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VOLUME 22 ISSUE 23

MARCH 20, 2013

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B.C.’s film industry struggles

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Kamloops Film Festival coverage 8&9

WolfPack recruiting updates 14

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Can B.C.’s film industry survive with the increasing competition out east? Julian Legere

Capilano Courier (Capilano) NORTH VANCOUVER (CUP) — If there’s one group that you can be sure has passion, it’s artists. That’s likely the reason why a rally two months ago at North Shore Studios drew over 2,000 people‚ some reports had attendance as high as 4,500 – who all gathered to hear industry experts and lobbyists speak about recent efforts made to demand action from the B.C. government to save the film industry. The New Hollywood North Save B.C. Film, the lobby group that organised January’s rally, has been advocating on behalf of an estimated 25,000 industry professionals whose livelihoods they claim are being threatened by increased government support for the film industry in Ontario and Quebec. The first concern is the loss of foreign, namely American, film productions, the presence of which in the past earned Metro Vancouver the moniker “Hollywood North.” Currently, the B.C. Production Services Tax Credit offers a credit of 33 per cent of BC labour expenditures only, whereas Ontario and Quebec offer a 25 per cent credit on all production expenditures within each respective province. In 2011, B.C. fell to the fourthranked production centre in North America, behind Ontario. Industry advocates, including those present at the rally in January, are calling for policy changes in order to keep B.C. competitive. Peter Leitch, president of North Shore Studios, advocated at last month’s rally for an “All Spend Policy” that would give foreign productions tax breaks on all production spending within B.C., the same policy currently in place in Ontario and Quebec, rather than solely labour spending. Premier Christy Clark defends the current policies, describing B.C.’s current $285 million tax credit as “generous.” She goes on to call the increased tax credits in Ontario and Quebec as a “race to the bottom,” and makes it clear that she has no intention of allowing B.C. to engage in that race, a view reflected in her government’s recently released budget. Industry members contest the idea that increasing B.C.’s investment in the industry would create that kind of bottomless climate because according to Brian Hamilton, a vicepresident at Omnifilm, American productions prefer B.C. due to its better infrastructure and talent pool.

Leitch says that American clients who have worked with North Shore Studios have told him the same things: “We don’t need to match Ontario and Quebec, we just need to be competitive,” he explained to the rally crowd. Home-grown films

The second concern is the loss of domestic film production. Currently, B.C. gives tax credits to domestic productions, to the tune of 35 per cent. In 2009, Quebec and Ontario both raised their incentives to match that 35 per cent. According to Jackson Davies, vice-president of the Union of B.C. Performers and an instructor at Capilano University, B.C. saw about $500 to $600 million worth of domestic film production annually prior to 2009, but since Ontario and Quebec increased their domestic productions tax credits, that number has fallen to about $200 million. Davies also worries about the long term implications of the $300 to $400 million loss triggered in 2009, because the lack of productions causes a loss of film industry infrastructure, including facilities like studios and editing suites. “Once all the infrastructure is gone from the community, they have to shut down or move to Ontario,” he says. Once that infrastructure is gone, and the talent moves to the East, there’s even less incentive for revenue and job generating American productions to come to B.C. Aaron Stewart, an acting student at Capilano University says that he sees the decline of the film industry in B.C. as an enormous obstacle to his future career.

The future of B.C.’s film industry is at stake, and many have opinions on how to move forward in what used to be a half-billion dollar industry in the province.

—ILLUSTR ATION BY MILES CHIC/CAPILANO COURIER

bringing around $1.2 billion worth of revenue into the province annually, but it’s not just the financial benefits that members of the film industry are fighting for. Citing his long-running hit TV show The Beachcombers, filmed in Gibsons, as an example, Davies describes the importance of domestic productions not only for their direct investment into local economies, but also for the increased tourism. “All around the world, they see the beauty of B.C. We get to tell our stories. That’s not just a business investment, that’s a cultural investment.” Stewart agrees that the film industry is important both for its economic and its cultural benefits, and that the B.C. Liberal government should be doing everything it can to encourage the industry’s growth. “It seems counterproductive to not continue investing. It creates tourism opportunities and it allows actors and —Peter Leitch, other artistic people the chance to actually President, North Shore Studios pursue what it is they love.”

“Tax credits are not

paying for Brad Pitt’s million dollars to come here.” “I fear that my three to four years of intense schooling won’t be put to good use when there are so few jobs. And on top of that, I fear that I may have to pack up and move to a new city, hell, even a new country, to get work.” Cultural economy The film industry as a whole is a hugely important component of the B.C. economy, employing an estimated 25,000 people and

Misgivings and misperceptions Some of the Save B.C. Film advocates have claimed that there is a public misconception concerning the need for tax breaks for big budget American films. “Tax credits are not paying for Brad Pitt’s million dollars to come here.” Leitch reminds the crowd at January’s rally. The current tax policies reflect that, since only money paid to B.C. residents or companies are eligible for the tax breaks.

Along the same lines, Davies emphasizes the nature of the provincial government’s investment. “It’s not a subsidy,” he explains. “The B.C. government doesn’t write a cheque. There has to be money generated in order for money to be refunded.” This point is reflected in the comments of the other advocates at January’s rally. “We are an industry, not a special interest group,” someone points out during the question and answer session, and Paul Klassen, senior business representative for IATSE, the film and theatre technicians union, agrees: “This is about the economy of B.C.” Taking action, searching for solutions As part of the Save B.C. Film campaign, a petition circulating online has gained over 30,000 signatures, and a poll funded by the Motion Picture Production Industry Association of B.C. has reflected fairly strong public support as well. According to the report, 56 per cent of British Columbian adults believe the province should “encourage strong growth” of the film industry, putting it in second, behind the tourism industry with 67 per cent in favour of strong growth. In addition to more funding for tax incentives, industry leaders such as Brian Hamilton would like to see B.C. create some sort of body to liaise between the government and the film industry, similar to the Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC). “Where is our ministry?” he demanded at January’s rally, to rousing applause from the crowd. The OMDC is an agency of the Ontario Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and their mission

statement describes them as “the central catalyst for Ontario’s cultural media cluster. It promotes, enhances and leverages investment, jobs and original content creation.” The OMDC oversees distribution of much of Ontario’s media related arts funding, including their film tax incentives. According to Hamilton, the creation of a similar agency in British Columbia would provide the creative industries with a “one stop shop to address our needs.” B.C. NDP leader Adrian Dix has expressed support for a ministry for the creative sector, though neither his party nor anyone from the industry seem to have a viable plan as to how that would work or how much it might cost. Meanwhile, Clark has been promoting the potential benefits of her government’s attempts to strengthen ties between B.C. and the Indian film industry. The government invested $11 million dollars to secure a deal that will bring the Times of India Film Awards to Vancouver in April. The deal also guarantees at least one Indian film production coming to B.C., and Clark hopes that that is going to be the beginning of a long, profitable trade relationship between B.C. and India, rooted in the film industry. Ultimately, the implications of a declining industry would be undeniable. “I know acting is a risky profession to go into,” Stewart laments, “but this just makes it even harder to secure a living doing what I love.” As the debate continues to rage, and with a provincial election rapidly approaching, the future of the B.C. film industry seems precarious. Many are waiting to know if they’ll be hearing a call of “action” or “cut.”

ON THE COVER: TRUSU candidates will be campaigning for your votes over the next week before the polls open March 25. Meet the candidates on pages 6 and 7 this week.. — PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 23

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

March 20, 2013

Volume 22, Issue 23

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Editorial/Opinions I’m changing the calendar!

Mike Davies

editor@truomega.ca

250-828-5069

@PaperguyDavies NEWS EDITOR

Devan C. Tasa

news@truomega.ca @DCTasa ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Brendan Kergin

arts@truomega.ca @roguetowel SPORTS EDITOR

Adam Williams

sports@truomega.ca @AdamWilliams87 ROVING EDITOR

Courtney Dickson

roving@truomega.ca @dicksoncourtney COPY/WEB EDITOR

Taylor Rocca

copy@truomega.ca @manovrboard

omegacontributors Mark Hendricks, Travis Persaud, Owen Munro, Mason Buettner, Jess Buick, Cassandra Hoffman, Kassandra Mitchell, Jessica Klymchuk, Jessica Duncan, Nathan Crosby

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * VACANT INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Editor’s Note Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief I often wish — as many of you likely do, as well — that there should be more time in a day. I have too much to do and it always takes longer than it should because, well, to be honest, I take as long to do things as I have time to accomplish them. I have arrived at a solution to this problem — and it doesn’t even involve slowing the rotation of the planet — and that solution is the Daviesian Calendar. Instead of figuring out how to have more hours in a day, we are about to have fewer. This may sound counterintuitive, but just stay with me for a minute. Each day in the Daviesian Calendar is 21 hours long and there are eight of them in a week. Everything else remains the same (months are the same length, years are still numbered by the same system, etc.), we have simply added one day and shortened all of them to make room for it. That day is called Placiday (pronounced plah-sid-ay). Named from the Latin word placidus, meaning “gentle, quiet,

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until deadlines to improve whatever it is I’m doing and make it the best it can be. I’ve seen myself the advantages to taking time to myself — I’ve spoken of this on more than a few occasions in this column — and how I work more efficiently when I have less time. I often leave my office before I’ve accomplished my “to do” list for the day, knowing that despite that act leaving me more on my plate for the following day, I will be better able to accomplish it all if I have the proper time to recuperate and refresh. So while the Daviesian Calendar is likely a pipe-dream — it would take literally everyone on the planet to buy in for it to work — I again urge you to consider what it stands for. If you can take time periodically to avoid being “on” and “accomplishing” things, you’ll be better off. Even huge multinational corporations (you know, the ones who we generally agree don’t actually care about the well-being of the individuals in their ranks) have realized this. Best Buy, for example, has seen a 35 per cent increase in productivity in departments that have switched to a “results only work environment” at their head office in Minnesota, a system that sees people drifting in and out of the office whenever they want, working when they feel most productive rather than on predetermined schedules. If massive corporations are moving to this, what’s keeping you on the metaphorical hamster wheel? Take a Placiday once in a while. editor@truomega.ca

Changing the calendar won’t change a thing

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 0C8 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editor@truomega.ca Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

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still, calm, mild, peaceful,” according to our old friend Wikipedia, Placiday will be used to accomplish nothing. It will be used to recuperate from all the accomplishing you did over the rest of the week. You wouldn’t be able to accomplish anything on Placiday even if you wanted to. You see, no one is allowed to work on Placiday. You cannot go to the store for groceries, because no one is there to sell them to you. You cannot go to the petting zoo, or to a hockey game (as none will be scheduled on Placidays) or to a restaurant for dinner. You could, however, read a book (provided you owned that book already, as you could not purchase it that day), watch television (there would be no news or other live broadcasts, though), surf the Internet (as long as you’re happy with content created at least the day before) or just nap the day away. “Human beings aren’t designed to expend energy continuously. Rather, we’re meant to pulse between spending and recovering energy,” according to an article entitled “Relax! You’ll Be More Productive,” published in a February 2013 New York Times. Various studies have suggested (and continue to build on the notion) that working fewer hours actually improves work performance, because people work more efficiently when they are engaged and let’s face it, it’s hard to stay engaged for the extended periods demanded by employers (and some educators). As I said earlier, I generally take as long to do things as I have. It’s not procrastination (well, not always), it’s that I work right up

TRUe Thoughts Taylor Rocca Ω Copy/Web Editor Placiday eh? (See above for this reference) Sounds like a load of garbage to me. Let’s take a look way back through the looking-glass of time. Let’s look all the way back to a long time ago, in a... white picket fenced, suburban neighborhood not too far away. I’m talking about the generation before us. The generation that the baby boomers grew up in. Now, I can’t speak first-hand about this generation and what things were like, but I know my mother and father have told me many a tale about how life was back then. Remember the days when kids used to walk through blizzards, uphill in both directions to get to and from school? Remember the days when kids used

to get one pair of shoes a year and it was on $1.49-day at Woodward’s? Remember the days when kids used to chase an old hoop, pushing it with a stick down the street? Okay, maybe that hoop and stick thing was a bit further back in time.... Regardless, what I am getting at here is that it wasn’t too long ago when we had a Placiday. In fact, you might even recognize the name of this intriguing, long-desired but hard-to-get day. Sunday. Yes, you read that right. Sunday. “But Taylor! We still have Sunday! What could you possibly be talking about?” I was raised in a Catholic home and while I don’t necessarily prescribe to the teachings of the Catholic church in the way I once did, according to documents from the Vatican, it is clearly defined within the 10 commandments that, “Six days you shall labour and do your work; but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work.” SIX DAYS YOU SHALL LABOUR...THE SEVENTH DAY...YOU SHALL NOT DO ANY WORK. As far as I have been told, that is pretty much how things went on Sundays when my parents were growing up. The most taxing thing that happened was getting the family up in the morning, out the door and into the pews to repent their sins. After that, everyone came home and relaxed.

