February 15, 2012

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VOLUME 21 ISSUE 20 FEBRUARY 15, 2012

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Canada closer to three-year degrees? 4

Arts funding explored

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Playoff bound WolfPack

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International Days 2012

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PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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February 15, 2012

News International Days a TRUly special week Taylor Rocca Roving Editor

With more than 1,600 international students from over 80 countries enrolled at TRU, International Days is a truly special week. Running from Feb. 6 to 10, it was a weeklong celebration of campus cultural diversity featuring more than 65 events. “It has basically grown every year,” said Krista Bergmann, event co-ordinator for International Days. “It is a celebration of all the countries and regions that are represented on campus.” With approximately 13,000 students studying at TRU, 12.3 per cent are international students. For comparisons sake, the University of Northern B.C. (UNBC) had a student body of 4,183 with 343 international students in 2009-10. The international student body represents 8.2 per cent of UNBC’s total student population. “The reason we do International Days is to highlight this international education campus that we have evolved into,” Bergmann said. “It’s something that TRU is very proud of and we want TRU students to really understand the depth of [that].” Planning for the event typically begins in October and goes on right through late January and the week leading up to the event. “Usually the beginning of

school year, September [and] October is when they do a call for participants,” Bergmann said. “If you want to be a performer, if you want to be in the fashion show, or if you want to do food then they [take applications] throughout [the school year] and up to the beginning of February.” With such a large international student body, Bergmann said that the event rarely ever scrambles to find performers and participants. “This year we had tons of people,” Bergmann said. “We don’t ever try to turn people away, we try to make everyone fit.” Apart from the performers and participants, International Days relies heavily on student volunteers to chip in and help out along the way. This year, Bergmann was working with 132 volunteers to make sure the week went by with as few speed bumps as possible. “Everyone has been amazing and everyone has done a fantastic job,” Bergmann said. “I had to turn people away. I had more volunteers than I ever imagined that we would have. It’s a great way to be involved.” Volunteers don’t just get the opportunity to be involved in one of TRU’s most well-known events, they can also be eligible for credit towards Global Competency according to Bergmann. Global Competency is a credential that can be earned in tandem

with any credit program. It recognizes the globally-minded knowledge, skills and attitudes that students earn through educational experiences. While guest scholars and keynote speakers are a significant part of the week, Bergmann said that International Days isn’t just about that. “It’s not all just classroom lectures. A lot of students have this impression that it’s boring; it’s just more lectures, more classroom stuff,” Bergmann said. “That is a big part of it because we’ve brought in guest scholars from around the world but there are also a lot of other things.” The International Tea Expo, Global Grind snowboard and ski demo, Global Kitchen Cooking Show and day-long International Showcase were just a few of the events that got students out of the classroom and immersed in a variety of cultural experiences and performances. International guest scholars included Mr. Ivan Zavadsky, Dr. Dean Chan, Dr. Lena Dominelli, Dr. Arend Hardorff, Dr. Yaniv Belhassen and Dr. Martin Brokenleg. The keynote speakers for International Days were Dr. Gwynne Dyer and Captain Charles Moore. 2012 marked the 19th year for International Days at TRU. Check out the Omega’s full coverage of International Days on pages eight to 10 this week.

That’s what you said For this week’s issue, we patrolled the grounds looking for your answers to this question:

What was your favourite part of International Days 2012?

Volunteers participate in the International Flag Parade, which signals the beginning of the closing celebration of TRU International Days 2012. —PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

Reader responds to city transit editorial Omega reader Matt wrote to us this week about the piece entitled “Kamloops to improve transit ‘service’” which ran in the Feb. 8 edition. Dear Editor,

Abid Hajee

Samantha Garvey

Mac Ecclestone

Right after the fashion show there was a girl from China who danced. There were a lot of people. It was really nice. They had the food stands. That was really sweet, too.

I joined the Friday celebration and enjoyed most of all the Taiwanese Snake Dance. It was amazing, and blew my mind.

The Global Grind was my favourite part. It brought everyone together outside and it was a great environment.

Business Administration

Journalism

Tourism Management

That’s right, we’re getting you involved whether you want to be or not! Well, not really, you have to be willing to talk to us to make it into the paper, but if you are, keep your eyes open for us and come chat!

I was sad to see the angle of last week’s editorial on transit service. As a regular user of transit, I have to say that the vast majority of my bus driver experiences have been good ones. Drivers are generally courteous and clearly make an effort to be as helpful and accommodating as possible. Of course some drivers are better than others, and even the best driver can slip up, but I think it’s a clear sign in their favour that you can regularly hear a ‘thank you’ before riders get off at their stop. If all drivers were always as bad as the one you described, I hardly think that sign of mutual respect would be as common as it is. By the way, did you know there’s a feedback page on the Transit website for incidents just like the one you described? I’ve used it myself, and it works. I had a complaint in January, and within two days I had a reply back apologizing for the incident and notifying me that the driver in question had been talked to. Surely that’s a more productive way of dealing with problem drivers than undermining public support for the entire system based on what may have been a single driver just having a really bad day. Isn’t transit having a hard enough time getting support from a pennypinching city council as it is? The service expansion on offer this year finally addresses some of the most longstanding complaints about transit service in Kamloops, finally making Sunday ser-

vice usable and further strengthening several highly-used routes... but only if the councillors hear a loud voice of support for doing it. $2 million is a lot of money after all, but it could be an investment that pays huge economic, social and environmental dividends in turn. If anyone reading this has ever complained about the useless Sunday service in particular, PLEASE send a quick email to legislate@kamloops.ca letting them know that this is something we really want! Matt, I have personally used the feedback section of the website numerous times and the best response I’ve ever received was an obvious form letter about how “my feedback is important to them and will be taken into account,” or some such nonsense. As far as the improved service is concerned, I tried to make it clear that I am in favour of the increase, and I will, in fact, send an email telling council this. My point was merely to point out that people deserve a certain level of respect when using the service, and I think that level needs to be elevated. Your point is well taken that “some drivers are better than others,” but I have to disagree with your assertion that it’s “the vast majority” that are good. The good ones are REALLY good, but the bad (or indifferent) ones I would say outnumber the good ones by a fair margin. Thanks for your feedback. I genuinely appreciate everyone who takes the time to respond intelligently to our publication, and hope this clears up my point.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

February 15, 2012

Volume 21, Issue 20

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

Editorial

Point your fingers at those responsible, not at concepts

Stock phobia will hurt you in Bad parenting is killing children with inherited ignorance the end

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Roving Editor

Taylor Rocca Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Devan C. Tasa, Amy Berard, Michael Potestio, Mihir Vaidya, Lee Richardson, Jeremy Hannaford, Marvin Beatty, Sarah MacMillan, Karlene Skretting, Ryley Unrau, Dustin Pollack, Felicia Nicholson, Simon Yackulic, Matt Hirji, Tom Ingram, Ali Hackett

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

copyright

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: (250)372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

If you followed us on twitter you could have won Blazers tickets last week! @TRU_Omega

Editor’s Note Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief It always saddens me to hear that a young person has taken his or her own life. But for some reason it always makes me less sad than angry. I decided to explore why that is — why sorrow isn’t the primary emotion I feel when I hear that another child has taken their own life, and anger fills me instead. I think maybe it’s because when I hear that a child couldn’t take any more taunting, harassment, physical or emotional attacks or other form of abuse, the blame is always misplaced. We blame a concept. “Bullying” is to blame for this, we say. But for some reason we don’t go back further and explore why the bullying is happening in the first place. Instead we shake our fists in the air and cry, “stop the bullying!” and mourn the loss of another child. The bullying is happening because people are raising shitty children. And these shitty children are killing their peers with hate and ignorance that they

receive directly from (or at the very least are not dissuaded from by) their parents. We cry “stop the bullying!” and point our fingers at the kids. What we should be crying is “stop raising shitty people!” and pointing our fingers at those children’s role models and teachers. And I’m not talking about the teachers in the school system that people rely on to raise their children because they can’t be bothered. And I’m not talking about the teachers we supply our children with when we prop them up in front of the television, or plug them in to a video game that we then look at and complain about because it’s teaching our kids violence — or whatever we’re blaming technology for nowadays. And I’m not talking about these so-called “role models” that we put on pedestals for a while and then complain about when they don’t live up to our expectations for them, like athletes and spoiled-ass celebrities. I’m talking about the people that are supposed to be children’s teachers and role models. The people who brought them into the world and are supposed to be responsible for them. I think next time I hear of a child who killed themselves because they couldn’t take living in a world that would treat them so badly, I’ll make a concerted effort to feel sad instead of angry. But if I’m successful it will be because I’ve managed to feel sorry for the children who were treating the deceased with such disregard that they killed them inside long before their death.

I’ll feel sorry for them because it’s not their fault that they’re shitty people, really. It’s because no one held their parents accountable for sucking at their most important job in life. Heck, maybe it’s because no one held their parents’ parents responsible for being shitty people. Who knows how far back the ignorance began? I don’t like being angry. Maybe disappointed in humanity will feel better. Somehow I don’t think I’ll manage it, but I think I’ll give it a try.

gram offers mentorship and support for new immigrants to the community. Students can volunteer to mentor a newcomer and are connected with someone from another culture.

