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VOLUME 21 ISSUE 28 April 18, 2012

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TRU Distinguished Alumni Awards

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The “fresh face” of Kamloops art

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WolfPack year in review 10

Another year done...almost

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PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES

TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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April 18, 2012

Feature Organization helps young workers with bad bosses Devan C. Tasa

Von Sychowski says that most non-unionized workers, fearing beAround five years ago, an ice cream ing dismissed from their jobs, simply parlour in Vancouver that was shutting don’t fill out the self-help kits. “A large amount of people will down for the winter laid off all of its workers without any notice or sever- simply say: ‘Well, forget about it. I’m not going to take that risk. I’m not goance pay. The B.C. Employment Standards ing to do that. It’s too intimidating, Branch was unwilling to step in until it’s too risky’ and so a lot of the comthe workers completed a form that must plaints just disappear,” he said. That’s where workers can contact also be filled in by the employer. The employer was unwilling to co-operate. EARN for help. Over the last year, The workers were left with one op- EARN has assisted between 120 to tion, says Stephen Von Sychowski, 150 workers. EARN now has around who was friends with one of the work- 1,500 members. “Our goal is not just to create a ers. “That’s when we actually did picket large membership that’s names on that business and actually did, over the paper,” said Von Sychowski. “It’s to course of two days, win the severance create an activist base of non-union workers that can work collectively pay,” Von Sychowski said. with us and That event take some acinspired the cretion to improve ation of the Emthings out ployee Action there.” and Rights NetThe liquor work (EARN) server wage in 2010, which is one thing was founded to that EARN is help non-uniontaking action ized workers against. On deal with bad May 1, most employers, workers will educate young have a $10.25 workers about an hour minitheir rights in mum wage. the workplace But those who and advocate serve liquor for improvewill have a ments to labour minimum standards. wage of $9. Von Sy“We bechowski is now lieve that there the chair of the should be a B.C. Federa—Steven Von Sychowski m i n i m u m tion of Labour’s wage and there Young Workers Committee, which is the organization shouldn’t be anything below that,” said Von Sychowski. “The minimum behind EARN. If a non-unionized worker wants is the minimum.” EARN is also calling on the proto deal with a problem with his or her boss, that worker must first go to the vincial government to restore a reguEmployment Standards Branch’s web- lation requiring there be more than site, then fill out a form called a “self- one person working at a gas station help kit.” The self-help kit must be during late night hours. As of Apr. 15, 2012, late night gas filled out within six months. Problems that the self-help kit can station workers can work alone if the deal with include not being paid prop- employers install a time-lock safe for erly, not getting a notice of termination cash, limit access to the inside of the and severance pay when being laid off station, provide video surveillance and the employee having to pay for ob- and provide the employee with monitored emergency transmitters. taining and cleaning a work uniform. Those who want to join EARN can The worker must then give the filled-out self-help kit with their griev- do so by filling out an online form at ance to their employer. If the employer www.earnbc.ca. It is free to join and does not respond to the self-help kit any information and correspondence within 15 days, only then can a worker is confidential. Those who want ask the Employment Standards Branch EARN’s help can contact them at info@earnbc.ca. for help.

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TRU Distinguished Alumni Awards honour deserving recipients Taylor Rocca Ω Roving Editor

The 2012 Thompson Rivers University (TRU) Distinguished Alumni Awards dinner was held on Apr. 13 in the Grand Hall of TRU’s Campus Activity Centre. Five awards were given out on the evening, including the Neil Russell Student Leadership Award, the Grace Chronister Bachelor of Social Work Award, the Professional Achievement Award, the Community Service Award and the Milestone Achievement Award. The evening opened with TRU president, Dr. Alan Shaver, addressing the audience prior to the award presentations. “You remind us of why we are here and you inspire us to become an even better institution,” Shaver said. “In short, you carry our banner everyday, and for this we thank you sincerely.” Amanda Jones was the first award recipient to be recognized. Currently pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree majoring in chemistry, Jones was awarded the Neil Russell Student Leadership Award. She volunteered as a hockey coach as well as a student mentor on campus. “Volunteering is like tossing a stone in water,” Jones said. “You impact one person and the ripples that form from that one stone spread out and affect others around them.” The second award recipient to be honoured was Raj Chahal, who was given the Grace Chronister Bachelor of Social Work Award. Chahal completed her Bachelor of Social Work degree in 2002 at TRU and has since moved on to work for the Ministry of Children and Family Development and most recently Royal Inland Hospital. Chahal has also taught at TRU for the past six years. “I am very honoured that this university has not only served my education, but continued to guide me in my profession,” Chahal said. Paul Houle, receipient of the Professional Achievement Award, was the third honouree. Houle completed his Bachelor of Science degree in 2001 at TRU. He would go on to become an analytical chemist, creating two state-ofthe-art chemistry laboratories.

Raj Chahal (right) receives the Grace Chronister Bachelor of Social Work Award at the 2012 TRU Distinguished Alumni Awards dinner.

—PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

“If you were to have asked me 11 years ago when I finished my studies at [TRU] if I would be standing here receiving this award,” Houle said, “my response to you would be ‘you are categorically insane.’ “I was the guy who at the time thought it was a very, very good idea to organize study sessions at Heroes,” Houle said. “Believe me when I tell you that never, ever works out the way you think it will.” James McCreath was then honoured with the Community Service Award. McCreath received his Bachelor of Journalism from TRU in 2002 and went on to obtain a Masters of Business Administration (MBA) from Royal Roads University. He has worked with KidSport Calgary and most recently BMO Nesbitt Burns. McCreath helped to raise more than $14,000 towards the purchase of software that will help elementary students new to Canada learn English. “My narrative ended up crossing paths with TRU,” McCreath said. “I learned about the power of story telling and enhancing your story and enhancing the story of others.

“I came here and I was inspired, I was engaged and I was appreciated. The net result of that is that when I left here, I was empowered. I am forever grateful to TRU for that experience.” KPMG was the final award recipient of the night, receiving the Milestone Achievement Award for its support towards TRU students over many years. Ian Hanomansing wrapped the night up as the event’s keynote speaker. Hanomansing’s speech highlighted a list of “five things that make Canada great that we take for granted.” Hanomansing’s list consisted of the following: It doesn’t matter what postsecondary institution you attend. Public school is a viable option for parents to send their children to. We are extraordinarily safe in this country. We are advanced in diversity acceptance in this country. We own an incredible level of free speech. The TRU Distinguished Alumni Awards has honoured 65 different TRU alumni since the event was first established in 1995.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 28

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

April 18, 2012

Volume 21, Issue 28

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272

Editorial Everyone else did a “year in review” Things type piece, so I guess I get to, as well I learned

BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Roving Editor

Editor’s Note

Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief

Taylor Rocca Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Devan C. Tasa, Amy Berard, Marvin Beatty, Lauren Bell, Julia Marks, David Luca

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

CHECK OUT SOME GREAT WEB-EXCLUSIVE ARTICLES AND PHOTOS THIS WEEK AT THEOMEGA.CA

In the spirit of Kergin’s “Things I learned this year” column to the right — as well as his “In case you missed it” feature we’ve been running most of the year and Crosby’s “Year that was in TRU sports” on page 10 this week — I thought for my last column of the winter 2012 TRU semester, I might treat you to a brief rundown of the best (in my opinion) pieces The Omega had to offer over the course of the last 28 issues. We opened the year with a fun “get to know what’s around you” geocache game that never really caught on. It was a fun way to see some areas of Kamloops — often within walking distance — that you should’ve checked out (and still can!). Those who participated were greatly rewarded, not just with prizes from us, but with amazing views and fun experiences. Kamloops got in on the “Occupy” movement for a while in the fall, but considering that we’re not exactly a mecca of high-finance or a poverty-stricken community

destroyed by corporate greed, that never really caught on, either. A fair number of important or influential people visited our campus throughout the year. Not only did many of the federal NDP leadership candidates stop by during their campaigns to lead the party, but senator Mobina Jaffer came and discussed women’s and Aboriginal rights, Peter Mansbridge (one of the most recognizable Canadian broadcasters in history) came to talk about what’s great about Canada and Canadians, and Chief Justice the Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin came to discuss the strengths and flaws in the Canadian judicial system. These were all fantastic events, we should be proud to have hosted such people, and I think The Omega had great coverage of these visits. Hardly anyone bothered to vote. For anything. Over the Christmas break, the first student representative for the board of governors and senate was elected with a whopping 2.2 per cent turnout of eligible voters. Some thought the poor turnout was a result of a lack of awareness of the election and the fact that it was held while everyone was on break, but a few months later, we turned out in even fewer numbers while school was in full session to elect a second representative. A slightly higher number of people bothered to vote for their student union representatives, but that number barely broke the 10 per cent mark of eligible voters. It’s possible that because there was only one nominee for every position, people didn’t feel it was worth voting for either the nominee or not the nominee.

The last few weeks of the year had some of the most interesting news, as well as some of our best coverage, I think. TRU student Sooraya Graham had her art ripped off the wall in the fine arts wing of Old Main by a staff member of TRU World, an event that has since garnered national (and in fact international) attention about the issues of freedom of expression, gender roles and stigmas associated with cultural preconceptions. We’re still waiting on the press release about disciplinary action (or lack thereof ) taken, and will update this story when there’s some sort of resolution beyond the official statement that the school doesn’t condone this type of behaviour. TRU was recently acknowledged for its sustainability initiatives — a growing issue being considered by students as far as their choice of university (see story on page eight this week). Kamloops’ first ever Pride Parade was held right here at TRU just a few weeks ago, and was a fitting conclusion to a great semester, with people from all demographics coming together to celebrate equality. You can check out these stories and everything else we covered this year at theomega.ca under “full issues.” Have a great summer, good luck to those of you who still have final exams and I’ll see you on the stands again in September if you’re not around for our monthly publications from May to August. editorofomega@gmail.com

A final note as you finish up As the semester winds down, this will be my final column of the school year. I started writing in December with the goal of helping you as a reader to “know your community,” and not just on this campus, but in larger Kamloops as well. In the past month alone, I can think of two excellent examples of the strength of our campus community. Just two weeks ago, Kamloops’ first-ever pride parade was hosted on our campus because of an entirely student-led initiative. The celebration included many community groups who arrived on campus due to the inclusivity and leadership shown by TRU. As well, the recent controversy over Sooraya Graham’s photo of a woman in a niqab holding a bra made TRU the subject of several national media stories. The highlight though is the support shown by TRU’s administration towards Graham and our ability to embrace cultures in this international community we’ve created in Kamloops. TRU is making concerted efforts to enhance our community and each of us has an opportunity to participate. Starting next September, a “culture of caring” will be introduced across campus in an effort to create a more caring and open community.

