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VOLUME 21 ISSUE 30 JUNE, 2012

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A celebration of pedal power

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Québec band’s album “not a waste of time” 5

Photo gallery from FanFest and more 8

Congratulations 2012 Grads!

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PHOTO BY SAMANTHA GARVEY

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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June, 2012

Feature Cystic Fibrosis is killing our children five) have varying degrees of difficulty with the disease and as such have Ω Editor-in-Chief different regimens of treatment and One in every 3,600 children born in therapies. “In the morning the girls have to do Canada has Cystic Fibrosis (CF), and according to the averages, one person about an hour and a half of inhalation dies from the disease in Canada every treatments and physiotherapy sessions before we can leave the house,” acweek. Ninety per cent of cases will be di- cording to Robinson. Physiotherapy for Kiana consists of agnosed before the age of ten, and just over half of those diagnosed will live clapping on her sides back and chest to the age of 40. This is a far longer life to try and get rid of the mucus in her expectancy than even a decade ago, as lungs, while Alysa does her breathing exercises, during which she suspends well as a far better rate of diagnosis. The fight to continue this move for- a “little thing” inside a tube with her ward took another step itself on the exhalation for 4 seconds, 15 times. morning of May 27 at the BC Wildlife She does six repetitions of this. They repeat the therapies before Park just east of Kamloops. They couldn’t have asked for a nicer bed at night, meaning they spend day for a wander around the park — about three hours per day just workand many turned out to show their ing on their lungs. They also have to take numerous support in the battle against the affliction which is the most common fatal pills and medications before meals genetic disease affecting young Cana- and snacks so that their bodies will metabolize their food. dians today. And then there are the hospitalizaAround 50 people, including many children, came out to support the CF tions. “Alysa is Kamloops orat the point in ganization in her treatment their annual where she is “Great Strides being hospitalWalk,” this ized every two year, raising months for a an estimated minimum of $10,500. two weeks,” That’s about said Robinson. $3,000 more Kiana isn’t than the previh o s pit a l i z e d ous year, acnearly as often, cording to Mathe said, “probthew Robinson, ably only about CF Kamloops’ —Matthew Robinson four times in chapter presiher life,” which dent. “We did notice a lot of new faces he suspects is because of her early dithis year, which is fantastic,” Robin- agnosis. Alysa was diagnosed when she was 18 months old while Kiana son said. “Nicole [Matthew’s wife] and I was diagnosed before she was even work really hard to get CF awareness born by a process called amniocentiout there as most people don’t know sis. It is a difficult life for the Robinson what it is, and in turn do not donate or show up for our walks. Slowly but family — one that many might pity, and some would resent if it were their surely we are getting there.” Matthew and Nicole have three own — but they live lives full of happiness and joy, and they try to make the daughters, two of which have CF. Alysa and Kiana (aged seven and world more aware while they live it.

Mike Davies

“We did notice

a lot of new faces this year, which is fantastic.”

Some of the fifty-plus participants in the annual Great Strides Walk posed for a picture to celebrate the event held May 27 at the BC Wildlife Park just east of Kamloops. Over $10,000 was raised, and more events are coming soon.

—PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

“It is sometimes difficult to talk about, but if sharing our story means that more people are learning that CF is out there, we will tell it over and over again,” Robinson said. CF Kamloops is holding another fundraiser this summer, hosting a fishing derby at Kamloops Lake on Saturday, Jul. 7. They have many prizes to give away — including a fishing boat package that you can win without even catching a fish — as well as a beer garden, concession stand and various entertainers on-site at the Savona Boat Launch. The event begins at 7 a.m. and you can get involved by calling Steven at 250-314-1460 or emailing him at catchnrelease@telus.blackberry.net.

Shinerama? Shinerama, a CF fundraising event that began at Wilfred Laurier University in Ontario (then known as Waterloo Lutheran University), began as a way to turn the tradition of “hazing” into something positive, according to Vahnessa Espig, Shinerama coordinator at the University of British Columbia. “It’s such a great campaign,” she said, adding that it is another way that incoming students could meet and socialize early in the semester, while doing

City staff suggest polling station at TRU Kamloops exploring various options in an attempt to improve voter turnout for municipal elections Devan C. Tasa Ω Contributor

Kamloops city staff has suggested that an advance voting location be put on TRU campus in the next city election. That suggestion was part of a series of recommendations made at the May 1 city council meeting to try to improve voter turnout in the 2014 election. Also suggested were ideas such as moving voting locations to malls and mailing voter information cards directly to Kamloops households. Cindy Kennedy, who was the chief electoral officer for the last election, told council the suggestions were inspired by looking at how Kelowna ran their last election. Kelowna had 33.1 per cent of voters show up while Kamloops only had 29.8 per cent. Kelowna had a voting location at both their local college and university, but turnout was less than expected. Kennedy told council that

Kelowna staff suggested that Kamloops have a voting location at TRU on a weekday for only a few hours. “They did recommend that we keep it to a four-hour day just for the first time to see how it works,” she said.

