Issuu on Google+

VOLUME 22 ISSUE 17

JANUARY 30, 2013

T

H

E

Ω

Justin Trudeau talks leadership

6

Eating healthier when time is short 9

Who is playoff bound? Omega predictions 14

And the votes are in...

M

E

G

A

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


2

January 30, 2013

Feature In memoriam: Grace Hall

Celebrating the life of a student who, despite a still-undiagnosed medical condition, just wanted to go to school Jess Buick

to her on-going struggle with health problems. “We started noticing signs of She rolled around campus weakness when she was in grade in a green wheelchair with an six,” her mother said. “She was on unwavering and infectious smile crutches by grade nine and in grade on her face — brave, independent, ten was in a wheelchair and used beautiful. Her name was Grace that mainly to get around.” Grace had a mountain to climb Hall. She began attending TRU in September 2010, three years after during the years between high she had graduated high school in school graduation and her eventual 2007 and was proud to be a member arrival at TRU. She was constantly fighting a battle with her own body, of the fine arts program. The opportunity to experience but she gladly tackled that summit, four years of university education never complaining or feeling sorry is something many students often for herself — just constantly trying take for granted. The early morning to conquer her ferocious uphill classes, the endless hours of studying battle, as if she could see the peak in the library and the chaotic new but it was always just slightly out lifestyle that is never found in public of her grasp. She worked so hard to schools, these are things most don’t reach the top and in September 2010 appreciate. We don’t often take a all the hard work paid off and she step back and appreciate how lucky was able to come to Kamloops. Her and privileged we are to be here. father, Trafford Hall, also took a job For Grace, attending TRU was her in Vernon, B.C. so he could be close proudest moment — and she was to his daughter and watch over her if she ever needed help. only here for six weeks. “We finally felt that she was “She really had everyone’s attention because she responded stable enough to be on her own,” her to every single question that the mother said. “It was really important teacher asked with pretty unique and to her to go to school. She wanted inspirational answers,” said Sissi her independence.” Grace grew up in the small Chen, one of Grace’s first friends at the school. The two met in Grace’s town of Kitimat, B.C. and had a 2D art foundations class. “I just close relationship with her parents couldn’t help paying attention to her. Trafford and Heather, her younger I wondered where she came up with brother River and her two older these strange but absolutely smart sisters Etta and Annie. “She was the glue that held our ideas about art.” Grace always had the most family together,” her mother said. She felt trapped there after high wonderful and quirky sense of humour. She was an observer of school, however, as she watched as people and had a passion for drawing many of her friends got to leave and cartoons based on the smallest start new lives and post-secondary attention to detail that most would education. Those years after high school not notice. “We really felt she was going weren’t all negative, though, as she somewhere with her art,” her mother continued her education from home — doing a course in graphic design Heather Gordon-Hall said. According to friends and family, — and passing down her talents by Grace both loved her art and was teaching young children cartooning very talented. Not only did she at Riverlodge, a recreation centre in draw hilarious cartoons, she also Kitimat. Despite her many medical made short videos and even a longer mockumentary poking fun at her old complications, her mother said it high school and how “accessible” it never occurred to her that she would was to those who were handicapped. someday not be around. “It never dawned on me that I The reason for Grace’s long awaited arrival at university was due would lose her.” On Oct. 12, 2010, following a severe migraine, Grace fell into a coma and was admitted to the intensive care unit at Royal Inland Hospital, six weeks after she had started her school year — the school year she had fought so hard to finally get to. “She had this bizarre genetic mutation, it’s like her chemistry was breaking down,” her mother said. After about two months, Grace woke See more of Grace’s work on page 8. up and started —IMAGES SUPPLIED BY HEATHER GORDON-HALL rehabilitation, but

Ω Contributor

Grace Hall, TRU fine arts student, had a unique degenerative disease due to “a genetic defect that controls many genes,” according to her doctor.

began having seizures because of brain damage. “Her MRI showed lots of brain damage,” said Dr. Gabriela Horvath, Grace’s long-time doctor. Just like that she was pushed off the mountaintop and had to start fighting upwards all over again. “In December I was finally allowed to see Grace,” Chen remembered. “During her time in the hospital, every time she saw me she felt she was still connected to the school, she was still part of the school life.” Dr. Horvath, remembers when she first met Grace. “The reason for me to start seeing her when she was 15 was because she had a low level of serotonin in her spinal fluid,” Dr. Horvath said. “Her disease is unique. Nobody has ever described it in the medical literature, it involves a genetic defect that controls many genes — how they get expressed and function in the body.” After a long struggle with rehabilitation, Grace was finally released from Royal Inland Hospital and returned to Kitimat in March 2011. “She was so upset she lost her school year,” her mother said. “We were always so optimistic that she would return after she recovered.” But it was not to be. Grace returned home where her mother and sister Annie — with the help of some home-care nurses — took care of her, but only ten days later, she was admitted back into the hospital in Kitimat and another ten days after that she was flown to Vancouver General.

—PHOTO SUPPLIED BY HEATHER GOR DON-HALL

“If I was half the person Grace was I’d be really happy with myself,” her brother said. Grace’s funeral took place Feb. 4, 2012. The church was more than full; hundreds of people came and stood amongst a crowd to pay their respects to this intelligent, gorgeous girl. Chen was there. She came to Kitimat from Kamloops and dressed her friend for the funeral, a task most couldn’t do. “I wasn’t sure if I could control my emotion when I saw Grace. I wasn’t sure if I could take on this responsibility and do a good job.” Chen said. “But the moment I saw Grace, I calmed down. Grace was lying there; she looked so beautiful as always. It was like she was sleeping and she could wake up at any second and say my name again.” It’s been almost a year since Grace’s —Heather Gordon-Hall, passing; a whole year that the rest of us have Grace Hall’s mother been lucky enough to enjoy on the campus of TRU. Maybe when about, but there she was sitting in her we have complaints about late nights or wheelchair, with the same smile on her homework, we should think better of it. “The minute you think of giving up, face she wore around campus when she think of the reason why you hold on so first arrived. Grace was back in the hospital in long to get here.” This was Grace and Chen’s favourite December, and on Jan. 31, 2012 she passed away in Kitimat General Hospital motto. Grace battled for so long and still surrounded by her family. “I had a dream about her after she died had the attitude of never giving up. She and she was sitting and smiling and she affected the lives of those around her in had a small piece of paper in her hands. an impossibly positive way. She made Unfortunately I woke up before she gave people feel more confident, special it to me,” Dr. Horvath said. “It was like and loved. All Grace ever wanted was to she could’ve told me what was wrong go to school — a gift we are all so with her.” Grace fought so hard for the bulk fortunate to have. I try to remember of her life. She fought to be better; she that every time I start complaining fought for independence, fought for a full about an early-morning class or a life that most of us don’t have to work for. pop quiz I wasn’t ready for. I remember Grace Hall. She was courageous. After being stabilized, Grace was admitted into G.F. Strong, a rehabilitation centre in Vancouver. She spent a few months there, but in September 2011, her mother and father were informed that she would be discharged because she was no longer in the process of recovery. At this point she had lost her use of speech and was getting weaker in her limbs. “She was frustrated, I could see it,” her brother said. “But she was still happy and we could tell what she wanted by her other expressions.” Grace had her last birthday on Oct. 24, 2011. She was so happy blowing out her candles. She had so much to be angry

“She was the glue that held our family together.”

ON THE COVER: Record numbers turned out for the 2013 TRUSU AGM held Jan. 24 in the TRUSU Boardroom. See page 4 for details on what happened. — PHOTO BY KEVIN SKREPNEK


3

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

January 30, 2013

Volume 22, Issue 17

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Mike Davies

Editorial/Opinions Chock full o’ love

editor@truomega.ca

250-828-5069

@PaperguyDavies NEWS EDITOR

Devan C. Tasa

news@truomega.ca @DCTasa ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Brendan Kergin

arts@truomega.ca @roguetowel SPORTS EDITOR

Adam Williams

sports@truomega.ca @AdamWilliams87 ROVING EDITOR

Courtney Dickson

Editor’s Note

COPY/WEB EDITOR

Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief

roving@truomega.ca @dicksoncourtney

Taylor Rocca

copy@truomega.ca @manovrboard

omegacontributors Jess Buick, Cavelle Layes, Kevin Skrepnek, Wayne Cardinal, Sean Brady, Karla Karcioglu, Jessica Duncan, Mark Hendricks, Travis Persaud

publishingboard

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * VACANT INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

Welcome one and all to the first (of a few) expanded edition of the 2012-13 school year! I say first of a few because we have some plans for you over the next couple of months. I don’t want to give away too much, but let’s just say that International Days and the Kamloops Film Festival are both coming up and we’ve been working on more than a few long-term investigations that you’ll want to check out in the next couple of months. But that’s for later. Let’s talk about the first bolstered-up edition that you have in your hands. As you’ll see on the page opposite, we have a touching story of a TRU student whose life was cut short by a degenerative ge-

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Follow us on Twitter: @TRU_Omega “Like” us on Facebook. Do it. Seriously.

something’s stirring in a significant way. “Three out of four sexually active people will contract human papilloma virus (HPV) in their lifetime, according to Health Link B.C.,” and Courtney Dickson has the goods on where and how some of you can get a free immunization for this virus — a virus that happens to be linked to cervical cancer, by the way (page 7). Valentine’s Day is but a few weeks away and we all know what that means, right? For some, like Rebecca MacLean and fellow organizers, it means a time to examine and battle violence against women (page 7). Vagina Monologues performances will be taking place starting on Valentine’s Day with proceeds going to local organizations focused on ending violence against women. Guys, this ain’t just for the ladies. Karla Karcioglu talked to some folks who are encouraging healthy eating—even for those of us who don’t think we have enough hours in a day to cook decent meals (page 9). National best-selling authors stopped by the North Kamloops Library last week to help spread the word that this is, in fact, possible. As always, the arts and entertainment section (pages 9 to 10) are full of reviews of music and films. This week we have a teas-

er about the upcoming International Days festival, now going on its 20th year. Over a million books are coming off the shelves of libraries at the University of Saskatchewan, McGill University is trying to avoid having to give out information that they are legally required to when asked and there’s some kind of North Korean professor exchange happening at UBC. These are a few of the goodies in this week’s paper from the Canadian University Press wire (page 12). Adam Williams kind of went nuts this week, attending the jersey retirement of a Kamloops icon, analyzing the men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball teams’ playoff chances, as well as providing all the weekend sports coverage that we are used to (pages 13 to 14). Oh…and I got my Sudoku puzzles from somewhere else this week, because rumour had it that even the “easy” ones were a bit tough. You still have to fight through the crossword, though — I see a lot of those lying around barely started (whether it’s because they’re hard or people just don’t have the time, I don’t know). Anyway, that’s what you can look forward to this week. I hope you like it, because we put a lot of extra love into it for you. editor@truomega.ca

body or your ego), but if you want it bad enough, no one can stop you from achieving your ultimate dream. I came out of my last degree planning on falling into the grit and grind of the assembly-line workforce that many other students get shuff led into once they receive their bachelor degree. Now, I don’t mean a literal assembly line, rather a metaphorical one where a job is just that -- a job and nothing more. No incentive. No reward. No challenge. Nothing but monotonous and boring work that has little to no impact on the world around us. Don’t get me wrong. For those who are satisfied falling into that line of work, I am not here to judge you. I respect you for your decision and understand that sometimes, these decisions are not within our control. Life can certainly throw curveballs that force people to change their strategy and approach to the game. With that being said, I finally stood up for my own dreams and said, “To hell with this. I’m going chasing and I will do what it takes to make this happen.” That decision brought me to TRU and eventually sent me on to my dream internship in Toronto, Ont. this past summer. It has allowed me to continue freelancing for a magazine I grew up reading as a child, only ever fantasizing about one day seeing my own name on a byline within its pages. It might not seem like much, but for me, it is just step one in a long line of stones that I am ready to start making my way across.