In the meantime, become involved and take advantages of opportunities this summer. If you’re still a student searching for a summer job, I suggest introducing yourself to one of our many local non-profit organizations.

Know Your Community Amy Berard

Most of them are still awaiting approval for government funding and once they receive it, they will be looking to TRU students to start work in early May. You can find many of these organizations on www.accesskamloops. org. A summer at a local non-profit could give you a new perspective on lives led under different cir-

cumstances, or on how you can use your education to make a difference. One of the many roles you could take on could find you planting a garden with people who have mental illnesses, hanging out with youth who have endured juvenile detention, teaching brain injury awareness to young kids or picking fruits and vegetables from local gardens for people in need. Congratulations to those of you graduating and entering the TRU alumni community. Whether you move far away or stay right here at home, I encourage you to remain connected with the campus. Our alumni network is growing and there are opportunities for you to give back to the school. Volunteer some of your time as a career mentor to a TRU student and share your experience as a new graduate. Whatever you decide to do, I hope you are finding your place at TRU and in Kamloops, and welcoming those students who will join us in September. Amy Berard is a TRU business student and the campus liaison for United Way. To get connected with the community, email her at youth@unitedwaytnc.ca.

this year

Kergin’s Take

Brendan Kergin, News Edior

There are a few things I’ve learned at TRU. Some of them are even the reasons I came here. Here are the other ones: TRU World is actually a separate school from TRU. And TRU Residence is a separate company. And Aramark food services aren’t part of the school either! OK, that last one is a pretty well-known fact, as they’re one of the biggest companies in North America and provide grub for many many schools, hospitals and other places in need of uncomplicated food. But yeah, the first two are true too at TRU. The vending machines dispense pop at a surprising price structure. For barely over half the price of a bottle of pop you can get a can of pop. If my math is correct, a bottle is 591 ml. Two cans are 710. That’s a net difference of 119 ml. That’s big over a year, and then you have two reasons to sneak out of a boring class. Also, the vending machines only stock the most inoffensive Dorito’s f lavour, Nacho Cheese. On lucky occasions Zesty Cheese may show up. The campus pub Heroes is not even second-place on the list of places open latest to get food. It’s regularly beaten by the Tim Horton’s in the House of Learning and Common Grounds coffee shop run by TRUSU. The science building has lots of cool little nooks to hide in. The CFBX house was built before Hitler died — and I just won a bet for fitting Hitler into one of my articles for The Omega. Buying a mattress is essential for good grades. Currently stacked on this student’s f loor are three foamies and a sleeping bag. I don’t sleep well. Not sleeping well means I go to class tired. Ipso facto, sleep is important for school; roving editor Taylor Rocca was right. Don’t wear a real tie to court. A clip-on will slip off your neck when you get grabbed by an alleged violent offender. Location, location, location is important not just for where you live, but also for where you place your school. Being surrounded by industrial businesses and big box corporate stores is unlikely to have helped the culture of the school. How long until we can gentrify this joint?


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April 18, 2012

News In case you missed it, Kergin’s got you covered: Things you probably didn’t see happening around you last week Brendan Kergin Ω News Editor

Global • Kabul attacks While Canada’s combat role in Afghanistan has wrapped up, the beleaguered country is still dealing with war-like violence on a regular basis, even in its capital. Kabul experienced an attack lasting 18 hours this past weekend, which has left nearly 20 people dead, mostly from the insurgents’ group. Automatic firearms and grenades were fired at buildings belonging to the government in the city. The attack was launched around the same time as three other attacks in other provinces of Afghanistan. Read more at cbc.ca. • Cuba left out Most countries in the Western Hemisphere gathered their leaders together last week as part of the Summit of the Americas. One notable exception to the list of attendees was Cuba. This became more notable as discussions turned to inviting the small island nation to the next summit. While most countries

agreed, Canada stood by it’s biggest trade partner the U.S. American President Barack Obama said the country had not yet reached acceptable levels of democracy or human rights yet to deserve attendance at the summit. Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Cuba can attend next time if it is a democratic nation. Read more at bbc.co.uk/news.

National • Québec students University students in Québec are continuing to fight with their provincial government over how the post-secondary system is funded. While students have been striking for weeks due to the government’s plan to double tuition fees over the next few years ,the government has been working out a plan to appease the students. Instead of looking at tuition increases, they’ve presented a plan to increase student aid, providing more and offering it to students coming from higher-income families than before. As of press time the student organizations central to the protest were not interested. Read more at cupwire.ca

• Dav id Su z uk i David Su z u k i is resig n i ng f rom h is posit ion on the David Su z u k i Fou nd at ion. Yes, he’s resig n i ng f rom the orga n izat ion wh ich bea rs h is name. I n an open let ter on h is website he descr ibes how he wishes to be an elder now a nd able to spea k f reely about what he sees. With the Ha r per gover n ment look i ng at alter i ng how cha r it ies a re classif ied , Su z u k i is wor r ied h is polit ical st ate ments may ha r m the fou nd at ions st at us as a n envi ron ment al cha r it y. W h ile not st at i ng explicitly who the fou nd at ion’s oppo nents a re, he does suggest they a re at tempt i ng to silence the fou nd at ion th roug h at t ack i ng its cha r it able st at us. Read more at davidsuz u ki.ca.

