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VOLUME 21 ISSUE 17 JANUARY 25, 2012

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Miller retains position on board 2

Benefits of being Women’s volleyball thrifty 5 still in the hunt 11

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PHOTO BY JULIA MARKS

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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January 25, 2012

Feature

What’s a Canadian?

Peter Mansbridge touches hearts with tales of patriotism and pride people know who you are just because you’re on television — and yes, he still Editor-in-Chief got that speeding ticket. He went on to discuss how he serenPeter Mansbridge, possibly the most dipitously got his start in broadcast jourrecognizable and well-respected news- nalism, “by f luke in 1968 in Churchill man in Canada, entertained and enlight- Manitoba.” A 19-year-old Mansbridge was working ened an audience of hundreds in the Grand Hall of the Campus Activity Cen- for Transair, a small regional airline on the Prairies, mainly servicing the Canatre on Jan. 19. He made us laugh; he made me cry (if dian North. He did a bit of everything — loading getting emotional about Canadian pride is wrong, I don’t want to be right), and it cargo, selling tickets and fuelling planes — when he was asked one day to anwas a great night by all accounts. nounce the f light Part of the to Winnipeg over TRUSU Common the public address Voices Lecture system. Series, MansAfter he’d anbridge opened by nounced the f light, commenting on “people were all the weather and moving towards how it was “nice the gate, but this to see Kamloops one chap came knows how to celstraight towards ebrate winter,” (it me,” he said. was during a cold “It turns out snap) and went on that he was the to talk a bit about manager of the the aspect of ceCBC northern lebrity associated service station in with his chosen —Peter Mansbridge Churchill, and his career and his name was Gaston place in Canadian PHOTO BY JULIA MARKS Charpentier.” culture. Charpentier approached him about do“For those of us in television,” he said, The CBC’s Peter Mansbridge adressed a large crowd in the Grand Hall Jan. 19 “we haven’t really quite figured out why ing the late night shift on the radio, beand left everyone with a renewed sense of Canadian pride. people do associate with us. They seem to cause he “had a great voice.” He told stories of various interviews see us as more than just journalists.” “It’s easy sometimes to get carried he’s done with various famous figures — know about Canada, let alone have that in desperate times — and saved them. And she knew that because her parents had away in assuming that means that every- not the least of which was US President attitude about it. It turned out that three nurses from Van- taught her that. And her school system had body knows who we are,” he said, “and Barack Obama — but once the autobiogevery now and then it’s good for us to raphy section of the night was done, and couver had f lown to the region on their ensured she knew that. And she was going be reminded that not everybody watches the audience’s collective stomach mus- own dime and set up a clinic to help how to make sure that her son knew it.” The third story was about a graduate television, and not everyone watches the cles were exhausted from laughter, Man- they could, and that little girl had seen them and received vaccinations and medi- from McGill University that he’d met in news,” he said, humbly admitting that he sbridge told three more stories. He told the story of being in Sri Lanka cal attention earlier that day. She now rec- Afghanistan, whose job it was to explain has made the mistake of a slight lack of after the devastating tsunami in late 2005 ognized the f lag on Mansbridge’s jacket, to Afghan women what their rights were humility himself at times. He told the story of travelling up an and meeting a small child who recognized and would forever associate it with “good.” under the new constitution. What was more amazing than the job He told the story of being in the NetherOntario road to his cottage on the lake his Canadian f lag pin on his jacket, and with his wife, and getting, “a little car- in broken English said, “Canada good,” lands and seeing a parade for WWII veter- she was doing was the fact that she’d been born in Afghanistan, and her family had ried away, as we all do on occasion, and and he wondered how she could possibly ans on May 8, 2006. “250,000 people were out f led that country and were welcomed by suddenly I notice in the rear view in the street waving Cana- Canada as refugees in the early 1990’s. mirror, there was a car followUpon graduation, “she was wooed by a dian f lags,” he said, “but they ing me with a red light blinking weren’t Canadians, they were number of private sector companies…and away.” she said, ‘I want that job, but first I want Dutch.” The officer asked for all the And he asked a woman who to go back to Afghanistan and show the standard documentation, and he was holding a small child why people there what’s possible in a country looked at his driver’s license, and she would bring her son out that celebrates freedom.’” said, “Peter Mansbridge!” “What’s the thread through those three in the pouring rain to watch “And I thought, God I love this as the uniformed old men stories?” he asked the crowd. “I’ll tell you job!” what it is for me. marched past. Once the laughter died off, “For me the thread is that we care. We And she’d told him, “I Mansbridge gave the officer’s brought him here because I care not only about ourselves and our famresponse to the name on the card want him to know what a Ca- ilies, but we care about our neighbours — before him, which was, “we were whether those neighbours are across the nadian is.” in scouts together!” “For almost all of my report- street, across the city, across the province, And after they’d discussed the ing career, I’ve been trying to across the country or on the other side of “good old days of Scouting,” and answer that question,” Man- the world. recalled various camping trips “We care, and we find remarkable ways sbridge said that night in the and jamborees they’d been at toPHOTO BY JULIA MARKS to show that caring.” Grand Hall. gether, “suddenly the conversaThat’s what a Canadian is according to “What’s a Canadian?” tion kinda stopped,” Mansbridge “For this woman, in Apel- Peter Mansbridge. recalled, “and he looked at me The Omega was lucky enough to get an exclusive And everyone who was in that room on doorn, on this day…she knew and he said, ‘So — what do you one-on-one with Peter Mansbridge after his public exactly what a Canadian was. Jan. 19 felt it to their very soul, I think. do now?’” address. The piece is in post-production and should be I for one will certainly never ask the A Canadian was somebody And that’s when he realized available for viewing online in the coming weeks. who had come to her country question again. that he shouldn’t assume that

Mike Davies

“We care, and we find remarkble ways to show that caring.”

theomega.ca or @TRU_Omega on Twitter


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January 25, 2012

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

January 25, 2012

Volume 21, Issue 17

Published since November 27, 1991

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Editorial Okay, so it’s not just me Taylor Rocca

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Julia Marks, Taylor Rocca, Devan C. Tasa, Allison Gibbard

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #2 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: (250)372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail. com (Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

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Editor’s Note Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief

Last week I shared with you my version of the week that was the Canadian University Press (CUP) national conference. I’m obviously a bit biased — I make no secret that I’m a big proponent of CUP — so I thought I’d share with you some others’ thoughts on the CUP national conference that was held Jan. 11 to 15 in Victoria. I’m happy that we were able to bring along some budding journalists, and this is what they had to say about the event.