I often hear this sort of sentiment from people I run into and it has really started to bother me. “Well, it’s too late for me to take a shot at that. I gave up that dream a long time ago.” Let me tell you... YOU ARE WRONG. I truly believe it is never too late to start towards anything. I went through five years of postsecondary before finally realizing what I truly wanted to do. I almost told myself after those five years that I should just suck it up and stick to what I started with. Had I done that, I would be a miserable human being. Don’t let time bog you down or discourage you. Western society has this tendency to pressure citizens into this constant rush, like as if time will run out on us any instant. The reality of it is that time will always continue on. As long as that is a truth, then it is never too late to reach for that ultimate goal. So to all of you out there already striving for your best, working towards what you enjoy and loving every minute of it -- I say congratulations. Try to take a moment out of your day to inspire someone else to do the same in their life. To those of you who for whatever reason are hesitant or scared to take that leap -- I say jump. Look off into the distance, pick out that dream and hop off the paved pathway society has set out for you. Blazing your own new trail might be dark and frightening at times, but you will rise to the occasion. Before you know it you’ll be strolling along wondering to yourself, “Why didn’t I take this route earlier?” copy@truomega.ca

Trailblazers

copyright

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 0C8 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editor@truomega.ca Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

netic disorder at this time last year. It should make you think about how lucky you are to have the opportunity to be attending a post-secondary school — before you continue on into these pages telling you what’s been going on at your post-secondary school. The TRUSU annual general meeting (AGM) happened last week and for the first time in a long time, there was something on the agenda that people cared enough about to show up and vote for (page 4). A couple of new positions were created, some policies were changed, the budget was released — but best of all the campus community showed up and declared they actually do care about some things. Well done. Liberal leadership hopeful and national fresh face on the political scene (despite his pedigree) Justin Trudeau stopped in to address a packed Grand Hall (page 6). The Liberal Party of Canada has been taking some hits to their numbers over the past decade or so and Trudeau hopes to rally people back to the party. Another Idle No More gathering brought music, drums and peaceful opposition to what they view as political oppression and overreach on Jan. 25 in the Campus Commons (page 6). It seems this movement isn’t going away, and no matter how you feel about it, you need to acknowledge that

theomega.ca

THE

TRUe Thoughts Taylor Rocca Ω Copy/Web Editor In a society full of expectations and standardized norms, it has become increasingly easy, sometimes encouraged, for young adults to give up their dreams in exchange for a safe, sound and stable lifestyle. Whether it is the run-of-the-mill job that pays the bills or nestling into your career after finishing up your university education to find it isn’t at all what you expected, I would venture to say that the percentage of people who enjoy their careers is severely out-weighed by the percentage of those who don’t particularly enjoy their respective lines of work. I understand that being responsible and taking care of your bottom line is an important thing when transitioning into adulthood. But can’t we chase our dreams while keeping that bottom line in mind? I am here to tell you it is possible. It might take some hard work, a little bit of spit-shine and you might suffer the odd cut or bruise along the way (be those to your


4

January 30, 2013

News Well-attended AGM approves new LGBTQ position Devan C. Tasa

dent representative because it creates a voice on campus,” said faculty representative of graduate students The most well attended TRUSU Kathleen Hutfluss as she introduced annual general meeting in at least the motion. “We need to provide that seven years saw students over- voice and perspective on our camwhelmingly support the creation of a pus and on our council.” Pride club leader Matthew new LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, queer and question- Griffiths also urged students to vote in favour. ing) representative. “I believe that by passing this resThere were large lines as students registered at the Jan. 24 meeting, lo- olution, that this will have a positive effect for not only cated on the second LGBT students but floor of the Indefor every student,” pendent Centre. he said. Study tables loThat change cated along the side passed unanimouswere moved to crely. Once it was seate more seating cured, a large rush room and the meetof approximately ing itself started 23 30 students left the minutes late. meeting. In the end, 136 McIntyre said students attended, the creation of the more than tripling new positions was last year’s attenthe most important dance of 39 stuthing to happen at dents. the meeting. “It went extreme“As the univerly well,” president sity has grown, it’s Dustin McIntyre been increasingly said the next day. —Dustin McIntyre, important that we “Turnout was create advocacy great.” TRUSU president representatives for Most of the atother segments, tention in the meetother people on ing was directed towards a bylaw change that created campus and this was the logical next the new LGBTQ representative and step as far as the council’s growth,” a graduate representative that would he said. The new LGBTQ and graduate be responsible for a new graduate equity collectives led by the new equity collective. In order to pass, two-thirds of representatives were officially created at the council meeting on those present had to vote in favour. “I believe we need a LGBT stu- Jan. 29.

Ω News Editor

“...this was the logical next step as far as the council’s growth.”

The most well-attended students union annual general meeting in almost a decade saw the approval of an LGBTQ representative and graduate student representative and converting the four faculty representatives to directors at large.

—PHOTO BY KEVIN SK REPNEK

That wasn’t the only bylaw change to be approved at the meeting. The four faculty representatives were converted into directors at large. “Since the last time our bylaws were last amended, the university has really transformed considerably, making faculty-based representation kind of unwieldy,” vice president external Dylan Robinson said during his report. The nomination period for TRUSU elections was also increased from one to two weeks. Women’s

representative Alexandra Moulton told the audience she thought the change would make elections more accessible. Other changes passed included the removal of the requirement for elected members to produce written reports for each council meeting; adding a requirement that requires anybody running for women’s, international, Aboriginal, LGBTQ or graduate representative to be a member of those groups; and the standardization of each committee’s membership to have a chair,

TRUSU maintains “strong financial position” Devan C. Tasa and Courtney Dickson

 $300,000    

Ω News Editor and Roving Editor TRUSU’s annual audit, presented at the annual general meeting (AGM) Jan. 24, has confirmed the students union has remained on target, fiscally. “The students union continues to be in a strong financial position,” said Brent Ashby, the KPMG accountant who performed the audit. The audit, dated July 31, 2012, stated the students union made $2.96 million in revenue and spent $2.77 million in the 201112 fiscal year. For the 2012-13 budget, TRUSU projects it will raise $3.07 million and spend $3.03 million. One of the projected expenses for this fiscal year was $75,000 for the annual Kickstart event in September 2012. This included costs for the back to school barbecue and a live concert headlined by the Arkells. At the AGM, one student asked if there could be more local groups playing at the event. “To make sure Tunes Against Tuition works properly, you have to have a big name draw,” said Dustin McIntyre, TRUSU’s president, the next day. “I can put a recommendation for the next VP internal to look into local groups.” Overshadowed by the money budgeted for Kickstart is the $2,000 allocated to the students union’s food bank. McIntyre said that dollar figure doesn’t tell the whole story. “$2,000 for the food bank is not saying that’s all the mon-

one additional executive member, three members of council and two students from the community. Kiirstyn Goudie attended the meeting to support the new LGBTQ position. “It was a little long, but I really learned a lot,” she said after the meeting. “I enjoyed having a voice and being able to vote on things that affect students on campus.” Trad Bahabri, vice president external, also revealed the speaker at this year’s Common Voices Lecture: celebrated Canadian author Margaret Atwood.

GRAPHIC BY DEVAN C. TASA

$778,000  

 $250,000    

 $200,000    

 $150,000    

 $100,000    

 $50,000    

 $-­‐    

ey that goes towards the food bank,” he said. “We put in manhours going around the city and partner with other groups to fill the food bank. “We would never let the food bank go empty. Though it was reported it was empty last year,

there’s not a single student that came to the front desk and asked for a food package that didn’t get it.” One of the students union’s biggest expenses is paying for its staff. This year, $290,000 was budgeted. However, of the

five staff members working in the upstairs office, two have left over the last year. McIntyre said TRUSU plans to fill these positions this year. “They [the jobs] have not been posted yet. As far as I know, they will be posted this year.”

The other large expenditure the students union is responsible for is the U-Pass. It has budgeted $778,000, which is offset by the U-Pass fee TRUSU collects. The budget can be viewed on TRUSU’s website at http://trusu. ca/section/271.


5

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

News A voyage through time with oysters as guides Mark Hendricks Ω Contributor

to collapse due to the spread of an aquatic parasite. The government then began importing alien species of oyster that were resistant to the parasite and promoting scientific research to improve the ostréiculture industry. In the modern era, oysters are considered both a delicacy and an aphrodisiac, but the natural oyster native to French waters has been almost completely replaced with Japanese oysters. This history of state-funded scientific research into exploitation can be compared with the trends found in herring, f latfish and cod fisheries by analyzing maps showing fish cultivation at different periods of time. This is a dangerous and unsustainable trend according to Kinsey. “The more the state and scientists involve themselves in issues relating to improving exploitation,” Kinsey said, “the more unsustainable the fisheries become and the more threatened the species being exploited become.” The environmental science seminar series are open to everyone and will be taking place on Thursdays in room S203 in the science building. A full listing of dates along with abstracts of the presentations can be found by going to TRU’s website and searching “science seminar series.”

On Thursday, Jan. 24, guest lecturer Darin Kinsey spoke to a gathering of nearly 30 students, staff and interested listeners about the history of oyster cultivation – or ostréiculture – in France and the parallels that can be drawn to modern fisheries. As the presentation came to a close, a lively question and answer period ensued. After a while, the question that is on the mind of everyone concerned about the environment was asked: will we ever learn from our mistakes? “That’s a question I might want to ask you guys,” responded Kinsey in a joking tone that suggested it was a question he often asks himself. Kinsey’s lecture was the second seminar in the masters of environmental science program’s semester-long seminar series. His lecture, entitled Science on the half shell, discussed French ostréiculture and the politics of science in 19th-century France. It brought the listeners on a voyage through time with oysters as the guide. The history of the oyster in France is a history of exploitation, Kinsey told the audience. The French relationship with the oyster began in 120 BC, when the Gauls inhabited what would become France. Oysters were used as a source of purple dye prized by the Roman upper classes. Between 1400 AD to the French revolution, the demand for oysters rose. The government responded by funding scientific investment into better methods of exploiting oyster fisheries. By the time Napoleon rose to power, French scientists of the time named oysters as “the healthiest of foods.” After the Napo- Darin Kinsey speaks Jan. 24 as part of leonic era, natural the TRU science seminar series. oyster beds began — PHOTO BY MARK HENDRICKS

Puzzle of the Week Puzzle of the Week #13 – Truth and Lies

Tom, Dick, and Harry each made two consecutive statements. Truthtellers always tell the truth, Liars always lie, and Fencesitters alternate between telling the truth and lying. Tom stated, “Dick is a Liar.” and “Harry is not a Fencesitter.” Dick stated, “Harry is a Liar.” and “I am not a Liar.” Harry stated, “I am a Fencesitter.” and “Tom is a Fencesitter.” Determine the truth of each of the six statements. This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

International Intonation

A possible cure for AIDS, the Lance Armstrong/ Oprah admission, and bigger turbines coming Mark Hendricks Ω Contributor

Cure for AIDS?