Coun. Nancy Bepple told council that TRU students are unaware of their voting rights. She said that she’s talked to many TRU students, and though some of them were very engaged — l leaders in the student clubs, for example — they “had no idea

“...anything that makes it easier for [students] to participate... is a good thing.” At this point, the suggestions are just that — suggestions. Council will have to vote closer to the election date before they are put into action. The recommendations in general were well received by council.

—Dylan Robinson that they were eligible to vote.” A TRU student can vote in the election if they have lived in B.C. for six months and lived in Kamloops for 30 days. “Most TRU students are eligible and yet they don’t know,”

Bepple said. “I think that they need to be educated that they do have the right to vote in Kamloops.” Kennedy says doing that is possible. “We have no problems going to TRU and educating them,” she said. “If they’re interested, we’re more than happy to be there.” Newly elected TRUSU VP external Dylan Robinson said he was unaware of the recommendations before The Omega contacted him, but that he’s pleased with the suggestion. “TRUSU is delighted about this recommendation made by the City of Kamloops staff, because one of our principles is that anything that makes it easier for [students] to participate in the democratic process and have their voices heard is a good thing,” he wrote via email. Robinson said he imagines TRUSU will be following up with city staff to further discuss the issue. Keep watching The Omega (and theomega.ca) for updates.

some good in their community, as well. “I think Kamloops is a great philanthropic town, and the response would be awesome,” she said. Espig, who grew up in Kamloops — and was in fact Miss Teen Kamloops 2011 — is currently trying to organize a Shinerama event here at TRU. You can find out how you can help bring a student CF fundraiser to TRU by contacting her at shinerama@ams.ubc.ca.

How is your summer going so far? Why not write a “letter to the editor” and talk about it? Got a beef or some kudos to give? Let us help you get it out. editorofomega @gmail.com


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 30

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

June, 2012

Volume 21, Issue 30

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

Editorial What does the Québec student protest have to do with us?

Uprising in “La Belle Province” should piss you off, no matter what happens

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Will resume fall 2012 SPORTS EDITOR

Will resume fall 2012 Copy Editor

Will resume fall 2012 Photo Editor

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Will resume fall 2012 Roving Editor

Will resume fall 2012

omegacontributors Samantha Garvey, Devan C. Tasa, Adam Williams, Sunny Thorne, Kevin Menz, Cavelle Layes

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

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Editor’s Note Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief With the country’s (especially post-secondary students) eyes turned toward Québec and their pot-banging, riot-police-dodging masses, I found myself asking, “How will this affect the rest of us?” “Are you kidding?” you might be saying. “They’re striking in protest of a tuition hike in Québec. That won’t affect me.” Really? What does it mean if they’re successful? What if they actually manage to keep their tuition fees (and other ancillary-type fees) as low as they have been for decades? That means you have a justifiable reason to be super pissed off, is what that means. Maybe you would be pissed off that you study hard and attend classes instead of throwing flaming bottles of things and damaging people’s property, causing some citizens of your community to not want to go out because they’re afraid and that you are being pun-

ished for that academic dedication by having seemingly endless increased expenses for your education. Or maybe you would be pissed off that we live in a society in Canada where violence and being a public nuisance gets you what you want rather than it being punished, and you might decide to engage in some of it yourself. If you get enough of your friends to join in, it might work for you too, right? But then you’ll think that you’ll probably just get arrested or beaten yourself, so you’ll stay in class and learn and be pissed off that you’re overpaying for your education, and that your student union spent another 30 grand on a concert no one went to see as they hold up “drop fees” signs for no one and pretend to be surprised when fees don’t go down while paying themselves hefty salaries (or honoraria) for doing nothing of substance. It could be that you’re pissed off that the previous generation of students didn’t march in the streets and destroy people’s property, and get themselves beaten by police so that their fees (and subsequently yours) would be reasonable, rather than just being diligent students quietly mumbling about the everincreasing cost of doing so. We’ve already established that you probably won’t, so others should have, right? You could be pissed off that dissent worked to change their world, and you’re stuck paying WAY more for your education than they are. I’d hope that would piss you off. But what does it mean if those Québec protests are unsuccessful?

What if enough of them get thrown in jail, or fined or beaten by the police that the rest decide it’s not worth it and go back to class instead? That means you have a justifiable reason to be super pissed off, is what that means. Maybe you would be pissed off because those students want what you want (affordable education, their government to listen to their pleas, etc.), and their government said, “No, actually, you’ll do what we tell you,” and despite all their efforts, including trying to light their own damn province on fire, the government won. Or maybe you would be pissed off that it suddenly seems that you live in a dictatorship, and you didn’t realize that until the will of the people was literally quashed before you, even though you probably should have seen it coming when your national government decided to kill a bunch of environmental protections you liked having, stopped listening to scientists and spent more money than probably actually exists in physical form in the country on some jets — because about 20 per cent of Canada said that they could run the joint. You might be pissed off that their attempt to come together in solidarity and community was snuffed out by oppressive governance. I’d hope that would piss you off. So yes — the Québec protests affect you, or at least they should. They should piss you off. It just hasn’t been established why yet.

