on Thursday can go to www.tru.ca/makeagift, check the box marked “Specific scholarship or award,” and then type “Emergency Bursary Fund” in the “Award Name” section. The TRU Foundation will provide tax receipts to all contributors to the bursary. Check out the TRU Newsroom blog and find out if you’re in a class that has an affected student in it. They may have lost their notes for the last two months, and you can help out there too. And hey, if you have an extra room (or couch, even) that you could lend to someone while they wait for the cleanup operations, get in touch with TRU Student and Judicial Affairs at 250-852-7117. You never know when a dryer in your laundry room is going to ignite a lint trap and cause some serious difficulties for you through no fault of your own, so help out where you can when it happens to someone else.

recommendations to the city on issues that will have social impacts. Rodrigue became involved with the council in July 2010, and less than a year later, in

Brendan Shaw is a former TRU business student and sits on the Social Planning Council as well. He also holds board positions with several local non-profits such as the Elizabeth Fry Society. Shaw lists learning experiences and new connections as two large advantages to his community involvement. Both Rodrigue and Shaw agreed it is important to find a role that fulfills your passion. “Find a society that you are interested in - one that has the same goals, values and likeminded volunteers. “You are going to be placing a lot of time, effort and commitment into your role as a volunteer, so you need to make sure it is the right fit,” Shaw said. Kamloops depends on volunteers to increase the capacity of non-profit and community organizations. When TRU students offer their knowledge and energy as leaders, the opportunity to create change is realized. Find an hour, day, or week this semester to follow your passion into the community.

Follow a passion, volunteer and become a community leader While studying at TRU there are many clubs, committees and services looking for volunteers and student representatives to contribute. A leadership role on campus can expand your friend circle and offer you new skill sets to enhance your learning. The experience, recognition and networks it can bring to you are endless. With so much here at TRU, it’s easy to forget how much the community needs your perspective and passion as a youth. Off-campus opportunities can use your classroom knowledge to effect real change. Many non-profit organizations in Kamloops seek out young citizens as members of their boards of directors. The City of Kamloops’ committees themselves look to have the youth voice represented in city planning. This week I had a chance to speak with two young Kamloops citizens, a former and a current TRU student, about how they are each directly inf luencing initiatives to address the root causes of social issues. Jovan Rodrigue is a TRU computer science student and the chair of the city’s Social Planning Council. It’s an important and inf luential role that gives him the responsibility of leading the 13-person council in making

Know Your Community Amy Berard

March, was elected to the position of chair. The role has given Rodrigue the opportunity to learn more about our city. “While I don’t necessarily feel that my role is as important as some of the people involved in the numerous social agencies in town, I feel I am a better person for doing what I do. It really just encourages me to want to do more in our community,” he said.

Amy Berard is a TRU business student and the campus liaison for United Way. To get connected with the community, email her at youth@unitedwaytnc.ca.

Student elections upon us again Brendan Kergin Ω News Editor

It’s that time of year again. Ballot boxes are put together, the smell of fresh ink on campaign posters lingers in the air and the debate and banter of student politicians fills the air on campus grounds across the country. Yes, I’ve taken a friendly tone with the student union elections this year, because I believe everyone needs to chill the fuck out some days. Yes, politics can be contentious, but no one wants to end up like the classic blowhard trust-free trust-fund politicians we see on TV. Student politics is one of the few places you can see democracy in action. Some say it’s due to a small voting base. Others say it’s due to a more personal connection to students sharing classes with you as opposed to taking military helicopters from fishing lodges. Personally, I think it’s because of all of that and more. If you have a person in responsibility you can go talk to right away, you’re going to make sure that person is someone you can talk to. Also, these people are often friends, acquaintances or members of the community for three or four years. You often know them or at least about them, as those running for office tend to make it their business to stand out. Some may stand out because they’re blowhards, seeking attention like a 13-year-old boy seeks the bra section of the Sears catalogue. Others simply grab your eye because they are passionate about an issue that they feel they have the power to change So lets give them our ears for a couple weeks, especially those actually looking to continue moving the school forward. Student representation is always low, so we need those who take that role to count. Apathy and communication issues are something that face many schools, and we’re no different here. But this is not the time to not pay attention to politics because you don’t really understand. Here’s a hint: almost no one fully understands politics, otherwise they’d be elected every time. This is a school, where you learn things. Don’t think that the student nominees knew all about politics upon arrival at the school. Being interested in the choices made by those in power isn’t a genetic trait handed down. It’s like some strange food delicacy, an acquired taste. This acquired taste isn’t like others though. It’s not your responsibility to like curry, but it is your duty as a member of whichever society you are a part of to partake in its democracy. And while federal politics might be big and scary; And while provincial politics bipartisan and petty; A nd wh i le mu n icipal p ol it ics u n i mp or t a nt a nd for home ow ne r s; You shou ld st a r t pay i ng att e nt ion. So do it at scho ol, whe re you le a r n.


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March 7, 2012

News No action to reform TRU increases security broken student around Clocktower, Old Main election process Devan C. Tasa Ω Contributor

Some still lobbying for change “Obviously we weren’t pleased with how it went,” Robinson said. Ω Contributor “It was really ridiculously hard to get people involved in the elecThe TRU senate isn’t looking tion as it was during a super busy at reforming its election rules time.” For his part, Robinson says he for student representatives to the senate and board of governors to will continue to lobby the regisprevent a repeat of the problems trar’s office, which was responsible for conducting the election, faced in the last election. The election was held online to make changes. As for making from Dec. 8 to Dec. 22, 2011, at a motion at a senate meeting that the same time as exams and holi- calls for reforms, that’s something that Robdays. The isinson says he sue was caused has to investiby a delay afgate further. ter a problem Jordan Harwas discovered ris, TRUSU’s with the voters VP external, lists in comsays the stubination with dent union also rigid timing has concerns. requirements “The elecin the election tion [turnout] rules. numbers were Only 2.2 per low,” Harris cent of 13,689 said. “We want eligible voters the best politicast a ballot. cal representaAmong those tion on campus elected to the and we do want board and sento see the numate was Adrian bers increase.” Miller, who, TRUSU has in the past has offered to run had a diffithe elections cult relationship with the —Jordan Harris for the university at the university and same time they is currently involved in a lawsuit with the conduct their own elections, Harris says. He added that the offer school. An email from the university has been extended for “the past secretariat, the office that deals couple of years.” “If TRU wants our assistance with the senate’s policies and procedures, confirmed that the for the election we’d be more than issue of changing the election happy to do it,” said Harris. “We rules has not come before senate. want to do what we can to help to The university secretariat ensure more political representahadn’t returned The Omega’s re- tion and higher turnouts.” According to Harris, the uniquests for an interview by press versity has not responded to the time. Fiona Chan, the chair of the offer. However, Robinson says he board of governors, says that likes the idea a lot. “Everyone can expect when the she was unaware of the circumstances of the election. She says elections will be,” Robinson said. that the board will not ask for any “I think it would raise voter turnout because one of the strengths changes to the rules. “I’m sure that administration of the student union elections is will look at it, but this is not un- they’re physical. It’s on campus, der the direction of the board,” it’s present, people are reminded Chan said. “That’s not our func- about it, and there are people campaigning.” tion.” The next election, for the secStudent senator Dylan Robinson says the student senators ond student position on the board, have concerns about the voter will be held online from Mar. 20 to Apr. 2. turnout at the election.

Devan C. Tasa

“We want the best political representation on campus and we do want to see the numbers increase.”

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TRU has increased security in the Clocktower Building and near the student services area of Old Main. According to Diana Skoglund, TRU’s Media & Communications co-ordinator, security is being increased to ensure that the university is meeting due diligence and WorkSafeBC requirements. “Staff, faculty and students are not unlike the regular population who read the paper and have read about incidences that may have been going on where individuals were threatening their landlord,” said Skoglund. “Those people would be concerned about their safety as much as anyone else would be.” Threats by young people against landlords and building owners are not unheard of. For example, in October 2010, controversial student senator Adrian Miller was convicted of mischief

after an incident in 2007 where he drove his vehicle to within two to three inches of his former landlord, according to a judgment written by Judge Michael Gray that found Miller guilty of vandalizing a Prince George apartment. “I find that his actions towards [the landlord] while in his vehicle were meant to intimidate,” wrote Gray. Skoglund said the increased security is not the result of an individual request or a particular incident, however in a press release dated Feb. 24, Fiona Chan, Chair of TRU board of Governors, said, “The top priority of TRU is the safety and security of students, faculty and staff and this decision was made after a thorough and complete review,” said Fiona Chan, Chair TRU Board of Governors. “In Mr. Miller’s case, he has been found sleeping in campus public spaces, including the computer labs and other common areas, in contravention of TRU policies.”