What a fantastic experience. Actually, that doesn’t even really do it justice. Attending is the only real way to get a concrete understanding of how beneficial this conference truly is. If you are a student journalist, or are interested in the field and you have the opportunity to attend any Canadian University Press conference, I highly recommend you take advantage. Whether it is a regional conference or the national one, these gatherings give students the chance to network with other aspiring Canadian student journalists. What better way to get ahead of the game than to network with the future force of the industry? Apart from the networking opportunities, the national conference also brings a wide variety of phenomenal speakers in to present to conference guests. Journalists from various backgrounds with unique experiences and expertise share advice and insight that can otherwise be difficult to come by. My experience was highlighted by listening to Dave Zirin speak about sports, politics and culture. Being a big sports buff, it isn’t every day that you get the opportunity to hear someone as well versed as Zirin speak about sports and politics. I enjoyed every second of my time

at Archipelago NASH 74. I want to extend a huge thank you to the organizers of the conference, Jason Schreurs of Nexus and Kristi Sipes of The Martlet. I am already looking forward to NASH 75. Hopefully I’ll see you there!

Lauren Gagatek Most students are hearing secondhand about the CUP conference in Victoria B.C., as a massive norovirus outbreak consisting of a lot of vomit. Believe it or not, the conference was actually about journalism and the only thing I found contagious was the laughter. The conference was a breath of fresh air. It was refreshing to hear keynote speakers dropping f-bombs. It was refreshing to see a speaker who can speak to their failures and how they have overcome these. Explosive body fluids were a completely appropriate topic, and well received by the masses. The uncensored speaking resulted in an erupting crowd of laughter. Three-hundred-and-sixty university newspaper snobs are a pretty tough crowd, yet laughter was a norm at Nash 74. Attendees learned that not only do we have to be journalists, we have to be videographers, dedicated tweeters and facebookers, professional baristas, fashion snobs, morning people, suit wearers, black coffee drink-

ers and lastly, know how to throw a punch in an emergency. Admittedly, style at the conference was at an all-time high. There were overwhelmingly large amounts of indie newspaper folk, the skinny jean, plaid shirt, horn rimmed glasses type. Girls sported tights, cardigans and satchels of all kinds. I sported sweat pants and stood out like a sore thumb. Newspaper folk are stylish, and that’s all there is to that. This conference inspired many dwindling journalists to pick their socks up and start writing again. Despite the negative stigma surrounding the future of journalism, this optimism will be enough to tide us over until next year’s conference. I am very grateful to the TRU journalism department, the Omega and CUEF for their generous sponsorship, which made attending this conference possible.

Devan Tasa The reason I went to the conference, affectionately referred to by its attendees and organizers as “Nash,” was to find out what the future media landscape would look like and which skills I should develop to take advantage of it.

SEE

Nash PAGE 5

In case you missed it, Kergin’s got you covered:

Things you probably didn’t see happening around you last week

Brendan Kergin News Editor

Global *Egypt One of the first successful countries in what has been dubbed the Arab Spring, Egypt has completed its first round of elections. The lower house (similar to Canada’s House of Commons) has been voted on, with a party associated with the Muslim Brotherhood having the largest share of seats. The more hardline Islamist party got the second largest chunk, with three more liberal parties also getting seats. The complicated system is still counting votes and assigning seats to individuals, who may or may not have party allegiances. Read more at telegraph.co.uk *France/Turkish Armenian Genocide France and Turkey are playing a bit of diplomatic dodgeball as France looks to put a new law on the books. The contentious law makes it illegal to deny that the mass killing of Armenians by Ottoman Turks in 1915 was genocide. While some estimates put the number killed as high as 1.5 million, Turkey claims it was around 300,000. Not an easy issue to reconcile being that the event in question occurred nearly 100 years ago. The Turkish government does not deny the fact many Armenians died at the time, but contends that it was during a period of time when many people were dying on both sides of a brutal conflict. Turkey says the bill is a bid by France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy to gain the country’s many Armenian votes in an upcoming election. Turkey has threatened a variety of actions including economic sanctions and accusing France of genocide in Algeria during the Algerian war for independence. In 2004 Canada’s House of Commons voted to recognize the 1915 mass killing as a genocide, one of the first countries to do so. Read more at af.reuters.com

National

*Old Documentary A 1919 silent documentary of Canada’s Arctic is being restored for viewing by the public over 90 years after it was filmed. Made by the Hudson Bay Company to mark its 250th anniversary, the film was captured over six months across Canada’s northern provinces and parts of the territories. The two filmmakers started on an icebreaker in Montreal and headed west. Pre-dating “Nanook of the North” as a documentary, this is considered one of the first examples of a non-fiction film. A s Canada was once known as a hotbed for natural documentaries, this is not only a documentary with first-hand history of Canada as a nation, but is, in itself, a piece of history. Read more at bbc.co.uk/news or returnfarfurcountry.ca *Russian Spies Straight out of the ‘60s, Canada is possibly embroiled in a bit of spy scandal. A Canadian naval officer has been arrested and accused of espionage and selling Canadian secrets to foreign interests. At the same time, four Russians have been expelled from their embassy in Ottawa this week. While the Kremlin in Moscow denies the two stories are connected, some sources do say they are connected. Russian officials in Canada have been instructed by the Kremlin not to make comments. These events are probably not good for the already icy relationship Canada already has with our Arctic neighbours. Read more at theglobeandmail.com