My nonno didn’t go back to his regular gig at the railroad. My nonna didn’t stitch any of the tears in my father’s pants. My grandfather didn’t make sales calls for International Harvester. My grandmother didn’t do any laundry. My mother and father didn’t do any homework for school. Neither did my one lonely uncle or any of my aunts. Sunday was a day for rest, relaxation and recharging the batteries. (They had batteries back then, right?) With society advancing and communication evolving in the same way humanity has, attention spans have lessened and as a result, people have demanded there be more things to keep them occupied 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Guess what that means? Shops and stores are open on Sunday. Guess what that means? Shops and stores require people to work in order for them to be open on Sunday. Society has changed and not necessarily for the better. To bring this full circle, why is the Daviesian Calendar a load of garbage? Because while it is a great sentiment (one that I fully endorse), humanity would find a way to ruin it just as we did with Sunday. We would get bored and eventually we would be unable to entertain ourselves for 21 short hours. And very quickly, Placiday would turn into just another regular Sunday. copy@truomega.ca

Staying energized without coffee

Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

This society’s dependency on coffee and all things infused with energy is getting out of control. I’ve noticed many of my peers replacing entire meals with a caffeinated beverage over the past few months. Why have we become so reliant on, what is essentially, a performance-enhancing and addictive drug? I gave up caffeine recently as part of a healthy lifestyle change a friend and I made. My routine for six months prior had been having at least four cups of coffee every day to keep me going, so this did not seem like it was going to be a successful endeavour. I’m not just talking coffee. I’m talking about those giant energy drinks, caffeine-packed teas and in all seriousness, pop, as well. Any student and anyone in the journalism school in particular, can agree that this is probably nuts. But, I quickly learned why quitting caffeine is such a good idea. I now know when I’m actually tired and am able to fix it naturally. Caffeine gives drinkers a false sense of alertness which can lead to quicker burn-outs and mental and physical illness. By not drinking coffee alone, I’ve saved roughly $20 per week. If I can continue for just one year, I could save more than $1,000. That’s without including the money I’d probably spend on pop and caffeinated tea. I’ve been bringing water or tea from home that I know is free of caffeine. I’m also saving time by not standing in 15-minute line-ups waiting to order my extra-large coffee with four creams. The best part is, according to sports editor Adam Williams, I haven’t been any grumpier than I was when I was consuming caffeine regularly. So with all these advantages, why does quitting caffeine seem so impossible? Health Canada recommends that adults consume no more than 400 mg of caffeine per day, in order to avoid adverse effects including, but not limited to, tremors, nausea, increased blood pressure and increased heart rate. Of course, this number varies depending on the presence of other health conditions and pregnancy. We’re all exhausted. Not a day goes by where you ask someone how he or she is doing and the response isn’t “sleepy,” or “exhausted.” There are other ways to keep going that don’t include giving in to a caffeine addiction. If you want to stay awake, get some exercise, fresh air, or the obvious solution, get enough sleep at night. Do things you enjoy to keep your life balanced and stress at a minimum. Then, you too could quit caffeine and save money, time and your sanity. roving@truomega.ca


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March 20, 2013

News Associate vice president was devoted to education Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

A TRU associate vice president was remembered at a memorial service March 15 for his passion for education and interacting with different cultures. Approximately 200 people gathered in the Grand Hall to remember Wesley Koczka, the university’s international associate vice president and CEO of global operations, who died suddenly while in Germany during the March 9 weekend. “He thought education was important to develop character in individuals,” said his son Kim Koczka, who added that his father thought education also made people more dedicated, patient and accepting of others. Wesley Koczka himself had four degrees. He attended the University of Saskatchewan and Brigham Young University in Utah. When Koczka joined TRU on May 1, 2010, Mike Henniger, TRU World’s director of international marketing, thought Koczka, with his tall figure and immaculate suits, would be a scary boss that would be hard to work for. That wasn’t the case.

“It was anything but,” he said. “The three years working with him were the best three years of my professional life.” Koczka became known as a kind and supportive boss, buying Timbits for the TRU World staff every Friday and encouraging Baihua Chadwick, TRU World’s managing director of global operations, to get a doctorate. Under his watch, TRU expanded its international connections. Now TRU World brings in 1,570 students from more than 80 countries and has 1,600 students enrolled in partner universities overseas. Alan Shaver, TRU’s president, travelled extensively with Koczka. He said there were two types of travelling companions “One is the one you just can’t wait to get away from,” he said. “The other you just can’t wait to get on the road again with.” For Shaver, Koczka was the latter. Shaver encouraged the staff at the memorial to continue Koczka’s work in expanding TRU’s international profile. “It’s really important that we remember Wes and his idealism about internationalization,” he said.

In front of the podium at Wes Koczka’s memorial in the Grand Hall on March 15 were pictures and flowers celebrating his life. —PHOTO BY DEVAN C. TASA

Elections B.C. youth voting efforts include campus voting place

TRUSU briefs

Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

The chief of Elections B.C. was at TRU March 13 to encourage more students to vote in the May 14 election. Part of that effort will include a chance to vote on campus. Keith Archer, the chief electoral officer, was available along with elected members of TRUSU at a voter registration table in the Campus Activities Centre for an hour before giving a speech. The day before, there was a registration table at TRU New Residence. “We were really excited to hear that Dr. Archer would be coming to TRU,” said Dylan Robinson, TRUSU’s vice president external. “Of course, him being the chief electoral officer, I think it speaks to the importance that Elections B.C. is putting on youth participation in the electoral process.” As part of that, Elections B.C. is looking at putting a polling station on campus for a single day. While full details will be released closer to Election Day, the station will tentatively be in the Independent Centre on May 9. “It was clear that there was an interest among some in this campus to have a voting place physically on campus,” Archer said, adding that since Election Day is happening after classes are over, it’s harder to determine what the demand will be for universities. Robinson, who has been working on a campaign to have an on-campus voting station since last summer, was pleased to hear that news.

Executive progress reports expanded

Dylan Robinson, TRUSU’s vice-president external, Keith Archer, Elections B.C.’s chief electoral office and Trad Bahabri, TRUSU’s vice-president internal were registering voters in the CAC on March 13. —PHOTO BY DEVAN C. TASA

“We’re very excited to hear that they’ve taken our advice into consideration and are hopefully holding an advance poll on campus,” he said. Archer said Elections B.C. has been working to make sure the voters’ list is up to date since Feb. 25. Part of that effort has been to send letters to every household to confirm if the list’s information is correct. “In addition to that, we’re doing a targeted outreach for the first time in British Columbia and the target outreach is intended to provide additional registration opportunities

for those groups of voters that are less likely to be on the voters’ list,” he said. Those targeted include youth, First Nations, those that move around a lot, those living in new residential areas and those that don’t speak English as a first language. “We’re on the campus of TRU today as part of that effort to increase the prominence of voter registration during this period of targeted activities and we’ve had a great reception from the students union,” Archer said.

There are plenty of methods for students to vote, Archer said. “In B.C., you can vote at any voting place,” he said. “Even though we assign you to a particular voting place, you don’t need to vote there. You can vote at another voting place that’s more convenient.” Elections B.C. will be releasing a smartphone app that points the user to the closest voting station. Voters can also organize a mail-in ballot or vote early at an advance voting station or at the district electoral office at 100-1967 East Trans-Canada Highway after April 8.

theomega.ca

TRUSU council voted on March 12 to increase the number of progress reports the executive receives. Before the change, there were three progress reports: one about campaigns, one about services and one about entertainment. Three more have been added: internal operations, clubs and collectives. The policy was changed because of the new LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer and questioning) and graduate collectives, said Dylan Robinson, TRUSU’s vice president external. “That change is to have the [executive] agenda to line up with our new structure,” he said.

Food bank numbers tracked The students union will now be tracking how many items are given to students from its food bank. TRUSU began measuring food bank items in January. It’s also measuring how many graduate gowns are rented and how many international student identity cards (ISIC) students are getting. “It’s good that we are able to track it,” said TRUSU directorat-large Olivia Skagos, adding that a large increase in food bank items could speak to a tuition fee that’s too high for students. No numbers relating to the new measurement were revealed at the meeting.


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 23

News

Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

March 14 was World Kidney Day and TRU nursing students and faculty were happy to get involved in Sahali Mall’s annual event, once again. Between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. people could visit the mall and learn about kidney health from volunteers. TRU nursing students were set up at two tables assessing blood pressure and blood glucose levels. Floriann Fehr, nursing professor at TRU, has been involved with World Kidney Day for more than five years and uses the event as a teaching tool for her students. “I like to get some of the shyer students out to get them talking to people,” she said. Fehr said it’s important for Kamloopsians of all ages to attend events like this because “not everyone has a family doctor, so it’s an easy way to get information without one.” In young adults, poor kidney health often stems from urinary tract infections (UTIs). More common in young women than men, UTIs can be caused by pregnancy, new sexual partners and leaving tampons in for too long. All these causes affect the pH balance in the vagina, which triggers an infection. Third-year nursing students Chelsea Brown and Leah Tigchelaar spent the morning checking blood glucose levels and blood

pressure, both of which can lead to kidney disease if a healthy level of each is not maintained. According to Brown and Tigchelaar, the optimal glucose level falls between four and seven (millimoles per litre), however Brown had a woman visit her in a clinic in Merritt last summer with a blood glucose level of 61. “That’s really rare, though,” Brown said. According to the American Diabetes Association, high glucose levels can cause problems in the kidneys because too much sugar f lowing through the blood makes the kidneys work too hard, which can lead to kidney disease. “Everything in your body is related to your kidneys,” Fehr said. High blood pressure can also lead to kidney disease. Because high blood pressure doesn’t always present symptoms immediately, Fehr said this is why it’s extremely important to be aware of blood pressure. At the same event in 2012, Fehr and her students had a man come in with a blood pressure of 220/110 (a healthy blood pressure is 120/80 according to the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation). His face was red and he hadn’t seen a doctor in more than a year. Fehr and her students were able to educate him about the negative effects of high blood pressure and the man told Fehr he was going to do something about it right away.