Miller’s board of governors induction delayed Devan C. Tasa Ω Contributor

The TRU board of governors has delayed Adrian Miller’s oath of office. Miller was arrested for an alleged breach of probation on Feb. 23, missing his first board meeting on the same day. He was released on Mar. 2. “The board decided that we would want to delay until we figure out all of the issues,” said Fiona Chan, the chair of the board of governors. According to Chan, the board has concerns about the issues Miller is currently facing in court, as well as concerns about allegations of Miller sleeping in a TRU computer lab despite requests from security to leave. Miller told Omega reporter Cavelle Layes he thinks the allegation he was sleeping in labs is a, “little bit exaggerated if not outright false.”

“It’s really primarily for the safety of students, faculty and staff on campus,” said Chan. “Everything done is with that in mind.” Chan says even if Miller were able to attend the meeting, the board had an in-camera meeting at which it was decided that Miller’s oath of office would have been delayed. Miller told Layes he felt hurt by the delay and questioned its legality. “They do not have any legal grounds to stop someone from being sworn in that’s elected,” said Miller. “I don’t know how they plan on justifying that one.” Chan says the board has the authority under its bylaws to delay the oath of office. As of press time, The Omega has not yet located the section of the bylaws that provides the board with that authority. -With files from Cavelle Layes

No students will be blocked from entering their classes located in the Clocktower, said Skoglund. “Students are free to come and go to the journalism lab and the alumni theatre for their classes,” said Skoglund. “They just may be inconvenienced by having to ask to have the door opened for them.” Skoglund says the increased security, which began again on Mar. 2, will continue into next week and that TRU will be reassessing the situation daily. TRU first increased security on Friday Feb. 24 then did it again for part of the day on Monday Feb. 27. When Miller found out about the increased security, he laughed. “That’s a new one,” Miller told Omega reporter Cavelle Layes. “I think my laughter speaks louder than words. I think they are trying scare tactics now.” “I just don’t understand what crime I have done that would ban me from university campus that would have them feeling like that. I have done nothing violent, I have never been violent.” -With files from Cavelle Layes

Want to get involved in covering campus news? Apply to contribute to The Omega. We’re always looking for writers, photographers and volunteers for events.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

News Federal student summer job centres to close, move online Lee Richardson

CUP Ontario Bureau Chief TORONTO (CUP) — The federal government is closing job centres that help students find seasonal summer employment, shifting its services online to save $6.5 million a year. The offices, called Service Canada Centres for Youth, were open temporarily from May to August to offer job-finding advice and career-building tips to youth aged 15 to 24. “The number of students visiting these sites has significantly decreased over the years, making them less effective and relevant for today’s youth,” said Alyson Queen, spokesperson for Human Resources and Skills Development Minister Diane Finley. “Young Canadians have told us that they want to access more government services online, so as a result we are expanding our website with more resources to help them find employment.” While Finley announced on Jan. 27 that services were moving to the government’s youth employment

site, there was no mention in that an- good forms of training, coaching and said NDP post-secondary educanouncement that the centres would be development of skills ultimately to tion critic and MP for Scarboroughget around the labour market,” said Rouge River Rathika Sitsabaiesan. closing. Diverse reaction has followed the McMaster University political sci- “We should be encouraging our ence professor Peter Graefe. “All that youth to find better employment, we announcement. should be providing “It doesn’t surthat support, but we prise me, because can’t.” this government has Trudeau said that shown its willingthe issue has been ness to cut its exbrought up briefly in penses on the backs the House of Comof the most vulnermons. able,” said Liberal “It came up at MP for Papineau one point in quesJustin Trudeau, the tion period and [the party’s critic for C o n s e r v a t i v e s’ ] youth and post-sec —Rathika Sitsabaiesan answers have been ondary education. about streamlining, “Young people, offering the same unfortunately, are quality of services, easy targets in that making better use of taxpayers’ dolis lost when we move things online.” sense.” The shift online comes at a time lars,” said Trudeau. “But this is not The centres provided career advice such as resume writing and interview when unemployment among Cana- making better use of taxpayers’ doltechniques, and were stationed coun- dian youth is 14.5 per cent, according lars, this is removing investments in try-wide with about 100 in Ontario to Statistics Canada — almost double young people.” The federal Conservatives, howthe rate of unemployment of all Caalone. ever, are reiterating the fact that the “There might be a good reason to nadians. “We need to be ensuring that youth summer job-finding services will move important aspects of these job centres online, but the other side of it have access to jobs and that youth still continue, being integrated into is you probably need, more than ever, have access to services to find jobs,” already existing Service Canada of-

“We should be encouraging our youth to find better employment.”

fices. “What we want to be clear about is students will continue to have access to in person service… at our Service Canada offices,” said Queen. “There is no longer the need for these seasonal temporary offices.” Also repeated by the federal government is the statement that more young people are going online. But according to Graefe, excluding those who cannot navigate the online job market could be problematic, and that while those who know how to move from the online job market to getting a job will do well, others who might not have access or experience with looking for jobs online could be left behind. “There [are] problems that haven’t been thought of,” Graefe said, adding that if youth use other mainstream online job sites to find work, support for the traditional centres may not be enough for them to stay open. “It’s a government that’s looking to cut as much as possible, in places that they think people aren’t going to feel it, and let’s face it — youth aren’t going to come out for these employment centres,” he said.

TRUSU election time Camosun College radio rolls around again station off-air, goes digital-only Voting to take place Mar. 21 and 22 after week-long campaigning period Brendan Kergin Ω News Editor

It’s election time again, and the posters are up and the nomination packages printed. Now TRUSU is looking for candidates for 11 positions. “There’s the executive position and then there are the faculty reps and the advocacy reps,” said Nathan Lane, executive director of the student union and member of the TRUSU electoral committee. The faculty reps are three elected positions that participate in council meetings and other TRUSU activities. The advocacy reps work in a similar manner, but also work with collectives related to the group they represent. The executive positions include the president, VP finances, VP external and VP internal. They’re a step up in responsibility and attend council and executive meetings among other activities. This year executive members have travelled to Canadian Federation of Students conferences and spoken with many politicians. TRUSU will be looking for nominations starting Mar. 7. Nominations will be accepted for one week. Interested TRUSU members can inquire at the TRUSU about packages to fill out. “It requires the signature and nomination of members who are in good standing of the union. You have to identify a position and whether or not you’re a candidate on a slate,” said Lane. “The electoral committee reviews them at the end of the nomination period.” According to TRUSU policy, a student in good standing is anyone who has been assessed fees and has paid them.

Nominees are required to have the signatures of 10 members in good standing with the union. Once that is completed the process begins rolling quickly. Candidates will have a general meeting with the electoral committee to go over the campaigning procedures and rules. They are than able to campaign until Mar. 22, the day polls close. TRUSU’s electoral policy asks that candidates and slates, “act reasonably, responsibly and in good faith.” “What will happen is you will have the various slates go out and do tabling and hand-billing and posters and basically have a discussion about, with the members, why they believe they should be elected,” said Lane. “There’s also an all-candidates forum where the executive members are at the front of the room and members have an opportunity to ask them questions about their portfolio.” There are a variety of TRUSU electoral policies relating to campaigning. For example no clubs or student groups registered with the student union may provide any slate or candidate from within. Voting will take place on Mar. 21, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on Mar. 22, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Lane says this gives students a good chance to get into the Independent Centre to vote. As these days are a Wednesday and a Thursday and include an evening, many students will be on campus. Over the two-day period most will have a few minutes to spare to cast a ballot. For those interested in nomination packages, visit the TRUSU desk. For those interested in the electoral policy, visit the TRUSU website at trusu. ca/section/231.