Provincial *Pickton Inquiry The rather despicable story of Robert Pickton is still limping on. The current chapter is the Pickton Inquiry, a look by the province at the police work behind the case. However, the man at the top of the inquiry is getting concerned the lawyers dog-piling onto the case may damage the public’s view of the inquiry. There are lawyers representing at least 11 participants right now, and Commissioner Wally Oppal is worried this will bog down proceedings. Read more at theglobeandmail.com

*Catalyst Taxes The Vancouver Island District of North Cowichan has won a court battle that pitted them against Catalyst Paper Corp. The Supreme Court of Canada sided with the community unanimously over taxes owed by Catalyst. The conflict arose out of different tax rates applied to different types of property. While tax bylaws are not the stuff of snazzy court dramas, this is good news for any small town with a large corporation inside its bounds. Read more at cbc.ca

Local *The Blazers Congrats to our hometown team. While you may have heard that the local WHL team is doing well, it’s better than that. We’re in first! By we I mean the royal we, including us over here at The Omega by proxy due to our location within the city limits. By first I mean first in the league. Overall. No one is above us, at least at the time of print. And with a twopoint lead over the next place, we’re in a good situation. To add icing to the cake, the most recent win came over the Tri-City Americans, the team right below us. It’s still a long road, but we should get some playoff hockey this year kids. Read more at whl.com *UNICEF This week sees the launch of UNICEF’s Student Challenge. The international children’s aid organization is issuing a challenge to all Canadian post-secondary students. If you and a friend can raise a bunch a money, they might send you to New York! OK, so it may not be as simple as that. The aim of the challenge is to raise money for water pumps for impoverished villages. Seeing as UNICEF estimates 884 million kids are without access to clean, safe water, feel free to go overboard. Like, way overboard. Each pump costs $500, and earns you a ballot into a draw to win a trip to New York, which is awesome. But you know what is more awesome? Not letting kids drink dirty water that may contain cholera like what happened in Haiti. Just sayin’. Read more at unicef.ca/studentchallenge


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January 25, 2012

News Unique circumstance calls for unique protocol

Several TRU students kept away from campus to avoid possible spread of norovirus

Taylor Rocca

Omega Contributor Seven TRU students were encouraged to stay away from campus from January 16 to 18 after coming in contact with the norovirus at a student conference in Victoria, B.C. During the Canadian University Press (CUP) 74th national conference there was a reported outbreak of the virus. The seven students were in Victoria as part of an eight-person delegation representing TRU student newspaper, The Omega. Two TRU students fell ill before returning to Kamloops. The norovirus typically spreads through contaminated food and water, but can also be passed from person to person, according to Health Link BC. Apart from direct consumption of contaminated food, people can become infected through

contact with a contaminated surface or someone who is infected. In responding to the situation, Thompson Rivers University was in communication with Interior Health services, the TRU Advancement Office, the TRU head of marketing, the TRU Office of Student and Judicial Affairs and Occupational Health and Safety according to Duane Seibel, Manager of Student and Judicial Affairs at TRU. “It was an unusual circumstance,” Seibel said, “there wasn’t one [TRU conference student] who didn’t come in contact with [the virus].” Because of the unusual circumstance, there was no applicable established health and safety protocol on TRU campus. As a result, the university, in consultation with Interior Health services, established the unique protocol to respond to the equally unique circumstance. TRU dean of arts Dr. Michael

Mehta gave the final approval for the decision, said Seibel. Since the outbreak was first reported in Victoria, Andy Veilleux has been tracking the spread of the virus. Veilleux is an editor at The Muse, a CUP newspaper at Memorial University of Newfoundland. As of Jan. 22 at 6 p.m. 152 students have been reported ill from 52 different student newspapers across the country, according to Veilleux. Only four papers are unaccounted for. “I do not find the quarantine surprising, although I do find it surprising that TRU is the only school I have heard enforce it,” Veilleux said. “With the number (of sick) now climbing up over 150 students sick over the course of the conference, and some only getting sick days after the initial outbreak, the school’s positions seems more logical,” Veilleux said.

Veilleux’s record is available at w w w.andy veilleux.com / nash74 -sick-numbers/. Devan Tasa was one of the TRU st udents that attended the conference in Victoria. Apar t f rom attending classes at TRU, Tasa also lives on campus. Despite not cont racting the illness, he was not allowed to ret ur n to his quad-unit until he had been cleared to do so by the universit y. “After a long time away f rom home, I was not happy to hear that I could not go back until the universit y could be sure that I wouldn’t infect other people in the residence,” Tasa said. “I do understand why it was done. “The universit y wanted to make sure that nobody would be har med by the norovir us, especially when it could be stopped at the source.”

“W hen you go for a long t rip, you don’t expect to be told at the end you can’t go home again,” Tasa said. On the other side of the count r y, st udents who cont racted the illness received no off icial recommendations f rom their respective schools. Br yan nah James cont racted the norovir us while attending the conference in Victoria. James is a st udent at St. Thomas Universit y and the spor ts editor at The Br unswickan, a CU P newspaper in Fredericton, N.B. “The only feedback we had f rom our universit y was f rom the head of the jour nalism depar tment,” James said, “he was more concer ned with us getting home.” “We weren’t told we couldn’t ret ur n back to classes,” James said, “and most of us ret ur ned after the 24 – 48 hour recover y period.”

That’s what you said www.theomega.ca For this week’s issue, we patrolled the grounds looking for your answers to this question:

Were you aware that there was a possible norovirus outbreak at TRU in January and the steps taken? Were you/would you have been concerned?

Some kudos for TRU security! I received a note this past week from a TRU student about a concern quickly quelled by campus security, and thought it right to share it with our readers here. Dear Editor,

-- Lacey MacDonald, third-year English

-- Sheldon Brown, first-year Police & Justice Studies

-- Yulia Egorova, fourth-year Bachelor of Science

No. I definitely would have been concerned for my health seeing as I have a weak immune system. So I’d be concerned for others who also have a weak immune system. I think the school did what they saw was necessary, because when health issues arise you have to do what you have to do.