Lance Armstrong comes clean about history of doping and performance-enhancing drugs

to talk show host Larry King in 2005. “I would never do that. No. No way.” A full transcript of the interview with Oprah Winfrey can be found on BBC’s website.

For the past 10 years Armstrong Australian scientist David Har- has battled allegations of steroid use. Where you can find out more: rich may have found a potential On Jan. 18, in an interview with talk show host Oprah Winfrey, Arm- www.bbc.co.uk/sport cure for the AIDS epidemic. Harrich’s breakthrough works strong admitted to a worldwide audiWind turbines to become bigger by preventing the process in ence he used performance-enhancwhich HIV transforms into ing drugs in all seven of his Tour de Offshore wind turbines are about to AIDS. By modifying a protein France victories. get a lot bigger as the world’s in the HIV virus that is largest wind turbine blades are responsible for self-replibeing produced for the U.K.cation, it is possible to renbased Energy Technologies Inder the HIV virus inert and stitute. prevent it from spreading to These new blades measure other cells. This process is up to 328 feet long, the length of called Nullbasic. two Olympic-sized swimming “With money running pools. The largest turbine blades out, I had my PhD student currently in use are 246 feet. try one more experiment “Offshore wind has the in late 2007. The experipotential to be a much larger ment was to test if Nullbacontributor to the U.K. energy sic could render HIV nonsystem if today’s costs could be infectious,” Harrich told significantly reduced,” said Paul the Australian Times. “The Trinick, offshore wind project student came back and said manager at ETI, in a press reit worked, so I told him to lease. do it again and again and The new blades are being again. It works every time.” manufactured out of carbon Nullbasic involves creat— IMAGE COURTESY CHRISTIAN FISCHER / fibre and will be assembled in ing an HIV-resistant culture WIKIMEDIA COMMONS multiple sections instead of one of stem cells through a spelarge piece. This has the dual cially designed HIV therapy advantages of the new blades and then introducing the Prior to this confession Armstrong being up to 40 per cent lighter than curstem cells into the body. Harrich believes that by pre- denied and was even outwardly hos- rent blades but also being cheaper for manufacturers to produce. venting the spread of HIV within tile towards allegations of doping. The project is currently in prototype “If you consider my situation: a the body it would be possible to prevent all symptoms of the dis- guy who comes back from argu- phase but could see commercial use by ably, you know, a death sentence, late 2014. ease. why would I then enter into a sport Where you can find out more: Where you can find out more: and dope myself up and risk my life again? That’s crazy,” Armstrong said news.discovery.com www.australiantimes.co.uk

Free fitness classes for TRU staff and students Karla Karcioglu Ω Contributor

Pina Russo, TRU Recreation coordinator, praises her instructors for going “above and beyond” not simply by providing fitness instruction but for educating students and staff on health and wellness as well. “They are interested in students’ and staffs’ well-being,” Russo said. “The instructors are approachable and knowledgeable.” TRU Recreation offers several different fitness classes including yoga, zumba, boot camp and low-impact fitness. Each of these classes is held in the TRU Gym. “Classes are at your own level,” Russo said. Instructors modify poses and exercises to fit individual needs. There are six instructors and 15 classes offered at lunch and in the evening. Stacey Rowat, first-year bachelor of science student feels the classes are the right level for her. “It won’t kill you,” Rowat said, “but it will make you work.” Clarisse Vogel, first-year respiratory therapy student, started attending TRU Recreation fitness classes because she wanted to make a change and try something new. She finds motivation from seeing people she knows in classes. “There’s a different feeling to TRU Recreation fitness,” Russo said. “It’s more social but you’re still getting a good workout.” Russo added how nice it is to see

Students take advantage of the free fitness classes offered by TRU Recreation.

—PHOTO BY K ARLA K ARCIOGLU

the in-class interaction between staff, faculty and students. According to Russo, there are five beneficial components to fitness -- cardiovascular health, flexibility, muscular endurance, muscular strength and body composition. Improvement of mental health and stress reduction are also benefits of fitness. Kathleen Wright, TRU Recreation fitness instructor, is seeing class sizes pick up towards the end of January. “The low-impact class seems to have the most interest,” said Wright, indicating that is on par with new year resolutions and beginner fitness. “It’s now standing room only.” “We’re seeing an average of 24 participants in the afternoon classes,” Russo said. “Evening classes have

been hitting 60, on average.” Russo is preparing to survey staff and student interest in morning recreational classes. As well, the department is looking into new paid classes. “A minimal fee would cover bringing in extra equipment,” Russo said. There is no fee for TRU staff and students who attend TRU Recreation fitness classes. TRU Recreation fitness is funded by the Comprehensive University Enhancement Fund (CUEF), which also funds other groups on campus for educational enrichments such as guest speakers, coop education and scholarships. Students paid $5.45 per credit into the CUEF Fund for the winter 2013 semester.


6

January 30, 2013

News

Trudeau talks education Sean Brady

Many of Trudeau’s remarks were loaded with caveats. While he stressed the federal governLiberal leadership hopeful ment needed to be more conJustin Trudeau wants the federal cerned about student debt loads, government to play a stronger he added: “But we also have to role in post-secondary educa- make sure we are not removing tion, but his platform is without money from a system that is already strained.” specifics. “A post-secTrudeau, the ondary educaapparent fronttion commitment runner in the – and perhaps Liberal leaderan act – needs ship contest, to happen,” he spoke to a group said during his of approximately speech. During 600 in the Camthe question and pus Activity Cenanswer period, tre’s Grand Hall he repeated the on Monday, Jan. federal govern21. ment needed to As the current play a larger role MP for the Papin post-secondineau, Que. elecary education, toral district, he but added, “as a was one of just Québec MP, I’m 34 Liberal MPs extremely sensielected in the tive to provincial 2011 federal elecareas of jurisdiction, down from tion.” 103 seats in 2008. He stressed Trudeau did that any changes not cite any spewould be done cific plans on imin co-operation proving post-secwith provincial ondary education —Justin Trudeau governments. in Canada, but he Trudeau spoke was still willing about matching demands for to express his concerns. “I’m not so worried right now or post-secondary education in the preoccupied with mechanisms,” job sector with post-secondary he said. “What I’m worried about accessibility, saying that if we is making sure we can all agree on know how many jobs require the goals, the values and the di- post-secondary education, at least as many Canadians should rection we need to go in.”

Ω Contributor

“A postsecondary education commitment - and perhaps an act - needs to happen.”

Liberal leadership hopeful Justin Trudeau addresses those in attendance at the Campus Activity Centres’s Grand Hall on Monday, Jan. 21. —PHOTO BY SEAN BR ADY

have access to it as well. Tr udeau’s plans for increasing access to education remain vague, but his targets include Aboriginal peoples and those with low income, saying that “If a $3,000 tuition and a $2,000 tuition is the difference between being able to go to school or not, that’s where our focus needs to be.” Another focus of his speech was youth involvement in poli-

tics. Using the halls of TRU as an example, Tr udeau pointed to hallway poster boards with ads for exchange programs, calls for activism, single-issue campus clubs and community initiatives. “So for me, if young people aren’t involved in politics nearly enough, that’s not the fault of young people, it’s the fault of politicians,” he said.

The 2011 federal election saw a 61.1 per cent voter turnout among those eligible to vote, but for those between the ages of 18 and 24, just 38.8 per cent voted, according to Elections Canada. Justin Trudeau’s father, Pierre Trudeau, also a Liberal, last led Canada as prime minister in 1979. The Liberal Party of Canada will host its next leadership debate in Winnipeg on Feb. 2.

Idle No More holds flash mob round dance at TRU Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

On a sunny Friday afternoon, approximately 100 people gathered in front of the Campus Activity Centre. They formed a circle as First Nations elders performed a smudging ceremony to help clear away negative ener-

gy. The people danced as songs and drums played. Jan. 25’s Idle No More event combined that with speeches expressing concern about C-45, an omnibus bill passed in December that contains changes to environmental laws. The speeches also discussed concerns about the treatment of First Nations

people in Canada. One of the changes in the bill saw the 130-year-old Navigable Waters Protection Act replaced by the Navigation Protection Act, which removed environmental protections from thousands of rivers and lakes. Supporters of Idle No More are concerned this change will pri-

The Idle No More movement made its way to TRU’s Campus Commons with a flash mob round dance Friday, Jan. 25.

—PHOTO BY WAY NE CARDINAL

oritize development at the cost of the environment. “The environmental concerns that come from C-45 and C-38 [another omnibus bill] are astronomical when it comes to looking at how we live our life,” said Lenora Starr, a speaker who organized the Kamloops Idle No More event on Dec. 21. “For us in particular, as First Nations people who are guaranteed a way of life, this bill jeopardizes our way of life. It’s for us to stand up, not only for our own people and our own generations but for all of humanity that’s impacted by this.” “We all drink water, we all eat food from the ground, we all breath the air that’s here and if all of that is sold, it will be another form of control that the government has over us,” said Jordan Robinson, a TRU student involved in organizing the event. “We should be controlling the government, not vice-versa.” While Idle No More supporters share a concern about C-45, TRU anthropology professor Lisa Cook told the audience the movement means different things to different people. “I encourage anybody with any questions to ask them, please,” she said. “Listen with your heart to the answers and then figure out where you stand and what this movement and this moment means to you, because this is a movement of individuals.” The TRU Idle No More event had its beginnings at the Dec. 21 event, where some young women

had the idea to organize an event at the university, Starr told the audience. She said she was proud of their work and its results. “They did it,” she said. “With very little direction they knew what they were doing.” It was important to have an event on campus, Robinson said. “[The event was held] to let people know that it’s not just an Indian thing, it’s not just a bunch of Natives that are mad, it’s everybody that should be a little pissed at what Stephen Harper is doing,” he said. “It affects all of us.” Leif Douglass, TRUSU arts, science and education representative, spoke to express the students union’s support of the movement. “I’m just happy and honoured to be here and see such great attendance,” he said. “It’s a great event to have on campus and to see students involved is always great.” Matt Griffiths, a TRU student, was one of the people attending the event. “I have friends that also wanted to attend and it’s a good movement that they are doing,” he said. “They are tackling environmental issues and Aboriginal issues as well and that needs to be a thing [in which] work gets done.” Robinson said he was pleased at how the event turned out. “I think it was a great success,” he said. “A lot of people showed up, the circle [was] huge. It was perfect.”