Station looks forward to new listenership as AM transmitter costs become too large Sarah Henderson

Nexus (Camosun College) VICTORIA (CUP) — As of March 4, Camosun College’s radio station will have been taken off the airwaves and set up online. CKMO Village 900, a non-profit, educational radio station located at the Lansdowne campus, has stopped broadcasting its AM frequency and will only be available to listeners by streaming online. “This is not the end for us,” says Brad Edwards, Village 900 station manager. “We still have a station, we are still going to broadcast and students will still receive the same education.” The radio station, established in 1973 and formerly heard on an FM frequency, provides training for students in the applied communication program (ACP). In September of 2000, the station struck a deal with Rogers Communications to relinquish their old FM location with Rogers agreeing to pay for the use of an AM transmitter. When the deal with Rogers recently expired, CKMO’s board of directors decided that the cost to keep the AM transmitter was too large. “It’s an expensive venture, no matter how you look at it,” says Edwards, who says the yearly cost of the transmitter was over $60,000. “We don’t really have another option. We have to think about what’s cost-effective and bringing the station off-air and going online seems like the right answer.” Allie Bowman, assistant promotion director at the Zone and ACP grad, says going digital isn’t a bad thing. “I think it’s going to be ben-

Village 900 station manager Brad Edwards.. —PHOTO BY SARAH HENDERSON

eficial,” she says. “Village 900 now gets a chance to play in the social media world, intrigue new listeners, and, more importantly, students will still be able to gain that valuable studio experience. It’s possible that Village 900’s current supporters will not be able to adapt this change, but streaming online will appeal to a whole new demographic.” By going fully digital, Village 900 will now be heard all around

the world, for anyone who wants to tune into the livestream, including those using smartphones. “It’s time that we embrace new tech nologies and adapt that into ou r prog ram,” says Edwards. “I never saw this coming, but Village 900 is embracing this. We are going to focus on where we are going tomor row and that is what is impor tant: the new f rontier.”


6

March 7, 2012

News In case you missed it, Kergin’s got you covered:

Bonus Editorial The three-step plan to rob teachers

Things you probably didn’t see happening around you last week Brendan Kergin Ω News Editor

Global • Pun k Lifest yle W hile some pun k rockers in Nor th A mer ica may feel a little repressed by “ the man,” it is unlikely they face any thing like their counter par ts in Indonesia and Bu r ma. At a recent pun k show in Jakar ta, Indonesia, 65 at tendees were ar rested before the show got star ted. W hile no charges were laid, they were sent to a police-r un re-education camp to spend 10 days get ting cleaned up and ret rained for societ y. Meanwhile in Bu r ma, a small g roup of pun ks have star ted up, with the constant th reat of gover n ment inter vention. With the Bu r mese junta being one of the most repressive in the world, the pun ks stand for something more than fashion in their minds, shouting resistance in an abandoned restau rant. Read more at spiegel.de/inter national. • Pr ivate Police The U.K. is looking at cont racting out some of its more classic police f unctions to pr ivate companies according to some leaked documents. A couple of police forces have looked at moving some of their f unctions over to pr ivate businesses due to large cuts in their budgets. This would include some pat rolling and investigation procedu res. W hile it is not yet a cer taint y to happen, it does highlight the f inancial sit uation cur rently taking place in Eu rope. Read more at bbc.co.u k /news.

National • Climate Science? One g roup of scientists is suggesting another scientist’s class has got some bad science in it. The Ot tawa-based Com mittee for the Advancement of Scientif ic Skepticism has singled out Tom Har r is’ Carlton Universit y class, “Climate Change: A n Ear th Sciences Perspective” as showing bias and containing inaccu rate science. Har r is is par t of an Ot tawabased g roup called Inter national Climate Science Coalition, which does not suppor t the com monly-held scientif ic opinion that humans are altering the planet’s climate. Har r is has been teaching the cou rse for t wo years as a replacement for a professor going on sabbatical. Read more at cbc.ca.

•Drummond report A report was recently presented to the Ontario provincial government with 362 recommendations on how to balance the budget by 2018. The Ontario budget will probably come out in late March. The recommendations include how money for post-secondary education in Canada’s largest province should be spent. In order to save money, Drummond’s report includes suggestions such as moving to three-year fast-tracked degrees and more of an emphasis on teaching than research. Read more at thecord.ca.

Provincial

Read more at kamloopsnews.ca.

Read more at thetyee.ca.

The last week has seen a great deal of action surrounding the B.C. Teachers Federation (BCTF). It would seem as though the BC Government has laid out a threestep plan to not only rob the teachers of their money but tarnish their reputation at the same time. Step 1: Escalation

• Mayor Money With the filing of campaign expenses by the mayoral candidates of last November’s municipal election it is clear that while Peter Milobar won the race, he didn’t receive the best value on the dollar. With a campaign which cost just a few dollars shy of $14,000 he gained 9,000 votes, well under a vote per dollar. Meanwhile, Dieter Duty, Milobar’s closest rival, spent just $4,642 on his run at the position, and fell just a couple hundred short of Milobar’s mark.

• Food Dieticians of Canada released a report recently suggesting families aiming for a nutritious diet are looking at a continued rising cost. They suggested $868.42 per month should go to food for an average family to have a nutitious diet. That number was taken from averages across the province. Costs were higher on the lower mainland than northern B.C. The cost would not include condiments, spices, cultural choices, dietary needs, eating out or prepackaged foods. The cost is based on 60 items to feed a family of four including a teenaged boy and a female child. Five years ago a similar basket would have cost about $715.

Ω Contributor

There will also be the expansion of Optik TV and long-term evolution upgrades to the wireless network which add up to another $25 million.

Read more at kamloopsnews.ca

Step 3: Step Back

Simon Braun

.

Late last week and early this week the government began to draft back to work legislation for the BCTF. This led the teachers to apply to the Labour Relations Board for the right to strike in what seems like a union version of chicken. Step 2: Bait The next step for the government was to put their bill into action, which in turn caused the BCTF to vote in favour (87 per cent in favour) of striking.

Here is the really slimy part of the government’s plan. Instead of pushing the bill through to vote by the end of the weekend, which would force teachers back to work Monday, they have allowed it to go into extended debate. This will mean that the teachers will get their strike; good right? Wrong. By not forcing the teachers back to work the government is essentially saving $30 to 40 million, while at the same time turning the public against the teachers (approximately 63 per cent of British Columbians are opposed to the strike, according to a recent CBC poll). So there you are — three steps to trap teachers, make them hated and steal $30 million all in five days. Simon Braun is a third-year history student at TRU.

Application Deadline:

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• NWCC Budget Northwest Community College is facing the difficult decision of which full-time employees to lay off. With a $1.7 million budget shortfall, cuts will be coming. Staffing is the highest expense, so that’s where the cuts are coming from, as the college has already spent years streamlining its budget. The college has not received an increase of funding from the provincial government since 2006 according to the college’s president. The provincial government reduced province-wide post-secondary funding in its most recent budget by one per cent.

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Local • Telus Data Centre $3 billion will be coming B.C.’s way with an announcement from Telus. While Vancouver will get a large chunk of that, the entire province will benefit economically. Kamloops will see a $75 million data centre built, which won’t generate many long-term jobs, but does boost the community a bit.

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Contact us for more information about funding opportunities. Ph: (403) 380-1819 msc.management@uleth.ca www.ulethbridge.ca/graduatestudies


7

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

Arts & Entertainment Provocative Paula Scott exhibit on display at TRU Art Gallery it from a non-traditional perspective. Another piece was propped Ω Roving Editor up and encased in glass as opposed to being hung on the wall. “I really wanted to show [the Narrative, Dream, and the emotion] without telling it; letColours in Between: the visual ting the work speak for itself and studies of Paula Scott, is on disshow it in a way that is a little bit play at the TRU Art Gallery from unconventional for most gallerFeb. 27 to Mar. 9. ies,” Harder said. Scott was in attendance on Harder and Scott come from Mar. 2 for the opening of the extwo very different backgrounds. hibit, which was curated by DaScott is not an academic, having vid Jacob Harder, a visual arts never attended post-secondary and history student at TRU. education. Harder is just finish“I had this vision of the system, ing up his degree at the institution, but TRU. at the same time It might be difwe’re all individual ficult to believe artists working tothat two people wards something,” from such opposing Harder said. backgrounds could “[Scott’s] been come together and working and dofind success on a ing this for so long. project, but Harder When she proposed and Scott managed her idea of showing her abstracts I —Paula Scott to discover the perfect balance. thought it was per“It’s highly acafect because all of demic but at the same time not,” her work was so narrative before really long story. “In the beginning when I first Harder said. and now [her work is] allowing “I have that academic backpeople to create their own narra- started painting, it was a way to work out some things. And being ground but at the same time with tives.” Scott’s mediums of choice are a story-teller, there is a story be- Paula, she has never gone to school so it’s that juxtaposition mainly oil paints and waterco- hind every work.” The exhibit was unique in between the two that works so lours. Her creations are thought-pro- terms of how Scott’s work was well. “When she agreed to doing [the displayed. voking and intriguing. Harder set up a bed and hung exhibit], it worked,” Harder said. One might describe them as psy“It was that equilibrium bechedelic, with vibrant colours and one of the pieces from the ceiling, encouraging guests to view tween her not being a part of the a vast array of unique imagery. Within her work, Scott combines provocative elements of imagery that most others could never even imagine. Harder believes that the stories behind Scott’s work are what make her pieces so powerful. “It has so much emotion behind it. It becomes something different all the time, like oral histories become something different,” Harder said. “I have a lot of life experience,” Scott said. “They’re autobiographical, mostly. It’s like a

Taylor Rocca

“They’re autobiographical, mostly. It’s like a really long story.”