over one that can offer full-ride scholarships and the opportunity to compete in a high performance division. Athletes will always be drawn to institutions that seem to value athletics more; a high performance division will give such an impression. Smaller institutions will struggle to obtain the same high-level talent and while certain athletes may choose to defy the norm, schools like our very own will not be able to make the same recruiting offers as their larger counterparts. It’s a problem that could not only lead to less entertaining sporting events but also prevent institutions from growing and improving their athletics programs. As a sports fan I struggle with the concept of a high performance division. As a spectator I love the idea — I’ve seen far too many varsity hockey games end with a score of 7-2 to believe that Canada West is perfectly fine the way it is. It’s clear that league administration needs to do something to increase the level of competition and curb an exodus of athletes to the NCAA, but is a high performance division the solution? Personally, I would rather see Canada West take a more hands-on approach and work with smaller institutions to help them to bring the prestige and performance of their programs up to a level that can better

compete with schools like UBC. The alternative is competing in what will inevitably be colloquially refered to as the “low performance division,” where the performances may be more akin to a weekly recreational league than a high-level spectator sport. The full details of the report have not yet been released, so it’s altogether possible that I’ve misjudged the impacts of this proposal and will change my tune in a matter of weeks. As Menz mentioned in his article, all the schools involved in these discussions have “embraced” the approach, which would include the administration here at TRU. I’ve been around university politics for long enough to know that an institution is always going to have its own interests at the forefront, and ours is no different. My only hope is that the impacts of this proposal will indeed turn out to be positive for athletics here at TRU. Unfortunately, it will be hard to predict the full effects before they have been implemented, and I for one fear for the future of the small institutions’ athletics programs should it go ahead.

editorofomega@gmail.com

The rich get richer in the CIS Adam Williams Ω Contributor

Like the provinces it governs, the Canada West Universities Athletic Association has always had its share of haves and have-nots; such is the nature of university athletics. Certain institutions will always have more money and resources to contribute to varsity sports. But will a recent proposal from the Canada West Task Force make university athletics even tougher for small institutions? According to an article written on Mar. 7 by Kevin Menz, Canada West administration will consider introducing a “sport by sport high performance division,” which would require participating institutions to guarantee significant financial commitments to their programs. It’s an idea that certainly has the potential to raise the level of competition at larger institutions, and schools will find themselves playing more against rivals of similar size and athletic prowess on a more regular basis. But programs in smaller schools around Canada West won’t have the same financial resources available to them. Making competing against the West’s big schools even more difficult than it already is. It’s hard to imagine a situation where an athlete would choose to go to a smaller institution, maybe one that is closer to family and friends,

Editor’s note: You can read the above-mentioned article by Kevin Menz on page 6.

The subliminal side of board games Jacey Gibb

The Other Press (Douglas College) NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C. (CUP) — Everyone knows that kids are a bunch of impressionable sacks of flesh. They’re so eager to absorb new information that a lesson’s content is often unquestioned. While in the midst of a recent board game session with my little brother, I began to realize just how many alarming lessons can lie within a game’s instructions. The most obvious example of this is in The Game of Life (made by Hasbro), which is specifically designed to walk you through the successes and failures one can expect over their lifetime. Nowhere else are society’s basic norms laid out so blatantly for you. STOP! Get married. STOP! Buy yourself some real estate. Both are unavoidable in The Game of Life, even though real life quickly teaches us that not everyone has a ring and a mortgage to their name. The game enforces a traditional lifestyle, without much room for individuality. At the game’s end, it doesn’t matter how many kids you had, that you won the Nobel Peace Prize, or that you enjoyed everything along the way; the winner is whoever has accumulated the most wealth — because everyone knows that money is the most important thing in life. The same can be said about Monopoly (Parker Brothers), everyone’s favourite form of capitalism in a box. Your goal is to buy up as much real estate as possible, build up an empire on your monopoly of properties and force your competition into declaring bankruptcy. Sounds a bit like the Vancouver or Toronto scenes, doesn’t it? While we’re on the topic of games that take an eternity to play, Risk, the game of strategic conquest (also made by Parker Brothers), revolves around players’ abilities to dominate their opponents and wipe out armies until they’ve successfully conquered the entire world. I’m not a fan of war glorification and war in general, so that might explain why half of the times that I’ve played Risk have ended in myself and another player simply declaring world peace. Either that or the game takes an unbearably long time to finish. My favourite board game of all time is 1313 Dead End Drive, a lesserknown game by — you guessed it — Parker Brothers. Rich Aunt Agatha has recently passed away, and your goal is to murder everyone else and escape with the most money. While everyone starts with $1 million, that’s not considered a sufficient sum to be a winner. Greed is incredibly prominent in the game, while homicide is strongly encouraged. There are a few games that actually endorse healthy habits and reward ethical qualities. Scrabble encourages proper spelling and rewards people with extensive lexicons, while Scattergories forces players to think creatively. Even Sorry found a way to incorporate proper manners instead of just having players massacre each other until there’s only one person left. People may argue that these are all just games and shouldn’t be considered influential, but if violence and mature subject matters in other media are considered dangerously suggestive, then aren’t board games also agents of influence?