Prov incial • B.C. by- elect ion A pai r of provi ncial by- elect ions on T hu rsd ay could give a bet ter read of the polit ical cli mate i n B.C. tha n any poll. Two seats i n the legislat u re a re open i n t wo r idi ngs with st rong Liberal h istor ies.

IN MEMORIAM. Students both past and present, faculty, friends and family gathered at the Sagebrush Theatre on Apr. 11 to celebrate the memory of Jane Powell, a treasured member of the Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) faculty. Jane passed away this past summer, but remains very present in the hearts of all who knew her. The second-year B. Ed students fundraised and because of the generous donations they received, were able to purchase a seat plaque at the theatre in her honour (J15), drama supplies for the B. Ed program and a photo and plaque to hang in AE 366. Jane made enormous contributions to the education and drama communities and the B. Ed students are proud to have helped preserve her memory.

—PHOTO BY LAUREN BELL

However bot h seats a re be i ng challenged for by N DP a nd Conser vat ive ca nd id ates, wit h other smaller pa r t ies havi ng cand id ates as well. T h is is a cha nce for t he B.C. Liberals to halt or at least slow thei r ever-si n k i ng poll nu mbers, wh ile t he Conser vat ives look at it as a cha nce to f i nally ret u r n to Victor ia. Read more at cbc.ca. • Enbr idge march A lb e r t a’s Enbr idge I nc. fa ce d some he at i n B.C.’s cap it al cit y ove r t he we eke nd a s a ct iv ist s t o ok t o t he st re et t o prot e st t he prop ose d Nor t he r n G at eway P roje ct , a pip el i ne con ne ct i ng t he oi lsa nd s i n Nor t he r n A lb e r t a t o t he Pacif ic O ce a n. T he g roup, wh ich h a d ne a rly 1,0 0 0 pa r t icipa nt s at it s p e a k , shut dow n m ajor roa d s a s it m a de it s way t o t he leg islat u re. T he prot e st wa s i n s pi re d by a do cu me nt a r y m a de by a pai r of e co -a dve nt u re r s who t r avel le d t he prop ose d pip el i ne’s rout e. T he f i l m wa s show n re ce ntly i n Vict or ia . Re a d more at t i me scolon ist. com

Local • Kamloops sports The Kamloops Sports Council held it’s annual awards last week and highlighted the achievements of a variety of local sports people. 17-year-old Keifer Johnson won male athlete of the year while Tori Spence won female athlete for competitive speed skating and cycling. Local mountain biker Catharine Pendrel and shot-putter Dylan Armstrong were also honoured after strong years internationally. Read more on kamloopsnews.ca • Miller time Adrian Miller has been put under house arrest after pleading guilty to charges related to breach of probation and theft. While he currently does not have a home to stay in after being evicted from his former residence in March he will likely be staying in a motel until he finds a new permanent address. His sentence allows him to return to his university classes as well. Miller’s complex story will continue as he is still pursuing a civil case against TRU. Read more at kamloopsthisweek.com.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 28

Arts & Entertainment Kamloops newcomer puts a fresh face on region Clement Yeh makes portraits of locals in a variety of mediums, creating eclectic show

Cory Hope

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor Clement Yeh with a pen in his hands makes me really jealous. Maybe not if he was writing, because I’ve never read any of his writing (and I’m rather fond of my own because I happen to think I’m pretty funny sometimes, even if your average economist might disagree), but get Yeh drawing and I have to say I wouldn’t even want to play a game of hangman against him. But I’d gladly go see his show again, and you should probably go see it, too. Yeh has been TRU’s studio technician for the visual arts department this year, and somehow, despite all of the time he’s put into making things work so that students can work, he’s managed to put together a show of all his own new material. How do I know it’s all new material? Because Yeh is new to town, and his show features people from Kamloops. In fact, it’s called “Fresh Faces: Portraits of Kamloops Residents By a Newcomer.” The show, hosted at Wilson House Gallery at 115 Tranquille Rd., opened up Apr. 10 and runs until May 9. It features several different works of Yeh’s. Each piece uses a different medium (OK, two of them were us-

ing the same medium, but I think in the art world they are classified as a diptych), and each one’s a recognizable portrait of a person with whom he has met since he moved to Kamloops. On top of more traditional methods of portraiture, such as watercolour and pen drawings, there are also a pair of carved maple portraits. I’m not implying that the ballpoint pen was invented before carving here, but the precision in the maple carvings Yeh has produced look so much like they were made using lasers, the label for them specifically states that no lasers were used. The fine work on these pieces was done with a scroll saw. Another medium used is Meccano, which is sort of like a predecessor to Lego except made of metal. Using bits of Meccano, Yeh made a large-scale portrait of a TRU student. While looking at this one, I couldn’t help but think that it looked like what a character out of a video game from Futurama would look like if you yanked it out of the television and put it on the wall. Please note: I love Futurama, and this is a compliment. Perhaps the most unusual piece, to me at least, was also one of the most instantly recognizable, both in subject and medium. It was a portrait carved out of drywall.