Immigrant Services office. This will provide you with valuable experience at a Canadian organization and a letter of reference to prove it for when you are ready to pursue employment here. Finally, the office hosts several workshops and information sessions throughout the year discussing topics like immigration and social norms in Canada. It’s easy to add your name to the mailing list so you are invited to these free events throughout the year. To learn more, you can stop by Kamloops Immigrant Services at 109 Victoria St. downtown to sign up for these opportunities. On Wednesday, Mar 21. you are invited to celebrate your culture and bring awareness to ending racial discrimination by joining in a march down Victoria Street. The march begins at 3 p.m. at the library and includes ethnic food sampling displays by local restaurants. A strong community is one that engages individuals from all cultures, especially in Canada. Through sharing our traditions with one another on campus as we did last week, we build a stronger international network that strengthens Kamloops. Amy Berard is a TRU business student and the campus liaison for United Way. To get connected with the community, email her at youth@unitedwaytnc.ca.

editorofomega@gmail.com Here’s the lead of a story from the Vancouver Sun this past week: “A youth who videotaped a teenager’s sexual assault at a Pitt Meadows rave was sentenced to 12 months’ probation in Port Coquitlam Provincial Court Friday.” Yes. You can videotape a gang rape at a party and your punishment is “you can’t do anything bad for a year, okay?” Oh, but that’s not all! He also has to write a 1,500 word essay on reputation and integrity, which concludes with an apology to the victim. What do his parents have to do as punishment for raising a child who not only stands by while a girl gets gang raped, but also videotapes it and shares it with people? I guess they have to try to make sure he doesn’t do anything within that year that he could get punished for. I can’t even imagine how you rear someone to think that it’s okay to do this. I’m listening to anyone who thinks they have an answer, though.

International Days not the only way to interact multiculturally Last week, International Days highlighted the diverse community we have created on our campus. The week-long celebrations hosted by TRU World showcased our incredible variety of nations that both domestic and international students can appreciate while studying here. TRU World does a great job of offering a wide range of services to international students. Domestic students can also become involved through programs like the International Student Activity Program (ISAP) connecting international and domestic students with different events. The opportunity for both groups to interact continues off campus at Kamloops Immigrant Services downtown. This non-profit organization helps immigrants, new refugees and visible minorities adjust to life in Canada. Some of its programs and activities are open to TRU students and are a great way to explore options off campus. Language Groups occur several times a week as conversational meetings to practice speaking English and French. All students are welcome to attend and while international students may want the chance to practice, domestic students can attend to help the group learn. The Community Connections pro-

Know Your Community Amy Berard

This is an opportunity for both international and domestic students to act as mentors and activities can range from helping someone practice his or her English to hanging out at a hockey game. If you are an international student who needs some work experience in Canada, you have the opportunity to volunteer your time at the Kamloops

Mihir Vaidya

The Mike (St. Michaels) TORONTO (CUP) — Most college students are baff led by stock investments. The indices of numbers and puzzling technical jargon associated with stock analyses are enough to turn away most young adults. Yet, even for the sizable group of financially savvy 20 to 30 year olds, the stock market doesn’t always appear lucrative. The destabilizing effect of the Great Recession on many of our parents’ portfolio values has scared many of us into not trusting markets anymore. As Chris Taylor documents for Reuters, young adults have begun a retreat towards minimal but constant return bank products such as savings accounts. Unfortunately, this leads to alarming consequences for our retirement savings. The scale of the distaste for stocks was highlighted in a recent study conducted by Bostonbased money managers MFS Investment Management. While the poll discovered that 29 per cent of all respondents expect to remain perennially uncomfortable with stock investments, the number for investors under age 31 is markedly higher at 52 per cent. William Finnegan, MFS’s senior managing director states, “Younger folks are essentially saying that the market is a very scary place — and as a result, a lot of their money is just being held in cash.” The problem with this fear is that it deters youngsters from making higher-return investments. Consequently, their retirement portfolios can be significantly reduced. Taylor illustrates this phenomenon by showing how one can accumulate $1 million by age 65 by simply saving $500 a month from ages 21–30 and earning a seven per cent annual return on the savings. Of course, such a return would typically require diversified investments including stocks. Moreover, if another person saves the same $500 a month from ages 31 to 65 and earns the same seven per cent return, they still wouldn’t accumulate $1 million. Thus, the benefits of carefully investing into higher-return investments such as stocks at a young age are clear. If we take 10 to 15 years to shake off this fear of the markets, then we may do more than diminish the number of retirement condos in Florida: we may compromise our chances for any sort of financially stable, satisfying retirement. Look for more money advice for students coming up in The Omega, including a review of a money management how-to book and an examination of debt-repayment dos and don’ts.


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February 15, 2012

News

Did it just get colder in here?

A few degrees cooler campus-wide adds up to a more than a few savings — in more than a few ways Brendan Kergin News Editor

Some may have noticed a cooling trend sweeping through the buildings of TRU last Wednesday. Feb. 9 has been dubbed Sweater Day by the World Wildlife Fund, and the TRU Environment and Sustainability Department got the school involved this year. Temperatures in the larger buildings across the campus were turned down for the day by an average of one to three degrees. “Most occupants said they didn’t really notice,” said James Gudjonson, TRU’s energy manager. Even with the minor change there were some major energy savings in some of the buildings.

“There’s over 1 million square TRUSU supports sweater day According to a release from Gudjonson many buildings had feet of area to heat,” said Gudjon- as well, with the goal to promote noticeable drops in heating costs. son. “This is the size of six hun- awareness of energy use in buildNotably there was the B.C. Cen- dred and fifty 1700 square foot ings. TRU SU Ecoclub was also supporting the event. tre for Open Learning, which was homes.” Gudjonson said down nearly 40 per there were two comcent for energy plaints about areas use. The library being cold, but other and Clock Tower than that the day was also reduced their successful. Some energy consumpareas did cool down tion by nearly a third. —James Gudjonson more than expected, getting just below 20 It’s estimated C. There is an orgathe school saved nearly 40 giga joules (GJ) of natWith that much area to heat it nization which has guidelines for ural gas. Over a year the school equals about the same as 100 GJ building heat, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and hits an average of about 65,000 per a home to heat the school. It also notes that the reduction Air Conditioning Engineers, which GJ. While 40 doesn’t seem like a huge reduction of the 65,000, it of 40 GJ equals about 2.76 tonnes states buildings should be kept at a should be noted that the average of CO2. The average student minimum of 20 C. Gugjonson suggested the fluchousehold is usually just short of at TRU is probably producing tuations from building to building around 20 tonnes a year. 100 GJ annually.

“Most occupants said they didn’t really notice.”

had to do with building use and style. “It was more a how long the building was open and some of the buildings have fairly sophisticated systems,” said Gudjonson. “What that means is, say the gymnasium for example, it will measure the CO2 in the building. So that means if there’s a lot of people in gym... it’ll keep exchanging the air accordingly and that air has to be heated.” There will be more opportunities for participation in energy consumption awareness events in the near future, with the most notable probably being Earth Hour — the recent but fast-growing movement of turning off almost all electronics for an hour at night in April. Gudjonson expects both the school and residences will participate in that event.

University of Guelph considers three-year degrees and changes to transfer credits Lee Richardson

CUP Ontario Bureau Chief TORONTO (CUP) — The University of Guelph may eventually see accelerated three-year degrees, as a working group is currently in the early stages of studying their feasibility. The potential three-year bachelor degrees would be equivalent to the current four-year degree, with the possibility of adding another year to gain a Master’s degree in four years. The research group looking into the idea, made up of members of faculty, students and administration, will study the practicality of bringing the three-year degrees to U of G. “It’s really exploratory at this stage,” said U of G provost and vice-president academic, Maureen Mancuso. “But there’s a lot of interest with what’s happening in Europe, the United States and Australia with respect to the possibility of three-year degrees, or accelerated degrees.” As well as considering the shortened degrees, the group will study the provincial transfer credit system, with a goal of streamlining the process for incoming students who have graduated from college. “It’s not very easy for a student to move between institutions, either way, from college to

university or university to college, or even between jurisdictions,” said Mancuso. “There are a lot of difficulties in making those transitions or those moves, so I think we need to help the students in trying to make it as easy for them as we can.” Over the past couple of years, there has been discussion in regards to reforming both the transfer credit process in Ontario — which has led to colleges forming their own four-year degree programs — and whether bachelor degrees should have to be four years long. While the Ontario government set up the Pathways Initiative in 2009 to streamline elements of the transfer credit process, there are still students who find that they have to repeat similar courses to ones they have already taken, or have to take more than the usual number of electives to fill out a program. “It should be tied to your status. I think mature students shouldn’t be forced to take a number of electives,” said Colin Mitchell, who transferred into McMaster University with six credits, or three classes, after his graduation from Mohawk College in Hamilton. “They could totally give you more transfer credits and let you bypass that stage.” In terms of the research being carried out at U of G, which has already been involved with the

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Pathways Initiative, there is no set date for research findings being announced. “There’s a lot of behind-thescenes operational stuff that needs to be worked out if we’re going to make this work,” said Mancuso. “I would like to see some significant progress by the end of this semester.” Three-year degrees are widely accepted in many other countries, including the United States, where universities like Georgia Southwestern State University, Arcadia University and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro all have established three-year degrees, and a growing number of universities are introducing the accelerated programs. They are also common in European countries, which agreed to harmonize their education policies under the Bologna Process. In the United Kingdom, there has been discussion by Vince Cable, the Business Secretary, in regard to switching to a two-year bachelor degree system in order to save the state money. In Canada, though, outside of select universities like Athabasca, those shortened three-year degrees are virtually unknown. “It’s an interesting idea. I cer tainly think there [are] people who believe that we could be better off if we get down to three [years],” said University

The University of Guelph is studying the feasibility of introducing three-year degrees and making the transfer credit process easier. —PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH

of Toronto economics professor Philip Oreopoulos. “I’m not aware of any evidence that says one way or the other that it matters. If it doesn’t make any difference to labour market outcomes, and knowledge and lifetime socioeconomic outcomes, that’s great — let’s all go down to three.” But there is debate over what effect cutting a year from a bachelor’s degree would have. “One thing to consider is that a lot of graduate programs expect the bachelor degree to be a four-year degree,” said associate

professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Barrie Bennett. “At [OISE], our graduate applicants must have a four year degree or have something that really sets them apart, so if the undergrad expects to do graduate work, they may put themselves into difficult spot. “That said, if that three-year program is going to be an incredible program, then three years of incredible beats four years of mediocre,” Bennett added. “Of course, as a parent, I would rather have four years of incredible.”