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June, 2012

Life & Community Bike to Work Week bigger than ever

Fifth-annual celebration sees 108 teams and 462 individuals hop on bikes instead of driving Samantha Garvey Ω Contributor

a n i t ’ pai f o

movement in which cyclists ride together, usually in a sidewalk to sidewalk herd, in order to raise awareness about the need to share the road with cyclists, as well as general bike safety. Its format was originally a protest, but has grown to be more cooperative and awareness focused. “It’s getting bigger and bigger every year,” said Jeff Porter, who joined Kamloops’ Critical Mass earlier in 2012. “Kamloops is definitely a carcentric city,” Porter said. “We need awareness on how dangerous it is to bike on our roads.” “It is unbelievably dangerous.” The group in Kamloops meets every last Friday of the month at 5:15 at Riverside Park and everyone is welcome to attend. While Critical Mass’ main objective is making vehicles aware of riders and rider safety, it also shares the goals of Bike to Work Week: promoting a cleaner mode of transportation for the environment as well as a healthier lifestyle for the cyclist, physically and financially. Jay Williamson and his threeyear-old son Gabriel joined the large group on Monday. He says events like these are good for raising awareness. “We’re a car-dominated society but it can’t keep going on

d s d r

From May 28 to June 1, cars were sharing the road with hundreds of cyclists on their way to and from work, celebrating the 5th Annual Bike to Work Week. Dozens of volunteers were responsible for the success of the Kamloops event. The goal was 100 teams, the highest number since it began five years ago. Teams consisted of work colleagues, clubs, friends and existing cycling groups. On Monday, day one, the force grew to 103, and by the end of the week, 108 was the grand total number of teams, with a total of 462 individual participants. Last year there were 73 teams and 301 participants. Celebration stations were located around the city serving as a pit stop for bikers to meet other riders, grab supplies, water and Malcolm Smith powers the Bike Blender to make refreshing smoothies for cyclists at the even freshly made smoothies Wrap-Up BBQ for Bike to Work Week, Friday, June 1. from the Bike Blender. —PHOTO BY SAMANTHA GARVEY “What we’re hoping is if we can get people to at least try it wrap-up barbecue for particieven one day this week, it might itself I don’t know how many pants and volunteers that saw get them thinking a little more over 100 people attend. This times.” about it, in terms of its not as Also in attendance was Lee event was supported by local difficult or challenging as they Kenney, also known as the “Ka- business Conscientious Catering thought,” said Colleen Lepik, using local beef from Heartland mloops Bike Guru.’ City of Kamloops’ TransportaHe appeared in a bright pink Foods. tion Coordinator, and Bike to Co-sponsor of the event, for the shirt with the capWork Week voluntion, “Real Ryders first time this year, was TRU Deteer. Wear Pink,” refer- partment of Sustainability. Lepik said im“An event like this won’t affect ring to competitive proving bike paths Canadian cyclist people who ride all the time” said and connectivity Tom Owen, chair of the department, Ryder Hesjedal. around the city is a On May 27, Hes- “but will for the people who might major focus of the jedal won the title want to come out and try it, or used event. “[We are] at Giro d’Italia, to bike all the time. It’s a stimulus trying to make it finishing only 16 for people to start biking again.” easier for people to The City of Kamloops website seconds behind make that choice.” Monday’s sta —Jeff Porter the fastest time recommends the following for bike ever recorded at safety: tion was in front Always wear a helmet and althat 3,500 km race. of the ‘Tournament Kenney said Hesjedal is putting ways wear brightly colored or reCapital’ sign next to Overlander like that,” Williamson said. flective clothing so that motorists “We use way too much energy cycling in minds of Canadians. Bridge. Late in the day a group “There are more people bicy- can see you, walk your bike across of more than 45 cyclists of all and our energy source is unages f looded the area as a part clean. Bicycles are a good way cling,” he said of Kamloops, but all crosswalks, and use recognized of the Critical Mass, which has to cut down on energy usage and the space for them in the city is hand signals to show motorists and not good enough. “Right now, other cyclists that you want to stop been going on regularly in Ka- be healthy.” He gestured towards his bike people are concerned. It has to or turn. mloops for three years and held For more information go to bikeand said with a chuckle, “I’ve improve.” a special edition for this event. The week ended Friday with a towork.ca/kamloops or search CritiCritical Mass is a worldwide had this bike for about 20 years

“We need awareness on how dangerous it is to bike on our roads.”