7

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

Life & Community

HPV vaccine available to some at no cost Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

Three out of four sexually active people will contract human papilloma virus (HPV) in their lifetime, according to Health Link B.C. HPV is the leading cause of cervical cancer, which will kill 40 British Columbian women this year. Women born in 1991, ‘92 and ‘93 are eligible for the free HPV

immunization provided by the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control until they run out of the vaccine, which was purchased in April 2012. Mike Huitema, pharmacist and owner of the Shoppers Drug Mart on Summit Drive, said there probably will not be an opportunity like this provided for women born in 1990 or earlier, due to benefitto-cost ratio. “As people are more sexually active, the rate of infection increases

and the vaccine is not effective if already infected,” he said. The vaccine is a preventative immunization, not a cure for those who have already contracted HPV. Dr. Hilary Yoshida works at the TRU Clinic and is a believer in the vaccine. “It ‘s very effective,” Yoshida said. “Canada is usually the last country to approve medication, so you know it’s safe. “Cervical cancer is a cancer that we do see in young people,” she added.

A client receives her immunization at Shopper’s Drug Mart on Summit Drive - one of the many locations that eligible B.C. residents can receive the free HPV vaccine. —PHOTO BY COURTNEY DICKSON

The two most common HPV the free vaccine can still get the vaccines are Cervarix and Gar- prescription. They just have to pay the sometimes-costly fee. dasil. Some health care insurance Cervarix is the vaccine that the B.C. government is provid- providers may cover some or all ing and it protects against the of the cost. TRUSU health and dental, protwo strains of the virus that vided by Green are most likely Shield, does not to cause cervical cover HPV vaccancer. cines. Gardasil preThe on-campus vents against four clinic at TRU strains of HPV, located in Old including genital Main is adminwarts. Gardasil istering the vacis safe and reccine to qualifyommended for ing students. males. L e e - G a ye According to Hicketts, medicervarix.ca, the cal office assisvaccine should tant at the TRU be administered clinic, said apin three doses, proximately 50 with the second students have vaccination comtaken advantage ing one to two of the free vacmonths after the cine at the clinic. first, while the Some of the third vaccination other pharmacies should be taken and clinics adapproximately five months after —Dr. Hilary Yoshida ministering the vaccine around the second. The Kamloops inwebsite emphaclude, but are not sizes that it is imlimited to, Shopportant to receive pers Drug Mart (all three locaall three doses. Patients are not guaranteed tions), Superstore, Wal-Mart and to receive all three vaccines for the Burris Clinic downtown. Those receiving the free Cerfree, as the government could run out of the vaccine at any varix vaccine do not have to pay time. However, for the vaccine an injection fee, but most pharto be effective, one must receive macies will charge an injection fee of $10 to $25 for those payall three on schedule. Those who do not qualify for ing for Gardasil or Cervarix.

“Canada is usually the last country to approve medications, so you know it’s safe.”

Kamloops group working to end violence against women Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

The Kamloops Dames Investing in Social Harmony (DISH) Society is hoping to raise awareness about domestic violence against women leading up to V-Day, a global movement for the same cause, on Feb. 14. Young women are particularly at risk of domestic violence, according to the Canadian Women’s Foundation. Women between the ages of 15 and 24 are killed almost three times more often than women of all ages as a result of domestic homicide and 66 per cent of female victims of sexual assault are under the age of 24. The Vagina Monologues performances will take place Feb. 14, 15 and 16 at the Kamloops Convention Centre, where they will raise money for Interior Community Services, Kamloops Family Tree and Immigrant Services, all of which are committed to ending violence against women. “Every dollar raised from ticket sales will go to one of the three beneficiaries,” said Rebecca MacLean, Chair of the Kamloops DISH Society. MacLean, a TRU alumnus, got involved with the Vagina Monologues in 2007. The Vagina Monologues was held at TRU from 2007 to 2009, but

erdeen Mall on Saturday, Jan. 26. They asked men (and women) to leave their handprints on a banner that read, “These Hands Don’t Hurt Women.” “The youngest board member at DISH is 19 years old, so her presence helps attract younger people,” Parisone said. Originally written in 1996 by Eve Ensler, the Vagina Monologues have become a safe venue for women to express themselves. V-Day was incorporated into the performances in 1998 to raise money and awareness surrounding the problem of violence against women. “A lot of people are afraid to come to the monologues because they think that they are filled with anger,” Parisone said, “but that’s not how we operate. “Sometimes the monologues are really funny. —Rebecca MacLean, Sometimes they get intense. Sometimes they can be really Chair, Kamloops DISH society sad,” Parisone said. On Feb. 14 at 11 a.m., the One Billion Rising movement will take place for the act as ushers for the evening and first time. Various radio stations are called “Bobs.” “Bob” symbol- will play The Spirit Indestructible izes a man who, as Teresa Pari- by Nelly Furtado and listeners are sone, a director at DISH described, encouraged to stop what they are “loves vaginas and would never doing and dance. “This says we’re done with viohurt women.” Young people are getting in- lence against women,” Parisone volved with V-Day and the Vagina said. “The real goal is to spread awareMonologues. Carver Stewart, Jon Ibsen, Gabrielle Putoto and Me- ness,” MacLean said. “We want to gan Graham, all four under age make this community part of some30, worked the DISH table at Ab- thing global.” was moved to the convention centre in 2010 in order for more people to attend and to attract a broader audience. “Everybody has women in their lives that they love,” MacLean said. “We realize that we have to be able to engage men if we want to continue.” Men are getting involved with the movement. They volunteer to

“We realize that we have to be able to engage men if we want to continue.”

Carver Stewart, Jon Ibsen, Gabrielle Putoto and Megan Graham sit with the “These Hands Don’t Hurt Women” banner at Aberdeen Mall Jan. 19. They are four of the many young people involved with V-Day. —PHOTO BY COURTNEY DICKSON

Follow us on Twitter: @PaperguyDavies, @manovrboard, @dicksoncourtney, @adamwilliams87, @roguetowel, @dctasa or @TRU_Omega


8

January 30, 2013

Life & Community Brides and vendors squeeze into CAC

NIGHT CROSSINGS CAN BE A PAIN

Cavelle Layes Ω Contributor

The Campus Activity Centre was transformed into a bride’s dream Sunday, Jan. 27, as vendors showcasing their cakes, dresses, jewelry, photography and more lined the hallways for the annual Kamloops Bridal Fair. There was barely any elbow room as brides squeezed in, trying to find the perfect photographer to capture their special day, a unique venue in which to host it and an upbeat DJ to entertain it. Karly Harrison, a former TRU student and manager of Get Polished, had attended the event in the past both as a bridesmaid and as the bride. This year, however, she was excited to be able to attend the event as a vendor. Get Polished has only been open for a year but has already become popular in the area. “We were invited to attend a total of three bridal fairs this year and this is the only one we signed up for,” Harrison said. For her, it was an easy choice. Harrison explains that the TRU bridal fair is where most brides tend to go, they have a good mixture of vendors and the atmosphere is perfect. “If we are going to be in any bridal show this is the one we are going to,” she said. Stephanie Viventi, a second-year human services student, couldn’t agree more, stating how impressed she was with the friendliness of everyone at the event. She had attended the event last year with a friend, but returned this year as a bride. “I found it to be much more organized this year,” said Viventi, explaining how there was more flow and space. The event took up three floors of the

Vehicles take longer to stop under slippery winter conditions. Wear light coloured or reflective clothing at night. Speed limit 30 KMH on campus. A message from TRU Facilities Services

Are you missing out?

Wedding fare (including entire table settings) was on display Jan. 27 in the Campus Activity Centre. —PHOTO BY CAVELLE LAYES

Campus Activity Centre and featured vendors from Kamloops, Sun Peaks and even a few from Alberta. Some took a traditional approach to their affair while others took a more cre-

ative swing by presenting a Super Marioinspired wedding cake or purple fondue. The day winded down with the annual fashion showcase featuring dresses from many local dress shops.

Study Abroad! Attend an information session to learn more on how you can Study Abroad!

Information Session Dates Monday, Jan. 28

2:30pm – 4:30pm

IB Panorama Room

Tuesday, Jan. 29

4:30pm – 6:30pm

IB Panorama Room

Wednesday, Jan. 30

9:30am – 11:30am

IB Panorama Room

Thursday, Jan. 31

1:30pm – 3:30pm

IB Panorama Room

Wednesday, Feb. 6

11:30am – 1:30pm

IB Panorama Room

Thursday, Feb. 7

9:30am – 11:30am

IB Panorama Room

Monday, Feb. 25

1:30pm – 3:30pm

IB 3037

Tuesday, Mar. 5

2:30pm – 4:30pm

IB 3037

Wednesday, Mar. 13

4:30pm – 6:30pm

IB 3037

Friday, Mar. 22

11:30am – 1:30pm

IB 3037

Thursday, Mar. 28

10:30am – 12:30pm

IB 3037

www.truworld.ca/exchange www.facebook.com/TRUstudyabroad

create yourown experience Grace Hall, who had a degenerative genetic defect and died one year ago, had an interesting view of the world and a talent for expressing it.

—IMAGES SUPPLIED BY HEATHER GORDON-HALL

MC117267

Did you know there is financial support available? Ask Us!


9

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

Life & Community Healthy eating for busy students

TRU Wellness teams with national best-selling authors to give dietary advice

Karla Karcioglu Ω Contributor

January is the month of resolutions and Chelsea Corsi, coordinator at TRU Wellness Centre, has focused this month’s issue of Bladder Chatter on common resolutions such as healthy eating, fitness and quitting smoking. TRU Wellness Centre recommends the S.M.A.R.T goal-setting system, which focuses on five important aspects of successful goal setting: specificity, measurability, attainability, realistically and timeliness. Corsi recognizes four major barriers for students trying to eat healthy -- time, budget, knowledge and access to convenient foods, such as pre-packaged foods. “We don’t spend as much time preparing foods,” said Corsi. “We’re getting very conveniencedriven.” The four major food staples Corsi thinks students should be eating are whole grains (to help stabilize blood sugar levels), fruits and vegetables (to get essential vitamins and nutrients), calcium (especially for women) and protein (especially for vegetarians and vegans). Corsi also advises students to avoid too much sodium, sugar, and caffeine, which are typically abundant in convenient, prepackaged foods. When trying to eat on a budget, Corsi emphasized that it is cheaper to prepare your own foods than it is to buy convenience foods when on the go. Meal preparation ahead of time is her number one suggestion for students.