International Intonation

Life that doesn’t need light, Egyptian relics being pilfered and U.S. ramping up missle defense Mark Hendricks Ω Contributor

Who needs the sun? A research paper published in the March 14 issue of Science describes an ecosystem at the bottom of the ocean completely independent of the sun. The ecosystem is composed of chemosynthetic microbes, which derive their energy entirely from chemical reactions between the seawater and the basalt rocks of Earth’s oceanic crust. Chemosynthetic organisms have been found before in mine shafts and near sea floor hydrothermal vents but the sheer size of the ecosystem is what makes this different. Earth’s oceanic crust covers 60 per cent of the planet’s surface, representing a massive ecosystem. “The largest ecosystem on Earth, by volume, is supported by chemosynthesis,” Mark Lever from Aarhuis University in Denmark and part of the research team told Wired. The paper is the culmination of 15 years of research and reveals a potentially rich array of life just waiting to be discovered at the ocean floor. Where you can find out more: www.wired.com Egyptian tomb raiders A renowned Egyptologist and former Egyptian minister of state for antiquities affairs warns that unless actions are taken, Egypt could lose its his-

torical artifacts forever. Zahi Hawass’ warning came after a modern cemetery was built on top of a UNESCO-protected heritage site. “In Dahshur, they have built a new cemetery above the causeway which links two pyramids, one of the fourth dynasty and one dating to the fifth dynasty,” Hawass told the Sunday Express. “This was totally illegal.”

— IMAGE COURTESY CHRISTIAN

FISCHER / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Hawass believes the new ministers are wary of criticizing president Morsi for fear of losing their jobs. Looting is on the rise in Egypt. Police officers no longer provide protection to historical sites and since the Arab Spring more than 5,600 illegal digs have been carried out. This number continues to rise.

Letter to the editor

Nursing student Chelsea Brown volunteers to educate patients and assess blood glucose levels at World Kidney Day on March 14. —PHOTO BY COURTNEY DICKSON

Puzzle of the Week Puzzle of the Week #19 – Square Hearts?

Hearts is a card game for three or four players. Each turn, either 26 points are distributed amongst two or more of the players, or every player gets 26 points except one player who gets none. A game is over when one or more players reach 100 or more points. The low score wins. Is it possible in a three-player game for each players’ score each turn to be a square? How about in a four-player game? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

Thompson Rivers University’s student union slogan “Ban the bottle” should be “Ban all disposable drink containers.” Plastic bottles are not the only issue. The effort that has been put into this campaign getting people to ban plastic bottles should be put into educating people to recycle their beverage containers responsibly. A majority of people in this beautiful city of Kamloops are unaware of how to/what to recycle as beverage containers not limited to but including plastic bottles. I worked at a bottle depot for 2.5 years. When I was approached by a student union member on campus providing information on “Ban the Bottle” I realized there was an problem — the information offered was that we should be banning plastic bottles because they can only be “downcycled” meaning that they could only be made into lower grade plastic. However, I know that plastic bottles are made into new plastic bottles, paint buckets and clothing — in fact I have a shirt that is made from a plastic bottle. From my experience, tetra packs, (a.k.a. juice boxes), are the biggest offenders. According to encorp.ca, for every ton of juice boxes recycled

17 trees are not cut down. Only 60 per cent of tetra packs being sold in British Columbia are returned, whereas 80 per cent of aluminum cans and 75 per cent of plastic bottles are returned. Let’s focus on recycling these as well as plastic bottles. Banning plastic bottles on campus is not a long-term solution since commercialization, consumerism and convenience will make it difficult to achieve. If people educated themselves on recycling beverage containers responsibly this would be a step in the right direction and a long-term solution. Cassandra Hoffman

Do you have an opinion on this or any other issue affecting campus life? Email editor@truomega.ca

and we’ll see if we can run it.

A $153 million restoration project in Cairo that would have focused on 30 major monuments has also been scrapped. Where you can find out more: www.worldcrunch.com United States missile defense

increasing

The Obama administration announced it will increase its missile defences on the West Coast by nearly 50 per cent in case of a possible attack by North Korea. The announcement came a week after North Korea conducted their third nuclear test. Last week an unidentified spokesman for Pyongyang’s foreign ministry threatened the United States with a preemptive attack, saying they will exercise their right to “a preemptive nuclear attack to destroy the strongholds of the aggressors.” In response to these statements the U.S. is planning to add 14 interceptors to its West Coast missile defence. “The U.S. has missile defences to protect us from limited ICBM attacks,” defence secretary Chuck Hagel said at the press conference. “But North Korea in particular has recently made advances in its capabilities and has engaged in a series of irresponsible and reckless provocations.” The interceptors will cost $1 billion and won’t be ready for four years. Where you can find out more: www.time.com

theomega.ca

Nursing students educate community about kidney health


6

March 20, 2013

Your candidates are as follows: (bios submitted by individual candidates and have not been edited)

Colin Macedo

Declan Harrison

Kaitlin Clement

Director-at-Large

Director-at-Large

Director-at-Large

To all TRUSU members, my name is Declan Harrison and I am running in the upcoming Student Union election for the position of Director-at-Large. Currently, I am a second year Bachelor of Arts student with the goal of completing this degree with a major in Sociology and a minor in Psychology. For the past two years, I have had the opportunity to work for a non-profit organization in Kamloops where I have discovered what it means to be a part of a community. This sense of community is what has encouraged me to put my name forward for a position on council. Having been afforded the chance to work on a number of different committees over the past few months, the experiences have allowed me to understand the benefits of this type of work and the effort it takes to achieve changes beneficial to the audience you are catering to. I believe using our resources to provide opportunities for student growth while emphasizing the importance of access and advocacy is a necessity for students at TRU.

Kaitlin Clement is a second year nursing student. Kaitlin is involved on campus and is passionate about encouraging other students to enrich their university experience by getting involved with their school outside of academics. Kaitlin currently sits on the Canadian Nursing Student Association’s Global health Committee and is working towards inspiring TRU students to get involved with sharing their resources internationally. Kaitlin has volunteered in many different countries. Last year she co-led an international development team to Cambodia. Kaitlin believes that in order to be successful, a student should have a healthy balance between school and leisure. Kaitlin also believes that a comfortable and clean work environment can make long days at school more enjoyable. Kaitlin wants to represent TRU students and work towards making positive changes to help students develop an enriching university experience. Kaitlin is running alongside the members of Your Vote = Your Voice.

No bio was submitted

Nolan Guichon

Parth Mukesh

Director-at-Large

Director-at-Large

Nolan Guichon is an Aboriginal from the Tsilhqot’in Nation, looking to represent TRUSU for the third time and first time as the director at large. His goals as the Representative will be to create a harmonized environment for both non-aboriginal and aboriginal students; with a University they can be proud to share our rich culture with. His current experience with the Aboriginal Collective will create a basis for successful event and support planning. Over this last two years within TRUSU, he has learned the significance in what it takes to serve students. With his current knowledge and if elected, the ability to learn more of student services, he aspires to bring the student body together once again. Overall the success in the events that took place will be a solid foundation to what can be done in the following semesters. This will ultimately allow him to distinguish our values further within TRU.

Parth Mukesh Patel is currently a Final year Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Human Resource Management Student. Parth is an approachable student leader who is known to reach out to students and fight for their rights. His prominent roles in student leadership include: current terms as International Students’ Representative and student representative on Board of Governors. As a student representative, He advocates for student consultation and transparency in university governance, making sure that student rights are protected. While serving as the International Students’ Representative, he has been a spearhead in developing “Per-Credit Fee Campaign” for International Students. If elected as a Director at large at TRUSU, he promises to transfer that knowledge and research to the incoming International Students’ Representative. He hopes to support the incoming representative with all the help s/he may require. Parth has proven his leadership skill by creating a LGBTQ advocacy representative on the TRUSU council in 2012-2013. Parth is excited about this opportunity to bring his experience his perspective to the TRUSU council. He is of firm belief that “The fate of any School, College or University is in the hands of STUDENTS and STUDENTS only.” Cheers!!


7

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 23

Dylan Robinson

Leif Douglass

Ashley Goodwin

President

Vice President External

Vice President Internal

Vice President Internal

Vice President Finance

Dylan Robinson is a 3rd year Political Science/Philosophy student running for President. Dylan combines an open and intrepid leadership style with a long track record of successful campus involvement including: a term as TRUSU VP External, 2 years organising the P.H.P. Conference on campus, 3 terms on the TRU Senate, President of the TRU Politics club, and much more. Dylan’s past experiences in Campaigns and Government Relations and University Governance will be an asset to the position of President, while his understanding of TRUSU Clubs and campus groups ensure he is an approachable and open candidate who listens to students and their concerns. Dylan has proven that he can win real change, with demonstrable results from his Ban Disposable Plastic Bottles campaign and success in creating a LGBTQ Advocacy Representative on the TRUSU council this past year. Dylan is eager for this opportunity to bring his experiences in campaigns and a new perspective to the position of President. He hopes to be a strong spokesperson for the Union and a strong voice at the TRU table on behalf of all students. Dylan is an excellent candidate to continue growing the great Advocacy, Services, and Entertainment work of TRUSU in 2013/14.

Leif Douglass is a third year Bachelor of Arts student who is running for VP External because he is passionate about student advocacy. Leif views student representation as vital in continuing to support and improve TRU as a more diverse, open, and responsive university experience and has extensive experience in campus involvement and governance, including being elected as a Director-at-Large for TRUSU, serving as a student senator, working as a Research Assistant for the Director of Sustainability on campus, leading the ECO Club as Co-President, and representing student rights on two senate subcommittees. Much of Leif’s work during his term as a representative for the students’ union has been on campaigns and media relations, specifically regarding TRUSU’s campaign to ban the sale of disposable plastic bottles. In the coming year Leif will advocate for a more sustainable and equitable campus that listens to students’ voices. With this experience and a passion to continue to engage students and create positive change on campus Leif is an excellent candidate on the Your Vote = Your Voice slate for the position of VP External.

Through a variety of campus activities I have come to realize the importance of a holistic approach in life. These opportunities have also made me the outgoing and motivated individual I am today.

Will George is a fourth year student at Thompson River’s University majoring in Politics and Economics. Will is excited to run for the first time, with the “Your Vote equals Your Voice” slate for the Vice President Internal position on the TRU Student Union. Past experience includes creating, managing and hosting events for a large group of clubs on campus. With experience in over 15 clubs and groups on campus throughout his time here, Will is ready to continue to work and support students with their university experience. Will prides himself on being available and committed to work as a representative of the students. His deep commitment with TRU stretches from a Study Abroad Ambassador to an active member in many clubs on campus. Will is eager to represent TRU students and their activities in and outside of the classroom. He would like to see more improvement with student services and a more sustainable and open campus. If elected Vice President Internal for the TRU Student Union, Will is committed to lobby towards international and domestic student rights, assistance towards preparing for the job market and increased TRUSU student relations.

Trad Bahabri is a third year student, running for the position of Vice President Finance under “Your Vote = Your Voice” slate. it is his second year working with the Union when started working as vice president internal last year. Through the last year working in the Union Trad developed experience advocating and serving students as the chair of entertainment committee and a member of few committees in board of governance, Trad is very proud of organizing successful events for the students last year such as Margret Atwood common voices lecture series, Blazers Nights, Cineplex Movie Night (Pre-screening Broken City), BackTo-School BBQ and few others. Trad is very motivated and committed to advocate students` voice in the decision making process in his participation at board of governance committees and convocation committee at TRU. He is also a leadership facilitator at the leadership program in TRU. This year his motivation is to provide quality services to students and partnership with the community of Kamloops to provide more quality opportunities for students discounts locally. Trad is very committed and motivated to offer students at TRU great advocacy, services, and entertainment for the up coming year as vice president finance.

Liz Whiting

Deborah Efretuei

Nic Zdunich

Olivia Skagos

Aboriginal Rep

International Rep

LGBTQ Rep

Amanda Hill

Liz Whiting is an Aboriginal from the Nuxalk Nation and is running for the first time at Thompson Rivers Students’ Union as Aboriginal Representative as a member of Your Vote = Your Voice. Liz currently holds the position as co-chair of the TRUSU Student Caucus and previously held the position of Aboriginal Representative at Cape Breton University in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Liz is a strong believer in Aboriginal rights and awareness. Liz believes that if elected she can bring more awareness of what Aboriginal culture is really like and how politics, health, education and community effect the Aboriginal community. Over the past few years, Liz has sat on many important committees within both Universities that she has attended and believes that with the knowledge she has gained, she can make a difference within the Thompson Rivers Students’ Union. With a perspective of holding the same position at Cape Breton University, Liz believes that she can make a difference with her outside perspective and fresh, exciting and unique ideas.