Narrative, Dream and the Colours in Between: the visual studies of Paula Scott is showing in the TRU Art Gallery just off Student Street in Old Main until Mar. 9. —PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

institution and me being very much a part of it. But like a collaboration of the two.” Scott is a California-born artist who moved to Quesnel, B.C. in 1964. “I started painting in 1994 and started in watercolour. I always have stories going in my head,” Scott said. “I thought it would be inter-

esting to see if I could just paint and still have them look kind of good.” People came from all over B.C. to attend the event, with people in attendance from places such as Pentiction and 100 Mile House, according to Harder. “I’ve been told so many times that this is the best show we’ve had here in years.”

The bombshells behind Bomb Girls

Global TV’s latest series brings period-piece drama and Canadiana together

Angela Espinoza

The Other Press (Douglas College) NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C. (CUP) — Only days after the explosive fireworks display that was New Year’s 2012, Global TV premiered their latest series, Bomb Girls. Bomb Girls focuses on the Canadian women who worked in munitions factories during World War II, while the country’s men were on the battlefront. Although Bomb Girls began as a sixpart miniseries, it found enough of an audience to be renewed for a second, 12-episode season — which was announced to the public one day prior to the season finale on Feb. 8. With the combination of heavy selfpromotion, the casting of an Academy Award-nominated actress (Meg Tilly), and the public’s need for some fresh TV drama, a second season was inevitable. Not to mention well prepared for, if the onslaught of episode six’s cliffhangers were any indication. But can the success of Bomb Girls be attributed to simple logic, or is there more to this story? A woman on the inside Following the overwhelming popularity of AMC’s Mad Men and HBO’s Boardwalk Empire, ABC and Global managed to jump on the period-piece bandwagon just in time. But while ABC’s Pan Am and Global’s Bomb Girls entered the ring as shows focusing on the then-modern woman, only Bomb Girls seems to have survived, as Pan Am is doomed

our Canadian history, ourselves includ- a place for a series like Bomb Girls to for cancellation. exist in a time and nation where womWhat made the significantly smaller ed,” Mitchell said. “The Canadian women munitions en are equal? production come out on top? “Well, I guess it’s all about how workers were on full alert — no one A better story? knew if the world would be the same. you define ‘equal,’” said Mitchell. Interesting characters? “One has to ask if women are truly So they lived in the moment, pushed Canadian pride? Co-creator/director/executive pro- boundaries and experienced a kind of equal to men if current statistics reducer of Bomb Girls, Adrienne Mitch- independence they had never experi- veal that women still earn 74 cents for each dollar a man earns for work ell, opened up about some of these in- enced. of equal value, which quiries. qualifies them for “Makeup artist Debi less social security Drennan and author and pension; women Maureen Jennings apare five [times] more proached Janis Lundlikely to encounman and I with [the initer domestic abuse; tial] concept,” Mitchell women continue to said, on the topic of the be vastly underrepshow’s history. resented in politics. “What struck us Bomb Girls is trying immediately in their research was that if it —Adrienne Mitchell to show that women can make important weren’t for thousands strides forward, [and] of women like Mina that men played an [Ribble — Drennan’s There were stories of women crying important role in that, but as it regrandmother] and Hilda [Lyall— Drennan’s godmother] who traveled over their first paycheque because they minds us about the struggles in the past it also alerts us to those same across Canada to work at the factories, had never in their life earned one. “I have been totally touched by the struggles in the present. the Allies would have never won the “So yes, I feel [Bomb Girls] is inaudience response from viewers diswar. “We didn’t even know the extent to covering that their grandmothers or credibly relevant now, in spite of the which Canadian women played such a great aunts worked during the war in gains that women have made.” pivotal role in turning things around for munitions factories, and how they were She stands on her own the Allies — and all this was happen- learning about their family members in ing even before the Americans joined a way that they never knew before.” Bomb Girls’ popularity isn’t based For someone as close to the show’s the war. So it was a slam-dunk for us that this story had to be told and had a production as Mitchell to express such on history alone. While it’s important gratitude towards viewers influenced to keep our country’s past at the heart populist appeal.” That settles the question of Canadian by our otherwise little-known past, of it all, awareness can’t be raised pride, but is that pride based on favour- there is relief in knowing where the without a compelling story to push things forward. ing an original Canadian series, or on show’s audience stands. Part of what made Bomb Girls’ However, one glaring question reour actual history? “What astounds me is how many mained, if only because most young season one viewers return week afpeople didn’t know about this part of women often forget the answer: is there ter week were the characters’ own

“...it was a slam-dunk for us that this story had to be told and had a populist appeal.”

battles. One character in particular, Betty McRae (portrayed by rising B.C.-based starlet Ali Liebert), attempted to shed light on the topic of homosexuality during that period. While in Los Angeles on the day of Bomb Girls’ season finale, Liebert offered a few words via phone. “Initially, I liked her survival skills — her tough exterior, her tactics, [and] her breathiness,” Liebert said of being drawn to Betty’s character. “I found the way she functioned in the world to be pretty interesting.” To paint a clearer picture, Betty is a high-ranking worker at the munitions factory where Bomb Girls takes place. Over the course of the first season, Betty’s tough-girl attitude is gradually revealed to be an aspect of her closeted lesbianism, something that grows to be more difficult to hide as she falls for a fellow munitions worker named Kate Andrews (Charlotte Hegele). Liebert, who has portrayed lesbian characters before in works such as The L Word and Sook-Yin Lee’s Year of the Carnivore (2009), said her experience working on Bomb Girls has been “creatively fulfilling.” “The producers and creators of the show really made sure to treat all the actors respectively, and they respected our opinions in terms of character development,” she said. “I’d just never worked on a show where they were so open to our suggestions and our feelings.” You can catch Liebert later this year in the films In the Hive, Foxfire, and, of course, in season two of Bomb Girls.


8

March 7, 2012

MARCH

8 - 15, 2012 16th Annual

Kamloops Film Fesval Join Join us for usthe formost the most up toup date to date information information

Join us on Facebook (/KamloopsFilmFestival) and Twitter (@KamFilmFest) for the most up to date information

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K A M L O O P S

2012 March 9 & 10

@ the TRU Clocktower Theatre

7:00 pm Friday March 9th

9:00 pm Friday March 9th

with Special Guest, John Fallon

“I honestly can’t believe this movie [Hobo with a Shotgun] got made . . . and in Canada no less. It’s off the rails. It’s gross. It’s weird. And it’s great. ” Film Reviews from the Basement

Film Reviews from the Basement

7:00 pm Saturday March 10th

“Some Guy Who Kills People is a horror film with a lot of heart.” www.planetofterror.com

“Filmmakers who piss and moan about not being able to make a good movie on a low budget need to shut the fuck up and watch Deaden.”