Clement Yeh uses unusual mediums in his portraiture. Despite the often minimalist use of line and shape, the subjects are definitely recognizable.

—PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

While drywall is not necessarily the most unusual thing to make art with (ask anyone with a child about that), Yeh has captured a moment with this portait that has made this person instantly recognizeable, even though a bare minimum of lines were used.

I had to leave before the show had actually started, but according to everyone I spoke to who made it out, Fresh Faces was both well-attended and well-received. Hopefully, Yeh will return to us after the summer. He’s returning to Montreal to

be with his family over the break, but judging by the work he’s put into making portraits of people he’s met in town, he’s grown quite fond of Kamloops and the people in it. Wilson House Gallery is open from Monday to Friday, 1 to 4 p.m.

Ye Olde Canadian Music Corner Kergin and Rocca highlight the underappreciated Taylor Rocca Ω Roving Editor

Brendan Kergin Ω News Editor

San Sebastian is an indie-rock act from Hamilton, Ont. They’ve earned recent publicity travelling as the opening act on the tour for fellow Hamiltonians, the Arkells. San Sebastian rolled through Kamloops earlier in this academic year in support of their most recent album Relations, which was released Oct. 4, 2011. Relations features the singles Wake Up and Young Youth. Also worth checking out is the track Say I’m Alright. With catchy pop lyrics and melodies, San Sebastian is a band that will appeal to a wide variety of listeners. There are instances where Relations reminds me of Jimmy

Eat World’s infamous album Bleed American. Chances are if you enjoy that classic record from Jimmy Eat World, you will also enjoy San Sebastian’s debut studio album. San Sebastian is led by the energetic and boisterous performance of vocalist Mike Veerman, who gives it his all while onstage. When seeing Veerman live and comparing his performance to the record, it easy to tell that he doesn’t ease up in the studio either. Veerman’s vocals ooze with energy and an upbeat attitude throughout Relations. San Sebastian is offering a free download of their track Baby, which can be found on their website, www.sansebastianmusic.com.

With a show at the legendary SXSW last year followed by three shows at this year’s Canadian Music Week in their hometown of Toronto and past appearances at New York’s CMJ and Halifax’s Pop Explosion Festival, Dinosaur Bones is getting its name out there. So the band’s got a bit of hype to pique your interest, but what does it offer? The quintet’s quintessential sound is a slower, dreamier indie sound. Aiming to create thoughtful music, the band doesn’t rely on a quirky sound or big bombastic musicianship, instead it hits a solid sound between banal pop rock of the mainstream and inaccessible hipster rock. The slower feel doesn’t suggest party rock; this is more a style created for listening pleasure while you’re physically doing something. Not a sit back and try and discover the meaning behind ob-

scure lyrics, it’s much more easy going than that. No frills rock music, how it it was supposed to have evolved before marketing corporations got ahold of the genre. A solid member of the Canadian indie scene, Dinosaur Bones has toured with Yukon Blonde recently, and shared stages with the likes of I Mother Earth and Sloan. While it’s often played as the opener, there’s a good chance the band will be swinging through the country as the leader of its own tour soon. With the release of My Divider on Mar. 8, it’s now got a young album to nurture and grow and share with the country. Check out the song Ice Hotels for an auditory example of Dinosaur Bones’ work.

RENOS UNDERWAY! Grant’s Crane Services was contracted to lift new boiler and heating machinery to the roof of the Old Main building at Thompson Rivers University on Apr. 5. The 51.5 m high crane was doing work to prepare for a third floor that will house the new School of Law.

—PHOTO BY MARVIN BEATTY


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April 18, 2012

C ongratulations

2012 Grunert Scholarship

Nominees

Thompson Rivers University launched the Alvin & Lydia Grunert Scholarship to recognize and foster academic achievement: eight scholarships valued at $5,000 each, offered to the student with the highest Fall/Winter GPA from each faculty and school and one athlete.

Each Winter term, the 10 students from each faculty, school, and athletics with the highest Fall GPAs will be nominated for the scholarship. Each May, the students with the highest combined Fall and Winter GPAs will each be offered one of eight Grunert scholarships for

use in the 2012 Fall term. Almost 1,000 top TRU students met the scholarship’s stringent minimum criteria. Of those, only the top 10 from each area were selected, for a total of 70 nominations, as listed below. This elite group’s average Fall GPA was 4.21.

The following continuing students held the 10 highest GPAs* in their faculty last term Faculty of Arts Chace Barber Elisabeth Bass Alexander Condon Amy Longo Robert Marsden Emily Hope Will Plommer Rebecca Sanden Elizabeth Warner Graham Woodhurst

Faculty of Science Colin Bailey Natascha Hedrich Michael Hildebrandt Harry Holman Teralynn Ledger Taran Main Kristine McDonald Jennifer Olsen Jillian Rutherford Justin Smeaton Blake St.Peter

School of Business and Economics Mohsen Alyami Ruvimbo Chinyanganya Matthew Klassen Reta Langlands Katelin McNichol Brittany Morrison Parth Patel Shannon Rex Kateryna Shkal Breanna Wacheck