“To eat healthy, you have to have a plan,” said Corsi. “It’s cheaper for you to bring carrots and celery to campus than it is to buy them from the campus cafes.” She also recommends checking prices and buying in bulk in order to save money. “Don’t be afraid to try new things,” said Corsi. Quinoa and tofu are both healthy alternatives you may enjoy. The number-one benefit for student eating healthy is brainpower. Corsi also stresses the importance of not missing breakfast, even if it’s just a small meal to kick-start your metabolism. Registered dietitian Laura Kalina and certified personal trainer Cheryl Christian, is are both native to Kamloops. They are also authors of the national best seller, Low G.I. Meals in Minutes. On Jan. 24 they presented Healthy Eating for Families to a crowd of 50 at the Kamloops North Shore Library. “Many people are on the carbohydrate rollercoaster,” Kalina said. “They eat foods that temporarily spike their blood sugar and then quickly cause it to crash, leaving them craving another instant fix.” Kalina and Christian promote “moderation, not deprivation.” “I don’t believe putting yourself on a diet is the right thing to do,” Christian said, adding that most people on diets gain the weight back within two years. “It takes about 90 [days] to change your eating patterns.” “It’s not about counting calories,” Kalina said. “It’s about eating wholesome foods.” Corsi is a believer in the low

glycemic index method and has been using Kalina and Christian’s book, herself. She believes it is a healthy way to eat and recommends it to anyone who wants to make a healthy change, especially university students who require stamina to make it through long school days. There are many resources for students who are unsure of how

to eat healthy. Corsi is available for one-on-one chats and can be reached via email at ccorsi@tru. ca. She also highly recommends Healthy Families BC’s website (www.healthyfamiliesbc.ca), or

calling 811 to talk to a registered nutritionist. The TRU Wellness Centre’s website (www.tru.ca/wellness) also offers links to nutritional information.

International Days

Do you like food?

February 4–8, 2013

inexpensive, really good food even

“I met new people who are helping me to discover what opportunities are out there and what I want to do with my career.” - Rolena TRU student 4

—PHOTO BY K ARLA K ARCIOGLU

Do you like

TRU Career Mentoring

th

Laura Kalima and Cheryl Christian present some less-common foods that are low on the glycemic index and easy to cook and prepare meals with at the North Kamloops Library.

more?

The Omega and CFBX are hosting a

year

steak/chicken/salmon

MC117423

dinner at Fox’n Hounds Pub on Feb. 24.

Tickets are only $10

Discover the Power of Networking

and all proceeds go

School of Business and Economics Networking 411 Event > Feb 12, 2013 Grand Hall

to supporting

Faculty of Science Networking 411 Event > Feb 13, 2013 Grand Hall

independent

Mimics “speed dating” format

on-campus media.

> Meet with 5–7 professionals over 90 minutes > Answer your career questions in quick group discussions > A wide variety of industry professionals will be present

Learn who is hired and why, and increase your career understanding

Contact Mike at

Check our website for attending industry professionals and other details

International Days 2013 has many new features and events! This year our keynote speaker is Colin Angus, adventurer, author and photographer, and we have six international guest scholars who address various topics ranging from the Global Financial Crisis, to Phoenix Tourism and Sexual Diversity and legal norms in Cuba. Other events to watch out for this year include: • • • • • •

Global Village - A TRU Mobility Event International Education Leaders Panel International Flag Parade + Showcase International Movie Matinees Field School Presentations Art Exhibit: “The Games People Play”

View the program guide online for more information.

editor@truomega.ca MC117359

for tickets. www.tru.ca/careermentoring

www.facebook.com/TRU.IDays www.twitter.com/TRUiDays Email: internationaldays@tru.ca

www.tru.ca/internationaldays

Check out this year’s schedule:


10

January 30, 2013

Arts & Entertainment

Hannah Georgas embraces electronic soundscape Justin Andrade

The Gateway (U of A) EDMONTON (CUP) — Collaboration is often at the heart of great music, and Hannah Georgas’s self-titled sophomore album is no exception. Bringing on Graham Walsh to produce her latest record, Georgas recently began exploring the world of electronic music on Hannah Georgas, an album swimming with deeply personal songs. Though the hauntingly intimate tracks retain her classic singer-songwriter style, they’re tinged with groovy synth beats and choral swells this time around, amplifying the emotion Georgas conveys through her vocals. Speaking over the phone from her home in Vancouver, Georgas admits she’s been fostering an interest in electronic music for some time now. “I’ve always been wanting to do that, and during the writing process I was diving into that realm,” she says. For Georgas, it became a natural course of action to pursue that changing interest and “make the songs go where I wanted them to go.” Bringing on Walsh as the album’s producer proved to be the right choice too, allowing Georgas to utilize his extensive knowledge of electronic music to realize her vision. “I knew [from] being a massive fan of his work that it would just be the right choice to go with him, because he’s the genius at making all of those elements

come to life,” Georgas explains. “If you just sit down in a room with him and let him play with his synths and all of his electronic stuff that he has, [you realize] he’s just a wizard. He’s a fantastic producer and added so much to this album and to making everything sound so sonically full and rich.” But even with Walsh’s help, Georgas still found it challenging to combine her more traditional singer-songwriter style with the electronic music she’d wanted to explore for so long. And beneath the synth beats, drum loops and wispy vocals that make up Hannah Georgas lay songs expressing her anxieties, vulnerabilities and relationship troubles. The confessional songs even go so far as to delve into the emotional turmoil she experienced following her father’s death, as expressed in the tender song “Ode to Mom.” “My dad passed away while I was making my last record, and shortly after that, it was just the song that ‘boom!’ kind of came out of that,” Georgas says about the track. “I think with my writing, I’m just trying to be honest with myself and just [trying] to get out of my head and not think about anything else but channelling honesty within myself. It’s not a conscious effort to get personal — it just happens. A lot of time it’s just a cathartic, therapeutic thing for me to get [to] whatever it is on my mind, and it can be pretty personal. I don’t want to say that’s all I do, but a lot of the stuff on this record is definitely personal.”

Canadian Music Corner Travis Persaud

Ω Resident Music Guy Increasingly, it’s unjust to classify the Hamilton, Ont. based Arkells as a small Canadian band. Over the past few years the group has played on damn near every university or college campus in Canada – several times. As of late, the quintet is touring with The Tragically Hip and made a stop in Kamloops on Jan. 20. To label Arkells as a small Canadian rock ‘n’ roll outfit just doesn’t seem to fit the bill; perhaps the next Hip might be more sufficient. To achieve such legendary status, Arkells still have lots of room to grow considering the Hip has more than10 full-length albums and 20-plus years of hustling on them. Arkells first effort, Jackson Square, starts out swinging with “Deadlines,”

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor D.O.A. may be the most important punk band in Canada. Before the bubble gum f lavoured dreck of Simple Plan, Avril Lavigne and the likes, all the real punk rockers jammed D.O.A. into their Walkman. The Vancouver-based group has been around since the late1970s and while there have been numerous line-up changes, the group has worked continuously with Joey Keithley at the centre except for a short period during

but balances out for a complete listening experience yielding a diversity of sounds falling under a recognizable unity. Exploring new sounds with the 2011 sophomore album, Michigan Left, the band added a generous heaping of catchy guitar hooks. While the sounds of both albums are branded with a signature Arkells stamp, Jackson Square leans more towards the steel-town rock ‘n’ roll you would expect to come out of an industrial hub like Hamilton. Arkells know how to treat fans right, exemplified by consistently energetic live performances and facilitating an on-stage wedding proposal to “Abigail,” the couple’s favourite song. If they roll through town again soon, cross your fingers, or better yet, tweet at them to request their dancing shoes-worthy cover of Hall and Oates “You Make My Dreams.” the early-1990s. The group has been so inf luential in Vancouver that the mayor decided to have a day in 2003 for D.O.A.’s 25th anniversary. Now D.O.A. may be saying farewell again, currently embarking on another final tour. This is partly due to Keithley’s interest in pursuing a position in politics instead of just talking about it. D.O.A. will be swinging through Kamloops at Bailey’s Pub on Feb. 15. For a sample of classic punk rock check out “I AM Canadian” from the 2002 release Win the Battle.

International Days celebrates 20 years of food, dance and music

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor TRU will be celebrating 20 years of International Days starting Feb. 4. The annual event brings together the many cultures students and faculty represent on campus. The dozens of interesting interconnected international events are the work of Krista Bergmann, International Days event co-ordinator, and a committee from TRU World. “It’s our time to celebrate all the different cultures and countries and regions that are represented by students and faculty and staff,” Bergmann said. Event types are almost as varied as nationalities represented, with foreign films, a tea expo, field school presentations, guest scholars, concerts, an art gallery show and food aspects. There will even be a f lag parade. “This semester we have people representing over 72 different countries,” Bergmann said. “It’s really important for us to take this week to celebrate the diversity that we have on campus.” One of the bigger events will be the opening keynote speaker -- adventurer and filmmaker Colin Angus. Angus, from the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island, was the first person to circumnavigate the world using only human power. He’s also participated in a variety of other expeditions including a rafting trip on the Amazon

and catch a f lick,” Bergmann said. The TRU Art Gallery will be hosting a show related to International Days as well. “The art gallery exhibit is actually really neat this year. It’s an interactive display curated by our local artist Tricia Sellmer,” Bergmann said. “Her and eight or nine other local artists have put together this exhibit called ‘The Games People Play.’” The show will bring board games from around the world onto the campus. People will be able to come and see the games and actually get to play some of them. Another big event will be Delhi2Dublin’s show in the Culinary Arts Training Centre. The Vancouverbased group will be playing only its second show ever in Kamloops, coming up specifically for International Days, bringing a sound fusing traditional Celtic and Indian music with electronica. “It’s exciting to come back for sure,” Tarun Nayar said. Nayar, the group’s DJ and tabla (a traditional Indian drum), describes the music as global party music. “I think it’s very much a West Coast vibe,” he said. International Days isn’t just a chance for people to represent their cultural heritage; it’s a chance for TRU to connect with the community of Kamloops. Bergmann is hoping a larger offcampus marketing strategy will bring TRU’s neighbours onto the campus. “We’ve done a lot in expanding our marketing out to the Kamloops community more, as well as the TRU community because it is a week full of events that really are for everyone,” Bergmann said. “There’s a good variety of events.” International Days runs from Feb. 4 to 8 with events starting as early as 9 a.m. and ending as late as midnight (or when Heroes closes). It will end with the five-hour International Showcase in the TRU Gymnasium on Friday starting at 3 p.m. and Celebrating World Cultures (a 19+ event) starting in Heroes at Last year’s International Showcase featured many colourful 8:30 p.m. performances. —PHOTOS BY TAYLOR ROCCA River for source to sea. He will be speaking Monday, Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. in the Grand Hall in the Campus Activity Centre. The university’s tourism department has come on board to help host the event. “He’s going to speak to us about his anecdotes of these travels that he faced,” Bergmann said. “Different cultural experiences, the elements that he faced, stuff like that.” For the 20th anniversary a new aspect will be brought in with internationals films shown in the Alumni Theatre in the Clocktower Building. “That’s just a great opportunity to have a relaxing afternoon


11

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

Arts & Entertainment Film review: Play Again Jessica Duncan Ω Contributor

Play Again, the independent documentary from director Tonje Hessen Schei, explores the idea that the concept of “play” has adopted different meanings for modern day youth. This smalltime film has gained worldwide respect, winning 11 awards across the globe, including the Best of Fest at the 2010 Colorado Environmental Film Festival. In the spirit of Kamloops Literacy Week, the Kamloops Film Society screened the 2010 film. Play Again follows six American teenagers as they embark on a “screen-fast” followed by a wilderness retreat with no technology allowed. As any good documentary should, Play Again starts off with some shocking statistics; the average American teenager spends 90 per cent of their time inside and 7.5 hours in front of computers, cellphones and televisions daily. Six seemingly different teenagers from Portland, Ore. were chosen to partake in the making of the film. Individually they express the importance of technology in their lives. Most use their cellphones extensively as social tools and partake in social networking websites such as MySpace. The group includes a few who enjoy the video gaming aspect of technology. The belief that technology makes society closer was common throughout the group. The teens then partake in a “screen-fast,” which demonstrated how long each of them could last without using technology. Some felt lonely and only lasted a day, while others fought through over eight days of no screens.