I heard a little. It was the only thing they probably could have done. Yeah, I would have been concerned for my health if I had heard more.

No, I hadn’t heard of it. I’m not sure, I don’t think it is very dangerous. I don’t know the point, why they wouldn’t let the one student back to residence, so he had to go stay somewhere else with people.

seemed out of place to me. I wanted to find out why it was there. I’ll admit, Oklahoma buildings resembling torn apart papier-mâché were some of the first images that popped into my head. So I called the TRU Security office and asked the person who answered my call (on the first ring) what it was doing there. “Unloading supplies for an event,” came the prompt reply. It’s re-assuring that those being paid to oversee the protection of those on our campus are so on top of things. I certainly don’t take it for granted.

Letter to the Editor

Re: TRU Security on Top of Things The morning of Wednesday, Jan. 18, what appeared to be a one-ton rental truck was parked on the pedestrian walkway in front of the Old Main building, near “muster station” number 24. It was bitterly cold that day and bundled-up students, teachers and staff members hurried by without so much as a sideways glance. No one was around the truck and having some experience in security, it

Marvin Beatty TRU journalism student


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 17

News Newly elected student representative suing TRU Difficult to determine what the claim is: lawyer Devan C. Tasa

Omega Contributor A recently elected student representative to TRU’s board of governors and senate is in the midst of suing TRU for 16 different claims. “It’s difficult to determine what the claim is,” said John Hogg, the university’s lawyer, in court on Jan. 20. “He’s claimed almost every tort in the textbook.” Adrian Miller, who was elected by students in an online election held between Dec. 8 and Dec. 22 (see story on page 7), says in legal documents filed to the court that the university failed to reasonably accommodate his disability and medical problems, the nature of which were left unspecified. Miller’s documents go on to say that when he went to senior TRU officials to ask for help in receiving accommodation, they ignored or squelched his complaints and failed to apply university policy. The documents also say that TRU sought to make Miller miserable so he would leave the university. The university has denied the allegations. “[Miller] knows these allegations are

Nash...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 Judging from what I heard from the presenters at Nash, there is plenty of disagreement. Suzanne Raitt, VP Marketing & Innovation at Newspapers Canada, says that newspapers are not going anywhere soon. She says that according to polls they are the number one source of news people trust and that people overwhelming want to have a physical copy of the paper into the future. Raitt says that the highest share of advertising, which funds journalistic activities, is going into newspapers. She also says that newspaper advertising is being used as a major component in social media and smartphone-based advertising campaigns.

false, unnecessary, scandalous, frivolous and vexatious,” said a legal document filed in response to the lawsuit. The university’s documents also say that TRU properly investigated any complaints and that Miller failed to use internal processes to seek remedy to his complaints even after being told about them. According to the legal documents filed by Miller, he is asking TRU to pay $249,999.99 in damages, write a letter of apology to him, pay for university and living expenses from September 2007 to the time his lawsuit is completed, pay for all future post-secondary education, and admit him unconditionally to the faculty of law with a full scholarship in compensation for his troubles. Miller has also faced criminal charges in the past. When confronted by Kamloops reporters about a mischief conviction, he told them it was the result of a prank done when he was on the University of Northern B.C.’s basketball team. But Kamloops This Week found out that Miller was not part of the team. A court judgment revealed that he was Other speakers disagreed. Richard Mostyn from the Yukon Times says that publishers will switch to electronic formats and get rid of the expensive printing press and physical delivery systems. I enjoyed Nash a lot and learned a lot of information that I will use in my future journalism career. If asked, I would wholeheartedly recommend that other students attend future Canadian University Press national conferences.

Cavelle Layes When I first heard about this conference I will be honest in saying that I thought it was going to be like most conferences, long and boring. However despite the tedious nature of each of these conferences I always walked away with a

found guilty of damaging an apartment in Prince George from which he was evicted. The judgement does not mention anybody being accused besides Miller, who said a girlfriend did the damage. Miller was also arrested and released on Jan. 19 due to allegations that he breached his probation relating to that conviction. Despite Miller’s legal battles, TRUSU executive director Nathan Lane says that TRUSU will treat Miller like any other duly elected student representative to the board of governors and senate. “We [will] set up a meeting with each one of [the newly elected representatives] in the coming month to let them know that we are available as a resource and that we are happy to work with them on issues of institutional governance,” Lane said. According to TRU’s election procedures, a student can only be barred from seeking and holding elected office if they have not paid their fees or if their studies would end before the end of the one-year term. Miller was unavailable for direct comment with the Omega by print deadline. broader knowledge of something. This is why I took the opportunity to attend the CUP conference. I was completely willing to sit through hours of exhausting lectures if it meant learning more about the journalism world. Now looking back at it I am extremely glad I took this opportunity. The entire experience has meant a great deal to me. Not only was the conference educational in many different ways but it was entertaining as well. In a nutshell it was everything I thought it wasn’t going to be. Each day I was able to see more of the people I consider to be amongst journalism’s greats. I was shocked to find how down to earth they were, and as they told their stories they filled me with inspiration. Even simple tips were like gold to us.

Newly elected TRU student representative Adrian Miller is seeking reparations from the school, including being admitted unconditionally to the law program. Ω File Photo

For example when we asked Chris Jones for advice on applying for jobs he simply stated to put a face with our name. Our future employers are more likely to choose our resume out of the stack of thousands if he can apply a face to a piece of paper. Simple right? This knowledge came in somewhat useful later that weekend when our group was being contacted by many different reporters from across British Columbia. Thanks to Jones’ advice we were able to talk to many professionals and get our name out there in some little way. I already have a few job shadowing opportunities lined up just because I remembered that simple word of advice. I believe that the conference was and will be one of the best experiences of my career.