* based on

School of Nursing Jessica Bauer Kaitlin Clement Sarah Denbigh Melanie Klein Amelia Mackay-Smith Tiana Miller-Tait Mary Stewart Melanie van Erp Janine Vanwyk Jennifer Werkman

Athletics Nicholas Azad Rolena de Bruyn Kelsey Googel Monica Hehli Kia Lidster Jessica Paustian Spencer Reed Justin Smeaton Vanessa Wiebe Taiysa Worsfold

scholarship criteria

MC_00116081

(For complete criteria, see www.tru.ca/finaid/awards, click View the TRU Awards Guide, select Award Type “Scholarship”, and click Alvin & Lydia Grunert Scholarship)

Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism Kristina Kisio Colin Loose Aiden Macintyre Audrey Mataseje Shawneen Moorhouse Jyllean Norlander Evan Rathgeber Hailey Robertson Katelyn Scorer Yan Yan Wu

Faculty of Human, Social, and Educational Development Kyle Allan Heidi Athersych Kelsey Clovechok Samantha Elliott Kathryn Gibbard Cassandra Hook Chelan Lubin Robyn Samborsky Kaelene Santos Tatijana Yung

LEARN MORE about this award and other student awards at

www.tru.ca/finaid/awards


7

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 28

Photo Gallery

PHOTO CREDITS: ABOVE: CORY HOPE ABOVE RIGHT: TAYLOR ROCCA BELOW RIGHT: CORY HOPE BELOW LEFT: JULIA MARKS

BEST PHOTOS OF 2011/2012 (WINTER)

We’re still looking for a photo/image editor for next year. Send samples, cover letter and resume to: editorofomega@gmail.com


8

April 18, 2012

Life & Community

TRU named STARS silver institution

Sustainability award recognizes excellence as well as ways to improve on area of growing awareness

that TRU is doing very well at the moment,” Owens said, “But Taylor Rocca it also highlights areas where we Ω Roving Editor can improve.” Dr. Owen is the liaison for the TRU submission to the AASHE. Thompson Rivers University “Students are demanding more (TRU) has been named a Sustainof their university in terms of ability Tracking Assessment and sustainability,” Dr. Owens said Rating System (STARS) silver via email, “New students are coninstitution by the Association for sidering sustainability in their the Advancement of Sustainabilichoice of university. ty in Higher Education (AASHE). “[The STARS rating] is an opSTARS is a means for univerportunity for TRU to highlight sities and colleges to measure sustainability in resustainability cruitment.” performance and TRU joins the Unicompare progress versity of Northern to past results. It B.C. (UNBC), Okanalso provides acaagan College, Royal demic institutions Roads University with the opportu(RRU) and Simon nity to compare Fraser University themselves with (SFU) as the only competing instituSTARS silver-rated tions. in B.C. The AASHE, —Dr. Tom Owen schools According to located in Lexthe STARS webington, Ky., is the Operational components of the site, www.stars.aashe.org, TRU international professional organization in the field of post-second- report include more common sus- scored lower than UNBC and ary institutional sustainability. It tainability issues such as energy Okanagan College, but higher use, water conservation and recy- than SFU. was established in Jan. 2006. The University of B.C. (UBC) On Dec. 19, 2011, TRU submit- cling. The full breakdown of TRU’s is the only academic institution in ted a report to the AASHE for its consideration. The report re- report is available at https:// the province to receive a STARS quired that the institution answer s t a r s . a a s h e . o r g / i n s t i t u t i o n s / gold-rating from the AASHE, over 100 questions that address thompson-r ivers-universit y-bc/ scoring 65.09. The rating will be good for academic and operational areas report/2011-12-19/. According to Dr. Tom Owen, three years, although TRU is free of sustainability. This is the first time that TRU has made a sub- the director for environmental to submit once per year. The STARS project is currently mission to the AASHE in an ef- sustainability at TRU, the rating is important to TRU because of only active in North America. fort to receive a STARS rating. There are four rating levels the institution’s founding princi- AASHE has recently launched a within STARS: bronze, silver, ple to be the university of choice STARS international pilot project for academic institutions outside gold and platinum. A minimum for environmental sustainability. “[The STARS rating] shows of North America. score of 45 is required to obtain a silver rating. TRU scored 48.57. In order to step up to the gold rating, a minimum score of 65 is required. No post-secondary institution has obtained a platinum rating, which requires a minimum score of 85. Academic components of the report include areas such as the number of courses addressing sustainability and the number of faculty engaging in sustainability-based research.

“Students are demanding more of their university in terms of sustainability.”

“Your Space Place” The exams will soon be finished. Now you need to store your possessions for the summer.

STUDENT SPECIAL 15% OFF March to September For as many months as you prepay. 10’x10’ or smaller—must present Student ID

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Community Calendar There are many upcoming events for career prep and employment strategies. Check out www.tru.ca/ careereducation/ events to find out more about ways to improve your prospects.

If you know of upcoming events that the student body should be aware of, you should let us know! Get them in the calendar for free! Contact: editorofomega@gmail.com Anything that is happening next month that you want us to tell people about should be included. “Community calendar” in the subject line will help ensure they get to the campus community.