Bio-pic Hitchcock gives audience an intimate view of the acclaimed filmmaker and director Isabela Sasaki

The Concordian (Concordia)

—IMAGE COURTESY GROU ND PRODUCTIONS

The wilderness aspect of Play Again proved to be intriguing. None of the teenagers had been on a camping trip before and found this new experience to be tiring at times, but also rewarding. With no technology in sight they were forced to learn about nature, themselves and the people around them. Play Again is a knowledgeable piece while also being aesthetically pleasing. Schei did her homework by including environ-

mentalist David Suzuki and Dr. Diane Levin, an early childhood specialist for more than 25 years. Anyone interested in the preservation of today’s environment and the children left to care for it will find this documentary helpful and informative. Norwegian director Schei has been active in the indie-documentary scene since the mid1990s and in 2006 she released her first documentary, Independent Intervention.

MONTREAL (CUP) — Complete with “Hitchcock blondes” and the famous Psycho shower scene, the biopic Hitchcock premiered Nov. 30 at Cineplex Odeon Forum, allowing moviegoers a glimpse at the life of the mastermind behind the 1960 cult classic. Directed by Sacha Gervasi, Hitchcock begins with an unrecognizable Anthony Hopkins as the master of suspense, and Helen Mirren as his wife and right hand, Alma Reville. The film takes the audience behind the scenes of the film Psycho, but also shows the inf luence Alma had on Hitchcock during that turbulent time. Based on the book by Stephen Rebello, Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho, the movie begins after Hitchcock receives some bad reviews about his film North by Northwest. Frustrated, Hitchcock feels that drastic change is required to convince the critics that he hasn’t lost his touch. When a newspaper publishes the story of murderer and body snatcher, Ed Gein, Hitchcock is inspired. Hitch, as he liked to be called, develops a small obsession with the bloody story and decides to turn it into a movie. However, Paramount decided they wouldn’t finance the movie so Hitchcock, as a headstrong artist, decided that he would make the movie regardless. He mortgaged his house and started production on Psycho. While the making of his greatest movie is one of the main points of the picture, his relationship with his wife is also in focus. It is portrayed in a way that is not dis-

tracting, but complements the film as a whole, unifying the biography of Hitchcock. Alma was Hitchcock’s friend and counselor and much more than just a wife. However, they had a sexless marriage and thus Hitchcock became obsessed with his consistently blonde leading ladies — since referred to as “Hitchcock blondes.” In the meantime, Alma spent her time with writer Whitfield Cook, which caused Hitchcock a great deal of jealousy. Despite their far-from-perfect marriage, their relationship is admirable because of the amount of support and companionship they continued to show each other in spite of infidelity. The remake of the classic shower scene with Janet Leigh was beautifully played by Scarlett Johansson. Considering that it is one of the most famous scenes in movie history, the expectations were high. Johansson’s acting throughout the film was not spectacular — never being quite believable, but that scene in particular was a piece of art. Hitchcock is easy on the eyes; Jeff Cronenweth’s cinematography is just right, using the perfect amount of suspense in each take, the right amount of light and camera velocity when approaching the subject. The photography was never boring or dull. The editing is also at its best; each scene f lows naturally to the other. The movie gives the audience a shallow yet elegant depiction of Hitchcock’s life as the infamous director of Psycho and as a husband who argues with his wife, has insecurities and snores at night.

Album review: Giulietta Masina at the Oscars Crying Jess Buick

Ω Contributor Former Blue Rodeo keyboardist Bob Wiseman is releasing a new solo album entitled Giulietta Masina at the Oscars Crying. Wiseman’s 12th album crosses many genres, from indie/folk rock to slow melodic piano ballads. This eclectic collection is fuelled with a wide array of sounds and introspective lyrics, which vary from subtle to in-your-face political meaning. “The Reform Party at Burning Man,” paints an image of members of the former Canadian federal political party attending the massive hippie festival in Las Vegas. Another track, “Aristide at the Press Conference,” refers to Haiti’s first democratically-elected president JeanBertrand Aristide, who was deposed and exiled in 2004 after many in Haiti came to regard him as a dictator. Most of the album sounds heavily influenced by Athens, Ga. based indie rockers Of Montreal. It also has a resemblance to Daniel Johnston’s folk style, but sounds much more sophisticated. Wiseman’s gift of writing music that perfectly compliments his lyrics is showcased by songs such as the title track. The harmonies and lyrics are haunting. It’s the first track and is very slow and harmonic, setting the tone for the album in a way one wouldn’t expect. The lyrics allude to the marriage between Masina and famous Italian director and scriptwriter Frederico Fell-

ini. The marriage lasted 50 years and ended in 1993 when Fellini died. The tone of the song portrays heartbreak perfectly and one can hear the wellexecuted melancholy mood. The first single off the album is “Neil Young at the Junos,” which starts with heavy keyboards and light tambourine with a very country feel. Essentially about Neil Young performing and receiving awards at the Junos, one may say it is an ode to Young. It’s littered with compliments to the Canadian performer but also has a hint of sarcasm to it.

—IMAGE COURTESY BOB WISEMAN

One track that jumps out at the listener immediately is “Robert Dzienkanski at the Vancouver Airport.” The lyrics start with “I was born in Poland, but I died in Canada, shocked five times by four men.” The song is an overt analysis of the RCMP handling of the infamous incident, which happened almost six years ago. Musically this album is a very soothing study companion, but also opens minds to some obscure and interesting popular and political culture that the audience may not have heard of, or haven’t read up on in a while.


12

January 30, 2013

The Wire Culling the best from Canadian campuses

McGill attempts to bar student journalists UBC optimistic about from access to information requests future of North Korean Matthew Guité The Concordian (Concordia) professor exchange

MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill University has filed a motion that would grant it the ability to deny access to information (ATI) requests from The McGill Daily, The Link, the website McGilliLeaked and anyone associated with them. This comes in response to what the university describes as a “complex system of repetitious and abusive requests” for information. According to the Canadian Access to Information Act, publically-funded, government-run institutions like universities are required to release certain documents to the public when officially requested. The McGill Daily reported on Jan. 19 that the university filed the motion to the Commission d’accès à l’information, the provincial body which oversees access to information requests, claiming that the ATI requests were set up “as a retaliation measure against McGill in the aftermath of the 2011-2012 student protests.” The motion, which names 14 respondents, seeks the authority to disregard current requests as well as any future requests made by the respondents or any person who can be linked to them, essentially barring the individuals named from ever submitting ATI requests to McGill. It also seeks the right to deny future requests on a variety of subjects, such as military research and mining investments. Future requests could also be denied if they were found to be “overly broad,” “frivolous” or if they target “trivial documents and information.” McGill’s motion claims that the respondents set up a “complex system” via repeated ATI requests, which the university describes as repetitious and abusive. It also argues that responding to the requests would represent “serious impediments to [the University’s] activities.”

Arno Rosenfeld The Ubyssey (UBC)

—IMAGE BY JEN NIFER KWAN/THE CONCORDIAN

McGill student Christopher Bangs, the founder of the website McGilliLeaked and one of the respondents involved in the case, told The Concordian that he was not only worried about the motion itself, but also the motivations behind it. “We’ve had a lot of complaints, not just from McGill students but from a lot of members of the McGill community, about how ATI requests are handled,” he said. “We’ve all had trouble with it, but the fact that they’re going to take this extreme step at this point makes us wonder about their commitment to ensuring both an open dialogue and access to information.” Bangs also contested the suggestion that the fourteen respondents were operating in collaboration while filing their requests. “There were 14 of us in this motion and the 14 of us did not co-ordinate our motions,” Bangs said. “We did not submit them together, we did not have some sort of secret plan to bring down the university through access to information requests, so the fact that they were all submitted at the same time does not give McGill university the right to deny not only those requests

but also all future requests we might make.” Julie Fortier, associate director for McGill’s media relations office, explained that the motion is based on current law which allows ATI recipients the right to not answer a request if it breaks certain rules, and that the ATIs in question fall into these categories. “There are provisions within the law on access to information that allow an organization to make the request to the commission to not reply to certain requests when these are abusive by their nature,” said Fortier. “When they’re systematic or repetitive, or when they could seriously disrupt normal activities, and we thought that this was the case.” Fortier also said that prior to this motion the ATIs in question were not rejected, and that future requests would be denied if they were considered to be of the same nature as those in the motion. The Concordian contacted Chris Mota for comment on the nature, depth and number of ATI requests that Concordia receives, but Mota said that the school could not comment on the matter.

VANCOUVER (CUP) — Following the departure of six North Korean professors from an exchange program at UBC this past December, Kyung-Ae Park, the professor in charge of the program, is optimistic another cohort will arrive in July. The professors from the secluded country first began arriving at UBC in 2011 as part of the Knowledge Partnership Program, North Korea’s only academic exchange program in North America. Similar exchange programs have existed between North Korea and Mexico, Australia and Switzerland. “I think [the program] has been quite successful and that’s why we’ve been able to continue the program for two years,” Park said in an interview. But even given such success, the future of the program is not set in stone. “There have been no roadblocks,” Park said, “but until it’s finalized, we do not know if it will continue or not.” Park said she hopes to know whether or not the program will continue by March. The program allows six North Korean professors to stay in student residences and take business and economics classes at the university. They also meet with business leaders in Vancouver and other Canadian cities to gain an understanding of the Canadian economy. Given the sensitivity of working with the North Korean government, Park is often reluctant

to speak with the media. Much information about the program, such as who funds it, is unavailable. The Knowledge Partnership Program grew out of UBC’s longtime involvement with North Korea. UBC has more Korean specialists than any other Canadian university, according to professor Paul Evans, former director of the Institute for Asian Research at UBC, who has been involved in the program. Some of those specialists were involved in “Track 2” talks between Canada and North Korea in the 1990s, attempting to establish diplomatic relations between the two countries. Some of the specialists who participated in those negotiations in the 1990s that didn’t already work for the university were later brought on board. One of those specialists was Joseph Caron, a former Canadian ambassador to North Korea who brief ly taught at the Liu Institute for Global Studies at UBC. Canada established diplomatic ties with North Korea in 2001, but severed them in 2010 following the North Korean bombing of a South Korean warship. The program has not entirely eluded controversy, with some questioning of whether UBC should be hosting professors from an authoritarian country like North Korea. But as Evans put it in an interview with The Ubyssey last April, “It has been part of the ethos of UBC for a generation that we can play a special role with North Korea.”