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January 25, 2012

News Federal leadership candidate discusses the issues Brendan Kergin News Editor

Political parties don’t last long without leaders, and when you’ve had one as well known and well liked as Mr. Jack Layton, the job of finding a replacement can be daunting. Recently, one of the front runners, Mr. Thomas Mulcair, came by the Thompson Rivers University campus to sell students on his ideological wares and talk to the media. Currently representing Outremont, a riding in Montreal, for the federal NDP, Mulcair was a major part of the NDP and Layton’s push in Quebec as a deputy leader of the party. Now running for leadership, Mulcair is not trying to replace Layton, but carry on the legacy. While he does have support in the west, most of it is in the east. While in Kamloops he answered a few questions for the media.

On education: “I come from a family of 10 children. I would have never been able to do my studies at a university like McGill if it wasn’t for the fact that I came from a province which invests heavily in postsecondary education. “Tuitions in Quebec are on average one-half of what they are in the rest

of Canada. That gives people an even chance. “The only thing that should decide whether you get through university is whether or not you can do your studies. But more and more young people in Canada are looking at the average debt of $30,000 for even an undergraduate degree and simply deciding its not worth it. “The only way to increase wealth in a society is to increase knowledge. “So we have to once again have the federal government engage on post-secondary education and I would add on research. “We’re really becoming laggards within the OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) and it’s inexcusable. “We’re one of the richest countries in the world. To be indebting the students that much when we’re also leaving them great deficits year after year and we’re leaving them an environmental debt that they’re going to have to pay off for years to come is totally unacceptable and we’ve got to reverse course on that. “So as the leader of the NDP and eventual prime minister of Canada one of my top priorities would be to invest massively in post-secondary education in agreement with the provinces.”

On the next federal election and the leadership campaign: “I think that we’ve got to start chang-

International Days

ing our approach. In this campaign the most important question is who can defeat Stephen Harper. “I believe I am that person. I have been elected six times in a row. Three times provincially, including several years as a minister in Quebec, now I’ve been elected three times federally for the NDP in Quebec. “We have to hold on to what we’ve obtained in the province of Quebec and build on that.

On the abolition of the Senate: “The abolition the Senate purely and simply has to take into account the fact that the province of Quebec considers that a profound constitutional change and you can’t start the process of profound constitutional change without opening up to a bunch of other things. “The offers we have on the table right now for Quebec I think are very positive, don’t require another round a la Meech a la Charlottetown. “Yes, I do consider this Canadian Senate to be a vestigial organ of no use in this day and age...but at the same time you have to realize that if you’re putting that patient back on the operating table, you don’t get to decide that you’re only going to fix the ingrown toenail, the whole thing is going to be open. “Before reopening the whole constitution I believe we have a lot of other priorities.”

PHOTO BY DEVAN C. TASA NDP leadership candidate Thomas Mulcair stopped by TRU on a campaign tour and spoke about some of the issues that will arise in the upcoming election.

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New This Year International Days 2012 has a fresh new focus, here are just a few of the events that we’ve added for you to enjoy. This year we have invited six international guest scholars and two keynote speakers who address various topics ranging from environmental sustainability, to Canadian, American and Australian graphic narratives and the tourism industry to today’s contemporary youth. Other events to watch out for this year include: • TRU TV

• ISAP meets the WolfPack

• Global Village — A TRU Mobility Event

• International Education Leaders Panel

• Global Grind — Snowboarding Event

• International Flag Parade + Showase

Kamloops

View the program guide online for more information.

facebook.com/international.days.2012

www.tru.ca/internationaldays

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For more information contact: Krista Bergmann, Events Coordinator 250.852.6449 or email: internationaldays@tru.ca

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7

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 17

News Student elections held when student voters not present at TRU 2.2 per cent of students elected student representatives for everyone Omega Contributor While TRU students were writing exams and enjoying their holidays, elections were held to choose student representatives for TRU’s board of governors and senate. The elections were held online between Dec. 8 and Dec. 22. The last regular day of classes for students was Dec. 2. According to TRU Acting Registrar Marion Hannaford, the election was to be held from Nov. 22 to Dec 5, but a problem was found at the end of the original nomination period. “What happened at the end of nominations was we discovered there was a problem with the voters’ list,” Hannaford said. “This was the first time we had actually put Open Learning and campus [students] together. “We thought to be fair we

should get it right and restart nominations.” According to the election procedures, there must be a three-week nomination period, a period of four weeks between nominations and voting, and then a two-week voting period. The restarting on nominations placed the voting period in December. According to Hannaford, there was no way to move the election to January. “What had to be taken into account was the times set out in the election procedures,” Hannaford said. “We could not deviate from that.” Hannaford says that for most elections, there aren’t any major

Wednesday, Jan. 25

Thursday, Jan. 26 - Community Perspectives Exhibition Tour with TRU Professor Derek Cook. 7 p.m. Kamloops Art Gallery downtown. - Violin VS Vinyl live at Cactus Jacks. 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. $5 cover

Tuesday, Jan. 31 - DODGEBALL! South Sahali Elementary (Up across from 7-11 on Summit Dr.) Contact Garrett Horvath garrett.horvath@gmail.com for details

cember was a bad idea. “The middle of the year is actually a poor time to have an election to start with,” Lane said. “The elections, to improve student opportunities to participate, need to be held towards the end or the beginning of a year because it allows people to plan a year of participation.” The TRUSU’s preference would be to have the election in March at the same time as its —Nathan Lane own elections. “There [are] actually a lot of plac“That’s a bad time to have es where the board of governors people participate in an elec- and senate elections are contion,” said TRUSU Executive ducted with the student union election,” Lane said. Director Nathan Lane. “You’d vote in the same votLane said holding an election in late November and early De- ing process and the institution

“That’s a bad time to have people participate in an election. ”

Community Calendar - Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism Seminar Series “Snow Sport Injury Research: Why is it a tourism issue?” 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. OM 2221

problems and the election procedures usually ensure that the election is held in late November and early December. TRUSU said that it was not happy with this year’s election timing.

would recognize those representatives. “That’s something that we’d be open to but the institution would have obviously to make some changes to their process.” Voter turnout for the elections was approximately 2.2 per cent. 13,689 eligible voters cast 304 votes to elect one representative on the board and 414 votes to elect four representatives for the senate. The turnout for last year’s TRUSU election was 18 per cent. Elected to represent students on the board was Stephen Adrian Miller with 151 votes. Elected to the senate was Miller with 160 votes, Dylan Robinson with 67 votes, Jordan Del Giudice with 46 votes and Chris Albinati with 45 votes. Hannaford says that nominations for the second student position on the board of governors will open in late January or February.