Thrill Chil Ki

9:00 pm Saturday March 10th

“Skew really makes you think. You’ll be trying to figure out what’s going on all the way up to the very end. And then the reveal is splendidly disturbing. .” www.imdb.com

SPONSORED BY:


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

Omega Sponsors Prospective sponsors and advertisers should contact our business manager, Natasha Slack at managerofomega@gmail.com Air Quality in Kamloops: The Present State & Prospects for Improvement – 2012 version

TRU faculty of arts is accepting applications for their 2012/13 mentorship program. Deadline for applications is March 12. Contact Dr. Jenna Woodrow at jenna.woodrow@gmail.com or Dr. Catherine Ortner at cortner@tru.ca for more information

HEROES PUB STUDENT NIGHT

It’s Thursday night and you have the entire weekend to study. Take a break,

Thursday March 8, 2012

don’t burn out, and join us for drinks, music, and dancing!

7:30 PM

Cover is only $5!

International Building IB 1020

Thompson Rivers University Kamloops

SPONSORED BY: Thompson Rivers University Faculty Association (TRUFA) along with the Faculty of Science and the Department of Geography at TRU

EVERYONE WELCOME! ADMISSION IS FREE!

Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Faculty of Science, the University of British Columbia

Dr. Steyn is a world-renowned expert in the field of air pollution meteorology. In this presentation, Dr. Steyn will summarize air pollution in Kamloops in relation to local topography, regional meteorology, monitoring, present status, past trends and management. He will also discuss air quality in relation to the Ajax Mine proposal.

Ω

Brought to you by :

The Omega TRU’s Student Newspaper

Ω

T HURSDAY

March 8th

Environmental Achievement Award Are you passionate about improving the environment or do you know someone who is? The Department of Environment and Sustainability is recognizing individuals within the Thompson Rivers University community that have made or are making substantial positive contributions to environmental sustainability.

Eligibility: The award is based upon an outstanding contribution to environment and sustainability. It will be based upon a single identifiable contribution. The Honouree must be an employee or alumnus of Thompson Rivers University.

Note: In exceptional circumstances a member of the broader community may be nominated, provided the reason for the nomination is directly related to TRU.

To apply for this award or nominate a candidate, please contact: Kaitlin Boyd at kboyd@tru.ca Environment & Sustainability – Facilities Building

Deadline: Applications must be submitted before Friday, March 30th, 2012

theomega.ca

Guest Speaker

Prof. Douw G. Steyn


10

March 7, 2012

Arts & Entertainment Witness “Bearing Witness” at Kamloops Art Gallery Cory Hope

Wednesday, Mar. 7

• Jim Cooperman talk, “The Proposed Enbridge Norhter Gateway Pipeline & the Tar Sands” 1:30 p.m. AE 266

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor Bearing Witness has been in the Kamloops Art Gallery since Jan. 14, and this is the last week you have to check it out. Combining several different visual mediums, Bearing Witness is an exhibition that looks at, “[s]ocially engaged works of art.” It features a wide range of artists, from the contemporary such as Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky, to Pablo Picasso. Yes — that Picasso. It’s the first time the Kamloops Art Gallery (KAG) has featured a Picasso, so you might do well to go down and see it just for that. There’s even one piece that predates the Picasso by three years, but if I told you that you should go down and check out Margaret Bourke-White’s “Shock Brigadier” from 1934, you would probably skip the rest of the article. It’s a piece worth seeing, but to the general population (of which I am a member), Picasso says “famous art worth paying to see” a lot more than Margaret Bourke-White. The KAG costs under four dollars with a student ID, and is free on Thursday. The Picasso wasn’t the highlight for me. I looked at it with interest, but I haven’t the background to fully appreciate it for what it is. What made the trip worthwhile for me was the wide variety of art dealing with issues I am familiar with through readings in classrooms and also through my own personal interest. Issues such as the slave trade, war, apartheid, the feminist movement and bullying are just a few of the topics covered in Bearing Witness. The art universally speaks out

Community Calendar

Thursday, Mar. 8 Stephen Shames, Tear Gas Grenade, Berkeley, 1970. One of the many great works on display at the Kamloops Art Gallery during the Bearing Witness exhibit. —SUBMITTED

against the issues—including the Picasso, although I’m taking the informational card’s word on that one. Perhaps the most moving piece for me was a photograph by Robert Capa. I almost walked right by it, as it was so close to the piece next to it that I was getting ready to move on. But I took a second look at it after I read the card beside it. The card states that Robert Capa swam to shore on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, and documented the beginning of the end of the Second World War. He was later killed by a landmine in Indochina in 1954 while documenting yet another war. I immediately went back to the photograph, and stood there looking at it with a sense of awe. At 1 p.m. Saturday, Mar. 10 (also the final day of the show), curator Ian

Thom will be doing a tour of Bearing Witness. I’m hoping to be able to attend this, as I think it will fill in some of the blanks I feel I left with as a member of Joe Public. Thom says, “[A]ll of these works, in their own way, make strong sociocultural statements beyond the purely visual.” I’m just dying to know a little bit more about that Picasso. Although Bearing Witness is leaving the gallery soon, it will be followed up by Esther Shalec-Gerz’s, “White Out: Between Telling and Listening,” which tells, “fugitive stories - stories that exist fleetingly between the actual and the fictional, between the imagined and the experienced.” This opens on Mar. 24. I’m looking forward to it. I feel a sense of intrigue at its description, and I won’t have to tell anyone that I didn’t “get” the Picasso.

• TRU Job Fair hosted by TRU Career Education Department 10 a.m. to 3. p.m. Grand Hall, CAC • Jpod with special guests Nouveau Cactus Jacks Nightclub $5 cover

Friday, Mar. 9 • Not Just a Game hosted by TRU Journalism Club, a documentary by Nation Magazine sports editor Dave Zirin about sports and politics 1 p.m. TRUSU Boardroom

• Multidisciplinary Sleep Science Conference see page 14 for details, or check out tru.ca/sleep

Wednesday, Mar. 14 • Do it in the Dark Party hosted by TRU Eco Club. Live music in candlelight and free pizza & smoothies to raise environmental awareness 7 p.m. The Terrace, CAC

Know of upcoming events the student body should be aware of? Get them in the calendar for free! Contact: editorofomega@gmail.com “Community calendar” in the subject line will help ensure they get to the campus community.


11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

Arts & Entertainment A ska show and a time traveller walk into a bar... Cory Hope

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor For a long time I believed the third wave of ska had crested long ago, and had receded back into an ocean of mind-numbing generic pop music that made me question why it is I ever bothered to clean my ears. I can admit when I’m wrong, though. And I must have been really wrong about this one. Pogue Mahone was the venue for a ska show on Mar. 3, and while it wasn’t sold to capacity, it was packed with a much larger crowd than I’ve seen in a while. As a regular myself, I only recognized one face in that crowd. I thought I recognized a second one, but as it turns out it was just someone who looks like Richard Hatch, who played Captain Apollo in the original Battlestar Galactica. After some careful thought, I decided that unless he had travelled through time to come and see a ska show in Kamloops (which was highly unlikely), it was probably just someone who looked a lot like Richard Hatch did in 1978. It’s a good thing I wasn’t drinking, or that time travel thing might have seemed like a viable possibility, and chaos might have ensued (like me trying to stay one step ahead of him all night trying to make sure he didn’t step on a bug or trying to prevent him from impregnating his own granddaughter). What was I talking about? Right. Battlestar Galactica. No - the ska show at Pogue Mahone.

Nanaimo’s Dope Soda opened the night, and were an unexpected delight. They weren’t listed on the bill and it was unexpected to see them at all. Dope Soda played a set for free, as in, they played that night just for the opportunity to play. In a day when you can look up the riders that certain performers insist upon before they’ll agree to play a show, seeing a young band jump up onstage with a “Hell yeah we’ll play!” attitude and looking like they’re having fun while they’re doing it is amazing. Add to that the disclaimer on the back of their CD that clearly states, “Copyright Concerns: Please share with your friends,” and I would have liked this band even if I didn’t like this band. Dope Soda — check ‘em out. Next up were Kamloops’ own Matt Stanley and the Decoys. While I went through an initial period of adjustment when they took the stage, asking myself questions like, “Where is the horn section?” and, “Is this one of those ska bands that doesn’t use a horn section?” it turned out that Matt Stanley and the Decoys are not a ska band. They are a rock band. But not just a rock band they’re an example of what a good rock band can be if they’re not afraid to venture away from the current “rock” sound. By the time my period of adjustment was over, I found myself thoroughly enjoying their set. And then there was Antiparty. Oh, Antiparty. When a band starts setting up onstage, certain assumptions about their sound can make their way into

The Brass Action, proud members of Cory Hope’s “third wave of ska” and showstoppers at Pogue Mahone on Mar. 3.