Deborah Efretuei is a third year Bachelor of Science student from Nigeria, looking to become the International Student Representative in the Thompson Rivers University Student Union. Deborah is a devoted team player and she is very passionate about serving others, as well as addressing the major issues and concerns that affect the International student body. She is actively involved in several school activities and, having worked as a Student’s Representative in the Student Engagement Committee, and as a Secretary in the Pan-African club, she has gained valuable experience and knowledge that she wishes to use to advocate for the International Students of the Thompson Rivers University. Deborah’s goal is to make the Thompson Rivers University a conducive and productive environment where the International students can learn, gain and enjoy the remarkable and rewarding experiences that the school has to offer.

Nic Zdunich is a second year business student, and first year at Thompson Rivers University. Originating from Saskatchewan, Nic has been gaining experience in a variety of industries. In 2006, Nic relocated to Vancouver where he attended The Art Institute Of Vancouver and graduated on the Honor Roll from the Digital Film & Video Program. Shortly afterwards he helped coordinate media for many high profile events including Vancouver Fashion Week. He then shifted his focus and relocated to Ottawa where he worked designed media for the Prime Minister and other Members Of Parliament. Nic then relocated back to Saskatchewan and was the Creative Director for Wired96.3, winner of Radio Station of the Year – 2010 at Canadian Music week. He was then given the opportunity to go abroad to Australia and work with one of the world’s most environmentally sustainable music festivals. After 1 year abroad, Nic returned to Canada to upgrade his education at Thompson Rivers University. Nic is running for the LGBTQ Representative and wants to bring his skills obtained around the globe to give a strong voice to the LGBTQ community on campus, and create a strong sense of community and pride amongst the TRU student body.

Will George

Trad Bahabri

Women’s Rep

Women’s Rep

My name is Amanda Hill and I’m running for Women’s Student Representative. This is my 3rd year of classes in an educational journey that has so far taken 10 years. Each year has been in a different stage in my life and as a student I have struggled with bad roommates, moving out on my own, working multiple jobs to pay for rent, bills, and food, as well as balancing marriage and children. I also understand that when you take a “break” from university how difficult it can be to return. Being a student can be the most exciting and stressful time in your life. I truly believe that every student should have equal access to education and equal opportunity to succeed. I love the diversity of our campus and especially the diversity of women on campus. We have women experiencing life away from home for the first time, women in athletics, women in the sciences, women in trades, women who are married, women with children and more. Each one of them faces a different set of challenges and if elected my goal is to be approachable, listen, and to support.

Olivia Skagos is in her 3rd year of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program at TRU and has been involved in TRUSU in various capacities for a number of years. She is currently running for reelection with the slate Your Vote = Your Voice, and hopes to be your next Women’s Students Representative. Olivia is truly passionate about education. Accessible, affordable and equitable education is directly linked to positive health outcomes and wellbeing. In order to maintain and secure this right, Olivia believes that student engagement in political processes, both locally and nationally, will be invaluable. Olivia is committed to ensuring that student voices across campus are heard. She has extensive experience in student advocacy and is fully confident in her ability to support and promote student issues on campus. If re-elected, Olivia plans to work closely with other stakeholders to create an inclusive pride positive community on campus, continue with and foster the work towards affordable, accessible and equitable education and finally, create a platform of open and safe discussion on gender-related issues that students face on a daily basis.


8

March 20, 2013

Stories We Tell A Royal Affair

Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief Stories are what connect us. But stories are also what allow us to connect. Sarah Polley, one of the most iconic figures in Canadian film, has woven a tale about a story, and told it using one story as told from multiple perspectives. Confused yet? Let’s try to break it down. The story of the film, Stories We Tell, is the story of the making of a documentary. That part is relatively straightforward. The documentary being produced in the story is Polley examining her family history from the multiple viewpoints of the members within that family. Now, it’s not a groundbreaking idea that the same series of events — or even one individual person — will be remembered very differently by those observing them, even when those people are directly involved in (or related to) the events and people themselves. What Polley has done, however, is highlight those differences by having the various members of her immediate family tell the story of her deceased mother and how Sarah came to find out who her real biological father is. Subtle differences in the recounting of the tale are used to expose the aspect of memory and identity, as the audience finds itself finding different “characters” more or less trustworthy than the others as the tale unravels. As if that isn’t complex enough, the aesthetic of the film is such that modern,

high-definition camera work is intermingled with eight-millimetre camera, archive-style clips (spoiler alert: These are actually re-enactments) to bounce back and forth between the interviews being done with her family members as they recollect the past, the narration from her father in a sound booth and “historic” footage of her parents in the ‘70s and ‘80s. Love is explored in a way that most don’t consider. It’s discussed in degrees at times and at others examined from certain emotional, and sociological angles that some choose to ignore when discussing this sometimes-ideological emotion. It’s not the type of movie that you escape into to forget the world around you for a couple of hours — but then again, that’s not why you attend a film festival (or generally engage in a documentary, either, for that matter) — but it certainly is an interesting examination of the human condition. It can be hard to follow (which of these adult children being interviewed are the biological result of which two other humans?) and slow in progressing, but you won’t be able to say it’s not engaging. It’s also impossible to ignore the emotion of the subjects themselves as they tell the tale(s) that will make up the story that is their lives. It’s not depressing or uplifting, but there are tears to be shed and belly-laughs induced. As I said — it’s complicated. But it’s worth your time to sift through, just as I’m sure it was worth Polley’s time to produce.

Mark Hendricks Ω Contributor

As a mother nears the end of her life she writes to the children she never had a chance to know to both seek forgiveness from being absent from their lives and to tell her children the truth of her exile. This is the stage that marks the beginning of director Nikolaj Arcel’s drama — based on a true period of Danish history — A Royal Affair. A Royal Affair is a story told on two fronts. It is a story of a nation in the midst of change from its theocratic origins to the free thinking ideals of the Enlightenment. It is also a story about a growing affair between the queen of Denmark Caroline Mathilde, played by Alicia Vikander and the king’s personal physician Johann Friedrich Struensee, played by Mads Mikkelsen. An affair within a royal court is a popular movie trope, but rarely is it done as well as this. The relationship between Struensee and Mathilde blossoms naturally. This isn’t love at first sight, nor is it a sudden change of heart. Mathilde is initially distrustful of Struensee’s relationship with the mentally ill King Christian VII, played by Mikkel Boe Følsgaard, with whom she has grown distant. It

Amour

Kassandra Mitchell Ω Contributor

—PHOTO COURTESY NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA

On Monday, March 11, the Kamloops Film Festival featured the French film Amour, written and directed by Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke. Set in Paris, it tells the story of Georges (JeanLouis Trintignant) and Anne (Emmanuelle Riva), two retired music teachers enjoying their elderly years together as a married couple. The film begins with the pair taking in a night of theatre, an event they’ve probably shared together on many occasions. Afterwards, as they make their way home, they discover thieves have tampered with the locks on their front door, leaving Anne frightened and uneasy. As they lay in bed, Georges can sense his wife’s preoccupation, even with barely a word exchanged between the two of them. The scene is subtle and unhurried, yet reveals the connection they share in an obvious way. While enjoying breakfast the following morning, Anne suffers a stroke that paralyzes the right

isn’t until Mathilde discovers Struensee’s enlightenment ideals that their relationship begins to grow. Struensee has his own motives for getting close to Christian. Once he has Christian’s trust, Struensee begins to use him to attempt to enact a wide series of social changes. The writing is well done and the actors portray their roles well, from the eccentricities of Christian to the serious nature of Struensee. Følsgaard’s portrayal of the king is masterful, at times aloof, at other times furious and at other times simply seeming like a child in need of a friend. Christian is a complex character; he is simultaneously the most powerful man in the movie and also the one with the least control. His childish nature is directly at odds with the weighty power that he wields. Although he is king, his mental condition causes him to constantly be taken advantage of by all sides. During the latter half of the movie this relegates Christian to little more than a tragic plot device as competing interests use him as a mouthpiece for their own agendas. Despite the aristocratic nature of the film, Arcel manages a good balance of shots. The scenes vary from the lavish gold bedecked interior of the Danish castle in Copenhagen, to the green livery of the royal summer home and to the drab greys and

browns of the surrounding cities where the peasantry live in squalor. The use of music is subtle yet effective. In one scene, during a masquerade ball, the music seamlessly and un-dramatically changes from a royal waltz to a track with more tension, changing the mood without saying a word and in a manner that isn’t jarring to the audience. A Royal Affair is a movie that uses the backdrop of Danish history to tell an intensely personal story about forbidden love and a country in the midst of change that is worth experiencing.

side of her body and ultimately restrains her to a wheelchair. She makes her husband promise that no matter what happens, he is never to bring her to a hospital again. As time progresses she becomes fragile and tired, eventually suffering from a second stroke. Georges then hires a nurse to help him take care of his nowimmobile wife. As the film progresses, we play witness to the burdened journey of a man losing his soul mate, slowly, vexingly before his eyes. Haneke brilliantly contrasts moments of incredible sadness with small, tender glimpses of joy. It’s a film that is measured and deliberate, mirroring a woman’s external battle with body and a husband’s internal war of heart — a heart unwilling to break a promise. At its very core, Amour is a haunting and beautiful love story. For many it echoes the lives of grandparents and parents, family and friends. For myself, it offered thoughts of my senior years, still far from reality but fated, nonethe-less. I left the theatre hoping that I, like Anne, will one day be blessed enough to have someone

who loves me enough to take care of me should I ever fall sick. I also left hoping that neither my future partner nor I will ever have to endure the agony of losing one another in such a slow and painful way. Hollywood often depicts tales of romance and chooses to tell the journey rather than the destination. Most of us hope to find love in our lifetime. We hold in our hearts dreams of romance, idealizing a relationship with our perfect match. Not often however, do stories remind us that life-long love is, in actuality, only as long as time allows. Haneke bravely reminds us of the painful caveat in the phrase “happily ever after.” Amour is a gorgeous tale of love that will linger in your thoughts long after the credits roll. Trintignant delivers a powerful performance as the adoring, yet helpless husband and Riva helps you understand how Anne feels — trapped and isolated by her body. Although a dark, and at certain points depressing, story, in the end Haneke leaves you with a few moments of happiness that might just be enough.