COURTSIDE

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Know of upcoming events the student body should be aware of? Get them in the calendar for free! Contact: editorofomega@ gmail.com “Community calendar” in the subject line will help ensure they get to the campus community.

University of Saskatchewan Friday, January 27, 2012 • 6pm Tournament Capital Centre Pick up your Tickets at TRU Gym G303

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8

January 25, 2012

Life & Community Thrift shoppin’

Vintage technology, furniture that doesn’t suck, and clothes you can use for tourniquets

Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor Still not all caught up after holiday spending? Still thinking about ways to have a little fun on the cheap? Well, whatever you might think Kamloops is lacking in commercial shopping, it certainly doesn’t lack when it comes to thrift shopping. I like thrifting better than regular shopping, unless I’m in the market for underwear. There are some things I still just can’t get behind buying used. But there are also things you can’t buy new. Like a Betamax player. What in the hell would you want with a Betamax player, you might be asking yourself. Or perhaps even, what in the hell is a Betamax player? Well, a Betamax player was another version of a VCR, similar to a VHS player, but of better quality. What in the world would you want with analogue technology incompatible with anything you can buy in stores today? Well, the ability to say, “Yes, you can borrow Labyrinth, but I only have it on Betamax,” for one thing. It’s cold out, and if you’d like to stay home but still want to hang out with your friends, this is probably a good way to go about it. You can always offer to loan the machine out too, but the things usually weigh about 15 pounds. You can collect movies from the

‘80s and always have retro nights in the comfort of your own home. You could also have the same type of nights with Laserdiscs if you manage to find a Laserdisc player. Imagine the quality of VHS with the convenience of a record (right down to f lipping it over halfway through the movie), especially when you’ve got the original version of the DVD at your command. Both the Betamax and Laserdisc players average about 15 dollars when you can find them (try Penny Pinchers on the North Shore). When compared to the hundreds they used to cost, they’re totally worth it just for the novelty. Vintage technology aside, there are plenty of other reasons to hit up the thrift stores in town. As students you might feel a moral obligation to own furniture you can disassemble and reassemble with an allen key. Deep down inside however, you might be looking at this furniture and thinking to yourself, “What a piece of crap.” Sure, it’s reasonably inexpensive and everyone you know has the allen key you need in case you lose it, but imagine being able to buy furniture made of actual wood, or maybe just something that doesn’t look like - well, you know - that allen key stuff. It’s all out there for cheap in the thrift stores. You just have to want it. And then there are always the clothes.

Like I said before, I’m not likely to be buying my underwear at a used store any time soon, or socks for that matter, but sometimes there’s nothing better than finding clothes you like at a thrift store. It combines the excitement of finding something you want with the joy of not having to pay retail prices for it, which almost makes it disposable, when it comes right down to it. Imagine this - you’re waiting for the bus, and a car skips over

the curb, losing a hubcap in the process. The hubcap spins fast enough to decapitate the guy in the business suit, but his neck fat slows it down enough that it doesn’t kill the cute guy/girl it hits next. Without any time to spare, you need to make a tourniquet to patch him/her up, but the only things you’re wearing cost you a fortune, and you don’t know if you even really like this person yet. The next person rips off their thrift store shirt and patches up

the injured cutie, who manages to pull through the ordeal without much more than a scar that serves to remind them how the two of them met. They have a long and prolific sex life together. Do you know how close it was to being you? Imagine what you could be missing out on, had you only been able to depart with that shirt... For shame. Thrift shopping: Potentially good for your sex life.


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 17

Arts & Entertainment Ways NOT to stay afloat in a dying industry Movie Mart tries different angles...but fails to impress Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor When Blockbuster Video closed its Canadian stores last year, it provided an opportunity for mom and pop video stores to make a comeback. The struggles of being one of the little guys seemed to have been cut a break for the first time in years. While Movie Mart was wise to seize this time to expand their reach by opening up another store on the North Shore, they did do something else that struck me as being a bad idea. And it wasn’t their first one in recent history. I remember going to Movie Mart for the first time a few years ago, and I was impressed by the collection of VHS films they’d held on to, even though the demand for them had fallen substantially. They had a collection of films that were difficult to find anywhere else, partially because they simply hadn’t become available on DVD up to that time. It was the best place in town to look for a variety of titles. Okay, it still is. But they’ve started to lose some of the charm of why I liked the place to begin with. Movie Mart used to provide reading glasses in little tubes throughout the store, so that people could read the back of the boxes without difficulty. But they got rid of them. You’re probably thinking that this is the complaint of an old man who should bring his own damned glasses to the store, and if I had used them, you would be right. It wasn’t that I needed the glasses, though. It was that they had them. It was something different that helped them stand out from the rest of the stores. It was something that you would take note of, and mention to people later, like I’m doing now. They also used to have a member-based ratings system. I had never seen anything like it. When I walked into the store and saw that the community’s voice had been replaced with that of none other than Rotten Tomatoes rankings (which are available wherever one has Internet access), I was disappointed to say the least. They definitely don’t have the same level of intimacy as knowing the opinions you’re seeing might be those of the person next to you. The next change they made was replacing the shelving with a new system that displayed the front of the boxes instead of the profile. While it might be argued that it is easier to read the front of the box than the profile, you now have to shuffle through each row to see all of the titles. I liked browsing, not for specific titles in alphabetical order, but by simply looking at all of the titles in a row, and checking out the movie based on the title. It was easier to find things that way. The most recent change they’ve made, though, and the one that really bugs me the most, is the new format of their New Releases wall. They used to adhere to this system you may have heard of in the past. It’s called “Alphabetical Order.” What they did was simply place the movies in the