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 28

Arts & Entertainment

Not a Titanic 3D review

Our arts and entertainment editor orders the wrong ticket on purpose

Cory Hope

Ω Arts and Entertainment Editor I couldn’t do it. I was going to go and see Titanic 3D and review it for you, but the fates were against it. I couldn’t even fake it for you because I have never seen Titanic, but I do know that the ship sinks by the end of the movie and Kate Winslet shows her boobs and then throws Leonardo DiCaprio into the water. I also know Celine Dion sang a lot, which probably would have sent me throwing myself into the icy abyss too if I had had the option. But as I said, the fates were against it. There I was at the ticket booth, cursing myself for agreeing to see Titanic and ruining my claim to fame as the last person on Earth who hadn’t seen it. (W hich does beg the question: W ho needs a review of Titanic?) But when my mouth opened up I said, “One for Cabin In The Woods, please.” If I had gone to the theatre and not seen a new Joss Whedon movie, and instead gone to see, well, anything else to be honest, I would have never been able to forgive myself. Joss Whedon is the brains behind Firef ly, the too-short-lived television series about space cowboys; the recently cancelled Dollhouse, which never got its due; Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Buffy’s spinoff series Angel. If you haven’t seen any of

those, go check them out. If you don’t like any of them, let us never speak to each other again. He also wrote the screenplay for the original Toy Story. Are you sold on seeing Cabin In The Woods yet, or do I have to review it? I’ll keep writing, just in case. Five kids go on a camping trip into the middle of nowhere, searching for a cabin so far off the grid that there’s no cellphone service. Cliché enough for you? Don’t worry, Joss Whedon wouldn’t leave you in the woods with a cliché. Of course, all hell breaks loose on their innocent weekend vacation, and victims - ahem, I meant innocent campers - find themselves on the wrong end of a new kind of old kind of horror movie. The Cabin In The Woods knows that you know what happens in the cabin in the woods, but from before the opening credits are over serves you up a twist that you would never have seen coming, which it explores along the way. I can remain spoiler-free (at least as much as the commercials and previews keep it) by telling you that secret agencies and SWAT teams get involved as the happy campers get picked off one at a time, running for their lives as they try to figure out just what the hell is going on. Fran Kranz plays Marty, the stoner. Of course there had to be a stoner. He’s the conspiracy-theorist of

the bunch, and an integral part of any group of kids heading off into the woods. He’s also the all-too-important fifth wheel of the social group. His background in the Whedonverse (the universe of Joss Whedon) was the character of Topher Brink, the genius engineer at The Dollhouse. Even if Whedon himself wasn’t involved with The Cabin In The Woods, I would have gone to see it just for Kranz. His delivery of lines is so brilliant that the lines themselves only have to be a little bit funny for him to make them hilarious. According to my wife he’s easy on the eyes, too. I guess I can see that. And speaking of easy on the eyes, the rest of the cast is right up there, too, and for a horror movie their acting is pretty damn good. Even the f lash-and-stabbed types are way above par for this style of movie. Hopefully this movie marks a return of some sort for Joss Whedon after two television shows in a row got cancelled. Even though he wrote the Avengers movie due out this summer (which I probably will go to see, just because he wrote the screenplay), I would rather see an original story by him than his style of writing placed onto a pre-existing idea. So what does any of this have to do with Titanic 3D? Go see Cabin In The Woods, that’s what. Trust me. Have I ever let you down? (Pipe down, Mom.)

—IMAGE COURTESY LIONSGATE FILMS

John K. Samson, lead singer of The Weakerthans, plays the Commodore downtown on Apr. 12. The event was put on by David Luca, Kacie Wright, Brandy White, Kristina Kisio, Kaitlin Veillette, Terry Welton, Kazu Tasogare and Paris Sanesh as part of TRU’s staging special events course, and was a great success.

—PHOTO BY DAVID LUCA


10

April 18, 2012

Sports

The year that was for TRU sports

Women’s teams all make playoffs, tradgedy won’t keep a good man down, and the future looks bright Nathan Crosby Ω Sports Editor

WolfPack teams skated, swung, smashed, shot, dribbled, danced, ran, kicked and screamed their way into writing another chapter of TRU’s growing athletic programs. It was the women’s teams who stole the spotlight this year with the volleyball, basketball and soccer programs all making the playoffs in their respective leagues. The year started with the women’s soccer team winning the PACWEST title, defeating UBCO 2-1 for the school’s first conference title in the sport since 2004. The heroic effort of Alanna Bekkering, who scratched her retina in the semi-final game against Langara College, was the stuff of sports lore. She scored both goals in the championship game, including the overtime winner and was named Championship MVP. The team went on to represent TRU at the CCAA Nationals in Québec City where they finished fourth in the country. The team was defeated by the Ahuntsic Indiennes 3-0 in the semi-finals but was voted the most sportsman-like team at the tournament. The women’s volleyball team achieved a new benchmark this year in wins and for the first time since joining the CIS, made the playoffs. The team went on a five-game winning streak that started with a win over Brandon on Jan. 20. Captain Kelly Asleson finished in the top 20 in hitting percentage and kills in the Canada West and setter Kara Twomey finished sixth in assists.