—PHOTO COURTESY ZENTROPA ENTERTAINMENTS


9

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 23

War Witch

Jessica Klymchuk Ω Contributor

Canadian director Kim Nguyen presents a culturally authentic depiction of the devastation faced by youth rebels in War Witch. Rachel Mwanza makes her screen debut as Komona, a 14-year-old girl who plainly narrates the film, telling her story to her unborn child. Komona’s simple narration is mirrored by the blunt horrors of her life as a child soldier in Africa. Komona is 12 when rebel soldiers ambush her village and force her to kill her parents. She is adopted into the rebel army where she is given an AK-47 and taught to kill. The rebels drink white tree sap, “magic milk,” with seemingly hallucinogenic side effects and Komona begins seeing ghosts that warn her when government soldiers are near, earning her the name “war witch” from Great Tiger, the rebel leader. Among the ghosts of past soldiers are her parents, who continuously haunt her. Amidst the terror of war, however, blossoms a love story between Komona and fellow youth rebel Magician, played by Serge Kanyinda. When Magician convinces Komona that eventually Great Tiger will kill them, like he has others, they run away together. This is where War Witch takes an unexpected lighter, even humorous,

tone as Magician searches for the white rooster Komona tells him he needs to find in order to marry her, like her father used to say. He is laughed at by villagers and told the white rooster is a myth but he searches until he finds one, proving his love through his relentless determination. When the young married couple returns to Magician’s uncle, a world of order is restored and rebellion seems further away than ever. This proves to be a short-lived fantasy and the grip of war once again becomes their grim reality. In a film so plagued by death it is remarkable how the subject is dealt with delicately and without the gore that is typically presumed. There is very little blood, but poignant images of violence still resonate from the scenes. It is not sensationalistic, but genuine. There are several aspects of the film that build its authentic nature; sorcery is an unexpected cultural element. At one point Magician presents Komona with a grigri, an amulet meant to protect the wearer from evil. There is also a ceremonious style to the way the rebel children are first presented with their weapons. The sorcery adds a religious layer that intensifies the reality of each situation. The ghosts Komona sees are uniquely realistic. They are the dead themselves covered in white clay or paint with zombie-glazed eyes. They parallel well with

Boy Brendan Kergin

he can with the man he’s looked up to for so long. However, as the days go by, his father’s true The sunny seemingly eternally nature, apparent to the audience village of Waihau Bay in 1984 early on, begins to leak into Boy’s New Zealand plays a warm back- reality, leading to Boy’s realizadrop for the coming-of-age story tion about his father and Alamein’s first step towards truly fillof Boy. The story centres on the world ing the role as father. The film, while simple and huof 11-year-old Boy (James Rolleston). It’s a world that starts off morous on the surface, is more happy and simple, despite the fact complex with layers to characthat, if viewed by an outsider, it ters’ backstories and relationseems to be in tatters. His mother ships. Cameron BTM which is There isRauschenberger very little passed away during childbirth, Time... bla ck- a nd -wh it e his father is in Director to thinkprison about the career opportunity of a lifetime. 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However, Waititi didn’t give The return of his father is central to these hopes, as Boy idol- himself an easy role, playing a izes him, openly talking about deadbeat dad too young for the himabout as a hero. to think the career opportunity responsibility of a lifetime. of a single father, When his grandmother leaves too immature to realize the reFor more to apply: Considerfor this.aThe demand for financial advisors of info thator responsibility and week, leaving Boy in charge, alness Cameron Rauschenberger BTM and Canadians need for financial planning at an still wounded by his love’s death. his father returns with two isfriends all-time high. The career opportunity of a lifetime It’s easy to see how this became and Boy’s world is turned around. Division Director is waiting for you... 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Together, we canoff helpof youBoy’s achieve life. upcam.rauschenberger@investorsgroup.com a bit neat for some and it’s to come personal and professional rewards enamoured far beyond thoseby one of the rare few films that He’s immediately associated withfather, a traditional his the job. leader of a “gang” could stand to be longer (to al(really it’s Alamein and his two low for more exploration of ™ Trademarks owned by IGM Financial Inc. and licensed to its subsidiary corporations. these are quibfriends) and toughyour guy. This is a full-time opportunity to establish own variable-income and Boy’s friends), Investors Group Financial Services Inc. self-employed business in association with Investors Group Financial Services Inc. Asservices children do, he imitates his bles about an otherwise com(in Québec, a financial firm). MP1459 (12/2011-P) father and spends as much time as pletely engrossing film.

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor

Time...

the blunt nature of the film, while still incorporating the haunting aspect of the paranormal that play a key role in Komona’s suffering. The use of contemporary African music tops off the genuine depiction while it was filmed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. War Witch is a refreshing portrayal of the devastating story of child warriors. Its string of awards and nominations are well earned, including its Academy Award nomination for Canada’s entry into the Foreign Language Film category.

—PHOTO COURTESY ITEM 7

The Omega gave away a bunch of tickets to this festival. Follow us on Twitter for your chance to win stuff, too. @TRU_Omega

Rust and Bone

Jessica Duncan Ω Contributor

Rust and Bone (De rouille et d’os) was among the bigger titles at this year’s Kamloops Film Festival. Gaining recognition worldwide, the 2012 film has received 13 awards. At the 2013 César Awards (the national film awards of France) it won four awards alone, including Best Original Score and Best Adapted Screenplay. Rust and Bone is based on Craig Davidson’s short story of the same name. Featuring breathtaking cinematography of the southern France setting shot by Stéphane Fontaine along with a remarkable original score composed by Alexandre Desplat, this film is likely to entice. Marion Cotillard brilliantly stars as Stéphanie, a former whale trainer who suffers the loss of both her legs in a brutal work accident. Matthias Schoenaerts portrays Alain, an unemployed father who has recently moved in with his sister Anna (Corinne Masiero) who helps with his son, Sam (Armand Verdure). Alain starts working security at a nightclub where he meets Stéphanie prior to her accident. Alain and Stéphanie eventually build a friendship as he slowly helps her deal with the loss of her limbs. Alain has a deep-seeded interest in kickboxing and is approached by a co-worker to partake in underground boxing matches. The thrill of the fight draws him in and the steady flow of money that comes along with seems to only be a plus. Alain’s love for fighting seems to overpower his interest in his son Sam. Schoenaerts magnificently portrays Alain as an animalistic and wildly sexual being Stéphanie spends countless hours at the beach with Alain as he teaches her how to swim again. Eventually their relationship in-

cludes occasional sexual encounters. Despite Stéphanie’s condition Alain is not afraid to be rough during these encounters. This oddly demonstrates the respectful dynamic of their relationship. Alain also hooks up with other women but doesn’t hesitate to tell her. Cotillard gives an emotionally raw performance as Stéphanie. She receives prosthetic legs and begins to literally get back on her feet. She begins to accompany Alain to fights, working as his agent as she negotiates the fights for him. Rust and Bone turns out to be a beautiful, unlikely romance. Although the film is a tad predictable, the struggles each character faces feel genuine and honest. The film ties together a little too perfectly, but anyone who is a sucker for a happy ending will appreciate this. Cotillard and Schoenaerts’s performances alone make this film worth watching. Parisian Jacques Audiard produced and directed the French-Belgian production. His other works include, Read My Lips (2001) and A Prophet (2009), the winner of the Grand Prix at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival.

—PHOTO COURTESY WHY NOT PRODUCTIONS

Time...

to think about the career opportunity of a lifetime.

Consider this. The demand for financial advisors and Canadians need for financial planning is at an all-time high. The career opportunity of a lifetime is waiting for you... Fast Company magazine named personal financial advisor as the #1 job Statistics Canada and Canadian Business magazine have both concluded that a career in financial planning is a major growth area Money magazine and Salary.com named the financial advisor career among the Top 10 for young adults So contact us. Together, we can help you achieve personal and professional rewards far beyond those associated with a traditional job.

For more information or to apply, contact: Cameron Rauschenberger BTM

(250) 372-2955 (250) 372-2938

Division Director 100-741 Sahali Terrace Kamloops, BC V2C 6X7

cam.rauschenberger@investorsgroup.com

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10

March 20, 2013

Life & Community New Ryerson Students’ Union policy challenges new men’s issues group

Anna-Lilja Dawson The Sheaf

Diana Hall

The Eyeopener (Ryerson) TORONTO (CUP) — An effort to guard the empowerment of women’s voices on campus took form on March 4 when the Ryerson Students’ Union (RSU) swiftly adopted a bold new policy rejecting the concept of misandry — the hatred or fear of men. Neda Hamzavi, a faculty of community services representative on the RSU board of directors (BOD), watched her amendment to the RSU’s policy on women’s issues pass without any debate, discussion or dispute. This could cause conflict at a time when controversial men’s issues movements are on the rise at university campuses. “There’s been a lot of work across campuses not only in Ontario but also across the country that have been working sort of [as] anti-women’s rights groups,” Hamzavi said in her pitch to the BOD. “We want to acknowledge that the additions that we added here are regarding the ideas of misandry and reverse-sexism, both of which are oppressive concepts that aim to delegitimize the equity work that women’s movements work to do.” Marwa Hamad, vice-president equity at the RSU, said the policy will preserve space for discussing misogyny and institutionalized gender imbalances. The amendment applies to a women’s issues clause that provides a strict mandate for which activities the RSU opposes. Outlined in the board’s agenda, the new policy rejects: “4. Groups, Meetings or events [that] promote misogynist views to-

U of S grads strike gold getting stench out of sports equipment

Anjana Rao, left, Argir Argirov and Sarah Santhosh hope to create a men’s issues group on campus. —PHOTO BY STINE DANIELLE/THE EYEOPENER

wards women and ideologies that promote gender inequity, challenges women’s right to bodily autonomy, or justifies sexual assault 5. The concept of misandry as it ignores structural inequity that exist between men and women 6. Groups, meetings events or initiatives [that] negate the need to centre women’s voices in the struggle for gender equity.” The RSU’s three-pronged policy change could complicate the creation of a men’s issues group which applied for student-group status last week. Sarah Santhosh, a second-year biology student and the founder of the Ryerson Association for Equality, said she was shocked the RSU passed this motion two days before the executives’ meeting with the Student Groups Committee.

Santhosh insisted her group is not about being anti-feminist, but rather the right to discuss men’s issues on campus – including misandry. “The ironic thing is my voice is being silenced right now because I can’t even form a group without having to face this really back-handed deal that’s really attacking our group,” Santhosh said. But Hamad said the policy will help the RSU protect women’s issues, which “have historically and continue to today to be silenced.” “I think it’s important to remember that when we’re talking about dismantling patriarchy, we’re talking about supporting men, we’re talking about supporting women [and] we’re talking about supporting the entire gender spectrum,” she said.

SFU and UBC researchers test new anti-influenza drug

SASKATOON (CUP) — Since graduating, two former University of Saskatchewan business students have been on a mission to find a solution to one of Canada’s most pressing issues — the smell of dirty hockey equipment. Dan Robinson and Chad Fischl, cofounders and CEOs of Shutout Solutions, came up with the idea for a deodorant spray for your hockey or gym bag while taking an entrepreneurial class at the U of S. Today, less than a decade later, the product is being sold across the country. “We didn’t know what it was going to be,” Robinson said. “We just knew it was going to be something in a bottle that worked to get the smell out of hockey equipment.” The two students asked members of the university’s health sciences department why hockey equipment tends to stink so much and why many cleaning products can’t get rid of the smell. They were told that bacteria living in the equipment causes odour and antibacterial cleaners are the only way to deal with it. Most products either mask the smell with a fragrance or use heavy chemicals that are harmful to the skin. The goal for Robinson and Fischl was to design a product that was all-natural, that was safe and that actually worked. “We searched for a natural antibacterial and found silver. We found that nobody was really doing it in a product like that and really there were barely any products out there that [used] silver,” Robinson said. While researching for the assignment, Robinson and Fischl came across a company working at Pohang University of Science and Technology in Pohang, South Korea that was developing silver for commercial use as an antibacterial. At the time, the company had worked on a small line of personal care products that included facial soap, makeup remover and antibacterial mascara.

This technology uses a specific amount of silver nanoparticles of a particular size and creates a solution that stops the particles from settling out or sticking to the sides of the container. It does this all without using any chemicals. Fischl and Robinson made a deal with the South Korean company that allows the two businesses to work together exclusively for five years. Shutout went on to patent the silver process as SilverSync+ Technology. The young entrepreneurs came back to the U of S to test their first line of products, which included body wash, athletic equipment spray and laundry detergent. The Canadian Light Source confirmed that silver is both in the products and properly distributed throughout the solutions. Currently Robinson is working with the university’s French department to translate Shutout’s packaging so it can be sold in Quebec. “Anytime we’ve approached the university … usually professors and almost anybody you approach is interested in collaborating with a company that wants to do something and involve students,” Robinson said. Since their first line was released, Shutout has expanded to 26 products, most of them industrial cleaners like degreasers and mopping solutions that they are marketing to mining companies and hotel chains. Health and safety has become a large commitment for many companies in the last five years, Robinson said. He believes that people now see how hazardous some industrial cleaners and sprays can be. Robinson said that while Shutout will continue selling its retail products, its main focus has shifted to engaging industries, like the mining and oil companies that are moving into Southern Saskatchewan, that want cleaners that are safe to use. “We’re still fairly new and we’ve got to be going after those customers that are going to give us growth and give our company strength.”