same order that they would be found in their placement by the alphabet. It is such an infallible system that the whole thing works the same in both of our official languages. Try it out. It’s amazing. What they have attempted to do is to divide the movies into sections, the same as they would be in the rest of the store, which isn’t necessarily a bad system, provided you know what you’re in the mood for while browsing. There is some interpretation involved, though. A movie that will later be filed under “Action” will be found under “What A Rush” on the New Releases wall. Not a difficult one to interpret, I know. Neither is “Out Of This World” (Sci-Fi) or “Crime Time” (you know, cop flicks). But what the hell is “Compelling Characters”? I find the decision to make this one of the sections maddening. What is a compelling character movie? Well, according to Movie Mart, it’s Black Swan. Okay. I would have called it a drama, but that’s fine. But it would appear that it’s a mishmash of many different types of movies, many of which are documentaries, which would also be fine if it wasn’t placed right beside the “Documentaries” section. I took a while to look at the movies available in this section, and I decided that a compelling characters documentary was a documentary film based on a single person of interest rather than a broader topic. I wouldn’t say I was satisfied with this, but I was at least comfortable with my own understanding of their filing system. Until I found not one, but two Leonard Cohen documentaries side by side in the regular documentary section. Leonard Cohen isn’t a compelling character? Okay. Well then, who is? John Lennon. Okay. I’ll give them that. But Lemmy? The drummer from Motorhead is a compelling character but Cohen isn’t? Wait, and Winnebego Man is too? Something is wrong here. The frustration I’ve felt going into Movie Mart lately is infuriating. Although I would like to support the independent store, I’m finding fewer and fewer reasons to go there. I’ve asked about the changes as politely as I can, in the hopes that I might be one of many voices that would get things changed back to the way they used to be (wow, now I do sound like an old man), but with every change that gets made, it seems like it’s getting further away from being the store I want to go to. But I’ll still go. Despite all the negative changes I’ve seen there, it’s still my local independent. The selection is good and the employees are some of the nicest I’ve been served by at a video store. I’ll admit that I subscribe to an online video service, but there’s just something so much nicer about spending a couple of bucks that help keep my downtown alive. No matter how good the quality I get online might be, pushing buttons isn’t as satisfying as walking those aisles, even if I do have to flip the damn boxes.

Puzzle of the Week #12 – Snowflakes Your backyard is covered in snow. There are abcdef snowflakes. 1. abcd is prime. 2. Three of the digit values are odd, and three are even. 3. One digit value is the product of a prime value and a prime value. 4. a ≥ b, c ≥ d, and e ≥ f. 5. All four single-digit primes occur as digit values. 6. b < c < e. 7. All of the digit values are different except for one pair. 8. a < d < f. So how many snowflakes are there? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

Study Ab r o a d i n f o s e s s i o n s This & other events MC00115642

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January 25, 2012

Coffee Break

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1. Shoreline protector 7. Flipper’s constellation? 13. Long Island ___ 15. Noble head topper 16. Piquant parade 18. Congratulations, of a sort 19. Money substitute 20. Bristle 21. Direction (var.) 23. Jackman or Grant 24. Japanese icebreaker 26. Military scouting 28. Author, White Feather 31. Back talk 32. “___ Ng” (They Might Be Giants song) 22. Heroin, slangily 25. Cathedral recess 27. Colon cleaner 29. ___ Europe 30. Man and Casino 33. Brightly colored seed cover 36. Tittle-tattles 37. Shed light on 38. ___ Review 39. TV series, 1991-95 40. Weapon storer 46. About 1% of the atmosphere 48. On fire 49. Certain angler 50. Green teas

52. It takes two to do it..... 54. “Snowy” bird 57. Novelist Jones 59. Legendary Tibetan 61. Video maker, for short 62. He played a robot on TV 63. Pronged spear

45. ___ Tower 47. Not just trim 51. Exec 53. “Your majesty” 55. Take orders 56. “Oh, my aching head!,” e.g. 58. Drenched 60. Wiehl of FOX News 61. Piquant parade 64. Changing of lean to elan, e.g. 65. Cyber user 66. Strain 67. Go-getters

Down 1. ___ Roo 2. Cooling-off period 3. Ulcer type 4. Certain computer file 5. Rash goddesses 6. Roost 7. DeLuise 8. Assayers’ stuff 9. Derby prize 10. Turkey part 11. Putting off 12. His “4” was retired 14. Myst character 15. Encodes 17. Haute couture 34. Italian monks 35. Sitting pols 36. Piquant parade 41. “___ di Stasio,” French film 42. Thickness measures 43. “Fantasy Island” prop 44. Short order, for short

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11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 17

Sports TRU hockey earns a split with Okanagan College Allison Gibbard Omega Contributor

Last weekend saw the Wolf Pack hockey team’s first two regularseason games since the break for the holidays, facing the Okanagan College Coyotes at Memorial Arena on Jan. 20 and again on Jan. 21 at Kelowna’s Memorial Arena. Even though TRU fought hard against the Coyotes the first game,

WolfPack head coach Don Schulz (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

they were unable to pull out a win and finished the game with a 4-3 loss, ending their five-game winning streak. The ‘Pack then rebounded with a 4-3 win the next night. This semester, TRU’s Wolf Pack welcomed six new players into its lineup. Jose Reyes, Taylor Stuart, Cody Rose, Casey Patterson, Rylee Orr and Kevin Hanna all decided to join TRU and will be playing with the ‘Pack for the rest of the season. During the first game the WolfPack had a great first period, with Andrew Fisher assisting David Gore as he scored the first goal. Curtis Tonello wasted no time scoring the second goal of the night. It was assisted by Rose and Reyes. Okanagan College returned the pressure and came back with Mike Houston scoring their first goal of the game. Houston was assisted by James Neitsch and Brendan Redshchlag. This was the last goal of the first period leaving the Wolf Pack with a 2-1 lead over the Coyotes. TRU started off strong in the second period and Rose scored his first goal for the ‘Pack. The assist

went to Casey Patterson. Okanagan College’s Layne Stopanski scored the Coyote’s second goal of the evening, ending the period with TRU still leading 3-2.