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

Arts & Entertainment Film Reviews From The Basement Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor Campus radio is known for playing non-mainstream material in a non-commercial environment. For the last 18 months, TRU’s own CFBX has been home to a show called Film Reviews From The Basement, where hosts Jason Hewlett and Shawn Seagal review movies you have likely never heard of. Film Reviews From The Basement began as a bi-weekly podcast available through iTunes and podOmatic in January 2010. After recording 10 episodes, they began a blog on blogspot.com to complement it, and then found another home on CFBX in October of that year.

Described by Hewlett as, “a guide to help people find nonmainstream movies to watch,” the Basement Dwellers began their show on CFBX in an effort to help their audience grow. And it has grown, with Film Reviews From The Basement now having over 300 daily listeners. At the time they started the show on CFBX, they were recording it live, then pulling the recording from the files at The X and using it to create their podcast. But in January of this year one of their shows was lost. The audio file was unusable, and they thought about what it was they should do to prevent it from happening again. It was then that they moved back down to the basement. They now record on Friday nights, and Mike

S (a friend of theirs) live tweets their show. The blog is updated shortly after, and the podcast goes up on Saturday morning. The audio is then delivered to CFBX for their new time slot: Fridays at 3 p.m. The production behind Film Reviews From The Basement takes longer than the average radio show at CFBX, with Hewlett and Seagal picking out the movies to watch, finding the time to watch and review the movies individually, writing down their thoughts about it, producing a scripted outline of the show, and then getting together to record it. And that’s not counting any of the time they spend making contacts or doing interviews with people throughout the week. Seagal both wrote and produced

Community Calendar

Tuesday, Feb. 21 • DODGEBALL! South Sahali Elementary (Up across from 7-11 on Summit Dr.) Contact Garrett Horvath garrett.horvath@gmail.com for details

Wednesday, Feb. 22 • James Struthers and Kate Morgan The Art We Are 246 Victoria Street 8 p.m. $7 cover

The Cascade (UFV)

ENJOY YOUR WEEK OFF! Know of upcoming events the student body should be aware of? Get them in the calendar for free! Contact: editorofomega@gmail.com “Community calendar” in the subject line will help ensure they get to the campus community.

timedia outlets used by the Basement Dwellers create a show that is entertaining and professional. It has brought them enough attention that filmmakers have started sending them movies to review, such as Chris Witherspoon’s “Rage.” This review can be found through their blog, or listened to on Friday at 3 p.m. on CFBX 92.5. Film Reviews From The Basement is a great example of how to use technology and social media effectively. By taking their passion for movies and mixing it with some good planning, Hewlett and Seagal should be able to keep their show going for a long time. I’ll be interested to see where they take it next. Check out the blog at http://filmreviewsfromthebasement. blogspot.com.

Film Review: Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method Jeremy Hannaford

Thursday, Feb. 16 • Printmaking workshop hosted by the Kamloops Printmakers Society at the Kamloops Art Gallery downtown. 7 to 9 p.m. Free admission/participation

the opening and closing music pieces himself, and carefully pieces the podcast together into one smooth, hour-long episode while they record. I was invited to sit in (and even participate) on a recording with the Basement Dwellers last week. Although I had listened to the show before, I hadn’t really put much thought into what went into creating one of their shows. As much work as they put into it, it was easy to tell they really enjoy what they’re doing. Although the show could be recorded over the course of the night, the three friends are wellcoordinated and well-prepared, and the show I saw took about the same amount of time to record as it would to listen to. The result is polished. The mul-

David Cronenberg’s films have always centered around sex and violence. In A Dangerous Method, the sex is violent, not only in provocative foreplay but also in the form of affecting one’s psychosis, so is the underlying message as Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud converse and debate on the creation of psychoanalysis. Cronenberg delves into the themes that he is accustomed to, yet he still discovers something new. He keeps the camera glued to Michael Fassbender as they both uncover Jung’s secrets, secrets which can be shocking, but after examining current lifestyles, not unusual. Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortenson are as engaging as ever and, when put together, light up the screen with talent and wisdom. The chemistry between them is enthralling when they are praising each other’s ideas and accomplishments and it becomes intoxicating when their friendship begins to falter and their darker impressions of one another come to light. Keira Knightley becomes the character Sabina Spielrien in such a way that one would question her own sanity after watching this movie. From contracted facial movements to sporadic dialogue, her performance at first feels exaggerated, but it is engaging nonetheless. A Dangerous Method is a more mature film for Cronenberg, yet it is his third collaboration with Mortenson. Mortenson moves with a different flavour as he encompasses a man who truly believed that people were born with a single purpose and that changing that purpose was not only impossible

but absurd. This is the basis for the growing agitations between Jung and Freud. Jung believes that through his treatment he cannot only save people from their own imprisonment, but also help guide them on a path to change their purpose. These arguments are the centrepiece of the film as they raise compelling as well as controversial suggestions to the theory of psychoanalysis. While the film’s conversations are highly enthralling due to the superb acting and intelligent script, it does not hide the film’s odd faults. Although the film is in a linear fashion, it can still lose itself with the constant jumps in time as well as unusual breaks in sequences that could have opened more doors about the main characters. Other problems involve the sudden revealing of Jung’s belief in “supernatural” tendencies. The theory disappears as quickly as it arrives and it leaves an empty gap both in the story as well as in the audience’s mind as you try to understand where it all came from. Cronenberg is never one to stray away from images that can be seductive as well as repulsive but with A Dangerous Method, he attempts to move in a more psychological direction and delves deeper into what one sees inside their own mind rather than what they watch on screen. Although there is a lot of information to take in (especially if you don’t know much about psychology) and there are moments of disillusion, there is no doubt that Fassbender and Mortenson make this film. The experience is engaging as you will be waiting for the next conversation of minds and theories between the two.


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News In case you missed it, Kergin’s got you covered:

Things you probably didn’t see happening around you last week

Brendan Kergin News Editor

Global

February 15, 2012

29

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• Brazilian dam There are some big numbers being thrown around at the Amazonian site of the Belo Monte Dam Complex in the state of Para in Brazil. Ground breaking took place in June, but heavy construction has only recently started. At $14 billion it’s an extraordinarily expensive project, aiming to be the thirdlargest dam in the world. There’s also the environmental impact and the impact on human lives. It will create a reservoirs totalling 500 square kilometres and threaten hundreds of species of animals, especially fish. The human toll is massive as well. It’s unclear what will happen with tens of thousands of indigenous people officially displaced, tens of thousands probably unofficially displaced, and thousands of migrant workers moving in.

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Read more at aljazeera.com. • Chilean student In 2011 Chilean students began protesting a variety of issues in their education system, ranging from the privatization of nearly half the high schools to inequality in society in general. While the government at first pandered to the growing movement, the students didn’t really buy it. More protests in conjunction with other groups led to some minor changes. In August protests hit 100,000 marchers. Now, as negotiations continue, a new law is being brought forth cracking down on protesters’ rights, according to critics. In response, student leader Camila Vallejo has gone to the UN to ask for human rights monitors to visit Chile. Read more at expatica.com.

National • McGill Occupation Taking a page out of the Occupy playbook, students at Montreal’s McGill University took a grievance right to the source last week. In protest of the administration’s rejection of a referendum, the students took to the office of the administrator who made the decision and stayed there for five days. The conflict arose over a referendum held on the funding of a student group and

© 2012 H&R Block Canada, Inc. *$29.95 valid for regular student tax preparation only. Cash Back service included. To qualify for student pricing, student must present either (i) a T2202a documenting 4 or more months of full-time attendance at a college or university during 2011 or (ii) a valid high school identification card. Expires July 31, 2012. Valid only at participating H&R Block locations in Canada. SPC Card offers valid from 08/01/11 to 07/31/12 at participating locations in Canada only. For Cardholder only. Offers may vary, restrictions may apply. Usage may be restricted when used in conjunction with any other offer or retailer loyalty card discounts. Cannot be used towards the purchase of gift cards or certificates.

campus radio station. The students say the raised in Quebec, it no doubt affects stu- has been a full-time job lately with a variety of controversies to choose from. vote was valid; the university wants a sec- dents across Canada. One of the notable cases was when offiond vote. A vice principal for the school Read more at cupwire.ca. cers of the Vancouver Police Department said the building had to be shut down to responded to a call and ended up beating keep the occupation from spreading. The a man, the wrong man, and injuring him, students left the building when evicted Provincial DOCKET/AD#: 11-HRB-047-BW-SP-E-1 NEWSPAPERS: particularly in the face. An investigation peacefully on the weekend by campus sewas conducted into the incident by the curity and police. Not allADULT students agreed- ENGLISH• Offspring rights JOB NAME: TS ‘12 YOUNG NEWSPAPER SCANNER Delta Police Department. They found the with the protest, and social media groups DATE STARTED: Jan 11 LIVE AREA: – MEDIUM were set up in opposition to the protesters. A big case is being battled out in the BC officers involved not at fault. However, the ARTIST: CS TYPE SAFETY: – Police Complaint Commissioner suggests Court of Appeals. REV#: 0 more at montrealgazette.com.TRIM: 8" X 10" This Tuesday saw the resumption of a there were flaws in the investigation. He Read LASER %: BLEED: – case that affects anyone born through do- would like there to be a public inquiry, but DISKED: BW • Tuition in Quebec nated genetic material. It’s continuing the that has now been blocked by the BC SucaseSTUDIO comparing theMGMT. privacy rights of the preme Court, which has said the commisART DIRECTOR COPY WRITER CREATIVE DIR. PRINT PROD. MGR. ACCT. The government of Quebec announced donor versus the rights of the offspring to sioner is overstepping his bounds. More, no doubt, to come. last year that tuition would be rising for know who their biological parent is. students across the province by about On one side are the offspring, who wish Read more at vancouversun.com. $1,600 a year over the next 5 years. to know their genetic ancestry. While this isn’t recent news, a women’s On the other is the provincial governgroup is speaking about it now, and point- ment, whose lawyers are arguing two Local ing out the basic inequality the tuition sets of points. First, they suggest that if the hike highlights. While many would say donor isn’t kept anonymous there may be • Census Canada is a relatively equal society, it still fewer donations. The second argument is has some notable sticking points. The fact that policy decisions shouldn’t be left up to The Canadian census has come women are still undervalued in society is the courts. through, and Kamloops is up. one, highlighted by the fact there is still The first part of the census announces income disparity. Read more at theglobeandmail.ca. distribution of the population. In this case That translates into the fact that a male Kamloops and surrounding areas are at will make more after graduating and • Of courts, cops and commissioners about 100,000 people. This includes the therefore have an easier time paying off neighbouring community of Chase and student debt. While this is an issue being Keeping an eye on the police of B.C. other nearby districts. The city proper is