Compound may prove to be more effective than any other drug on the market Kristina Charania The Peak (Simon Fraser)

BURNABY (CUP) — SFU virologist Masahiro Niikura and PhD student Nicole Bance have collaborated with researchers from Australia, the United Kingdom and UBC to test the f lucontrolling capacity of a new anti-inf luenza drug. The team is headed by enzymologists and chemists at UBC who first synthesized the new compound. Positive results were achieved from test tube experiments and as a result, Bance and Niikura ran a series of animal model tests which also produced very promising results. “We gave mice this new drug and then infected them with inf luenza to see if they were protected against the virus. All of them survived, which was good,” said Bance. The group’s research will be published in the journal Science, and it became available online in Science Express in late February. In order to increase the number of infected cells in an organism, the inf luenza virus must leave an infected cell to attack

healthy cells. A viral enzyme or a large molecule that speeds up chemical reactions and helps specific units bind — called nuramidase — helps inf luenza escape the cell by processing sialic acid, a simple sugar on the cell surface. If another substance tightly binds to nuramidase, the virus cannot exit infected cells because the enzyme can no longer digest the acid. The new drug is designed to form an almost irreversible covalent bond to nuramidase in order to block it from bonding to sialic acid. Because the new compound is more structurally similar to sialic acid than other nuramidase inhibitor drugs, it will be less prone to generating resistant inf luenza strains and an ideal choice for future antiinf luenza drugs. The compound carries the advantages of two existing nuramidase inhibitors on the market: Tamif lu and Relenza. Tamif lu is popular with physicians because it is water-soluble and available orally, but overuse has promoted the emergence of Tamif lu-resistant inf luenza strains. In contrast, Relenza is effec-

tive against most Tamif lu-resistant viruses and administered through a nasal spray. “The new compound combines the advantages of Relenza with Tamif lu, so it will be orally available and effective against Tamif lu resistant strains,” said Bance. Ultimately, anti-inf luenza drugs like the one tested by Niikura and Bance buy more time for vaccine production. Because clinically isolated viruses quickly kill the embryonated chicken eggs they are produced in, weakened viruses must be created in order to produce high amounts of viruses ready for vaccines. This process can take a month or longer, according to Niikura. Anti-inf luenza drugs directly alter the activities of nuramidase, making them effective against both old and new inf luenza strains unlike vaccines. “Because the required mutations are different, anti-viral drugs and vaccines can compliment each other.” said Bance. “This could be effective when used with current drugs to reduce the impact of a pandemic caused by emerging strains.”

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11

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 23

Life & Community Aboriginal icon visits TRU Courtney Dickson

David Dyck

Ω Roving Editor

TRUSU’s annual Storyteller’s Gala, held Thursday, March 14, featured Aboriginal role model, journalist and musician, Wab Kinew. More than 200 people attended the early-evening event to listen to Kinew and other guests speak about this year’s gala theme of Aboriginal language and culture. “Right now, everyone wants to get an actual Shuswap language credit course,” said Nolan Guichon, Aboriginal collective director, “That’s the meaning of this event.” When Kinew took the podium following a video presentation and traditional Aboriginal dances, he spoke about a number of Aboriginal issues, including residential schools and the Idle No More movement. As he reminded listeners, more than 10,000 Aboriginals appeared on Parliament Hill on Jan. 11, 2013 in support of Idle No More. “Who had the power that day?” he asked. “The people did. Don’t ever forget that. “What this (Idle No More) represents is a chance for Canada to get it right.” Kinew has always been an Aboriginal rights supporter. Though he doesn’t have a degree in journalism, he used his 2012 CBC program to educate Canadians about Aboriginal rights and culture. Kinew had been working multiple jobs upon graduation from the University of Winnipeg when he got involved with the media. He wrote a letter to the editor of the Winnipeg Free Press and people noticed him. Not long after, he was working for CBC Radio and later transitioned into television. He got involved in some larger projects for CBC, because, as Kinew puts it, he’s a “bit of an

Kinew combines traditional storytelling with current events to give the variety of audience members something to relate to during the Story Teller’s Gala on March 14. —PHOTO BY COURTNEY DICKSON

outspoken person.” When the topic of residential schools was brought to the table, Kinew told others how important the story was and that it had to be told properly. Eventually, this turned into the CBC documentary-series 8th Fire, which examined the relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people. “The things that unite us are greater than the things that divide us,” he told listeners. Throughout the hour, Kinew emphasized what seemed to be his motto, “We do better when we work together.” There were Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal listeners out to support Kinew on Thursday evening, however Kinew noticed a lack of international students. “It would have been nice to have more of the international student community involved,” he said. While Kinew was doing tourism reporting, he said travellers would tell him they came to

Canada to see “the Rocky Mountains, a Christmas tree and some Indians.” He noted, however, that some of the international population doesn’t seem interested in Aboriginal culture. Recently, Kinew became the first director of indigenous inclusion at the University of Winnipeg. His job is to help Aboriginal people utilize their talents and share them with outside communities. Guichon started planning the gala in May of last year and had no problem convincing Kinew to be part of it. Guichon had prepared the Grand Hall in the Campus Activity Centre for 160 people and was glad he had to find more seating to accommodate everyone. “We try to get non-Aboriginal people to come to these events to learn about our culture and our history and our issues. “To have First Nations and nonFirst Nations people in one room together is just, it’s great.”

Scholarship will be made available to students in Ontario, Alberta and Quebec The Fulcrum (U of Ottawa) OTTAWA (CUP) — Students with ADD/ADHD will now have the chance to receive financial assistance as well as time-management mentoring while attending post-secondary institutions. Shire Canada, a biopharmaceutical company that focuses particularly on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), is creating a scholarship program for Canadian adults who suffer from the disorder. The scholarship will be introduced in September 2013 and will include financial support for tuition as well as one year of ADHD coaching. According to Heidi Bernhardt, former executive director of the Canadian ADHD Resource Alliance, the ADHD Scholarship Program will help provide critical help to those who have the disorder. “I think our biggest challenge with ADHD in the post-secondary [community] is that there

changes to the project came a new price tag: $2 million, which an anonymous donor agreed to pay in full. BURNABY (CUP) — In 2010, Details are also hazy as for when the Simon Fraser University (SFU) structure will begin construction. “The vague timeline is that things unveiled plans to build an observatory on it’s Burnaby campus. are moving ahead, and the project It was originally meant to go should be made public soon,” said up next to the Diamond Alumni Trottier. But he was adamant that although Centre, as pictured, but according to Howard Trottier, physics he couldn’t give many details on the professor and host of the popular project at this time, it was a sure “Starry Nights @ SFU” program, thing. “There’s absolutely no turning the plans have since changed sigback now. It’s coming,” he said. “It’s nificantly. “What largely changed was that built up a lot of awareness, a lot of someone pointed out that this pro- support from all kinds of people, gram is largely for kids who come all walks of life on campus and off on campus,” Trottier told The Peak. campus, so that reservoir of goodIf the observatory is on the north will is really huge, and we’ll tap into slope, it is a problem because that it soon.” Trottier is the host of Starry Nights isn’t an area where you really get to see the university. “That’s a really @ SFU, a program that brings people of all ages big part of the up to Burnaby experience, that Mountain they see what for stargazuniversity life ing. It started is like.” in 2009, and The project gained imhas been split mediate popuinto two differlarity. The ent parts: the program is observatory and geared specifia daytime classcally towards room space, the children, but two of which do includes many not necessarily SFU students. have to be in the Trottier same location. credited a A l t h o u g h —Howard Trottier, lesser- known Trottier was not program on able to disclose SFU physics professor campus for where the locamuch of Starry tion for the new Night’s sucbuilding will be, he did say, “the observatory is cess: Science in Action, created by now a standalone structure which SFU chemistry professor Sophie will go in a very exciting, very high Lavieri. “It’s a community thing that may profile spot,” that students will see have grown within SFU but to have every day. “A thousand students will pass it the community engaged in this way, every day, and everyone at SFU will would not exist without science in have access to equipment as good action,” he said. According to Trottier, the classas, or better, than the observatory at the Vancouver Space Centre,” said room space will work with the obAJ Koenig, an SFU undergraduate servatory to enhance a program that student who is a member of the SFU is “broader than just a university observatory.” Astronomy Club. “You won’t find another program “Given Vancouver’s light pollution, the facility will not be making like this in Canada once it’s up and new research, but will be making running,” said Trottier. There are new astronomers. And if enough even plans to have a video link to people get involved, we may find schools outside the lower mainland, SFU pressured into building a larger so that they may book time to operate it remotely. astronomy faculty,” he added. “It’s not just the observatory, it’s Currently there is no astronomy department at SFU, though the phys- the whole science outreach program ics department offers some under- that drives the scale of it. It’ll be a graduate classes that may appeal to first in that way, there’s no university science centre like it. There are stargazers. Originally the observatory project things of that nature in the States, was budgeted at $4 million. With but not in Canada.”

The Peak (Simon Fraser)

New scholarship benefits students with ADD/ADHD

Jesse Mellott

Simon Fraser observatory project moves forward

is still a lot of stigma [when it comes to] understanding this disorder,” Bernhardt said. She explained that when people living with ADHD get to the post-secondary level, the executive functioning impairment that is a part of the disorder hits them in a big way and makes things like planning, organizational skills, and time management difficult. Some also have to deal with the fact that they’re away from their support system — usually family. Sarah Patterson, coordinator for the academic support unit at the University of Ottawa’s Access Service, agrees with Bernhardt’s characterization of ADHD and sees the benefits of the proposed scholarship. “It seems to be a unique structure for a scholarship in that it is allotting money towards offsetting the cost of tuition — which is pretty typical for a scholarship. But they have also specified that it’s for coaching as well, and academic coaching is something that a lot of students can benefit from, specifically

students with an attention deficit [disorder],” Patterson said. In order to be considered for the scholarship, students must be diagnosed by a physician and must be seeking treatment for the disorder. The coaching provided with the scholarship will provide students with a skill set to help them succeed in postsecondary and beyond. Bernhardt feels these conditions are the most important parts of the program, as symptoms in adults are less obvious than in children. “They don’t grow out of it in most cases; the symptoms just portray differently, but it doesn’t mean that they’re not as impaired with their ADHD in adulthood,” she said. The ADHD Scholarship Program will be made available to students in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, with spots for five scholarship winners. A minimum of one student per province will be selected. Students can apply until March 27, and winners will be announced June 17.

“...we may find SFU pressured into building a larger astronomy facility.”

—PHOTO COURTESY SFU PUBLIC AFFAIRS AND MEDIA RELATIONS


12

March 20, 2013

Arts & Entertainment

Another successful year for KFF Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief Kelowna musician Devon Coyote brought his driving acoustic sound to the Noble Pig downtown on Victoria Street March 16 for the closing party of the 2013 Kamloops Film Festival. “We thought he was going to be solo, but he brought a couple of friends up,” said Dusan Magdolen, who will chair next year’s festival. “The Noble Pig has been so great to us. The food was great, they make us the festival beer, and it’s nice and close [to the theatre]. I think it was a big hit. “It’s all about engagement of people; ultimately what we’re there for. It’s all about people coming in and celebrating their enjoyment of films together.” Looking forward to taking the lead on the progression of the festival after being involved in various aspects of it for the past six years, Magdolen says one key aspect of growth will be reaching out further into the region. “Eventually we’re going to hit a ceiling in Kamloops,” Magdolen said, as there are a finite number of people interested in film here. He added that because the festival only happens once a

year, they hope to make it a destination for people in the region, which they could use to highlight the city and its arts scene. “Kamloops is in a very unique position. The arts community in Kamloops is really, really strong … it’s important for the greater community to have access to all these things, and the film festival as part of the arts community is just another facet of that.” Magdolen seems to have his work cut out for him if he intends on sustaining the rate of growth the festival has seen over the past few years. “We don’t have the full numbers yet, but it looks like it was the best attended ever,” he said, adding that they’re at the point where they likely need to recruit more volunteers. “The festival has grown, but really the group of people putting it on hasn’t, they’re just doing more. If we can get 20 people, it’s really not that much work for each person,” he said. If you would like to be involved with the film festival as a committee member and organizer, contact Magdolen at dmagdolen@tru.ca. If you’d like to help out with the festival itself (ushers, guides, etc), the committee will start organizing those people in the fall for the 2014 event.