WolfPack forward Jassi Sangha (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

In the last period the Wolf Pack weren’t able to hold onto their lead. Layne Stopanski scored his second and third goals giving the Coyotes a 4-3 lead.

In the last minute of the game TRU pulled their goalie but weren’t able to score and ended the game two goals short of a win. The ‘Pack traveled to Kelowna Jan. 21 to face the Coyotes once again and this time TRU was able to beat them 4-3. Wolf Pack head coach Don Schulz said Saturday’s game saw a, “much more consistent effort from all the players throughout the game.” TRU had another strong start to the game, scoring three goals in the first period. Andrew Fisher started the trend off, assisted by David Gore and Jassi Sangha. Casey Patterson followed, scoring TRU’s second goal of the period assisted by Rose and Dylan Becker. Sangha got his first goal of the game assisted by Gore and Becker. Okanagan College fought back and Brendan Urban scored their first goal of the evening. The period ended with TRU having a 3-1 lead over Okanagan College. No goals were scored in the second period due to “Shane Mainprize[‘s] solid game in net,” according to coach Shulz. In the third period TRU’s Cody

WolfPack goaltender Shane Mainprize (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

Lockwood scored their final goal of the game assisted by Rose and Casey Patterson. Okanagan worked hard and scored two more goals to make it a close game of 4-3 for TRU. This win raises TRU’s record to 8-4-2. The Wolf Pack’s next game on home ice will be Jan. 27 against Eastern Washington University at Memorial Arena starting at 8:30 p.m.

Two huge wins for women’s volleyball team over Brandon Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

The Wolf Pack played its best games of the season last weekend, beating the Brandon Bobcats twice and improving to 6-10 to put the pressure on Calgary and Brandon for the final playoff spot. TRU sits two games back of seventh-place Brandon and this critical matchup between these rivals couldn’t have gone better for the ‘Pack. Coming into the weekend, TRU had only won one of its last eight and Brandon was winner of six straight. The first game on Jan. 20 ended faster than it took the teams to warm up, as the Wolf Pack laid the beat down on the Bob-

cats in three straight sets, 25-13, 25-19 and 25-15. Fifth-year outside hitter Kelly Asleson led the charge with 12 kills in 17 chances, three block assists and two service aces. “In her fifth year, that’s what we expect from Kelly, that’s what she has to bring and she’s bringing it,” Wolf Pack head coach Keith Lundgren said. Brandon couldn’t focus and never got any rhythm going in the short game. Libero Shanlee McLennan had a tough time with the Wolf Pack servers; TRU middle Katarina Osadchuk also had two serving aces. The Bobcats’ defence had problems trying to block the outside, thanks to setter Kara Twomey’s composed distribu-

tion to her strikers. She finished with 35 assists and four digs. Friday night’s game was as perfect as it can get. The following night, it was nearly the same result with the ‘Pack winning in four sets, 2517, 31-29, 16-25 and 25-20. The Bobcats came out sluggish in the first set and finally got some chemistry in an extended second set that went to 31-29. The ‘Pack held on, thanks to two key plays by rookie outside hitter Brianne Rauch, who finished with nine kills on 22 attempts. The Wolf Pack rookies were one of the most important factors in the two wins. Outside hitter Anne Weiss had a monster

weekend, finishing with 15 kills on 34 attempts and four serving aces in the second game. “We struggled in the third set but we picked it up again with team work and it was fun out there on the court,” Weiss said. “This is so big when you think of the playoffs and we wanted to get back on the winning track and we did it.” Coach Lundgren had a big smile on his face following the game and praised Weiss’ performance. “Anne really stepped up. In her first year for her to be in that situation and be successful, we’re very proud of her,” he said.

When asked if he thought his team believes they can make the post-season, he didn’t hold back. “You’d have to ask them that question, I’m a believer in them,” Lundgren said. The team takes on the 0-14 Saskatchewan Huskies this weekend at the TCC and finishes the season on the road facing the 3-11 UBCO Heat. Calgary, who has played fewer games than TRU and Brandon, sits in sixth and the Bobcats sit in seventh with an 8-8 record. With bottom-feeder teams on the menu for the ‘Pack, and needing to get into the seventh and final playoff spot, it’s time for the girls to feast on the weaker opponents.

WolfPack Prowl Basketball The basketball teams are on the road until the end of the season, but you can watch them online. Hit the CanadaWest.tv link on the right side of the athletics department website

Volleyball Women’s

Friday Jan. 27 6 p.m. @ TCC vs Saskatchewan

Men’s

Friday Jan. 27 7:45 p.m. @ TCC vs Saskatchewan

Hockey Friday Jan. 27 8:30 p.m. Memorial Arena vs Eastern Washington PHOTO BY CORY HOPE Katarina Osadchuk attacks the net during the ‘Pack’s back-to-back winning weekend.


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January 25, 2012

TRUSU Membership Advisory ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 1.0) 1.1) 1.2) 1.3) 1.4) 1.5) 1.6) 1.7)

Call to Order Approval of the Agenda Presentation of the Annual Report Special Resolutions (available at trusu.ca) Presenation of the 2011-12 Budget Presentation of the 2010-11 Audited Financial Statements Appointment of the Auditor Adjournment

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

Students who take a co-op work term are almost 5x more likely to get a job immediately after graduation

T • INCREASE ED B E D UC T N A E

FE N O I UIT T E

T U O ALL

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JAN. 25, 12PM, TRUSU Boardroom

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National Day of Action Come out and show your support for an affordable system of Post-Secondary Education! To get involved, drop by the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building or send an email to info@trusu.ca

This Week: • TRUSU Annual General Meeting • Awakening the Dreamer by the TRUSU Socialists Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

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January 28, 2012  

The January 28, 2012 edition of the Omega

January 28, 2012  

The January 28, 2012 edition of the Omega

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