up to 85,000 now, which is a growth of 6.6 per cent higher than the national average of 5.4 per cent. All in all there are more people here than five years ago, and that’s a trend that’s been going on for at least the past 15 years. Read more at statcan.gc.ca. • Wal-Mart Nationally, Wal-Mart is aiming to grow right across Canada right now. One of the places the world’s largest retailer is aiming at is right here. Wal-Mart Canada has applied to city council to expand their store by 19,000 square feet to include a grocery section. In the original plan, when the store moved into that location, there were concerns about how the store, and in particular a grocery section, would affect the community. Wal-Marts have been criticized across North America for their effects on small competing businesses. This time there is less criticism, so far. However, council has voted to have a public hearing on the subject soon. Keep an eye out for a date and time if you wish to make a point. Read more at kamloopsnews.ca.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

Arts & Entertainment

State of the arts

How arts funding affects our communities Ali Hackett

Nexus (Camosun) VICTORIA (CUP) — When Stephen Harper famously declared that “ordinary people” don’t care about arts funding during the 2008 election campaign, artists and arts groups were quickly forced to prove their worth. In 2009, $45 million was cut from the federal arts budget, and not long after, the government of B.C. made serious cuts of its own. Since those serious cuts to arts funding in 2009, many artists and arts groups in B.C. have had to find innovative ways to generate money while struggling to make ends meet. The Victoria Spoken Word Festival is one of the affected groups, and is coming into its second year without any government funding. Missie Peters, festival director, said it’s the only one of its kind in Canada, but that their application for a government grant was denied. The festival pairs emerging poets with professionals from across the country to help them develop new skill sets. In lieu of government funding, Peters was inspired to fundraise for the festival herself and decided to register it with IndieGoGo, one of the biggest online funding platforms. “The idea really was for me to be able to connect with the spoken word community, and the people who love the art form across the country,” she said. “In this way, we can pool funding on a national level, get people excited, and get some exposure for the festival, in addition to getting funds.” Beyond the funding, which at press time was only $50 short of its $1,000 goal, Peters said she’s received community support in the form of billets, drivers, and other volunteers. “To me, getting people who may not have otherwise had an opportunity to get involved is almost as valuable, or more important, than the money,” she said. “It’s really made us build that local network.” The Spoken Word Festival’s situation is not unique. This festival has had a positive experience without government funding, and although it hasn’t been easy, Peters said she’s proud that the festival has been able to succeed without any grant money.

and exists at an arms length from political imperatives,” said Higgins. “That really allows a multiplicity of voices.” Higgins said that when it comes to discussing arts funding, the focus often tends to revolve around whether or not artists can produce work, but said that’s not necessarily the issue. “You’re going to see art made,” said Higgins, “but you’re not going to see it. What public investment often ensures is that the public will have access to the culture that’s being made.” Whether it’s paintings, sculpture, plays or writing, the access to culture is an important distinction. Although there’s some truth to the “starving artist” stereotype, having poor artists doesn’t necessarily serve the community. “If I see it from my point of view,” said Higgins, “I see the arts as a welcoming space. Quite often in theatre, music or dance, you find a haven for people who, for one reason or another, find they don’t fit in somewhere.” Higgins also said that exposure to arts and different culture can enhance communication within a community. “We’re more able to get along as communities and as societies when

Artistic independence

Ian Case, general manager of the Intrepid Theatre in Victoria, said they’ve had to make administrative changes, including the reduction of staff, to keep up with funding cuts. Case has been working at Intrepid for almost 10 years, and said the loss of provincial gaming grants and cuts to arts funding in 2009 has had huge impacts on the arts community in B.C. When Case started, government funding made up 45 to 50 per cent of Intrepid’s annual budget; now it’s about 30 per cent. The theatre company increasingly relies on earned revenues, donations and sponsorship to make ends meet. “As the company has grown, it’s become less reliant on [government fundArtistic endeavors are being funded less and less by public ing],” said Case. “Having said that, money, and organizations are stuggling to keep beautifying government funding is still really imtheir communities. portant, not only for Intrepid Theatre, —PHOTO BY CAROL-LYNNE MICHAELS but for all the non-profit arts organizations, because it allows them to main- 225 communities in B.C. Hamilton said their doors due to gaming grants cuts tain the accessibility and affordability almost 80,000 people are employed in in 2009. When the gallery moved, the the arts sector in B.C. The economic only premises they could afford in of their programs.” Increased reliance on commercial impacts of the arts are felt regionally as Vancouver didn’t have plumbing or or box-office sales means looking less well, and it’s not just the employment heat. “We’re managing, but I wouldn’t at pushing the boundaries and more at of the artists. Hamilton points to the Belfry Theatre and the Victoria Sym- ask somebody else to work in these marketing towards mass appeal. “Having government funding means phony, both of which receive operating circumstances,” said Higgins. “I’ve got we can offer work that you might not grants from the BCAC, as supporters full-time work here: publishing, presee otherwise,” said of the local economy. Their audiences senting exhibitions, putting on public Case. “It also encour- tend to spend money on dinner or programs. But my salary works out to ages artists to test drinks when attending shows, as well about 10 bucks an hour once you break their limits, and cre- as parking, public transportation and it down over all the work I’m doing. The ability to apply for the [gaming ate work that is more cabs. Case also knows the effect of the arts grants] again is going to ease a lot of exciting than regular on the economy and he’s often asked to pain.” commercial fare.” The B.C. Liberal argue for the arts from the economic All points to public funding party recently rein- point of view. He cites the 2010 Greater stated $15 million Victoria Arts and Culture Sector EcoJo-Ann Roberts, host of All Points in gaming grants, nomic Activity Study, completed by bringing the total to Dr. Brock Smith of the Peter B. Gus- West on CBC Radio One in Victoria, $135 million annu- tavson School of Business at the Uni- said exposure to and involvement in the ally. They’ve guar- versity of Victoria, as a great example arts fosters our ability as a society to think creatively. anteed the same of the success of arts. —Keith Higgins amount for the next “It’s always been my feeling that the “It’s not a small industry,” said Case. fiscal year, but still “It creates a lot of jobs, and it’s an eco- arts allow us to think about bigger ishaven’t outlined a nomic generator municipally, in terms sues,” said Roberts, “and to see things in a way we haven’t seen them before. there’s access to culture,” said Hig- sufficient long-term strategy — at least of activity downtown.” The study said the total economic ac- The arts often show us a creative way gins, “especially when there’s cul- not in the point of view of Higgins. “Anybody whose lived here will tell tivity generated by the Greater Victoria forward when faced with tough times.” ture being produced that’s actually She makes the case for publicly fundyou that the provincial government arts and culture sector in 2010 was $170 responsive to the community.” According to Higgins, the impor- works on a sort of binge-purge cycle, million in net income. This takes into ed art and includes some of CBC’s protance of the arts isn’t often acknowl- as far as budgeting goes,” said the art- account all expenditures by part-time gramming in that category, although edged. The debate about the value of ist. “About a year and a half before an artists and hobbyists, full-time artists, not everyone agrees. Opponents of the election, they suddenly have money for arts businesses and organizations, as CBC say taxpayers’ money would be art can be a heated one. better spent elsewhere Opponents of public arts funding things. Abruptly afand the market should say an unfair advantage is given to ter the election they dictate art consumption. people who get grants over those who say, ‘By the way, The issue with this, don’t. Beyond that, it’s hard to place a our budget foresaid Roberts, is that when monetary value on something as sub- casts weren’t quite right,’ and the ausjective as art. left in the hands of priThat being said, Higgins maintains terity measures roll vate media corporations, that culture is worth investing in, for out.” the focus becomes genboth social and economic reasons. erating profit, rather than Art economy “The provincial government in the public interest. British Columbia, regardless of its “Because [CBC] is not The B.C. Arts political stripes, has rarely stepped tied to meeting just what up with adequate or reasonable levels Council (BCAC) shareholders want, we of support, especially when it comes is a provincially can often present what is funded peer-review to access to culture,” he said. not commercially viable, —Jo-Ann Roberts at least initially,” said “The unfortunate thing about that panel that gives is people without access don’t know grants to artists and Roberts. what it’s like to have those facilities arts groups. The government appoints well as money spent by arts patrons, She cites CBC Radio 3, which proits members but the panel operates un- and is the equivalent of $21 million in motes independent music, and their in their communities.” property tax revenue. Higgins feels that the underinvest- der its own mandate. annual literature competition, Canada The report shows that money invest- Reads, as two of many examples of “Once the government gives us the ment in culture has left us in a negamoney they do not interfere in how we ed in the arts scene in Victoria not only how CBC makes art accessible to the tive cycle. One result of this historic lack of distribute it amongst the disciplines stays in the community, it draws people public. appreciation is that many artists have and applicants,” said Stanley Hamilton, here. The vibrancy of a city rich in culThe bottom line when it comes to ture entices investors and tourists alike. arts funding, according to Roberts, is left their communities in search of a BCAC chair. Higgins, too, applauds the economic providing avenues for arts groups to be The BCAC acts as an advocate for place where they will feel valued. It’s also hard for artists to lobby the arts, and has a different funding impact of the arts, but said wages are heard. She said arts cuts directly impact for federal money, either from the pool than the gaming grants or the still pretty low when compared to the the state of arts in Canada. Canada Council for the Arts, or the Ministry of Community, Sport, and provincial average, and a lot of art“If art isn’t publicly funded,” said Canada Cultural Investment Fund, Cultural Development, another provin- ists are struggling. Higgins is also the Roberts, “there’s less reason for private executive director of the UNIT/PITT news or broadcast organizations to covwhen they haven’t received previ- cial contributor to arts funding. Last year the BCAC contributed al- Projects, formerly the Helen Pitt Gal- er and support the arts, because they’re ous investments at the provincial or most $17 million in arts grants, across lery, and said they almost had to close not feeling any competitive pressure.” municipal level.