Check out more photos from Bike to Work Week, and comment on this story about your experience biking in Kamloops at theomega.ca

New, safer option for Valleyview-downtown bicyclists Samantha Garvey Ω Contributor

It’s taken many years to complete with contributions of nearly $6 million from multiple levels of government, but the Valleyview Interchange Multi-Use pathway is officially open — snipped ribbon and all. On Tuesday, June 6, six city councillors were present in a crowd of more than 30 people as Mayor Peter Milobar and MLA - North Thompson Terry Lake cut the ribbon to open the new overpass that will connect Valleyview to Lorne Street and downtown bike paths. Previously, cyclists could only pass through on the shoulder of the Trans-Canada Highway (TCH), a dangerous route. Now the path has a separate lane, a barrier from the road and a cross walk. During the presentations, both Milobar and Lake mentioned the persistence of residents who commu-

nicated their concerns and demands for a solution. The project began while Lake was the city’s mayor. “We’re here today after five or six years since this project really began,” Lake said to the crowd. “It’s really a heartwarming day for me.” The provincial government was one of many stakeholders that came together to see the project through. The Province contributed $2.7 million of the $5.9 million total price tag. The taxpayers through City of Kamloops contributed another $1.1 million. Canada’s federal Gas Tax Fund (GTF) supplied the final $2.1 million to see the pathway’s completion. The GTF became permanent in Canada’s 2011 federal budget. From now on, a portion of the excise tax on gasoline is given back to municipalities for infrastructure projects that must have the outcome of reduced

greenhouse gas emissions, cleaner air, and cleaner water. The Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) is the organization that administers the GTF towards infrastructure projects. “I think you know about the infrastructure challenges that we’re facing all across this country,” said Rhona Martin, the second vice-president of UBCM, during her presentation. “The federal government’s commitment to ensure that the gas tax goes back to the communities is really a wonderful thing. The dollars that come forward will help us improve.” In order to complete the connection, the steel retaining wall between the Trans-Canada Highway off ramp and the CP rail line was reinforced, as was a new retaining wall constructed under the TCH overpass. “We all knew as partners how important this connection was from Valleyview to downtown and to the Rivers Trail,” said Lake.

MLA Terry Lake (left), Jennifer Thompson (representing MP Cathy Mcleod) and Kamloops Mayor Peter Milobar cut the ribbon proclaiming the Valleyview Interchange Multi-Use Pathway open for use June 6. —PHOTO BY SAMANTHA GARVEY


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 30

Arts & Entertainment Album Review: Set Fire!

GrimSkunk shows versatility, but lacks cohesion and could do without the generic pop-punk

Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief As I push Set Fire! into my computer getting ready for some screaming, unintelligible instrument bashing — admittedly judging a book (or rather album) by its cover — I key “GrimSkunk” into my search engine, and am pleasantly surprised to learn that the Montreal band formed in 1989, so if they’re going to hit their instruments hard and scream into microphones, at least they should be good at it by now. I was pleasantly surprised when the opening track began and I found myself enjoying it. Falling into Shadow has haunting melodic tones behind an intricate drumbeat, nicely harmonized vocals that I could understand perfectly — something I consider key to enjoyable music — and driving, distorted guitar lines and licks that I was bopping my head to. It’s another song I found this summer to add to the “highway driving” list. Good work, gentlemen. Unfortunately, I was all but turned off the band completely by Fuck Shit Up, the second track on Set Fire! This is what I expected when I saw the name GrimSkunk as I pulled the CD out of the envelope that came from the record company. Unimpressed, gentlemen.

Then the band continued with Set Fire to the Nation, and I became thoroughly confused. A not-unpleasant blend of latenineties Rage Against the Machine and Beastie Boys efforts — with some Sublime mixed in for good measure — alternating heavy metal and ska-type guitar sections, I now had no idea what GrimSkunk was doing, and knew I must continue listening. Sunless Summer opens with Beatles-like keyboard and vocals, and continues on this thread, confusing me all-the-more. It’s literally like they were trying to recreate a lost song off Seargent Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. What are you up to here, GrimSkunk? Certainly, you’re showing versatility, but there’s just no cohesion. Intriguing — but aggravating. Moral Bigotry is mostly boring, cookie-cutter, Blink 182-type punk with sections of rapid screaming for some reason, followed by Green Pixie, which continues along that vein. At one point I forgot what I was listening to, and think a Simple Plan song slipped in there somehow. I almost gave up completely, but since I was reviewing the album, I felt obliged to finish it. Snake in the Grass just sucks. They’re doing some interesting things in there, but it should not have been on the album. It’s not a good song musically. The other ones

I didn’t like at least showed talent in genres that aren’t my thing. Don’t Ask Questions is one of these. It reminded me of my Social Distortion phase in middle school. Good times. Then comes Amnesia, which almost made me forget that I really wasn’t enjoying the album overall, followed by Un Jour, a fun, reggae-style ska song, which I think I would have enjoyed even more if it was in English — their Québec roots showing through by putting some French on the album. My lack of understanding the lyrics didn’t really take as much away from the song as it could have, which I realize contradicts an earlier statement in this review. GrimSkunk contradict themselves a lot on this album, so I’m okay with doing that in their review. Parts of Stand My Ground wouldn’t be out of place on a Bob Marley album, both in style and message, and coming after Amnesia and Un Jour, I completely forget that the band pissed me off with generic pop-punk and nonsensical screaming only ten minutes before. Then they immediately reminded me. I’m pretty sure that Souriez, vous etes filmes would be in the same category with Snake in the Grass even if I understood what they were saying. They close the album off with two more good ones, which they really

—IMAGE COURTESY INDICA RECORDS

needed to do to redeem themselves. In fact, Everybody Hates You (which closes the album) is probably their best song on the album. A light, well-harmonized show of musical talent with guitar lines reminiscent of Neil Young, it’s a good way to take my attention off some of the grossness that happened along my journey through the album.