the mind. But when a metal drummer, a hipster bass player, a goth-ish keyboard player/vocalist and an improbably waifish punk guitar/trumpet player walk into a bar, it sounds like the beginning of a joke more than anything else. Until they started playing, that is. Their MySpace page lists their inf luences as, “Ella Fitzgerald, Fugazi, Suffocation, The Ventures, throwing chopsticks into a fireplace, The Rolling Stones (in that order).” I’m going to have to say that sounds about accurate. The combined styles worked surprisingly well together, and

Antiparty might really be on to something. I’d be interested in checking them out again. By the time The Brass Action took the stage, I was reasonably convinced that I was no longer at Pogue Mahone to see a ska show, and that it was more of an eclectic mix of a night. I had enjoyed everything I had heard up to that point, so I wasn’t too disappointed, but there really is something about the horn section and fast guitar riffs of a ska band that are really good for the soul. I’m not exaggerating. Having a good collection of ska records gives you an unfair

—PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

advantage for gaining access to the good aspects of the afterlife. It’s the only part of the afterlife that has been scientifically proven (citation needed). The Brass Action were the second ride on the third wave of ska to hit the stage on Saturday, and they reminded me of why it is that I should have been keeping an eye on Richard Hatch. If he managed to step backward in time again, went too far and stepped on a bug that happened to create an alter native future where the only difference was that the third wave of ska never came to be, I’d be pissed off.


12

March 7, 2012

Sports Goon pays homage to the bruisers but not for everyone Nathan Crosby Ω Sports Editor

Goon was everything I wanted it to be. It was basically a punch in the face to the bad movies of last year — if the bad movies of last year had a face. Goon’s a winner because it has cliché hockey characters and Canadian jokes. It showcases the violence despite the current climate of hockey safety being the number one point of discussion. Seann William Scott plays Doug Glatt, a lovable and incredibly dumb main character who reminded me of former New York Islanders bruiser Steve Webb (if you don’t remember Steve Webb’s short but lasting career, go to Youtube and watch him destroy Darcy Tucker in the middle of the ice). Glatt is a bar bouncer who is discovered at a hockey game in the stands after he’s caved in a hockey player’s face who happened to walk into the audience at a local game. The coach finds him and quickly Glatt becomes a feared enforcer who moves up the minor systems to land a spot with the Halifax Highlanders, which would be the equivalent of an AHL team. Here he meets Xavier Laf lamme, a washed up Francophone prodigy who was a huge draft bust after signing a $5 million contract. Laf lamme’s character is reminiscent of Ottawa Senators’ first overall pick in 1993, Alexander Daigle, who after realizing he hated playing hockey, pursued a career in acting (I think he’s playing hockey in Switzerland now). Laf lamme doesn’t like Glatt and the attention he is receiv-

ing, but eventually they learn that they need each other. I guess the character of Doug Glatt can be a tribute to any bruiser who has played the game. I think the point the director was trying to make was that Glatt was to remind audience members of their favourite blue collar heroes, i.e. Rocky, Tim Thomas and Micky Ward.

If you like the rougher side of hockey and some good old-fashioned Canadiana, you might want to check out this film.

PHOTO COURTESY ALIANCE ATLANTIS

I thought the funniest lines came from the captain of the Highlanders. He is a 39-year-old wreck. His pep-talks are rants about how much his wife has screwed him over, how he never gets to see his kids and he even keeps a tally of the divorced players on the opposing team. He reminded me of that Andy Samberg skit on SNL of the dead-

beat dad who has an addiction to the white stuff. He even tries to fight at one point and valiantly gets crushed. The team is full of funny secondary characters, like the goalie whose mask design is a painting of his mother. There is also a happy-go-lucky, always positive and annoying guy who snaps eventually. The one problem is how Euegene Levy’s character, Glatt’s father, is under-used. He is in two scenes and there is never that ‘aha’ moment at the end when he runs on the ice and gives Glatt a hug. If you are going to make a movie with obvious hockey clichés; the father-son moment needs to be included. Liev Schreiber plays Ross “The Boss” R hea, a grizzled and aging enforcer who is ready to hang up the skates, but wants to f ight Glatt. Schreiber really made me a believer that he was once a minor-league enforcer and as was intended, reminded me of Mar ty McSorley (At one point, Schreiber’s character swings his stick like an axe at another player’s head — a seemingly obvious homage to McSorley). One of the movie’s best scenes involves Glatt and R hea meeting in a restaurant. R hea tells Glatt that all the crowd wants is for the f ighters to bleed. This scene really shows the side of the hockey business that brings violence into perspective. Although I feel f ighting in hockey is on its way out due to growing health concer ns, I feel movies like Goon show the need for a hero who is willing to sacrif ice his body for the glor y of the game.

Congratulations on five in a row. Yes, we said five national championships in a row. It might not be TRU’s team, but you can’t help but admire that feat. —PHOTO COURETSY JAY ROUTIN (CIS)

UBC wins fifth-straight women’s volleyball title Fraser Caldwell

The Silhouette (McMaster) HAMILTON (CUP) — It was hardly the dominant run of years past, but the UBC Thunderbirds claimed their fifth-consecutive national women’s volleyball title at the expense of the Alberta Pandas on March 4. Battling back from a two set to one deficit in front of a large and energized crowd at McMaster University’s Burridge Gym on Sunday night, the Thunderbirds capped their comeback victory with a block on Alberta’s rookie standout Alena Omelchenko. “We found a way. I think of the first set as symbolic of the rest,” said UBC head coach Doug Reimer “We were able to hang in there and turn things around. I couldn’t be prouder of this group. A lot of teams when they are getting it handed to them and when it’s not what you are excepting to happen... they kinda go away. We never did.” Final set scores were 25-21, 1525, 19-25, 25-20, 15-12 in favour of the British Columbian outfit in what was a neck-and-neck encounter between the nation’s top two teams. The opening frame saw the Pandas open an early lead at 10-6 as UBC began to misfire from the outside, and the Alberta squad would maintain that advantage at the technical timeout after an emotional single block brought the score to 16-13 in their favour. The Thunderbirds would emerge the stronger from the timeout however, and after Omelchenko botched an attempted attack from the middle, the Pandas’ lead had dwindled to just a single point at 20-19. UBC seized their opportunity and completed the first set comeback with a double block for 25-21. Despite the setback, Alberta looked reinvigorated as the second set got underway, and won the first five points of the frame thanks largely to some heroic backcourt defence. That early push proved vital for the Pandas, who took a 16-10 lead into the second set technical after the Thunderbirds were flagged for four touches. Alberta was dominating play, and the set rarely looked in doubt as they raced toward the finish line. The Pandas would wrap up the onesided frame by a 10-point margin after UBC’s Kyla Richey fired well long from the left side. Having leveled the match, Alberta immediately set to work in the third set, outdueling the Thunderbirds in seemingly every facet to build a 10-4 lead before UBC called time in hopes of regrouping. The surging Pandas were causing havoc for the defending champions from the service line and were immaculate on the attacking front, playing the entire third set without committing a hitting error. Alberta rode that frightening form to a massive 16-8 lead at the technical timeout, and would see out the third set despite a spirited UBC run that saw the Thunderbirds close within six points at 24-18. They had fallen behind, but the abortive late surge on the defending champions’ part had broken Alberta’s momentum, and that reality became readily apparent in the fourth frame. After a period of side-out volleyball to begin the set, UBC would