“We’re more able to get

along as communities and as societies when there’s access to culture.”

Public investment equals public enjoyment Keith Higgins, a Vancouver-based artist, has been involved in artist-run organizations since the ’80s. He has helped create all sorts of institutions, including Artspeak Gallery, The Pacific Association of Artist-Run Centres, and continues to run Publication Studio Vancouver, a small publishing house, among other initiatives. He believes that although there are ways for artists and arts groups to generate income, public investment allows artists to be more experimental in their work. “We’re quite lucky to have an institution like the Canada Council [for the Arts], which awards money based on the perceived merits of the work,

“It’s always been my

feeling that the arts allow us to think about bigger issues.”


8

February 15, 2012

Non-violent revolution leads to democracy: Dyer Opening keynote addresses uprisings Devan C. Tasa

Omega Contributor The Arab Spring is the latest example of a world becoming more democratic through nonviolent revolutions, said journalist Gwynne Dyer. Dyer, the keynote speaker for the f irst day of TRU’s Inter national Days, focused his speech on the recent wave of democratization happening in the Arabic Middle East. “I’m happy about the world this year,” he said. “We have seen the last region of the world bound by tyranny begin to free itself.” When Tunisians had enough of their gover nment and protested non-violently, it took three

months for the countr y’s dictator to leave, according to Dyer. When that sentiment spread to Egypt, it only took three weeks for that countr y’s dictator to be deposed. Non-violent revolution is effective at toppling gover nments because it gathers the suppor t of those people who aren’t par t of the r uling regime but are essential to the smooth day-today r unning of the gover nment, according to Dyer. But non-violent revolution is not without risk, he war ns. “Non-violence doesn’t mean that nobody dies, just that the protestors don’t kill,” Dyer said. “[But] when the ar my gets tired of shooting people from their own community, it’s over.” While the most famous non-

violent revolution was India’s bid for independence from the British in the 1940s, other examples according to Dyer are the wave of democratization in Southeast Asia in the 1980s beginning in the Philippines, the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of apar theid in South Africa. But there are some failures. The event at Tiananmen Square in China in the 1980s was an example of where non-violent revolution failed. “It does not work ever y time,” Dyer said. With that being said, 30 years ago two-thirds of the world’s population lived under dictatorships, but today two-thirds live in democracies, according to Dyer. Kareem Ibrahim, an international student from Egypt studying f ine ar ts, was pleased with the event. “It strikes your hear t. It makes you think,” Ibrahim said. “Coming from a man that was behind the lines and saw this happening, we need to stop and listen.”

TOP RIGHT: Gwynne Dyer addresses the crowd at the International Days 2012 opening ceremonies on Feb. 6.

—PHOTO BY MICHAEL POTESTIO ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY TAYLOR ROCCA

The age of plastics Marvin Beatty

Omega Contributor Captain Charles Moore, one of the world’s leading voices on the millions of tons of plastic waste now littering the oceans, gave an eye-opening presentation to an audience of at least 200 in the Irving K. Barber Centre at Thompson Rivers University Feb. 8. Moore’s talk was just one keynote address for International Days, a week-long series of events organized by TRU World. Moore made clear he believes the problem of plastic waste affects more than just marine environments. “I’m here to talk about the age that we live in,” Moore said,

“Which I think is pretty easily defined as the age of plastics. We drive in it, we live in it, our food is delivered in it, we wear it and it’s kind of crept up on us surreptitiously.” Throughout the evening, Moore’s engaging speaking style helped explain the enormity of the problem. Moore moved deftly between research graphs and tables to a mix of humour, knowledge and the occasional sly political reference. Huge artificial reefs of plastic are allowing species to exist where they should not and Moore said plastics are entering the food chain, potentially altering the course of evolution. “This material now is acting

both as predator and prey in the ocean. It’s predating in the sense of tangling things,” Moore said, “and it’s acting as prey. It’s being consumed as if it were food. It’s a very good food fake.” Moore wrapped up with a discussion about the consequences of consumerism and an increasing reliance on the plastics industry. He fielded questions from the audience for more than a half hour. Moore’s current research focus and topic of a new book, Plastic Ocean: How a Sea Captain’s Chance Discovery Launched a Determined Quest to Save the Oceans, looks at a better understanding of the magnitude of the plastic industry, including the effects of plastic on human health.

Interna

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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

ational

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Dr. Dean Chan guest lecture Michael Potestio Omega Contributor

Dr. Dean Chan of the University of Wallongong was on hand Tuesday Feb. 7 to give a guest lecture on comics and Asian culture. In his lecture, Dr. Chan looked at all types of comics from web-based to the traditional print comics, discussing how Asian diaspora, or migrant, cultures are being produced in places such as Canada, America and Australia. Chan said he is interested in his observations of how the medium of comics has facilitated intercultural communication, particularly in the last decade. Dr. Chan used the term graphic narratives as an umbrella term in describing all the different variations of comics, such as manga and graphic novels. During the lecture Chan discussed how these comics bring Asian immigrant issues such as race relations into dialogue. One American example Dr. Chan talked about was “American Born Chinese” by Gene Luen Yang. The example showed an awkward conversation between a Chinese-American boy and a Taiwanese boy. Chan said the example shows the tensions between newly arrived Asian immigrants and third or fourth generation Asian-Americans. Another example Chan discussed was the comic “Shortcomings” by Adrian Tomine.

In this example Chan showed a page from the book where a Korean woman and Japanese man are discussing meeting the Korean woman’s parents, which Chan used as an example of the topic of race relations in an Asian-American context. Chan also looked at Australian examples such as the “The Arrival” by Shaun Tan, which is a wordless comic that Chan said expects the reader to create the narrative. He also said the comic is a metaphoric re-telling of the challenges of migrating to a new land. Dr. Chan finished with a Canadian example, “The Magical Life of Long Tack Sam” by Ann Marie Fleming. Chan talked about the graphic novel, which he says describes the story of Fleming’s great grandfather, Long Tack Sam, using photos and graphic narrative to tell the story. Chan talked about Fleming’s use of archival information and old fables about her grandfather, noting Fleming’s use of larger issues such as the Canadian head tax and the U.S. Chinese Exclusion Act to provide a link between her personal family history

and the larger Asian immigrant history. Chan said this was his first trip to Canada and enjoyed being able to take in the cities of Kamloops and Vancouver as part of his first visit to the country. “I was very struck when I arrived here at TRU that there is such a notable international student presence as well as the very culturally diverse local student grouping to begin with,” Dr. Chan said. With that diversity, Dr. Chan hopes his lecture on intercultural communication had an impact on students. “I would like my talk today which was about intercultural communication and fostering intercultural communication to resonate with students here,” Dr. Chan said. Dr. Chan also works on digital gaming cultures, which has been a major focus for him since 2004. He is very interested in the phenomenon of digital gaming particularly in the Asian Pacific region and is currently working on research monographs on gaming culture in East Asia.

Colours, energy and enthusiasm for multiculturalism were in abundance on Friday Feb. 10 at the TRU Gymnasium for the International Showcase, which ran from noon to 8 p.m. Check out Rocca’s photo gallery at theomega.ca

Internationalization roundtable Sarah MacMillan Omega Contributor

Education leaders from across the world met in an open forum on Friday, Feb. 10 at TRU to discuss the importance of international students on campus. The panel, which consisted of education leaders from Canada as well as representatives from Saudi Arabia, China and Australia, focused on the benefits of the internationalization of postsecondary campuses. During the panel, TRU President Alan Shaver listed five reasons for internationalization, all of which were ref lected in the presentations of the other education leaders. The first reason for having international students on campus, said Shaver, is that it’s an

academic benefit. Challenges such as global warming require a multicultural approach and having international students on campus allow for new and different solutions. Another added benefit of increased international presence is the cultural diversity that is brought to the campus. “It takes us beyond ourselves,” said Majella Franzmann, pro vice-chancellor at Curtin University in Perth, Australia. Internationalization also aids the economy, bringing money in while increasing Canada’s opportunity to trade internationally. “International students, through their high tuition fees, help to build B.C. infrastructure,” Shaver said. Having international students

allows for universities such as TRU to offer greater numbers of courses due to the larger student population. In addition, it prevents the courses being taught from being introverted, said Franzmann. Courses focus more on the world, rather than just one specific country. Internationalization also creates what Shaver calls a ‘brain chain,’ where people are united around the world because of the contact they have made during their studies abroad. These however, are not the largest benefits of internationalization. “One of the biggest satisfactions and fulfillment I have taken from internationalization is the joy,” Shaver said, “the joy of learning.”