If I could marry March Madness, I would Nathan Crosby Ω Contributor

I remember my first year at TRU trying to watch March Madness in Heroes. It was St. Patrick’s Day, 2011 and I was wearing my festive green Michigan State shirt. It was a great Patty’s day; the tournament started on the same day you get to drink green beer. Actually, that might go down as one of the greatest days of my life. I also missed my afternoon classes; which led to a valuable lesson in priorities. Back then I didn’t have PVR. The greatest tournament in sports is about to begin. I say it’s the greatest tournament in sports because no other sport would have the guts to organize a oneand-done scenario challenge like NCAA men’s basketball provides us. If this is new to you, think of it as a warm-up to the Stanley Cup playoffs. There are five rules about making your bracket; 1) History often repeats itself; 2) Don’t pick Syracuse; 3) The person who wins probably doesn’t watch basketball; 4) Don’t pick teams based on nicknames, team colours, logos or if they are “Your Team;” and 5) Balance adventurous with realistic when filling out your sheet. Rule four can be flipped if you just want to go crazy and pick whoever. Save the headache. The universal agreement this year is there is no consensus pick to run the table. It’s anyone’s tournament. So it’s the opposite of last year when everyone picked Kentucky and everyone was right. There are 11 teams that will be favoured to win it all: The Usual Suspects: Kansas, Ohio State and Duke. The Blasts from the Past: Indiana, Michigan and Georgetown The Cautionary Picks: Louisville, Michigan State and Gonzaga

Canadian Music Corner Travis Persaud

Ω Resident Music Guy Whether it’s Dave Monks’s standalone voice or an evercatchy element present in each track, Tokyo Police Club’s sound boasts a distinct unifying thread with a thirst for experimentation. Cue “The Nature of Experiment” off of the A Lesson in Crime EP, the band’s recording debut. From A Lesson in Crime to the final track on Champ, Tokyo Police Club’s second and most recent full-length album, the band progresses towards a polished coming-of-age sound. With the success of 2010’s Champ, Tokyo Police Club secured its spot on the Canadian indie scene. As of early 2013 the

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor Turnatablism may not be the biggest genre out there, but it has got a global fan base. It’s what many picture old hip-hop DJs are doing, using the basic turntable elements to mix and remix albums and songs to create new ones. Perhaps the most notable turntablist to come from Canada is Kid Koala. He’s a master at this art, using a variety of old vinyl to create new music for the new generations since 1996. His latest contribution was 12 Bit Blues, a notable contribution

band has been back in the studio working on its next album. This release will mark the band’s first album since the 2011 studio effort Ten Songs, Ten Days, Ten Years, a recording project that saw the band cover 10 songs from the 2000’s over a 10-day period. As a starting point with Tokyo Police Club check out “Gone” off of Champ. If that doesn’t do it for you and you happen to be a fan of remixes, Tokyo Police Club still has what it takes to win hearts. With the release of its debut full length, Elephant Shell, the band added a five-song remix CD featuring tracks off the album redone by musicians outside of the band like Tom Campesinos of Los Campesinos! and another, of “Your English is Good,” spun by k-os. to both Canada’s music scene and the turntablism culture. It brought together classic blues and the more modern ideas found in scratching and remixing, creating a unique sound. Each track follows the pattern of the track number, followed by “Bit Blues.” If all this sounds like something contrived in a garage and impossible to bring to the stage, take a chance on a ticket and see the oneman band live; he may just break out four turntables, running them like a chess master at a mall. For more, check out “Two Bit Blues” off of 12 Bit Blues.

If you slept through the men’s basketball season, here are some stories you should be aware of before you turn on your TV Thursday morning: 1. The fall of Kentucky: Once again, the Wildcats were built for another long run. Then, their highly touted NBA prospect Nerlens Noel, proud owner of the flat top hairdo, tore his ACL in a game against Florida in February. The team has been okay since, but that’s not an adjective people use to describe Kentucky.

Gonzaga’s Kelly Olynyk (13) is a player to watch during this year’s March Madness. He also happens to hail from Kamloops. —PHOTO COURTESY SD DIR K /FLICK R COMMONS

2. The Dunk Tank: Louisville’s Chane Behanan (6-foot-6, 250 pounds) had the dunk of the year and mismatch of the year by ploughing through DePaul’s Worrel Clahar (5-foot-11, 186 pounds). 3. Wolverines and Hoosiers: The rebirth of the two once-powerhouses, Michigan and Indiana, has them as popular picks to go deep after years of mediocrity and NCAA violations. 4. A Non-Major Number One: Gonzaga went two weeks atop the AP poll, led by Kamloops’ own Kelly Olynyk (son of TRU athletic director, Ken Olynyk). The Mullet is scoring 17.7 points and shooting 65.2 per cent this season. The Zags, who play in the obscure WCC, have their share of critics but have owned their conference, only losing to non-conference opponents Illinois and Butler early in the season. Speaking of Canadians, here are some key ones that you should cheer for: Olynyk’s teammate Kevin Pangos, Anthony Bennett of UNLV, Bryson Johnson of Bucknell and freshmen Nik Stauskas of Michigan and Olivier Hanlan of Boston College. Continue reading if you want my advice. VCU and Butler are as well-coached as any team and have the goods to give the top seeds a run for the Final Four and they have done it before. Rule 1; History repeats itself. I like Georgetown and Creighton. Otto Porter Jr. for the Hoyas and Doug McDermott for the Bluejays are game

changing players; guys who even the best defenses can’t stop when the game is on the line. The Hoyas blew up Syracuse 6139 in February. Remember Rule 2; don’t pick Syracuse. Every year I tell myself they are going to break through and then they disappoint. So this year I’m not picking them, which means they will probably win the National Championship. Never be afraid to go for upsets, even if they’re ridiculous. Every year the tournament gets more competitive. Remember, two 15 seeds won last year, Lehigh and Norfolk State. Two teams I’d be careful with are Miami and Michigan State. The Hurricanes destroyed Duke 90-63 in January but stumbled at the end of the season, losing three of their last five, including a loss to Wake Forest (13-18). The Spartans can never be counted out when coach Tom Izzo is at the helm, but down the stretch they lost three in a row to Indiana, Michigan and Ohio State. So organize your time well, accept that you have no clue who will win and if you miss class trying to watch the round of 64, I hold no responsibility. Nathan Crosby, a graduate of TRU’s bachelor of journalism program, was the 2011-12 Omega sports editor, WolfPack play-by-play announcer for basketball and volleyball, host of Tournament Capital Sports on 92.5 CFBX and recipient of the 2011 James McCreath Award for Excellence in Sports Journalism.

Devon Coyote and a couple of friends popped into town from Kelowna to play the closing party of the 2013 Kamloops Film Festival, held at The Noble Pig on Victoria Street March 16. Check out all our coverage of the film festival, including reviews of 13 films screened, at www.theomega.ca. —PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES


13

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 23

Arts & Entertainment

Billy Talent blows up ISC with energetic performance Jess Buick

Ω Contributor Billy Talent’s Dead Silence World Tour continued with its second Canadian date at the Interior Savings Centre March 16. A variety of fans spanning all ages waited excitedly outside the arena in anticipation of the all-Canadian rock show featuring four Ontario-based bands. Indian Handcrafts was the first to hit the stage, using its edgy punk to set the tone for the rest of the evening, clearly stating the audience should prepare for a night of hard rocking. Hollerado took over from there, jumping on stage and pumping out a great vibe with its indie rock and a energetic set. The lights dimmed as AC/DC’s “T.N.T.” echoed throughout the building before Sum 41 exploded on stage, opening with the 2003 hit “The Hell Song.” Led by lead singer Deryck Whibley and his fire-engine red hair, Sum 41 rocked old favourites such as “In Too Deep,” “Still Waiting” and “We’re All To Blame.” The performance struck a chord with the audience as seemingly everyone knew every last word, making for an outrageous experience. A few songs in, Whibley took a moment to invite members of the audience on stage. He picked five lucky fans who were brought up to dance on the side, up close and personal with the band and the raucous party. At one point, Whibley parted ways with his guitar, belting out his own rendition of Queen’s “We Will Rock You.” Smiling, joking and having a blast on stage, Sum 41’s presence was infectious, wrapping up with the hit that sent the band to stardom, “Fat Lip,” from 2001’s All Killer, No Filler.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower Mason Buettner Ω Contributor

Billy Talent headed a four band all-Canadian punk rock arena show at the Interior Savings Centre March 16.

Billy Talent took to the stage, kicking out songs from across its entire catalogue. Opening with “Lonely Road to Absolution” and continuing straight into “Viking Death March,” the Mississauga foursome was energetic and ready to rock right from the start. Ben Kowalewicz, lead vocalist of Billy Talent, proved why he is regarded as such an amazing entertainer. His character and charisma was second to none, solidifying him as a powerful frontman. Drummer Aaron Solowoniuk maintained a huge grin throughout the performance, clearly enjoying every second of the show, happy to be in an arena playing music with his friends. “Stand Up and Run,” a single from the band’s latest release, Dead Silence, was dedicated to the late Stompin’ Tom Connors, famous for his puck-inspired hit “The Hockey

—PHOTO BY JESS BUICK

Song.” Such a tribute to a legendary and influential Canadian musician was fitting within the bounds of an all-Canadian Saturday night rock show. Continuing with the hockey flavour, Kowalewicz playfully dedicated “This Suffering” to Vancouver Canucks fans in the audience, referencing the team’s most recent loss. Playing a huge collection of songs, Billy Talent made sure to include some of its oldest hits, including “Try Honesty” and “This Is How It Goes” from the band’s self-titled debut album. “Devil On My Shoulder” from Billy Talent III, closed out the band’s regular set. With the crowd pleading for an encore, Billy Talent returned emphatically hammering out “Red Flag” and “Fallen Leaves” before ending the night with “Surprise, Surprise.”

Stephen Chbosky, director and writer, has an instant classic with both the novel and film versions of The Perks of Being a Wallf lower. Chbosky’s screenplay for the film is an improvement on the novel he wrote 13 years earlier. The film’s natural f low is something only the original author of the novel could achieve. Chbosky leaves out just enough details to keep the audience wanting more as the movie unfolds, but some of the details are left for the audience to figure out for themselves. The film is narrated by the main character Charlie, played by Logan Lerman, who is entering into his first year of high school. It is made clear in the opening scene that Charlie is a loner. He writes revealing letters throughout the duration of the film to an unknown receiver just so someone is listening to what is going on in his life. Charlie had a hard time in middle school and is frightened about entering into his freshman year of high school. After his first day, he admits that high school is even worse than middle school, but he did connect with his advanced English teacher, Mr. Anderson, played by Paul Rudd. Charlie eventually takes a risk at a school football game by talking to a classmate named Patrick, played by Ezra Miller, who invites Charlie to sit with him. This leads to Charlie meeting

Patrick’s stepsister Sam, played by Emma Watson, a beautiful and free-spirited senior. The trio become close friends effectively bringing Charlie out of his shell into the inner circle of the school. Even though Charlie is focusing on participating in society more, he still cannot escape his past. Chbosky does not reveal to the audience until the end what is haunting Charlie and even then it is not completely clear. Charlie slowly learns how to participate with others throughout the film, but often slips up providing many humorous moments. Chbosky is able to trigger a wide array of emotions in the audience. The film’s well-rounded cast brings everything together in the film. Lerman appears comfortable acting the numerous uncomfortable situations Charlie puts himself in. Watson sells the American accent well and the audience falls in love with her as Charlie does in the film. Lerman and Watson were both nominated for multiple awards for their performances. Miller is perfect as the eccentric and at times highly emotional Patrick, winning numerous awards for his performance. Chbosky’s directing and wellwritten screenplay combined with the all-star cast make The Perks of Being a Wallf lower a must see. Even though the film is based in 1991, it is truly a film that speaks to the generation of youth today, touching on many current topics of discussion.