build a 12-9 lead with an ace and force the Pandas to call time. The Thunderbirds’ service struck again only a few points later as the defending champions carried a 1612 advantage into the fourth set technical. The Panda attack that had seemed nearly invincible in the third frame was comparatively vulnerable in the fourth, and after Omelchenko fell into a waiting UBC double block, Alberta fired wide to gift the set to the Thunderbirds and send the championship match to a deciding fifth game. Much as they had in the previous set, UBC started quickly in the fifth and won the first three points of the abbreviated period. The Pandas would recover their form well to close the early gap, but after CIS Player of the Year Kyla Richey found the floor with a powerful cross-court swing, UBC led 8-7 at the changeover. The Thunderbirds pressed home their advantage after the break, and would move ahead 12-8 after an emotional double block. The Pandas once again mounted a comeback, but when a wayward Alberta serve brought up match point the Pandas proved unable to stave off elimination. Alberta would attempt a rushed attack at 14-12 only for Omelchenko to push an attempted tip into a waiting UBC double block. The only thing left for Alberta to do was watch as the rejected attack found the floor and the Thunderbirds mobbed the court to celebrate their fifth-consecutive national championship. UBC’s Lisa Barclay was her team’s leading scorer on the day, racking up 12 kills, six aces and three block assists for a total of 18.5 points. Meanwhile, the Pandas’ CIS AllRookie outside Alena Omelchenko was the most prolific hitter on court, notching 19 kills, two aces and four combined blocks for 24 points over the course of the five set contest. For her weekend-long effort, Barclay was named as the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. “We just really knew that Alberta’s an amazing team and we had to take every point seriously. We’re not invincible,” said Barclay. “So we had to come out and play — we learned that last weekend. Coming out we really wanted this and fought really hard so I thought we deserved it in the end.” Earlier on Sunday, the McGill Martlets overcame the favoured Montreal Carabins in an all-Quebec bronze medal match by a 3-1 score line. The result caps an unlikely late season run for a Martlet team that struggled throughout the RSEQ season en route to a 5-10 record. But after upsetting the Laval Rouge et Or in a conference semifinal to book their spot in the national tournament, McGill has claimed the first medal in school history. The Martlets’ only previous appearance at the tournament in 1997 ended with a sixth-placed finish. The Trinity Western Spartans also closed their championship account on a winning note on Sunday, downing the AUS-champion Saint Mary’s Huskies in four sets to finish fifth in the eight-team field. — With files from McMaster University sports information


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

Sports PACWEST and ACAC dominate National Badminton Championships Nathan Crosby Ω Sports Editor

RuiLin Huang and Dan Kai may be the best badminton singles players in the CCAA, but it was the men’s doubles gold medal game that stole the show at the Tournament Capital Centre. Thompson Rivers University hosted the CCAA National Badminton Championships. It was three days of the best badminton Kamloops has ever seen, according to TRU badminton coach Brad Pape. The tournament ran from Mar. 1 to 3 and was capped off with five gold medals being handed out. Three went to Douglas College who represented the PACWEST. “As far as the tournament goes, it ran very smooth. The players showed up and they showed up to play,” Pape said. “The men’s doubles game was an unbelievable game, that’s as good as it gets.” Simon Wu and Luo Wei of Douglas College took on the favoured pairing of Dayvon Reid and Mark Wong from George Brown of the OCAA for the men’s doubles gold. Wei and Wu lost to Wong and Reid in round robin play in two sets, but the pair from Douglas College stole the first set in the best-of-three, 21-19. George Brown controlled the second set, winning 21-12, which set up a thrilling third set finish. “I was very nervous, but I tried to just think about the game,” Simon Wu said. “We tried to slow down their game and give ourselves a little bit more time to defend, try not to

push f lat shots too much because they are really fast.” Points went back and forth and the TCC crowd was buzzing. Douglas College went up 20-17 for match point, but George Brown came back to take a 21-20 lead. This set up the rally of the week, which lasted for half a minute and garnered gasps from the crowd. Douglas College took the lead back and won the game on a service ace, which Wei and Wu erupted in celebration by hugging each other. “The last few points I was so tired,” said Luo Wei. Andy Wong and Willis Kwee of Kwantlen Polytechnic won bronze in men’s doubles. RuiLin Huang won her fourth women’s singles gold medal, beating Humber College’s Tracy Wong in two sets, 21-14 and 21-10. “It’s exciting, I’m happy,” she said. “No one has done this four years in a row in women’s singles, but I had the confidence to win this match.” Grace Box of Concordia University won the bronze. In men’s singles, Dan Kai of NAIT was the man to beat and was exceptional once again. He won gold over Douglas College’s Bob Sharma to claim his third straight title. Despite winning 21-13 and 2111, Kai had high praise for Sharma. “I think he’s the smartest singles player in this tournament,” he said. Kai was also impressed with TRU’s hosting duties. “I think they prepared really well and the supporters were good,” Kai said.

Luke Couture of Langara College won the men’s singles bronze. In women’s doubles, Jessica Yu of Concordia University and Sinead Cheah of NAIT took home gold, beating Veronica Yeung and Rosalynn Chong of Capilano University. Alyssa Woon and Renee Yip of Humber College won bronze. In mixed doubles, Logan Campbell and Charmagne Yeung of Douglas College won gold, defeating Weslee Cheah and Quinn Conway of NAIT. “We played them in the team event earlier and played pretty well against them and won pretty easily,” Campbell said. “They played a lot better in the [finals] and threw us off guard but we came through in the end and pulled it together.” Sanjay Ashokkumar and Patricia Lau of Seneca College won bronze. In total, Douglas College walked away with four medals either gold or silver. “We had a great run with our school; four medals overall, got to be happy with that,” Douglas’ Campbell said. “Our coach is proud of us and we had a good year.” The PACWEST finished with three gold, two silver and two bronze. The ACAC won two gold, one silver and one bronze. The OCAA finished with two silver and two bronze, while the ACAA failed to win a medal. It was the second national tournament TRU has hosted this year, after welcoming athletes to the CCAA cross country championships in November 2011.

Much Canadian University badminton is celebrated at the CCAA Nationa Championships hosted at TRU Mar. 1 to 3. It is the second national championship that has been hosted by the school this year.

—PHOTOS BY CORY HOPE

Baseball team returns from USA ready to work Nathan Crosby Ω Sports Editor

The WolfPack used their annual spring trip to Arizona and California to carve a new identity. Despite returning home with a 2-6 record from south of the border, the team has realized what needs to be fixed before the season opens in Kelowna on Mar. 24. “We didn’t pitch in those games; a lot of walks, hit batters and we didn’t execute,” WolfPack head coach Ray Chadwick said. “The games that we won, we pitched real well and we hit. When we hit and pitch, we’re going to win, it doesn’t matter who we are playing.” The ‘Pack won their first game on Feb. 17 over Arizona Western 9-2 but followed it up with four straight loses to Mesa, Chandler-

WolfPack head coach Ray Chadwick (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

at how far he has come. Gilbert and twice to Glendale. “It’s pretty crazy,” he said. “We got a lot to do before our sea“Before the first game we played son gets going,” WolfPack first baseI had a lot of different stuff going man Tyler Lowey said. “Pitching, hitting and defence have through my head and I really didn’t to get going and we got time to work know what to expect from myself and I ended playon it.” ing a pretty good The ‘Pack game.” played a douLowey’s new ble-header with eye looks incredYavapai on Feb. ibly real, but he 22, the first of said there were which they won times when he 8-0, followed by had to make adlosing a close 4-2 justments with his second game. sightlines. They closed out “It wasn’t difthe road trip the ferent physically. next day against “Sometimes Paradise Valley, I couldn’t see losing 6-1. where a runner “In the eight was on base. It games we played, was mentally difwe played two WolfPack first baseman ferent.” great games that Tyler Lowey (Photo He would finwe won. We courtesy of TRU Athletics) ish with four hits, played two other two stolen bags good games that we could’ve won or should’ve won and two RBIs at 16 at-bats. The team used the trip to bond and and then the other four weren’t good acquaint the experienced with the at all,” coach Chadwick said. One of the big stories over the off- newbies. One rookie who made an imseason was the accident Tyler Lowey pression during the spring exhibifaced in early October 2011. Lowey lost his right eye after a tion was Erik Herbranson, an outfreak bounce of his bat during an ex- fielder and left-handed pitcher. He had six hits, two runs, a stohibition game. He was sent back to his home city len base and three RBIs at 18 atof Calgary for surgery and to recuper- bats. He had more hits on the trip than ate. Miraculously, he is back and joined any other Wolf Pack player. “We were making solid contact, the team on the trip. He got playing time in all eight even though we were hitting right games. Even Lowey seemed amazed to the outfielders. We had the right

Last year’s WolfPack fell just short of their goal, and this years’ hopes to make amends for that.

approach, it just wasn’t going our way,” Herbranson said. The WolfPack rookie said that the trip was important for him to get comfortable in his first year. “It was a good bonding session with the team. I didn’t really know much about the team and they took me in and I learned a lot,” he said. TRU took in a Los Angeles KingsPhoenix Coyotes game at the Staples Center and didn’t forget to have some fun. Lowey said that he got a chance to see the newly acquired Los Angeles

— OMEGA FILE PHOTO

Angels all-star Albert Pujols take part in batting practice. Erik Herbranson admitted he didn’t get up early enough to go with the group that saw the nine-time MLB all-star. The team will now focus on the calendar that is shrinking daily leading up to the start of the regular season and coach Chadwick will have expectations set high. “Everytime we take the field we should be playing in that great to good category where we got a chance to win every game.”