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February 15, 2012

More International Days

Learning — one bite at a time Karlene Skretting Omega Contributor

A dash of creativity, a pinch of patience and a sparing amount of energy proved to be the recipe for success Thursday evening at the Campus Activity Centre. Anita Lyapina, Alesya Sharay and Marina Savelyeva walked students through how to prepare three traditional Russian staples: olivier, Russian salad and pickled cabbage. Elena Tsvetkova was the spokesperson for the first half of the evening. “In Russia there are a lot of farms, and as a result an abundance of fresh vegetables,” Tsetkova said. “People cook at home rather than buying the fast food and processed goods that are common in North America.” Those in attendance were given the opportunity to sample the cooking for themselves. All the food quickly disappeared and students begged for seconds. Many present raved over how delicious the olivier was. It was a very natural fresh tasting salad. The flavours blended nicely, but you could still make out the individual ingredients. Olivier is a traditional Russian dish, and is especially popular in the Eastern Bloc countries. It is made with diced potatoes, vegetables, eggs and meat and is dressed with mayonnaise. In many communities it is a common dish at New Years celebrations. Russian cooking uses small amounts of spices compared to Canadian for just this reason. Vegetables all have natural flavours and add to a dish. Too much seasoning is overpowering. Russians also add meat to many dishes. Traditionally it’s red meat if you lived away from the water and fish if you bordered the water. “Our country is very cold. If it’s minus-35 and you live in a small isolated village, you’re not going to survive on

Week-long art exhibition off Student Street Ryley Unrau

Omega Contributor

shuan paper, canvas and traditional paper to demonstrate the unique ways they each absorb water and ink. It brings the different dynamics of her style into focus. Her sole piece on shuan paper was the exhibit standout. It depicts a dreary city harbour and is titled, “The Gloaming Lisbon.” Not only is it larger in size than the others but also in its depth, dream-like quality and Asian flare. While some of the paintings displayed in the exhibit contain deep purple and jewel tones, the majority of her work depicts illuminating background sunsets with bright yellow, salmon and teal colours. Illustrated individually in each of her pieces through magnificent

pigmentation and great attention to detail are themes of international trade, the sweet sense of home and the West versus the East. Placed among Chen’s artwork were three quotes tying each picture together to form a peaceful and mysterious atmosphere in the exhibit. The most endearing of these small written pieces said, “A harbour is always a home for boats and ships [that] eventually come back to where they belong after their journey and missions are complete.” It’s a great metaphor for life and perhaps for the process of Sue-Jane Chen as well, who has described breathtaking sentiment through her creations and brought it to Thompson Rivers University for all to see.

veggies alone. You need meat, you need those calories,” Tsvetkova said, explaining why only about five per cent of the Russian population is vegetarian. Two Indian dishes, coconut chicken curry, and potatoes and peas were also prepared for students to taste that evening. The goal was to expose students to other cultures in a casual setting and encourage them to meet new people and enjoy good food that they probably had otherwise never tasted. TRU World and the Russian Speaking Students Association hosted the Global Kitchen Cooking Show as part of International Days.

A Perspective of Global Harbour: When West Meets East is an incredible show of watercolour art by Taiwan-based artist Sue-Jane Chen, which ran all week in the TRU Art Gallery off Student Street in Old Main during International Days. Located in the Old Main art gallery during International Days, the exhibit indeed evoked a nostalgic sentiment as promised. Chen’s work of vivid harbours and serene city lines in Portugal and Taiwan was described as using visual memory through intertextuality. She uses her watercolour technique on different papers including

Olivier

International Showcase caps week of international excellence

Ingredients: 2 big potatoes 2 eggs 3 large carrots 1 cup cooked chicken ½ cup canned peas ¼ cup onion 2 larger pickles Salt & pepper to taste ½ cup mayonnaise 6 sprigs parsley Instructions: Boil the potatoes, carrots and eggs Cook chicken, or use leftover chicken pieces Let ingredients cool to room temperature and peel Cut the potatoes, eggs, carrots, chicken, pickles and onion into small ¼ inch cubes Finely chop the parsley Mix all the ingredients together Add the canned peas and salt & pepper to taste Season the salad with mayonnaise and mix well

Taylor Rocca Roving Editor

After a week of international academics, cuisine, events, lectures and education, last week was capped off with a daylong celebration of cultural diversity during the International Showcase. The International Showcase saw over 2,300 people come through the doors to take in the culmination of TRU’s International Days cultural diversity celebration according to Krista Bergmann, event coordinator for International Days. “The [International] Showcase is the highlight event every year,” Bergmann said. Held in the TRU Gymnasium, it was preceded by the annual International Flag Parade. The procession began in the Campus Activity Centre rotunda, eventually making its way out into Campus Commons before continuing past Old Main and up into the TRU Gymnasium. Once the procession entered the gymnasium, the International Showcase was officially underway. The open-

EUReKA! Science Program SUMMER JOB POSTINGS EUReKA! is a student-run, non-profit organization that strives to increase interest in and excitement towards science in youth. We are looking for enthusiastic individuals to become the next EUReKA! instructors. Responsibilities include: developing and delivering science workshops (May- June) and summer day camps (July-August). Please visit www.tru.ca/eureka/staff for information. Positions Available (#): Assistant Director (1), 4-Month Instructor (6), 3-Month Instructor (2), and 2-Month Instructor (4). Requirements: TRU student with a science/computer background and/or experience working with children. Submit your resume, cover letter, and a write-up of a hands-on science project for elementary students in any science th discipline by February 17 , 2012 electronically to eureka@tru.ca

ing ceremonies featured a drum and dance performance courtesy of the Sage Hills Drum and Dance Group of the Tk’emlups Indian Band. The showcase featured booth displays, an international fashion show, a food fair and cultural performances. It ran from approximately noon to eight o’clock. Highlights of the cultural performances included the Sage Hills Drum and Dance Group and Raiden Taiko Drumming by the Kamloops Japanese Canadian Association. Wedged in the middle was a performance by the TRU World Rock Band, featuring student musicians from a variety of countries. The showcase was sent out on a high note with a performance by the TRU Bhangra Dance Team to conclude the evening. Dance performances during the showcase came from places such as Africa, China, Columbia, India, Ireland, Latin America, the Middle East and Taiwan. The fashion show included colourful traditional displays from places such as China, Columbia, Japan, Mexico, Norway and Saudi Arabia. Booth displays were on site from Af-

rica, China, Columbia, India, Jamaica, Mexico, Palestine, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia and Turkey. Each booth had its own unique display of cultural clothing, spices, currency, board games and art as well as a representative to answer questions from curious passers-by. The food fair featured Vietnamese subs and vermicelli provided by Donut King. Japanese sushi and bento boxes were also available as well as Indian butter chicken and samosa. Visitors could get a sampling of various Asian cuisines courtesy of Wok Box Asian Kitchen. Harlen Chung is a second-year business student at TRU from Taiwan. He performed a modern hip-hop dance with Daniel Wu and Ethan Ng, both TRU business students from China. The group said that the atmosphere during the International Showcases was one of the best parts of the event. Chung also said that International Days and the International Showcase are important for TRU because, “We can get to know everyone’s culture and everyone’s background.”


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

Kamloops gets indoor skatepark Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor It’s been a long time coming, but Kamloops finally has what looks to be a viable indoor skateboard park in Faction. Located on Dalhousie Drive, Faction looks quite unassuming from the outside, blending in with the other retailers along the strip it resides on. Even when you walk through the front doors, the storefront hides the skatepark that occupies a good three-quarters of the place. What lies behind the retail portion of the store, though, is what every skateboarder in Kamloops has been dreaming of through every long winter, every short rainfall and every other time where irritating natural phenomena like the weather have interfered with the opportunity to go skateboarding. The park makes good use of its available space. Some obstacles are placed quite close together, but aren’t laid out in a way that prevents any of them from being used. It’s always evolving. Faction owner Wayne Parsons works at keeping it interesting and challenging working within the confines of the shop. A well-constructed four-foot halfpipe takes up a good chunk of the room without being overbearing, and Wayne plans on making it bigger sometime soon. The transitions are smooth, and would lend themselves nicely to the increase in size. A five-foot quarterpipe extension comes off of the ramp, allowing for easy transitions in between the street portion of the park and

the ramp. The quarterpipe also helps frame the street portion of the park, with a vert wall on the opposite end. The only aspect of the park that feels awkward is a two-foot quarterpipe that has the transition of a much larger ramp. Placed as a drop-in ramp to help the skaters get speed, the transition doesn’t feel like it does anything besides throw you slightly off balance at the beginning of a run, which to the best of my knowledge is not the desired effect. The only other aspect of the park that can make it difficult to ride is how slippery the floors can feel. I’ve seen this problem fixed in other skateparks by diluting some pop in water and mopping the floor with it, but being so close to a pet food store, Wayne doesn’t want to take any chances inviting mice (or worse) into his shop. A runner-up on ways to fix this problem would be simply to buy some softer wheels. The rates at the park are reasonable, from the entrance fee to the rentals to the products on the shelf. I can’t vouch for the prices on the BMX equipment sold there, but if it’s anything like the rest of what Faction has to offer, it’s probably a pretty good deal too. Faction provides an indoor space for a sport that is too often neglected when it comes to facilities. Kamloops now has one of the best outdoor skateboard parks in the region, but without a place like Faction to go in the winter, there can be a long, unhappy wait in between sessions. Thankfully it doesn’t have to be that way anymore.

Brian Mayo comes off the vert wall with enough speed to scare almost anyone while he and Cory Hope check out the new indoor skatepark on Dalhousie Drive.

—PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

theomega.ca

Arts & Entertainment


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February 15, 2012

Sports

A coach’s journey back to basketball

Ryerson assistant coach Susan Stewart came back from the brink of death to once again immerse herself in the game she loves Dustin Pollack

The Ryersonian (Ryerson) TORONTO (CUP) — Susan Stewart couldn’t walk and couldn’t talk. She couldn’t eat without a feeding tube or breathe without medical support. But her situation was better than the doctors at the Mercy Medical Hospital predicted. When she was admitted to Mercy Medical in Canton, Ohio, on April 13, 2005, her family was told that not only did most people who suffered her type of injury not survive; they usually didn’t make it from the ambulance to the hospital. Stewart’s brain was bleeding and the doctors said that if they operated she could die, and if they did nothing and her brain continued to bleed, she could die. “When they told me I was going to die, I remember the chaplain came in and read me my rites,” Stewart said. “I was very afraid because I was in a condition that I had no control over.” In the late ’80s to mid-’90s, Stewart was a Canadian basketball star. She played for the Canadian national team, won two national championships with Laurentian University and competed for her country at the summer Olympics in Atlanta, Ga., in 1996. After retiring from the game she became a coach and it was while coaching in a tournament with a bantam girls’ team from Chagrin Falls, Ohio, that her life took a disastrous turn. After one of the tournament

games, Stewart went back to her hotel room to take a shower. While in the shower, she slipped and hit her head on the showerhead. Although feeling pain, she didn’t think much of it and decided to try and sleep it off. But that night, while giving her team a pre-game speech, she began to vomit profusely and it continued later that night on the bus ride home to Chagrin Falls. She decided to go right to bed when she got home, but when she couldn’t fall asleep, she went to the bathroom to try to gather herself. “I remember looking up in the mirror and then falling backwards,” she said. That’s when one of her roommates, who heard the fall, came running and called the ambulance. She had suffered a brain aneurism on the second fall and was bleeding from her brain stem. She spent nearly a month as a patient at Mercy Medical Hospital until the bleeding stopped and she was healthy enough to be airlifted to Trillium Medical Centre in Mississauga, Ont. where her family lived and she could begin rehabilitation. “I had to relearn how to be a person again,” she said. After years of speech therapy, physiotherapy and interval training to work on her motor skills, Stewart was able to begin doing things day-to-day just like the average person. But when the late Ryerson Rams women’s basketball coach Sandy Pothier approached her in 2009 to join the Rams’ coaching

staff, she didn’t feel right. “[Pothier] was doing a girls’ basketball camp and she encouraged that I come in the fall and coach, but I wasn’t ready yet,” Stewart said. “I didn’t feel I was at the point in my rehab, where I could take the train and walk and do all that I’m doing right now.” But two years later when the Rams approached her again, she decided she was ready to get involved and now is working through her first season as an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator with the team. “We talk a lot about challenges and overcoming adversity, and she personifies that,” said Charles Kissi, head coach of the women’s basketball team. “I think our girls value that. Anything that can teach them perspective at this point in their lives is very valuable.” But things still aren’t perfect. While Stewart’s independent in many ways — she can do most things the average person can do — there are many things she can’t. She can’t live independently, so she lives at home with her parents in Mississauga and commutes to Ryerson, and she is still unable to drive. And while Stewart admits that the progress she’s made since 2005 is remarkable, it’s been a frustrating journey. “I kept asking the nurses, how long will this take? I wanted it over,” she said. “You know when you sprain your ankle or break your foot, they give you a guesstimate; well this is something [for

Susan Stewart has gone through a lot on her road to coaching the Ryerson Rams women’s basketball team.

—PHOTO BY FELICIA NICHOLSON

which] they can’t give a guesstimate, because it depends on the individual.” But for now she’s happy to be back in basketball. “I enjoy working with the Ryerson Rams women’s basketball team. That’s really my joy; to be around them and encour-

age them and to inspire them. That’s really what I’m about,” said Stewar t. “The way I look at [my situation] is it’s a challenge,” she said. “It’s not going to be an easy road; it’s going to take some time.”

U of A reclaims dodgeball world record Nearly 5,000 take part in world’s largest dodgeball game Simon Yackulic

The Gateway (U of A) EDMONTON (CUP) — Cheers of “U of A! U of A!” broke out in the University of Alberta’s Butterdome on Feb. 3 with news that the school had once again captured the Guinness World Record for the largest dodgeball game ever played. With 4,979 players, the U of A’s record-breaking game smashed the previous dodgeball record held by the University of California, Irvine, who took the title in September after hosting a dodgeball game with 4,000 players. For the U of A, it wasn’t only students who competed — many staff and alumni came out to play, including one alumna who received her first degree from the U of A in 1968 and was one of the final 20 players to be eliminated. A Guinness judge was also flown out to adjudicate the game. Philip Robertson, who attends about two record-breaking attempts a week on behalf of Guinness, was an enthusiastic observer of the record attempt. He told those around him that the

volleys of balls raining back and forth over the court reminded him of “what medieval warfare must have looked like” in terms of raining arrows. “This is actually a really competitive record — this is the 13th dodgeball attempt,” Robertson said, explaining that it was important for record-challengers to abide by strict rules for the game. For the U of A, that included having at least 100 referees on hand. “For this event, there are over 4,900 participants, and they’re allowed one ball for every four participants, so at least 1,250 balls,” Robertson noted. Both teams of nearly 2,500 participants were evenly matched, and the game came down to a nail-biting end as each team was worn down to just five players battling across the court. Ultimately, for the third year in a row, the gold team edged out a victory. “It’s the most fun event on campus that I’ve ever attended,” said gold team member Michael Ross. “I’ve never seen so many U of A students get together behind one thing and have such a wicked awesome time doing it.” Chemistry professor Chuck Lucy was also wearing a gold team shirt, and might have been responsible for

a few hundred students attending the event. “I’m out here for school spirit,” Lucy said. “I saw it on the web and asked my class of 400 to show up, but we start at one, and so I’m hoping we can actually make it for class today.” While the game didn’t get underway until after 1 p.m., despite an advertised noon start, thousands of people eventually packed into the Butterdome and added another notch to dodgeball history. U of A Students’ Union vice-president of student life Colten Yamagishi, who worked for weeks to ensure a large turnout, was blown away by the response from the university community. “It was absolutely amazing. This whole week, I never truly believed that it was going to happen, but I had confidence that the U of A loves dodgeball and loves this event, and I knew that we could come through,” Yamagishi said. “It’s something that you can’t imagine in your wildest dreams until it comes true.” Yamagishi said that he hoped either the University of California, Irvine, or another school would rise to the U of A’s

4,979 students, staff and alumni of the University of Alberta helped the school reclaim the world record for largest dodgeball game ever played. —PHOTO BY MATT HIRJI

challenge and continue the competition. He also responded to speculation by dean of students Frank Robinson that, considering the growth in turnout for the dodgeball game over the past few years, the university could aim to get 10,000 participants out next year.

“I hope they come out and break it again,” Yamagishi said. “We got to 5,000, and that said, we still had to turn people away, so we want UC Irvine to do it so that we can come back and do it again next year. “Let them have a little taste, and then we can take back the record again.”


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

Sports Women’s volleyball to play in first ever playoff game School record sends the team to Edmonton to take on the powerhouse Pandas Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

For the first time since TRU joined CIS women’s volleyball, the Wolf Pack is heading to the post season. The team finished with a school record, nine wins and 11 losses and will play Alberta in the first round. The ‘Pack head to Edmonton as winners of five of their last six and will measure themselves against one of the best in the West. The 14-6 Pandas had their way with TRU back in the first week of November, beating the ‘Pack twice in straight sets, but should expect a more mature team this weekend. “None of them will have played in a match like this,” TRU head coach Keith Lundgren said. “There’s going to be a lot of people and the energy is going to be tremendous from the fans, Laurie (Pandas coach Laurie Eisler) is going to have the team geared up. “It’s going to be fun, I’m really excited to be in that atmosphere and compete with them.” It will be the first playoff game for fifth year veterans Amanda Frayna, Kelly Asleson and Vanessa Wiebe. Their guidance will be crucial for this young squad that will likely start rookies Brianne Rauch, Sarah Pettersson and Anne Weiss, according to Lundgren. “Everything is going to be a learning experience, they’re a young squad and luck is a residue of design,” he said. “I thought we earned what we

got and it’s going to be great for next year to have these experience the playoffs.” The Pandas finished second in the Canada West and ranked first in serving aces, second in hitting percentage and sixth in kills. Two of their top hitters, Jenice Warkentin and Jaki Ellis, are ranked first and third respectively in hitting percentage. Freshman Alena Omelchenko is fourth in kills.

Captain Kelly Asleson (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

“Their right side is very good, she’s tall and hits a good ball and serves well and we have to control that best we can. When they’re in system, they have a lot of good hitters, so it’s going to be about getting them out of their system as best we can,” Lundgren said. “If they make some mistakes, we have to make sure we’re playing efficient.” The Wolf Pack as a team rank

fourth in blocks in the Canada West, thanks to six-foot-three middle Katarina Osadchuk and her versatile presence. She is ranked second in blocks. Captain Kelly Asleson leads TRU players in kills and is ranked in the top 20. Setter Kara Twomey finished ranked sixth in assists. Coach Lundgren attributes this season’s success not only to the players but the people behind the scenes. “When I got hired, I said it would be about the people we had around us who are going to make this thing work,” he said. “Now, we have a great support staff that are very consistent and to me that has been the biggest component on why this has worked this year.” TRU finished off the season on the road at UBCO, winning 3-2 on Feb. 10 and losing 3-2 on Feb. 11. The Feb. 10 game turned out to be the one that got them into the playoffs, and it was a close call. The ‘Pack were down 2-1 before rallying behind to win the game in five sets. “We were down and we showed a lot of character and statistically we didn’t play very well but we fought,” Lundgren said. “For me that’s the biggest part, the compete aspect. When we compete, we have great talent and we can do very well.” TRU and Brandon both finished with a 9-11 record, but the ‘Pack win the tiebreaker based on the amount of sets they’ve won and lost. Whatever happens this weekend in the City of Champions, nothing can take away the banner year the women’s volleyball team had.