Follow us on Twitter @TRU_Omega or @PaperguyDavies @manovrboard @dctasa @Dicksoncourtney @roguetowel @adamwilliams87 —IMAGE COURTESY SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT


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March 20, 2013

Sports WolfPack recruitment update Adam Williams Ω Contributor

Though the 2012-13 athletics season is just drawing to a close, TRU Athletics has already been busy recruiting athletes for 2013-14. Eleven new recruits have committed to the Wolf Pack for the coming school year, adding depth and talent to TRU’s athletics corps. Men’s Basketball Head coach Scott Clark has announced the signings of Josh Wolfram, Justin King and Reese Pribilsky to the Wolf Pack men’s basketball team for the upcoming season. King played for the Wolf Pack in 2011-12 and was named a second team Canada West all-star. He led the league in scoring and defensive rebounding, averaging 23.1 points per game and 8.3 defensive rebounds per game. King spent the 2012-13 season away from basketball, studying at the College of Southern Nevada. Reese Pribilsky, the younger brother of recently retired player and new assistant coach Kevin Pribilsky, joins the Wolf Pack after playing the last two seasons with the University of Victoria Vikes. Pribilsky is a point guard, as his brother was and will look to fill some of the void left by Kevin’s retirement.

Clark feels the addition of King and Pribilsky can help take the Wolf Pack to the next level. “Both of these young men are quality individuals in what they can bring to the team, both on the f loor and their passion for the game of basketball,” Clark told Wolf Pack Athletics. “Both are hardworking, energetic type of athletes in practice. They add that to our team. Their talent and ability to score, defend and physical traits add to the basketball team and that is what we were looking to do. We have made some improvements over the years but we are looking to make a jump in the standings.”

Men’s Hockey

The Wolf Pack men’s hockey team has added three players to their 2013-14 roster: Alex Martin and Ryan Cuthbert of Maple Ridge, B.C. and Brandon Watson of Keremeos, B.C. Martin and Cuthbert played the last three seasons for the Delta Ice Hawks of the Pacific Junior Hockey League and were defensive partners for the duration of their time in Delta. “It’s great to be able to continue to be teammates with Alex,” Cuthbert told TRU Athletics. “We talked about it in the past, although it seemed almost too good to be true. I thought the chances were very slim.” Cuthbert and Martin will be joined by Watson of the KIJHL’s Osoyoos Coyotes. In 41 games with the Coyotes this season, Watson had 23 goals and 22 assists. Badminton

WolfPack soccer recruit Jodi Hutton (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

The TRU Wolf Pack badminton team has announced the signings of Joel Feenstra and Nathan McNeilly for 2013-14. Feenstra and McNeilly hail from King’s Christian School in Salmon Arm and have been doubles partners for several years. “Nathan is a strong player with good technical skills while Joel is very athletic and has high end potential,” assistant coach Ross Perkin told TRU Athletics.

Cariboo College in the mid-’80s. Hutton is a defender and will play a role in filling the void left on the Wolf Pack’s defence by co-captain Blair MacKay’s retirement. “I am really excited,” Hutton told TRU Athletics. “It’s something I have wanted to do, play university soccer in my home town. I will try my best and show up at training camp aiming to prove I belong.” Men’s Volleyball

WolfPack volleyball recruit Tyler Pomietlarz (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

“Both are very coachable. Joel has won a number of singles and doubles tournaments in the Interior.” The King’s Christian School badminton program has finished in the top three in both the junior and senior divisions of the Okanagan Valley league the last three years. Women’s Soccer Head coach Tom McManus has announced the signing of Jodi Hutton to the Wolf Pack women’s soccer team for 2013-14. Hutton is a Kamloops resident and will be the second person in her family to play soccer in Kamloops— her father Tim Hutton played for

Setter Tyler Pomietlarz and left side/middle Jordan Foot have recently committed to playing for the Wolf Pack men’s volleyball in 2013-14. Pomietlarz and Foot add to the volleyball team’s considerable depth and will benefit from the mentorship and guidance of their peers in the early-going. “I think Tyler will blossom here under Mike Hawkins as an assistant coach and Colin Carson as a fifth-year setter, as well as Graham Stoliker,” head coach Pat Hennelly told TRU Athletics. “The first year, Tyler will get a chance to develop strength and be mentored by our current setters and coaching staff. The plan is when Carson finishes his fifth year, Tyler will be able to step in and run our offense and team systems along with Graham, without missing a beat.” With files from TRU Athletics

Game-changing sports apps for every fan Owen Munro Ω Contributor

The recent emergence of smartphones and the accompanying rise of social media has revolutionized the way we watch sports. Applications such as TSN and ScoreMobile offer realtime scoring with the press of a button. Social media, especially Twitter, has changed the way we look at athletes and interact with sports personalities. Just look at how Twitter handled the Manti Te’o scandal. So for the avid sports fan, The Omega presents the top five free apps that can keep you in touch and in shape in the world of sports. Twitter With over 140 million active users, Twitter has exploded onto the scene and is the clear go-to application for breaking news in the sporting world. With the ability to follow your favourite sports teams, athletes and personalities, Twitter gives the

world unprecedented access. Twitter has completely revolutionized sports, particularly the way fans watch sports, creating an intriguing parallel between fan and athlete. To the average person, Twitter can seem a tad overwhelming at first. To ease the new user into Twitter for sports, here are some accounts that are must-follows: TSN hockey insider mogul Bob McKenzie (@TSNBobMcKenzie), Phoenix Coyotes enforcer Paul Bissonnette (@biznasty2point0), UFC president Dana White (@danawhite) and Los Angeles Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant (@kobebryant). ScoreMobile While Twitter provides the news and ability to follow almost anyone, ScoreMobile has created its own powerhouse app. Not only can you receive real-time updates from virtually every professional and collegiate league in the world, but ‘MyScore’ gives you the ability to customize the app to receive

updates for your favourite teams and any statistic imaginable. Push notifications can also be turned on so that you’re notified every time your team is playing. The sleek interface makes it easy to navigate through multiple leagues and teams. It loads quicker than its TSN counterpart and is always jam-packed with usable content. ScoreMobile is a must have for any sports fan, casual or die-hard. TSN “Canada’s Sports Leader” has done a quality job making a modern and professional app that combines scoring updates and customizable features for your favourite teams. TSN also has a stable of some of the best talent in Canada — from Bob McKenzie to Jay Onrait and Dan O’Toole — TSN is jam-packed with columns, scores, podcasts and fantasy sports. The other component to TSN’s app is the introduction of TSN Mobile. While not out across all cellular carriers in Canada

just yet, TSN Mobile gives Bell subscribers the opportunity to watch crystal clear live HD sports on mobile devices for just $5 a month. Mobile live streaming is likely one of the next inventions that will take off in the smartphone world, giving TSN a leg up on its competition. Nike+ Living a healthy lifestyle is all the rage these days and no app better represents that than Nike’s own Nike+ app. The innovative application works across all platforms and is integrated within Apple’s operating system so people can access it on their iPhones when they go for that morning jog. It tracks everything from how long you’ve been working out, to your distance travelled, your pace and even how many calories you have burned in your session. What’s also cool about the app is its seamless transition between your device and the Nike website, where you can

store your information, track your progress and even compare your workouts to people around the world. While it’s not useful as any more than a running app, Nike has come up with groundbreaking technology that is both innovative and extremely useful. ESPN Fantasy Sports There are not many things that have exploded in the sporting world over the last decade quite like fantasy sports, especially fantasy football. With the rise of social media came increased access to information for fans and ESPN’s fantasy apps are packed with information — the research put into ranking players, doing mock drafts and player values is staggering. ESPN’s app allows you to follow your fantasy games in realtime, with the ability to customize your team on the go. You can even draft on your mobile device before. It’s an incredible app to keep on top of your team when you can’t get to a computer.


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Across 1. Accord 6. Flub 10. Certain reptiles 14. Birthplace of Columbus 15. Parrot 16. Islamic division 17. Mary 20. “Mârouf” baritone 21. ____ pendens 22. Gives up 23. Turn to crime? 26. “ ______ Row” 27. Treat for the idle rich? 29. Singer Lenya 30. “Encore!” 31. Harmony 32. Andy Warhol painting 35. Jack and Jill 39. Affranchise 40. Clip 41. Whimpered 42. Beth’s preceder 44. Misrepresents 45. Presidential favors 48. Traction aid 49. 2002 film 50. Baby’s first word, maybe 51. Bow 54. Little Jack Horner 58. Cave 59. ___-Altaic languages

60. Fiats 61. Meets 62. Gerbils, maybe 63. Senior member Down 1. Eastern pooh-bah 2. Buffet 3. In a snit 4. “Sesame Street” watcher 5. Cry of disgust 6. Arctic 7. Wood sorrels 8. Law man? 9. Clock for the pocket 10. Radiant 11. Treat rudely, in a way 12. Pied one 13. Pert 18. Flamboyance 19. Lean to one side 24. Final notice 25. 007 26. Drawing medium 27. Reprimand, with “out” 28. Arch type 29. “Blue Velvet” director 31. Trades 32. Aggressiveness 33. Away from the wind 34. Goes with mobile 36. Cut surgically

37. Cutlass 38. Sinuous dance 42. Conforms 43. Balcony section 44. Alliance 45. Metallic sounds 46. Mites 47. Move, as a plant 48. Barbecue fuel 50. Beach nuisance 52. Ending for disc53. __berry 55. Fury 56. Like some socks 57. Duran Duran girl of song

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MYLES MELLOR AND SALLY YORK

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Coffee Break


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March 20, 2013

ELECTION NOTICE POLLING WILL TAKE PLACE ON: Monday, March 25th, 8:00AM-8:00PM & Tuesday, March 26th, 8:00AM-4:00PM in the Students’ Union Building The following members were nominated for the vacant positions as listed below: President

International Students’ Representative

• Robinson, Dylan | Your Vote = Your Voice

• Efretuei, Deborah | Your Vote = Your Voice

Vice President External

LGBTQ Students’ Representative

• Douglass, Leif | Your Vote = Your Voice

• Zdunich, Nicolas | Your Vote = Your Voice

Vice President Finance

Women Students’ Representative

• Bahabri, Trad | Your Vote = Your Voice

• Hill, Amanda | Independent • Skagos, Olivia | Your Vote = Your Voice

Vice President Internal • George, Will | Your Vote = Your Voice • Goodwin, Ashley | Independent

Aboriginal Students’ Representatives • Chillihitzia, Mathilda | Independent • Whiting, Elizabeth | Your Vote = Your Voice

Director-at-Large (4) • • • • •

Clement, Kaitlin | Your Vote = Your Voice Guichon, Nolan | Your Vote = Your Voice Harrison, Declan | Independent Patel, Parth Mukesh | Your Vote = Your Voice Macedo, Colin | Your Vote = Your Voice

Graduate Students’ Representative • Vacant

The campaign period begins at 8:00AM on Monday, March 18, 2013 and runs untill 4:00PM on Tuesday March 26, 2013. The all candidates forum will be held on Friday, March 22, at 12:00 noon in the Indepepndent Centre. If you have questions regarding the TRUSU General Election please contact the Electoral Committee at elections@trusu.ca or 250.828.5289

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