Overall, GrimSkunk could completely lose a couple of songs from Set Fire! — and I could do without the generic pop-punk that rears its ugly head a few times — but it’s interesting and I don’t feel like I completely wasted my time, because I found a few songs I’d like to hear a few more times.

A summer festival style guide Sunny Thorne

The Ubessey (UBC) VANCOUVER (CUP) — From Coachella to Electric Daisy Carnival to Sasquatch and more, outdoor music festivals are one of the best parts of summer. With non-stop music, parties, camping and drinking (and other, less legal forms of escapism), there is really no better place to see the most fabulous and questionable expressions of personal style. In anticipation of a festival-filled summer with great music and hopefully better fashion, here is a brief list of festival fashion do’s and don’ts. DO connect with your vintage roots. Music festivals evoke an old-school feeling that can be expressed through a variety of great style choices. Here’s an opportunity to wear that awesome retro band shirt you found at an overpriced vintage store or that hippie fringe vest you stole from your mom’s closet. There is probably no better occasion to let your hair down and express your inner flower child or rock and roll god/ goddess. After all, when else will you have the excuse to sport hippie head bands, flower crowns and fanny-packs all at the same time? DON’T advertise your love of acid trips through your choice of chapeau. For the love of all things aesthetically pleasing, can we please address the SpiritHood?! These handmade, faux-fur hat/scarf combos (available in wild roadkill varieties such as hawk, leopard, wolf…and yes, panda bear) are a fashion choice that cause even the most style-blind individuals to stare in confusion. If the ridiculousness of a stuffed animal resting on your head doesn’t deter you, perhaps the problematic marketing of the “Navajo spirit” should raise some alarms. Not only are these hats offensive to the eyes, they are actually offensive to

the cultures they claim to express. You will not embody the spirit of the owl. You are not a wolf. You are just a fool who shelled out $150 to look like a hybrid teddy bear. DO try something funky in denim. Music festivals are a perfectly appropriate environment to shed your everyday jeans and don a pair of cutoff shorts instead. Denim allows you to express your inner wild child, so channel some Nirvana or Courtney Love. Whether you shred them, embroider them or stud them, you can’t go wrong; 90s grunge, in the form of oversized denim jackets and acid washed jeans, is definitely coming back in style. Paired with flip-flops for the California surfer look, or with combat boots for a more punk-rock twist, denim is a versatile and incredibly comfortable style choice for those long, hazy festival days. DON’T dress like a glowstick. Avoid the highlighter tees and the sunglasses at night. This is not A Night at the Roxbury and you are not fooling anyone, “bro.” While those who enjoy their hallucinogens might express their inner National Geographic, festival “bros” seeking heavy basslines and techno anthems stick out like a sore…jaw? And ladies, never ever get caught in a photo with a pacifier. The 90s are over, and so is your infancy. Let the raves RIP. DON’T get a Skrillex haircut. This “techno-mullet” is not only passé, but really quite hideous. The fact that you like the sound of robots copulating with the occasional T. Rex shriek followed by a “siiiick bass drop” does not need to be advertised on your head. In fact, all that your patchy scalp brings to mind is the hair-clipper prank in Jackass. Don’t cut it off…Just cut it out. Armed with these fashion guidelines, you can now go dance your heart out in the sunshine, confident that you look as great as you feel. Let the festival fun begin!


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June, 2012

Sports

Victoria Day long weekend on Northwestern British Columbia golf courses Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief This past Victoria Day long weekend (May 18 to 21), I decided that since my friend who lives up north has come down to play golf with me both of the last two summers, I should reciprocate. I wish I could have experienced a few more of the courses in the area, as there are surely some good experiences to be had up there, but alas, I could only afford — both financially and time-wise — to play three tracks on this trip. Here are the results of that trip in case any of you are considering golfing in the north-western region of B.C. Skeena Valley Golf and Country Club Despite the claim on their website that you can enjoy “a picturesque scenery and a staff dedicated to your total enjoyment,” this experience was adequate and nothing more. We arrived on the Friday afternoon (of a long weekend, as I mentioned) for our tee-time and were greeted very unenthusiastically by a kid lounging indifferently behind the counter of the pro shop chatting casually with his buddy who was sporting some MMA gear and pants that didn’t fit. It’s kind of a pet peeve of mine that if you’re at a golf course you should know how to wear clothing and use your brain to chose appropriate attire. Show some respect for the sport, you know? Anyway, I seem to be digressing already. After paying our $90 or so for the two of us (twilight rate, thankfully), we were given the key to