Middle Katarina Osadchuk has been a force difficult to reckon with for the opposition this season. She is ranked second in the Canada West division of the CIS in blocks heading into the playoffs.

— OMEGA FILE PHOTO

Regina or Saskatchewan: women’s basketball await first round opponent Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

TRU has waited five years for these words: the women’s basketball team has made the playoffs. The WolfPack had a record-setting year, finishing with nine wins and nine losses. The team has qualified for the playoffs, finishing third in the Pacific division of the Canada West. “It’s kind of surreal right now for me to accept it, but I think once we get there and fly out to where we are playing, then it will really hit for sure,” WolfPack forward Diane Schuetze said. A day after the ‘Pack sealed their playoff fates with a win over UBCO (69-59 on Feb. 12), Schuetze was all smiles sitting in the TCC. Her team is riding a season-high four-game winning streak. She also finished the season as the Canada West scoring leader. The ‘Pack start practicing on Feb. 16, but won’t know their opponent until after the weekend. UBC and the 8-9 Victoria Vikes have one game remaining on Feb. 17 which will have a large effect on TRU. If Victoria wins, TRU will be heading to Regina to play the undefeated Cougars. If the Vikes lose, the WolfPack will fly to Saskatoon to play the Huskies. Either way, TRU will be ready, said Schuetze.

“I like playing both of them; they’re big match-ups for me.” Regina’s Lindsay Ledingham will be expected to cover Schuetze’s sixfoot-three frame. Ledingham is sixth in rebounding in the Canada West. Saskatchewan’s rookie sensation, Dalyce Emmerson, will be Schuetze’s match. Also at six-foot-three, Emmerson was the best rebounder in the league this year, averaging 10.4 a game and leading the Canada west in offensive rebounds with 73. “I would like to play Sask again; I think we definitely have it in us to take one off of them. Also with Regina, we always play well against them,” Schuetze said. The WolfPack nearly knocked off the perfect Regina Cougars back on Nov. 26, losing 83-78 at the TCC. TRU forward Tracy Kocs chipped in 17 points and eight rebounds and Schuetze had 21 points and 11 rebounds, outperforming Regina’s Ledingham. The one meeting between TRU and Saskatchewan came on Jan. 21 in Saskatoon, and Schuetze had one of her best games of the year. She scored 31 points and kept the Huskies’ Emmerson to just 13 points. Saskatchewan ended up winning the game 70-62. For Schuetze, this year’s trip to the playoffs is part of the building reputation TRU is getting in the Canadian athletic scene. “It’s really important because it

The WolfPack women’s basketball team poses for a photo op after their final home games of the year, ecstatic to be heading to the playoffs. —PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

puts our name on the map,” she said. “When I first got here, it was like, ‘Oh, why are you going to TRU? Why? Why would you choose that school?’ But now that we are going to the playoffs behind TRU’s name, then people will say, ‘They have that experience after going to playoffs.’” At 5-9 at the end of January, it seemed like a long shot. It took two wins over rival Trinity Western in the first weekend of February to get the ball rolling. TRU’s final home game of the year

on Feb. 11 was important for the playoff picture, but was an emotional one for a different reason. The seat-filled TCC gave a standing ovation to veterans Kailey Colonna, Kaitlyn Widsten and MichelleDimond when they took their final curtain call with a minute left to play in the fourth. TRU pounded UBCO 80-42. They were their final home games of their careers which were spent entirely with the ‘Pack. Colonna finished with six points and three rebounds. Widsten had sev-

en points and two rebounds and Dimond had statistically the best night with eight points and eight rebounds. Their friends and family were on hand to greet the women after the game, including former player Jessica Mulock, who presented the three with their framed jerseys and a portrait to commemorate their five years with TRU. The three veterans will get the moment they’ve been waiting for; and will likely never forget the night of Feb. 11.


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February 15, 2012

Science & Technology

Time out Top virology scientists temporarily halt research on highly transmissible avian flu Critics of the safety of Fouchier’s research were unwavering. John Steinbruner, an international security expert at the University of Maryland, questioned WI N NIPEG (CUP) — The the ability of governments to do leaders of several top virology anything meaningful within 60 labs have agreed to a 60-day days. halt on research involving new Richard Ebright, a biologist strains of avian inf luenza that from Rutgers University in New are more transmissible in mamJersey, called Fouchier’s statemals. ment “strictly symbolic.” The agreement was spear“The letter rejects, out of hand, headed by Ron Fouchier, a the need for enhanced biosafety, Dutch virologist and the lead biosecurity, and dual-use overauthor of a controversial study sight, and, instead, on bird f lu, curmaintains that all rently in press at that is needed is Science. an opportunity for Fouchier’s work researchers ‘to asat the Erasmus sure the public’ Medical Center and ‘to clearly exin Rotterdam creplain the benefits ated a new strain of this important of H5N1 inf luenresearch and the za, which allows measures taken to for the airbor ne minimize its posspread of the vir us sible risk,’” said between fer rets. Ebright. Fer rets catch the Thomas Inglesf lu in a similar by, a biosecurity manner to humans, expert who critiand are thought to cized Fouchier’s be good models research when of f lu infection in it was first anhumans. nounced, comThe United pared bird f lu to States National the Spanish f lu, a Science Advisor y disease that was Board for Bios—Ron Fouchier widespread and ecurity (NSABB), deadly in 1918. to which Fouchier “H5N1 avian insent his paper for f luenza has sickreview before publishing, advised that cer tain de- said Anthony Fauci, from the Na- ened 571 people, killing 59 per tails be left out of the published tional Institute of Allergy and cent of them,” he wrote. “To give Infectious Diseases in Maryland. some perspective, the fatality ar ticle for security reasons. Fouchier himself believes that rate of the virus that caused the After the story broke, Fouchier saw growing public unease about the fears about his research are 1918 Great Pandemic was 2 per cent, and that pandemic killed his research and began talking to overblown. “Bioterrorists can’t make this on the order of 50 million peoother flu scientists. They came to the conclusion virus, it’s too complex, you need ple.” A more transmissible H5N1 that some time was needed to al- a lot of expertise,” he said. “And rogue nations that do virus, he believes, “could cause low governments and health organizations to think about the issues have the capacity to do this don’t billions of illnesses and deaths raised by the work. A statement need our information. So I don’t around the world.” Fouchier plans to keep to the was published on Jan. 20 in the think they will benefit from this NSABB’s recommendations as journals Science and Nature an- information at all.” Meanwhile, the WHO worries well as he can, but warns that it nouncing the pause, which affects work on “highly pathogenic” bird that restrictions on publishing would be “very unwise” not to flu strains. Research on naturally f lu research will jeopardize a share information with his close occurring influenza will continue. painstakingly negotiated inter- collaborators in Indonesia, a maDuring this period, Fouchier national data-sharing agreement jor centre of H5N1 infection. A mechanism for sharing senhopes to organize a meeting intended to “increase and expewith the U.S. government and dite access to essential vaccines, sitive data with legitimate scienthe World Health Organization antivirals and diagnostic kits, es- tists is in the works and expected to be solidified in late February. pecially for outbreak areas.” (WHO) in attendance.

Tom Ingram

The Manitoban (U of M)

“People need to talk, and infectious diseases specialists need to take the microphone and explain why this research is important and how you can do it safely,” he said in an interview with Science. Some are worried about the harsh response to research that could have major benefits to public health. “I have concerns that people understandably concerned about security may put restrictions on important research that might go a little bit too far,”

“Bioterrorists can’t make this virus, it’s too complex...and rogue nations that do have the capacity to do this don’t need our information.”

Math Puzzle of the week Puzzle of the Week #15 – Still More Marbles I have some marbles. Each is one of these colours: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. There is at least one marble of each colour and fewer than ten of each colour. 1. The number of red marbles can be evenly divided by the number of yellow marbles. 2. There are fewer green marbles than blue marbles. 3. There is a different number of marbles for each of the colours. 4. There is an even number of marbles for each of the colours red, yellow, and violet. 5. There are fewer blue marbles than violet marbles. 6. The total number of red, orange, and yellow marbles is equal to one-half of the total number of marbles. 7. None of the numbers of marbles of each colour are prime, except for one of them. How many marbles are there of each of the colours? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 20

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64. 1952 Olympics host 65. Home, informally 66. Heart chambers 67. Western or Buy 68. Arabic miracle 69. Leather whip Down 1. Eastern pooh-bah 2. “Dang!” 3. Common contraction 4. Fashionable 5. Funeral slabs 6. Pursue relentlessly 7. “Give it ___!” 8. Disheveled 9. Harmonize 10. Play title word 11. Relating to a steward 12. Spoonful, say 13. Cold shower? 18. Spicy stew 19. Corn dish 24. Like, with “to” 25. Mark for misconduct 27. Aroma 28. Truth 29. Scat queen, to friends 30. Hinged dredgers 34. “And I Love ___” (1964 tune) 35. Mature

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Notice anything wrong with The Omega? Bring it to our attention and win a prize. We may have done it on purpose just to keep you on your toes...or you might just be helping us get better. Either way... you win!


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February 15, 2012

TRUSU Membership Advisory Did you know the Students’ Union has a

MEMBERS’ ADVOCATE? The Members’ Advocate can help you with academic issues, housing issues, and more. To set up a meeting, email advocate@trusu.ca

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

Don’t believe it can happen? Tuition fees for Adult Basic Education were eliminated in 2007

This Week:

Travelling over Reading Break? Post your trip on the RIDESHARE to save $$ and reduce your carbon footprint!

WWW.TRUSU.CA

• TRU Cultural Events • TRUSU SIFE Club - Tool Box Workshop • Board of Governors election nomination deadline Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

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Did you know that you can file your taxes online for free? UFile and the Canadian Federation of Students have partnered so that students can file their taxes online for free! It’s fast, easy, and convenient. All you need to qualify is your tuition fees tax receipt (T2202A)

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