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March 7, 2012

Science & Technology

Looking at sleep hygiene Taylor Rocca Ω Roving Editor

Let’s just face it: university students typically aren’t the poster boys or girls for respectable sleep hygiene. We drink mass amounts of coffee, energy drinks and ingest numerous other stimulants in order to battle our way through heavy workloads, tiring employment and over-indulgent partying. At the time, it probably seems worthwhile to most students. But in the long run, does it benefit us at all, or are we doing more harm than good? I was initially triggered to think about this when I stumbled across an article sent to me from a classmate that was originally published on Feb. 22 on the BBC website. Stephanie Haggerty of BBC World Service described the change in human sleep patterns from the 16th century to today. Oddly enough in the sixteenth century, most people slept for a total of eight hours per day — but for no more than four hours at a time. This meant that there were two sleep periods during a day. In between, most people got up and did chores, visited neighbours and bustled around town. I’m lucky to get four hours of sleep in one night. Forget four hours of sleep twice in a day.

“There’s little evidence that lack of sleep, or sleep deprivation as it’s known, causes any immediate psychological damage to the body,” said Dr. Jeni Worden of BBC Health in a linking artcle contained within the article that piqued my interest in the subject. “But it certainly affects how you feel and how your brain works and it can interfere with work and home life.” Thankfully, there is an opportunity for students educate themselves on healthy sleep hygiene this week. The Multidisciplinary Sleep Science Conference will be held from Mar. 9 to 11 at TRU in the Campus Activity Centre. Students can attend the conference by registering on site. The cost for on-site registration for the duration of the conference is $200 for students. This is the third-annual edition of the conference that is geared towards medical professionals and students studying or interested in sleep disorders. Les Matthews, associate professor of respiratory therapy, is organizing the event, as he has done for the past two years. Stephanie Montalban is a respiratory therapy student at TRU and she is volunteering to help put on the conference. “Sleep is [Matthews’] baby,” Montalban said.

This year’s conference features a discussion on children with sleep problems with Dr. Osman Ipsiroglu and Dr. Manisha Whitmans. This talk will be free for all to attend and it takes place at 7 p.m. on Mar. 9 in the TRU Campus Activity Centre. Conference registration is not required. Following the discussion with Dr. Ipsiroglu and Dr. Whitmans, Heroes will be host to a social event for conference guests to mingle. Other talks throughout the conference include sleep in primary health care and sleep medicine. Practitioners and medical professionals from across western Canada are expected in attendance at the conference, which has seen significant growth since its creation. Last year, approximately 180 people registered and attended, according to Matthews. Montalban believes that Matthews envisions the Multidisciplinary Sleep Science Conference growing into an international event attended by professionals from around the globe. With exam season fast approaching and class projects coming due, it might be a wise choice for students to attend the free Friday session at the Multidisciplinary Sleep Science Conference rather than overindulge in adult beverages.

An Omega editor’s life. Surrounded by empty energy drink containers and Tim Hortons’ cups, Taylor Rocca drifts off for some of his far-too-few hours of sleep. —PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

That’s what you said For this week’s issue, we patrolled the grounds looking for your answers to this question:

How much sleep do you get in on an average day? Do you think that’s enough?

Huang Qiong Finance

“I usually get eight or six [hours]. It’s never enough. “I’ve always got something to do that goes late.”

Amy Ulveland Law

“On a good day, eight [hours] but on most days six-and-a-half [hours]. “What I’ve found with law is that there is always something that you have to sacrifice and I’m sure that goes with any program, whether it’s sleep, or your social life, or your sanity. “Generally you have to pick whatever the healthier option is.”

Travis McKenna Business

“Six to eight [hours] I would think. “Six not so much. “If I’m doing homework until late and looking at mathematics, usually my mind is thinking in numbers and I dream about numbers and I wake up lots. “So that kind of causes some issues.”

Math Puzzle of the week Puzzle of the Week #17 – The Group Given the following statements, come up with an arrangement where all of them are true and another where all of them are false. 1. There are five people in the group. 2. Sam is older than Bob. 3. Mary is the oldest. 4. John is younger than Mary, or maybe Sue, but not both. 5. Bob is the oldest male.

That’s right, we’re getting you involved whether you want to be or not! Well, not really, you have to be willing to talk to us to make it into the paper, but if you are, keep your eyes open for us and come chat!

6. Sue is not the youngest. This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 22

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1. Craving 5. Parsley bit 10. Annul 14. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g. 15. France’s longest river 16. Escape, in a way 17. It was redone in ‘04 20. Agnolotti, e.g. 21. Saint Petersburg, once 22. Whimsical 24. Exploit 25. Tend to, as a bad lawn 29. Quip 31. Mozart’s “L’___ del Cairo” 34. At any time 35. “Agreed!” 37. Snake or mathematician, at times 39. William Thornton designed it 42. Nice goodbye? 43. Persuaded 44. Mercury, for one 45. ___ soup 46. Rimbaud, for one 48. Early word form 50. Money in Moldova 51. Costa Rican peninsula 52. Shortcomings 57. Mediterranean evergreen 62. The Temple of Zeus was its model

64. Healthy berry 65. Upload ___ 66. Manhattan eatery 67. Boxing prize 68. Case type 69. Case type Down 1. Arctic native 2. Water-soluble compound 3. Some are deadly 4. Red arachnid 5. Arch 6. Tom’s aunt 7. Bank of Paris 8. Persia, now 9. Einstein, e.g. 10. Grammar topic 11. Warm, so to speak 12. Hindu god 13. Kind of column 18. Thief’s obstacle 19. Set up (var.) 23. Variety of taro 25. Go over 26. Get around 27. Artist’s hue 28. Port city 29. Cascade of ruffles 30. Jewish month 31. Disgrace 32. Literary work

33. About 1% of the atmosphere 36. Besides 38. June 6, 1944 40. City where Elvis was born 41. Bad day for Caesar 47. Nix 49. ___ Bell 50. Allowed 51. Buddhist lecturer, Tendzin, and others 52. Middle-age scourge 53. Houston university 54. Cancer kind 55. Details 56. Eastern prince 58. Spirited horse 59. Stir, with “up” 60. They may be sown 61. Smudge 63. Fulfilled S H U T

E A S E

P I E R

T R A S H A D A M G A Z A O N O N R E T A S H R E L I A R A S Q U P L U N P E A S

P R O S T I N T S A S C A E K E R A J E E R A S U M A E S H I G D A R N E O D A M M I R N O V A I E T A S K O R E R Y A E

I N T R C O R E P E G O A I O D D N T O O O D L E C S O A H H O R S L T E E E O S L S I S S C R A A M O U S S P I C S E N I

O R T S S T E N O M E A D

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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MYLES MELLOR and SALLY YORK

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“D.C. Destinations”

Notice anything wrong with The Omega? Bring it to our attention and win a prize. We may have done it on purpose just to keep you on your toes...or you might just be helping us get better. Either way... you win!


16

March 7, 2012

TRUSU Membership Advisory Story Teller's Gala Grand Hall • March 15 • 10am-2:30pm Join the TRUSU Aboriginal Collective for the Story Teller’s Gala. Lunch will be provided. RSVP to guichon@trusu.ca Workshops include: • Pine-Needle Basket Weaving • Post-Secondary Student Support Program • Performers TRUSU ABORIGINAL • Keynote Speaker Pamela Palmater

Miss

n o i t a t n e s e R p e R Film Screening

International Women’s Day March 8th 7pm - Clock Tower Free Admission

ELECTION NOTICE Nomination pacakges can be picked up and dropped off at the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building

Check out trusu.ca for more information Nominations open March 7 at 9:00AM and close March 14 at 4:00PM

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

More than a dozen campuses across Canada have banned the sale of bottled water

This Week: • International Women’s Day • Business Affair • Narrative, Dream & the Colour in Between Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment

March 7, 2012  

The March 7, 2012 edition of the Omega

March 7, 2012  

The March 7, 2012 edition of the Omega

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