1.1 million books to be removed from University of Saskatchewan libraries Anna-Lilja Dawson The Sheaf (U of S)

SASKATOON (CUP) — More than one million hard-copy books are set to be removed from University of Saskatchewan libraries in the coming years. The move, which will wipe the shelves at four of the seven campus libraries, is the third phase in the library’s long-term plan to become efficient in the digital age. This third phase follows phases of renovations that included the major renewal of the Murray Library and the addition of the University Learning Centre and Learning Commons, which nearly doubled student learning areas and service spaces in the Murray Library. The removal of the 1.1 million books will begin with the Veterinary Medicine Library in September 2013, followed by the Engineering Library in 2014. Both the Law Library and the Education and Music Library will be gutted at an undetermined later date. The remaining books will create a three-branch collection in the main Murray Library, the

Leslie and Irene Dubé Health Sciences Library, which will open in the spring of 2013, and the soonto-be renamed Sciences Library, currently the Natural Sciences Library in the Geology Building. According to the official planning document, the number of books that students have been taking out has has dropped 42 per cent in the past decade. The university acquired 1.6 million books from 2008 and years previous, of those books, 1.1 million have been deemed suitable for disposal or storage. Books that are moved into the high-density storage facility will be available for students to read upon request in a provided location. Ken Ladd, associate dean of the U of S Library and co-author of the planning document, told the StarPhoenix that most universities are revamping their libraries with a shift towards a more digital book collection. The goal for most facilities, he said, is to decrease book space by at least 20 to 30 per cent. Despite the strategic move away

from the printed copy, Vicki Williamson, dean of the U of S Library, told the StarPhoenix that visits to the Murray Library skyrocketed since the renovations three years ago. This space will be used to create a classroom, a reading room, graduate student commons, additional space for special collections and archives as well as a digitization centre where resources can be made easily available beyond the U of S community . Ladd told On Campus News that the third and current phase of the plan will help define the university’s library by allotting new space for archives and special collections. “With the way electronic resources are going, libraries are becoming more similar to each other except for their archives and special collections. These, as well as service and facilities, are what makes libraries unique from each other.” The planning document describes the amount of books that will be removed as equivalent to 32 kilometres of bookshelves.

—IMAGE COURTESY CCAA NORTH LIBR ARY/FLICK R


13

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

Sports Feature “Some will say God is a Blazers fan”

Another legend of hockey has his jersey lifted to the rafters of Interior Savings Centre Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

Scott Niedermayer sits at a table at the head of the Kamloops Blazers board room, on his right sits Mark Recchi, on his left the Memorial Cup. His number 28 hangs around the room on vintage Blazers jerseys and plastered on pucks and t-shirts. Niedermayer looks slightly uncomfortable with the attention being bestowed upon him – the board room is bursting with local media – which is indicative of his personality. Niedermayer is the only player to ever win every major North American and international hockey championship and despite being a future Hall of Famer he is still just a humble guy from Cranbrook, B.C. He’s is in Kamloops to see his number 28 retired by the Blazers on Jan. 25, 2013. Niedermayer is the fifth Blazer all-time to be honoured with a number retirement, following in the footsteps of Greg Hawgood (4), Mark Recchi (8), Dean Evason (20), Greg Evtushevski (26) and Rob Brown (44). In his 156 regular season games with the Blazers, Niedermayer amassed 47 goals and 143 assists. He helped the franchise win its first Memorial Cup in 1992 and was named tournament MVP. “It’s very special,” Niedermayer said. “I guess in a way I owe a lot to the organization here. I mean I benefited as a hockey player, as a person coming here and learning about the game, learning about myself, moving away from home and all those things. So for the organization to honour me by retiring my number tonight is very special.” Niedermayer left home in 1989 at the age of 16 to play for the Blazers. At the time the team

was coached by Ken Hitchcock and they were just closing the door on Mark Recchi’s tenure in Kamloops. Luckily for the Blazers, as one iconic franchise cornerstone left another came along – Niedermayer had just begun playing for the Blazers when the team retired Recchi’s number 8.

“I remember every day skating in Memorial Arena looking up at those numbers,” Niedermayer said. “I’m sure there wasn’t a time that I was on the ice that went by where I didn’t look up and just recognize those guys whose names were up there and what it meant.” Recchi, now a part of the Blazers ownership group, spoke at length about Niedermayer’s

contribution to the Blazers in his time with the team. He described Niedermayer as a wonderful person off the ice, but his recollections of playing against Niedermayer in New Jersey were not quite as fond. “It drove me nuts because I could never actually hit him,” Recchi laughed. “He was always such a great skater and so smart. Obviously he’s a winner, he’s won everywhere he’s been and he’s just a wonderful person. Being around him he brings success and he knows what it takes to win and be part of a winning team.” Blazers owner Tom Gaglardi, WHL commissioner Ron Robison, former Ducks general manager Brian Burke, former Blazers general manager Rob Brown and Niedermayer’s brother, mother, wife and four kids were all in attendance for the ceremony and joined him on the ice. Ken Hitchcock and former teammate Darryl Sydor were not able to attend but congratulated Niedermayer on his honour during a video montage. Robison also presented Niedermayer with the WHL’s Alumni Achievement Award in the professional category as part of the ceremony. After leaving the Blazers Niedermayer wore 27 for the rest of his career – 28 already belonged to someone when he arrived in New Jersey and upon changing he never went back. The Devils retired number 27 in 2011. Though he already experienced a similar honour with the Devils, the significance of having his WHL number retired was not diminished. “It’s quite similar in a lot of ways and really has very special meaning for me just like it did in New Jersey,” Niedermayer said. “Like I said, when an organization thinks that highly of what you’ve tried to accomplish and the things you’ve done in your career, it’s pretty special.

Mark Recchi (left) and Niedermayer address the media surrounded by commemorative memorabilia and the trophy Niedermayer helped bring to the city for the first time in 1992.

—PHOTO BY ADAM WILLIAMS

The Niedermayer family gets a special spot on the ice at the Interior Savings Centre on Scott’s big night.

—PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

– on the strength of a solid first “It doesn’t happen a lot.” Niedermayer now spends major- period – beating the Prince Albert ity of his time in California and is Raiders 4-1. “It’s definitely pretty cool,” an assistant coach with the Anasaid Blazers alternate captain Coheim Ducks. He enjoys being able to remain lin Smith. “You look at a guy like involved in the game, but is glad that who’s so humble and what he’s he’s not involved in decisions like done over his career. I remember who’s on the power play. In his time watching him play during the Cup finals. For him away from the to come back, Ducks he is sold out crowd, also involved it was pretty in coaching cool to be a hockey for his part of it and kids. it’s definitely Since his an honour for retirement, him.” Nieder mayer Niedermayer has also bewill long be recome involved membered for in a number bringing Kamof environloops its first mental initiaMemorial Cup tives, includch a m pio n s h ip ing being the and as possibly Freshwater the best player Ambassador to ever suit up of the World for the BlazWildlife Fund ers, but as one - Canada. Do —Mark Recchi, would expect ing his part to he’s quick to help the enBlazers and NHL alumnus shine the light vironment is on those around important to him. He joked that living in a place him instead. “I was very fortunate to be a like California was ironic because though there’s a bear on the flag Blazer for three years. I learned a you could probably only ever see lot from the coaches we had here, from the teammates I had and realone in the zoo. Though Niedermayer doesn’t ly, I probably couldn’t have picked visit Kamloops very often, his im- a better place to play junior hockey pact is still reverberates through- as a young kid.” Former play-by-play man Kirk out the Blazers organization. As the team raised his banner he re- Fraser, who MCed Niedermayer’s ceived a standing ovation from the ceremony, was more effusive in sell-out crowd of 5,464. The Blaz- his praise. “Some will say God is a Blazers fan.” ers went out and won that game

“He was always such a great skater and so smart. Obviously, he’s a winner.”

Follow us on Twitter: @PaperguyDavies, @manovrboard, @dicksoncourtney, @adamwilliams87, @roguetowel, @dctasa or @TRU_Omega


14

January 30, 2013

Sports Who’s in the hunt? The Omega weighs in on the ‘Pack’s playoff chances Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

With just more than two weeks left in the Canada West regular season the playoff picture is taking shape. Which of TRU’s teams is headed for the post-season and who’s going home empty handed? Below is The Omega’s analysis of TRU’s playoff chances. Men’s Basketball Record: 6-11 Games remaining: 5 Canada West Pacific Division Standings: UBC - 28 points (1st) Victoria - 22 points (2nd) UFV - 18 points (3rd) TWU - 14 points (4th) ------TRU - 12 points (5th) Analysis: With back-to-back losses against the University of Victoria, the men’s basketball team is in tough in the Pacific Division of Canada West. They sit two points out of the fourth and final playoff spot, with just five games to go in the season. Unfortunately they have played one more game than most of the league, so their competition has a leg up. It’s very possible that TRU’s season will be decided this week, as they play Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 against Trinity Western University (TWU). TWU currently holds the final playoff spot in the Pacific Division, so for TRU to have a shot at the playoffs they’ll need to win one,

if not both games. The situation is further complicated by the fact that TWU has two games remaining against the 2-15 UBCO Heat. The basketball team is going to need some help from their opponents to see the playoffs this year. The Omega predicts they will have to win four of their five remaining games to guarantee a playoff spot. The Omega’s prediction: The men fall just short of the playoffs, splitting action against TWU, losing both games against the University of Fraser Valley (UFV) and winning their final game against UBCO. TWU will win both games against UBCO and put the playoffs out of reach. Women’s Basketball Record: 12-5 Games remaining: 5 Canada West Pacific Division Standings:

Ω Sports Editor

With a win Jan. 26 the WolfPack women’s basketball team are headed back to the playoffs – they may even be hosting. The WolfPack bounced back from a 71-67 loss on Jan. 25 with a 73-63 win over the University of Victoria. The win gave the WolfPack 24 points on the season and put them in a tie with UBC for second place in the Pacific Division. The top two teams in the division host the first round of Canada West playoffs and while UBC currently holds the tiebreaker over TRU, there’s still five games left in the season. “We’re still fighting for position, the math is not done yet,” said head coach Scott Reeves. “There’s still a big series between UBC and Vic. UBC owns the tiebreak on us, we

The Omega’s prediction: UBC wins five of their final six games putting them at 34 points. TRU wins four of five, beating Mount Royal twice, UFV once and finishing the season off with a win against UBCO. TRU will wrap up the season with 32 points and fall just short of playing at home in the first round. TRU will face either Calgary or Regina in the first round of the playoffs, as the visiting team.