While the team will say goodbye to Asleson and Twomey as well as Amanda Frayne and Vanessa Wiebe, the team’s future looks to be heading in the right direction with the emergence of Anne Weiss, Brianne Rauch and libero Sara Pettersson. The team finished with a 9-11 record under the tutelage of coach Keith Lundgren and eventually lost in the first round of the playoffs to Alberta. The women’s basketball team also made the playoffs for the first time, finishing the season on a four game winning streak and a 9-9 record. The team was one of the best rebounding teams in the Canada West. Forward Diane Schuetze finished first in scoring and third in rebounding and Jorri Duxbury finished second in assists. The team looked to be out of it in January when they hit a four game losing streak, but the team pulled through with back-to-back wins over Trinity Western and UBCO. The team played Saskatchewan in the first round of the playoffs, losing by six points in the first game and following it up with a loss in the game two to end the year. Both the women’s volleyball and basketball teams set new standards for TRU. Away from the hardwood, the golf team finished third in team standings in the PACWEST and Riley Balson won an individual silver medal for his play during the season. October came and tragedy of the most unimaginable and probable nature occurred in an exhibition baseball game at Norbrock stadium. The heart and soul of the base-

ball team, Tyler Lowey, was struck in the eye after swinging at a high fastball. The ball smashed his right eye and he would go on to lose it. A glass eye was made for him and he was forced to leave school midway through the semester. But Lowey didn’t let losing an eye stop him from making the most surprising comeback to return to class in the winter semester and not miss any games for the baseball team. Because of his inspiring story, the Tyler Lowey Award for perseverance was created in his name and he was the first recipient. TRU will give out the year every year from now on to an athlete who struggled with adversity and overcame it. Hopefully, no TRU athlete will ever have to go through what happened to Lowey that day in October. The men’s soccer team failed to reach the playoffs after finishing fourth in the Group B division with four wins, two ties and five losses. Conor Doherty, however, finished in the top five in scoring in the PACWEST. The men’s basketball team finished with a 6-12 record, a best since joining the CIS. They beat a tough UFV team and followed it up with a win in Calgary to start the year. At the semester break, the team was 4-4, matching the previous year’s win total. However, the team won two of its last ten to miss the playoffs. The team was led by forwards Justin King — who was also Canada West’s leading scorer — and Chas Kok. Both finished in the topten in rebounds. It was Kok’s last year and he will now look to help the program as an assistant coach. King will not be returning next year after deciding to return home to the United States. For the men’s volleyball team, it was a season of disappointment after the team finished 3-17 and last in the Canada West. However, the future seems to favour the WolfPack, with the rise of hitter Brad Gunter, who was among the top ten in kills during the season before suffering a season-ending ankle injury. Setter Colin Carson finished 11th in the Canada West in assists and will be an important piece of coach Pat Hennelly’s team next year with his experience. November had TRU hosting the CCAA National Cross Country Championships and runners from around the country raced across a wet and cold course on McArthur Island. In the women’s five km heat, TRU was represented by eight runners. In the eight km male heat they had 13. Faryn Brown and Obed Masege had the best times for a TRU runner in their respective categories. The WolfPack badminton team said goodbye to one of TRU’s longest-serving coaches. Brad Pape retired after 27 years of coaching the badminton teams of TRU and UCC. This year, Pape’s squad finished with three bronze medals at the PACWEST tournament hosted by TRU. Kia Lidster won bronze in women’s singles, Marlee Mertens and Anica Arduini won bronze in women’s doubles and Joey Chu won bronze in men’s doubles. Although it wasn’t enough for TRU to have a player represent the school at Nationals, the school served as a great host to the tour-

—ALL PHOTOS BY CORY HOPE

nament. Once again, players from around the country came to the TCC for the CCAA National Badminton Tournament, which included a spectacular men’s doubles final that brought much attention to the sport. WolfPack hockey also hosted the BCIHL Championships at Memorial Arena in March. It was another successful year for the team. Headed by first year coach Don Schulz, the team went on to finish third in the league and were favourites to win it all with an experienced group of veterans including David Gore, Jassi Sangha, Andrew Fisher, Cody Lockwood and versatile defenceman Shane Oatway. But it wasn’t meant to be. The team lost a heartbreaker to its rivals from SFU in the semi-finals. The WolfPack were one of the few teams that beat SFU in the regular season but the team fell short after two straight years of reaching the finals. The cheerleading team made a big

step this year by representing TRU at the Sea to Sky Imitational Cheerleading Competition. It was the first time the cheerleading team competed in a competition. The teams finished second in the open four division. As for the baseball team, they are in the thick of their season at the moment. The off-season had the team travel to California and Arizona for spring training. Since returning, the team has gone 8-8 through the first half of the schedule, with Dave Hole and Alex Condon leading the league in hits, RBIs and home runs. Rookie Erik Herbranson has found himself a regular spot in the starting line-up and Denver Wynn continues to be one of the most feared pitches in the CCBC. The comeback kid Tyler Lowey has been used in a variety of positions around the field as a relief pitcher, left fielder and second baseman. The baseball team will host the CCBC Championships in May at Norbrock Stadium.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 28

SUDOWEB.COM

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A C L O L L O T O S L L D Y S A L G A

P L O D

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12

April 18, 2012

TRUSU Membership Advisory

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BC Students are tied with the maritimes for the highest student debt in the country upon graduation This Week: • Brain Stew • Exam Period

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April 18, 2012  

The April 18, 2012 edition of The OMega

April 18, 2012  

The April 18, 2012 edition of The OMega

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