our cart, and found it parked outside caked in mud, filled with almost-empty beer cans, plastic bags and one Timbit in a box. We cleaned it out ourselves into the garbage and headed out to the first tee. I guess the course was nice enough, but although it was Victoria Day weekend, they had yet to take a lawnmower to the rough this season I think, and because of this lack of maintenance any shot that trickled off the fairway had a good chance of forcing you to dig another ball out of your bag. It got expensive for a couple of midhandicap golfers that afternoon. There was almost no one out on the course, which should tell you something about the perceived value that people have for it better than I can in a review. We gave it another shot on the Sunday, and they’d brought the lawnmowers out in between our excursions. Why you choose the Saturday of a long weekend to do the major maintenance generally required to open for the season I’ll never guess, but it made for a much nicer round. They still treated us like more of a nuisance than welcomed guests however, and they will never receive my money for anything ever again. Prince Rupert Golf Club We took to the highway for about an hour and a half Saturday morning and were warmly welcomed by Moe Hays, the head pro at Prince Rupert and “Head Professional of the Year, 2003” according to the BCPGA — before we were even in the pro shop. He’s a fantastic guy who loves the game and mingles with his guests as if at a family reunion. He personally went to the garage,

picked a freshly washed cart out for us and drove it up to the pro shop while we each paid our $60 and we stretched for a few minutes while he gave us some tips on managing our way around the course. It’s not a very long course, but it plays longer because — well, it’s Prince Rupert, and I don’t think things ever dry out there. Not a lot of rollout off the tee. I expect that it would be a better round later in the season, as the grass was overly saturated that early in the year, but overall, it’s a treasure that you should definitely spend an afternoon on if you’re ever up that way. The eighteenth is one of the best finishing holes I’ve played in a long time — despite the doublebogey I was forced to put down on the card. Hirsch Creek Golf and Winter Club

Sunday morning we called Skeena Valley and found to our surprise that they were pretty fully booked for most of the day, but that we could get on mid-afternoon. So off we headed to Kitimat while we waited, intending on playing nine holes at Hirsch Creek (we’d called a couple of weeks before and found that only the front nine was open). When we arrived however, we found that they had recently opened the back nine, so we figured we’d happily do a full round instead — if we didn’t make it back to Terrace in time to play Skeena again, so be it. Good decision, Davies. I will admit I was a bit worried about the course’s condition when we looked down the first fairway and saw two large snow banks beside the first green, but

The view from the seventeenth tee at Prince Rupert Golf Club. If you’re up that way, check it out, and play Hirsch Creek in Kitimat, but go ahead and skip Skeena Valley in Terrace.

although a bit wet those fears were unfounded. A challenging course that forces you to think through your shot selection rather than just bombing it off the tee box and selecting a club from there, Hirsch Creek is a hidden gem. We both shot better rounds than we have since we were teenagers, and we enjoyed every shot as we incorporated our cerebral skills

—PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES into our shot making. A light drizzle kept the humidity from wearing us out while not putting a damper on the experience. In fact it added to it as well as keeping the mosquitoes at bay. We even made friends with a curious fox who came out to watch us play the twelfth and thirteenth holes. We named him Gary. He was delightful.

UBC leading charge to rethink varsity sport in Canada

University presidents in Canada West push for high performance division Kevin Menz

The Sheaf (U of Saskatchewan) SASKATOON (CUP) — The University of British Columbia has taken the reins in an initiative amongst Canada West universities to reconsider how the conference divides its 16 teams. Last April, UBC announced it would no longer seek membership into the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and would remain a member of Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS). The school felt it could be at the forefront of changing Canada’s university athletics. According to Canadian University Press, UBC president Stephen Toope “cited the CIS’s willingness to reform on a variety of fronts, including proposed changes to governance and tiering, as a reason to stay within the organization.” His desire for change was backed by fellow university presidents from within the conference. A letter signed by Toope and four other presidents was sent to the Canada West administration around the same time as UBC’s announcement. It not only informed the conference of UBC’s decision to remain in Canada, but also stated a need for change in the conference’s competitive structure, which included a demand for tiering — though

it wasn’t made clear what exactly was meant by tiering. When the Canada West conference was formed in 1971, it consisted of UBC and the universities of Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge, Saskatchewan and Victoria. Over the last 14 years, the number has increased to 16 member schools, with 14 currently competing and the University of Northern British Columbia and Mount Royal University scheduled to join the conference in the fall of 2012. Grant MacEwan University in Edmonton recently submitted an application to join the conference but, as concern amongst Canada West schools grows over the quality of competition within the conference, the league is reluctant to accept new members. According to Richard Price, the senior advisor to Toope, many schools are concerned that the skill-level of the average Canada West athlete has decreased as the number of roster spots within the conference has increased, and that too many Canadian studentathletes are leaving to play higher quality sport in the NCAA as opposed to staying in Canada. “[One] concern is that there has been the dilution of the talent level and that’s simply because of the increased numbers. There are simply more teams and more kids have to fill out those teams,”

said Price, over the phone from Vancouver. “The continuing exodus of student athletes to the NCAA greatly magnifies that problem, and that problem has been getting worse and worse.” To add to this, in certain sports where the number of teams competing is very high, the conference has divided regionally. In men’s and women’s basketball, for example, the Prairie division consists of schools in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba while the Pacific division consists of schools in British Columbia. The two divisions most often play within their own regions, rarely crossing over to compete against each other. For schools like UBC and Victoria, this means playing predominantly smaller schools within British Columbia. For schools in the Prairie division, it means not playing often more competitive teams from UBC and Victoria. “We’re not even in the same division as our traditional rivals: Saskatchewan, Calgary, Alberta,” said Price. ”We like those traditional rivalries. They generate the most fan interest and we’ve always had excellent competition.” Canada West’s response to these concerns was to form a committee of university presidents and athletic directors from schools throughout the league.