UFV - 26 points (1st) UBC - 24 points (2nd) TRU - 24 points (3rd) Victoria - 22 points (4th) ------UNBC - 12 points (5th)

Men’s Volleyball

Analysis:

Alberta - 36 points (1st) TWU - 26 points (2nd) Manitoba - 24 points (3rd) Saskatchewan - 24 points (4th) UBC - 24 points (5th) Brandon - 20 points (6th) Winnipeg - 16 points (7th) ------Mount Royal - 14 points (8th) Calgary - 12 points (9th) TRU - 12 points (10th)

The women have booked a ticket to the playoffs, all that stands to be decided is whether they will host a first round matchup in Kamloops. Right now, UBC holds the tiebreaker over TRU, with games remaining against Victoria, Mount Royal and UNBC. TRU has a much tougher schedule, with

Women’s basketball working towards post-season Adam Williams

games against UFV, Mount Royal and UBCO remaining. TRU has already won two games against Mount Royal and destroyed UBCO 91-54 in their only game against them this season. The University of Fraser Valley is another story however, they’ve lost just three games this season, all of which came against top-four teams in the Prairie Division. Not only that, but all three losses came on the road after significant travel.

now – I think, mathematically – should own the tiebreak on Vic, but something could happen in the next week that could change that.” Jen Ju led the WolfPack on Jan. 26, with 21 points in 37 minutes of action. Ju, now in her final year with TRU, played a 94-foot game Saturday, making strong plays both offensively and defensively. “We had a game plan and a scouting report we needed to follow and down the stretch we knew they had some key players they were going to utilize against our defence so we keyed on those players,” Ju said. “Knowing what our jobs were helped a lot down the stretch.” The women will also be hosts to action on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, against a Trinity Western University team that is no longer in the running for a spot in the playoffs. Both games start at 6 p.m.

The ladies charge the hoop for a rebound in their Jan. 26 win over the University of Victoria Vikes.

—PHOTO BY ADAM WILLIAMS

Record: 6-12 Games remaining: 4 Canada West Standings:

Analysis: Back-to-back losses in Calgary has put the men’s basketball team’s chances of a playoff berth on life-support. Their final two games of the season come against Mount Royal and Winnipeg, two teams ahead of them in the standings, so they will have some semblance of control over their fate. Unfortunately, if their games against Calgary are any indication, the high-pressure situation might be a stumbling block for TRU. If TRU runs the table and wins their final four games it would almost certainly guarantee they would see the playoffs. Mount Royal has gone 3-3 since Christmas and Winnipeg has gone 2-4, so TRU’s main competition hasn’t been perfect either. Winnipeg still has two games to play against last place UBCO. Mount Royal and Calgary will both be facing off against top-five teams in the coming weeks. The Omega’s prediction: The men have lost five of six since the Christmas break, getting swept 3-0 in four of those games. Brandon and Winnipeg both have two games against UBCO remaining and can put the playoffs close to out of reach for TRU with victories in those games (Winnipeg and TRU would go to a tiebreak if TRU wins the remainder of their games and Winnipeg wins both games against UBCO). The Omega predicts it’s too little, too late for the ‘Pack, who will win two of four and finish

on the outside looking in of the playoffs. Women’s Volleyball Record: 0-18 Games remaining: 4 Canada West Standings UBC - 34 points (1st) TWU - 32 points (2nd) Alberta - 26 points (3rd) Mount Royal - 24 points (4th) UBCO - 22 points (5th) Calgary - 18 points (6th) Manitoba - 18 points (7th) ------TRU - 0 points (12th) Analysis: The women’s volleyball team is in the midst of a rebuild – seven of their 10 players are first-year students and are getting their first taste of university-level volleyball. The team should remain largely intact next season, with no senior players being lost to graduation and the Wolf Pack will reap the benefits of that. The Wolf Pack should also be welcoming back Brianne Rauch and Morgan Kolasa who have missed significant time this year with injuries. The women’s volleyball team will need to put this season behind them as quickly as possible; there is plenty to be learned from a season like this, but hanging on to those lessons for too long will impact them negatively. Recruitment and retention will be key for head coach Keith Lundgren and the Wolf Pack moving forward – rebuilding depends on it.

Playoff aspirations for men’s basketball suffer setback Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

With the end of the season closing in and a playoff spot on the line, the WolfPack men’s basketball team was looking for a pair of wins against the University of Victoria Vikes Jan. 25 and Jan. 26. Unfortunately they walked away with a pair of losses. The WolfPack extended their losing streak to four games, losing 8164 Jan. 25 and 80-65 Jan. 26. The timing couldn’t be worse for TRU, as they sit in fifth place in their division – two points short of a playoff spot. “Today we should hold our heads high, I thought we represented ourselves well,” said head coach Scott Clark, following Saturday’s loss. “They’re a good basketball team. We turned the ball over a bit little too much and made a couple of smaller errors that cost us here and there. “Our margin for error isn’t that great against a good basketball team like that, but nobody should hang their heads about our effort, or our toughness, or our resolve today.” The WolfPack played well in the first half of the game, leading for most of the first and second quarters, but relinquished the lead late into the second. Even still the game remained close, the ‘Pack only trailed 36-32, but as the game wore on University of Victoria showed why they are currently second place in the Pacific Division of Canada West. Victoria missed very few of

their field goals as time wore on the basketball program – he repreand the WolfPack walked away sents himself well, he’s an unbelievpointless from the majority of their ably likable guy.” The WolfPack will host Trinity drives. TRU now needs a near-perfect re- Western University this week and cord in the final five games of the will be looking to win back-to-back Canada West season should they games against the Spartans, who currently hold the fourth and final hope to make the playoffs. “You hope for better, but next playoff spot in the Pacific Division. weekend the games are very im- Games will be played on Jan. 31 and portant obviously,” Clark said. “We Feb. 1 at 8 p.m. know that, we’re at home. It’s our job to prepare to the very best of our abilities and then play to the very best of our abilities. Those are the things we have control of. It would be pointless to think of other stuff.” Fifth-year player Kevin Pribilsky led the team with 17 points in 33 minutes of action Saturday. Pribilsky, in his final year of eligibility, is from Victoria and undoubtedly wanted to win against his hometown squad. “He’s from Victoria, I think it means a little more,” Clark said. “He’s an unbelievable guy. He’s a The men dropped two straight over the great ambassador weekend hurting their playoff chances . for the university, —PHOTO BY ADAM WILLIAMS


15

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 17

WEBSUDOKU.COM

7 8 5 2

6 1 7

5 3

Across

4

2

5 1 3

3 4 1

2 3 9 6

2 9 4 WEBSUDOKU.COM

last issue’s answers easy

hard

8

4

6

2

3

5

7

1

9

8

2

6

9

5

7

1

4

3

7

9

5

8

1

6

3

2

4

9

4

3

8

2

1

6

5

7

3

2

1

7

4

9

5

5

8

7

5

1

4

3

6

9

2

8

4

6

8

5

9

2

1

3

7

3

9

5

7

1

4

8

6

2

9

1

3

6

7

4

2

8

5

2

6

7

5

8

9

4

3

1

5

7

2

3

8

1

4

9

6

4

1

8

2

6

3

5

7

9

1

3

9

4

5

8

6

7

2

6

8

2

1

7

5

3

9

4

6

8

4

1

2

7

9

5

3

1

3

9

6

4

2

7

8

5

2

5

7

9

6

3

8

4

1

5

7

4

3

9

8

2

1

6

1. Brewski 5. Orange juice factor 9. Bow 13. Certain surgeon’s “patient” 14. Celebes beast 15. Anoint 16. Romantic setting 17. Dock 18. Carpentry grooves 19. Come down hard 22. Cleaning cabinet supplies 23. Absorbed, as a cost 24. Yugoslavia, now 28. Plant fuel 32. 86 is a high one 33. Aspersion 35. Not just “a” 36. Pot of gold site? 40. Golf term 41. Quite a stretch (var.) 42. Seize forcibly (old word) 43. Indiana town 46. Finn’s friend 47. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 48. The Amish, e.g. 50. 1952 musical 58. Convex molding 59. Music genre 60. Annul 61. Locks up 62. Fashion

63. Auction cry 64. Bow 65. Increase, with “up” 66. “Trick” joint Down 1. Ado 2. “Major” animal 3. Kosher ___ 4. Caught in the act 5. Yellow fruit 6. Bind 7. Fertile soil 8. Legal prefix 9. Wreath for the head 10. Completely fix 11. Blockage 12. Pianist, Dame Myra 15. Build on 20. Precipice 21. Lagos currency 24. Hex 25. “It’s a Wonderful Life” role 26. Isuzu model 27. “You stink!” 28. Make, as a CD 29. Cornered 30. Treat rudely, in a way 31. Ratty place 33. Abandon 34. “Seinfeld” uncle 37. Claw

38. About to explode 39. “What’s ___?” 44. Pooh’s pal 45. Hodgepodges 46. Drag 48. Condescending one 49. Chopin piece 50. Hit 51. “Terrible” czar 52. Canceled 53. Doctrines 54. Dry biscuit 55. Soon, to a bard 56. Doing nothing 57. Central point

S O R B E T

A H A A P T

A G O U T I

C E L I A C

K E E L D E T A E T A R C H Y A H S E M S S I S H O M L O N E E R I L I N C T

M A R I A C H I

A N E N T

E T C T H I E S P E D

S T A G A N E L E W A R E

S E R B L O C T E C T A I T A T E E R R I E E R

A R M O R

N A A C P

G Y M K H A C A N U R A R E V S H E O T H O I K P U S P

L O O N B O A N R E I D L O R M O L U

W E E N E D

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

2 8 1

sudokuhard

crossword

2 9 7 4 4 8 5 3 6 5 6 2 8 7 1 9 7 6 3 2 2 3 4 2 7 4 3 5 6 9 7 5 9 6 1

“It’s Wet Out Here”

MYLES MELLOR AND SALLY YORK

sudokueasy

Coffee Break


16

January 30, 2013

TRUSU Membership Advisory Get your

FREE ISIC 8AM-10PM Monday-Friday at the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building A service for members of the Canadian Federations of Students

Feb 15th

7:00 PM Grand Hall

Margaret Atwood Free Admission Tickets available at the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building starting Feb 1st (Limit: 2/person)

TRUSU Women’s Collective Next Meeting: Thursday Jan 31st @ 5PM Students’ Union Building

for more information email women@trusu.ca

Post-Secondary Education Fact: International students at TRU pay a flat tuition fee of $7,900/semester regardless of how many classes they take. This Week: • TRUSU Human Resource Management Club Meeting • Jersey Party • International Days Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment


January 30, 2013