The committee was tasked with finding new ways to divide or tier the conference’s 16 teams and to make it “more attractive to top Canadian student-athletes to stay in Canada rather than go to the NCAA,” said Price. Currently, presidents from the Trinity Western University and the universities of Winnipeg, Saskatchewan and Lethbridge sit alongside Toope on the committee. The athletic directors are from the universities of Manitoba, Regina, Alberta and Victoria, as well as Thompson Rivers University. The committee, also referred to as the Canada West Task Force, released its first preliminary report at the conference’s most recent meeting Feb. 7-8 in Calgary, Alta. The proposal no longer focuses on the language of tiering but on the idea of a “sport by sport consideration of a high performance division,” said Price. This means that rather than following a system much like the NCAA in which different schools are declared division one, two or three based on their size and their ability to offer scholarships, the Canada West would allow each school to select which sport or sports they want to perform in a more elite division of competition. “One school may be committed to high performance competition in basketball and to a more recreational

level of competition in hockey,” wrote University of Saskatchewan President Peter MacKinnon in an email to the Sheaf. In order to classify as a high performance team, added Price, the team would have “to make the full commitment to full-ride scholarships, full-time head and assistant coaches, integrated sports medicine” or whatever else the Canada West deems necessary. “The interesting thing about the proposal and the principles that exist in the preliminary report is that all the members of the Task Force — big schools, small schools, newer schools and older schools — have all embraced this approach,” said Price. “Personally, I favour an approach that sees universities compete according to their levels of commitment to particular sports,” wrote MacKinnon. “The Canada West Task Force is simply trying to develop sensible ways of preserving historical patterns of competition to the extent possible while accommodating newer institutions that may wish to compete in one or two sports, or in several.” The committee is currently waiting for feedback from the Canada West membership in order to refine its proposal and, eventually, take it to the CIS to see if the system could be implemented nation-wide.


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1. Awestruck 5. Gelling agents 10. Kind of car 14. Box 15. Nine performers 16. Roulette bet 17. Auto list 20. Besmirch 21. Sound entrance point 22. Metallica drummer, Ulrich 25. Limerick, e.g. 26. Good, in the ‘hood 29. Insect stage 31. Female demons 35. Altar avowal 36. Period 38. As recently as 39. Auto list, part 2 43. One of the Simpsons 44. Rolls’ first aero engine 45. Between pi and sigma 46. Enduring forever, old way 49. Cozy retreat 50. Bit 51. Math term 53. “La Scala di ___” (Rossini opera) 55. Anonymous guy in court 58. Rarin’ to go 62. End of auto list 65. India setting

66. Deceived 67. Little biter 68. Cravings 69. Parkinson’s treatment 70. Pianist, Dame Myra Down 1. Short court figures? 2. Bit of physics 3. 100% 4. Kind of wave 5. “Wheel of Fortune” purchase 6. “The Bourne Supremacy” opening locale 7. Add to the pot 8. Chart anew 9. Chole or ergo followers 10. Rare 11. Music category 12. Cork’s place 13. Like some humor 18. Milkshake 19. Perlman of “Cheers” 23. German industrial region 24. “The final frontier” 26. Religious book 27. Acknowledge 28. Throw the ice bucket 30. Geo-political org. 32. Dead to the world 33. Island greeting 34. Church assembly

37. Borders 40. Naturally formed methane 41. Different 42. Hunting dog 47. Diamond complement 48. Ultimate object 52. Put an edge on 54. Expression of disgust 55. “Light My Fire” singer, Feliciano 56. Father of Balder 57. Tropical plant 59. Heredity carrier 60. Geologists’ studies 61. Vermin 62. “Waterloo Bridge: Gray __” by Monet 63. Criminal’s nemesis 64. Santa ___ winds T A M P

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8

June, 2012

Photo Gallery

ABOVE LEFT: Sri Whorrall receives her Communications and School Support certificate at Friday morning’s Convocation, June 15. ABOVE RIGHT: TRU president Alan Shaver (far right), Fiona Chan, member of TRU’s Board of Governors (mid-stage), and Chancellor Wally Oppal oversee the spring 2012 convocation.

—PHOTOS BY SAMANTHA GARVEY

BELOW: The Canadian Football League’s BC Lions hold their annual FanFest day at Hillside Stadium June 10. Kamloops Junior Football players had a chance to run some drills with the team before autograph sessions began, followed by an open practice where fans got their first look at the team hoping to repeat as Grey Cup champions this season. See more photos at www.theomega.ca.

—PHOTOS BY MIKE DAVIES

BELOW: Fire season again! A fire rips through a few hectares of land outside Prichard before two air tankers dumping retardant, a helicopter bucketing water and 25 firefighters on the ground suppressed the blaze.

—PHOTOS BY CAVELLE LAYES (courtesy Salmon Arm Observer)

June, 2012  

The June, 2012 edition of The Omega

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